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Sample records for zero-point vacuum fluctuations

  1. Electronic zero-point fluctuation forces inside circuit components

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2018-01-01

    One of the most intriguing manifestations of quantum zero-point fluctuations are the van der Waals and Casimir forces, often associated with vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. We study generalized fluctuation potentials acting on internal degrees of freedom of components in electrical circuits. These electronic Casimir-like potentials are induced by the zero-point current fluctuations of any general conductive circuit. For realistic examples of an electromechanical capacitor and a superconducting qubit, our results reveal the possibility of tunable forces between the capacitor plates, or the level shifts of the qubit, respectively. Our analysis suggests an alternative route toward the exploration of Casimir-like fluctuation potentials, namely, by characterizing and measuring them as a function of parameters of the environment. These tunable potentials may be useful for future nanoelectromechanical and quantum technologies. PMID:29719863

  2. Ubiquity of quantum zero-point fluctuations in dislocation glide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeiro Dos Reis, Marie; Choudhury, Anshuman; Proville, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    Modeling the dislocation glide through atomic scale simulations in Al, Cu, and Ni and in solid solution alloys Al(Mg) and Cu(Ag), we show that in the course of the plastic deformation the variation of the crystal zero-point energy (ZPE) and the dislocation potential energy barriers are of opposite sign. The multiplicity of situations where we have observed the same trend allows us to conclude that quantum fluctuations, giving rise to the crystal ZPE, make easier the dislocation glide in most materials, even those constituted of atoms heavier than H and He.

  3. Zero-Point Spin-Fluctuations of Single Adatoms.

    PubMed

    Ibañez-Azpiroz, Julen; Dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Blügel, Stefan; Lounis, Samir

    2016-07-13

    Stabilizing the magnetic signal of single adatoms is a crucial step toward their successful usage in widespread technological applications such as high-density magnetic data storage devices. The quantum mechanical nature of these tiny objects, however, introduces intrinsic zero-point spin-fluctuations that tend to destabilize the local magnetic moment of interest by dwindling the magnetic anisotropy potential barrier even at absolute zero temperature. Here, we elucidate the origins and quantify the effect of the fundamental ingredients determining the magnitude of the fluctuations, namely, the (i) local magnetic moment, (ii) spin-orbit coupling, and (iii) electron-hole Stoner excitations. Based on a systematic first-principles study of 3d and 4d adatoms, we demonstrate that the transverse contribution of the fluctuations is comparable in size to the magnetic moment itself, leading to a remarkable ≳50% reduction of the magnetic anisotropy energy. Our analysis gives rise to a comprehensible diagram relating the fluctuation magnitude to characteristic features of adatoms, providing practical guidelines for designing magnetically stable nanomagnets with minimal quantum fluctuations.

  4. Theory of the magnetic susceptibility including zero-point spin fluctuations of itinerant nearly ferromagnetic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Rikio; Hatayama, Nobukuni; Takahashi, Yoshinori

    2018-05-01

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of itinerant nearly ferromagnetic compounds based on the spin fluctuation theory. It is based on the conservation of the local spin amplitude that consists of both the thermal and the zero-point components. The linear dependence of the zero-point spin fluctuation amplitude on the inverse of magnetic susceptibility is usually assumed. The purpose of our present study is to include its higher order terms and to see their effects on the magnetic susceptibility. For the thermal amplitude, it shows T2-linear temperature dependence at low temperatures.

  5. Quantum principle of sensing gravitational waves: From the zero-point fluctuations to the cosmological stochastic background of spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, Diego A.; Oniga, Teodora; Varcoe, Benjamin T. H.; Wang, Charles H.-T.

    2017-08-01

    We carry out a theoretical investigation on the collective dynamics of an ensemble of correlated atoms, subject to both vacuum fluctuations of spacetime and stochastic gravitational waves. A general approach is taken with the derivation of a quantum master equation capable of describing arbitrary confined nonrelativistic matter systems in an open quantum gravitational environment. It enables us to relate the spectral function for gravitational waves and the distribution function for quantum gravitational fluctuations and to indeed introduce a new spectral function for the zero-point fluctuations of spacetime. The formulation is applied to two-level identical bosonic atoms in an off-resonant high-Q cavity that effectively inhibits undesirable electromagnetic delays, leading to a gravitational transition mechanism through certain quadrupole moment operators. The overall relaxation rate before reaching equilibrium is found to generally scale collectively with the number N of atoms. However, we are also able to identify certain states of which the decay and excitation rates with stochastic gravitational waves and vacuum spacetime fluctuations amplify more significantly with a factor of N2. Using such favorable states as a means of measuring both conventional stochastic gravitational waves and novel zero-point spacetime fluctuations, we determine the theoretical lower bounds for the respective spectral functions. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings on future observations of gravitational waves of a wider spectral window than currently accessible. Especially, the possible sensing of the zero-point fluctuations of spacetime could provide an opportunity to generate initial evidence and further guidance of quantum gravity.

  6. Zero-point fluctuations in naphthalene and their effect on charge transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Joe J; Frost, Jarvist M; Kirkpatrick, James; Nelson, Jenny

    2008-09-25

    We calculate the effect of vibronic coupling on the charge transport parameters in crystalline naphthalene, between 0 and 400 K. We find that nuclear fluctuations can cause large changes in both the energy of a charge on a molecule and on the electronic coupling between molecules. As a result, nuclear fluctuations cause wide distributions of both energies and couplings. We show that these distributions have a small temperature dependence and that, even at high temperatures, vibronic coupling is dominated by the effect of zero-point fluctuations. Because of the importance of zero-point fluctuations, we find that the distributions of energies and couplings have substantial width, even at 0 K. Furthermore, vibronic coupling with high energy modes may be significant, even though these modes are never thermally activated. Our results have implications for the temperature dependence of charge mobilities in organic semiconductors.

  7. Lifshitz transitions and zero point lattice fluctuations in sulfur hydride showing near room temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Jarlborg, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Emerets's experiments on pressurized sulfur hydride have shown that H3S metal has the highest known superconducting critical temperature Tc = 203 K. The Emerets data show pressure induced changes of the isotope coefficient between 0.25 and 0.5, in disagreement with Eliashberg theory which predicts a nearly constant isotope coefficient.We assign the pressure dependent isotope coefficient to Lifshitz transitions induced by pressure and zero point lattice fluctuations. It is known that pressure could induce changes of the topology of the Fermi surface, called Lifshitz transitions, but were neglected in previous papers on the H3S superconductivity issue. Here we propose thatH3S is a multi-gap superconductor with a first condensate in the BCS regime (located in the large Fermi surface with high Fermi energy) which coexists with second condensates in the BCS-BEC crossover regime (located on the Fermi surface spots with small Fermi energy) near the and Mpoints.We discuss the Bianconi-Perali-Valletta (BPV) superconductivity theory to understand superconductivity in H3S since the BPV theory includes the corrections of the chemical potential due to pairing and the configuration interaction between different condensates, neglected by the Eliashberg theory. These two terms in the BPV theory give the shape resonance in superconducting gaps, similar to Feshbach resonance in ultracold fermionic gases, which is known to amplify the critical temperature. Therefore this work provides some key tools useful in the search for new room temperature superconductors.

  8. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yicheng; Kurtsiefer, Christian, E-mail: christian.kurtsiefer@gmail.com; Center for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543

    2016-07-25

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  9. Observation of zero-point quantum fluctuations of a single-molecule magnet through the relaxation of its nuclear spin bath.

    PubMed

    Morello, A; Millán, A; de Jongh, L J

    2014-03-21

    A single-molecule magnet placed in a magnetic field perpendicular to its anisotropy axis can be truncated to an effective two-level system, with easily tunable energy splitting. The quantum coherence of the molecular spin is largely determined by the dynamics of the surrounding nuclear spin bath. Here we report the measurement of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1n in a single crystal of the single-molecule magnet Mn12-ac, at T ≈ 30 mK in perpendicular fields B⊥ up to 9 T. The relaxation channel at B ≈ 0 is dominated by incoherent quantum tunneling of the Mn12-ac spin S, aided by the nuclear bath itself. However for B⊥>5 T we observe an increase of 1/T1n by several orders of magnitude up to the highest field, despite the fact that the molecular spin is in its quantum mechanical ground state. This striking observation is a consequence of the zero-point quantum fluctuations of S, which allow it to mediate the transfer of energy from the excited nuclear spin bath to the crystal lattice at much higher rates. Our experiment highlights the importance of quantum fluctuations in the interaction between an "effective two-level system" and its surrounding spin bath.

  10. Adiabatic physics of an exchange-coupled spin-dimer system: Magnetocaloric effect, zero-point fluctuations, and possible two-dimensional universal behavior

    DOE PAGES

    Brambleby, J.; Goddard, P. A.; Singleton, John; ...

    2017-01-05

    We present the magnetic and thermal properties of the bosonic-superfluid phase in a spin-dimer network using both quasistatic and rapidly changing pulsed magnetic fields. The entropy derived from a heat-capacity study reveals that the pulsed-field measurements are strongly adiabatic in nature and are responsible for the onset of a significant magnetocaloric effect (MCE). In contrast to previous predictions we show that the MCE is not just confined to the critical regions, but occurs for all fields greater than zero at sufficiently low temperatures. We explain the MCE using a model of the thermal occupation of exchange-coupled dimer spin states andmore » highlight that failure to take this effect into account inevitably leads to incorrect interpretations of experimental results. In addition, the heat capacity in our material is suggestive of an extraordinary contribution from zero-point fluctuations and appears to indicate universal behavior with different critical exponents at the two field-induced critical points. Finally, the data at the upper critical point, combined with the layered structure of the system, are consistent with a two-dimensional nature of spin excitations in the system.« less

  11. Mesoscopic structure formation in condensed matter due to vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Siddhartha; Gupta, Kumar S.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    An observable influence of zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum electromagnetic field on bound electrons is well known in the hydrogen atom, where it produces the Lamb shift. Here, we adapt an approach used to explain the Lamb shift in terms of a slight expansion of the orbits due to interaction with the zero-point field and apply it to assemblies of N electrons that are modeled as independent atomically bound two-level systems. The effect is to stabilize a collective ground-state energy, which leads to a prediction of novel effects at room temperature for quasi-two-dimensional systems over a range of parameters in the model, namely, N , the two-level excitation energy ℏ ω and the ionization energy ℏ ω +ɛ . Some mesoscopic systems where these effects may be observable include water sheaths on protein or DNA, surfaces of gaseous nanobubbles, and the magnetic response of inhomogeneous, electronically dilute oxides. No such effects are envisaged for uniform three-dimensional systems.

  12. UVIS Photometric Zero Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalirai, Jason

    2009-07-01

    This proposal obtains the photometric zero points in 53 of the 62 UVIS/WFC3 filters: the 18 broad-band filters, 8 medium-band filters, 16 narrow-band filters, and 11 of the 20 quad filters {those being used in cycle 17}. The observations will be primary obtained by observing the hot DA white dwarf standards GD153 and G191-B2B. A redder secondary standard, P330E, will be observed in a subset of the filters to provide color corrections. Repeat observations in 16 of the most widely used cycle 17 filters will be obtained once per month for the first three months, and then once every second month for the duration of cycle 17, alternating and depending on target availability. These observations will enable monitoring of the stability of the photometric system. Photometric transformation equations will be calculated by comparing the photometry of stars in two globular clusters, 47 Tuc and NGC 2419, to previous measurements with other telescopes/instruments.

  13. Chiral vacuum fluctuations in quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Magueijo, João; Benincasa, Dionigi M T

    2011-03-25

    We examine tensor perturbations around a de Sitter background within the framework of Ashtekar's variables and its cousins parameterized by the Immirzi parameter γ. At the classical level we recover standard cosmological perturbation theory, with illuminating insights. Quantization leads to real novelties. In the low energy limit we find a second quantized theory of gravitons which displays different vacuum fluctuations for right and left gravitons. Nonetheless right and left gravitons have the same (positive) energies, resolving a number of paradoxes suggested in the literature. The right-left asymmetry of the vacuum fluctuations depends on γ and the ordering of the Hamiltonian constraint, and it would leave a distinctive imprint in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, thus opening quantum gravity to observational test.

  14. On the fine-structure constant in a plasma model of the fluctuating vacuum substratum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cragin, B. L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of an intimate connection between the quivering motion of electrons and positrons (Zitterbewegung), predicted by the Dirac equation, and the zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum is suggested. The nature of the proposed connection is discussed quantitatively, and an approximate self-consistency relation is derived, supplying a purely mathematical expression that relates the dimensionless coupling strengths (fine-structure constants) alpha sub e and alpha sub g of electromagnetism and gravity. These considerations provide a tentative explanation for the heretofore puzzling number 1/alpha sub e of about 137.036 and suggest that attempts to unify gravity with the electroweak and strong interactions will ultimately prove successful.

  15. Cosmological density fluctuations produced by vacuum strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilenkin, A.

    1981-04-01

    Consideration is given to the possible role of vacuum domain strings produced in the grand unification phase transition in the early universe in the generation of the density fluctuations giving rise to galaxies. The cosmological evolution of the strings formed in the grand unification phase transition is analyzed, with attention given to possible mechanisms for the damping out of oscillations produced by tension in convoluted strings and closed loops. The cosmological density fluctuations introduced by infinite strings and closed loops smaller than the horizon are then shown to be capable of giving rise to mass condensations on a scale of approximately 10 to the 9th solar masses at the time of the decoupling of radiation from matter, around which the galaxies condense. Differences between the present theory and that suggested by Zel'dovich (1980) are pointed out, and it is noted that string formation at the grand unification phase transition is possible only if the manifold of the degenerate vacua of the gauge theory is not simply connected.

  16. Gravity and Zero Point Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, U. W.

    When Planck introduced the 1/2 hv term to his 1911 black body equation he showed that there is a residual energy remaining at zero degree K after all thermal energy ceased. Other investigators, including Lamb, Casimir, and Dirac added to this information. Today zero point energy (ZPE) is accepted as an established condition. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the density of the ZPE is given by the gravity constant (G) and the characteristics of its particles are revealed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Eddies of ZPE particles created by flow around mass bodies reduce the pressure normal to the eddy flow and are responsible for the force of gravity. Helium atoms resonate with ZPE particles at low temperature to produce superfluid helium. High velocity micro vortices of ZPE particles about a basic particle or particles are responsible for electromagnetic forces. The speed of light is the speed of the wave front in the ZPE and its value is a function of the temperature and density of the ZPE.

  17. Vacuum fluctuations of the supersymmetric field in curved background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilić, Neven; Domazet, Silvije; Guberina, Branko

    2012-01-01

    We study a supersymmetric model in curved background spacetime. We calculate the effective action and the vacuum expectation value of the energy momentum tensor using a covariant regularization procedure. A soft supersymmetry breaking induces a nonzero contribution to the vacuum energy density and pressure. Assuming the presence of a cosmic fluid in addition to the vacuum fluctuations of the supersymmetric field an effective equation of state is derived in a self-consistent approach at one loop order. The net effect of the vacuum fluctuations of the supersymmetric fields in the leading adiabatic order is a renormalization of the Newton and cosmological constants.

  18. Electroweak vacuum instability and renormalized Higgs field vacuum fluctuations in the inflationary universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Matsui, Hiroki

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the electroweak vacuum instability during or after inflation. In the inflationary Universe, i.e., de Sitter space, the vacuum field fluctuations < δ phi 2 > enlarge in proportion to the Hubble scale H2. Therefore, the large inflationary vacuum fluctuations of the Higgs field < δ phi 2 > are potentially catastrophic to trigger the vacuum transition to the negative-energy Planck-scale vacuum state and cause an immediate collapse of the Universe. However, the vacuum field fluctuations < δ phi 2 >, i.e., the vacuum expectation values have an ultraviolet divergence, and therefore a renormalization is necessary to estimate the physical effects of the vacuum transition. Thus, in this paper, we revisit the electroweak vacuum instability from the perspective of quantum field theory (QFT) in curved space-time, and discuss the dynamical behavior of the homogeneous Higgs field phi determined by the effective potential V eff( phi ) in curved space-time and the renormalized vacuum fluctuations < δ phi 2 >ren via adiabatic regularization and point-splitting regularization. We simply suppose that the Higgs field only couples the gravity via the non-minimal Higgs-gravity coupling ξ(μ). In this scenario, the electroweak vacuum stability is inevitably threatened by the dynamical behavior of the homogeneous Higgs field phi, or the formations of AdS domains or bubbles unless the Hubble scale is small enough H< ΛI .

  19. Electroweak vacuum instability and renormalized Higgs field vacuum fluctuations in the inflationary universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Matsui, Hiroki, E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp, E-mail: matshiro@post.kek.jp

    In this work, we investigated the electroweak vacuum instability during or after inflation. In the inflationary Universe, i.e., de Sitter space, the vacuum field fluctuations < δ φ {sup 2} > enlarge in proportion to the Hubble scale H {sup 2}. Therefore, the large inflationary vacuum fluctuations of the Higgs field < δ φ {sup 2} > are potentially catastrophic to trigger the vacuum transition to the negative-energy Planck-scale vacuum state and cause an immediate collapse of the Universe. However, the vacuum field fluctuations < δ φ {sup 2} >, i.e., the vacuum expectation values have an ultraviolet divergence, andmore » therefore a renormalization is necessary to estimate the physical effects of the vacuum transition. Thus, in this paper, we revisit the electroweak vacuum instability from the perspective of quantum field theory (QFT) in curved space-time, and discuss the dynamical behavior of the homogeneous Higgs field φ determined by the effective potential V {sub eff}( φ ) in curved space-time and the renormalized vacuum fluctuations < δ φ {sup 2} >{sub ren} via adiabatic regularization and point-splitting regularization. We simply suppose that the Higgs field only couples the gravity via the non-minimal Higgs-gravity coupling ξ(μ). In this scenario, the electroweak vacuum stability is inevitably threatened by the dynamical behavior of the homogeneous Higgs field φ, or the formations of AdS domains or bubbles unless the Hubble scale is small enough H < Λ {sub I} .« less

  20. Vacuum quantum stress tensor fluctuations: A diagonalization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiappacasse, Enrico D.; Fewster, Christopher J.; Ford, L. H.

    2018-01-01

    Large vacuum fluctuations of a quantum stress tensor can be described by the asymptotic behavior of its probability distribution. Here we focus on stress tensor operators which have been averaged with a sampling function in time. The Minkowski vacuum state is not an eigenstate of the time-averaged operator, but can be expanded in terms of its eigenstates. We calculate the probability distribution and the cumulative probability distribution for obtaining a given value in a measurement of the time-averaged operator taken in the vacuum state. In these calculations, we study a specific operator that contributes to the stress-energy tensor of a massless scalar field in Minkowski spacetime, namely, the normal ordered square of the time derivative of the field. We analyze the rate of decrease of the tail of the probability distribution for different temporal sampling functions, such as compactly supported functions and the Lorentzian function. We find that the tails decrease relatively slowly, as exponentials of fractional powers, in agreement with previous work using the moments of the distribution. Our results lend additional support to the conclusion that large vacuum stress tensor fluctuations are more probable than large thermal fluctuations, and may have observable effects.

  1. Observable consequences of zero-point energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Siddhartha; Gupta, Kumar S.

    2017-12-01

    Spectral line widths, the Lamb shift and the Casimir effect are generally accepted to be observable consequences of the zero-point electromagnetic (ZPEM) fields. A new class of observable consequences of ZPEM field at the mesoscopic scale were recently proposed and observed. Here, we extend this class of observable effects and predict that mesoscopic water layers should have a high value for its solid-liquid phase transition temperature, as illustrated by water inside a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT). For this case, our analysis predicts that the phase transition temperature scales inversely with the square of the effective radius available for the water flow within the CNT.

  2. Zero point energy of polyhedral water clusters.

    PubMed

    Anick, David J

    2005-06-30

    Polyhedral water clusters (PWCs) are cage-like (H2O)n clusters where every O participates in exactly three H bonds. For a database of 83 PWCs, 8 < or = n < or = 20, geometry was optimized and zero point energy (ZPE) was calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. ZPE correlates negatively with electronic energy (E0): each increase of 1 kcal/mol in E0 corresponds to a decrease of about 0.11 kcal/mol in ZPE. For each n, a set of four connectivity parameters accounts for 98% or more of the variance in ZPE. Linear regression of ZPE against n and this set gives an RMS error of 0.13 kcal/mol. The contributions to ZPE from stretch modes only (ZPE(S)) and from torsional modes only (ZPE(T)) also correlate strongly with E0 and with each other.

  3. Zero-point term and quantum effects in the Johnson noise of resistors: a critical appraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.

    2016-05-01

    There is a longstanding debate about the zero-point term in the Johnson noise voltage of a resistor. This term originates from a quantum-theoretical treatment of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). Is the zero-point term really there, or is it only an experimental artifact, due to the uncertainty principle, for phase-sensitive amplifiers? Could it be removed by renormalization of theories? We discuss some historical measurement schemes that do not lead to the effect predicted by the FDT, and we analyse new features that emerge when the consequences of the zero-point term are measured via the mean energy and force in a capacitor shunting the resistor. If these measurements verify the existence of a zero-point term in the noise, then two types of perpetual motion machines can be constructed. Further investigation with the same approach shows that, in the quantum limit, the Johnson-Nyquist formula is also invalid under general conditions even though it is valid for a resistor-antenna system. Therefore we conclude that in a satisfactory quantum theory of the Johnson noise, the FDT must, as a minimum, include also the measurement system used to evaluate the observed quantities. Issues concerning the zero-point term may also have implications for phenomena in advanced nanotechnology.

  4. Fluctuation of a Piston in Vacuum Induced by Thermal Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2017-10-01

    We consider the displacement of a piston dividing a vacuum cavity at a finite temperature T induced by fluctuations in the thermal radiation pressure. The correlation function of the thermal radiation pressure is calculated using the theoretical framework developed by Barton, which was first applied to the fluctuation of the Casimir force at absolute zero. We show that the variance of the radiation pressure at a fixed point is proportional to T8 and evaluate the mean square displacement for a piston with a small cross section in a characteristic correlation timescale ħ/(kBT). At room temperature, the contribution of the thermal radiation to the fluctuation is larger than that of the vacuum fluctuation.

  5. Vacuum fluctuations in an ancestor vacuum: A possible dark energy candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hajime; Iso, Satoshi; Lee, Da-Shin; Sekino, Yasuhiro; Yeh, Chen-Pin

    2018-02-01

    We consider an open universe created by bubble nucleation, and study possible effects of our "ancestor vacuum," a de Sitter space in which bubble nucleation occurred, on the present universe. We compute vacuum expectation values of the energy-momentum tensor for a minimally coupled scalar field, carefully taking into account the effect of the ancestor vacuum by the Euclidean prescription. We pay particular attention to the so-called supercurvature mode, a non-normalizable mode on a spatial slice of the open universe, which has been known to exist for sufficiently light fields. This mode decays in time most slowly, and may leave residual effects of the ancestor vacuum, potentially observable in the present universe. We point out that the vacuum energy of the quantum field can be regarded as dark energy if mass of the field is of order the present Hubble parameter or smaller. We obtain preliminary results for the dark energy equation of state w (z ) as a function of the redshift.

  6. Uncertainty relations, zero point energy and the linear canonical group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudarshan, E. C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The close relationship between the zero point energy, the uncertainty relations, coherent states, squeezed states, and correlated states for one mode is investigated. This group-theoretic perspective enables the parametrization and identification of their multimode generalization. In particular the generalized Schroedinger-Robertson uncertainty relations are analyzed. An elementary method of determining the canonical structure of the generalized correlated states is presented.

  7. The Schrödinger Equation, the Zero-Point Electromagnetic Radiation, and the Photoelectric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    França, H. M.; Kamimura, A.; Barreto, G. A.

    2016-04-01

    A Schrödinger type equation for a mathematical probability amplitude Ψ( x, t) is derived from the generalized phase space Liouville equation valid for the motion of a microscopic particle, with mass M and charge e, moving in a potential V( x). The particle phase space probability density is denoted Q( x, p, t), and the entire system is immersed in the "vacuum" zero-point electromagnetic radiation. We show, in the first part of the paper, that the generalized Liouville equation is reduced to a simpler Liouville equation in the equilibrium limit where the small radiative corrections cancel each other approximately. This leads us to a simpler Liouville equation that will facilitate the calculations in the second part of the paper. Within this second part, we address ourselves to the following task: Since the Schrödinger equation depends on hbar , and the zero-point electromagnetic spectral distribution, given by ρ 0{(ω )} = hbar ω 3/2 π 2 c3, also depends on hbar , it is interesting to verify the possible dynamical connection between ρ 0( ω) and the Schrödinger equation. We shall prove that the Planck's constant, present in the momentum operator of the Schrödinger equation, is deeply related with the ubiquitous zero-point electromagnetic radiation with spectral distribution ρ 0( ω). For simplicity, we do not use the hypothesis of the existence of the L. de Broglie matter-waves. The implications of our study for the standard interpretation of the photoelectric effect are discussed by considering the main characteristics of the phenomenon. We also mention, briefly, the effects of the zero-point radiation in the tunneling phenomenon and the Compton's effect.

  8. Magnification of signatures of a topological phase transition by quantum zero point motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Pedro L. e. S.; Ghaemi, Pouyan

    2015-08-01

    We show that the zero point motion of a vortex in superconducting doped topological insulators leads to significant changes in the electronic spectrum at the topological phase transition in this system. This topological phase transition is tuned by the doping level, and the corresponding effects are manifest in the density of states at energies which are on the order of the vortex fluctuation frequency. Although the electronic energy gap in the spectrum generated by a stationary vortex is but a small fraction of the bulk superconducting gap, the vortex fluctuation frequency may be much larger. As a result, this quantum zero point motion can induce a discontinuous change in the spectral features of the system at the topological vortex phase transition to energies which are well within the resolution of scanning tunneling microscopy. This discontinuous change is exclusive to superconducting systems in which we have a topological phase transition. Moreover, the phenomena studied in this paper present effects of Magnus forces on the vortex spectrum which are not present in the ordinary s -wave superconductors. Finally, we demonstrate explicitly that the vortex in this system is equivalent to a Kitaev chain. This allows for the mapping of the vortex fluctuating scenario in three dimensions into similar one-dimensional situations in which one may search for other novel signatures of topological phase transitions.

  9. Resonant paramagnetic enhancement of the thermal and zero-point Nyquist noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    França, H. M.; Santos, R. B. B.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction between a very thin macroscopic solenoid, and a single magnetic particle precessing in a external magnetic field B0, is described by taking into account the thermal and the zero-point fluctuations of stochastic electrodynamics. The inductor belongs to a RLC circuit without batteries and the random motion of the magnetic dipole generates in the solenoid a fluctuating current Idip( t), and a fluctuating voltage εdip( t), with spectral distribution quite different from the Nyquist noise. We show that the mean square value < Idip2> presents an enormous variation when the frequency of precession approaches the frequency of the circuit, but it is still much smaller than the Nyquist current in the circuit. However, we also show that < Idip2> can reach measurable values if the inductor is interacting with a macroscopic sample of magnetic particles (atoms or nuclei) which are close enough to its coils.

  10. Resolving the vacuum fluctuations of an optomechanical system using an artificial atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecocq, F.; Teufel, J. D.; Aumentado, J.; Simmonds, R. W.

    2015-08-01

    Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle results in one of the strangest quantum behaviours: a mechanical oscillator can never truly be at rest. Even at a temperature of absolute zero, its position and momentum are still subject to quantum fluctuations. However, direct energy detection of the oscillator in its ground state makes it seem motionless, and in linear position measurements detector noise can masquerade as mechanical fluctuations. Thus, how can we resolve quantum fluctuations? Here, we parametrically couple a micromechanical oscillator to a microwave cavity to prepare the system in its quantum ground state and then amplify the remaining vacuum fluctuations into real energy quanta. We monitor the photon/phonon-number distributions using a superconducting qubit, allowing us to resolve the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the macroscopic oscillator’s motion. Our results further demonstrate the ability to control a long-lived mechanical oscillator using a non-Gaussian resource, directly enabling applications in quantum information processing and enhanced detection of displacement and forces.

  11. Water Electrolyzers and the Zero-Point Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, M. B.

    The gas emitted from popular water electrolyzer projects manifests unusual energetic anomalies, which include vaporizing tungsten when used in a welding torch and running internal combustion engines on small quantities of the gas. Some claim to run generators in closed loop fashion solely on the gas from the electrolyzer, which is powered solely from the generator. Most investigators believe the energy is from burning hydrogen. A hypothesis is proposed that the dominant energy is not coming from hydrogen, but rather it is coming from charged water gas clusters, which activate and coherently trap zero-point energy.

  12. Vibrational zero point energy for H-doped silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karazhanov, S. Zh.; Ganchenkova, M.; Marstein, E. S.

    2014-05-01

    Most of the studies addressed to computations of hydrogen parameters in semiconductor systems, such as silicon, are performed at zero temperature T = 0 K and do not account for contribution of vibrational zero point energy (ZPE). For light weight atoms such as hydrogen (H), however, magnitude of this parameter might be not negligible. This Letter is devoted to clarify the importance of accounting the zero-point vibrations when analyzing hydrogen behavior in silicon and its effect on silicon electronic properties. For this, we estimate the ZPE for different locations and charge states of H in Si. We show that the main contribution to the ZPE is coming from vibrations along the Si-H bonds whereas contributions from other Si atoms apart from the direct Si-H bonds play no role. It is demonstrated that accounting the ZPE reduces the hydrogen formation energy by ˜0.17 eV meaning that neglecting ZPE at low temperatures one can underestimate hydrogen solubility by few orders of magnitude. In contrast, the effect of the ZPE on the ionization energy of H in Si is negligible. The results can have important implications for characterization of vibrational properties of Si by inelastic neutron scattering, as well as for theoretical estimations of H concentration in Si.

  13. Electron fluctuation induced resonance broadening in nano electromechanical systems: the origin of shear force in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Siria, A; Barois, T; Vilella, K; Perisanu, S; Ayari, A; Guillot, D; Purcell, S T; Poncharal, P

    2012-07-11

    This article presents a study of the poorly understood "shear-force" used in an important class of near-field instruments that use mechanical resonance feedback detection. In the case of a metallic probe near a metallic surface in vacuum, we show that in the 10-60 nm range there is no such a thing as a shear-force in the sense of the nonconservative friction force. Fluctuations of the oscillator resonance frequency, likely induced by local charge variations, could account for the reported effects in the literature without introducing a dissipative force.

  14. Zero-point energy effects in anion solvation shells.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott

    2014-05-21

    By comparing classical and quantum-mechanical (path-integral-based) molecular simulations of solvated halide anions X(-) [X = F, Cl, Br and I], we identify an ion-specific quantum contribution to anion-water hydrogen-bond dynamics; this effect has not been identified in previous simulation studies. For anions such as fluoride, which strongly bind water molecules in the first solvation shell, quantum simulations exhibit hydrogen-bond dynamics nearly 40% faster than the corresponding classical results, whereas those anions which form a weakly bound solvation shell, such as iodide, exhibit a quantum effect of around 10%. This observation can be rationalized by considering the different zero-point energy (ZPE) of the water vibrational modes in the first solvation shell; for strongly binding anions, the ZPE of bound water molecules is larger, giving rise to faster dynamics in quantum simulations. These results are consistent with experimental investigations of anion-bound water vibrational and reorientational motion.

  15. Evaluation of parameters for particles acceleration by the zero-point field of quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rueda, A.

    1985-01-01

    That particles may be accelerated by vacuum effects in quantum field theory has been repeatedly proposed in the last few years. A natural upshot of this is a mechanism for cosmic rays (CR) primaries acceleration. A mechanism for acceleration by the zero-point field (ZPE) when the ZPE is taken in a realistic sense (in opposition to a virtual field) was considered. Originally the idea was developed within a semiclassical context. The classical Einstein-Hopf model (EHM) was used to show that free isolated electromagnrtically interacting particles performed a random walk in phase space and more importantly in momentum space when submitted to the perennial action of the so called classical electromagnrtic ZPE.

  16. Protecting quantum coherence of two-level atoms from vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobao; Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci

    In the framework of open quantum systems, we study the dynamics of a static polarizable two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field and explore under which conditions the coherence of the open quantum system is unaffected by the environment. For both a single-qubit and two-qubit systems, we find that the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise when the atom interacts with a non-boundary electromagnetic field. However, with the presence of a boundary, the dynamical conditions for the insusceptible of quantum coherence are fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transverselymore » polarizable. Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction. -- Highlights: •We study the dynamics of a two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field. •For both a single and two-qubit systems, the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise without a boundary. •The insusceptible of the quantum coherence can be fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. •Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction.« less

  17. Role of zero-point effects in stabilizing the ground state structure of bulk Fe2P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Soumya S.; Gupta, Kapil; Bhattacharjee, Satadeep; Lee, Seung-Cheol

    2018-05-01

    Structural stability of Fe2P is investigated in detail using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. While the orthorhombic C23 phase is found to be energetically more stable, the experiments suggest it to be hexagonal C22 phase. In the present study, we show that in order to obtain the correct ground state structure of Fe2P from the first-principles based methods it is utmost necessary to consider the zero-point effects such as zero-point vibrations and spin fluctuations. This study demonstrates an exceptional case where a bulk material is stabilized by quantum effects, which are usually important in low-dimensional materials. Our results also indicate the possibility of magnetic field induced structural quantum phase transition in Fe2P, which should form the basis for further theoretical and experimental efforts.

  18. A theoretical model for investigating the effect of vacuum fluctuations on the electromechanical stability of nanotweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhabadi, A.; Mokhtari, J.; Koochi, A.; Abadyan, M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the impact of the Casimir attraction on the electromechanical stability of nanowire-fabricated nanotweezers is investigated using a theoretical continuum mechanics model. The Dirichlet mode is considered and an asymptotic solution, based on path integral approach, is applied to consider the effect of vacuum fluctuations in the model. The Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is employed to derive the nonlinear governing equation of the nanotweezers. The governing equations are solved by three different approaches, i.e. the modified variation iteration method, generalized differential quadrature method and using a lumped parameter model. Various perspectives of the problem, including the comparison with the van der Waals force regime, the variation of instability parameters and effects of geometry are addressed in present paper. The proposed approach is beneficial for the precise determination of the electrostatic response of the nanotweezers in the presence of Casimir force.

  19. Consistent parameter fixing in the quark-meson model with vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignano, Stefano; Buballa, Michael; Elkamhawy, Wael

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the renormalization prescription for the quark-meson model in an extended mean-field approximation, where vacuum quark fluctuations are included. At a given cutoff scale the model parameters are fixed by fitting vacuum quantities, typically including the sigma-meson mass mσ and the pion decay constant fπ. In most publications the latter is identified with the expectation value of the sigma field, while for mσ the curvature mass is taken. When quark loops are included, this prescription is however inconsistent, and the correct identification involves the renormalized pion decay constant and the sigma pole mass. In the present article we investigate the influence of the parameter-fixing scheme on the phase structure of the model at finite temperature and chemical potential. Despite large differences between the model parameters in the two schemes, we find that in homogeneous matter the effect on the phase diagram is relatively small. For inhomogeneous phases, on the other hand, the choice of the proper renormalization prescription is crucial. In particular, we show that if renormalization effects on the pion decay constant are not considered, the model does not even present a well-defined renormalized limit when the cutoff is sent to infinity.

  20. Breakdown of the Migdal approximation at Lifshitz transitions with giant zero-point motion in the H3S superconductor.

    PubMed

    Jarlborg, Thomas; Bianconi, Antonio

    2016-04-20

    While 203 K high temperature superconductivity in H3S has been interpreted by BCS theory in the dirty limit here we focus on the effects of hydrogen zero-point-motion and the multiband electronic structure relevant for multigap superconductivity near Lifshitz transitions. We describe how the topology of the Fermi surfaces evolves with pressure giving different Lifshitz-transitions. A neck-disrupting Lifshitz-transition (type 2) occurs where the van Hove singularity, vHs, crosses the chemical potential at 210 GPa and new small 2D Fermi surface portions appear with slow Fermi velocity where the Migdal-approximation becomes questionable. We show that the neglected hydrogen zero-point motion ZPM, plays a key role at Lifshitz transitions. It induces an energy shift of about 600 meV of the vHs. The other Lifshitz-transition (of type 1) for the appearing of a new Fermi surface occurs at 130 GPa where new Fermi surfaces appear at the Γ point of the Brillouin zone here the Migdal-approximation breaks down and the zero-point-motion induces large fluctuations. The maximum Tc = 203 K occurs at 160 GPa where EF/ω0 = 1 in the small Fermi surface pocket at Γ. A Feshbach-like resonance between a possible BEC-BCS condensate at Γ and the BCS condensate in different k-space spots is proposed.

  1. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  2. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  3. Toward an interstellar mission: Zeroing in on the zero-point-field inertia resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Bernhard; Rueda, Alfonso

    2000-01-01

    While still an admittedly remote possibility, the concept of an interstellar mission has become a legitimate topic for scientific discussion as evidenced by several recent NASA activities and programs. One approach is to extrapolate present-day technologies by orders of magnitude; the other is to find new regimes in physics and to search for possible new laws of physics. Recent work on the zero-point field (ZPF), or electromagnetic quantum vacuum, is promising in regard to the latter, especially concerning the possibility that the inertia of matter may, at least in part, be attributed to interaction between the quarks and electrons in matter and the ZPF. A NASA-funded study (independent of the BPP program) of this concept has been underway since 1996 at the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto and the California State University at Long Beach. We report on a new development resulting from this effort: that for the specific case of the electron, a resonance for the inertia-generating process at the Compton frequency would simultaneously explain both the inertial mass of the electron and the de Broglie wavelength of a moving electron as first measured by Davisson and Germer in 1927. This line of investigation is leading to very suggestive connections between electrodynamics, inertia, gravitation and the wave nature of matter. .

  4. Inflaton and metric fluctuations in the early universe from a 5D vacuum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membiela, Agustin; Bellini, Mauricio

    2006-04-01

    In this Letter we complete a previously introduced formalism to study the gauge-invariant metric fluctuations from a noncompact Kaluza Klein theory of gravity, to study the evolution of the early universe. The evolution of both, metric and inflaton field fluctuations are reciprocally related. We obtain that <δρ>/ρ depends on the coupling of Φ with δφ and the spectral index of its spectrum is 0.9483

  5. Vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributions to the resonance dipole-dipole interaction between two atoms near a reflecting boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenting; Rizzuto, Lucia; Passante, Roberto

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the resonance dipole-dipole interaction energy between two identical atoms, one in the ground state and the other in the excited state, interacting with the electromagnetic field in the presence of a perfectly reflecting plane boundary. The atoms are prepared in a correlated (symmetric or antisymmetric) Bell-type state. Following a procedure due to Dalibard et al. [J. Dalibard et al., J. Phys. (Paris) 43, 1617 (1982);, 10.1051/jphys:0198200430110161700 J. Phys. (Paris) 45, 637 (1984), 10.1051/jphys:01984004504063700], we separate the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction (source) field to the resonance interaction energy between the two atoms and show that only the source field contributes to the interatomic interaction, while vacuum field fluctuations do not. By considering specific geometric configurations of the two-atom system with respect to the mirror and specific choices of dipole orientations, we show that the presence of the mirror significantly affects the resonance interaction energy and that different features appear with respect to the case of atoms in free space, for example, a change in the spatial dependence of the interaction. Our findings also suggest that the presence of a boundary can be exploited to tailor and control the resonance interaction between two atoms, as well as the related energy transfer process. The possibility of observing these phenomena is also discussed.

  6. Vacuum Fluctuation Force on a Rigid Casimir Cavity in de Sitter and Schwarzschild-De Sitter Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the net force on a rigid Casimir cavity generated by vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field in three cases: de Sitter space-time, de Sitter space-time with weak gravitational field and Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time. In de Sitter space-time the resulting net force follows the square inverse law but unfortunately it is too weak to be measurable due to the large universe radius. By introducing a weak gravitational field into the de Sitter space-time, we find that the net force can now be split into two parts, one is the gravitational force due to the induced effective mass between the two plates and the other one is generated by the metric structure of de Sitter space-time. In order to investigate the vacuum fluctuation force on the rigid cavity under strong gravitational field, we perform a similar analysis in Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time and results are obtained in three different limits. The most interesting one is when the cavity gets closer to the horizon of a blackhole, square inverse law is recovered and the repulsive force due to negative energy/mass of the cavity now has an observable strength. More importantly the force changes from being repulsive to attractive when the cavity crosses the event horizon, so that the energy/mass of the cavity switches the sign, which suggests the unusual time direction inside the event horizon.

  7. Zero point and zero suffix methods with robust ranking for solving fully fuzzy transportation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngastiti, P. T. B.; Surarso, Bayu; Sutimin

    2018-05-01

    Transportation issue of the distribution problem such as the commodity or goods from the supply tothe demmand is to minimize the transportation costs. Fuzzy transportation problem is an issue in which the transport costs, supply and demand are in the form of fuzzy quantities. Inthe case study at CV. Bintang Anugerah Elektrik, a company engages in the manufacture of gensets that has more than one distributors. We use the methods of zero point and zero suffix to investigate the transportation minimum cost. In implementing both methods, we use robust ranking techniques for the defuzzification process. The studyresult show that the iteration of zero suffix method is less than that of zero point method.

  8. Einstein-Langevin and Einstein-Fokker-Planck equations for Oppenheimer-Snyder gravitational collapse in a spacetime with conformal vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Steven David

    1999-10-01

    A consistent extension of the Oppenheimer-Snyder gravitational collapse formalism is presented which incorporates stochastic, conformal, vacuum fluctuations of the metric tensor. This results in a tractable approach to studying the possible effects of vacuum fluctuations on collapse and singularity formation. The motivation here, is that it is known that coupling stochastic noise to a classical field theory can lead to workable methodologies that accommodate or reproduce many aspects of quantum theory, turbulence or structure formation. The effect of statistically averaging over the metric fluctuations gives the appearance of a deterministic Riemannian structure, with an induced non-vanishing cosmological constant arising from the nonlinearity. The Oppenheimer-Snyder collapse of a perfect fluid or dust star in the fluctuating or `turbulent' spacetime, is reformulated in terms of nonlinear Einstein-Langevin field equations, with an additional noise source in the energy-momentum tensor. The smooth deterministic worldlines of collapsing matter within the classical Oppenheimer-Snyder model, now become nonlinear Brownian motions due to the backreaction induced by vacuum fluctuations. As the star collapses, the matter worldlines become increasingly randomized since the backreaction coupling to the vacuum fluctuations is nonlinear; the input assumptions of the Hawking-Penrose singularity theorems should then be violated. Solving the nonlinear Einstein-Langevin field equation for collapse - via the Ito interpretation - gives a singularity-free solution, which is equivalent to the original Oppenheimer solution but with higher-order stochastic corrections; the original singular solution is recovered in the limit of zero vacuum fluctuations. The `geometro-hydrodynamics' of noisy gravitational collapse, were also translated into an equivalent mathematical formulation in terms of nonlinear Einstein-Fokker-Planck (EFP) continuity equations with respect to comoving coordinates

  9. Energy transfer between two vacuum-gapped metal plates: Coulomb fluctuations and electron tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zu-Quan; Lü, Jing-Tao; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2018-05-01

    Recent experimental measurements for near-field radiative heat transfer between two bodies have been able to approach the gap distance within 2 nm , where the contributions of Coulomb fluctuation and electron tunneling are comparable. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method in the G0W0 approximation, based on a tight-binding model, we obtain for the energy current a Caroli formula from the Meir-Wingreen formula in the local equilibrium approximation. Also, the Caroli formula is consistent with the evanescent part of the heat transfer from the theory of fluctuational electrodynamics. We go beyond the local equilibrium approximation to study the energy transfer in the crossover region from electron tunneling to Coulomb fluctuation based on a numerical calculation.

  10. Zero-Point Calibration for AGN Black-Hole Mass Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Onken, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the measurement and associated uncertainties of AGN reverberation-based black-hole masses, since these provide the zero-point calibration for scaling relationships that allow black-hole mass estimates for quasars. We find that reverberation-based mass estimates appear to be accurate to within a factor of about 3.

  11. Zero-point energy constraint in quasi-classical trajectory calculations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhen; Bowman, Joel M

    2006-04-27

    A method to constrain the zero-point energy in quasi-classical trajectory calculations is proposed and applied to the Henon-Heiles system. The main idea of this method is to smoothly eliminate the coupling terms in the Hamiltonian as the energy of any mode falls below a specified value.

  12. Quantum random number generator based on quantum nature of vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. E.; Chivilikhin, S. A.; Gleim, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Quantum random number generator (QRNG) allows obtaining true random bit sequences. In QRNG based on quantum nature of vacuum, optical beam splitter with two inputs and two outputs is normally used. We compare mathematical descriptions of spatial beam splitter and fiber Y-splitter in the quantum model for QRNG, based on homodyne detection. These descriptions were identical, that allows to use fiber Y-splitters in practical QRNG schemes, simplifying the setup. Also we receive relations between the input radiation and the resulting differential current in homodyne detector. We experimentally demonstrate possibility of true random bits generation by using QRNG based on homodyne detection with Y-splitter.

  13. Broken vertex symmetry and finite zero-point entropy in the artificial square ice ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Gliga, Sebastian; Kákay, Attila; Heyderman, Laura J.

    In this paper, we study degeneracy and entropy in the ground state of artificial square ice. In theoretical models, individual nanomagnets are typically treated as single spins with only two degrees of freedom, leading to a twofold degenerate ground state with intensive entropy and thus no zero-point entropy. Here, we show that the internal degrees of freedom of the nanostructures can result, through edge bending of the magnetization and breaking of local magnetic symmetry at the vertices, in a transition to a highly degenerate ground state with finite zero-point entropy, similar to that of the pyrochlore spin ices. Finally, wemore » find that these additional degrees of freedom have observable consequences in the resonant spectrum of the lattice, and predict the occurrence of edge “melting” above a critical temperature at which the magnetic symmetry is restored.« less

  14. Broken vertex symmetry and finite zero-point entropy in the artificial square ice ground state

    DOE PAGES

    Gliga, Sebastian; Kákay, Attila; Heyderman, Laura J.; ...

    2015-08-26

    In this paper, we study degeneracy and entropy in the ground state of artificial square ice. In theoretical models, individual nanomagnets are typically treated as single spins with only two degrees of freedom, leading to a twofold degenerate ground state with intensive entropy and thus no zero-point entropy. Here, we show that the internal degrees of freedom of the nanostructures can result, through edge bending of the magnetization and breaking of local magnetic symmetry at the vertices, in a transition to a highly degenerate ground state with finite zero-point entropy, similar to that of the pyrochlore spin ices. Finally, wemore » find that these additional degrees of freedom have observable consequences in the resonant spectrum of the lattice, and predict the occurrence of edge “melting” above a critical temperature at which the magnetic symmetry is restored.« less

  15. Accurate anharmonic zero-point energies for some combustion-related species from diffusion Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Lawrence B.; Georgievskii, Yuri; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    Full dimensional analytic potential energy surfaces based on CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ calculations have been determined for 48 small combustion related molecules. The analytic surfaces have been used in Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the anharmonic, zero point energies. Here, the resulting anharmonicity corrections are compared to vibrational perturbation theory results based both on the same level of electronic structure theory and on lower level electronic structure methods (B3LYP and MP2).

  16. Accurate anharmonic zero-point energies for some combustion-related species from diffusion Monte Carlo

    DOE PAGES

    Harding, Lawrence B.; Georgievskii, Yuri; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2017-05-17

    Full dimensional analytic potential energy surfaces based on CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ calculations have been determined for 48 small combustion related molecules. The analytic surfaces have been used in Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the anharmonic, zero point energies. Here, the resulting anharmonicity corrections are compared to vibrational perturbation theory results based both on the same level of electronic structure theory and on lower level electronic structure methods (B3LYP and MP2).

  17. Accurate Anharmonic Zero-Point Energies for Some Combustion-Related Species from Diffusion Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Harding, Lawrence B; Georgievskii, Yuri; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2017-06-08

    Full-dimensional analytic potential energy surfaces based on CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ calculations have been determined for 48 small combustion-related molecules. The analytic surfaces have been used in Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the anharmonic zero-point energies. The resulting anharmonicity corrections are compared to vibrational perturbation theory results based both on the same level of electronic structure theory and on lower-level electronic structure methods (B3LYP and MP2).

  18. Comment on "How the huge energy of quantum vacuum gravitates to drive the slow accelerating expansion of the Universe"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, Francisco D.; Trombetta, Leonardo G.

    2018-03-01

    In a recent paper [Q. Wang, Z. Zhu, and W. G. Unruh, Phys. Rev. D 95, 103504 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.95.103504] it was argued that, due to the fluctuations around its mean value, vacuum energy gravitates differently from what was previously assumed. As a consequence, the Universe would accelerate with a small Hubble expansion rate, solving the cosmological constant and dark energy problems. We point out here that the results depend on the type of cutoff used to evaluate the vacuum energy. In particular, they are not valid when one uses a covariant cutoff such that the zero-point energy density is positive definite.

  19. Transmission of Helium Isotopes through Graphdiyne Pores: Tunneling versus Zero Point Energy Effects.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Marta I; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Campos-Martínez, José

    2015-10-29

    Recent progress in the production of new two-dimensional (2D) nanoporous materials is attracting considerable interest for applications to isotope separation in gases. In this paper we report a computational study of the transmission of (4)He and (3)He through the (subnanometer) pores of graphdiyne, a recently synthesized 2D carbon material. The He-graphdiyne interaction is represented by a force field parametrized upon ab initio calculations, and the (4)He/(3)He selectivity is analyzed by tunneling-corrected transition state theory. We have found that both zero point energy (of the in-pore degrees of freedom) and tunneling effects play an extraordinary role at low temperatures (≈20-30 K). However, both quantum features work in opposite directions in such a way that the selectivity ratio does not reach an acceptable value. Nevertheless, the efficiency of zero point energy is in general larger, so that (4)He tends to diffuse faster than (3)He through the graphdiyne membrane, with a maximum performance at 23 K. Moreover, it is found that the transmission rates are too small in the studied temperature range, precluding practical applications. It is concluded that the role of the in-pore degrees of freedom should be included in computations of the transmission probabilities of molecules through nanoporous materials.

  20. Electronic Zero-Point Oscillations in the Strong-Interaction Limit of Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Gori-Giorgi, Paola; Vignale, Giovanni; Seidl, Michael

    2009-04-14

    The exchange-correlation energy in Kohn-Sham density functional theory can be expressed exactly in terms of the change in the expectation of the electron-electron repulsion operator when, in the many-electron Hamiltonian, this same operator is multiplied by a real parameter λ varying between 0 (Kohn-Sham system) and 1 (physical system). In this process, usually called adiabatic connection, the one-electron density is kept fixed by a suitable local one-body potential. The strong-interaction limit of density functional theory, defined as the limit λ→∞, turns out to be like the opposite noninteracting Kohn-Sham limit (λ→0) mathematically simpler than the physical (λ = 1) case and can be used to build an approximate interpolation formula between λ→0 and λ→∞ for the exchange-correlation energy. Here we extend the systematic treatment of the λ→∞ limit [Phys. Rev. A 2007, 75, 042511] to the next leading term, describing zero-point oscillations of strictly correlated electrons, with numerical examples for small spherical atoms. We also propose an improved approximate functional for the zero-point term and a revised interpolation formula for the exchange-correlation energy satisfying more exact constraints.

  1. Sensing Atomic Motion from the Zero Point to Room Temperature with Ultrafast Atom Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K G; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Wong-Campos, J D; Monroe, C

    2015-11-20

    We sense the motion of a trapped atomic ion using a sequence of state-dependent ultrafast momentum kicks. We use this atom interferometer to characterize a nearly pure quantum state with n=1 phonon and accurately measure thermal states ranging from near the zero-point energy to n[over ¯]~10^{4}, with the possibility of extending at least 100 times higher in energy. The complete energy range of this method spans from the ground state to far outside of the Lamb-Dicke regime, where atomic motion is greater than the optical wavelength. Apart from thermometry, these interferometric techniques are useful for characterizing ultrafast entangling gates between multiple trapped ions.

  2. Threshold-adaptive canny operator based on cross-zero points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boqi; Zhang, Xiuhua; Hong, Hanyu

    2018-03-01

    Canny edge detection[1] is a technique to extract useful structural information from different vision objects and dramatically reduce the amount of data to be processed. It has been widely applied in various computer vision systems. There are two thresholds have to be settled before the edge is segregated from background. Usually, by the experience of developers, two static values are set as the thresholds[2]. In this paper, a novel automatic thresholding method is proposed. The relation between the thresholds and Cross-zero Points is analyzed, and an interpolation function is deduced to determine the thresholds. Comprehensive experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method and advantageous for stable edge detection at changing illumination.

  3. Zero-point energy conservation in classical trajectory simulations: Application to H2CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kin Long Kelvin; Quinn, Mitchell S.; Kolmann, Stephen J.; Kable, Scott H.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2018-05-01

    A new approach for preventing zero-point energy (ZPE) violation in quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) simulations is presented and applied to H2CO "roaming" reactions. Zero-point energy may be problematic in roaming reactions because they occur at or near bond dissociation thresholds and these channels may be incorrectly open or closed depending on if, or how, ZPE has been treated. Here we run QCT simulations on a "ZPE-corrected" potential energy surface defined as the sum of the molecular potential energy surface (PES) and the global harmonic ZPE surface. Five different harmonic ZPE estimates are examined with four, on average, giving values within 4 kJ/mol—chemical accuracy—for H2CO. The local harmonic ZPE, at arbitrary molecular configurations, is subsequently defined in terms of "projected" Cartesian coordinates and a global ZPE "surface" is constructed using Shepard interpolation. This, combined with a second-order modified Shepard interpolated PES, V, allows us to construct a proof-of-concept ZPE-corrected PES for H2CO, Veff, at no additional computational cost to the PES itself. Both V and Veff are used to model product state distributions from the H + HCO → H2 + CO abstraction reaction, which are shown to reproduce the literature roaming product state distributions. Our ZPE-corrected PES allows all trajectories to be analysed, whereas, in previous simulations, a significant proportion was discarded because of ZPE violation. We find ZPE has little effect on product rotational distributions, validating previous QCT simulations. Running trajectories on V, however, shifts the product kinetic energy release to higher energy than on Veff and classical simulations of kinetic energy release should therefore be viewed with caution.

  4. Understanding the reaction between muonium atoms and hydrogen molecules: zero point energy, tunnelling, and vibrational adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldegunde, J.; Jambrina, P. G.; García, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Sáez-Rábanos, V.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    The advent of very precise measurements of rate coefficients in reactions of muonium (Mu), the lightest hydrogen isotope, with H2 in its ground and first vibrational state and of kinetic isotope effects with respect to heavier isotopes has triggered a renewed interests in the field of muonic chemistry. The aim of the present article is to review the most recent results about the dynamics and mechanism of the reaction Mu+H2 to shed light on the importance of quantum effects such as tunnelling, the preservation of the zero point energy, and the vibrational adiabaticity. In addition to accurate quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, quasiclassical trajectories (QCT) have been run in order to check the reliability of this method for this isotopic variant. It has been found that the reaction with H2(v=0) is dominated by the high zero point energy (ZPE) of the products and that tunnelling is largely irrelevant. Accordingly, both QCT calculations that preserve the products' ZPE as well as those based on the Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics methodology can reproduce the QM rate coefficients. However, when the hydrogen molecule is vibrationally excited, QCT calculations fail completely in the prediction of the huge vibrational enhancement of the reactivity. This failure is attributed to tunnelling, which plays a decisive role breaking the vibrational adiabaticity when v=1. By means of the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that the tunnelling takes place through the ν1=1 collinear barrier. Somehow, the tunnelling that is missing in the Mu+H2(v=0) reaction is found in Mu+H2(v=1).

  5. Effects of zero point vibration on the reaction dynamics of water dimer cations following ionization.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2017-06-30

    Reactions of water dimer cation (H2O)2+ following ionization have been investigated by means of a direct ab initio molecular dynamics method. In particular, the effects of zero point vibration and zero point energy (ZPE) on the reaction mechanism were considered in this work. Trajectories were run on two electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of (H2O)2+: ground state ( 2 A″-like state) and the first excited state ( 2 A'-like state). All trajectories on the ground-state PES lead to the proton-transferred product: H 2 O + (Wd)-H 2 O(Wa) → OH(Wd)-H 3 O + (Wa), where Wd and Wa refer to the proton donor and acceptor water molecules, respectively. Time of proton transfer (PT) varied widely from 15 to 40 fs (average time of PT = 30.9 fs). The trajectories on the excited-state PES gave two products: an intermediate complex with a face-to-face structure (H 2 O-OH 2 ) + and a PT product. However, the proton was transferred to the opposite direction, and the reverse PT was found on the excited-state PES: H 2 O(Wd)-H 2 O + (Wa) → H 3 O + (Wd)-OH(Wa). This difference occurred because the ionizing water molecule in the dimer switched between the ground and excited states. The reaction mechanism of (H2O)2+ and the effects of ZPE are discussed on the basis of the results. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The environmental zero-point problem in evolutionary reaction norm modeling.

    PubMed

    Ergon, Rolf

    2018-04-01

    There is a potential problem in present quantitative genetics evolutionary modeling based on reaction norms. Such models are state-space models, where the multivariate breeder's equation in some form is used as the state equation that propagates the population state forward in time. These models use the implicit assumption of a constant reference environment, in many cases set to zero. This zero-point is often the environment a population is adapted to, that is, where the expected geometric mean fitness is maximized. Such environmental reference values follow from the state of the population system, and they are thus population properties. The environment the population is adapted to, is, in other words, an internal population property, independent of the external environment. It is only when the external environment coincides with the internal reference environment, or vice versa, that the population is adapted to the current environment. This is formally a result of state-space modeling theory, which is an important theoretical basis for evolutionary modeling. The potential zero-point problem is present in all types of reaction norm models, parametrized as well as function-valued, and the problem does not disappear when the reference environment is set to zero. As the environmental reference values are population characteristics, they ought to be modeled as such. Whether such characteristics are evolvable is an open question, but considering the complexity of evolutionary processes, such evolvability cannot be excluded without good arguments. As a straightforward solution, I propose to model the reference values as evolvable mean traits in their own right, in addition to other reaction norm traits. However, solutions based on an evolvable G matrix are also possible.

  7. The Zero-Point Field and the NASA Challenge to Create the Space Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard; Rueda, Alfonso

    1999-01-01

    This NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Workshop seeks to explore concepts that could someday enable interstellar travel. The effective superluminal motion proposed by Alcubierre (1994) to be a possibility owing to theoretically allowed space-time metric distortions within general relativity has since been shown by Pfenning and Ford (1997) to be physically unattainable. A number of other hypothetical possibilities have been summarized by Millis (1997). We present herein an overview of a concept that has implications for radically new propulsion possibilities and has a basis in theoretical physics: the hypothesis that the inertia and gravitation of matter originate in electromagnetic interactions between the zero-point field (ZPF) and the quarks and electrons constituting atoms. A new derivation of the connection between the ZPF and inertia has been carried through that is properly co-variant, yielding the relativistic equation of motion from Maxwell's equations. This opens new possibilities, but also rules out the basis of one hypothetical propulsion mechanism: Bondi's "negative inertial mass," appears to be an impossibility.

  8. Uncertainties in scaling factors for ab initio vibrational zero-point energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irikura, Karl K.; Johnson, Russell D.; Kacker, Raghu N.; Kessel, Rüdiger

    2009-03-01

    Vibrational zero-point energies (ZPEs) determined from ab initio calculations are often scaled by empirical factors. An empirical scaling factor partially compensates for the effects arising from vibrational anharmonicity and incomplete treatment of electron correlation. These effects are not random but are systematic. We report scaling factors for 32 combinations of theory and basis set, intended for predicting ZPEs from computed harmonic frequencies. An empirical scaling factor carries uncertainty. We quantify and report, for the first time, the uncertainties associated with scaling factors for ZPE. The uncertainties are larger than generally acknowledged; the scaling factors have only two significant digits. For example, the scaling factor for B3LYP/6-31G(d) is 0.9757±0.0224 (standard uncertainty). The uncertainties in the scaling factors lead to corresponding uncertainties in predicted ZPEs. The proposed method for quantifying the uncertainties associated with scaling factors is based upon the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement, published by the International Organization for Standardization. We also present a new reference set of 60 diatomic and 15 polyatomic "experimental" ZPEs that includes estimated uncertainties.

  9. Zero-Point Energy Constraint for Unimolecular Dissociation Reactions. Giving Trajectories Multiple Chances To Dissociate Correctly.

    PubMed

    Paul, Amit K; Hase, William L

    2016-01-28

    A zero-point energy (ZPE) constraint model is proposed for classical trajectory simulations of unimolecular decomposition and applied to CH4* → H + CH3 decomposition. With this model trajectories are not allowed to dissociate unless they have ZPE in the CH3 product. If not, they are returned to the CH4* region of phase space and, if necessary, given additional opportunities to dissociate with ZPE. The lifetime for dissociation of an individual trajectory is the time it takes to dissociate with ZPE in CH3, including multiple possible returns to CH4*. With this ZPE constraint the dissociation of CH4* is exponential in time as expected for intrinsic RRKM dynamics and the resulting rate constant is in good agreement with the harmonic quantum value of RRKM theory. In contrast, a model that discards trajectories without ZPE in the reaction products gives a CH4* → H + CH3 rate constant that agrees with the classical and not quantum RRKM value. The rate constant for the purely classical simulation indicates that anharmonicity may be important and the rate constant from the ZPE constrained classical trajectory simulation may not represent the complete anharmonicity of the RRKM quantum dynamics. The ZPE constraint model proposed here is compared with previous models for restricting ZPE flow in intramolecular dynamics, and connecting product and reactant/product quantum energy levels in chemical dynamics simulations.

  10. Thermodynamic stability of boron: the role of defects and zero point motion.

    PubMed

    van Setten, Michiel J; Uijttewaal, Matthé A; de Wijs, Gilles A; de Groot, Robert A

    2007-03-07

    Its low weight, high melting point, and large degree of hardness make elemental boron a technologically interesting material. The large number of allotropes, mostly containing over a hundred atoms in the unit cell, and their difficult characterization challenge both experimentalists and theoreticians. Even the ground state of this element is still under discussion. For over 30 years, scientists have attempted to determine the relative stability of alpha- and beta-rhombohedral boron. We use density functional calculations in the generalized gradient approximation to study a broad range of possible beta-rhombohedral structures containing interstitial atoms and partially occupied sites within a 105 atoms framework. The two most stable structures are practically degenerate in energy and semiconducting. One contains the experimental 320 atoms in the hexagonal unit cell, and the other contains 106 atoms in the triclinic unit cell. When populated with the experimental 320 electrons, the 106 atom structure exhibits a band gap of 1.4 eV and an in-gap hole trap at 0.35 eV above the valence band, consistent with known experiments. The total energy of these two structures is 23 meV/B lower than the original 105 atom framework, but it is still 1 meV/B above the alpha phase. Adding zero point energies finally makes the beta phase the ground state of elemental boron by 3 meV/B. At finite temperatures, the difference becomes even larger.

  11. Zero-Point Energy Leakage in Quantum Thermal Bath Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Brieuc, Fabien; Bronstein, Yael; Dammak, Hichem; Depondt, Philippe; Finocchi, Fabio; Hayoun, Marc

    2016-12-13

    The quantum thermal bath (QTB) has been presented as an alternative to path-integral-based methods to introduce nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations. The method has proved to be efficient, yielding accurate results for various systems. However, the QTB method is prone to zero-point energy leakage (ZPEL) in highly anharmonic systems. This is a well-known problem in methods based on classical trajectories where part of the energy of the high-frequency modes is transferred to the low-frequency modes leading to a wrong energy distribution. In some cases, the ZPEL can have dramatic consequences on the properties of the system. Thus, we investigate the ZPEL by testing the QTB method on selected systems with increasing complexity in order to study the conditions and the parameters that influence the leakage. We also analyze the consequences of the ZPEL on the structural and vibrational properties of the system. We find that the leakage is particularly dependent on the damping coefficient and that increasing its value can reduce and, in some cases, completely remove the ZPEL. When using sufficiently high values for the damping coefficient, the expected energy distribution among the vibrational modes is ensured. In this case, the QTB method gives very encouraging results. In particular, the structural properties are well-reproduced. The dynamical properties should be regarded with caution although valuable information can still be extracted from the vibrational spectrum, even for large values of the damping term.

  12. Impact of basic angle variations on the parallax zero point for a scanning astrometric satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkevich, Alexey G.; Klioner, Sergei A.; Lindegren, Lennart; Hobbs, David; van Leeuwen, Floor

    2017-07-01

    Context. Determination of absolute parallaxes by means of a scanning astrometric satellite such as Hipparcos or Gaia relies on the short-term stability of the so-called basic angle between the two viewing directions. Uncalibrated variations of the basic angle may produce systematic errors in the computed parallaxes. Aims: We examine the coupling between a global parallax shift and specific variations of the basic angle, namely those related to the satellite attitude with respect to the Sun. Methods: The changes in observables produced by small perturbations of the basic angle, attitude, and parallaxes were calculated analytically. We then looked for a combination of perturbations that had no net effect on the observables. Results: In the approximation of infinitely small fields of view, it is shown that certain perturbations of the basic angle are observationally indistinguishable from a global shift of the parallaxes. If these kinds of perturbations exist, they cannot be calibrated from the astrometric observations but will produce a global parallax bias. Numerical simulations of the astrometric solution, using both direct and iterative methods, confirm this theoretical result. For a given amplitude of the basic angle perturbation, the parallax bias is smaller for a larger basic angle and a larger solar aspect angle. In both these respects Gaia has a more favourable geometry than Hipparcos. In the case of Gaia, internal metrology is used to monitor basic angle variations. Additionally, Gaia has the advantage of detecting numerous quasars, which can be used to verify the parallax zero point.

  13. Primordial SdS universe from a 5D vacuum: scalar field fluctuations on Schwarzschild and Hubble horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, José Edgar Madriz; Bellini, Mauricio, E-mail: jemadriz@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar

    2010-11-01

    We study scalar field fluctuations of the inflaton field in an early inflationary universe on an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de Sitter (SdS) metric, which is obtained after make a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat Schwarzschild-de Sitter (SdS) static metric. We obtain the important result that the spectrum of fluctuations at zeroth order is independent of the scalar field mass M on Schwarzschild scales, while on cosmological scales it exhibits a mass dependence. However, in the first-order expansion, the spectrum depends of the inflaton mass and the amplitude is linear with the Black-Hole (BH) mass m.

  14. Semiclassical wave packet treatment of scattering resonances: application to the delta zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions.

    PubMed

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-09-28

    For the first time Feshbach-type resonances important in recombination reactions are characterized using the semiclassical wave packet method. This approximation allows us to determine the energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of the resonances and also to observe a very interesting correlation between them. Most important is that this approach permits description of a quantum delta-zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions and reproduces the anomalous rates of ozone formation.

  15. On the contribution of intramolecular zero point energy to the equation of state of solid H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekharan, V.; Etters, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental evidence shows that the internal zero-point energy of the H2 molecule exhibits a relatively strong pressure dependence in the solid as well as changing considerably upon condensation. It is shown that these effects contribute about 6% to the total sublimation energy and to the pressure in the solid state. Methods to modify the ab initio isolated pair potential to account for these environmental effects are discussed.

  16. Semiclassical gravitoelectromagnetic inflation in a Lorentz gauge: Seminal inflaton fluctuations and electromagnetic fields from a 5D vacuum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membiela, Federico Agustín; Bellini, Mauricio

    2010-02-01

    Using a semiclassical approach to Gravitoelectromagnetic Inflation (GEMI), we study the origin and evolution of seminal inflaton and electromagnetic fields in the early inflationary universe from a 5D vacuum state. The difference with other previous works is that in this one we use a Lorentz gauge. Our formalism is naturally not conformal invariant on the effective 4D de Sitter metric, which make possible the super adiabatic amplification of magnetic field modes during the early inflationary epoch of the universe on cosmological scales.

  17. Dissociation energies of six NO2 isotopologues by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy and zero point energy of some triatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Michalski, G; Jost, R; Sugny, D; Joyeux, M; Thiemens, M

    2004-10-15

    We have measured the rotationless photodissociation threshold of six isotopologues of NO2 containing 14N, 15N, 16O, and 18O isotopes using laser induced fluorescence detection and jet cooled NO2 (to avoid rotational congestion). For each isotopologue, the spectrum is very dense below the dissociation energy while fluorescence disappears abruptly above it. The six dissociation energies ranged from 25 128.56 cm(-1) for 14N16O2 to 25 171.80 cm(-1) for 15N18O2. The zero point energy for the NO2 isotopologues was determined from experimental vibrational energies, application of the Dunham expansion, and from canonical perturbation theory using several potential energy surfaces. Using the experimentally determined dissociation energies and the calculated zero point energies of the parent NO2 isotopologue and of the NO product(s) we determined that there is a common De = 26 051.17+/-0.70 cm(-1) using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The canonical perturbation theory was then used to calculate the zero point energy of all stable isotopologues of SO2, CO2, and O3, which are compared with previous determinations.

  18. The localized quantum vacuum field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, D.

    2008-03-01

    A model for the localized quantum vacuum is proposed in which the zero-point energy (ZPE) of the quantum electromagnetic field originates in energy- and momentum-conserving transitions of material systems from their ground state to an unstable state with negative energy. These transitions are accompanied by emissions and re-absorptions of real photons, which generate a localized quantum vacuum in the neighborhood of material systems. The model could help resolve the cosmological paradox associated with the ZPE of electromagnetic fields, while reclaiming quantum effects associated with quantum vacuum such as the Casimir effect and the Lamb shift. It also offers a new insight into the Zitterbewegung of material particles.

  19. Stable long-time semiclassical description of zero-point energy in high-dimensional molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Garashchuk, Sophya; Rassolov, Vitaly A

    2008-07-14

    Semiclassical implementation of the quantum trajectory formalism [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 1181 (2004)] is further developed to give a stable long-time description of zero-point energy in anharmonic systems of high dimensionality. The method is based on a numerically cheap linearized quantum force approach; stabilizing terms compensating for the linearization errors are added into the time-evolution equations for the classical and nonclassical components of the momentum operator. The wave function normalization and energy are rigorously conserved. Numerical tests are performed for model systems of up to 40 degrees of freedom.

  20. Bound state potential energy surface construction: ab initio zero-point energies and vibrationally averaged rotational constants.

    PubMed

    Bettens, Ryan P A

    2003-01-15

    Collins' method of interpolating a potential energy surface (PES) from quantum chemical calculations for reactive systems (Jordan, M. J. T.; Thompson, K. C.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1995, 102, 5647. Thompson, K. C.; Jordan, M. J. T.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 108, 8302. Bettens, R. P. A.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1999, 111, 816) has been applied to a bound state problem. The interpolation method has been combined for the first time with quantum diffusion Monte Carlo calculations to obtain an accurate ground state zero-point energy, the vibrationally average rotational constants, and the vibrationally averaged internal coordinates. In particular, the system studied was fluoromethane using a composite method approximating the QCISD(T)/6-311++G(2df,2p) level of theory. The approach adopted in this work (a) is fully automated, (b) is fully ab initio, (c) includes all nine nuclear degrees of freedom, (d) requires no assumption of the functional form of the PES, (e) possesses the full symmetry of the system, (f) does not involve fitting any parameters of any kind, and (g) is generally applicable to any system amenable to quantum chemical calculations and Collins' interpolation method. The calculated zero-point energy agrees to within 0.2% of its current best estimate. A0 and B0 are within 0.9 and 0.3%, respectively, of experiment.

  1. Thermodynamic Stability of Ice II and Its Hydrogen-Disordered Counterpart: Role of Zero-Point Energy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Yagasaki, Takuma; Tanaka, Hideki

    2016-03-03

    We investigate why no hydrogen-disordered form of ice II has been found in nature despite the fact that most of hydrogen-ordered ices have hydrogen-disordered counterparts. The thermodynamic stability of a set of hydrogen-ordered ice II variants relative to ice II is evaluated theoretically. It is found that ice II is more stable than the disordered variants so generated as to satisfy the simple ice rule due to the lower zero-point energy as well as the pair interaction energy. The residual entropy of the disordered ice II phase gradually compensates the unfavorable free energy with increasing temperature. The crossover, however, occurs at a high temperature well above the melting point of ice III. Consequently, the hydrogen-disordered phase does not exist in nature. The thermodynamic stability of partially hydrogen-disordered ices is also scrutinized by examining the free-energy components of several variants obtained by systematic inversion of OH directions in ice II. The potential energy of one variant is lower than that of the ice II structure, but its Gibbs free energy is slightly higher than that of ice II due to the zero-point energy. The slight difference in the thermodynamic stability leaves the possibility of the partial hydrogen-disorder in real ice II.

  2. Dynamics of quantum correlation and coherence for two atoms coupled with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhiming, E-mail: 465609785@qq.com; Situ, Haozhen, E-mail: situhaozhen@gmail.com

    In this article, the dynamics of quantum correlation and coherence for two atoms interacting with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar field in the Minkowski vacuum is investigated. We firstly derive the master equation that describes the system evolution with initial Bell-diagonal state. Then we discuss the system evolution for three cases of different initial states: non-zero correlation separable state, maximally entangled state and zero correlation state. For non-zero correlation initial separable state, quantum correlation and coherence can be protected from vacuum fluctuations during long time evolution when the separation between the two atoms is relatively small. For maximally entangledmore » initial state, quantum correlation and coherence overall decrease with evolution time. However, for the zero correlation initial state, quantum correlation and coherence are firstly generated and then drop with evolution time; when separation is sufficiently small, they can survive from vacuum fluctuations. For three cases, quantum correlation and coherence first undergo decline and then fluctuate to relatively stable values with the increasing distance between the two atoms. Specially, for the case of zero correlation initial state, quantum correlation and coherence occur periodically revival at fixed zero points and revival amplitude declines gradually with increasing separation of two atoms.« less

  3. Investigating the significance of zero-point motion in small molecular clusters of sulphuric acid and water

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, Jake L.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Ford, Ian J.

    2014-01-14

    The nucleation of particles from trace gases in the atmosphere is an important source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and these are vital for the formation of clouds in view of the high supersaturations required for homogeneous water droplet nucleation. The methods of quantum chemistry have increasingly been employed to model nucleation due to their high accuracy and efficiency in calculating configurational energies; and nucleation rates can be obtained from the associated free energies of particle formation. However, even in such advanced approaches, it is typically assumed that the nuclei have a classical nature, which is questionable for some systems.more » The importance of zero-point motion (also known as quantum nuclear dynamics) in modelling small clusters of sulphuric acid and water is tested here using the path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) method at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory. We observe a small zero-point effect on the the equilibrium structures of certain clusters. One configuration is found to display a bimodal behaviour at 300 K in contrast to the stable ionised state suggested from a zero temperature classical geometry optimisation. The general effect of zero-point motion is to promote the extent of proton transfer with respect to classical behaviour. We thank Prof. Angelos Michaelides and his group in University College London (UCL) for practical advice and helpful discussions. This work benefited from interactions with the Thomas Young Centre through seminar and discussions involving the PIMD method. SMK was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. JLS and IJF were supported by the IMPACT scheme at UCL and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. We are grateful for use of the UCL Legion High Performance Computing Facility and the

  4. Geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations in Cartesian coordinates: accurate reduction in zero-point energy.

    PubMed

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2005-08-22

    An approach for the inclusion of geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations is introduced. An important aspect of the approach is that Cartesian coordinates are used throughout. We devised an algorithm for the constrained sampling of initial conditions through the use of multivariate Gaussian distribution based on a projected Hessian. We also propose an approach for the constrained evaluation of the so-called Herman-Kluk prefactor in its exact log-derivative form. Sample calculations are performed for free and constrained rare-gas trimers. The results show that the proposed approach provides an accurate evaluation of the reduction in zero-point energy. Exact basis set calculations are used to assess the accuracy of the semiclassical results. Since Cartesian coordinates are used, the approach is general and applicable to a variety of molecular and atomic systems.

  5. A practical method to avoid zero-point leak in molecular dynamics calculations: application to the water dimer.

    PubMed

    Czakó, Gábor; Kaledin, Alexey L; Bowman, Joel M

    2010-04-28

    We report the implementation of a previously suggested method to constrain a molecular system to have mode-specific vibrational energy greater than or equal to the zero-point energy in quasiclassical trajectory calculations [J. M. Bowman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 91, 2859 (1989); W. H. Miller et al., J. Chem. Phys. 91, 2863 (1989)]. The implementation is made practical by using a technique described recently [G. Czako and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 244302 (2009)], where a normal-mode analysis is performed during the course of a trajectory and which gives only real-valued frequencies. The method is applied to the water dimer, where its effectiveness is shown by computing mode energies as a function of integration time. Radial distribution functions are also calculated using constrained quasiclassical and standard classical molecular dynamics at low temperature and at 300 K and compared to rigorous quantum path integral calculations.

  6. Zero point energy leakage in condensed phase dynamics: An assessment of quantum simulation methods for liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2009-12-01

    The approximate quantum mechanical ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and linearized semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR) methods are compared and contrasted in a study of the dynamics of the flexible q-TIP4P/F water model at room temperature. For this water model, a RPMD simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is only a few percent larger than the classical diffusion coefficient, whereas a LSC-IVR simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is three times larger. We attribute this discrepancy to the unphysical leakage of initially quantized zero point energy (ZPE) from the intramolecular to the intermolecular modes of the liquid as the LSC-IVR simulation progresses. In spite of this problem, which is avoided by construction in RPMD, the LSC-IVR may still provide a useful approximation to certain short-time dynamical properties which are not so strongly affected by the ZPE leakage. We illustrate this with an application to the liquid water dipole absorption spectrum, for which the RPMD approximation breaks down at frequencies in the O-H stretching region owing to contamination from the internal modes of the ring polymer. The LSC-IVR does not suffer from this difficulty and it appears to provide quite a promising way to calculate condensed phase vibrational spectra.

  7. Method and basis set dependence of anharmonic ground state nuclear wave functions and zero-point energies: application to SSSH.

    PubMed

    Kolmann, Stephen J; Jordan, Meredith J T

    2010-02-07

    One of the largest remaining errors in thermochemical calculations is the determination of the zero-point energy (ZPE). The fully coupled, anharmonic ZPE and ground state nuclear wave function of the SSSH radical are calculated using quantum diffusion Monte Carlo on interpolated potential energy surfaces (PESs) constructed using a variety of method and basis set combinations. The ZPE of SSSH, which is approximately 29 kJ mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/6-31G* level of theory, has a 4 kJ mol(-1) dependence on the treatment of electron correlation. The anharmonic ZPEs are consistently 0.3 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy than the harmonic ZPEs calculated at the Hartree-Fock and MP2 levels of theory, and 0.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy at the CCSD(T)/6-31G* level of theory. Ideally, for sub-kJ mol(-1) thermochemical accuracy, ZPEs should be calculated using correlated methods with as big a basis set as practicable. The ground state nuclear wave function of SSSH also has significant method and basis set dependence. The analysis of the nuclear wave function indicates that SSSH is localized to a single symmetry equivalent global minimum, despite having sufficient ZPE to be delocalized over both minima. As part of this work, modifications to the interpolated PES construction scheme of Collins and co-workers are presented.

  8. Method and basis set dependence of anharmonic ground state nuclear wave functions and zero-point energies: Application to SSSH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmann, Stephen J.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2010-02-01

    One of the largest remaining errors in thermochemical calculations is the determination of the zero-point energy (ZPE). The fully coupled, anharmonic ZPE and ground state nuclear wave function of the SSSH radical are calculated using quantum diffusion Monte Carlo on interpolated potential energy surfaces (PESs) constructed using a variety of method and basis set combinations. The ZPE of SSSH, which is approximately 29 kJ mol-1 at the CCSD(T)/6-31G∗ level of theory, has a 4 kJ mol-1 dependence on the treatment of electron correlation. The anharmonic ZPEs are consistently 0.3 kJ mol-1 lower in energy than the harmonic ZPEs calculated at the Hartree-Fock and MP2 levels of theory, and 0.7 kJ mol-1 lower in energy at the CCSD(T)/6-31G∗ level of theory. Ideally, for sub-kJ mol-1 thermochemical accuracy, ZPEs should be calculated using correlated methods with as big a basis set as practicable. The ground state nuclear wave function of SSSH also has significant method and basis set dependence. The analysis of the nuclear wave function indicates that SSSH is localized to a single symmetry equivalent global minimum, despite having sufficient ZPE to be delocalized over both minima. As part of this work, modifications to the interpolated PES construction scheme of Collins and co-workers are presented.

  9. Zero point energy leakage in condensed phase dynamics: an assessment of quantum simulation methods for liquid water.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E

    2009-12-28

    The approximate quantum mechanical ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and linearized semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR) methods are compared and contrasted in a study of the dynamics of the flexible q-TIP4P/F water model at room temperature. For this water model, a RPMD simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is only a few percent larger than the classical diffusion coefficient, whereas a LSC-IVR simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is three times larger. We attribute this discrepancy to the unphysical leakage of initially quantized zero point energy (ZPE) from the intramolecular to the intermolecular modes of the liquid as the LSC-IVR simulation progresses. In spite of this problem, which is avoided by construction in RPMD, the LSC-IVR may still provide a useful approximation to certain short-time dynamical properties which are not so strongly affected by the ZPE leakage. We illustrate this with an application to the liquid water dipole absorption spectrum, for which the RPMD approximation breaks down at frequencies in the O-H stretching region owing to contamination from the internal modes of the ring polymer. The LSC-IVR does not suffer from this difficulty and it appears to provide quite a promising way to calculate condensed phase vibrational spectra.

  10. The ground state tunneling splitting and the zero point energy of malonaldehyde: a quantum Monte Carlo determination.

    PubMed

    Viel, Alexandra; Coutinho-Neto, Maurício D; Manthe, Uwe

    2007-01-14

    Quantum dynamics calculations of the ground state tunneling splitting and of the zero point energy of malonaldehyde on the full dimensional potential energy surface proposed by Yagi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 1154, 10647 (2001)] are reported. The exact diffusion Monte Carlo and the projection operator imaginary time spectral evolution methods are used to compute accurate benchmark results for this 21-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface. A tunneling splitting of 25.7+/-0.3 cm-1 is obtained, and the vibrational ground state energy is found to be 15 122+/-4 cm-1. Isotopic substitution of the tunneling hydrogen modifies the tunneling splitting down to 3.21+/-0.09 cm-1 and the vibrational ground state energy to 14 385+/-2 cm-1. The computed tunneling splittings are slightly higher than the experimental values as expected from the potential energy surface which slightly underestimates the barrier height, and they are slightly lower than the results from the instanton theory obtained using the same potential energy surface.

  11. A Genuine Jahn-Teller System with Compressed Geometry and Quantum Effects Originating from Zero-Point Motion.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, José Antonio; García-Fernández, Pablo; García-Lastra, Juan María; Moreno, Miguel

    2016-07-18

    First-principle calculations together with analysis of the experimental data found for 3d(9) and 3d(7) ions in cubic oxides proved that the center found in irradiated CaO:Ni(2+) corresponds to Ni(+) under a static Jahn-Teller effect displaying a compressed equilibrium geometry. It was also shown that the anomalous positive g∥ shift (g∥ -g0 =0.065) measured at T=20 K obeys the superposition of the |3 z(2) -r(2) ⟩ and |x(2) -y(2) ⟩ states driven by quantum effects associated with the zero-point motion, a mechanism first put forward by O'Brien for static Jahn-Teller systems and later extended by Ham to the dynamic Jahn-Teller case. To our knowledge, this is the first genuine Jahn-Teller system (i.e. in which exact degeneracy exists at the high-symmetry configuration) exhibiting a compressed equilibrium geometry for which large quantum effects allow experimental observation of the effect predicted by O'Brien. Analysis of the calculated energy barriers for different Jahn-Teller systems allowed us to explain the origin of the compressed geometry observed for CaO:Ni(+) . © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Communication: A new ab initio potential energy surface for HCl-H2O, diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of D0 and a delocalized zero-point wavefunction.

    PubMed

    Mancini, John S; Bowman, Joel M

    2013-03-28

    We report a global, full-dimensional, ab initio potential energy surface describing the HCl-H2O dimer. The potential is constructed from a permutationally invariant fit, using Morse-like variables, to over 44,000 CCSD(T)-F12b∕aug-cc-pVTZ energies. The surface describes the complex and dissociated monomers with a total RMS fitting error of 24 cm(-1). The normal modes of the minima, low-energy saddle point and separated monomers, the double minimum isomerization pathway and electronic dissociation energy are accurately described by the surface. Rigorous quantum mechanical diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations are performed to determine the zero-point energy and wavefunction of the complex and the separated fragments. The calculated zero-point energies together with a De value calculated from CCSD(T) with a complete basis set extrapolation gives a D0 value of 1348 ± 3 cm(-1), in good agreement with the recent experimentally reported value of 1334 ± 10 cm(-1) [B. E. Casterline, A. K. Mollner, L. C. Ch'ng, and H. Reisler, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 9774 (2010)]. Examination of the DMC wavefunction allows for confident characterization of the zero-point geometry to be dominant at the C(2v) double-well saddle point and not the C(s) global minimum. Additional support for the delocalized zero-point geometry is given by numerical solutions to the 1D Schrödinger equation along the imaginary-frequency out-of-plane bending mode, where the zero-point energy is calculated to be 52 cm(-1) above the isomerization barrier. The D0 of the fully deuterated isotopologue is calculated to be 1476 ± 3 cm(-1), which we hope will stand as a benchmark for future experimental work.

  13. Measurements of the electric field of zero-point optical phonons in GaAs quantum wells support the Urbach rule for zero-temperature lifetime broadening.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Rupak; Mondal, Richarj; Khatua, Pradip; Rudra, Alok; Kapon, Eli; Malzer, Stefan; Döhler, Gottfried; Pal, Bipul; Bansal, Bhavtosh

    2015-01-30

    We study a specific type of lifetime broadening resulting in the well-known exponential "Urbach tail" density of states within the energy gap of an insulator. After establishing the frequency and temperature dependence of the Urbach edge in GaAs quantum wells, we show that the broadening due to the zero-point optical phonons is the fundamental limit to the Urbach slope in high-quality samples. In rough analogy with Welton's heuristic interpretation of the Lamb shift, the zero-temperature contribution to the Urbach slope can be thought of as arising from the electric field of the zero-point longitudinal-optical phonons. The value of this electric field is experimentally measured to be 3  kV cm-1, in excellent agreement with the theoretical estimate.

  14. Computation of deuterium isotope perturbation of 13C NMR chemical shifts of alkanes: a local mode zero-point level approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kin S; Hudson, Bruce

    2010-11-25

    Replacement of H by D perturbs the (13)C NMR chemical shifts of an alkane molecule. This effect is largest for the carbon to which the D is attached, diminishing rapidly with intervening bonds. The effect is sensitive to stereochemistry and is large enough to be measured reliably. A simple model based on the ground (zero point) vibrational level and treating only the C-H(D) degrees of freedom (local mode approach) is presented. The change in CH bond length with H/D substitution as well as the reduction in the range of the zero-point level probability distribution for the stretch and both bend degrees of freedom are computed. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts are computed with variation in these three degrees of freedom, and the results are averaged with respect to the H and D distribution functions. The resulting differences in the zero-point averaged chemical shifts are compared with experimental values of the H/D shifts for a series of cycloalkanes, norbornane, adamantane, and protoadamantane. Agreement is generally very good. The remaining differences are discussed. The proton spectrum of cyclohexane- is revisited and updated with improved agreement with experiment.

  15. Zero-point corrections and temperature dependence of HD spin-spin coupling constants of heavy metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes calculated by vibrational averaging.

    PubMed

    Mort, Brendan C; Autschbach, Jochen

    2006-08-09

    Vibrational corrections (zero-point and temperature dependent) of the H-D spin-spin coupling constant J(HD) for six transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes have been computed from a vibrational average of J(HD) as a function of temperature. Effective (vibrationally averaged) H-D distances have also been determined. The very strong temperature dependence of J(HD) for one of the complexes, [Ir(dmpm)Cp*H2]2 + (dmpm = bis(dimethylphosphino)methane) can be modeled simply by the Boltzmann average of the zero-point vibrationally averaged JHD of two isomers. For this complex and four others, the vibrational corrections to JHD are shown to be highly significant and lead to improved agreement between theory and experiment in most cases. The zero-point vibrational correction is important for all complexes. Depending on the shape of the potential energy and J-coupling surfaces, for some of the complexes higher vibrationally excited states can also contribute to the vibrational corrections at temperatures above 0 K and lead to a temperature dependence. We identify different classes of complexes where a significant temperature dependence of J(HD) may or may not occur for different reasons. A method is outlined by which the temperature dependence of the HD spin-spin coupling constant can be determined with standard quantum chemistry software. Comparisons are made with experimental data and previously calculated values where applicable. We also discuss an example where a low-order expansion around the minimum of a complicated potential energy surface appears not to be sufficient for reproducing the experimentally observed temperature dependence.

  16. Effect of the quantum zero-point atomic motion on the optical and electronic properties of diamond and trans-polyacetylene.

    PubMed

    Cannuccia, Elena; Marini, Andrea

    2011-12-16

    The quantum zero-point motion of the carbon atoms is shown to induce strong effects on the optical and electronic properties of diamond and trans-polyacetylene, a conjugated polymer. By using an ab initio approach, we interpret the subgap states experimentally observed in diamond in terms of entangled electron-phonon states. These states also appear in trans-polyacetylene causing the formation of strong structures in the band structure that even call into question the accuracy of the band theory. This imposes a critical revision of the results obtained for carbon-based nanostructures by assuming the atoms frozen in their equilibrium positions. © 2011 American Physical Society

  17. Changes in the zero-point energy of the protons as the source of the binding energy of water to A-phase DNA.

    PubMed

    Reiter, G F; Senesi, R; Mayers, J

    2010-10-01

    The measured changes in the zero-point kinetic energy of the protons are entirely responsible for the binding energy of water molecules to A phase DNA at the concentration of 6  water molecules/base pair. The changes in kinetic energy can be expected to be a significant contribution to the energy balance in intracellular biological processes and the properties of nano-confined water. The shape of the momentum distribution in the dehydrated A phase is consistent with coherent delocalization of some of the protons in a double well potential, with a separation of the wells of 0.2 Å.

  18. Casimir switch: steering optical transparency with vacuum forces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Fang; Li, Yong; Jing, H

    2016-06-03

    The Casimir force, originating from vacuum zero-point energy, is one of the most intriguing purely quantum effects. It has attracted renewed interests in current field of nanomechanics, due to the rapid size decrease of on-chip devices. Here we study the optomechanically-induced transparency (OMIT) with a tunable Casimir force. We find that the optical output rate can be significantly altered by the vacuum force, even terminated and then restored, indicating a highly-controlled optical switch. Our result addresses the possibility of designing exotic optical nano-devices by harnessing the power of vacuum.

  19. Zero-point corrections for isotropic coupling constants for cyclohexadienyl radical, C₆H₇ and C₆H₆Mu: beyond the bond length change approximation.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Bruce S; Chafetz, Suzanne K

    2013-04-25

    Zero-point vibrational level averaging for electron spin resonance (ESR) and muon spin resonance (µSR) hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) are computed for H and Mu isotopomers of the cyclohexadienyl radical. A local mode approximation previously developed for computation of the effect of replacement of H by D on ¹³C-NMR chemical shifts is used. DFT methods are used to compute the change in energy and HFCCs when the geometry is changed from the equilibrium values for the stretch and both bend degrees of freedom. This variation is then averaged over the probability distribution for each degree of freedom. The method is tested using data for the methylene group of C₆H₇, cyclohexadienyl radical and its Mu analog. Good agreement is found for the difference between the HFCCs for Mu and H of CHMu and that for H of CHMu and CH₂ of the parent radical methylene group. All three of these HFCCs are the same in the absence of the zero point average, a one-parameter fit of the static HFCC, a(0), can be computed. That value, 45.2 Gauss, is compared to the results of several fixed geometry electronic structure computations. The HFCC values for the ortho, meta and para H atoms are then discussed.

  20. The Tip of the Red Giant Branch Distances to Type Ia Supernova Host Galaxies. IV. Color Dependence and Zero-point Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, In Sung; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2017-01-01

    We present a revised Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) calibration, accurate to 2.7% of distance. A modified TRGB magnitude corrected for its color dependence, the QT magnitude, is introduced for better measurement of the TRGB. We determine the color-magnitude relation of the TRGB from photometry of deep images of HST/ACS fields around eight nearby galaxies. The zero-point of the TRGB at the fiducial metallicity ([Fe/H] = -1.6 ({(V-I)}0,{TRGB}=1.5)) is obtained from photometry of two distance anchors, NGC 4258 (M106) and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), to which precise geometric distances are known: MQT,TRGB = -4.023 ± 0.073 mag from NGC 4258 and MQT,TRGB = -4.004 ± 0.096 mag from the LMC. A weighted mean of the two zero-points is MQT,TRGB = -4.016 ± 0.058 mag. Quoted uncertainty is ˜2× smaller than those of previous calibrations. We compare the empirical TRGB calibration derived in this study with theoretical stellar models, finding that there are significant discrepancies, especially for red color ({({{F}}606{{W}}-{{F}}814{{W}})}0≳ 2.5). We provide the revised TRGB calibration in several magnitude systems for future studies.

  1. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert's Variational Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2008-09-09

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert's variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H(3) reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H(2), HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property

  2. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  3. Chemical Reaction Rates from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Zero Point Energy Conservation in Mu + H2 → MuH + H.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Aoiz, F J; Suleimanov, Yury V; Manolopoulos, David E

    2012-02-16

    A fundamental issue in the field of reaction dynamics is the inclusion of the quantum mechanical (QM) effects such as zero point energy (ZPE) and tunneling in molecular dynamics simulations, and in particular in the calculation of chemical reaction rates. In this work we study the chemical reaction between a muonium atom and a hydrogen molecule. The recently developed ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) technique is used, and the results are compared with those of other methods. For this reaction, the thermal rate coefficients calculated with RPMD are found to be in excellent agreement with the results of an accurate QM calculation. The very minor discrepancies are within the convergence error even at very low temperatures. This exceptionally good agreement can be attributed to the dominant role of ZPE in the reaction, which is accounted for extremely well by RPMD. Tunneling only plays a minor role in the reaction.

  4. Direct dynamics trajectory study of the reaction of formaldehyde cation with D2: vibrational and zero-point energy effects on quasiclassical trajectories.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Song, Kihyung; Hase, William L; Anderson, Scott L

    2005-12-22

    Quasiclassical, direct dynamics trajectories have been used to study the reaction of formaldehyde cation with molecular hydrogen, simulating the conditions in an experimental study of H2CO+ vibrational effects on this reaction. Effects of five different H2CO+ modes were probed, and we also examined different approaches to treating zero-point energy in quasiclassical trajectories. The calculated absolute cross-sections are in excellent agreement with experiments, and the results provide insight into the reaction mechanism, product scattering behavior, and energy disposal, and how they vary with impact parameter and reactant state. The reaction is sharply orientation-dependent, even at high collision energies, and both trajectories and experiment find that H2CO+ vibration inhibits reaction. On the other hand, the trajectories do not reproduce the anomalously strong effect of nu2(+) (the CO stretch). The origin of the discrepancy and approaches for minimizing such problems in quasiclassical trajectories are discussed.

  5. A new approach to detecting gravitational waves via the coupling of gravity to the zero-point energy of the phonon modes of a superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inan, Nader A.

    The response of a superconductor to a gravitational wave is shown to obey a London-like constituent equation. The Cooper pairs are described by the Ginzburg-Landau free energy density embedded in curved spacetime. The lattice ions are modeled by quantum harmonic oscillators characterized by quasi-energy eigenvalues. This formulation is shown to predict a dynamical Casimir effect since the zero-point energy of the ionic lattice phonons is modulated by the gravitational wave. It is also shown that the response to a gravitational wave is far less for the Cooper pair density than for the ionic lattice. This predicts a “charge separation effect” which can be used to detect the passage of a gravitational wave.

  6. Quantum vacuum effects from boundaries of designer potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Tomasz

    2009-04-15

    Vacuum energy in quantum field theory, being the sum of zero-point energies of all field modes, is formally infinite but yet, after regularization or renormalization, can give rise to finite observable effects. One way of understanding how these effects arise is to compute the vacuum energy in an idealized system such as a large cavity divided into disjoint regions by pistons. In this paper, this type of calculation is carried out for situations where the potential affecting a field is not the same in all regions of the cavity. It is shown that the observable parts of the vacuum energymore » in such potentials do not fall off to zero as the region where the potential is nontrivial becomes large. This unusual behavior might be interesting for tests involving quantum vacuum effects and for studies on the relation between vacuum energy in quantum field theory and geometry.« less

  7. Density functional theory calculations of the lowest energy quintet and triplet states of model hemes: role of functional, basis set, and zero-point energy corrections.

    PubMed

    Khvostichenko, Daria; Choi, Andrew; Boulatov, Roman

    2008-04-24

    We investigated the effect of several computational variables, including the choice of the basis set, application of symmetry constraints, and zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections, on the structural parameters and predicted ground electronic state of model 5-coordinate hemes (iron(II) porphines axially coordinated by a single imidazole or 2-methylimidazole). We studied the performance of B3LYP and B3PW91 with eight Pople-style basis sets (up to 6-311+G*) and B97-1, OLYP, and TPSS functionals with 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets. Only hybrid functionals B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-1 reproduced the quintet ground state of the model hemes. With a given functional, the choice of the basis set caused up to 2.7 kcal/mol variation of the quintet-triplet electronic energy gap (DeltaEel), in several cases, resulting in the inversion of the sign of DeltaEel. Single-point energy calculations with triple-zeta basis sets of the Pople (up to 6-311G++(2d,2p)), Ahlrichs (TZVP and TZVPP), and Dunning (cc-pVTZ) families showed the same trend. The zero-point energy of the quintet state was approximately 1 kcal/mol lower than that of the triplet, and accounting for ZPE corrections was crucial for establishing the ground state if the electronic energy of the triplet state was approximately 1 kcal/mol less than that of the quintet. Within a given model chemistry, effects of symmetry constraints and of a "tense" structure of the iron porphine fragment coordinated to 2-methylimidazole on DeltaEel were limited to 0.3 kcal/mol. For both model hemes the best agreement with crystallographic structural data was achieved with small 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets. Deviation of the computed frequency of the Fe-Im stretching mode from the experimental value with the basis set decreased in the order: nonaugmented basis sets, basis sets with polarization functions, and basis sets with polarization and diffuse functions. Contraction of Pople-style basis sets (double-zeta or triple-zeta) affected the results

  8. A density functional theory study on the effect of zero-point energy corrections on the methanation profile on Fe(100).

    PubMed

    Govender, Ashriti; Ferré, Daniel Curulla; Niemantsverdriet, J W Hans

    2012-04-23

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the surface hydrogenation of adsorbed atomic carbon to methane, following the reaction sequence C+4H(-->/<--)CH+3H(-->/<--)CH(2)+2H(-->/<--)CH(3)+H(-->/<--)CH(4), are studied on Fe(100) by means of density functional theory. An assessment is made on whether the adsorption energies and overall energy profile are affected when zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections are included. The C, CH and CH(2) species are most stable at the fourfold hollow site, while CH(3) prefers the twofold bridge site. Atomic hydrogen is adsorbed at both the twofold bridge and fourfold hollow sites. Methane is physisorbed on the surface and shows neither orientation nor site preference. It is easily desorbed to the gas phase once formed. The incorporation of ZPE corrections has a very slight, if any, effect on the adsorption energies and does not alter the trends with regards to the most stable adsorption sites. The successive addition of hydrogen to atomic carbon is endothermic up to the addition of the third hydrogen atom resulting in the methyl species, but exothermic in the final hydrogenation step, which leads to methane. The overall methanation reaction is endothermic when starting from atomic carbon and hydrogen on the surface. Zero-point energy corrections are rarely provided in the literature. Since they are derived from C-H bonds with characteristic vibrations on the order of 2500-3000 cm(-1), the equivalent ZPE of 1/2 hν is on the order of 0.2-0.3 eV and its effect on adsorption energy can in principle be significant. Particularly in reactions between CH(x) and H, the ZPE correction is expected to be significant, as additional C-H bonds are formed. In this instance, the methanation reaction energy of +0.77 eV increased to +1.45 eV with the inclusion of ZPE corrections, that is, less favourable. Therefore, it is crucial to include ZPE corrections when reporting reactions involving hydrogen-containing species. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag Gmb

  9. Trajectory dynamics study of the Ar + CH4 dissociation reaction at high temperatures: the importance of zero-point-energy effects.

    PubMed

    Marques, J M C; Martínez-Núñez, E; Fernandez-Ramos, A; Vazquez, S A

    2005-06-23

    Large-scale classical trajectory calculations have been performed to study the reaction Ar + CH4--> CH3 +H + Ar in the temperature range 2500 < or = T/K < or = 4500. The potential energy surface used for ArCH4 is the sum of the nonbonding pairwise potentials of Hase and collaborators (J. Chem. Phys. 2001, 114, 535) that models the intermolecular interaction and the CH4 intramolecular potential of Duchovic et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 1984, 88, 1339), which has been modified to account for the H-H repulsion at small bending angles. The thermal rate coefficient has been calculated, and the zero-point energy (ZPE) of the CH3 product molecule has been taken into account in the analysis of the results; also, two approaches have been applied for discarding predissociative trajectories. In both cases, good agreement is observed between the experimental and trajectory results after imposing the ZPE of CH3. The energy-transfer parameters have also been obtained from trajectory calculations and compared with available values estimated from experiment using the master equation formalism; in general, the agreement is good.

  10. Frequency and zero-point vibrational energy scale factors for double-hybrid density functionals (and other selected methods): can anharmonic force fields be avoided?

    PubMed

    Kesharwani, Manoj K; Brauer, Brina; Martin, Jan M L

    2015-03-05

    We have obtained uniform frequency scaling factors λ(harm) (for harmonic frequencies), λ(fund) (for fundamentals), and λ(ZPVE) (for zero-point vibrational energies (ZPVEs)) for the Weigend-Ahlrichs and other selected basis sets for MP2, SCS-MP2, and a variety of DFT functionals including double hybrids. For selected levels of theory, we have also obtained scaling factors for true anharmonic fundamentals and ZPVEs obtained from quartic force fields. For harmonic frequencies, the double hybrids B2PLYP, B2GP-PLYP, and DSD-PBEP86 clearly yield the best performance at RMSD = 10-12 cm(-1) for def2-TZVP and larger basis sets, compared to 5 cm(-1) at the CCSD(T) basis set limit. For ZPVEs, again, the double hybrids are the best performers, reaching root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) as low as 0.05 kcal/mol, but even mainstream functionals like B3LYP can get down to 0.10 kcal/mol. Explicitly anharmonic ZPVEs only are marginally more accurate. For fundamentals, however, simple uniform scaling is clearly inadequate.

  11. The effect of zero-point energy differences on the isotope dependence of the formation of ozone: a classical trajectory study.

    PubMed

    Schinke, Reinhard; Fleurat-Lessard, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The effect of zero-point energy differences (DeltaZPE) between the possible fragmentation channels of highly excited O(3) complexes on the isotope dependence of the formation of ozone is investigated by means of classical trajectory calculations and a strong-collision model. DeltaZPE is incorporated in the calculations in a phenomenological way by adjusting the potential energy surface in the product channels so that the correct exothermicities and endothermicities are matched. The model contains two parameters, the frequency of stabilizing collisions omega and an energy dependent parameter Delta(damp), which favors the lower energies in the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. The stabilization frequency is used to adjust the pressure dependence of the absolute formation rate while Delta(damp) is utilized to control its isotope dependence. The calculations for several isotope combinations of oxygen atoms show a clear dependence of relative formation rates on DeltaZPE. The results are similar to those of Gao and Marcus [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 137 (2002)] obtained within a statistical model. In particular, like in the statistical approach an ad hoc parameter eta approximately 1.14, which effectively reduces the formation rates of the symmetric ABA ozone molecules, has to be introduced in order to obtain good agreement with the measured relative rates of Janssen et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 3, 4718 (2001)]. The temperature dependence of the recombination rate is also addressed.

  12. Customizing vacuum fluctuations for enhanced entanglement creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin

    2018-07-01

    This paper connects the creation of entanglement through cavity enhanced decay rate with practical design parameters such as cavity dimension and cavity mirror reflectivity. The clarification of specific physical parameters on cavity enhanced emission in relation to entanglement creation is discussed. It is found that entanglement increases as the size of the cavity decreases, or the reflectivity of the cavity mirrors increases. Additionally, the negative effect of individual qubit decoherence on the entanglement is discussed. These results can be used to design or choose a practical system for implementing entanglement between two qubits for quantum computation and information processing.

  13. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  14. Relaxation of vacuum energy in q-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.; Savelainen, M.; Volovik, G. E.

    2017-08-01

    The q-theory formalism aims to describe the thermodynamics and dynamics of the deep quantum vacuum. The thermodynamics leads to an exact cancellation of the quantum-field zero-point-energies in equilibrium, which partly solves the main cosmological constant problem. But, with reversible dynamics, the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe asymptotically approaches the Minkowski vacuum only if the Big Bang already started out in an initial equilibrium state. Here, we extend q-theory by introducing dissipation from irreversible processes. Neglecting the possible instability of a de-Sitter vacuum, we obtain different scenarios with either a de-Sitter asymptote or collapse to a final singularity. The Minkowski asymptote still requires fine-tuning of the initial conditions. This suggests that, within the q-theory approach, the decay of the de-Sitter vacuum is a necessary condition for the dynamical solution of the cosmological constant problem.

  15. The ground states of iron(III) porphines: role of entropy-enthalpy compensation, Fermi correlation, dispersion, and zero-point energies.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2011-10-01

    Porphyrins are much studied due to their biochemical relevance and many applications. The density functional TPSSh has previously accurately described the energy of close-lying electronic states of transition metal systems such as porphyrins. However, a recent study questioned this conclusion based on calculations of five iron(III) porphines. Here, we compute the geometries of 80 different electronic configurations and the free energies of the most stable configurations with the functionals TPSSh, TPSS, and B3LYP. Zero-point energies and entropy favor high-spin by ~4kJ/mol and 0-10kJ/mol, respectively. When these effects are included, and all electronic configurations are evaluated, TPSSh correctly predicts the spin of all the four difficult phenylporphine cases and is within the lower bound of uncertainty of any known theoretical method for the fifth, iron(III) chloroporphine. Dispersion computed with DFT-D3 favors low-spin by 3-53kJ/mol (TPSSh) or 4-15kJ/mol (B3LYP) due to the attractive r(-6) term and the shorter distances in low-spin. The very large and diverse corrections from TPSS and TPSSh seem less consistent with the similarity of the systems than when calculated from B3LYP. If the functional-specific corrections are used, B3LYP and TPSSh are of equal accuracy, and TPSS is much worse, whereas if the physically reasonable B3LYP-computed dispersion effect is used for all functionals, TPSSh is accurate for all systems. B3LYP is significantly more accurate when dispersion is added, confirming previous results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  17. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  18. Color confinement from fluctuating topology

    DOE PAGES

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-10-19

    QCD possesses a compact gauge group, and this implies a non-trivial topological structure of the vacuum. In this contribution to the Gribov-85 Memorial volume, we first discuss the origin of Gribov copies and their interpretation in terms of fluctuating topology in the QCD vacuum. We then describe the recent work with E. Levin that links the confinement of gluons and color screening to the fluctuating topology, and discuss implications for spin physics, high energy scattering, and the physics of quark-gluon plasma.

  19. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  20. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(Ã) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-07-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode ν2 with n2=0,…,6 quanta of vibration) in the à electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTU /SD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTU /SD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH2 internal energy distributions obtained for n2=0 and n2>1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n2=1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n2 values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH2 internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n2=0 and n2=6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching.

  1. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(A) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories.

    PubMed

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-07-07

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode nu(2) with n(2)=0,[ellipsis (horizontal)],6 quanta of vibration) in the A electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTUSD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTUSD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH(2) internal energy distributions obtained for n(2)=0 and n(2)>1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n(2)=1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n(2) values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH(2) internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n(2)=0 and n(2)=6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching.

  2. High-resolution studies of tropolone in the S0 and S1 electronic states: isotope driven dynamics in the zero-point energy levels.

    PubMed

    Keske, John C; Lin, Wei; Pringle, Wallace C; Novick, Stewart E; Blake, Thomas A; Plusquellic, David F

    2006-02-21

    Rotationally resolved microwave (MW) and ultraviolet (UV) spectra of jet-cooled tropolone have been obtained in S(0) and S(1) electronic states using Fourier-transform microwave and UV-laser/molecular-beam spectrometers. In the ground electronic state, the MW spectra of all heavy-atom isotopomers including one (18)O and four (13)C isotopomers were observed in natural abundance. The OD isotopomer was obtained from isotopically enriched samples. The two lowest tunneling states of each isotopomer except (18)O have been assigned. The observed inversion splitting for the OD isotopomer is 1523.227(5) MHz. For the asymmetric (13)C structures, the magnitudes of tunneling-rotation interactions are found to diminish with decreasing distance between the heavy atom and the tunneling proton. In the limit of closest approach, the 0(+) state of (18)O was well fitted to an asymmetric rotor Hamiltonian, reflecting significant changes in the tautomerization dynamics. Comparisons of the substituted atom coordinates with theoretical predictions at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory suggest the localized 0(+) and 0(-) wave functions of the heavier isotopes favor the C-OH and C=O forms of tropolone, respectively. The only exception occurs for the (13)C-OH and (13)C[Double Bond]O structures which correlate to the 0(-) and 0(+) states, respectively. These preferences reflect kinetic isotope effects as quantitatively verified by the calculated zero-point energy differences between members of the asymmetric atom pairs. From rotationally resolved data of the 0(+) <--0(+) and 0(-) <--0(-) bands in S(1), line-shape fits have yielded Lorentzian linewidths that differ by 12.2(16) MHz over the 19.88(4) cm(-1) interval in S(1). The fluorescence decay rates together with previously reported quantum yield data give nonradiative decay rates of 7.7(5) x 10(8) and 8.5(5) x 10(8) s(-1) for the 0(+) and 0(-) levels of the S(1) state of tropolone.

  3. Novel electrostatic attraction from plasmon fluctuations

    PubMed

    Lau; Levine; Pincus

    2000-05-01

    In this Letter, we show that, at low temperatures, zero-point fluctuations of the plasmon modes of two mutually coupled 2D planar Wigner crystals give rise to a novel long-range attractive force. For the case where the distance d between two planar surfaces is large, this attractive force has an unusual power-law decay, which scales as d(-7/2), unlike other fluctuation-induced forces. Specifically, we note that its range is longer than the "standard" zero-temperature van der Waals interaction. This result may, in principle, be observed in bilayer electronic systems and provides insight into the nature of correlation effects for highly charged surfaces.

  4. Inertial Mass Viewed as Reaction of the Vacuum to Accelerated Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rueda, Alfonso; Haisch, Bernhard

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of the momentum flux (or of the Poynting vector) of the classical electromagnetic version of the quantum vacuum consisting of zero-point radiation impinging on accelerated objects as viewed by an inertial observer suggests that the resistance to acceleration attributed to inertia may be a force of opposition originating in the vacuum. This analysis avoids the ad hoc modeling of particle-field interaction dynamics used previously by Haisck Rueda and Puthoff (1994) to derive a similar result. This present approach is not dependent upon what happens at the particle point but on how an external observer assesses the kinematical characteristics of the zero-point radiation impinging on the accelerated object. A relativistic form of the equation of motion results from the present analysis.

  5. Expanding space-time and variable vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmeggiani, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    The paper describes a cosmological model which contemplates the presence of a vacuum energy varying, very slightly (now), with time. The constant part of the vacuum energy generated, some 6 Gyr ago, a deceleration/acceleration transition of the metric expansion; so now, in an aged Universe, the expansion is inexorably accelerating. The vacuum energy varying part is instead assumed to be eventually responsible of an acceleration/deceleration transition, which occurred about 14 Gyr ago; this transition has a dynamic origin: it is a consequence of the general relativistic Einstein-Friedmann equations. Moreover, the vacuum energy (constant and variable) is here related to the zero-point energy of some quantum fields (scalar, vector, or spinor); these fields are necessarily described in a general relativistic way: their structure depends on the space-time metric, typically non-flat. More precisely, the commutators of the (quantum field) creation/annihilation operators are here assumed to depend on the local value of the space-time metric tensor (and eventually of its curvature); furthermore, these commutators rapidly decrease for high momentum values and they reduce to the standard ones for a flat metric. In this way, the theory is ”gravitationally” regularized; in particular, the zero-point (vacuum) energy density has a well defined value and, for a non static metric, depends on the (cosmic) time. Note that this varying vacuum energy can be negative (Fermi fields) and that a change of its sign typically leads to a minimum for the metric expansion factor (a ”bounce”).

  6. Engineering matter interactions using squeezed vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeytinoglu, Sina; Imamoglu, Atac; Huber, Sebastian

    Virtually all interactions that are relevant for atomic and condensed matter physics are mediated by the quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field vacuum. Consequently, controlling the latter can be used to engineer the strength and the range of inter-particle interactions. Recent experiments have used this premise to demonstrate novel quantum phases or entangling gates by embedding electric dipoles in photonic cavities or waveguides which modify the electromagnetic fluctuations. In this submission, we demonstrate theoretically that the enhanced fluctuations in the anti-squeezed quadrature of a squeezed vacuum state allows for engineering interactions between electric dipoles without the need for a photonic cavity or waveguide. Thus, the strength and range of the resulting dipole-dipole coupling can be engineered by dynamically changing the spatial profile of the squeezed vacuum in a travelling-wave geometry. ETH-Zurich.

  7. Engineering matter interactions using squeezed vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeytinoglu, Sina; Imamoglu, Atac; Huber, Sebastian

    Virtually all interactions that are relevant for atomic and condensed matter physics are mediated by the quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field vacuum. Consequently, controlling the latter can be used to engineer the strength and the range of inter-particle interactions. Recent experiments have used this premise to demonstrate novel quantum phases or entangling gates by embedding electric dipoles in photonic cavities or waveguides which modify the electromagnetic fluctuations. In this talk, we demonstrate theoretically that the enhanced fluctuations in the anti-squeezed quadrature of a squeezed vacuum state allows for engineering interactions between electric dipoles without the need for a photonic cavity or waveguide. Thus, the strength and range of the resulting dipole-dipole coupling can be engineered by dynamically changing the spatial profile of the squeezed vacuum in a travelling-wave geometry. ETH Zurich.

  8. The Origin of Inertia and Matter as a Superradiant Phase Transition of Quantum Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxmilian Caligiuri, Luigi

    Mass is one of the most important concepts in physics and its real understanding represents the key for the formulation of any consistent physical theory. During the past years, a very interesting model of inertial and gravitational mass as the result of the reaction interaction between the charged particles (electrons and quarks) contained in a given body and a suitable "fraction" of QED Zero Point Fields confined within an ideal resonant cavity, associated to the same body, has been proposed by Haish, Rueda and Puthoff. More recently, the author showed that this interpretation is consistent with a picture of mass (both inertial and gravitational) as the seat of ZPF standing waves whose presence reduces quantum vacuum energy density inside the resonant cavity ideally associated to the body volume. Nevertheless so far, the ultimate physical origin of such resonant cavity as well as the mechanism able to "select" the fraction of ZPF electromagnetic modes interacting within it, remained unrevealed. In this paper, basing on the framework of QED coherence in condensed matter, we'll show mass can be viewed as the result of a spontaneous superradiant phase transition of quantum vacuum giving rise to a more stable, energetically favored, oscopic quantum state characterized by an ensemble of coherence domains, "trapping" the coherent ZPF fluctuations inside a given volume just acting as a resonant cavity. Our model is then able to explain the "natural" emergence of the ideal resonant cavity speculated by Haish, Rueda and Puthoff and its defining parameters as well as the physical mechanism selecting the fraction of ZPF interacting with the body particles. Finally, a generalization of the model to explain the origin of mass of elementary particles is proposed also suggesting a new understanding of Compton's frequency and De Broglie's wavelength. Our results indicates both inertia and matter could truly originate from coherent interaction between quantum matter-wave and

  9. On microscopic structure of the QCD vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, D. G.; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Kim, Youngman; Tsukioka, Takuya; Zhang, P. M.

    2018-05-01

    We propose a new class of regular stationary axially symmetric solutions in a pure QCD which correspond to monopole-antimonopole pairs at macroscopic scale. The solutions represent vacuum field configurations which are locally stable against quantum gluon fluctuations in any small space-time vicinity. This implies that the monopole-antimonopole pair can serve as a structural element in microscopic description of QCD vacuum formation.

  10. Engineering Matter Interactions Using Squeezed Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeytinoǧlu, Sina; Imamoǧlu, Ataç; Huber, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    Virtually all interactions that are relevant for atomic and condensed matter physics are mediated by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field vacuum. Consequently, controlling the vacuum fluctuations can be used to engineer the strength and the range of interactions. Recent experiments have used this premise to demonstrate novel quantum phases or entangling gates by embedding electric dipoles in photonic cavities or wave guides, which modify the electromagnetic fluctuations. Here, we show theoretically that the enhanced fluctuations in the antisqueezed quadrature of a squeezed vacuum state allow for engineering interactions between electric dipoles without the need for a photonic structure. Thus, the strength and range of the interactions can be engineered in a time-dependent way by changing the spatial profile of the squeezed vacuum in a traveling-wave geometry, which also allows the implementation of chiral dissipative interactions. Using experimentally realized squeezing parameters and including realistic losses, we predict single-atom cooperativities C of up to 10 for the squeezed-vacuum-enhanced interactions.

  11. Electronic structure and quantum spin fluctuations at the magnetic phase transition in MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povzner, A. A.; Volkov, A. G.; Nogovitsyna, T. A.

    2018-05-01

    The effect of spin fluctuations on the heat capacity and homogeneous magnetic susceptibility of the chiral magnetic MnSi in the vicinity of magnetic transition has been investigated by using the free energy functional of the coupled electron and spin subsystems and taking into account the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. For helical ferromagnetic ordering, we found that zero-point fluctuations of the spin density are large and comparable with fluctuations of the non-uniform magnetization. The amplitude of zero-point spin fluctuations shows a sharp decrease in the region of the magnetic phase transition. It is shown that sharp decrease of the amplitude of the quantum spin fluctuations results in the lambda-like maxima of the heat capacity and the homogeneous magnetic susceptibility. Above the temperature of the lambda anomaly, the spin correlation radius becomes less than the period of the helical structure and chiral fluctuations of the local magnetization appear. It is shown that formation of a "shoulder" on the temperature dependence of the heat capacity is due to disappearance of the local magnetization. Our finding allows to explain the experimentally observed features of the magnetic phase transition of MnSi as a result of the crossover of quantum and thermodynamic phase transitions.

  12. Quantum-Fluctuation-Initiated Coherence in Multioctave Raman Optical Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Wu, Chunbai; Couny, F.; Raymer, M. G.; Benabid, F.

    2010-09-01

    We show experimentally and theoretically that the spectral components of a multioctave frequency comb spontaneously created by stimulated Raman scattering in a hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber exhibit strong self-coherence and mutual coherence within each 12 ns driving laser pulse. This coherence arises in spite of the field’s initiation being from quantum zero-point fluctuations, which causes each spectral component to show large phase and energy fluctuations. This points to the possibility of an optical frequency comb with nonclassical correlations between all comb lines.

  13. De Sitter Space Without Dynamical Quantum Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddy, Kimberly K.; Carroll, Sean M.; Pollack, Jason

    2016-06-01

    We argue that, under certain plausible assumptions, de Sitter space settles into a quiescent vacuum in which there are no dynamical quantum fluctuations. Such fluctuations require either an evolving microstate, or time-dependent histories of out-of-equilibrium recording devices, which we argue are absent in stationary states. For a massive scalar field in a fixed de Sitter background, the cosmic no-hair theorem implies that the state of the patch approaches the vacuum, where there are no fluctuations. We argue that an analogous conclusion holds whenever a patch of de Sitter is embedded in a larger theory with an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space, including semiclassical quantum gravity with false vacua or complementarity in theories with at least one Minkowski vacuum. This reasoning provides an escape from the Boltzmann brain problem in such theories. It also implies that vacuum states do not uptunnel to higher-energy vacua and that perturbations do not decohere while slow-roll inflation occurs, suggesting that eternal inflation is much less common than often supposed. On the other hand, if a de Sitter patch is a closed system with a finite-dimensional Hilbert space, there will be Poincaré recurrences and dynamical Boltzmann fluctuations into lower-entropy states. Our analysis does not alter the conventional understanding of the origin of density fluctuations from primordial inflation, since reheating naturally generates a high-entropy environment and leads to decoherence, nor does it affect the existence of non-dynamical vacuum fluctuations such as those that give rise to the Casimir effect.

  14. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water-dimer III: Mixed Jacobi-valence parametrization and benchmark results for the zero point energy, vibrationally excited states, and infrared spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, Oriol; Brill, Michael; Gatti, Fabien; Lauvergnat, David; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2009-06-21

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the zero point energy, several low-lying vibrational states, and the infrared spectrum of the H(5)O(2)(+) cation. The calculations are performed by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. A new vector parametrization based on a mixed Jacobi-valence description of the system is presented. With this parametrization the potential energy surface coupling is reduced with respect to a full Jacobi description, providing a better convergence of the n-mode representation of the potential. However, new coupling terms appear in the kinetic energy operator. These terms are derived and discussed. A mode-combination scheme based on six combined coordinates is used, and the representation of the 15-dimensional potential in terms of a six-combined mode cluster expansion including up to some 7-dimensional grids is discussed. A statistical analysis of the accuracy of the n-mode representation of the potential at all orders is performed. Benchmark, fully converged results are reported for the zero point energy, which lie within the statistical uncertainty of the reference diffusion Monte Carlo result for this system. Some low-lying vibrationally excited eigenstates are computed by block improved relaxation, illustrating the applicability of the approach to large systems. Benchmark calculations of the linear infrared spectrum are provided, and convergence with increasing size of the time-dependent basis and as a function of the order of the n-mode representation is studied. The calculations presented here make use of recent developments in the parallel version of the MCTDH code, which are briefly discussed. We also show that the infrared spectrum can be computed, to a very good approximation, within D(2d) symmetry, instead of the G(16) symmetry used before, in which the complete rotation of one water molecule with respect to the other is allowed, thus simplifying the dynamical problem.

  15. The Stranger: Adventures at Zero Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heraud, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In one of his notebooks, Albert Camus describes, "The stranger," "The myth of Sisyphus," "Caligula" and "The misunderstanding" as pertaining to a series; a schema that suggests that if one were to write about one of these literary works, one would be writing about parts of a whole unless one also engaged…

  16. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  17. Natural vacuum electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, Nickolaus

    1990-01-01

    The ambient natural vacuum of space is proposed as a basis for electron valves. Each valve is an electron controlling structure similiar to a vacuum tube that is operated without a vacuum sustaining envelope. The natural vacuum electron valves discussed offer a viable substitute for solid state devices. The natural vacuum valve is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, system generated electromagnetic pulse, current transients, and direct exposure to space conditions.

  18. Fate of electroweak vacuum during preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2016-10-28

    Our electroweak vacuum may be metastable in light of the current experimental data of the Higgs/top quark mass. If this is really the case, high-scale inflation models require a stabilization mechanism of our vacuum during inflation. A possible candidate is the Higgs-inflaton/-curvature coupling because it induces an additional mass term to the Higgs during the slow roll regime. However, after inflation, the additional mass term oscillates, and it can destabilize our electroweak vacuum via production of large Higgs fluctuations during the inflaton oscillation era. In this paper, we study whether or not the Higgs-inflaton/-curvature coupling can save our vacuum bymore » properly taking account of Higgs production during the preheating stage. We put upper bounds on the Higgs-inflaton and -curvature couplings, and discuss possible dynamics that might relax them.« less

  19. True random numbers from amplified quantum vacuum.

    PubMed

    Jofre, M; Curty, M; Steinlechner, F; Anzolin, G; Torres, J P; Mitchell, M W; Pruneri, V

    2011-10-10

    Random numbers are essential for applications ranging from secure communications to numerical simulation and quantitative finance. Algorithms can rapidly produce pseudo-random outcomes, series of numbers that mimic most properties of true random numbers while quantum random number generators (QRNGs) exploit intrinsic quantum randomness to produce true random numbers. Single-photon QRNGs are conceptually simple but produce few random bits per detection. In contrast, vacuum fluctuations are a vast resource for QRNGs: they are broad-band and thus can encode many random bits per second. Direct recording of vacuum fluctuations is possible, but requires shot-noise-limited detectors, at the cost of bandwidth. We demonstrate efficient conversion of vacuum fluctuations to true random bits using optical amplification of vacuum and interferometry. Using commercially-available optical components we demonstrate a QRNG at a bit rate of 1.11 Gbps. The proposed scheme has the potential to be extended to 10 Gbps and even up to 100 Gbps by taking advantage of high speed modulation sources and detectors for optical fiber telecommunication devices.

  20. The Inertia Reaction Force and Its Vacuum Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Alfonso; Haisch, Bernard

    By means of a covariant approach we show that there must be a contribution to the inertial mass and to the inertial reaction force on an accelerated massive object by the zero-point electromagnetic field. This development does not require any detailed model of the accelerated object other than the knowledge that it interacts electromagnetically. It is shown that inertia can indeed be construed as an opposition of the vacuum fields to any change to the uniform state of motion of an object. Interesting insights originating from this result are discussed. It is argued why the proposed existence of a Higgs field in no way contradicts or is at odds with the above statements. The Higgs field is responsible for assigning mass to elementary particles. It is argued that still the underlying reason for the opposition to acceleration that massive objects present requires an explanation. The explanation proposed here fulfills that requirement.

  1. Four wave mixing as a probe of the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Daniel M.

    2016-06-01

    Much attention has been paid to the quantum structure of the vacuum. Higher order processes in quantum electrodynamics are strongly believed to cause polarization and even breakdown of the vacuum in the presence of strong fields soon to be accessible in high intensity laser experiments. Less explored consequences of strong field electrodynamics include effects from Born-Infeld type of electromagnetic theories, a nonlinear electrodynamics that follows from classical considerations as opposed to coupling to virtual fluctuations. In this article, I will demonstrate how vacuum four wave mixing has the possibility to differentiate between these two types of vacuum responses: quantum effects on one hand and nonlinear classical extensions on the other.

  2. XZP + 1d and XZP + 1d-DKH basis sets for second-row elements: application to CCSD(T) zero-point vibrational energy and atomization energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Campos, Cesar T; Jorge, Francisco E; Alves, Júlia M A

    2012-09-01

    Recently, segmented all-electron contracted double, triple, quadruple, quintuple, and sextuple zeta valence plus polarization function (XZP, X = D, T, Q, 5, and 6) basis sets for the elements from H to Ar were constructed for use in conjunction with nonrelativistic and Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians. In this work, in order to obtain a better description of some molecular properties, the XZP sets for the second-row elements were augmented with high-exponent d "inner polarization functions," which were optimized in the molecular environment at the second-order Møller-Plesset level. At the coupled cluster level of theory, the inclusion of tight d functions for these elements was found to be essential to improve the agreement between theoretical and experimental zero-point vibrational energies (ZPVEs) and atomization energies. For all of the molecules studied, the ZPVE errors were always smaller than 0.5 %. The atomization energies were also improved by applying corrections due to core/valence correlation and atomic spin-orbit effects. This led to estimates for the atomization energies of various compounds in the gaseous phase. The largest error (1.2 kcal mol(-1)) was found for SiH(4).

  3. Ca(AlH4)2, CaAlH5, and CaH2+6LiBH4: Calculated dehydrogenation enthalpy, including zero point energy, and the structure of the phonon spectra.

    PubMed

    Marashdeh, Ali; Frankcombe, Terry J

    2008-06-21

    The dehydrogenation enthalpies of Ca(AlH(4))(2), CaAlH(5), and CaH(2)+6LiBH(4) have been calculated using density functional theory calculations at the generalized gradient approximation level. Harmonic phonon zero point energy (ZPE) corrections have been included using Parlinski's direct method. The dehydrogenation of Ca(AlH(4))(2) is exothermic, indicating a metastable hydride. Calculations for CaAlH(5) including ZPE effects indicate that it is not stable enough for a hydrogen storage system operating near ambient conditions. The destabilized combination of LiBH(4) with CaH(2) is a promising system after ZPE-corrected enthalpy calculations. The calculations confirm that including ZPE effects in the harmonic approximation for the dehydrogenation of Ca(AlH(4))(2), CaAlH(5), and CaH(2)+6LiBH(4) has a significant effect on the calculated reaction enthalpy. The contribution of ZPE to the dehydrogenation enthalpies of Ca(AlH(4))(2) and CaAlH(5) calculated by the direct method phonon analysis was compared to that calculated by the frozen-phonon method. The crystal structure of CaAlH(5) is presented in the more useful standard setting of P2(1)c symmetry and the phonon density of states of CaAlH(5), significantly different to other common complex metal hydrides, is rationalized.

  4. Ca(AlH4)2, CaAlH5, and CaH2+6LiBH4: Calculated dehydrogenation enthalpy, including zero point energy, and the structure of the phonon spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marashdeh, Ali; Frankcombe, Terry J.

    2008-06-01

    The dehydrogenation enthalpies of Ca(AlH4)2, CaAlH5, and CaH2+6LiBH4 have been calculated using density functional theory calculations at the generalized gradient approximation level. Harmonic phonon zero point energy (ZPE) corrections have been included using Parlinski's direct method. The dehydrogenation of Ca(AlH4)2 is exothermic, indicating a metastable hydride. Calculations for CaAlH5 including ZPE effects indicate that it is not stable enough for a hydrogen storage system operating near ambient conditions. The destabilized combination of LiBH4 with CaH2 is a promising system after ZPE-corrected enthalpy calculations. The calculations confirm that including ZPE effects in the harmonic approximation for the dehydrogenation of Ca(AlH4)2, CaAlH5, and CaH2+6LiBH4 has a significant effect on the calculated reaction enthalpy. The contribution of ZPE to the dehydrogenation enthalpies of Ca(AlH4)2 and CaAlH5 calculated by the direct method phonon analysis was compared to that calculated by the frozen-phonon method. The crystal structure of CaAlH5 is presented in the more useful standard setting of P21/c symmetry and the phonon density of states of CaAlH5, significantly different to other common complex metal hydrides, is rationalized.

  5. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of the dissociation energy, zero-point, and 10 K properties of H7+/D7+ clusters using an ab initio potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Barragán, Patricia; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Qu, Chen; Prosmiti, Rita; Bowman, Joel M

    2013-07-14

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) and path-integral Monte Carlo computations of the vibrational ground state and 10 K equilibrium state properties of the H7 (+)/D7 (+) cations are presented, using an ab initio full-dimensional potential energy surface. The DMC zero-point energies of dissociated fragments H5 (+)(D5 (+))+H2(D2) are also calculated and from these results and the electronic dissociation energy, dissociation energies, D0, of 752 ± 15 and 980 ± 14 cm(-1) are reported for H7 (+) and D7 (+), respectively. Due to the known error in the electronic dissociation energy of the potential surface, these quantities are underestimated by roughly 65 cm(-1). These values are rigorously determined for first time, and compared with previous theoretical estimates from electronic structure calculations using standard harmonic analysis, and available experimental measurements. Probability density distributions are also computed for the ground vibrational and 10 K state of H7 (+) and D7 (+). These are qualitatively described as a central H3 (+)/D3 (+) core surrounded by "solvent" H2/D2 molecules that nearly freely rotate.

  6. An ab initio potential energy surface for the formic acid dimer: zero-point energy, selected anharmonic fundamental energies, and ground-state tunneling splitting calculated in relaxed 1-4-mode subspaces.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chen; Bowman, Joel M

    2016-09-14

    We report a full-dimensional, permutationally invariant potential energy surface (PES) for the cyclic formic acid dimer. This PES is a least-squares fit to 13475 CCSD(T)-F12a/haTZ (VTZ for H and aVTZ for C and O) energies. The energy-weighted, root-mean-square fitting error is 11 cm -1 and the barrier for the double-proton transfer on the PES is 2848 cm -1 , in good agreement with the directly-calculated ab initio value of 2853 cm -1 . The zero-point vibrational energy of 15 337 ± 7 cm -1 is obtained from diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. Energies of fundamentals of fifteen modes are calculated using the vibrational self-consistent field and virtual-state configuration interaction method. The ground-state tunneling splitting is computed using a reduced-dimensional Hamiltonian with relaxed potentials. The highest-level, four-mode coupled calculation gives a tunneling splitting of 0.037 cm -1 , which is roughly twice the experimental value. The tunneling splittings of (DCOOH) 2 and (DCOOD) 2 from one to three mode calculations are, as expected, smaller than that for (HCOOH) 2 and consistent with experiment.

  7. Zero-point Energy is Needed in Molecular Dynamics Calculations to Access the Saddle Point for H+HCN→H2CN* and cis/trans-HCNH* on a New Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Bowman, Joel M

    2013-02-12

    We calculate the probabilities for the association reactions H+HCN→H2CN* and cis/trans-HCNH*, using quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) and classical trajectory (CT) calculations, on a new global ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for H2CN including the reaction channels. The surface is a linear least-squares fit of roughly 60 000 CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pVDZ electronic energies, using a permutationally invariant basis with Morse-type variables. The reaction probabilities are obtained at a variety of collision energies and impact parameters. Large differences in the threshold energies in the two types of dynamics calculations are traced to the absence of zero-point energy in the CT calculations. We argue that the QCT threshold energy is the realistic one. In addition, trajectories find a direct pathway to trans-HCNH, even though there is no obvious transition state (TS) for this pathway. Instead the saddle point (SP) for the addition to cis-HCNH is evidently also the TS for direct formation of trans-HCNH.

  8. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  9. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  10. Improved Vacuum Bazooka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockman, John

    2003-04-01

    This apparatus is a modification to the well-known "vacuum bazooka" (PIRA 2B30.70). My vacuum bazooka is easy to construct and demonstrate, requires no precise fittings, foil, or vacuum grease, and propels ping-pong balls at a tremendous velocity!

  11. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  12. Giant vacuum forces via transmission lines

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Quantum electromagnetic fluctuations induce forces between neutral particles, known as the van der Waals and Casimir interactions. These fundamental forces, mediated by virtual photons from the vacuum, play an important role in basic physics and chemistry and in emerging technologies involving, e.g., microelectromechanical systems or quantum information processing. Here we show that these interactions can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude upon changing the character of the mediating vacuum modes. By considering two polarizable particles in the vicinity of any standard electric transmission line, along which photons can propagate in one dimension, we find a much stronger and longer-range interaction than in free space. This enhancement may have profound implications on many-particle and bulk systems and impact the quantum technologies mentioned above. The predicted giant vacuum force is estimated to be measurable in a coplanar waveguide line. PMID:25002503

  13. Intrinsic measurement errors for the speed of light in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Daniel; Schneiter, Fabienne; Fischer, Uwe R.

    2017-09-01

    The speed of light in vacuum, one of the most important and precisely measured natural constants, is fixed by convention to c=299 792 458 m s-1 . Advanced theories predict possible deviations from this universal value, or even quantum fluctuations of c. Combining arguments from quantum parameter estimation theory and classical general relativity, we here establish rigorously the existence of lower bounds on the uncertainty to which the speed of light in vacuum can be determined in a given region of space-time, subject to several reasonable restrictions. They provide a novel perspective on the experimental falsifiability of predictions for the quantum fluctuations of space-time.

  14. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  15. High resolution measurements supported by electronic structure calculations of two naphthalene derivatives: [1,5]- and [1,6]-naphthyridine--estimation of the zero point inertial defect for planar polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gruet, S; Goubet, M; Pirali, O

    2014-06-21

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) molecules are suspected to be present in the interstellar medium and to participate to the broad and unresolved emissions features, the so-called unidentified infrared bands. In the laboratory, very few studies report the rotationally resolved structure of such important class of molecules. In the present work, both experimental and theoretical approaches provide the first accurate determination of the rotational energy levels of two diazanaphthalene: [1,5]- and [1,6]-naphthyridine. [1,6]-naphthyridine has been studied at high resolution, in the microwave (MW) region using a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer and in the far-infrared (FIR) region using synchrotron-based Fourier transform spectroscopy. The very accurate set of ground state (GS) constants deduced from the analysis of the MW spectrum allowed the analysis of the most intense modes in the FIR (ν38-GS centered at about 483 cm(-1) and ν34-GS centered at about 842 cm(-1)). In contrast with [1,6]-naphthyridine, pure rotation spectroscopy of [1,5]-naphthyridine cannot be performed for symmetry reasons so the combined study of the two intense FIR modes (ν22-GS centered at about 166 cm(-1) and ν18-GS centered at about 818 cm(-1)) provided the GS and the excited states constants. Although the analysis of the very dense rotational patterns for such large molecules remains very challenging, relatively accurate anharmonic density functional theory calculations appeared as a highly relevant supporting tool to the analysis for both molecules. In addition, the good agreement between the experimental and calculated infrared spectrum shows that the present theoretical approach should provide useful data for the astrophysical models. Moreover, inertial defects calculated in the GS (ΔGS) of both molecules exhibit slightly negative values as previously observed for planar species of this molecular family. We adjusted the semi-empirical relations to estimate the zero-point

  16. The cosmic vacuum and the rotation of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechin, L. M.

    2010-08-01

    The rotational effect of the cosmic vacuum is investigated. The induced rotation of elliptical galaxies due to the anti-gravity of the vacuum is found to be 10-21 s-1 for real elliptical galaxies. The effect of the vacuum rotation of the entire Universe is discussed, and can be described by the invariant ω ν = ω 0 ˜ sqrt {Gρ v} . The corresponding numerical angular velocity of the Universe is 10-19 s-1, in good agreement with modern data on the temperature fluctuations of the cosmic background radiation.

  17. Fluctuation-driven electroweak phase transition. [in early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1992-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  18. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  19. Stochastic dark energy from inflationary quantum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavan, Dražen; Prokopec, Tomislav; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2018-05-01

    We study the quantum backreaction from inflationary fluctuations of a very light, non-minimally coupled spectator scalar and show that it is a viable candidate for dark energy. The problem is solved by suitably adapting the formalism of stochastic inflation. This allows us to self-consistently account for the backreaction on the background expansion rate of the Universe where its effects are large. This framework is equivalent to that of semiclassical gravity in which matter vacuum fluctuations are included at the one loop level, but purely quantum gravitational fluctuations are neglected. Our results show that dark energy in our model can be characterized by a distinct effective equation of state parameter (as a function of redshift) which allows for testing of the model at the level of the background.

  20. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM; Schare, Joshua M [Albuquerque, NM; Bunch, Kyle [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  1. Statistical fluctuations as the origin of nontopological solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griest, Kim; Kolb, Edward W.; Masarotti, Alessandro

    1989-01-01

    Nontopological solitons can be formed during a phase transition in the early universe as long as some net charge can be trapped in regions of false vacuum. It has been previously suggested that a particle-antiparticle asymmetry would provide a source for such trapped charge. It is pointed out that, for the model and parameters considered, statistical fluctuations provide a much larger concentration of charge, and are therefore, the dominant source of charge fluctuations in solitogenesis.

  2. NSLS II Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.; Doom, L.; Hseuh, H.

    2009-09-13

    National Synchrotron Light Source II, being constructed at Brookhaven, is a 3-GeV, 500 mA, 3rd generation synchrotron radiation facility with ultra low emittance electron beams. The storage ring vacuum system has a circumference of 792 m and consists of over 250 vacuum chambers with a simulated average operating pressure of less than 1 x 10{sup -9} mbar. A summary of the update design of the vacuum system including girder supports of the chambers, gauges, vacuum pumps, bellows, beam position monitors and simulation of the average pressure will be shown. A brief description of the techniques and procedures for cleaning andmore » mounting the chambers are given.« less

  3. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  4. Fluctuations in Cerebral Hemodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    Determination of scaling properties Detrended Fluctuations Analysis (see (28) and references therein) is commonly used to determine scaling...pressure (averaged over a cardiac beat) of a healthy subject. First 1000 values of the time series are shown. (b) Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA...1000 values of the time series are shown. (b) Detrended fluctuation analysis of the time series shown in (a). Fig . 3 Side-by-side boxplot for the

  5. Improving Vacuum Cleaners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between the Kirby company and Lewis Research Center, NASA technology was applied to a commercial vacuum cleaner product line. Kirby engineers were interested in advanced operational concepts, such as particle flow behavior and vibration, critical factors to improve vacuum cleaner performance. An evaluation of the company 1994 home care system, the Kirby G4, led to the refinement of the new G5 and future models. Under the cooperative agreement, Kirby had access to Lewis' holography equipment, which added insight into how long a vacuum cleaner fan would perform, as well as advanced computer software that can simulate the flow of air through fans. The collaboration resulted in several successes including fan blade redesign and continuing dialogue on how to improve air-flow traits in various nozzle designs.

  6. Fluctuation-dissipation relation in accelerated frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ananya; Bhattacharya, Krishnakanta; Chowdhury, Chandramouli; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2018-02-01

    A uniformly accelerated (Rindler) observer will detect particles in the Minkowski vacuum, known as the Unruh effect. The spectrum is thermal and the temperature is given by that of the Killing horizon, which is proportional to the acceleration. Considering that these particles are kept in a thermal bath with this temperature, we find that the correlation function of the random force due to radiation acting on the particles, as measured by the accelerated frame, shows the fluctuation-dissipation relation. It is observed that the correlations, in both (1 +1 ) spacetime and (1 +3 ) dimensional spacetimes, are of the Brownian type. We discuss the implications of this new observation.

  7. Vacuum phonon tunneling.

    PubMed

    Altfeder, Igor; Voevodin, Andrey A; Roy, Ajit K

    2010-10-15

    Field-induced phonon tunneling, a previously unknown mechanism of interfacial thermal transport, has been revealed by ultrahigh vacuum inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using thermally broadened Fermi-Dirac distribution in the STM tip as in situ atomic-scale thermometer we found that thermal vibrations of the last tip atom are effectively transmitted to sample surface despite few angstroms wide vacuum gap. We show that phonon tunneling is driven by interfacial electric field and thermally vibrating image charges, and its rate is enhanced by surface electron-phonon interaction.

  8. Baryogenesis in false vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuta; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2017-09-01

    The null result in the LHC may indicate that the standard model is not drastically modified up to very high scales, such as the GUT/string scale. Having this in the mind, we suggest a novel leptogenesis scenario realized in the false vacuum of the Higgs field. If the Higgs field develops a large vacuum expectation value in the early universe, a lepton number violating process is enhanced, which we use for baryogenesis. To demonstrate the scenario, several models are discussed. For example, we show that the observed baryon asymmetry is successfully generated in the standard model with higher-dimensional operators.

  9. VACUUM SEALING MEANS FOR LOW VACUUM PRESSURES

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-06-12

    S>A vacuum seal is designed in which the surface tension of a thin layer of liquid metal of low vapor pressure cooperates with adjacent surfaces to preclude passages of gases across pressure differentials as low as 10/sup -8/ mm Hg. Mating contiguous surfaces composed of copper, brass, stainless steel, nickel, molybdenum, tungsten, tantalum, glass, quartz, and/or synthetic mica are disposed to provide a maximum tolerance, D, expressed by 2 gamma /P/sub 1/, where gamma is the coefflcient of the surface tension of the metal sealant selected in dynes/cm/sub 2/. Means for heating the surfaces remotely is provided where temperatures drop below about 250 deg C. A sealant consisting of an alloy of gallium, indium, and tin, among other combinations tabulated, is disposed therebetween after treating the surfaces to improve wettability, as by ultrasonic vibrations, the surfaces and sealants being selected according to the anticipated experimental conditions of use. (AEC)

  10. Continuous information flow fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosinberg, Martin Luc; Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2016-10-01

    Information plays a pivotal role in the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes with feedback. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of information fluctuations in small-scale devices and their relation with fluctuations in other thermodynamics quantities, like heat and work. Here we derive a series of fluctuation theorems for information flow and partial entropy production in a Brownian particle model of feedback cooling and extend them to arbitrary driven diffusion processes. We then analyze the long-time behavior of the feedback-cooling model in detail. Our results provide insights into the structure and origin of large deviations of information and thermodynamic quantities in autonomous Maxwell's demons.

  11. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  12. Inexpensive high vacuum feedthroughs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, S.; Post, D.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the use of rigid coaxial cable in the construction of high vacuum coaxial and coaxial push-pull rotary motion feedthroughs. This type of feedthroughs is shown to be extremely cheap and simple to make and modify. It can be used for moderately high voltages and provides a continuous, well shielded, low-noise feedthrough cable in any desired configuration.

  13. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Veklenko, B. A.

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  14. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  15. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  16. Fully Quantum Fluctuation Theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åberg, Johan

    2018-02-01

    Systems that are driven out of thermal equilibrium typically dissipate random quantities of energy on microscopic scales. Crooks fluctuation theorem relates the distribution of these random work costs to the corresponding distribution for the reverse process. By an analysis that explicitly incorporates the energy reservoir that donates the energy and the control system that implements the dynamic, we obtain a quantum generalization of Crooks theorem that not only includes the energy changes in the reservoir but also the full description of its evolution, including coherences. Moreover, this approach opens up the possibility for generalizations of the concept of fluctuation relations. Here, we introduce "conditional" fluctuation relations that are applicable to nonequilibrium systems, as well as approximate fluctuation relations that allow for the analysis of autonomous evolution generated by global time-independent Hamiltonians. We furthermore extend these notions to Markovian master equations, implicitly modeling the influence of the heat bath.

  17. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  18. Optimal Operation of a Josephson Parametric Amplifier for Vacuum Squeezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malnou, M.; Palken, D. A.; Vale, Leila R.; Hilton, Gene C.; Lehnert, K. W.

    2018-04-01

    A Josephson parametric amplifier (JPA) can create squeezed states of microwave light, lowering the noise associated with certain quantum measurements. We experimentally study how the JPA's pump influences the phase-sensitive amplification and deamplification of a coherent tone's amplitude when that amplitude is commensurate with vacuum fluctuations. We predict and demonstrate that, by operating the JPA with a single current pump whose power is greater than the value that maximizes gain, the amplifier distortion is reduced and, consequently, squeezing is improved. Optimizing the singly pumped JPA's operation in this fashion, we directly observe 3.87 ±0.03 dB of vacuum squeezing over a bandwidth of 30 MHz.

  19. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  20. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  1. Sonoluminescence Explained by the Standpoint of Coherent Quantum Vacuum Dynamics and its Prospects for Energy Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxmilian Caligiuri, Luigi; Musha, Takaaki

    Sonoluminescence, or its more frequently studied version known as Single Bubble Sonoluminescence, consisting in the emission of light by a collapsing bubble in water under ultrasounds, represents one of the most challenging and interesting phenomenon in theoretical physics. In fact, despite its relatively easy reproducibility in a simple laboratory, its understanding within the commonly accepted picture of condensed matter remained so far unsatisfactory. On the other hand, the possibility to control the physical process involved in sonoluminescence, representing a sort of nuclear fusion on small scale, could open unthinkable prospects of free energy production from water. Different explanations has been proposed during the past years considering, in various way, the photoemission to be related to electromagnetic Zero Point Field energy dynamics, by considering the bubble surface as a Casimir force boundary. More recently a model invoking Cherenkov radiation emission from superluminal photons generated in quantum vacuum has been successfully proposed. In this paper it will be shown that the same results can be more generally explained and quantitative obtained within a QED coherent dynamics of quantum vacuum, according to which the electromagnetic energy of the emitted photons would be related to the latent heat involved in the phase transition from water's vapor to liquid phase during the bubble collapse. The proposed approach could also suggest an explanation of a possible mechanism of generation of faster than light (FTL) photons required to start Cherenkov radiation as well as possible applications to energy production from quantum vacuum.

  2. New approach to statistical description of fluctuating particle fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Saenko, V. V.

    2009-01-15

    The probability density functions (PDFs) of the increments of fluctuating particle fluxes are investigated. It is found that the PDFs have heavy power-law tails decreasing as x{sup -{alpha}-1} at x {yields} {infinity}. This makes it possible to describe these PDFs in terms of fractionally stable distributions (FSDs) q(x; {alpha}, {beta}, {theta}, {lambda}). The parameters {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, and {lambda} were estimated statistically using as an example the time samples of fluctuating particle fluxes measured in the edge plasma of the L-2M stellarator. Two series of fluctuating fluxes measured before and after boronization of the vacuum chamber were processed. It ismore » shown that the increments of fluctuating fluxes are well described by DSDs. The effect of boronization on the parameters of FSDs is analyzed. An algorithm for statistically estimating the FSD parameters and a procedure for processing experimental data are described.« less

  3. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1993-11-23

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm. 6 figures.

  4. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  5. Edison's vacuum technology patents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waits, Robert K.

    2003-07-01

    During 1879 Thomas Edison's Menlo Park, New Jersey laboratory developed the means to evacuate glass lamp globes to less than a mTorr in 20 min and in mid-1880 began production of carbon-filament incandescent lamps. Among Edison's nearly 1100 U.S. patents are five for vacuum pump improvements, and at least eight others that are vacuum-related; all applied for between 1880 and 1886. Inspired by an 1878 article by De La Rue and Müller [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 169, 155 (1878)] on studies of glow discharges, Edison devised a combination pump using the Geissler pump as a rough pump and the Sprengel pump for continuous exhaustion. Edison's patents described means to control the mercury flow and automate the delivery of the mercury to banks of up to a hundred pumps. Other patents described various means to remove residual gases during lamp processing.

  6. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  7. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  8. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  10. Integrated structure vacuum tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

  11. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  12. Quantum Prisoners' Dilemma in Fluctuating Massless Scalar Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming

    2017-12-01

    Quantum systems are easily affected by external environment. In this paper, we investigate the influences of external massless scalar field to quantum Prisoners' Dilemma (QPD) game. We firstly derive the master equation that describes the system evolution with initial maximally entangled state. Then, we discuss the effects of a fluctuating massless scalar field on the game's properties such as payoff, Nash equilibrium, and symmetry. We find that for different game strategies, vacuum fluctuation has different effects on payoff. Nash equilibrium is broken but the symmetry of the game is not violated.

  13. Gravitational vacuum energy in our recently accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bludman, Sidney

    2009-04-01

    We review current observations of the homogeneous cosmological expansion which, because they measure only kinematic variables, cannot determine the dynamics driving the recent accelerated expansion. The minimal fit to the data, the flat ACDM model, consisting of cold dark matter and a cosmological constant, interprets 4? geometrically as a classical spacetime curvature constant of nature, avoiding any reference to quantum vacuum energy. (The observed Uehling and Casimir effects measure forces due to QED vacuum polarization, but not any quantum material vacuum energies.) An Extended Anthropic Principle, that Dark Energy and Dark Gravity be indistinguishable, selects out flat ACDM. Prospective cosmic shear and galaxy clustering observations of the growth of fluctuations are intended to test whether the 'dark energy' driving the recent cosmological acceleration is static or moderately dynamic. Even if dynamic, observational differences between an additional negative-pressure material component within general relativity (Dark Energy) and low-curvature modifications of general relativity (Dark Gravity) will be extremely small.

  14. The emergence of gravity as a retro-causal post-inflation macro-quantum-coherent holographic vacuum Higgs-Goldstone field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfatti, Jack; Levit, Creon

    2009-06-01

    We present a model for the origin of gravity, dark energy and dark matter: Dark energy and dark matter are residual pre-inflation false vacuum random zero point energy (w = - 1) of large-scale negative, and short-scale positive pressure, respectively, corresponding to the "zero point" (incoherent) component of a superfluid (supersolid) ground state. Gravity, in contrast, arises from the 2nd order topological defects in the post-inflation virtual "condensate" (coherent) component. We predict, as a consequence, that the LHC will never detect exotic real on-mass-shell particles that can explain dark matter ΩMDM approx 0.23. We also point out that the future holographic dark energy de Sitter horizon is a total absorber (in the sense of retro-causal Wheeler-Feynman action-at-a-distance electrodynamics) because it is an infinite redshift surface for static detectors. Therefore, the advanced Hawking-Unruh thermal radiation from the future de Sitter horizon is a candidate for the negative pressure dark vacuum energy.

  15. GRADFLEX: Fluctuations in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailati, A.; Cerbino, R.; Mazzoni, S.; Giglio, M.; Nikolaenko, G.; Cannell, D. S.; Meyer, W. V.; Smart, A. E.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of experimental investigations of gradient driven fluctuations induced in a liquid mixture with a concentration gradient and in a single-component fluid with a temperature gradient. We also describe the experimental apparatus being developed to carry out similar measurement under microgravity conditions.

  16. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger…

  17. The vacuum platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes GridPP’s Vacuum Platform for managing virtual machines (VMs), which has been used to run production workloads for WLCG and other HEP experiments. The platform provides a uniform interface between VMs and the sites they run at, whether the site is organised as an Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud system such as OpenStack, or an Infrastructure-as-a-Client system such as Vac. The paper describes our experience in using this platform, in developing and operating VM lifecycle managers Vac and Vcycle, and in interacting with VMs provided by LHCb, ATLAS, ALICE, CMS, and the GridPP DIRAC service to run production workloads.

  18. Milking performance evaluation and factors affecting milking claw vacuum levels with flow simulator.

    PubMed

    Enokidani, Masafumi; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Shinozuka, Yasunori; Watanabe, Aiko

    2017-08-01

    Milking performance of milking machines that matches the production capability of dairy cows is important in reducing the risk of mastitis, particularly in high-producing cows. This study used a simulated milking device to examine the milking performance of the milking system of 73 dairy farms and to analyze the factors affecting claw vacuum. Mean claw vacuum and range of fluctuation of claw vacuum (claw vacuum range) were measured at three different flow rates: 5.7, 7.6 and 8.7 kg/min. At the highest flow rate, only 16 farms (21.9%) met both standards of mean claw vacuum ≥35 kPa and claw vacuum range ≤ 7 kPa, showing that milking systems currently have poor milking performance. The factors affecting mean claw vacuum were claw type, milk-meter and vacuum shut-off device; the factor affecting claw vacuum range was claw type. Examination of the milking performance of the milking system using a simulated milking device allows an examination of the performance that can cope with high producing cows, indicating the possibility of reducing the risk of mastitis caused by inappropriate claw vacuum. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10-23 Hz-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  20. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10 -23 Hz -1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  1. Accelerator Vacuum Protection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, Pradip; Kothari, Ashok; Archunan, M.; Joshi, Rajan

    2012-11-01

    A new and elaborate automatic vacuum protection system using fast acting valve has been installed to avoid accidental venting of accelerator from experimental chamber side. To cover all the beam lines and to reduce the system cost, it has been installed at a common point from where all the seven beam lines originate. The signals are obtained by placing fast response pressure sensing gauges (HV SENSOR) near all the experimental stations. The closing time of the fast valve is 10 milli-second. The fast closing system protects only one vacuum line at a time. At IUAC, we have seven beam lines so one sensor was placed in each of the beam lines near experimental chamber and a multiplexer was incorporated into the fast closing system. At the time of experiment, the sensor of the active beam line is selected through the multiplexer and the Fast closing valve is interlocked with the selected sensor. As soon as the pressure sensor senses the pressure rise beyond a selected pressure, the signal is transferred and the fast valve closes within 10 to 12 millisecond.

  2. MOLECULAR VACUUM PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Eckberg, E.E.

    1960-09-27

    A multiple molecular vacuum pump capable of producing a vacuum of the order of 10/sup -9/ mm Hg is described. The pump comprises a casing of an aggregate of paired and matched cylindrical plates, a recessed portion on one face of each plate concentrically positioned formed by a radially extending wall and matching the similarly recessed portion of its twin plate of that pair of plates and for all paired and matched plates; a plurality of grooves formed in the radially extending walls of each and all recesses progressing in a spiral manner from their respective starting points out at the periphery of the recess inwardly to the central area; a plurality of rotors rotatably mounted to closely occupy the spaces as presented by the paired and matched recesses between all paired plates; a hollowed drive-shaft perforated at points adjacent to the termini of all spiral grooves; inlet ports at the starting points of all grooves and through all plates at common points to each respectively; and a common outlet passage presented by the hollow portion of the perforated hollowed drive-shaft of the molecular pump. (AEC)

  3. Vacuum vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

  4. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  5. Physics of fashion fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donangelo, R.; Hansen, A.; Sneppen, K.; Souza, S. R.

    2000-12-01

    We consider a market where many agents trade different types of products with each other. We model development of collective modes in this market, and quantify these by fluctuations that scale with time with a Hurst exponent of about 0.7. We demonstrate that individual products in the model occasionally become globally accepted means of exchange, and simultaneously become very actively traded. Thus collective features similar to money spontaneously emerge, without any a priori reason.

  6. THERMOCOUPLE VACUUM GAUGE

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.W.

    1954-08-01

    A protector device is described for use in controlling the pressure within a cyclotron. In particular, an electrical circuit functions to actuate a vacuum pump when a predetermined low pressure is reached and disconnect the pump when the pressure increases abcve a certain value. The principal feature of the control circuit lies in the use of a voltage divider network at the input to a relay control tube comprising two parallel, adjustable resistances wherein one resistor is switched into the circuit when the relay connects the pump to a power source. With this arrangement the relay is energized at one input level received from a sensing element within the cyclotron chamber and is de-energized when a second input level, representing the higher pressure limit, is reached.

  7. Vacuum Powder Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Working, Dennis C.

    1991-01-01

    Method developed to provide uniform impregnation of bundles of carbon-fiber tow with low-solubility, high-melt-flow polymer powder materials to produce composite prepregs. Vacuum powder injector expands bundle of fiber tow, applies polymer to it, then compresses bundle to hold powder. System provides for control of amount of polymer on bundle. Crystallinity of polymer maintained by controlled melt on takeup system. All powder entrapped, and most collected for reuse. Process provides inexpensive and efficient method for making composite materials. Allows for coating of any bundle of fine fibers with powders. Shows high potential for making prepregs of improved materials and for preparation of high-temperature, high-modulus, reinforced thermoplastics.

  8. ULTRA HIGH VACUUM VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Fry, W.A.

    1962-05-29

    A valve for high vacuum applications such as the CStellarator where chamber pressures as low as 2 x 10/sup -10/ mm Hg are necessary is designed with a line-of-sight path through the valve for visual inspection of the contents of reactants in such chambers. The valve comprises a turnable resilient metal ball having an aperture therethrough, means for selectively turning the ball to rotate the axis of its line-of-sight path, and soft, deformable opposing orifices that are movable relatively toward said ball to seal with opposite ball surfaces upon said movement of said axis of said line-of-sight path. The valve also includes a bellows seal connected between said orifices and internal actuating means that eliminates the requirement for gasketed turnable valve closing stems. (AEC)

  9. Brownian Motion with Active Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2011-06-01

    We study the effect of different types of fluctuation on the motion of self-propelled particles in two spatial dimensions. We distinguish between passive and active fluctuations. Passive fluctuations (e.g., thermal fluctuations) are independent of the orientation of the particle. In contrast, active ones point parallel or perpendicular to the time dependent orientation of the particle. We derive analytical expressions for the speed and velocity probability density for a generic model of active Brownian particles, which yields an increased probability of low speeds in the presence of active fluctuations in comparison to the case of purely passive fluctuations. As a consequence, we predict sharply peaked Cartesian velocity probability densities at the origin. Finally, we show that such a behavior may also occur in non-Gaussian active fluctuations and discuss briefly correlations of the fluctuating stochastic forces.

  10. Entangled scalar and tensor fluctuations during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Hael; Vardanyan, Tereza

    2016-11-29

    We show how the choice of an inflationary state that entangles scalar and tensor fluctuations affects the angular two-point correlation functions of the T, E, and B modes of the cosmic microwave background. The propagators for a state starting with some general quadratic entanglement are solved exactly, leading to predictions for the primordial scalar-scalar, tensor-tensor, and scalar-tensor power spectra. These power spectra are expressed in terms of general functions that describe the entangling structure of the initial state relative to the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum. We illustrate how such a state would modify the angular correlations in the CMB with amore » simple example where the initial state is a small perturbation away from the Bunch-Davies state. Because the state breaks some of the rotational symmetries, the angular power spectra no longer need be strictly diagonal.« less

  11. The origin of density fluctuations in the 'new inflationary universe'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmological mysteries which are not explained by the Big Bang hypothesis but may be approached by a revamped inflationary universe model are discussed. Attention is focused on the isotropy, the large-scale homogeneity, small-scale inhomogeneity, the oldness/flatness of the universe, and the baryon asymmetry. The universe is assumed to start in the lowest energy state, be initially dominated by false vacuum energy, enter a de Sitter phase, and then cross a barrier which is followed by the formation of fluctuation regions that lead to structure. The scalar fields (perturbation regions) experience quantum fluctuations which produce spontaneous symmetry breaking on a large scale. The scalar field value would need to be much greater than the expansion rate during the de Sitter epoch. A supersymmetric (flat) potential which satisfies the requirement, yields fluctuations of the right magnitude, and allows inflation to occur is described.

  12. Constraints on stable equilibria with fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces.

    PubMed

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten

    2010-08-13

    We examine whether fluctuation-induced forces can lead to stable levitation. First, we analyze a collection of classical objects at finite temperature that contain fixed and mobile charges and show that any arrangement in space is unstable to small perturbations in position. This extends Earnshaw's theorem for electrostatics by including thermal fluctuations of internal charges. Quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are responsible for Casimir or van der Waals interactions. Neglecting permeabilities, we find that any equilibrium position of items subject to such forces is also unstable if the permittivities of all objects are higher or lower than that of the enveloping medium, the former being the generic case for ordinary materials in vacuum.

  13. Breather cloth for vacuum curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Finely-woven nylon cloth that has been treated with Teflon improves vacuum adhesive bonding of coatings to substrates. Cloth is placed over coating; entire assembly, including substrate, coating, and cloth, is placed in plastic vacuum bag for curing. Cloth allows coating to "breathe" when bag is evacuated. Applications include bonding film coatings to solar concentrators and collectors.

  14. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  15. Multipurpose Vacuum Induction Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Kulkarni, Deepak; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-11-01

    Multipurpose vacuum processing systems are cost effective; occupy less space, multiple functional under one roof and user friendly. A multipurpose vacuum induction system was designed, fabricated and installed in a record time of 6 months time at NFTDC Hyderabad. It was designed to function as a) vacuum induction melting/refining of oxygen free electronic copper/pure metals, b) vacuum induction melting furnace for ferrous materials c) vacuum induction melting for non ferrous materials d) large vacuum heat treatment chamber by resistance heating (by detachable coil and hot zone) e) bottom discharge vacuum induction melting system for non ferrous materials f) Induction heat treatment system and g) directional solidification /investment casting. It contains provision for future capacity addition. The attachments require to manufacture multiple shaped castings and continuous rod casting can be added whenever need arises. Present capacity is decided on the requirement for 10years of development path; presently it has 1.2 ton liquid copper handling capacity. It is equipped with provision for capacity addition up to 2 ton liquid copper handling capacity in future. Provision is made to carry out the capacity addition in easy steps quickly. For easy operational maintenance and troubleshooting, design was made in easily detachable sections. High vacuum system is also is detachable, independent and easily movable which is first of its kind in the country. Detailed design parameters, advantages and development history are presented in this paper.

  16. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  17. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  18. Zero-point angular momentum of supersymmetric Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-zu; Xu, Qiang

    2000-10-01

    The quantum behavior of supersymmetric Penning trap, specially the superpartner of its angular momentum, is investigated in the formulation of multi-dimensional semiunitary transformation of supersymmetric quantum mechanics. In the limit case of vanishing kinetic energy it is found that its lowest angular momentum is 3ℏ/2, which provides a possibility of directly checking the idea of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and thus suggests a possible experimental verification about this prediction.

  19. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometric study of cyclohexene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Cao, Maoqi; Wei, Bin; Ding, Mengmeng; Shan, Xiaobin; Liu, Fuyi; Sheng, Liusi

    2016-02-01

    In this work, photoionization and dissociation of cyclohexene have been studied by means of coupling a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with the tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The adiabatic ionization energy of cyclohexene as well as the appearance energies of its fragment ions C6 H9 (+) , C6 H7 (+) , C5 H7 (+) , C5 H5 (+) , C4 H6 (+) , C4 H5 (+) , C3 H5 (+) and C3 H3 (+) were derived from the onset of the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves. The optimized structures for the transition states and intermediates on the ground state potential energy surfaces related to photodissociation of cyclohexene were characterized at the ωB97X-D/6-31+g(d,p) level. The coupled cluster method, CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ, was employed to calculate the corresponding energies with the zero-point energy corrections by the ωB97X-D/6-31+g(d,p) approach. Combining experimental and theoretical results, possible formation pathways of the fragment ions were proposed and discussed in detail. The retro-Cope rearrangement was found to play a crucial role in the formation of C4 H6 (+) , C4 H5 (+) and C3 H5 (+) . Intramolecular hydrogen migrations were observed as dominant processes in most of the fragmentation pathways of cyclohexene. The present research provides a clear picture of the photoionization and dissociation processes of cyclohexene in the 8- to 15.5-eV photon energy region. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Gambling with Superconducting Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltyn, Marek; Zgirski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    Josephson junctions and superconducting nanowires, when biased close to superconducting critical current, can switch to a nonzero voltage state by thermal or quantum fluctuations. The process is understood as an escape of a Brownian particle from a metastable state. Since this effect is fully stochastic, we propose to use it for generating random numbers. We present protocol for obtaining random numbers and test the experimentally harvested data for their fidelity. Our work is prerequisite for using the Josephson junction as a tool for stochastic (probabilistic) determination of physical parameters such as magnetic flux, temperature, and current.

  1. Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David

    2005-01-01

    We have worked with our collaborators at the University of Milan (Professor Marzio Giglio and his group-supported by ASI) to define the science required to measure gradient driven fluctuations in the microgravity environment. Such a study would provide an accurate test of the extent to which the theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics can be used to predict the properties of fluids maintained in a stressed, non-equilibrium state. As mentioned above, the results should also provide direct visual insight into the behavior of a variety of fluid systems containing gradients or interfaces, when placed in the microgravity environment. With support from the current grant, we have identified three key systems for detailed investigation. These three systems are: 1) A single-component fluid to be studied in the presence of a temperature gradient; 2) A mixture of two organic liquids to be studied both in the presence of a temperature gradient, which induces a steady-state concentration gradient, and with the temperature gradient removed, but while the concentration gradient is dying by means of diffusion; 3) Various pairs of liquids undergoing free diffusion, including a proteidbuffer solution and pairs of mixtures having different concentrations, to allow us to vary the differences in fluid properties in a controlled manner.

  2. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  4. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  5. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  6. Gravitational vacuum condensate stars.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Pawel O; Mottola, Emil

    2004-06-29

    A new final state of gravitational collapse is proposed. By extending the concept of Bose-Einstein condensation to gravitational systems, a cold, dark, compact object with an interior de Sitter condensate p(v) = -rho(v) and an exterior Schwarzschild geometry of arbitrary total mass M is constructed. These regions are separated by a shell with a small but finite proper thickness l of fluid with equation of state p = +rho, replacing both the Schwarzschild and de Sitter classical horizons. The new solution has no singularities, no event horizons, and a global time. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by the standard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell, which is of the order k(B)lMc/Planck's over 2 pi, instead of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula, S(BH) = 4 pi k(B)GM(2)/Planck's over 2 pi c. Hence, unlike black holes, the new solution is thermodynamically stable and has no information paradox.

  7. Fluctuation Relations for Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Akimov, Alexei; Chernyak, Vladimir; Chertkov, Michael

    2011-03-01

    We consider a non-equilibrium statistical system on a graph or a network. Identical particles are injected, interact with each other, traverse, and leave the graph in a stochastic manner described in terms of Poisson rates, possibly strongly dependent on time and instantaneous occupation numbers at the nodes of the graph. We show that the system demonstrates a profound statistical symmetry, leading to new Fluctuation Relations that originate from the supersymmetry and the principle of the geometric universality of currents rather than from the relations between probabilities of forward and reverse trajectories. NSF/ECCS-0925618, NSF/CHE-0808910 and DOE at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  8. Two-mode bosonic quantum metrology with number fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Matsuoka, Koji; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    We search for the optimal quantum pure states of identical bosonic particles for applications in quantum metrology, in particular, in the estimation of a single parameter for the generic two-mode interferometric setup. We consider the general case in which the total number of particles is fluctuating around an average N with variance Δ N2 . By recasting the problem in the framework of classical probability, we clarify the maximal accuracy attainable and show that it is always larger than the one reachable with a fixed number of particles (i.e., Δ N =0 ). In particular, for larger fluctuations, the error in the estimation diminishes proportionally to 1 /Δ N , below the Heisenberg-like scaling 1 /N . We also clarify the best input state, which is a quasi-NOON state for a generic setup and, for some special cases, a two-mode Schrödinger-cat state with a vacuum component. In addition, we search for the best state within the class of pure Gaussian states with a given average N , which is revealed to be a product state (with no entanglement) with a squeezed vacuum in one mode and the vacuum in the other.

  9. Fluctuations in email size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoshitsugu; Musashi, Yasuo

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain fluctuations in email size. We have previously investigated the long-term correlations between email send requests and data flow in the system log of the primary staff email server at a university campus, finding that email size frequency follows a power-law distribution with two inflection points, and that the power-law property weakens the correlation of the data flow. However, the mechanism underlying this fluctuation is not completely understood. We collected new log data from both staff and students over six academic years and analyzed the frequency distribution thereof, focusing on the type of content contained in the emails. Furthermore, we obtained permission to collect "Content-Type" log data from the email headers. We therefore collected the staff log data from May 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015, creating two subdistributions. In this paper, we propose a model to explain these subdistributions, which follow log-normal-like distributions. In the log-normal-like model, email senders -consciously or unconsciously- regulate the size of new email sentences according to a normal distribution. The fitting of the model is acceptable for these subdistributions, and the model demonstrates power-law properties for large email sizes. An analysis of the length of new email sentences would be required for further discussion of our model; however, to protect user privacy at the participating organization, we left this analysis for future work. This study provides new knowledge on the properties of email sizes, and our model is expected to contribute to the decision on whether to establish upper size limits in the design of email services.

  10. Electric Propulsion Laboratory Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-06-21

    Engineer Paul Reader and his colleagues take environmental measurements during testing of a 20-inch diameter ion engine in a vacuum tank at the Electric Propulsion Laboratory (EPL). Researchers at the Lewis Research Center were investigating the use of a permanent-magnet circuit to create the magnetic field required power electron bombardment ion engines. Typical ion engines use a solenoid coil to create this magnetic field. It was thought that the substitution of a permanent magnet would create a comparable magnetic field with a lower weight. Testing of the magnet system in the EPL vacuum tanks revealed no significant operational problems. Reader found the weight of the two systems was similar, but that the thruster’s efficiency increased with the magnet. The EPL contained a series of large vacuum tanks that could be used to simulate conditions in space. Large vacuum pumps reduced the internal air pressure, and a refrigeration system created the cryogenic temperatures found in space.

  11. Plasma fluctuations as Markovian noise.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Hazeltine, R D; Gentle, K W

    2007-12-01

    Noise theory is used to study the correlations of stationary Markovian fluctuations that are homogeneous and isotropic in space. The relaxation of the fluctuations is modeled by the diffusion equation. The spatial correlations of random fluctuations are modeled by the exponential decay. Based on these models, the temporal correlations of random fluctuations, such as the correlation function and the power spectrum, are calculated. We find that the diffusion process can give rise to the decay of the correlation function and a broad frequency spectrum of random fluctuations. We also find that the transport coefficients may be estimated by the correlation length and the correlation time. The theoretical results are compared with the observed plasma density fluctuations from the tokamak and helimak experiments.

  12. Fluctuating Thermodynamics for Biological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Sihyun

    Because biomolecular processes are largely under thermodynamic control, dynamic extension of thermodynamics is necessary to uncover the mechanisms and driving factors of fluctuating processes. The fluctuating thermodynamics technology presented in this talk offers a practical means for the thermodynamic characterization of conformational dynamics in biomolecules. The use of fluctuating thermodynamics has the potential to provide a comprehensive picture of fluctuating phenomena in diverse biological processes. Through the application of fluctuating thermodynamics, we provide a thermodynamic perspective on the misfolding and aggregation of the various proteins associated with human diseases. In this talk, I will present the detailed concepts and applications of the fluctuating thermodynamics technology for elucidating biological processes. This work was supported by Samsung Science and Technology Foundation under Project Number SSTF-BA1401-13.

  13. Vacuum energy from noncommutative models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignemi, S.; Samsarov, A.

    2018-04-01

    The vacuum energy is computed for a scalar field in a noncommutative background in several models of noncommutative geometry. One may expect that the noncommutativity introduces a natural cutoff on the ultraviolet divergences of field theory. Our calculations show however that this depends on the particular model considered: in some cases the divergences are suppressed and the vacuum energy is only logarithmically divergent, in other cases they are stronger than in the commutative theory.

  14. Potential uses of vacuum bubbles in noise and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, Istvan L.

    1989-01-01

    Vacuum bubbles are new acoustic elements which are dynamically more compliant than the gas volume they replace, but which are statically robust. They are made of a thin metallic shell with vacuum in their cavity. Consequently, they pose no danger in terms of contamination or fire hazard. The potential of the vacuum bubble concept for noise and vibration control was assessed with special emphases on spacecraft and aircraft applications. The following potential uses were identified: (1) as a cladding, to reduce sound radiation of vibrating surfaces and the sound excitation of structures, (2) as a screen, to reflect or absorb an incident sound wave, and (3) as a liner, to increase low frequency sound transmission loss of double walls and to increase the low frequency sound attenuation of muffler baffles. It was found that geometric and material parameters must be controlled to a very high accuracy to obtain optimal performance and that performance is highly sensitive to variations in static pressure. Consequently, it was concluded that vacuum bubbles have more potential in spacecraft applications where static pressure is controlled more than in aircraft applications where large fluctuations in static pressure are common.

  15. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, J.

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -11/ Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing andmore » designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components. (LEW)« less

  16. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  17. Postinflationary vacuum instability and Higgs-inflaton couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Karčiauskas, Mindaugas; Lebedev, Oleg

    2016-11-11

    The Higgs-inflaton coupling plays an important role in the Higgs field dynamics in the early Universe. Even a tiny coupling generated at loop level can have a dramatic effect on the fate of the electroweak vacuum. Such Higgs-inflaton interaction is present both at the trilinear and quartic levels in realistic reheating models. In this work, we examine the Higgs dynamics during the preheating epoch, focusing on the effects of the parametric and tachyonic resonances. We use lattice simulations and other numerical tools in our studies. We find that the resonances can induce large fluctuations of the Higgs field which destabilizemore » the electroweak vacuum. Our considerations thus provide an upper bound on quartic and trilinear interactions between the Higgs and the inflaton. We conclude that there exists a favorable range of the couplings within which the Higgs field is stabilized during both inflation and preheating epochs.« less

  18. Theory of slightly fluctuating ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Shapochkina, I. V.; Lin, S. H.; Trakhtenberg, L. I.

    2017-04-01

    We consider a Brownian particle moving in a slightly fluctuating potential. Using the perturbation theory on small potential fluctuations, we derive a general analytical expression for the average particle velocity valid for both flashing and rocking ratchets with arbitrary, stochastic or deterministic, time dependence of potential energy fluctuations. The result is determined by the Green's function for diffusion in the time-independent part of the potential and by the features of correlations in the fluctuating part of the potential. The generality of the result allows describing complex ratchet systems with competing characteristic times; these systems are exemplified by the model of a Brownian photomotor with relaxation processes of finite duration.

  19. Quantum fluctuations of a fullerene cage modulate its internal magnetic environment.

    PubMed

    Kawatsu, Tsutomu; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2018-01-17

    To investigate the effect of quantum fluctuations on the magnetic environment inside a C 60 fullerene cage, we have calculated the nuclear magnetic shielding constant of protons in H 2 @C 60 and HD@C 60 systems by on-the-fly ab initio path integral simulation, including both thermal and nuclear quantum effects. The most dominant upfield from an isolated hydrogen molecule occurs due to the diamagnetic current of the C 60 cage, which is partly cancelled by the paramagnetic current, where the paramagnetic contribution is enlarged by the zero-point vibrational fluctuation of the C 60 carbon backbone structure via a widely distributed HOMO-LUMO gap. This quantum modulation mechanism of the nuclear magnetic shielding constant is newly proposed. Because this quantum effect is independent of the difference between H 2 and HD, the H 2 /HD isotope shift occurs in spite of the C 60 cage. The nuclear magnetic constants computed for H 2 @C 60 and HD@C 60 are 32.047 and 32.081 ppm, respectively, which are in reasonable agreement with the corresponding values of 32.19 and 32.23 ppm estimated from the experimental values of the chemical shifts.

  20. Vacuum-Gauge Connection For Shipping Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    External connector enables measurement of vacuum in stored part. Remote-readout connector added to shipping container and connected to thermo-couple vacuum gauge in vacuum-insulated cryogenic line packed in container. Enables monitoring of condition of vacuum without opening container.

  1. Fluctuating Selection in the Moran

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Antony M.; Lehman, Clarence; Yi, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to classical population genetics theory, experiments demonstrate that fluctuating selection can protect a haploid polymorphism in the absence of frequency dependent effects on fitness. Using forward simulations with the Moran model, we confirm our analytical results showing that a fluctuating selection regime, with a mean selection coefficient of zero, promotes polymorphism. We find that increases in heterozygosity over neutral expectations are especially pronounced when fluctuations are rapid, mutation is weak, the population size is large, and the variance in selection is big. Lowering the frequency of fluctuations makes selection more directional, and so heterozygosity declines. We also show that fluctuating selection raises dn/ds ratios for polymorphism, not only by sweeping selected alleles into the population, but also by purging the neutral variants of selected alleles as they undergo repeated bottlenecks. Our analysis shows that randomly fluctuating selection increases the rate of evolution by increasing the probability of fixation. The impact is especially noticeable when the selection is strong and mutation is weak. Simulations show the increase in the rate of evolution declines as the rate of new mutations entering the population increases, an effect attributable to clonal interference. Intriguingly, fluctuating selection increases the dn/ds ratios for divergence more than for polymorphism, a pattern commonly seen in comparative genomics. Our model, which extends the classical neutral model of molecular evolution by incorporating random fluctuations in selection, accommodates a wide variety of observations, both neutral and selected, with economy. PMID:28108586

  2. Fluctuating Selection in the Moran.

    PubMed

    Dean, Antony M; Lehman, Clarence; Yi, Xiao

    2017-03-01

    Contrary to classical population genetics theory, experiments demonstrate that fluctuating selection can protect a haploid polymorphism in the absence of frequency dependent effects on fitness. Using forward simulations with the Moran model, we confirm our analytical results showing that a fluctuating selection regime, with a mean selection coefficient of zero, promotes polymorphism. We find that increases in heterozygosity over neutral expectations are especially pronounced when fluctuations are rapid, mutation is weak, the population size is large, and the variance in selection is big. Lowering the frequency of fluctuations makes selection more directional, and so heterozygosity declines. We also show that fluctuating selection raises d n / d s ratios for polymorphism, not only by sweeping selected alleles into the population, but also by purging the neutral variants of selected alleles as they undergo repeated bottlenecks. Our analysis shows that randomly fluctuating selection increases the rate of evolution by increasing the probability of fixation. The impact is especially noticeable when the selection is strong and mutation is weak. Simulations show the increase in the rate of evolution declines as the rate of new mutations entering the population increases, an effect attributable to clonal interference. Intriguingly, fluctuating selection increases the d n / d s ratios for divergence more than for polymorphism, a pattern commonly seen in comparative genomics. Our model, which extends the classical neutral model of molecular evolution by incorporating random fluctuations in selection, accommodates a wide variety of observations, both neutral and selected, with economy. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  4. VACUUM TRAP AND VALVE COMBINATION

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.; Levenson, L.

    1963-02-19

    This patent relates to a vacuum trap and valve combination suitable for use in large ultra-high vacuum systems. The vacuum trap is a chamber having an inlet and outlet opening which may be made to communicate with a chamber to be evacuated and a diffusion pump, respectively. A valve is designed to hermeticaliy seal with inlet opening and, when opened, block the line-of- sight'' between the inlet and outlet openings, while allowing a large flow path between the opened vaive and the side walls of the trap. The interior of the trap and the side of the valve facing the inlet opening are covered with an impurity absorbent, such as Zeolite or activated aluminum. Besides the advantage of combining two components of a vacuum system into one, the present invention removes the need for a baffle between the pump and the chamber to be evacuated. In one use of a specific embodiment of this invention, the transmission probability was 45 and the partial pressure of the pump fluid vapor in the vacuum chamber was at least 100 times lower than its vapor pressure. (AEC)

  5. Carbon nanotubes based vacuum gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyk, N. N.; Il'in, O. I.; Il'ina, M. V.; Fedotov, A. A.; Klimin, V. S.; Ageev, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    We have created an ionization type Vacuum gauge with sensor element based on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Obtained asymmetrical current-voltage characteristics at different voltage polarity on the electrode with the CNTs. It was found that when applying a negative potential on an electrode with the CNTs, the current in the gap is higher than at a positive potential. In the pressure range of 1 ÷ 103 Torr vacuum gauge sensitivity was 6 mV/Torr (at a current of 4.5·10-5 A) and in the range of 10-5 ÷ 1 Torr was 10 mV/Torr (at a current of 1.3·10-5 A). It is shown that the energy efficiency of vacuum gauge can be increased in the case where electrode with CNT operates as an emitter of electrons.

  6. Microscale Digital Vacuum Electronic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Mojarradi, Mohammed M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement microscale digital vacuum electronic gates. In one embodiment, a microscale digital vacuum electronic gate includes: a microscale field emitter that can emit electrons and that is a microscale cathode; and a microscale anode; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are disposed within at least a partial vacuum; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are separated by a gap; and where the potential difference between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is controllable such that the flow of electrons between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is thereby controllable; where when the microscale anode receives a flow of electrons, a first logic state is defined; and where when the microscale anode does not receive a flow of electrons, a second logic state is defined.

  7. Loop corrections to primordial fluctuations from inflationary phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Peng; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2018-05-01

    We investigate loop corrections to the primordial fluctuations in the single-field inflationary paradigm from spectator fields that experience a smooth transition of their vacuum expectation values. We show that when the phase transition involves a classical evolution effectively driven by a negative mass term from the potential, important corrections to the curvature perturbation can be generated by field perturbations that are frozen outside the horizon by the time of the phase transition, yet the correction to tensor perturbation is naturally suppressed by the spatial derivative couplings between spectator fields and graviton. At one-loop level, the dominant channel for the production of primordial fluctuations comes from a pair-scattering of free spectator fields that decay into the curvature perturbations, and this decay process is only sensitive to field masses comparable to the Hubble scale of inflation.

  8. Simultaneous dense coding affected by fluctuating massless scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming; Ye, Yiyong; Luo, Darong

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the simultaneous dense coding (SDC) protocol affected by fluctuating massless scalar field. The noisy model of SDC protocol is constructed and the master equation that governs the SDC evolution is deduced. The success probabilities of SDC protocol are discussed for different locking operators under the influence of vacuum fluctuations. We find that the joint success probability is independent of the locking operators, but other success probabilities are not. For quantum Fourier transform and double controlled-NOT operators, the success probabilities drop with increasing two-atom distance, but SWAP operator is not. Unlike the SWAP operator, the success probabilities of Bob and Charlie are different. For different noisy interval values, different locking operators have different robustness to noise.

  9. Do metric fluctuations affect the Higgs dynamics during inflation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkanen, Tommi; Nurmi, Sami; Rajantie, Arttu

    2017-12-01

    We show that the dynamics of the Higgs field during inflation is not affected by metric fluctuations if the Higgs is an energetically subdominant light spectator. For Standard Model parameters we find that couplings between Higgs and metric fluctuations are suppressed by Script O(10‑7). They are negligible compared to both pure Higgs terms in the effective potential and the unavoidable non-minimal Higgs coupling to background scalar curvature. The question of the electroweak vacuum instability during high energy scale inflation can therefore be studied consistently using the Jordan frame action in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker metric, where the Higgs-curvature coupling enters as an effective mass contribution. Similar results apply for other light spectator scalar fields during inflation.

  10. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  11. Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

  12. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2001-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  13. Generalized noise terms for the quantized fluctuational electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Mikko; Häyrynen, Teppo; Tulkki, Jukka; Oksanen, Jani

    2017-03-01

    The quantization of optical fields in vacuum has been known for decades, but extending the field quantization to lossy and dispersive media in nonequilibrium conditions has proven to be complicated due to the position-dependent electric and magnetic responses of the media. In fact, consistent position-dependent quantum models for the photon number in resonant structures have only been formulated very recently and only for dielectric media. Here we present a general position-dependent quantized fluctuational electrodynamics (QFED) formalism that extends the consistent field quantization to describe the photon number also in the presence of magnetic field-matter interactions. It is shown that the magnetic fluctuations provide an additional degree of freedom in media where the magnetic coupling to the field is prominent. Therefore, the field quantization requires an additional independent noise operator that is commuting with the conventional bosonic noise operator describing the polarization current fluctuations in dielectric media. In addition to allowing the detailed description of field fluctuations, our methods provide practical tools for modeling optical energy transfer and the formation of thermal balance in general dielectric and magnetic nanodevices. We use QFED to investigate the magnetic properties of microcavity systems to demonstrate an example geometry in which it is possible to probe fields arising from the electric and magnetic source terms. We show that, as a consequence of the magnetic Purcell effect, the tuning of the position of an emitter layer placed inside a vacuum cavity can make the emissivity of a magnetic emitter to exceed the emissivity of a corresponding electric emitter.

  14. Anomalous influence of spin fluctuations on the heat capacity and entropy in a strongly correlated helical ferromagnet MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povzner, A. A.; Volkov, A. G.; Nogovitsyna, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of spin fluctuations on the thermodynamic properties of a helical ferromagnet MnSi has been investigated in the framework of the Hubbard model with the electronic spectrum determined from the first-principles LDA + U + SO calculation, which is extended taking into account the Hund coupling and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya antisymmetric exchange. It has been shown that the ground state of the magnetic material is characterized by large zero-point fluctuations, which disappear at the temperature T* (< T c is the temperature of the magnetic phase transition). In this case, the entropy abruptly increases, and a lambdashaped anomaly appears in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity at constant volume ( C V ( T)). In the temperature range T* < T < T c , thermal fluctuations lead to the disappearance of the inhomogeneous magnetization. The competition between the increase in the entropy due to paramagnon excitations and its decrease as a result of the reduction in the amplitude of local magnetic moments, under the conditions of strong Hund exchange, is responsible for in the appearance of a "shoulder" in the dependence C V ( T)).

  15. Fluctuation theorem: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek Mansour, M.; Baras, F.

    2017-10-01

    Fluctuation theorem for entropy production is revisited in the framework of stochastic processes. The applicability of the fluctuation theorem to physico-chemical systems and the resulting stochastic thermodynamics were analyzed. Some unexpected limitations are highlighted in the context of jump Markov processes. We have shown that these limitations handicap the ability of the resulting stochastic thermodynamics to correctly describe the state of non-equilibrium systems in terms of the thermodynamic properties of individual processes therein. Finally, we considered the case of diffusion processes and proved that the fluctuation theorem for entropy production becomes irrelevant at the stationary state in the case of one variable systems.

  16. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valvis, S. I.; Papagiannis, P.; Papadopoulos, A.; Hizanidis, K.; Glytsis, E.; Bairaktaris, F.; Zisis, A.; Tigelis, I.; Ram, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    On their way to the core of a tokamak plasma, radio frequency (RF) waves, excited in the vacuum region, have to propagate through a variety of density fluctuations in the edge region. These fluctuations include coherent structures, like blobs that can be field aligned or not, as well as turbulent and filamentary structures. We have been studying the effect of fluctuations on RF propagation using both theoretical (analytical) and computational models. The theoretical results are being compared with those obtained by two different numerical codes ``a Finite Difference Frequency Domain code and the commercial COMSOL package. For plasmas with arbitrary distribution of coherent and turbulent fluctuations, we have formulated an effective dielectric permittivity of the edge plasma. This permittivity tensor is then used in numerical simulations to study the effect of multi-scale turbulence on RF waves. We not only consider plane waves but also Gaussian beams in the electron cyclotron and lower hybrid range of frequencies. The analytical theory and results from simulations on the propagation of RF waves will be presented. Supported in part by the Hellenic National Programme on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion associated with the EUROfusion Consortium and by DoE Grant DE-FG02-91ER-54109.

  17. Poynting vector, energy densities, and pressure of collective transverse electromagnetic fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic calculation of the electromagnetic properties (Poynting vector, electromagnetic energy, and pressure) of the collective transverse fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas with velocity-anisotropic plasma particle distributions functions is presented. Time-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly damped wave-like fluctuations and space-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly propagating and aperiodic fluctuations are calculated. For aperiodic fluctuations, the Poynting vector as well as the sum of the space-averaged electric and magnetic field energy densities vanish. However, aperiodic fluctuations possess a positive pressure given by its magnetic energy density. This finite pressure density pa of aperiodic fluctuations has important consequences for the dynamics of cosmic unmagnetized plasmas such as the intergalactic medium after reionization. Adopting the standard cosmological evolution model, we show that this additional pressure changes the expansion law of the universe leading to further deceleration. Negative vacuum pressure counterbalances this deceleration to an accelerating universe provided that the negative vacuum pressure is greater than 1.5pa, which we estimate to be of the order 2.1 . 10-16 dyn cm-2.

  18. Cleaner Vacuum-Bag Curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, J. M.; Penn, B. G.; Ledbetter, Frank E., III; Daniels, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Improvement upon recommended procedures saves time and expense. Autoclave molding in vacuum bag cleaner if adhesive-backed covering placed around caul plate as well as on mold plate. Covering easy to remove after curing and leaves caul plate free of resin deposits.

  19. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  20. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  1. Plates for vacuum thermal fusion

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for effectively bonding arbitrary size or shape substrates. The process incorporates vacuum pull down techniques to ensure uniform surface contact during the bonding process. The essence of the process for bonding substrates, such as glass, plastic, or alloys, etc., which have a moderate melting point with a gradual softening point curve, involves the application of an active vacuum source to evacuate interstices between the substrates while at the same time providing a positive force to hold the parts to be bonded in contact. This enables increasing the temperature of the bonding process to ensure that the softening point has been reached and small void areas are filled and come in contact with the opposing substrate. The process is most effective where at least one of the two plates or substrates contain channels or grooves that can be used to apply vacuum between the plates or substrates during the thermal bonding cycle. Also, it is beneficial to provide a vacuum groove or channel near the perimeter of the plates or substrates to ensure bonding of the perimeter of the plates or substrates and reduce the unbonded regions inside the interior region of the plates or substrates.

  2. Vacuum Flushing of Sewer Solids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vacuum sewer and tank cleaning (flushing) technology removes sewer solids from urban drainage systems, such as storage tanks and pipes. This technology is both effective and inexpensive. In addition, it can be considered a true green technology. It operates under atmospheri...

  3. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  4. Degassing procedure for ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations based on diffusion coefficients and degassing rates for stainless-steel vacuum chambers indicate that baking at lower temperatures for longer periods give lower ultimate pressures than rapid baking at high temperatures. Process could reduce pressures in chambers for particle accelerators, fusion reactors, material research, and other applications.

  5. Derivation of the cut-off length from the quantum quadratic enhancement of a mass in vacuum energy constant Lambda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika; Sato, Hikaru

    2018-04-01

    Ultraviolet self-interaction energies in field theory sometimes contain meaningful physical quantities. The self-energies in such as classical electrodynamics are usually subtracted from the rest mass. For the consistent treatment of energies as sources of curvature in the Einstein field equations, this study includes these subtracted self-energies into vacuum energy expressed by the constant Lambda (used in such as Lambda-CDM). In this study, the self-energies in electrodynamics and macroscopic classical Einstein field equations are examined, using the formalisms with the ultraviolet cut-off scheme. One of the cut-off formalisms is the field theory in terms of the step-function-type basis functions, developed by the present authors. The other is a continuum theory of a fundamental particle with the same cut-off length. Based on the effectiveness of the continuum theory with the cut-off length shown in the examination, the dominant self-energy is the quadratic term of the Higgs field at a quantum level (classical self-energies are reduced to logarithmic forms by quantum corrections). The cut-off length is then determined to reproduce today's tiny value of Lambda for vacuum energy. Additionally, a field with nonperiodic vanishing boundary conditions is treated, showing that the field has no zero-point energy.

  6. Insects in fluctuating thermal environments.

    PubMed

    Colinet, Hervé; Sinclair, Brent J; Vernon, Philippe; Renault, David

    2015-01-07

    All climate change scenarios predict an increase in both global temperature means and the magnitude of seasonal and diel temperature variation. The nonlinear relationship between temperature and biological processes means that fluctuating temperatures lead to physiological, life history, and ecological consequences for ectothermic insects that diverge from those predicted from constant temperatures. Fluctuating temperatures that remain within permissive temperature ranges generally improve performance. By contrast, those which extend to stressful temperatures may have either positive impacts, allowing repair of damage accrued during exposure to thermal extremes, or negative impacts from cumulative damage during successive exposures. We discuss the mechanisms underlying these differing effects. Fluctuating temperatures could be used to enhance or weaken insects in applied rearing programs, and any prediction of insect performance in the field-including models of climate change or population performance-must account for the effect of fluctuating temperatures.

  7. Phase Fluctuation Enhanced Adaptive Processor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-04

    Serial Number Filing Date Inventor 09/498.348 4 February 2000 Ronald A. Wagstaff Jackson A. Mobbs NOTICE The above identified patent...phase angle, as describedin Phase Variations in a Fluctuation Based Processor, Ronald A. Wagstaff and Jacob George, SPIE Vol. 2751, April 1996, pages...16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Docket No.: N.C. 79,518 PATENT APPT TPATT™ Inventor’s Name: Wagstaff , et al APPLICATION 1 have medium phase fluctuations

  8. Medical management of motor fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Richard B

    2008-08-01

    Given the magnitude of the problem of motor fluctuations in patients who have Parkinson's disease treated with levodopa, a significant effort has been expended by physicians, researchers, and pharmaceutical manufacturers over the years to find effective treatments. This article briefly reviews the medical options for managing motor fluctuations that are in common use in the United States or that are expected to be available soon.

  9. Principle of minimal work fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and manipulating work fluctuations in microscale and nanoscale systems are of both fundamental and practical interest. For example, in considering the Jarzynski equality 〈e-βW〉=e-βΔF, a change in the fluctuations of e-βW may impact how rapidly the statistical average of e-βW converges towards the theoretical value e-βΔF, where W is the work, β is the inverse temperature, and ΔF is the free energy difference between two equilibrium states. Motivated by our previous study aiming at the suppression of work fluctuations, here we obtain a principle of minimal work fluctuations. In brief, adiabatic processes as treated in quantum and classical adiabatic theorems yield the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. In the quantum domain, if a system initially prepared at thermal equilibrium is subjected to a work protocol but isolated from a bath during the time evolution, then a quantum adiabatic process without energy level crossing (or an assisted adiabatic process reaching the same final states as in a conventional adiabatic process) yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW, where W is the quantum work defined by two energy measurements at the beginning and at the end of the process. In the classical domain where the classical work protocol is realizable by an adiabatic process, then the classical adiabatic process also yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. Numerical experiments based on a Landau-Zener process confirm our theory in the quantum domain, and our theory in the classical domain explains our previous numerical findings regarding the suppression of classical work fluctuations [G. Y. Xiao and J. B. Gong, Phys. Rev. E 90, 052132 (2014)].

  10. Vacuum polarization and Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, Shohreh

    Quantum gravity is one of the interesting fields in contemporary physics which is still in progress. The purpose of quantum gravity is to present a quantum description for spacetime at 10-33cm or find the 'quanta' of gravitational interaction.. At present, the most viable theory to describe gravitational interaction is general relativity which is a classical theory. Semi-classical quantum gravity or quantum field theory in curved spacetime is an approximation to a full quantum theory of gravity. This approximation considers gravity as a classical field and matter fields are quantized. One interesting phenomena in semi-classical quantum gravity is Hawking radiation. Hawking radiation was derived by Stephen Hawking as a thermal emission of particles from the black hole horizon. In this thesis we obtain the spectrum of Hawking radiation using a new method. Vacuum is defined as the possible lowest energy state which is filled with pairs of virtual particle-antiparticle. Vacuum polarization is a consequence of pair creation in the presence of an external field such as an electromagnetic or gravitational field. Vacuum polarization in the vicinity of a black hole horizon can be interpreted as the cause of the emission from black holes known as Hawking radiation. In this thesis we try to obtain the Hawking spectrum using this approach. We re-examine vacuum polarization of a scalar field in a quasi-local volume that includes the horizon. We study the interaction of a scalar field with the background gravitational field of the black hole in the desired quasi-local region. The quasi-local volume is a hollow cylinder enclosed by two membranes, one inside the horizon and one outside the horizon. The net rate of particle emission can be obtained as the difference of the vacuum polarization from the outer boundary and inner boundary of the cylinder. Thus we found a new method to derive Hawking emission which is unitary and well defined in quantum field theory.

  11. Controlling the net charge on a nanoparticle optically levitated in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmer, Martin; Luszcz, Karol; Ferreiro, Sandra; Jain, Vijay; Hebestreit, Erik; Novotny, Lukas

    2017-06-01

    Optically levitated nanoparticles in vacuum are a promising model system to test physics beyond our current understanding of quantum mechanics. Such experimental tests require extreme control over the dephasing of the levitated particle's motion. If the nanoparticle carries a finite net charge, it experiences a random Coulomb force due to fluctuating electric fields. This dephasing mechanism can be fully excluded by discharging the levitated particle. Here, we present a simple and reliable technique to control the charge on an optically levitated nanoparticle in vacuum. Our method is based on the generation of charges in an electric discharge and does not require additional optics or mechanics close to the optical trap.

  12. Breakdown-Resistant RF Connectors for Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caro, Edward R.; Bonazza, Walter J.

    1987-01-01

    Resilient inserts compensate for insulation shrinkage. Coaxial-cable connector for radio-frequency (RF) energy resists electrical breakdown in vacuum. Used on RF equipment in vacuum chambers as well as in spaceborne radar and communication gear.

  13. 14 CFR 25.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1433 Vacuum systems. There... discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery temperature of the air becomes unsafe. [Doc. No...

  14. Vacuum casting of thick polymeric films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1979-01-01

    Bubble formation and layering, which often plague vacuum-evaporated films, are prevented by properly regulating process parameters. Vacuum casting may be applicable to forming thick films of other polymer/solvent solutions.

  15. Switching Circuit for Shop Vacuum System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    No internal connections to machine tools required. Switching circuit controls vacuum system draws debris from grinders and sanders in machine shop. Circuit automatically turns on vacuum system whenever at least one sander or grinder operating. Debris safely removed, even when operator neglects to turn on vacuum system manually. Pickup coils sense alternating magnetic fields just outside operating machines. Signal from any coil or combination of coils causes vacuum system to be turned on.

  16. 14 CFR 29.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 29.1433 Section 29.1433... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1433 Vacuum systems. (a.... (b) Each vacuum air system line and fitting on the discharge side of the pump that might contain...

  17. [The evolution of vacuum extraction in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Nikolov, A

    2010-01-01

    Vacuum extraction is one of the methods for assisted vaginal delivery. In this article the evolution of vacuum extraction in obstetrics is been discussed. Historical facts and data from the invention up to state-of-the-art vacuum systems in modern obstetrics are presented.

  18. 14 CFR 29.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1433 Vacuum systems. (a... the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery temperature of the air becomes unsafe. (b) Each vacuum air system line and fitting on the discharge side of the pump that might contain...

  19. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake systems. (a) Vacuum brake assist unit integrity. The vacuum brake assist unit shall demonstrate integrity as... maintained on the pedal. (1) Inspection procedure. Stop the engine and apply service brake several times to...

  20. In-vacuum exposure shutter

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry A.; Replogle, William C.; Bernardez, Luis J.

    2004-06-01

    An in-vacuum radiation exposure shutter device can be employed to regulate a large footprint light beam. The shutter device includes (a) a source of radiation that generates an energy beam; (2) a shutter that includes (i) a frame defining an aperture toward which the energy beam is directed and (ii) a plurality of blades that are secured to the frame; and (3) device that rotates the shutter to cause the plurality of blades to intercept or allow the energy beam to travel through the aperture. Each blade can have a substantially planar surface and the plurality of blades are secured to the frame such that the planar surfaces of the plurality of blades are substantially parallel to each other. The shutter device is particularly suited for operation in a vacuum environment and can achieve shuttering speeds from about 0.1 second to 0.001 second or faster.

  1. Electric Field Fluctuations in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Dayton; Limmer, David; Chandler, David

    2013-03-01

    Charge transfer in solution, such as autoionization and ion pair dissociation in water, is governed by rare electric field fluctuations of the solvent. Knowing the statistics of such fluctuations can help explain the dynamics of these rare events. Trajectories short enough to be tractable by computer simulation are virtually certain not to sample the large fluctuations that promote rare events. Here, we employ importance sampling techniques with classical molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water to study statistics of electric field fluctuations far from their means. We find that the distributions of electric fields located on individual water molecules are not in general gaussian. Near the mean this non-gaussianity is due to the internal charge distribution of the water molecule. Further from the mean, however, there is a previously unreported Bjerrum-like defect that stabilizes certain large fluctuations out of equilibrium. As expected, differences in electric fields acting between molecules are gaussian to a remarkable degree. By studying these differences, though, we are able to determine what configurations result not only in large electric fields, but also in electric fields with long spatial correlations that may be needed to promote charge separation.

  2. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  3. Compound Walls For Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed compound-wall configuration enables construction of large high-vacuum chambers without having to use thick layers of expensive material to obtain necessary strength. Walls enclose chambers more than 1 m in diameter and several kilometers long. Compound wall made of strong outer layer of structural-steel culvert pipe welded to thin layer of high-quality, low-outgassing stainless steel.

  4. Improved Aerogel Vacuum Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    An improved design concept for aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels calls for multiple layers of aerogel sandwiched between layers of aluminized Mylar (or equivalent) poly(ethylene terephthalate), as depicted in the figure. This concept is applicable to both the rigid (brick) form and the flexible (blanket) form of aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels. Heretofore, the fabrication of a typical aerogel vacuum insulating panel has involved encapsulation of a single layer of aerogel in poly(ethylene terephthalate) and pumping of gases out of the aerogel-filled volume. A multilayer panel according to the improved design concept is fabricated in basically the same way: Multiple alternating layers of aerogel and aluminized poly(ethylene terephthalate) are assembled, then encapsulated in an outer layer of poly(ethylene terephthalate), and then the volume containing the multilayer structure is evacuated as in the single-layer case. The multilayer concept makes it possible to reduce effective thermal conductivity of a panel below that of a comparable single-layer panel, without adding weight or incurring other performance penalties. Implementation of the multilayer concept is simple and relatively inexpensive, involving only a few additional fabrication steps to assemble the multiple layers prior to evacuation. For a panel of the blanket type, the multilayer concept, affords the additional advantage of reduced stiffness.

  5. Cosmic vacuum and galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.

    2006-04-01

    It is demonstrated that the protogalactic perturbations must enter the nonlinear regime before the red shift z≈ 1; otherwise they would be destroyed by the antigravity of the vacuum dark energy at the subsequent epoch of the vacuum domination. At the zrrV={M/[(8π/3)ρV]}1/3, where M is the mass of a given over-density and ρV is the vacuum density. The criterion provides a new relation between the largest mass condensations and their spatial scales. All the real large-scale systems follow this relation definitely. It is also shown that a simple formula is possible for the key quantity in the theory of galaxy formation, namely the initial amplitude of the perturbation of the gravitational potential in the protogalactic structures. The amplitude is time independent and given in terms of the Friedmann integrals, which are genuine physical characteristics of the cosmic energies. The results suggest that there is a strong correspondence between the global design of the Universe as a whole and the cosmic structures of various masses and spatial scales.

  6. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  7. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena.

    PubMed

    Maroney, O J E

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  8. Continuous description of fluctuating eccentricities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Broniowski, Wojciech; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2014-11-01

    We consider the initial energy density in the transverse plane of a high energy nucleus-nucleus collision as a random field ρ (x), whose probability distribution P [ ρ ], the only ingredient of the present description, encodes all possible sources of fluctuations. We argue that it is a local Gaussian, with a short-range 2-point function, and that the fluctuations relevant for the calculation of the eccentricities that drive the anisotropic flow have small relative amplitudes. In fact, this 2-point function, together with the average density, contains all the information needed to calculate the eccentricities and their variances, and we derive general model independent expressions for these quantities. The short wavelength fluctuations are shown to play no role in these calculations, except for a renormalization of the short range part of the 2-point function. As an illustration, we compare to a commonly used model of independent sources, and recover the known results of this model.

  9. High throughput vacuum chemical epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, L. M.; Malocsay, E.; Sundaram, V.; Baird, R. W.; Mao, B. Y.; Lee, G. Y.

    1990-10-01

    We have developed a vacuum chemical epitaxy (VCE) reactor which avoids the use of arsine and allows multiple wafers to be coated at one time. Our vacuum chemical epitaxy reactor closely resembles a molecular beam epitaxy system in that wafers are loaded into a stainless steel vacuum chamber through a load chamber. Also as in MBE, arsenic vapors are supplied as reactant by heating solid arsenic sources thereby avoiding the use of arsine. However, in our VCE reactor, a large number of wafers are coated at one time in a vacuum system by the substitution of Group III alkyl sources for the elemental metal sources traditionally used in MBE. Higher wafer throughput results because in VCE, the metal-alkyl sources for Ga, Al, and dopants can be mixed at room temperature and distributed uniformly though a large area injector to multiple substrates as a homogeneous array of mixed element molecular beams. The VCE reactor that we have built and that we shall describe here uniformly deposits films on 7 inch diameter substrate platters. Each platter contains seven two inch or three 3 inch diameter wafers. The load chamber contains up to nine platters. The vacuum chamber is equipped with two VCE growth zones and two arsenic ovens, one per growth zone. Finally, each oven has a 1 kg arsenic capacity. As of this writing, mirror smooth GaAs films have been grown at up to 4 μm/h growth rate on multiple wafers with good thickness uniformity. The background doping is p-type with a typical hole concentration and mobility of 1 × 10 16/cm 3 and 350 cm 2/V·s. This background doping level is low enough for the fabrication of MESFETs, solar cells, and photocathodes as well as other types of devices. We have fabricated MESFET devices using VCE-grown epi wafers with peak extrinsic transconductance as high as 210 mS/mm for a threshold voltage of - 3 V and a 0.6 μm gate length. We have also recently grown AlGaAs epi layers with up to 80% aluminum using TEAl as the aluminum alkyl source. The Al

  10. Compactified Vacuum in Ten Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurmser, Daniel

    1987-09-01

    Since the 1920's, theories which unify gravity with the other fundamental forces have called for more than the four observed dimensions of space-time. According to such a theory, the vacuum consists of flat four-dimensional space-time described by the Minkowski metric M ^4 and a "compactified" space B. The dimensions of B are small, and the space can only be observed at distance scales smaller than the present experimental limit. These theories have had serious difficulties. The equations of gravity severely restrict the possible choices for the space B. The allowed spaces are complicated and difficult to study. The vacuum is furthermore unstable in the sense that a small perturbation causes the compactified dimensions to expand indefinitely. There is an addition a semi-classical argument which implies that the compactified vacuum be annihilated by virtual black holes. It follows that a universe with compactified extra dimensions could not have survived to the present. These results were derived by applying the equations of general relativity to spaces of more than four dimensions. The form of these equations was assumed to be unchanged by an increase in the number of dimensions. Recently, it has been proposed that gravity in more than four dimensions may involve terms of higher order in the curvature as well as the linear terms present in ordinary general relativity. I illustrate the effect of such terms by considering the example B = S^6 where S ^6 is the six-dimensional sphere. Only when the extra terms are included is this choice of the compactified space allowed. I explore the effect of a small perturbation on such a vacuum. The ten-dimensional spherically symmetric potential is examined, and I determine conditions under which the formation of virtual black holes is forbidden. The example M^4 times S^6 is still plagued by the semi -classical instability, but this result does not hold in general. The requirement that virtual black holes be forbidden provides a

  11. Entropic Repulsion Between Fluctuating Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janke, W.

    The statistical mechanics of fluctuating surfaces plays an important role in a variety of physical systems, ranging from biological membranes to world sheets of strings in theories of fundamental interactions. In many applications it is a good approximation to assume that the surfaces possess no tension. Their statistical properties are then governed by curvature energies only, which allow for gigantic out-of-plane undulations. These fluctuations are the “entropic” origin of long-range repulsive forces in layered surface systems. Theoretical estimates of these forces for simple model surfaces are surveyed and compared with recent Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Quantum fluctuations increase the self-diffusive motion of para-hydrogen in narrow carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Gauden, Piotr A; Terzyk, Artur P; Furmaniak, Sylwester

    2011-05-28

    Quantum fluctuations significantly increase the self-diffusive motion of para-hydrogen adsorbed in narrow carbon nanotubes at 30 K comparing to its classical counterpart. Rigorous Feynman's path integral calculations reveal that self-diffusive motion of para-hydrogen in a narrow (6,6) carbon nanotube at 30 K and pore densities below ∼29 mmol cm(-3) is one order of magnitude faster than the classical counterpart. We find that the zero-point energy and tunneling significantly smoothed out the free energy landscape of para-hydrogen molecules adsorbed in a narrow (6,6) carbon nanotube. This promotes a delocalization of the confined para-hydrogen at 30 K (i.e., population of unclassical paths due to quantum effects). Contrary the self-diffusive motion of classical para-hydrogen molecules in a narrow (6,6) carbon nanotube at 30 K is very slow. This is because classical para-hydrogen molecules undergo highly correlated movement when their collision diameter approached the carbon nanotube size (i.e., anomalous diffusion in quasi-one dimensional pores). On the basis of current results we predict that narrow single-walled carbon nanotubes are promising nanoporous molecular sieves being able to separate para-hydrogen molecules from mixtures of classical particles at cryogenic temperatures. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  13. Role of quantum fluctuations in structural dynamics of liquids of light molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Agapov, A.; Novikov, V. N.; Kisliuk, A.; ...

    2016-12-16

    A possible role of quantum effects, such as tunneling and zero-point energy, in the structural dynamics of supercooled liquids is studied by dielectric spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that the liquids, bulk 3-methyl pentane and confined normal and deuterated water, have low glass transition temperature and unusually low for their class of materials steepness of the temperature dependence of structural relaxation (fragility). Although we do not find any signs of tunneling in the structural relaxation of these liquids, their unusually low fragility can be well described by the influence of the quantum fluctuations. Confined water presents an especially interesting case inmore » comparison to the earlier data on bulk low-density amorphous and vapor deposited water. Confined water exhibits a much weaker isotope effect than bulk water, although the effect is still significant. Here, we show that it can be ascribed to the change of the energy barrier for relaxation due to a decrease in the zeropoint energy upon D/H substitution. We observed a difference in the behavior of confined and bulk water demonstrates high sensitivity of quantum effects to the barrier heights and structure of water. Moreover, these results demonstrate that extrapolation of confined water properties to the bulk water behavior is questionable.« less

  14. Apparent Endless Extraction of Energy from the Vacuum by Cyclic Manipulation of Casimir Cavity Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1983, Ambjorn and Wolfram produced plots of the energy density of the quantum mechanical electromagnetic fluctuations in a volume of vacuum bounded by perfectly conducting walls in the shape of a rectangular cavity of dimensions a(1), a(2), and a(3), as a function of the ratios a(2)/a(1) and a(3)/a(1). Portions of these plots are double-valued, in that they allow rectangular cavities with the same, value of a(2)/a(1), but different values of a(3)/a(1), to have the saint total energy. Using these double-valued regions of the plots, I show that it is possible to define a "Casimir Vacuum Energy Extraction Cycle" which apparently would allow for the endless extraction of energy from the vacuum in the Casimir cavity by cyclic manipulation of the Casimir cavity dimensions.

  15. Pilot Wave Model for Impulsive Thrust from RF Test Device Measured in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Harold; Lawrence, James; Sylvester, Andre; Vera, Jerry; Chap, Andrew; George, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    A physics model is developed in detail and its place in the taxonomy of ideas about the nature of the quantum vacuum is discussed. The experimental results from the recently completed vacuum test campaign evaluating the impulsive thrust performance of a tapered RF test article excited in the TM212 mode at 1,937 megahertz (MHz) are summarized. The empirical data from this campaign is compared to the predictions from the physics model tools. A discussion is provided to further elaborate on the possible implications of the proposed model if it is physically valid. Based on the correlation of analysis prediction with experimental data collected, it is proposed that the observed anomalous thrust forces are real, not due to experimental error, and are due to a new type of interaction with quantum vacuum fluctuations.

  16. Sustained Strong Fluctuations in a Nonlinear Chain at Acoustic Vacuum: Beyond Equilibrium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-21

    studied [5]. Fermi, Pasta , and Ulam (FPU) in collaboration with Tsingou [6] probed the dynamics of such a system in the presence of linear and nonlinear...D. Vitali and P. Grigolini, ibid. 39, 1486 (1989). [6] E. Fermi, J. Pasta , and S. Ulam, Los Alamos National Laboratory Report No. LA-1940, 1955

  17. Running vacuum cosmological models: linear scalar perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perico, E. L. D.; Tamayo, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    In cosmology, phenomenologically motivated expressions for running vacuum are commonly parameterized as linear functions typically denoted by Λ(H2) or Λ(R). Such models assume an equation of state for the vacuum given by bar PΛ = - bar rhoΛ, relating its background pressure bar PΛ with its mean energy density bar rhoΛ ≡ Λ/8πG. This equation of state suggests that the vacuum dynamics is due to an interaction with the matter content of the universe. Most of the approaches studying the observational impact of these models only consider the interaction between the vacuum and the transient dominant matter component of the universe. We extend such models by assuming that the running vacuum is the sum of independent contributions, namely bar rhoΛ = Σibar rhoΛi. Each Λ i vacuum component is associated and interacting with one of the i matter components in both the background and perturbation levels. We derive the evolution equations for the linear scalar vacuum and matter perturbations in those two scenarios, and identify the running vacuum imprints on the cosmic microwave background anisotropies as well as on the matter power spectrum. In the Λ(H2) scenario the vacuum is coupled with every matter component, whereas the Λ(R) description only leads to a coupling between vacuum and non-relativistic matter, producing different effects on the matter power spectrum.

  18. Wet/Dry Vacuum Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimers, Harold; Andampour, Jay; Kunitser, Craig; Thomas, Ike

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum cleaner collects and retains dust, wet debris, and liquids. Designed for housekeeping on Space Station Freedom, it functions equally well in normal Earth Gravity or in microgravity. Generates acoustic noise at comfortably low levels and includes circuitry that reduces electromagnetic interference to other electronic equipment. Draws materials into bag made of hydrophobic sheet with layers of hydrophilic super-absorbing pads at downstream end material. Hydrophilic material can gel many times its own weight of liquid. Blower also provides secondary airflow to cool its electronic components.

  19. Ultra high vacuum seal arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Flaherty, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Arrangement for demountably sealing two concentric metallic tubes in an ultra high vacuum system which facilitates remote actuation. A tubular seal includes integral spaced lips which circumferentially engage the metallic tubes. The lips plastically deform the metallic tubes by mechanical forces resulting from a martensite to austenite transformation of the tubular seal upon application of a predetermined temperature. The sealing force is released upon application of another temperature which causes a transformation from the stronger austenite to the weaker martensite. Use of a dual acting sealing ring and driving ring circumferentially contacting the sealing ring is particularly applicable to sealing larger diameter concentric metallic members.

  20. Vacuum Decay via Lorentzian Wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, J. L.

    We speculate about the space-time description due to the presence of Lorentzian worm-holes (handles in space-time joining two distant regions or other universes) in quantum gravity. The semiclassical rate of production of these Lorentzian wormholes in Reissner-Nordström space-times is calculated as a result of the spontaneous decay of vacuum due to a real tunneling configuration. In the magnetic case it only depends on the value of the field theoretical fine structure constant. We predict that the quantum probability corresponding to the nucleation of such geodesically complete space-times should be acutally negligible in our physical Universe.

  1. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  2. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  3. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  4. GRID BLACKOUT IN VACUUM TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, K.D.

    1961-06-01

    A method which gives quantitative data is presented which allows for characterization of the grid blackout effect and is applicable to calculation of circuit degradation. Data are presented for several tube types which show developed bias and discharge time constants as a function of pulse input conditions. Blackout can seriously change the performance of any vacuum tube circuit which utilizes the tube in positive grid operation. The effects on CW oscillators and UHF mixers are discussed. An equivalent circuit which simulates some portions of the blackout phenomenon is presented and used to calculate effective capacitance and resistance associated with themore » grid surface. (auth)« less

  5. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Brannon, P.J.; Cowgill, D.F.

    1990-12-18

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable. 10 figs.

  6. Fluctuating Hydrodynamics Confronts the Rapidity Dependence of Transverse Momentum Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokharel, Rajendra; Gavin, Sean; Moschelli, George

    2012-10-01

    Interest in the development of the theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics is growing [1]. Early efforts suggested that viscous diffusion broadens the rapidity dependence of transverse momentum correlations [2]. That work stimulated an experimental analysis by STAR [3]. We attack this new data along two fronts. First, we compute STAR's fluctuation observable using the NeXSPheRIO code, which combines fluctuating initial conditions from a string fragmentation model with deterministic viscosity-free hydrodynamic evolution. We find that NeXSPheRIO produces a longitudinal narrowing, in contrast to the data. Second, we study the hydrodynamic evolution using second order causal viscous hydrodynamics including Langevin noise. We obtain a deterministic evolution equation for the transverse momentum density correlation function. We use the latest theoretical equations of state and transport coefficients to compute STAR's observable. The results are in excellent accord with the measured broadening. In addition, we predict features of the distribution that can distinguish 2nd and 1st order diffusion. [4pt] [1] J. Kapusta, B. Mueller, M. Stephanov, arXiv:1112.6405 [nucl-th].[0pt] [2] S. Gavin and M. Abdel-Aziz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 162302 (2006)[0pt] [3] H. Agakishiev et al., STAR, STAR, Phys. Lett. B704

  7. Robot design for a vacuum environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belinski, S.; Trento, W.; Imani-Shikhabadi, R.; Hackwood, S.

    1987-01-01

    The cleanliness requirements for many processing and manufacturing tasks are becoming ever stricter, resulting in a greater interest in the vacuum environment. Researchers discuss the importance of this special environment, and the development of robots which are physically and functionally suited to vacuum processing tasks. Work is in progress at the Center for robotic Systems in Microelectronics (CRSM) to provide a robot for the manufacture of a revolutionary new gyroscope in high vacuum. The need for vacuum in this and other processes is discussed as well as the requirements for a vacuum-compatible robot. Finally, researchers present details on work done at the CRSM to modify an existing clean-room compatible robot for use at high vacuum.

  8. Vacuum Attachment for XRF Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Vacuum apparatuses have been developed for increasing the range of elements that can be identified by use of x-ray fluorescent (XRF) scanners of the type mentioned in the two immediately preceding articles. As a consequence of the underlying physical principles, in the presence of air, such an XRF scanner is limited to analysis of chlorine and elements of greater atomic number. When the XRF scanner is operated in a vacuum, it extends the range of analysis to lower atomic numbers - even as far as aluminum and sodium. Hence, more elements will be available for use in XRF labeling of objects as discussed in the two preceding articles. The added benefits of the extended capabilities also have other uses for NASA. Detection of elements of low atomic number is of high interest to the aerospace community. High-strength aluminum alloys will be easily analyzed for composition. Silicon, a major contaminant in certain processes, will be detectable before the process is begun, possibly eliminating weld or adhesion problems. Exotic alloys will be evaluated for composition prior to being placed in service where lives depend on them. And in the less glamorous applications, such as bolts and fasteners, substandard products and counterfeit items will be evaluated at the receiving function and never allowed to enter the operation

  9. Vacuum Stress in Schwarzschild Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Kenneth Webster

    Vacuum stress in the conformally invariant scalar field in the region exterior to the horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole is examined. In the Hartle-Hawking vacuum state <(phi)('2)> and are calculated. Covariant point-splitting renormalization is used, as is a mode sum expression for the Hartle-Hawking propagator. It is found that <(phi)('2)> separates naturally into two parts, a part that has a simple analytic form coinciding with the approximate expression of Whiting and Page, and a small remainder. The results of our numerical evaluation of the remainder agree with, but are more accurate than, those previously given by Fawcett. We find that also separates into two terms. The first coincides with the approximate expression obtained by Page with a Gaussian approximation to the proper time Green function. The second term, composed of sums over mode functions, is evaluated numerically. It is found that the total expression is in good qualitative agreement with Page's approximation. Our results disagree with previous numerical results given by Fawcett. The error in Fawcett's calculation is explained.

  10. Advanced Photon Source accelerator ultrahigh vacuum guide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Noonan, J.

    1994-03-01

    In this document the authors summarize the following: (1) an overview of basic concepts of ultrahigh vacuum needed for the APS project, (2) a description of vacuum design and calculations for major parts of APS, including linac, linac waveguide, low energy undulator test line, positron accumulator ring (PAR), booster synchrotron ring, storage ring, and insertion devices, and (3) cleaning procedures of ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) components presently used at APS.

  11. Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    Useful design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes are discussed for application to the development of high temperature well logs. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data are presented in the appendix.

  12. Vacuum Technology Considerations For Mass Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Patrick J.; Jabour, Zeina J.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum weighing of mass artifacts eliminates the necessity of air buoyancy correction and its contribution to the measurement uncertainty. Vacuum weighing is also an important process in the experiments currently underway for the redefinition of the SI mass unit, the kilogram. Creating the optimum vacuum environment for mass metrology requires careful design and selection of construction materials, plumbing components, pumping, and pressure gauging technologies. We review the vacuum technology1 required for mass metrology and suggest procedures and hardware for successful and reproducible operation. PMID:26989593

  13. Quantum vacuum noise in physics and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Davies, P. C. W.

    2001-09-01

    The concept of the vacuum in quantum field theory is a subtle one. Vacuum states have a rich and complex set of properties that produce distinctive, though usually exceedingly small, physical effects. Quantum vacuum noise is familiar in optical and electronic devices, but in this paper I wish to consider extending the discussion to systems in which gravitation, or large accelerations, are important. This leads to the prediction of vacuum friction: The quantum vacuum can act in a manner reminiscent of a viscous fluid. One result is that rapidly changing gravitational fields can create particles from the vacuum, and in turn the backreaction on the gravitational dynamics operates like a damping force. I consider such effects in early universe cosmology and the theory of quantum black holes, including the possibility that the large-scale structure of the universe might be produced by quantum vacuum noise in an early inflationary phase. I also discuss the curious phenomenon that an observer who accelerates through a quantum vacuum perceives a bath of thermal radiation closely analogous to Hawking radiation from black holes, even though an inertial observer registers no particles. The effects predicted raise very deep and unresolved issues about the nature of quantum particles, the role of the observer, and the relationship between the quantum vacuum and the concepts of information and entropy. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.D.

    1977-01-12

    The results of investigations carried out into the availability and suitability of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of logging tools for geothermal wells are summarized. Design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes for application to the development of high temperature well logs are discussed. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data is presented in the appendix. (MHR)

  15. Detecting temperature fluctuations at equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Purushottam D

    2015-05-21

    The Gibbs and the Boltzmann definition of temperature agree only in the macroscopic limit. The ambiguity in identifying the equilibrium temperature of a finite-sized 'small' system exchanging energy with a bath is usually understood as a limitation of conventional statistical mechanics. We interpret this ambiguity as resulting from a stochastically fluctuating temperature coupled with the phase space variables giving rise to a broad temperature distribution. With this ansatz, we develop the equilibrium statistics and dynamics of small systems. Numerical evidence using an analytically tractable model shows that the effects of temperature fluctuations can be detected in the equilibrium and dynamical properties of the phase space of the small system. Our theory generalizes statistical mechanics to small systems relevant in biophysics and nanotechnology.

  16. Charge fluctuations in nanoscale capacitors.

    PubMed

    Limmer, David T; Merlet, Céline; Salanne, Mathieu; Chandler, David; Madden, Paul A; van Roij, René; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-09-06

    The fluctuations of the charge on an electrode contain information on the microscopic correlations within the adjacent fluid and their effect on the electronic properties of the interface. We investigate these fluctuations using molecular dynamics simulations in a constant-potential ensemble with histogram reweighting techniques. This approach offers, in particular, an efficient, accurate, and physically insightful route to the differential capacitance that is broadly applicable. We demonstrate these methods with three different capacitors: pure water between platinum electrodes and a pure as well as a solvent-based organic electrolyte each between graphite electrodes. The total charge distributions with the pure solvent and solvent-based electrolytes are remarkably Gaussian, while in the pure ionic liquid the total charge distribution displays distinct non-Gaussian features, suggesting significant potential-driven changes in the organization of the interfacial fluid.

  17. Charge Fluctuations in Nanoscale Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, David T.; Merlet, Céline; Salanne, Mathieu; Chandler, David; Madden, Paul A.; van Roij, René; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The fluctuations of the charge on an electrode contain information on the microscopic correlations within the adjacent fluid and their effect on the electronic properties of the interface. We investigate these fluctuations using molecular dynamics simulations in a constant-potential ensemble with histogram reweighting techniques. This approach offers, in particular, an efficient, accurate, and physically insightful route to the differential capacitance that is broadly applicable. We demonstrate these methods with three different capacitors: pure water between platinum electrodes and a pure as well as a solvent-based organic electrolyte each between graphite electrodes. The total charge distributions with the pure solvent and solvent-based electrolytes are remarkably Gaussian, while in the pure ionic liquid the total charge distribution displays distinct non-Gaussian features, suggesting significant potential-driven changes in the organization of the interfacial fluid.

  18. Electrostatic fluctuations in collisional plasmas.

    PubMed

    Rozmus, W; Brantov, A; Fortmann-Grote, C; Bychenkov, V Yu; Glenzer, S

    2017-10-01

    We present a theory of electrostatic fluctuations in two-component plasmas where electrons and ions are described by Maxwellian distribution functions at unequal temperatures. Based on the exact solution of the Landau kinetic equation, that includes electron-electron, electron-ion, and ion-ion collision integrals, the dynamic form factor, S(k[over ⃗],ω), is derived for weakly coupled plasmas. The collective plasma responses at ion-acoustic, Langmuir, and entropy mode resonances are described for arbitrary wave numbers and frequencies in the entire range of plasma collisionality. The collisionless limit of S(k[over ⃗],ω) and the strong-collision result based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and classical transport at T_{e}=T_{i} are recovered and discussed. Results of several Thomson scattering experiments in the broad range of plasma parameters are described and discussed by means of our theory for S(k[over ⃗],ω).

  19. Electrostatic fluctuations in collisional plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Rozmus, W.; Brantov, A.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; ...

    2017-10-12

    Here, we present a theory of electrostatic fluctuations in two-component plasmas where electrons and ions are described by Maxwellian distribution functions at unequal temperatures. Based on the exact solution of the Landau kinetic equation, that includes electron-electron, electron-ion, and ion-ion collision integrals, the dynamic form factor, S( →k,ω), is derived for weakly coupled plasmas. The collective plasma responses at ion-acoustic, Langmuir, and entropy mode resonances are described for arbitrary wave numbers and frequencies in the entire range of plasma collisionality. The collisionless limit of S( →k,ω) and the strong-collision result based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and classical transport at Tmore » e = T i are recovered and discussed. Results of several Thomson scattering experiments in the broad range of plasma parameters are described and discussed by means of our theory for S( →k,ω).« less

  20. Electrostatic fluctuations in collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rozmus, W.; Brantov, A.; Fortmann-Grote, C.

    Here, we present a theory of electrostatic fluctuations in two-component plasmas where electrons and ions are described by Maxwellian distribution functions at unequal temperatures. Based on the exact solution of the Landau kinetic equation, that includes electron-electron, electron-ion, and ion-ion collision integrals, the dynamic form factor, S( →k,ω), is derived for weakly coupled plasmas. The collective plasma responses at ion-acoustic, Langmuir, and entropy mode resonances are described for arbitrary wave numbers and frequencies in the entire range of plasma collisionality. The collisionless limit of S( →k,ω) and the strong-collision result based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and classical transport at Tmore » e = T i are recovered and discussed. Results of several Thomson scattering experiments in the broad range of plasma parameters are described and discussed by means of our theory for S( →k,ω).« less

  1. Maximum entropy, fluctuations and priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caticha, A.

    2001-05-01

    The method of maximum entropy (ME) is extended to address the following problem: Once one accepts that the ME distribution is to be preferred over all others, the question is to what extent are distributions with lower entropy supposed to be ruled out. Two applications are given. The first is to the theory of thermodynamic fluctuations. The formulation is exact, covariant under changes of coordinates, and allows fluctuations of both the extensive and the conjugate intensive variables. The second application is to the construction of an objective prior for Bayesian inference. The prior obtained by following the ME method to its inevitable conclusion turns out to be a special case (α=1) of what are currently known under the name of entropic priors. .

  2. Fluctuations and QCD phase structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-11-01

    Fluctuation observables are invaluable tools in relativistic heavy ion collisions to investigate primordial thermodynamics of fireballs. Active experimental measurements have been performed at RHIC and LHC. In particular, interesting experimental results were recently reported on the electric charge fluctuation at ALICE and on the higher order cumulants at STAR, which show nontrivial behaviors reflecting non-hadronic and/or non-thermal physics. We argue that more detailed understanding on these observables are needed to use them effectively in the analysis of QCD phase structure. We suggest that the measurement of various cumulants of conserved charges including baryon number and their rapidity window dependence will provide important information needed for making progress in this subject.

  3. Temporal Structure of Volatility Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengzhong; Yamasaki, Kazuko; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    Volatility fluctuations are of great importance for the study of financial markets, and the temporal structure is an essential feature of fluctuations. To explore the temporal structure, we employ a new approach based on the return interval, which is defined as the time interval between two successive volatility values that are above a given threshold. We find that the distribution of the return intervals follows a scaling law over a wide range of thresholds, and over a broad range of sampling intervals. Moreover, this scaling law is universal for stocks of different countries, for commodities, for interest rates, and for currencies. However, further and more detailed analysis of the return intervals shows some systematic deviations from the scaling law. We also demonstrate a significant memory effect in the return intervals time organization. We find that the distribution of return intervals is strongly related to the correlations in the volatility.

  4. Electrostatic fluctuations in collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Brantov, A.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Glenzer, S.

    2017-10-01

    We present a theory of electrostatic fluctuations in two-component plasmas where electrons and ions are described by Maxwellian distribution functions at unequal temperatures. Based on the exact solution of the Landau kinetic equation, that includes electron-electron, electron-ion, and ion-ion collision integrals, the dynamic form factor, S (k ⃗,ω ) , is derived for weakly coupled plasmas. The collective plasma responses at ion-acoustic, Langmuir, and entropy mode resonances are described for arbitrary wave numbers and frequencies in the entire range of plasma collisionality. The collisionless limit of S (k ⃗,ω ) and the strong-collision result based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and classical transport at Te=Ti are recovered and discussed. Results of several Thomson scattering experiments in the broad range of plasma parameters are described and discussed by means of our theory for S (k ⃗,ω ) .

  5. Fuel Temperature Fluctuations During Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitin, R. E.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-10-01

    When oil and petroleum products are stored, their temperature significantly impacts how their properties change. The paper covers the problem of determining temperature fluctuations of hydrocarbons during storage. It provides results of the authors’ investigations of the stored product temperature variations relative to the ambient temperature. Closeness and correlation coefficients between these values are given. Temperature variations equations for oil and petroleum products stored in tanks are deduced.

  6. Development of High Interruption Capability Vacuum Circuit Breaker -Technology of Vacuum Arc Control-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Kaneko, Eiji

    Vacuum circuit breakers (VCB) have been widely used for power distribution systems. Vacuum Interrupters, which are the current interruption unit, have been increased its interruption capability with the development of vacuum arc control technology by magnetic field. There are three major type electrodes: disk shaped electrodes, radial magnetic field electrodes, axial magnetic field (AMF) electrodes. In the disk shaped electrode, the vacuum arc between the electrodes is not controlled. In the AMF electrode, the vacuum arc is diffused and stabilized by an axial magnetic field, which is parallel to the arc current. In the last type of electrodes, the vacuum arc column is rotated by magnetic force generated by the current flowing in the electrodes. The interruption current and the voltage of one break VCB is increased to 100 kA, 144 kV respectively. This paper describes basic configurations and functions of VCB, vacuum arc control technology in vacuum interrupters, recent researches and applications of VCB.

  7. Facing rim cavities fluctuation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Damiano; Ribeiro, André F. P.; Fares, Ehab

    2014-06-01

    Cavity modes taking place in the rims of two opposite wheels are investigated through Lattice-Boltzmann CFD simulations. Based on previous observations carried out by the authors during the BANC-II/LAGOON landing gear aeroacoustic study, a resonance mode can take place in the volume between the wheels of a two-wheel landing gear, involving a coupling between shear-layer vortical fluctuations and acoustic modes resulting from the combination of round cavity modes and wheel-to-wheel transversal acoustic modes. As a result, side force fluctuations and tonal noise side radiation take place. A parametric study of the cavity mode properties is carried out in the present work by varying the distance between the wheels. Moreover, the effects due to the presence of the axle are investigated by removing the axle from the two-wheel assembly. The azimuthal properties of the modes are scrutinized by filtering the unsteady flow in narrow bands around the tonal frequencies and investigating the azimuthal structure of the filtered fluctuation modes. Estimation of the tone frequencies with an ad hoc proposed analytical formula confirms the observed modal properties of the filtered unsteady flow solutions. The present study constitutes a primary step in the description of facing rim cavity modes as a possible source of landing gear tonal noise.

  8. Spacetime dynamics of a Higgs vacuum instability during inflation

    DOE PAGES

    East, William E.; Kearney, John; Shakya, Bibhushan; ...

    2017-01-31

    A remarkable prediction of the Standard Model is that, in the absence of corrections lifting the energy density, the Higgs potential becomes negative at large field values. If the Higgs field samples this part of the potential during inflation, the negative energy density may locally destabilize the spacetime. Here, we use numerical simulations of the Einstein equations to study the evolution of inflation-induced Higgs fluctuations as they grow towards the true (negative-energy) minimum. Our simulations show that forming a single patch of true vacuum in our past light cone during inflation is incompatible with the existence of our Universe; themore » boundary of the true vacuum region grows outward in a causally disconnected manner from the crunching interior, which forms a black hole. We also find that these black hole horizons may be arbitrarily elongated—even forming black strings—in violation of the hoop conjecture. Furthermore, by extending the numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation to the exponentially suppressed tails of the field distribution at large field values, we derive a rigorous correlation between a future measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the scale at which the Higgs potential must receive stabilizing corrections in order for the Universe to have survived inflation until today.« less

  9. Gravitational lensing effects of vacuum strings - Exact solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. R., III

    1985-01-01

    Exact interior and exterior solutions to Einstein's field equations are derived for vacuum strings. The exterior solution for a uniform density vacuum string corresponds to a conical space while the interior solution is that of a spherical cap. For Mu equals 0-1/4 the external metric is ds-squared = -dt-squared + dr-squared + (1-4 Mu)-squared r-squared dphi-squared + dz-squared, where Mu is the mass per unit length in the string in Planck masses per Planck length. A maximum mass per unit length for a string is 6.73 x 10 to the 27th g/cm. It is shown that strings cause temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background and produce equal brightness double QSO images separated by up to several minutes of arc. Formulae for lensing probabilities, image splittings, and time delays are derived for strings in a realistic cosmological setting. String searches using ST, the VLA, and the COBE satellite are discussed.

  10. Can Vacuum Assisted Venous Drainage be Achieved using a Roller Pump in an Emergency? A Pilot Study using Neonatal Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Hill, S. L.; Holt, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: There has been much advancement in perfusion technology over its 50 years of progression. One of these techniques is vacuum-assisted venous drainage (VAVD). Many perfusionists augment venous drainage using VAVD, typically from a wall vacuum source. This study explores alternates to providing VAVD if the wall vacuum fails. In two porcine laboratories, ∼36 in. of 3/16-in. tubing was connected to a sucker return port and placed into the roller head next to the arterial pump. The vacuum was monitored with a DLP pressure monitoring system (Medtronic). This system was connected to small-bore tubing and attached to a stopcock on top of the reservoir. The vacuum was regulated using another stopcock connected to a non-filtered luer lock port on top of the reservoir or by a segment of 3 × 0.25-in.-diameter tubing attached to the vent port with a c-clamp. Vacuum drainage was achieved, ranging from −18 mmHg to −71 mmHg by manipulating the stopcock or c-clamp. Changes in venous drainage were seen by volume fluctuations in the venous reservoir. The vacuum was adjusted to account for dramatic changes. Augmented venous drainage using a roller pump can be achieved successfully during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This method of active drainage can be used in lieu of wall suction or during times of emergency if wall suction fails. PMID:18293812

  11. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1987-01-01

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  12. Determination of Kicker Vacuum Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Martin E.

    This note examines the effect of elevated vacuum pressures in the kicker region of the DARHT 2nd Axis which can lead to changes in the beam tune due to the long pulse length. The kicker uses Rexolite as an insulator supporting the electrodes. Rexolite is hygroscopic resulting is a large outgassing rate and prolonged pump down times after exposure to atmospheric conditions. LAMDA [1] is used to simulate the effect of ionization of the residual gas resulting in partial space charge neutralization and changes to the tune between the beginning and end of the pulse. The effect of the ion-hosemore » instability is also examined. The purpose of this note is to establish/validate the required pressure in the downstream transport.« less

  13. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  14. Influence of the platform jitter on intensity fluctuation for laser launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Chunhong; Huang, Tong; Zhang, Jinghui; Fan, Chengyu

    2017-10-01

    The jitter of the transmitting system can cause the light intensity fluctuation at the target position of the laser transmission, which affects the performance of the laser communication, imaging and the adaptive optical system. In this paper, the platform jitter is modeled by Gaussian random fluctuation phase and the analytic expression of the system jitter effect on the fluctuation of light intensity is obtained under the vacuum condition based on extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The numerical simulation is compared with the theoretical expression and the consistency is obtained. At the same time, the influence of the jitter of the launch system on the intensity fluctuation of the target system under different turbulence conditions is analyzed by numerical simulation. The result show that normalized intensity fluctuation variance induced by platform jitter seems to be unrestricted. The jitter of the transmitting system has a more important influence on the fluctuation of the target position caused by the atmospheric turbulence, as the jitter increase. This result provides a reference for the application of the actual laser transmission system.

  15. 14 CFR 25.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 25.1433 Section 25.1433 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1433 Vacuum systems. There...

  16. Flux tubes in the SU(3) vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardaci, M. S.; Cea, P.; Cosmai, L.; Falcone, R.; Papa, A.

    We analyze the distribution of the chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair in the SU(3) vacuum. We find that the transverse profile of the flux tube resembles the dual version of the Abrikosov vortex field distribution and give an estimate of the London penetration length in the confined vacuum.

  17. Vacuum-jacketed transfer line installation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, W. M.

    1968-01-01

    Rolling-type spacers in the form of steel balls retained in appropriate sleeves affixed at intervals to the exterior of the transfer line facilitate the installation of a vacuum-jacketed line. They act as standoffs to position the transfer line concentrically within the vacuum jacket line.

  18. Sugar maple sap volume increases as vacuum level is increased

    Treesearch

    Russell S. Walters; H. Clay Smith

    1975-01-01

    Maple sap yields collected by using plastic tubing with a vacuum pump increased as the vacuum level was increased. Sap volumes collected at the 10- and 15-inch mercury vacuum levels were statistically significantly higher than volumes collected at the 5-inch level. Although the 15-inch vacuum yielded more sap than the 10-inch vacuum, the difference was not...

  19. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1993-11-09

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of standard polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  20. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1995-03-07

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  1. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  2. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  3. Fermionic influence on inflationary fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by apparent persistent large scale anomalies in the cosmic microwave background we study the influence of fermionic degrees of freedom on the dynamics of inflaton fluctuations as a possible source of violations of (nearly) scale invariance on cosmological scales. We obtain the nonequilibrium effective action of an inflaton-like scalar field with Yukawa interactions (YD ,M) to light fermionic degrees of freedom both for Dirac and Majorana fields in de Sitter space-time. The effective action leads to Langevin equations of motion for the fluctuations of the inflaton-like field, with self-energy corrections and a stochastic Gaussian noise. We solve the Langevin equation in the super-Hubble limit implementing a dynamical renormalization group resummation. For a nearly massless inflaton its power spectrum of super-Hubble fluctuations is enhanced, P (k ;η )=(H/2 π )2eγt[-k η ] with γt[-k η ]=1/6 π2 [∑i =1 NDYi,D 2+2 ∑j =1 NMYj,M 2]{ln2[-k η ]-2 ln [-k η ]ln [-k η0]} for ND Dirac and NM Majorana fermions, and η0 is the renormalization scale at which the inflaton mass vanishes. The full power spectrum is shown to be renormalization group invariant. These corrections to the super-Hubble power spectrum entail a violation of scale invariance as a consequence of the coupling to the fermionic fields. The effective action is argued to be exact in the limit of a large number of fermionic fields. A cancellation between the enhancement from fermionic degrees of freedom and suppression from light scalar degrees of freedom conformally coupled to gravity suggests the possibility of a finely tuned supersymmetry among these fields.

  4. Running vacuum cosmological models: linear scalar perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Perico, E.L.D.; Tamayo, D.A., E-mail: elduartep@usp.br, E-mail: tamayo@if.usp.br

    In cosmology, phenomenologically motivated expressions for running vacuum are commonly parameterized as linear functions typically denoted by Λ( H {sup 2}) or Λ( R ). Such models assume an equation of state for the vacuum given by P-bar {sub Λ} = - ρ-bar {sub Λ}, relating its background pressure P-bar {sub Λ} with its mean energy density ρ-bar {sub Λ} ≡ Λ/8π G . This equation of state suggests that the vacuum dynamics is due to an interaction with the matter content of the universe. Most of the approaches studying the observational impact of these models only consider the interactionmore » between the vacuum and the transient dominant matter component of the universe. We extend such models by assuming that the running vacuum is the sum of independent contributions, namely ρ-bar {sub Λ} = Σ {sub i} ρ-bar {sub Λ} {sub i} . Each Λ i vacuum component is associated and interacting with one of the i matter components in both the background and perturbation levels. We derive the evolution equations for the linear scalar vacuum and matter perturbations in those two scenarios, and identify the running vacuum imprints on the cosmic microwave background anisotropies as well as on the matter power spectrum. In the Λ( H {sup 2}) scenario the vacuum is coupled with every matter component, whereas the Λ( R ) description only leads to a coupling between vacuum and non-relativistic matter, producing different effects on the matter power spectrum.« less

  5. Analysis of dynamic multiplicity fluctuations at PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Zhengwei; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the dynamic fluctuations in the inclusive charged particle multiplicity measured by PHOBOS for Au+Au collisions at surdsNN = 200GeV within the pseudo-rapidity range of -3 < η < 3. First the definition of the fluctuations observables used in this analysis is presented, together with the discussion of their physics meaning. Then the procedure for the extraction of dynamic fluctuations is described. Some preliminary results are included to illustrate the correlation features of the fluctuation observable. New dynamic fluctuations results will be available in a later publication.

  6. Influence of Gap Distance on Vacuum Arc Characteristics of Cup Type AMF Electrode in Vacuum Interrupters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shaoyong; Xiu, Shixin; Wang, Jimei; Shen, Zhengchao

    2006-11-01

    The greenhouse effect of SF6 is a great concern today. The development of high voltage vacuum circuit breakers becomes more important. The vacuum circuit breaker has minimum pollution to the environment. The vacuum interrupter is the key part of a vacuum circuit breaker. The interrupting characteristics in vacuum and arc-controlling technique are the main problems to be solved for a longer gap distance in developing high voltage vacuum interrupters. To understand the vacuum arc characteristics and provide effective technique to control vacuum arc in a long gap distance, the arc mode transition of a cup-type axial magnetic field electrode is observed by a high-speed charge coupled device (CCD) video camera under different gap distances while the arc voltage and arc current are recorded. The controlling ability of the axial magnetic field on vacuum arc obviously decreases when the gap distance is longer than 40 mm. The noise components and mean value of the arc voltage significantly increase. The effective method for controlling the vacuum arc characteristics is provided by long gap distances based on the test results. The test results can be used as a reference to develop high voltage and large capacity vacuum interrupters.

  7. Wireless Integrated Microelectronic Vacuum Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krug, Eric; Philpot, Brian; Trott, Aaron; Lawrence, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center's (SSC's) large rocket engine test facility requires the use of liquid propellants, including the use of cryogenic fluids like liquid hydrogen as fuel, and liquid oxygen as an oxidizer (gases which have been liquefied at very low temperatures). These fluids require special handling, storage, and transfer technology. The biggest problem associated with transferring cryogenic liquids is product loss due to heat transfer. Vacuum jacketed piping is specifically designed to maintain high thermal efficiency so that cryogenic liquids can be transferred with minimal heat transfer. A vacuum jacketed pipe is essentially two pipes in one. There is an inner carrier pipe, in which the cryogenic liquid is actually transferred, and an outer jacket pipe that supports and seals the vacuum insulation, forming the "vacuum jacket." The integrity of the vacuum jacketed transmission lines that transfer the cryogenic fluid from delivery barges to the test stand must be maintained prior to and during engine testing. To monitor the vacuum in these vacuum jacketed transmission lines, vacuum gauge readings are used. At SSC, vacuum gauge measurements are done on a manual rotation basis with two technicians, each using a handheld instrument. Manual collection of vacuum data is labor intensive and uses valuable personnel time. Additionally, there are times when personnel cannot collect the data in a timely fashion (i.e., when a leak is detected, measurements must be taken more often). Additionally, distribution of this data to all interested parties can be cumbersome. To simplify the vacuum-gauge data collection process, automate the data collection, and decrease the labor costs associated with acquiring these measurements, an automated system that monitors the existing gauges was developed by Invocon, Inc. For this project, Invocon developed a Wireless Integrated Microelectronic Vacuum Sensor System (WIMVSS) that provides the ability to gather vacuum

  8. Entropic fluctuations in DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanos, Dimitrios; Li, Wentian; Provata, Astero

    2018-03-01

    The Local Shannon Entropy (LSE) in blocks is used as a complexity measure to study the information fluctuations along DNA sequences. The LSE of a DNA block maps the local base arrangement information to a single numerical value. It is shown that despite this reduction of information, LSE allows to extract meaningful information related to the detection of repetitive sequences in whole chromosomes and is useful in finding evolutionary differences between organisms. More specifically, large regions of tandem repeats, such as centromeres, can be detected based on their low LSE fluctuations along the chromosome. Furthermore, an empirical investigation of the appropriate block sizes is provided and the relationship of LSE properties with the structure of the underlying repetitive units is revealed by using both computational and mathematical methods. Sequence similarity between the genomic DNA of closely related species also leads to similar LSE values at the orthologous regions. As an application, the LSE covariance function is used to measure the evolutionary distance between several primate genomes.

  9. Universal bounds on current fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  10. Periodic Fluctuation of Perceived Duration

    PubMed Central

    Shima, Shuhei; Murai, Yuki; Yuasa, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Yuki

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have reported that the allocation of spatial attention fluctuates periodically. This periodic attention was revealed by measuring behavioral performance as a function of cue-to-target interval in the Posner cueing paradigm. Previous studies reported behavioral oscillations using target detection tasks. Whether the influence of periodic attention extends to cognitively demanding tasks remains unclear. To assess this, we examined the effects of periodic attention on the perception of duration. In the experiment, participants performed a temporal bisection task while a cue was presented with various cue-to-target intervals. Perceived duration fluctuated rhythmically as a function of cue-to-target interval at a group level but not at an individual level when the target was presented on the same side as the attentional cue. The results indicate that the perception of duration is influenced by periodic attention. In other words, periodic attention can influence the performance of cognitively demanding tasks such as the perception of duration. PMID:29755719

  11. Apparatus For Metal/Inert-Gas Welding In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Metal/inert-gas welding-torch assembly operates in vacuum. Plasma generated in interior chamber and focused onto workpiece in vacuum. Pinch rollers feed wire to weld puddle. Controlled flow of plasma reduces dispersal in vacuum, preventing extinction.

  12. 21 CFR 884.4340 - Fetal vacuum extractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... means of a suction cup attached to the scalp and is powered by an external vacuum source. This generic type of device may include the cup, hosing, vacuum source, and vacuum control. (b) Classification...

  13. 21 CFR 884.4340 - Fetal vacuum extractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... means of a suction cup attached to the scalp and is powered by an external vacuum source. This generic type of device may include the cup, hosing, vacuum source, and vacuum control. (b) Classification...

  14. Vacuum-Ultraviolet Photovoltaic Detector.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Richeng; Ran, Junxue; Zhang, Zhaojun; Ji, Xu; Huang, Feng

    2018-01-23

    Over the past two decades, solar- and astrophysicists and material scientists have been researching and developing new-generation semiconductor-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detectors with low power consumption and small size for replacing traditional heavy and high-energy-consuming microchannel-detection systems, to study the formation and evolution of stars. However, the most desirable semiconductor-based VUV photovoltaic detector capable of achieving zero power consumption has not yet been achieved. With high-crystallinity multistep epitaxial grown AlN as a VUV-absorbing layer for photogenerated carriers and p-type graphene (with unexpected VUV transmittance >96%) as a transparent electrode to collect excited holes, we constructed a heterojunction device with photovoltaic detection for VUV light. The device exhibits an encouraging VUV photoresponse, high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and extremely fast tempera response (80 ns, 10 4 -10 6 times faster than that of the currently reported VUV photoconductive devices). This work has provided an idea for developing zero power consumption and integrated VUV photovoltaic detectors with ultrafast and high-sensitivity VUV detection capability, which not only allows future spacecraft to operate with longer service time and lower launching cost but also ensures an ultrafast evolution of interstellar objects.

  15. Goddard with Vacuum Tube Device

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Robert H. Goddard with vacuum tube apparatus he built in 1916 to research rocket efficiency. Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard is commonly referred to as the father of American rocketry. The same year he built the apparatus, Goddard wrote a study requesting funding from the Smithsonian Institution so that he could continue his rocket research, which he had begun in 1907 while still a student at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. A brilliant physicist, with a unique genius for invention, Goddard may not have succeeded had it not been for the Smithsonian Institution and later the Daniel Guggenheim Foundation and his employer the Worcester Polytechnic Institute of Clark University. The former gave him research monies while the Institute provided leaves of absence so that he could continue his life's work. He was the first scientist who not only realized the potential of missiles and space flight, but also contributed directly to making them a reality. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  16. Troubleshooting crude vacuum tower overhead ejector systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, J.R.; Frens, L.L.

    1995-03-01

    Routinely surveying tower overhead vacuum systems can improve performance and product quality. These vacuum systems normally provide reliable and consistent operation. However, process conditions, supplied utilities, corrosion, erosion and fouling all have an impact on ejector system performance. Refinery vacuum distillation towers use ejector systems to maintain tower top pressure and remove overhead gases. However, as with virtually all refinery equipment, performance may be affected by a number of variables. These variables may act independently or concurrently. It is important to understand basic operating principles of vacuum systems and how performance is affected by: utilities, corrosion and erosion, fouling, andmore » process conditions. Reputable vacuum-system suppliers have service engineers that will come to a refinery to survey the system and troubleshoot performance or offer suggestions for improvement. A skilled vacuum-system engineer may be needed to diagnose and remedy system problems. The affect of these variables on performance is discussed. A case history is described of a vacuum system on a crude tower in a South American refinery.« less

  17. Vacuum coupling of rotating superconducting rotor

    DOEpatents

    Shoykhet, Boris A.; Zhang, Burt Xudong; Driscoll, David Infante

    2003-12-02

    A rotating coupling allows a vacuum chamber in the rotor of a superconducting electric motor to be continually pumped out. The coupling consists of at least two concentric portions, one of which is allowed to rotate and the other of which is stationary. The coupling is located on the non-drive end of the rotor and is connected to a coolant supply and a vacuum pump. The coupling is smaller in diameter than the shaft of the rotor so that the shaft can be increased in diameter without having to increase the size of the vacuum seal.

  18. Vacuum system for the SAMURAI spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Otsu, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, T.; Motobayashi, T.; Sato, H.; Yoneda, K.

    2013-12-01

    The first commissioning experiment of the SAMURAI spectrometer and its beam line was performed in March, 2012. The vacuum system for the SAMURAI spectrometer includes its beam line and the SAMURAI vacuum chamber with the windows for detecting neutrons and charged particles. The window for neutrons was made of stainless steel with a thickness of 3 mm and was designed with a shape of partial cylinder to support itself against the atmospheric pressure. The window for charged particles was of the combination of Kevlar and Mylar with the thickness of 280 and 75 μm, respectively. The pressure in the vacuum system was at a few Pa throughout the commissioning experiment.

  19. Comparison of vacuum and non-vacuum urine tubes for urinary sediment analysis.

    PubMed

    Topcuoglu, Canan; Sezer, Sevilay; Kosem, Arzu; Ercan, Mujgan; Turhan, Turan

    2017-12-01

    Urine collection systems with aspiration system for vacuum tubes are becoming increasingly common for urinalysis, especially for microscopic examination of the urine. In this study, we aimed to examine whether vacuum aspiration of the urine sample has any adverse effect on sediment analysis by comparing results from vacuum and non-vacuum urine tubes. The study included totally 213 urine samples obtained from inpatients and outpatients in our hospital. Urine samples were collected to containers with aspiration system for vacuum tubes. Each sample was aliquoted to both vacuum and non-vacuum urine tubes. Urinary sediment analysis was performed using manual microscope. Results were evaluated using chi-square test. Comparison of the sediment analysis results from vacuum and non-vacuum urine tubes showed that results were highly concordant for erythrocyte, leukocyte and epithelial cells (gamma values 1, 0.997, and 0.994, respectively; p < .001). Results were also concordant for urinary casts, crystals and yeast (kappa values 0.815, 0.945 and 1, respectively; p < .001). The results show that in urinary sediment analysis, vacuum aspiration has no adverse effect on the cellular components except on casts.

  20. Conductivity fluctuations in polymer's networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samukhin, A. N.; Prigodin, V. N.; Jastrabík, L.

    1998-01-01

    A Polymer network is treated as an anisotropic fractal with fractional dimensionality D = 1 + ε close to one. Percolation model on such a fractal is studied. Using real space renormalization group approach of Migdal and Kadanoff, we find the threshold value and all the critical exponents in the percolation model to be strongly nonanalytic functions of ε, e.g. the critical exponent of the conductivity was obtained to be ε-2 exp (-1 - 1/ε). The main part of the finite-size conductivities distribution function at the threshold was found to be universal if expressed in terms of the fluctuating variable which is proportional to a large power of the conductivity, but with ε-dependent low-conductivity cut-off. Its reduced central momenta are of the order of e -1/ε up to a very high order.

  1. Deformation of fluctuating chiral ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyukov, Sergey

    2003-03-01

    We find analytical solution of the model of a fluctuating filament with a spontaneously twisted noncircular cross section in the presence of external force and torque. We show that when such ribbon is subjected to a sufficiently strong extensional force, it exhibits an asymmetric response to large degrees of overwinding and unwinding. We construct the stability diagram that describes the buckling transition of such ribbons under the opposing action of force and torque and show that all the observed behaviors can be understood in terms of continuous transformations between straight and spiral states of the ribbon. The relation between our results and experimental observations on DNA is discussed and a new reentrant spiral to rod transition is predicted at intermediate values of twist rigidity and applied force.

  2. SHINE Vacuum Pump Test Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Gregg A; Peters, Brent

    2013-09-30

    Normetex pumps used world-wide for tritium service are no longer available. DOE and other researchers worldwide have spent significant funds characterizing this pump. Identification of alternate pumps is required for performance and compatibility with tritium gas. Many of the pumps that could be used to meet the functional performance requirements (e.g. pressure and flow conditions) of the Normetex pump have features that include the use of polymers or oils and greases that are not directly compatible with tritium service. This study assembles a test system to determine the flow characteristics for candidate alternate pumps. These tests are critical to themore » movement of tritium through the SHINE Tritium Purification System (TPS). The purpose of the pump testing is two-fold: (1) obtain baseline vacuum pump characteristics for an alternate (i.e. ''Normetex replacement'') pump intended for use in tritium service; and (2) verify that low pressure hydrogen gas can be transported over distances up to 300 feet by the candidate pumps. Flow rates and nominal system pressures have been identified for the SHINE Mo-99 production process Tritium Purification System (TPS). To minimize the line sizes for the transfer of low pressure tritium from the Neutron Driver Accelerator System (NDAS) to the primary processing systems in the TPS, a ''booster'' pump has been located near the accelerator in the design. A series of pump tests were performed at various configurations using hydrogen gas (no tritium) to ensure that this concept is practical and maintains adequate flow rates and required pressures. This report summarizes the results of the tests that have been performed using various pump configurations. The current design of the Tritium Purification System requires the ''booster'' pump to discharge to or to be backed by another vacuum pump. Since Normetex pumps are no longer manufactured, a commercially available Edwards scroll pump will be used to back the booster pump. In

  3. Is there vacuum when there is mass? Vacuum and non-vacuum solutions for massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Moruno, Prado; Visser, Matt

    2013-08-01

    Massive gravity is a theory which has a tremendous amount of freedom to describe different cosmologies, but at the same time, the various solutions one encounters must fulfil some rather nontrivial constraints. Most of the freedom comes not from the Lagrangian, which contains only a small number of free parameters (typically three depending on counting conventions), but from the fact that one is in principle free to choose the reference metric almost arbitrarily—which effectively introduces a non-denumerable infinity of free parameters. In the current paper, we stress that although changing the reference metric would lead to a different cosmological model, this does not mean that the dynamics of the universe can be entirely divorced from its matter content. That is, while the choice of reference metric certainly influences the evolution of the physically observable foreground metric, the effect of matter cannot be neglected. Indeed the interplay between matter and geometry can be significantly changed in some specific models; effectively since the graviton would be able to curve the spacetime by itself, without the need of matter. Thus, even the set of vacuum solutions for massive gravity can have significant structure. In some cases, the effect of the reference metric could be so strong that no conceivable material content would be able to drastically affect the cosmological evolution. Dedicated to the memory of Professor Pedro F González-Díaz

  4. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    DOE PAGES

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, T c, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at T c. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to T c. This striking effect offers anmore » unprecedented tool for direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Lastly, our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.« less

  5. Nonequilibrium fluctuations during diffusion in liquid layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogioli, Doriano; Vailati, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    Theoretical analysis and experiments have provided compelling evidence of the presence of long-range nonequilibrium concentration fluctuations during diffusion processes in fluids. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of the features of the fluctuations from the dimensionality of the system. In three-dimensional fluids the amplitude of nonequilibrium fluctuations can become several orders of magnitude larger than that of equilibrium fluctuations. Notwithstanding that, the amplitude of nonequilibrium fluctuations remains small with respect to the concentration difference driving the diffusion process. By extending the theory to two-dimensional systems, such as liquid monolayers and bilayers, we show that the amplitude of the fluctuations becomes much stronger than in three-dimensional systems. We investigate the properties of the fronts of diffusion and show that they have a self-affine structure characterized by a Hurst exponent H =1 . We discuss the implications of these results for diffusion in liquid crystals and in cellular membranes of living organisms.

  6. Nonequilibrium fluctuations during diffusion in liquid layers.

    PubMed

    Brogioli, Doriano; Vailati, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    Theoretical analysis and experiments have provided compelling evidence of the presence of long-range nonequilibrium concentration fluctuations during diffusion processes in fluids. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of the features of the fluctuations from the dimensionality of the system. In three-dimensional fluids the amplitude of nonequilibrium fluctuations can become several orders of magnitude larger than that of equilibrium fluctuations. Notwithstanding that, the amplitude of nonequilibrium fluctuations remains small with respect to the concentration difference driving the diffusion process. By extending the theory to two-dimensional systems, such as liquid monolayers and bilayers, we show that the amplitude of the fluctuations becomes much stronger than in three-dimensional systems. We investigate the properties of the fronts of diffusion and show that they have a self-affine structure characterized by a Hurst exponent H=1. We discuss the implications of these results for diffusion in liquid crystals and in cellular membranes of living organisms.

  7. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    PubMed Central

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool for direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon. PMID:25661237

  8. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs.

    PubMed

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A S; Vinokur, V M

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool for direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.

  9. Gravitational collapse and the vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, M.

    2014-03-01

    To explain the accelerated expansion of the universe, models with interacting dark components (dark energy and dark matter) have been considered recently in the literature. Generally, the dark energy component is physically interpreted as the vacuum energy of the all fields that fill the universe. As the other side of the same coin, the influence of the vacuum energy on the gravitational collapse is of great interest. We study such collapse adopting different parameterizations for the evolution of the vacuum energy. We discuss the homogeneous collapsing star fluid, that interacts with a vacuum energy component, using the stiff matter case as example. We conclude this work with a discussion of the Cahill-McVittie mass for the collapsed object.

  10. Ultrahigh vacuum gauge having two collector electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torney, F. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    A gauge for measuring ultrahigh vacuums with great accuracy is described. It provides a means for ionizing the gas whose pressure is being measured, and consists of a collector electrode, a suppressor, radiation shielding, and a second collector.

  11. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, G.W.; Bushman, J.F.; Alger, T.W.

    1996-07-23

    A vacuum housing and pumping system is described for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof. 7 figs.

  12. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, Gerald W.; Bushman, John F.; Alger, Terry W.

    1996-01-01

    A vacuum housing and pumping system for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof.

  13. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Cosmic vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, Artur D.

    2001-11-01

    Recent observational studies of distant supernovae have suggested the existence of cosmic vacuum whose energy density exceeds the total density of all the other energy components in the Universe. The vacuum produces the field of antigravity that causes the cosmological expansion to accelerate. It is this accelerated expansion that has been discovered in the observations. The discovery of cosmic vacuum radically changes our current understanding of the present state of the Universe. It also poses new challenges to both cosmology and fundamental physics. Why is the density of vacuum what it is? Why do the densities of the cosmic energy components differ in exact value but agree in order of magnitude? On the other hand, the discovery made at large cosmological distances of hundreds and thousands Mpc provides new insights into the dynamics of the nearby Universe, the motions of galaxies in the local volume of 10 - 20 Mpc where the cosmological expansion was originally discovered.

  14. SLAC All Access: Vacuum Microwave Device Department

    ScienceCinema

    Haase, Andy

    2018-05-11

    The Vacuum Microwave Device Department (VMDD) builds the devices that make SLAC's particle accelerators go. These devices, called klystrons, generate intense waves of microwave energy that rocket subatomic particles up to nearly the speed of light.

  15. Ultra-high-vacuum electrical feedthrough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavaler, J. R.; Janocko, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    Device for cathodic sputtering utilizes cathode dark-space region adjacent to high negative-potential surfaces. Feedthrough is made of metal and glass, is helium leaktight, and is bakeable; it can be incorporated into any vacuum apparatus.

  16. Source replenishment device for vacuum deposition

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    A material source replenishment device for use with a vacuum deposition apparatus. The source replenishment device comprises an intermittent motion producing gear arrangement disposed within the vacuum deposition chamber. An elongated rod having one end operably connected to the gearing arrangement is provided with a multiarmed head at the opposite end disposed adjacent the heating element of the vacuum deposition apparatus. An inverted U-shaped source material element is releasably attached to the outer end of each arm member whereby said multiarmed head is moved to locate a first of said material elements above said heating element, whereupon said multiarmed head is lowered to engage said material element with the heating element and further lowered to release said material element on the heating element. After vaporization of said material element, second and subsequent material elements may be provided to the heating element without the need for opening the vacuum deposition apparatus to the atmosphere.

  17. Source replenishment device for vacuum deposition

    DOEpatents

    Hill, R.A.

    1986-05-15

    A material source replenishment device for use with a vacuum deposition apparatus is described. The source replenishment device comprises an intermittent motion producing gear arrangement disposed within the vacuum deposition chamber. An elongated rod having one end operably connected to the gearing arrangement is provided with a multiarmed head at the opposite end disposed adjacent the heating element of the vacuum deposition apparatus. An inverted U-shaped source material element is releasably attached to the outer end of each arm member whereby said multiarmed head is moved to locate a first of said material elements above said heating element, whereupon said multiarmed head is lowered to engage said material element with the heating element and further lowered to release said material element on the heating element. After vaporization of said material element, second and subsequent material elements may be provided to the heating element without the need for opening the vacuum deposition apparatus to the atmosphere.

  18. A Vacuum-Aspirator for Counting Termites

    Treesearch

    Susan C. Jones; Joe K. Mauldin

    1983-01-01

    An aspirator-system powered by a vacuum cleaner is described for manually counting termites. It is significantly faster and termite survival is at least as high as when using a mouth-aspirator for counting large numbers of termites.

  19. SLAC All Access: Vacuum Microwave Device Department

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Andy

    2012-10-09

    The Vacuum Microwave Device Department (VMDD) builds the devices that make SLAC's particle accelerators go. These devices, called klystrons, generate intense waves of microwave energy that rocket subatomic particles up to nearly the speed of light.

  20. Evaluation of vacuum pycnometer : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1977-06-01

    This report is concerned with the evaluation of the Yale vacuum pycnometer to determine the feasibility of its use for the rapid determination of maximum specific gravity and asphalt content of bituminous paving mixtures. Asphalt contents of plant-mi...

  1. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  2. Gravitational baryogenesis in running vacuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.; Pan, Supriya; Nunes, Rafael C.

    2017-08-01

    We study the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism for generating baryon asymmetry in the context of running vacuum models. Regardless of whether these models can produce a viable cosmological evolution, we demonstrate that they produce a nonzero baryon-to-entropy ratio even if the universe is filled with conformal matter. This is a sound difference between the running vacuum gravitational baryogenesis and the Einstein-Hilbert one, since in the latter case, the predicted baryon-to-entropy ratio is zero. We consider two well known and most used running vacuum models and show that the resulting baryon-to-entropy ratio is compatible with the observational data. Moreover, we also show that the mechanism of gravitational baryogenesis may constrain the running vacuum models.

  3. Optical probe with light fluctuation protection

    DOEpatents

    Da Silva, Luiz B.; Chase, Charles L.

    2003-11-11

    An optical probe for tissue identification includes an elongated body. Optical fibers are located within the elongated body for transmitting light to and from the tissue. Light fluctuation protection is associated with the optical fibers. In one embodiment the light fluctuation protection includes a reflective coating on the optical fibers to reduce stray light. In another embodiment the light fluctuation protection includes a filler with very high absorption located within the elongated body between the optical fibers.

  4. Use of Vacuum Degreasing for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Eric; Edwards, Kevin; Mitchell, Mark; Boothe, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly strict environmental regulations and the consequent phase out of many effective cleaning solvents has necessitated the development of novel cleaning chemistries and technologies. Among these is vacuum degreasing, a fully enclosed process that eliminates fugitive solvent emissions, thereby reducing cost, environmental, and health related exposure impacts. The effectiveness of vacuum degreasing using modified alcohol for common aerospace contaminants is reported and compared to current and legacy solvents.

  5. Vacuum decay in an interacting multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Pérez, S.; Alonso-Serrano, A.; Bastos, C.; Bertolami, O.

    2016-08-01

    We examine a new multiverse scenario in which the component universes interact. We focus our attention to the process of "true" vacuum nucleation in the false vacuum within one single element of the multiverse. It is shown that the interactions lead to a collective behavior that might lead, under specific conditions, to a pre-inflationary phase and ensued distinguishable imprints in the comic microwave background radiation.

  6. Fluctuation solution theory of pure fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Pallewela, Gayani N.; Smith, Paul E.

    2017-03-01

    Fluctuation Solution Theory (FST) provides an alternative view of fluid thermodynamics in terms of pair fluctuations in the particle number and excess energy observed for an equivalent open system. Here we extend the FST approach to provide a series of triplet and quadruplet particle and excess energy fluctuations that can also be used to help understand the behavior of fluids. The fluctuations for the gas, liquid, and supercritical regions of three fluids (H2O, CO2, and SF6) are then determined from accurate equations of state. Many of the fluctuating quantities change sign on moving from the gas to liquid phase and, therefore, we argue that the fluctuations can be used to characterize gas and liquid behavior. Further analysis provides an approach to isolate contributions to the excess energy fluctuations arising from just the intermolecular interactions and also indicates that the triplet and quadruplet particle fluctuations are related to the pair particle fluctuations by a simple power law for large regions of the phase diagram away from the critical point.

  7. Current Fluctuations in Stochastic Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, L.; de Sole, A.; Gabrielli, D.; Jona-Lasinio, G.; Landim, C.

    2005-01-01

    We study current fluctuations in lattice gases in the macroscopic limit extending the dynamic approach for density fluctuations developed in previous articles. More precisely, we establish a large deviation theory for the space-time fluctuations of the empirical current which include the previous results. We then estimate the probability of a fluctuation of the average current over a large time interval. It turns out that recent results by Bodineau and Derrida [Phys. Rev. Lett.922004180601] in certain cases underestimate this probability due to the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions.

  8. Cryogenic Insulation System for Soft Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a cryogenic insulation system for operation under soft vacuum is presented in this paper. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications can be divided into three levels of thermal performance, in terms of apparent thermal conductivity [k-value in milliwatt per meter-kelvin (mW/m-K)]. System k-values below 0.1 can be achieved for multilayer insulation operating at a vacuum level below 1 x 10(exp -4) torr. For fiberglass or powder operating below 1 x 10(exp -3) torr, k-values of about 2 are obtained. For foam and other materials at ambient pressure, k-values around 30 are typical. New industry and aerospace applications require a versatile, robust, low-cost thermal insulation with performance in the intermediate range. The target for the new composite insulation system is a k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K (R-30) at a soft vacuum level (from 1 to 10 torr) and boundary temperatures of approximately 77 and 293 kelvin (K). Many combinations of radiation shields, spacers, and composite materials were tested from high vacuum to ambient pressure using cryostat boiloff methods. Significant improvement over conventional systems in the soft vacuum range was demonstrated. The new layered composite insulation system was also shown to provide key benefits for high vacuum applications as well.

  9. Inflation from the Superstring Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, M. D.

    Quartic higher-derivative gravitational terms in the effective Lagrangian of the heterotic superstring theory renormalize the bare, four-dimensional gravitational coupling κ 02≡ 8π G0, due to the reduction process hat { R}4-> Rbar { R}3, according to the formula κ -2 = κ 0-2 [1+15ζ (3)bar χ/16λ B r3 + bar χ/384π 2 Ar ], where Ar and Br are the moduli for the physical space gij(xk) and internal space bar {g}μ ν (yξ ), respectively. The Euler characteristic bar χ is negative for a three-generation Calabi-Yau manifold, and therefore both the additional terms, of tree-level and one-loop origin, produce a decrease in κ-2, which changes sign when κ-2 = 0. The corresponding tree-level critical point is B rc = [15 ζ (3)|bar χ|/16λ ]1/3 = 0.357, if we set bar χ = -6 and λ = 15π2, for compactification onto a torus. Values B r < B rc yield the anti-gravity region κ-2 < 0, which is analytically accessible from the normal gravity region κ-2 > 0. The only non-singular, vacuum minimum of the potential V(B r) ≡ (15)/(32)ζ (3)bar χλ -1κ 0-2R B r-3-A tilde r {B} { R}2 B r-2 is located at the point B r=[1 + 1.58(2/A r) (4/˜ B) × 10-4] B rc, where κ -2 = 4.73(2/Ar )(4/˜ B) × 10-4κ 0-2, the quadratic trace anomaly { R}2 anom dominates over { R}4, and a phase of de Sitter expansion may occur, as first envisaged by Starobinsky, in approximate agreement with the constraint due to the effect of gravitational waves upon the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. There is no non-singular minimum of the potential V(A r) ≡ bar χκ 0-2RA_ r-1/768π 2 - ((1)/(4) { R}2E + ˜ {B} B r-2 { R}2 )Ar.

  10. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in enclosed... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10...

  11. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in enclosed... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10...

  12. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in enclosed... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10...

  13. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in enclosed... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10...

  14. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in enclosed... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10...

  15. 7 CFR 305.29 - Vacuum heat treatment schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vacuum heat treatment schedule. 305.29 Section 305.29... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Heat Treatments § 305.29 Vacuum heat treatment... vacuum at 8 hours. Maintain the vacuum until the end of the treatment. Gradually increase the temperature...

  16. Vacuum Energy and Inflation: 4. An Inflationary Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2013-01-01

    This is the fourth paper in a series of four. The first paper in the series, "Vacuum Energy and Inflation: 1. A Liter of Vacuum Energy" [EJ1024183] discusses an example of vacuum energy. Vacuum energy is explained as an energy with a negative pressure whose energy density remains constant in an expanding space. Paper 2, "Vacuum…

  17. Shot noise: from Schottky's vacuum tube to present-day quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonenberger, Christian; Oberholzer, Stefan

    2004-05-01

    Shot-noise in the electrical current through a 'device' is caused by random processes that determine the electron transport from source to drain. Two sources can be distinguished: on the hand, electrons may randomly emanate from the contacts (source and drain), because the relevant states in the reservoirs fluctuate. On the other hand, the transmission through the device is non-deterministic (non-classical). As we demonstrate in this article the former dominates noise in the vacuum tube, whereas the latter applies to coherent mesoscopic devices, which have been studied in great detail during the last decade.

  18. Interface fluctuations during rapid drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz, Monem; Toussaint, Renaud; Schäfer, Gerhard; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Moura, Marcel

    2017-04-01

    We experimentally study the interface dynamics of an immiscible fluid as it invades a monolayer of saturated porous medium through rapid drainage. The seemingly stable and continuous motion of the interface at macroscale, involves numerous abrupt pore-scale jumps and local reconfigurations of the interface. By computing the velocity fluctuations along the invasion front from sequences of images captured at high frame rate, we are able to study both the local and global behavior. The latter displays an intermittent behavior with power-law distributed avalanches in size and duration. As the system is drained potential surface energy is stored at the interface up to a given threshold in pressure. The energy released generates elastic waves at the confining plate, which we detect using piezoelectric type acoustic sensors. By detecting pore-scale events emanating from the depinning of the interface, we look to develop techniques for localizing the displacement front. To assess the quality of these techniques, optical monitoring is done in parallel using a high speed camera.

  19. Isocurvature cold dark matter fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Bond, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    According to Preskill et al. (1983), the axion field represents a particularly attractive candidate for the dark matter in the universe. In many respects it behaves like other forms of cold dark matter, such as massive gravitinos, photinos, and monopoles. It is, however, a pseudo-Goldstone boson of very low mass, and it is only because of rapid coherent oscillations of the field that it can dominate the mass density of the universe. In the present paper it is assumed that the isocurvature mode is dominant. The linear evolution calculations conducted do not depend upon specific details of particle physics. For this reason, the conducted discussion is applicable to any cold dark matter model with isocurvature perturbations. The results of the study lead to the conclusion that scale-invariant isocurvature perturbations do not seem an attractive possibility for the origin of large-scale structure. The findings strengthen the review that primordial adiabatic perturbations were the dominant fluctuations in the early stages of the Big Bang.

  20. Fluctuating asymmetry and psychometric intelligence.

    PubMed Central

    Furlow, F B; Armijo-Prewitt, T; Gangestad, S W; Thornhill, R

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic nature of human psychometric intelligence (IQ), but it is widely assumed that IQ's heritability is at loci for intelligence per se. We present evidence consistent with a hypothesis that interindividual IQ differences are partly due to heritable vulnerabilities to environmental sources of developmental stress, an indirect genetic mechanism for the heritability of IQ. Using fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of the body (the asymmetry resulting from errors in the development of normally symmetrical bilateral traits under stressful conditions), we estimated the relative developmental instability of 112 undergraduates and administered to them Cattell's culture fair intelligence test (CFIT). A subsequent replication on 128 students was performed. In both samples, FA correlated negatively and significantly with CFIT scores. We propose two non-mutually exclusive physiological explanations for this correlation. First, external body FA may correlate negatively with the developmental integrity of the brain. Second, individual energy budget allocations and/or low metabolic efficiency in high-FA individuals may lower IQ scores. We review the data on IQ in light of our findings and conclude that improving developmental quality may increase average IQ in future generations. PMID:9265189

  1. Fluctuation instability of the Dirac Sea in quark models of strong interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    A number of exactly integrable (quark) models of quantum field theory that feature an infinite correlation length are considered. An instability of the standard vacuum quark ensemble, a Dirac sea (in spacetimes of dimension higher than three), is highlighted. It is due to a strong ground-state degeneracy, which, in turn, stems from a special character of the energy distribution. In the case where the momentumcutoff parameter tends to infinity, this distribution becomes infinitely narrow and leads to large (unlimited) fluctuations. A comparison of the results for various vacuum ensembles, including a Dirac sea, a neutral ensemble, a color superconductor, and a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) state, was performed. In the presence of color quark interaction, a BCS state is unambiguously chosen as the ground state of the quark ensemble.

  2. Fluctuation instability of the Dirac Sea in quark models of strong interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovjev, G. M., E-mail: Gennady.Zinovjev@cern.ch; Molodtsov, S. V.

    A number of exactly integrable (quark) models of quantum field theory that feature an infinite correlation length are considered. An instability of the standard vacuum quark ensemble, a Dirac sea (in spacetimes of dimension higher than three), is highlighted. It is due to a strong ground-state degeneracy, which, in turn, stems from a special character of the energy distribution. In the case where the momentumcutoff parameter tends to infinity, this distribution becomes infinitely narrow and leads to large (unlimited) fluctuations. A comparison of the results for various vacuum ensembles, including a Dirac sea, a neutral ensemble, a color superconductor, andmore » a Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer (BCS) state, was performed. In the presence of color quark interaction, a BCS state is unambiguously chosen as the ground state of the quark ensemble.« less

  3. Response of Fusarium solani to Fluctuating Temperatures

    Treesearch

    Keith F. Jensen; Phillip E. Reynolds; Phillip E. Reynolds

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure growth under a range of constant temperatures and under a series of fluctuating temperature regimes, and to determine if growth in the fluctuating temperiture regimes could be predicted satisfactorily from the growth data collected in the constant temperature experiments. Growth was measured on both agar and liquid culture to...

  4. The Spectrum of Wind Power Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandi, Mahesh

    2016-11-01

    Wind is a variable energy source whose fluctuations threaten electrical grid stability and complicate dynamical load balancing. The power generated by a wind turbine fluctuates due to the variable wind speed that blows past the turbine. Indeed, the spectrum of wind power fluctuations is widely believed to reflect the Kolmogorov spectrum; both vary with frequency f as f - 5 / 3. This variability decreases when aggregate power fluctuations from geographically distributed wind farms are averaged at the grid via a mechanism known as geographic smoothing. Neither the f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum nor the mechanism of geographic smoothing are understood. In this work, we explain the wind power fluctuation spectrum from the turbine through grid scales. The f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum results from the largest length scales of atmospheric turbulence of order 200 km influencing the small scales where individual turbines operate. This long-range influence spatially couples geographically distributed wind farms and synchronizes farm outputs over a range of frequencies and decreases with increasing inter-farm distance. Consequently, aggregate grid-scale power fluctuations remain correlated, and are smoothed until they reach a limiting f - 7 / 3 spectrum. This work was funded by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University, Japan.

  5. Electronic Noise and Fluctuations in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Sh.

    2008-07-01

    Preface; Part I. Introduction. Some Basic Concepts of the Theory of Random Processes: 1. Probability density functions. Moments. Stationary processes; 2. Correlation function; 3. Spectral density of noise; 4. Ergodicity and nonergodicity of random processes; 5. Random pulses and shot noise; 6. Markov processes. General theory; 7. Discrete Markov processes. Random telegraph noise; 8. Quasicontinuous (Diffusion-like) Markov processes; 9. Brownian motion; 10. Langevin approach to the kinetics of fluctuations; Part II. Fluctuation-Dissipation Relations in Equilibrium Systems: 11. Derivation of fluctuation-dissipation relations; 12. Equilibrium noise in quasistationary circuits. Nyquist theorem; 13. Fluctuations of electromagnetic fields in continuous media; Part III. Fluctuations in Nonequilibrium Gases: 14. Some basic concepts of hot-electrons' physics; 15. Simple model of current fluctuations in a semiconductor with hot electrons; 16. General kinetic theory of quasiclassical fluctuations in a gas of particles. The Boltzmann-Langevin equation; 17. Current fluctuations and noise temperature; 18. Current fluctuations and diffusion in a gas of hot electrons; 19. One-time correlation in nonequilibrium gases; 20. Intervalley noise in multivalley semiconductors; 21. Noise of hot electrons emitting optical phonons in the streaming regime; 22. Noise in a semiconductor with a postbreakdown stable current filament; Part IV. Generation-recombination noise: 23. G-R noise in uniform unipolar semiconductors; 24. Noise produced by recombination and diffusion; Part V. Noise in quantum ballistic systems: 25. Introduction; 26. Equilibrium noise and shot noise in quantum conductors; 27. Modulation noise in quantum point contacts; 28. Transition from a ballistic conductor to a macroscopic one; 29. Noise in tunnel junctions; Part VI. Resistance noise in metals: 30. Incoherent scattering of electrons by mobile defects; 31. Effect of mobile scattering centers on the electron interference

  6. Magnetic Fluctuations in the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espley, Jared

    2010-01-01

    The Martian ionosphere is influenced by both the solar wind and the regional magnetic fields present in the Martian crust. Both influences ought to cause time variable changes in the magnetic fields present in the ionosphere. I report observations of these magnetic field fluctuations in the Martian ionosphere. I use data from the Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer instrument. By using data from the aerobraking low altitude passes (approx. 200 km) I find that there are numerous fluctuations both near and far from the strong crustal sources. Using data from the 400 km altitude mapping phase (which is near the topside of the primary ionosphere), I look at the comparative strength of the fluctuations relative to the solar wind and temporal variations. I discuss which wave modes and instabilities could be contributing to these fluctuations. I also discuss the implications of these fluctuations for understanding energy transfer in the Martian system and the effects on atmospheric escape.

  7. Compressed Air/Vacuum Transportation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Shyamal

    2011-03-01

    General theory of compressed air/vacuum transportation will be presented. In this transportation, a vehicle (such as an automobile or a rail car) is powered either by compressed air or by air at near vacuum pressure. Four version of such transportation is feasible. In all versions, a ``c-shaped'' plastic or ceramic pipe lies buried a few inches under the ground surface. This pipe carries compressed air or air at near vacuum pressure. In type I transportation, a vehicle draws compressed air (or vacuum) from this buried pipe. Using turbine or reciprocating air cylinder, mechanical power is generated from compressed air (or from vacuum). This mechanical power transferred to the wheels of an automobile (or a rail car) drives the vehicle. In type II-IV transportation techniques, a horizontal force is generated inside the plastic (or ceramic) pipe. A set of vertical and horizontal steel bars is used to transmit this force to the automobile on the road (or to a rail car on rail track). The proposed transportation system has following merits: virtually accident free; highly energy efficient; pollution free and it will not contribute to carbon dioxide emission. Some developmental work on this transportation will be needed before it can be used by the traveling public. The entire transportation system could be computer controlled.

  8. Recent advances in vacuum sciences and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozetič, M.; Ostrikov, K.; Ruzic, D. N.; Curreli, D.; Cvelbar, U.; Vesel, A.; Primc, G.; Leisch, M.; Jousten, K.; Malyshev, O. B.; Hendricks, J. H.; Kövér, L.; Tagliaferro, A.; Conde, O.; Silvestre, A. J.; Giapintzakis, J.; Buljan, M.; Radić, N.; Dražić, G.; Bernstorff, S.; Biederman, H.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Miloševič, S.; Galtayries, A.; Dietrich, P.; Unger, W.; Lehocky, M.; Sedlarik, V.; Stana-Kleinschek, K.; Drmota-Petrič, A.; Pireaux, J. J.; Rogers, J. W.; Anderle, M.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in vacuum sciences and applications are reviewed. Novel optical interferometer cavity devices enable pressure measurements with ppm accuracy. The innovative dynamic vacuum standard allows for pressure measurements with temporal resolution of 2 ms. Vacuum issues in the construction of huge ultra-high vacuum devices worldwide are reviewed. Recent advances in surface science and thin films include new phenomena observed in electron transport near solid surfaces as well as novel results on the properties of carbon nanomaterials. Precise techniques for surface and thin-film characterization have been applied in the conservation technology of cultural heritage objects and recent advances in the characterization of biointerfaces are presented. The combination of various vacuum and atmospheric-pressure techniques enables an insight into the complex phenomena of protein and other biomolecule conformations on solid surfaces. Studying these phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is regarded as the main issue in the development of alternative techniques for drug delivery, tissue engineering and thus the development of innovative techniques for curing cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A review on recent advances in plasma medicine is presented as well as novel hypotheses on cell apoptosis upon treatment with gaseous plasma. Finally, recent advances in plasma nanoscience are illustrated with several examples and a roadmap for future activities is presented.

  9. Developing a vacuum cooking equipment prototype to produce strawberry jam and optimization of vacuum cooking conditions.

    PubMed

    Okut, Dilara; Devseren, Esra; Koç, Mehmet; Ocak, Özgül Özdestan; Karataş, Haluk; Kaymak-Ertekin, Figen

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of this study was to develop prototype cooking equipment that can work at reduced pressure and to evaluate its performance for production of strawberry jam. The effect of vacuum cooking conditions on color soluble solid content, reducing sugars total sugars HMF and sensory properties were investigated. Also, the optimum vacuum cooking conditions for strawberry jam were optimized for Composite Rotatable Design. The optimum cooking temperature and time were determined targeting maximum soluble solid content and sensory attributes (consistency) and minimum Hue value and HMF content. The optimum vacuum cooking conditions determined were 74.4 °C temperature and 19.8 time. The soluble solid content strawberry jam made by vacuum process were similar to those prepared by traditional method. HMF contents of jams produced with vacuum cooking method were well within limit of standards.

  10. Fluctuation-controlled front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Douglas Thacher

    1997-09-01

    A number of fundamental pattern-forming systems are controlled by fluctuations at the front. These problems involve the interaction of an infinite dimensional probability distribution with a strongly nonlinear, spatially extended pattern-forming system. We have examined fluctuation-controlled growth in the context of the specific problems of diffusion-limited growth and biological evolution. Mean field theory of diffusion-limited growth exhibits a finite time singularity. Near the leading edge of a diffusion-limited front, this leads to acceleration and blowup. This may be resolved, in an ad hoc manner, by introducing a cutoff below which growth is weakened or eliminated (8). This model, referred to as the BLT model, captures a number of qualitative features of global pattern formation in diffusion-limited aggregation: contours of the mean field match contours of averaged particle density in simulation, and the modified mean field theory can form dendritic features not possible in the naive mean field theory. The morphology transition between dendritic and non-dendritic global patterns requires that BLT fronts have a Mullins-Sekerka instability of the wavefront shape, in order to form concave patterns. We compute the stability of BLT fronts numerically, and compare the results to fronts without a cutoff. A significant morphological instability of the BLT fronts exists, with a dominant wavenumber on the scale of the front width. For standard mean field fronts, no instability is found. The naive and ad hoc mean field theories are continuum-deterministic models intended to capture the behavior of a discrete stochastic system. A transformation which maps discrete systems into a continuum model with a singular multiplicative noise is known, however numerical simulations of the continuum stochastic system often give mean field behavior instead of the critical behavior of the discrete system. We have found a new interpretation of the singular noise, based on maintaining

  11. Eccentricity fluctuations are not the only source of elliptic flow fluctuations in a multiphase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kai; Liu, Feng; Wang, Fu-Qiang

    2017-09-01

    Sources of event-by-event elliptic flow fluctuations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are investigated in a multiphase parton transport model (AMPT). Besides the well-known initial eccentricity fluctuations, several other sources of elliptic flow dynamical fluctuations are identified. One is fluctuations in initial parton configurations at a given eccentricity. Configuration fluctuations are found to be as important as eccentricity fluctuations in elliptic flow development. A second is quantum fluctuations in parton-parton interactions during system evolution. A third is fluctuations caused by hadronization and final-state hadronic scatterings. The magnitudes of these fluctuations are investigated relative to the eccentricity fluctuations and the average elliptic flow magnitude. The fluctuations from the latter two sources are found to be negative. The results may have important implications for the interpretation of elliptic flow data. Supported by MOST, China, under 973 Grant 2015CB856901, National Natural Science Foundation of China (11521064, 11547143, 11228513), U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-88ER40412), Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, South-Central University for Nationalities (CZQ15001) and Excellent Doctorial Dissertation Cultivation Grant from Central China Normal University (2013YBZD18)

  12. Probing the quantum vacuum with petawatt lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, W. T., III; Roso, L.

    2017-07-01

    Due to the bosonic nature of the photon, increasing the peak intensity through a combination of raising the pulse energy and decreasing the pulse duration will pile up more and more photons within the same finite region of space. In the absence of material, this continues until the vacuum is stressed to the point of breakdown and virtual particles become real. The critical intensity where this occurs for electrons and positrons - the so-called Schwinger limit - is predicted to be ˜ 1029 W/cm2. At substantially lower intensities, however, nonlinear aspects of the quantum vacuum associated with polarization of the vacuum can be explored. These studies become viable at the petawatt level where 1023 W/cm2 and above can be reached. This is an era into which we are just embarking that will provide critical tests of QED and theories beyond the Standard Model of particle physics.

  13. Venturi vacuum systems for hypobaric chamber operations.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R; Swaby, G; Sutton, T; Fife, C; Powell, M; Butler, B D

    1997-11-01

    Physiological studies of the effects of high altitude on man often require the use of a hypobaric chamber to simulate the reduced ambient pressures. Typical "altitude" chambers in use today require complex mechanical vacuum systems to evacuate the chamber air, either directly or via reservoir system. Use of these pumps adds to the cost of both chamber procurement and maintenance, and service of these pumps requires trained support personnel and regular upkeep. In this report we describe use of venturi vacuum pumps to perform the function of mechanical vacuum pumps for human and experimental altitude chamber operations. Advantages of the venturi pumps include their relatively low procurement cost, small size and light weight, ease of installation and plumbing, lack of moving parts, and independence from electrical power sources, fossil fuels and lubricants. Conversion of three hyperbaric chambers to combined hyper/hypobaric use is described.

  14. Sequestering the standard model vacuum energy.

    PubMed

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2014-03-07

    We propose a very simple reformulation of general relativity, which completely sequesters from gravity all of the vacuum energy from a matter sector, including all loop corrections and renders all contributions from phase transitions automatically small. The idea is to make the dimensional parameters in the matter sector functionals of the 4-volume element of the Universe. For them to be nonzero, the Universe should be finite in spacetime. If this matter is the standard model of particle physics, our mechanism prevents any of its vacuum energy, classical or quantum, from sourcing the curvature of the Universe. The mechanism is consistent with the large hierarchy between the Planck scale, electroweak scale, and curvature scale, and early Universe cosmology, including inflation. Consequences of our proposal are that the vacuum curvature of an old and large universe is not zero, but very small, that w(DE) ≃ -1 is a transient, and that the Universe will collapse in the future.

  15. Vacuum Outgassing of High Density Polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Sze, J; Schildbach, M A

    A combination of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and temperature programmed decomposition (TPD) was employed to identify the outgassing species, the total amount of outgassing, and the outgassing kinetics of high density polyethylene (HDPE) in a vacuum environment. The isoconversional kinetic analysis was then used to analyze the outgassing kinetics and to predict the long-term outgassing of HDPE in vacuum applications at ambient temperature. H{sub 2}O and C{sub n}H{sub x} with n as high as 9 and x centering around 2n are the major outgassing species from solid HDPE, but the quantities evolved can be significantly reduced by vacuum baking at 368more » K for a few hours prior to device assembly.« less

  16. Analysis of fluctuations in semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, Petru

    The random nature of ion implantation and diffusion processes as well as inevitable tolerances in fabrication result in random fluctuations of doping concentrations and oxide thickness in semiconductor devices. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in ultrasmall (nanoscale) semiconductor devices when the spatial scale of doping and oxide thickness variations become comparable with the geometric dimensions of devices. In the dissertation, the effects of these fluctuations on device characteristics are analyzed by using a new technique for the analysis of random doping and oxide thickness induced fluctuations. This technique is universal in nature in the sense that it is applicable to any transport model (drift-diffusion, semiclassical transport, quantum transport etc.) and it can be naturally extended to take into account random fluctuations of the oxide (trapped) charges and channel length. The technique is based on linearization of the transport equations with respect to the fluctuating quantities. It is computationally much (a few orders of magnitude) more efficient than the traditional Monte-Carlo approach and it yields information on the sensitivity of fluctuations of parameters of interest (e.g. threshold voltage, small-signal parameters, cut-off frequencies, etc.) to the locations of doping and oxide thickness fluctuations. For this reason, it can be very instrumental in the design of fluctuation-resistant structures of semiconductor devices. Quantum mechanical effects are taken into account by using the density-gradient model as well as through self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger computations. Special attention is paid to the presenting of the technique in a form that is suitable for implementation on commercial device simulators. The numerical implementation of the technique is discussed in detail and numerous computational results are presented and compared with those previously published in literature.

  17. Tunneling of Bloch electrons through vacuum barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, I. I.

    2001-08-01

    Tunneling of Bloch electrons through a vacuum barrier introduces new physical effects in comparison with the textbook case of free (plane wave) electrons. For the latter, the exponential decay rate in the vacuum is minimal for electrons with the parallel component of momentum kparallel = 0, and the prefactor is defined by the electron momentum component in the normal to the surface direction. However, the decay rate of Bloch electrons may be minimal at an arbitrary kparallel ("hot spots" ), and the prefactor is determined by the electron's group velocity, rather than by its quasimomentum. We illustrate this by first-principles calculations for (110) Pd surface.

  18. MEANS AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING A VACUUM

    DOEpatents

    Otavka, M.A.

    1960-08-01

    A new method is given for starting the operation of evapor-ion vacuum pumps. Ordinarily this type of pump is started by inducing an electric field with the vacuum chamber; however, by placing such an electric field in the chamber at the outset, a glow discharge may be initiated which is harmful to the pump. The procedure consists of using a negative electric field during which time only gettering action takes place; subsequently when the field reverses after a sufficient reduction of the number of gaseous particles in the chamber both gettering and ionizing takes place.

  19. Internal motion in high vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, J. M.

    Three transfer and positioning mechanisms have been developed for the non-air exposed, multistep processing of components in vacuum chambers. The functions to be performed in all of the systems include ultraviolet/ozone cleaning, vacuum baking, deposition of thin films, and thermocompression sealing of the enclosures. Precise positioning of the components is required during the evaporation and sealing processes. The three methods of transporting and positioning the components were developed to accommodate the design criteria and goals of each individual system. The design philosophy, goals, and operation of the three mechanisms are discussed.

  20. Particle adhesion to surfaces under vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1988-01-01

    The release of glass beads and standard dust from aluminum and glass substrates under centrifugation (simulating atmospheric pressure, low vacuum, and high vacuum conditions) was measured, with application to the estimation of contaminant particle release during spacecraft launch. For particles in the 10-100 micron range, dust was found to adhere more strongly than glass beads in all the cases considered. For most of the cases, dust and glass beads adhered more strongly to glass than to aluminum at all pressures. The adhesion force for dust on glass at 10 torr was shown to be as small as the value for dust on aluminum.

  1. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

    1996-12-31

    A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

  2. Evaluating operational vacuum for landfill biogas extraction.

    PubMed

    Fabbricino, Massimiliano

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript proposes a practical methodology for estimating the operational vacuum for landfill biogas extraction from municipal landfills. The procedure is based on two sub-models which simulate landfill gas production from organic waste decomposition and distribution of gas pressure and gas movement induced by suction at a blower station. The two models are coupled in a single mass balance equation, obtaining a relationship between the operational vacuum and the amount of landfill gas that can be extracted from an assigned system of vertical wells. To better illustrate the procedure, it is applied to a case study, where a good agreement between simulated and measured data, within +/- 30%, is obtained.

  3. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

    1998-10-06

    A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

  4. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Coyne, Martin J.; Fiscus, Gregory M.; Sammel, Alfred G.

    1998-01-01

    A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

  5. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Set Point Determination

    SciTech Connect

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-03-21

    The Safety Class Instrumentation and Control (SCIC) system provides active detection and response to process anomalies that, if unmitigated, would result in a safety event. Specifically, actuation of the SCIC system includes two portions. The portion which isolates the MCO and initiates the safety-class helium (SCHe) purge, and the portion which detects and stops excessive heat input to the MCO on high tempered water MCO inlet temperature. For the MCO isolation and purge, the SCIC receives signals from MCO pressure (both positive pressure and vacuum), helium flow rate, bay high temperature switches, seismic trips and time under vacuum trips.

  6. Rigidity in vacuum under conformal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Gregory J.; Vega, Carlos

    2018-04-01

    Motivated in part by Eardley et al. (Commun Math Phys 106(1):137-158, 1986), in this note we obtain a rigidity result for globally hyperbolic vacuum spacetimes in arbitrary dimension that admit a timelike conformal Killing vector field. Specifically, we show that if M is a Ricci flat, timelike geodesically complete spacetime with compact Cauchy surfaces that admits a timelike conformal Killing field X, then M must split as a metric product, and X must be Killing. This gives a partial proof of the Bartnik splitting conjecture in the vacuum setting.

  7. Very high-vacuum heat treatment facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1987-01-01

    A vacuum heat treatment facility, with hot zone dimensions of 12 x 19 x 19 cm, has been designed and constructed at a cost substantially below that of a commercial unit. The design incorporates efficient water cooling and a resistive heating element. A vacuum pressure of 1.5 x 10 to the -8th torr at room temperature has been obtained after baking. The temperature limit is approximately 1900 C. This limit results from the choice of niobium as the hot zone material.

  8. Fine-needle aspiration by vacuum tubes.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, N D

    1989-07-01

    Fine-needle aspiration of subcutaneous masses, accepted in many parts of Europe and the Americas as a routine diagnostic technique, employs a syringe holder to facilitate the creation of a vacuum to withdraw cells. This investigation demonstrates that a vacuum tube used in venipuncture can be used to supply the negative pressure to suck cells into the needle. This apparatus is more readily available than a syringe holder in hospitals and clinics, and particularly provides the operator with a more dexterous approach to the mass because the fingers holding the needle can be much closer to the mass being immobilized by the other hand.

  9. Evaluation of Dry, Rough Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This document provides information on the testing and evaluation of thirteen dry rough vacuum pumps of various designs and from various manufacturers. Several types of rough vacuum pumps were evaluated, including scroll, roots, and diaphragm pumps. Tests included long term testing, speed curve generation, voltage variance, vibrations emissions and susceptibility, electromagnetic interference emissions and susceptibility, static leak rate, exhaust restriction, response/recovery time tests, and a contamination analysis for scroll pumps. Parameters were found for operation with helium, which often is not provided from the manufacturer

  10. Vacuum Head Checks Foam/Substrate Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, James F.

    1989-01-01

    Electromechanical inspection system quickly gives measurements indicating adhesion, or lack thereof, between rigid polyurethane foam and aluminum substrate. Does not damage inspected article, easy to operate, and used to perform "go/no-go" evaluations or as supplement to conventional destructive pull-plug testing. Applies vacuum to small area of foam panel and measures distance through which foam pulled into vacuum. Probe head applied to specimen and evacuated through hose to controller/monitor unit. Digital voltmeter in unit reads deflection of LVDT probe head.

  11. Vacuum distillation/vapor filtration water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honegger, R. J.; Neveril, R. B.; Remus, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration (VD/VF) water recovery system are considered. As a functional model, the system converts urine and condensates waste water from six men to potable water on a steady-state basis. The system is designed for 180-day operating durations and for function on the ground, on zero-g aircraft, and in orbit. Preparatory tasks are summarized for conducting low gravity tests of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration system for recovering water from urine.

  12. Elasticity and Fluctuations of Frustrated Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Doron; Sharon, Eran; Diamant, Haim

    2016-06-01

    We derive a reduced quasi-one-dimensional theory of geometrically frustrated elastic ribbons. Expressed in terms of geometric properties alone, it applies to ribbons over a wide range of scales, allowing the study of their elastic equilibrium, as well as thermal fluctuations. We use the theory to account for the twisted-to-helical transition of ribbons with spontaneous negative curvature and the effect of fluctuations on the corresponding critical exponents. The persistence length of such ribbons changes nonmonotonically with the ribbon's width, dropping to zero at the transition. This and other statistical properties qualitatively differ from those of nonfrustrated fluctuating filaments.

  13. Effects of Fluctuations on Inhomogeneous Chiral Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tong-Gyu; Yoshiike, Ryo; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    We discuss the features of the order-parameter fluctuations in the normal phase near the phase boundary and their effects on the phase transition from the normal to the inhomogeneous phase with spatially modulated order parameter. Focusing on the chiral symmetry breaking, i.e., inhomogeneous chiral transition, we consider the fluctuation of the chiral pair consisting of quark-antiquark or quark-hole pair within the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the chiral limit. We clarify the roles of quantum and thermal fluctuations and also argue that anomalies for thermodynamic quantities in the inhomogeneous chiral transition should lead to phenomenological implications.

  14. Nonisothermal fluctuating hydrodynamics and Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falasco, G.; Kroy, K.

    2016-03-01

    The classical theory of Brownian dynamics follows from coarse graining the underlying linearized fluctuating hydrodynamics of the solvent. We extend this procedure to globally nonisothermal conditions, requiring only a local thermal equilibration of the solvent. Starting from the conservation laws, we establish the stochastic equations of motion for the fluid momentum fluctuations in the presence of a suspended Brownian particle. These are then contracted to the nonisothermal generalized Langevin description of the suspended particle alone, for which the coupling to stochastic temperature fluctuations is found to be negligible under typical experimental conditions.

  15. Real-time observation of fluctuations at the driven-dissipative Dicke phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Brennecke, Ferdinand; Mottl, Rafael; Baumann, Kristian; Landig, Renate; Donner, Tobias; Esslinger, Tilman

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the influence of dissipation on the driven Dicke quantum phase transition, realized by coupling external degrees of freedom of a Bose–Einstein condensate to the light field of a high-finesse optical cavity. The cavity provides a natural dissipation channel, which gives rise to vacuum-induced fluctuations and allows us to observe density fluctuations of the gas in real-time. We monitor the divergence of these fluctuations over two orders of magnitude while approaching the phase transition, and observe a behavior that deviates significantly from that expected for a closed system. A correlation analysis of the fluctuations reveals the diverging time scale of the atomic dynamics and allows us to extract a damping rate for the external degree of freedom of the atoms. We find good agreement with our theoretical model including dissipation via both the cavity field and the atomic field. Using a dissipation channel to nondestructively gain information about a quantum many-body system provides a unique path to study the physics of driven-dissipative systems. PMID:23818599

  16. Lightweight Vacuum Jacket for Cryogenic Insulation. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, D. L.; Bell, J. E.; Brogren, E. W.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of producing a lightweight vacuum jacket using state-of-the-art technology and materials was examined. Design and analytical studies were made on a full-scale, orbital maneuvering system fuel tank. Preliminary design details were made for the tank assembly, including an optimized vacuum jacket and multilayer insulation system. A half-scale LH2 test model was designed and fabricated, and a force/stiffness proof test was conducted on the vacuum jacket. A vacuum leak rate of .000001 atmosphere ml of helium per second was measured, approximately 1500 hours of vacuum pressure were sustained, and 29 vacuum-pressure cycles were experienced prior to failure.

  17. Scale-invariant fluctuations from Galilean genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Brandenberger, Robert, E-mail: wangyi@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2012-10-01

    We study the spectrum of cosmological fluctuations in scenarios such as Galilean Genesis \\cite(Nicolis) in which a spectator scalar field acquires a scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations during an early phase which asymptotes in the far past to Minkowski space-time. In the case of minimal coupling to gravity and standard scalar field Lagrangian, the induced curvature fluctuations depend quadratically on the spectator field and are hence non-scale-invariant and highly non-Gaussian. We show that if higher dimensional operators (the same operators that lead to the η-problem for inflation) are considered, a linear coupling between background and spectator field fluctuations is induced whichmore » leads to scale-invariant and Gaussian curvature fluctuations.« less

  18. Novikov Engine with Fluctuating Heat Bath Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalbe, Karsten; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2018-04-01

    The Novikov engine is a model for heat engines that takes the irreversible character of heat fluxes into account. Using this model, the maximum power output as well as the corresponding efficiency of the heat engine can be deduced, leading to the well-known Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency. The classical model assumes constant heat bath temperatures, which is not a reasonable assumption in the case of fluctuating heat sources. Therefore, in this article the influence of stochastic fluctuations of the hot heat bath's temperature on the optimal performance measures is investigated. For this purpose, a Novikov engine with fluctuating heat bath temperature is considered. Doing so, a generalization of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency is found. The results can help to quantify how the distribution of fluctuating quantities affects the performance measures of power plants.

  19. Fractal fluctuations in gaze speed visual search.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Damian G; Anastas, Jason

    2011-04-01

    Visual search involves a subtle coordination of visual memory and lower-order perceptual mechanisms. Specifically, the fluctuations in gaze may provide support for visual search above and beyond what may be attributed to memory. Prior research indicates that gaze during search exhibits fractal fluctuations, which allow for a wide sampling of the field of view. Fractal fluctuations constitute a case of fast diffusion that may provide an advantage in exploration. We present reanalyses of eye-tracking data collected by Stephen and Mirman (Cognition, 115, 154-165, 2010) for single-feature and conjunction search tasks. Fluctuations in gaze during these search tasks were indeed fractal. Furthermore, the degree of fractality predicted decreases in reaction time on a trial-by-trial basis. We propose that fractality may play a key role in explaining the efficacy of perceptual exploration.

  20. Fluctuating pressures in flow fields of jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. C.; Haviland, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    The powered lift configurations under present development for STOL aircraft are the externally blown flap (EBF), involving direct jet impingement on the aircraft flaps, and the upper surface blown (USB), where the jet flow is attached on the upper surface of the wing and directed downwards. Towards the goal of developing scaling laws to predict unsteady loads imposed on the structural components of these STOL aircraft from small model tests, the near field fluctuating pressure behavior for the simplified cases of a round free cold jet and the same jet impinging on a flat plate was investigated. Examples are given of coherences, phase lags (giving convection velocities), and overall fluctuating pressure levels measured. The fluctuating pressure levels measured on the flat plate are compared to surface fluctuating pressure levels measured on full-scale powered-lift configuration models.

  1. Detrended fluctuation analysis of human brain electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, C. P.; Zheng, B.; Wu, Y. Z.; Wang, Y.; Tang, X. W.

    2004-08-01

    With the detrended fluctuation analysis, we investigate dynamics of human brain electroencephalogram. Long-range temporal correlation and scaling behavior are observed, and certain characteristic of the Alzheimer's disease is revealed.

  2. Extracellular signal fluctuations in shark electrosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brandon R.; Hughes, Mary E.; Hutchison, John C.

    2003-05-01

    We examine the roll of an extracellular gel in the functioning of the electrosensors of elasmobranchs (sharks, skates, and rays). Here we focus on physical characteristics of the gel and their mechanistic relevance to the observed functioning of the electrosensors. The electrosensitive organs show sharp transient responses to both tiny electrical fluctuations and temperature fluctuations. We present a thermoelectric characterization of the gel. The data suggest a gel-mediated mechanism of transducing thermal fluctuations to electrical fluctuations in the electrosensor, independent of the sensing cells. We also present frequency-dependent electrical properties of the gel collected using electrical impedance spectroscopy. From these measurements we try to extract characteristic relaxation times. We analyze these results within the context of the electrosensors" bandwidth, as demonstrated in previous behavioral experiments.

  3. Vacuum Pyrolysis and Related ISRU Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Eric H.; Pomeroy, Brian R.; Banks, Ian S.; Benz, Alexis

    2007-01-01

    A number of ISRU-related techniques have been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The focus of the team has been on development of the vacuum pyrolysis technique for the production of oxygen from the lunar regolith. However, a number of related techniques have also been developed, including solar concentration, solar heating of regolith, resistive heating of regolith, sintering, regolith boiling, process modeling, parts manufacturing, and instrumentation development. An initial prototype system was developed to vaporize regolith simulants using a approx. l square meter Fresnel lens. This system was successfully used to vaporize quantities of approx. lg, and both mass spectroscopy of the gasses produced and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the slag were done to show that oxygen was produced. Subsequent tests have demonstrated the use of a larger system With a 3.8m diameter reflective mirror to vaporize the regolith. These results and modeling of the vacuum pyrolysis reaction have indicated that the vaporization of the oxides in the regolith will occur at lower temperature for stronger vacuums. The chemical modeling was validated by testing of a resistive heating system that vaporized quantities of approx. 10g of MLS-1A. This system was also used to demonstrate the sintering of regolith simulants at reduced temperatures in high vacuum. This reduction in the required temperature prompted the development of a small-scale resistive heating system for application as a scientific instrument as well as a proof-of principle experiment for oxygen production.

  4. Friction, wear, and lubrication in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    A review of studies and observations on the friction, wear, and lubrication behavior of materials in a vacuum environment is presented. The factors that determine and influence friction and wear are discussed. They include topographical, physical, mechanical, and the chemical nature of the surface. The effects of bulk properties such as deformation characteristics, fracture behavior, and structure are included.

  5. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-06-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed.

  6. Vacuum statistics and stability in axionic landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Masoumi, Ali; Vilenkin, Alexander, E-mail: ali@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2016-03-01

    We investigate vacuum statistics and stability in random axionic landscapes. For this purpose we developed an algorithm for a quick evaluation of the tunneling action, which in most cases is accurate within 10%. We find that stability of a vacuum is strongly correlated with its energy density, with lifetime rapidly growing as the energy density is decreased. On the other hand, the probability P(B) for a vacuum to have a tunneling action B greater than a given value declines as a slow power law in B. This is in sharp contrast with the studies of random quartic potentials, which foundmore » a fast exponential decline of P(B). Our results suggest that the total number of relatively stable vacua (say, with B>100) grows exponentially with the number of fields N and can get extremely large for N∼> 100. The problem with this kind of model is that the stable vacua are concentrated near the absolute minimum of the potential, so the observed value of the cosmological constant cannot be explained without fine-tuning. To address this difficulty, we consider a modification of the model, where the axions acquire a quadratic mass term, due to their mixing with 4-form fields. This results in a larger landscape with a much broader distribution of vacuum energies. The number of relatively stable vacua in such models can still be extremely large.« less

  7. Vacuum plasma coatings for turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Turbine blades, vacuum plasma spray coated with NiCrAlY, CoCrAlY or NiCrAlY/Cr2O3, were evaluated and rated superior to standard space shuttle main engine (SSME) coated blades. Ratings were based primarily on 25 thermal cycles in the MSFC Burner Rig Tester, cycling between 1700 F (gaseous H2) and -423 F (liquid H2). These tests showed no spalling on blades with improved vacuum plasma coatings, while standard blades spalled. Thermal barrier coatings of ZrO2, while superior to standard coatings, lacked the overall performance desired. Fatigue and tensile specimens, machined from MAR-M-246(Hf) test bars identical to the blades were vacuum plasma spray coated, diffusion bond treated, and tested to qualify the vacuum plasma spray process for flight hardware testing and application. While NiCrAlY/Cr2O3 offers significant improvement over standard coatings in durability and thermal protection, studies continue with an objective to develop coatings offering even greater improvements.

  8. Laser Vacuum Furnace for Zone Refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.; Zurburg, F. W.; Penn, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Laser beam scanned to produce moving melt zone. Experimental laser vacuum furnace scans crystalline wafer with high-power CO2-laser beam to generate precise melt zone with precise control of temperature gradients around zone. Intended for zone refining of silicon or other semiconductors in low gravity, apparatus used in normal gravity.

  9. Vacuum Flushing of Sewer Solids (Slides)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vacuum sewer and tank cleaning (flushing) technology removes sewer solids from urban drainage systems, such as storage tanks and pipes. This technology is both effective and inexpensive. In addition, it can be considered a true green technology. It operates under atmospheri...

  10. Ernst potentials for vacuum Bianchi models

    SciTech Connect

    Breton, N.

    The authors derive Ernst potentials for vacuum Bianchi I through VII models. A scheme to find inhomogeneous generalizations of such models by using generating techniques which incorporate electromagnetic fields or gravitational wave perturbations to a [open quotes]seed[close quotes] Bianchi solution is presented. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Atomic Oscillator Strengths in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Szabo, Csilla I.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed techniques to measure branching fractions in the vacuum ultraviolet using diffraction grating spectroscopy and phosphor image plates as detectors. These techniques have been used to measure branching fractions in Fe II that give prominent emission lines in astrophysical objects.

  12. Vacuum storage of yellow-poplar pollen

    Treesearch

    James R. Wilcox

    1966-01-01

    Vacuum-drying, followed by storage in vacuo or in an inert gas, is effective for storing pollen of many species. It permits storage at room environments without rigid controls of either temperature or humidity, an advantage that becomes paramount during long-distance transfers of pollen when critical storage conditions are impossible to maintain. In...

  13. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.; Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  14. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.; Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  15. Waveguide quantum electrodynamics in squeezed vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jieyu; Liao, Zeyang; Li, Sheng-Wen; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2018-02-01

    We study the dynamics of a general multiemitter system coupled to the squeezed vacuum reservoir and derive a master equation for this system based on the Weisskopf-Wigner approximation. In this theory, we include the effect of positions of the squeezing sources which is usually neglected in the previous studies. We apply this theory to a quasi-one-dimensional waveguide case where the squeezing in one dimension is experimentally achievable. We show that while dipole-dipole interaction induced by ordinary vacuum depends on the emitter separation, the two-photon process due to the squeezed vacuum depends on the positions of the emitters with respect to the squeezing sources. The dephasing rate, decay rate, and the resonance fluorescence of the waveguide-QED in the squeezed vacuum are controllable by changing the positions of emitters. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the stationary maximum entangled NOON state for identical emitters can be reached with arbitrary initial state when the center-of-mass position of the emitters satisfies certain conditions.

  16. Thick tellurium target preparation by vacuum deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarz, Anna

    1999-12-01

    Tellurium targets of thickness up to 6.5 mg/cm 2 on carbon backings were prepared by vacuum deposition. The influence of the crucible dimension, treatment of the backing foil by glow discharge and substrate cooling on the Te sticking efficiency was studied in order to achieve the best yield.

  17. Vacuum Baking To Remove Volatile Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscari, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Outgassing reduced in some but not all nonmetallic materials. Eleven polymeric materials tested by determining outgassing species as temperature of conditioned and unconditioned materials raised to 300 degrees C. Conditioning process consisted of vacuum bake for 24 hours at 80 degrees C in addition to usual cure. Baking did not change residual gas percentage of water molecules.

  18. Superconducting dc Current Limiting Vacuum Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alferov, D. F.; Akhmetgareev, M. R.; Budovskii, A. I.; Bunin, R. A.; Voloshin, I. F.; Degtyarenko, P. N.; Yevsin, D. V.; Ivanov, V. P.; Sidorov, V. A.; Fisher, L. M.; Tshai, E. V.

    Acircuitofadc superconductingfault current limiter witha direct current circuit-breaker fora nominal current 300A is proposed. It includes the 2G high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes and the high-speed dc vacuum circuit breaker.Thetestresultsof current-limitingcapacityandrecoverytimeof superconductivityafter currentfaultatvoltage upto3 kV are presented.

  19. Vacuum microelectronics for beam power and rectennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Henry F.

    1989-01-01

    Vacuum Microelectronic devices can be described as vacuum transistors or micro-miniature vacuum tubes, as one chooses. The fundamental reason behind this new technology is the very large current densities available from field emitters, namely as high as 10(8) A/sq cm. Array current densities as high as 1000 A/sq cm have been measured. Total electron transit times from source to drain for 1 micron feature size devices have been predicted to be about 150fs. This very short transit time implies the possibility of submillimeter wave transmitters and rectennas in devices which can operate with reasonably high voltages and which are small in size and are lightweight. In addition, they are expected to be extremely radiation hard and very temperature insensitive. That is, they are expected to have radiation hardness characteristics similar to vacuum tubes, and both the high temperature and low temperature limits should be determined by the package. That is, there should be no practical intrinsic temperature or carrier freezeout problems for devices based on metals or composites. But the technology is difficult to implement at the present time because it is based on 300 to 500 angstrom radius field emitters which must be relatively uniform. There is also the need to understand the non-equilibrium transport physics in the near-surface regions of the field emitters.

  20. A High Vacuum High Speed Ion Pump

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Foster, J. S. Jr.; Lawrence, E. O.; Lofgren, E. J.

    1952-08-27

    A vacuum pump based on the properties of a magnetically collimated electric discharge is described. It has a speed in the range 3000 to 7000 liters a second and a base pressure in the order of 10{sup -6} mm. (auth)

  1. Design of the ZTH vacuum liner

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, P.P.; Dike, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of the ZTH vacuum liner design is covered by this report. ZTH will be the first experiment to be installed in the CPRF (Confinement Physics Research Facility) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and is scheduled to be operational at the rated current of 4 MA in 1992. The vacuum vessel has a 2.4 m major radius and a 40 cm minor radius. Operating parameters which drive the vacuum vessel mechanical design include a 300 C bakeout temperature, an armour support system capable of withstanding 25 kV, a high toroidal resistance, 1250 kPa magnetic loading, a 10more » minute cycle time, and high positional accuracy with respect to the conducting shell. The vacuum vessel design features which satisfy the operating parameters are defined. The liner is constructed of Inconel 625 and has a geometry which alternates sections of thin walled bellows with rigid ribs. These composite sections span between pairs of the 16 diagnostic stations to complete the torus. The thin bellows sections maximize the liner toroidal resistance and the ribs provide support and positional accuracy for the armour in relation to the conducting shell. Heat transfer from the vessel is controlled by a blanket wrap of ceramic fiber insulation and the heat flux is dissipated to a water cooling jacket in the conducting shell.« less

  2. Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Fluctuation Funds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-21

    Services should account for gains and losses due to currency C-) exchange rate fluctuations in fiscal year 1981 military construc- tion and family...housing programs. Some officials contend that, ._J since no contingency funds were made available in fiscal year LJ* 1981, it is not necessary to account...possible trans- F fer to the contingency’ funds. Gains would have been recorded in C= fiscal year 1981 due to the favorable U.S. dollar fluctuations

  3. Quantum fluctuations of the superconducting cosmic string

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shoucheng

    1987-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of the proposed superconducting string with Bose charge carriers are studied in terms of the vortices on the string world sheet. In the thermodynamical limit, it is found that they appear in the form of free vortices rather than as bound pairs. This fluctuation mode violates the topological conservation law on which superconductivity is based. However, this limit may not be reached. The critical size of the superconducting string is estimated as a function of the coupling constants involved.

  4. Density Fluctuations in a Polar Coronal Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; D’Huys, Elke; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2018-06-01

    We have measured the root-mean-square (rms) amplitude of intensity fluctuations, ΔI, in plume and interplume regions of a polar coronal hole. These intensity fluctuations correspond to density fluctuations. Using data from the Sun Watcher using the Active Pixel System detector and Image Processing on the Project for Onboard Autonomy (Proba2), our results extend up to a height of about 1.35 R ⊙. One advantage of the rms analysis is that it does not rely on a detailed evaluation of the power spectrum, which is limited by noise levels to low heights in the corona. The rms approach can be performed up to larger heights where the noise level is greater, provided that the noise itself can be quantified. At low heights, both the absolute ΔI, and the amplitude relative to the mean intensity, ΔI/I, decrease with height. However, starting at about 1.2 R ⊙, ΔI/I increases, reaching 20%–40% by 1.35 R ⊙. This corresponds to density fluctuations of Δn e/n e ≈ 10%–20%. The increasing relative amplitude implies that the density fluctuations are generated in the corona itself. One possibility is that the density fluctuations are generated by an instability of Alfvén waves. This generation mechanism is consistent with some theoretical models and with observations of Alfvén wave amplitudes in coronal holes. Although we find that the energy of the observed density fluctuations is small, these fluctuations are likely to play an important indirect role in coronal heating by promoting the reflection of Alfvén waves and driving turbulence.

  5. Nearly Seamless Vacuum-Insulated Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanian, Christopher J.; Ou, Danny; Hu, Xiangjun

    2010-01-01

    A design concept, and a fabrication process that would implement the design concept, have been proposed for nearly seamless vacuum-insulated boxes that could be the main structural components of a variety of controlled-temperature containers, including common household refrigerators and insulating containers for shipping foods. In a typical case, a vacuum-insulated box would be shaped like a rectangular parallelepiped conventional refrigerator box having five fully closed sides and a hinged door on the sixth side. Although it is possible to construct the five-closed-side portion of the box as an assembly of five unitary vacuum-insulated panels, it is not desirable to do so because the relatively high thermal conductances of the seams between the panels would contribute significant amounts of heat leakage, relative to the leakage through the panels themselves. In contrast, the proposal would make it possible to reduce heat leakage by constructing the five-closed-side portion of the box plus the stationary portion (if any) of the sixth side as a single, seamless unit; the only remaining seam would be the edge seal around the door. The basic cross-sectional configuration of each side of a vacuum-insulated box according to the proposal would be that of a conventional vacuum-insulated panel: a low-density, porous core material filling a partially evacuated space between face sheets. However, neither the face sheets nor the core would be conventional. The face sheets would be opposite sides of a vacuum bag. The core material would be a flexible polymer-modified silica aerogel of the type described in Silica/Polymer and Silica/Polymer/Fiber Composite Aero - gels (MSC-23736) in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. As noted in that article, the stiffness of this core material against compression is greater than that of prior aerogels. This is an important advantage because it translates to greater retention of thickness and, hence, of insulation performance when pressure is

  6. Origin of density fluctuations in extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Salopek, David S.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The density fluctuations (both curvature and isocurvature) that arise due to quantum fluctuations in a simple model of extended inflation based upon the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory are calculated. Curvature fluctuations arise due to quantum fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field, in general have a nonscale-invariant spectrum, and can have an amplitude that is cosmologically acceptable and interesting without having to tune any coupling constant to a very small value. The density perturbations that arise due to the inflation field are subdominant. If there are other massless fields in the theory, e.g., an axion or an ilion, then isocurvature fluctuations arise in these fields too. Production of gravitational waves and the massless particles associated with excitations of the Brans-Dicke field are also discussed. Several attempts at more realistic models of extended inflation are also analyzed. The importance of the Einstein conformal frame in calculating curvature fluctuations is emphasized. When viewed in this frame, extended inflation closely resembles slow-rollover inflation with an exponential potential and the usual formula for the amplitude of curvature perturbations applies.

  7. Rotating Casimir systems: Magnetic-field-enhanced perpetual motion, possible realization in doped nanotubes, and laws of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that for a certain class of Casimir-type systems (“devices”) the energy of zero-point vacuum fluctuations reaches its global minimum when the device rotates about a certain axis rather than remains static. This rotational vacuum effect may lead to the emergence of permanently rotating objects provided the negative rotational energy of zero-point fluctuations cancels the positive rotational energy of the device itself. In this paper, we show that for massless electrically charged particles the rotational vacuum effect should be drastically (astronomically) enhanced in the presence of a magnetic field. As an illustration, we show that in a background of experimentally available magnetic fields the zero-point energy of massless excitations in rotating torus-shaped doped carbon nanotubes may indeed overwhelm the classical energy of rotation for certain angular frequencies so that the permanently rotating state is energetically favored. The suggested “zero-point-driven” devices—which have no internally moving parts—correspond to a perpetuum mobile of a new, fourth kind: They do not produce any work despite the fact that their equilibrium (ground) state corresponds to a permanent rotation even in the presence of an external environment. We show that our proposal is consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  8. Decay of the de Sitter vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul R.; Mottola, Emil; Sanders, Dillon H.

    2018-03-01

    The decay rate of the Bunch-Davies state of a massive scalar field in the expanding flat spatial sections of de Sitter space is determined by an analysis of the particle pair creation process in real time. The Feynman definition of particle and antiparticle Fourier mode solutions of the scalar wave equation and their adiabatic phase analytically continued to the complexified time domain show conclusively that the Bunch-Davies state is not the vacuum state at late times. The closely analogous creation of charged particle pairs in a uniform electric field is reviewed and Schwinger's result for the vacuum decay rate is recovered by this same real time analysis. The vacuum decay rate in each case is also calculated by switching the background field on adiabatically, allowing it to act for a very long time, and then adiabatically switching it off again. In both the uniform electric field and de Sitter cases, the particles created while the field is switched on are verified to be real, in the sense that they persist in the final asymptotic flat zero-field region. In the de Sitter case, there is an interesting residual dependence of the rate on how the de Sitter phase is ended, indicating a greater sensitivity to spatial boundary conditions. The electric current of the created particles in the E -field case and their energy density and pressure in the de Sitter case are also computed, and the magnitude of their backreaction effects on the background field estimated. Possible consequences of the Hubble scale instability of the de Sitter vacuum for cosmology, vacuum dark energy, and the cosmological "constant" problem are discussed.

  9. Influence of thermal fluctuations on ligament break-up: a fluctuating lattice Boltzmann study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiao; Biferale, Luca; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Toschi, Federico

    2017-11-01

    Thermal fluctuations are essential ingredients in a nanoscale system, driving Brownian motion of particles and capillary waves at non-ideal interfaces. Here we study the influence of thermal fluctuations on the breakup of liquid ligaments at the nanoscale. We offer quantitative characterization of the effects of thermal fluctuations on the Plateau-Rayleigh mechanism that drives the breakup process of ligaments. Due to thermal fluctuations, the droplet sizes after break-up need to be analyzed in terms of their distribution over an ensemble made of repeated experiments. To this aim, we make use of numerical simulations based on the fluctuating lattice Boltzmann method (FLBM) for multicomponent mixtures. The method allows an accurate and efficient simulation of the fluctuating hydrodynamics equations of a binary mixture, where both stochastic viscous stresses and diffusion fluxes are introduced. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Grant Agreement No 642069.

  10. Probable or improbable universe? Correlating electroweak vacuum instability with the scale of inflation

    DOE PAGES

    Hook, Anson; Kearney, John; Shakya, Bibhushan; ...

    2015-01-13

    Measurements of the Higgs boson and top quark masses indicate that the Standard Model Higgs potential becomes unstable around Λ I ~ 10 11 GeV. This instability is cosmologically relevant since quantum fluctuations during inflation can easily destabilize the electroweak vacuum if the Hubble parameter during inflation is larger than Λ I (as preferred by the recent BICEP 2 measurement). Here, we perform a careful study of the evolution of the Higgs field during inflation, obtaining different results from those currently in the literature. We consider both tunneling via a Coleman-de Luccia or Hawking-Moss instanton, valid when the scale ofmore » inflation is below the instability scale, as well as a statistical treatment via the Fokker-Planck equation appropriate in the opposite regime. We show that a better understanding of the post-inflation evolution of the unstable AdS vacuum regions is crucial for determining the eventual fate of the universe. If these AdS regions devour all of space, a universe like ours is indeed extremely unlikely without new physics to stabilize the Higgs potential; however, if these regions crunch, our universe survives, but inflation must last a few e-folds longer to compensate for the lost AdS regions. Lastly, we examine the effects of generic Planck-suppressed corrections to the Higgs potential, which can be sufficient to stabilize the electroweak vacuum during inflation.« less

  11. Vacuum Bloch-Siegert shift in Landau polaritons with ultra-high cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinwei; Bamba, Motoaki; Zhang, Qi; Fallahi, Saeed; Gardner, Geoff C.; Gao, Weilu; Lou, Minhan; Yoshioka, Katsumasa; Manfra, Michael J.; Kono, Junichiro

    2018-06-01

    A two-level system resonantly interacting with an a.c. magnetic or electric field constitutes the physical basis of diverse phenomena and technologies. However, Schrödinger's equation for this seemingly simple system can be solved exactly only under the rotating-wave approximation, which neglects the counter-rotating field component. When the a.c. field is sufficiently strong, this approximation fails, leading to a resonance-frequency shift known as the Bloch-Siegert shift. Here, we report the vacuum Bloch-Siegert shift, which is induced by the ultra-strong coupling of matter with the counter-rotating component of the vacuum fluctuation field in a cavity. Specifically, an ultra-high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas inside a high-Q terahertz cavity in a quantizing magnetic field revealed ultra-narrow Landau polaritons, which exhibited a vacuum Bloch-Siegert shift up to 40 GHz. This shift, clearly distinguishable from the photon-field self-interaction effect, represents a unique manifestation of a strong-field phenomenon without a strong field.

  12. Constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter and baryon isocurvature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, Martin; Martin, Jerome; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2009-12-15

    We set constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter - radiation and baryon -radiation isocurvature fluctuations through modulus decay, assuming the modulus remains light during inflation. We find that the moduli problem becomes worse at the perturbative level as a significant part of the parameter space m{sub {sigma}} (modulus mass) - {sigma}{sub inf} (modulus vacuum expectation value at the end of inflation) is constrained by the nonobservation of significant isocurvature fluctuations. We discuss in detail the evolution of the modulus vacuum expectation value and perturbations, in particular, the consequences of Hubble scale corrections to the modulus potential,more » and the stochastic motion of the modulus during inflation. We show, in particular, that a high modulus mass scale m{sub {sigma}} > or approx. 100 TeV, which allows the modulus to evade big bang nucleosynthesis constraints is strongly constrained at the perturbative level. We find that generically, solving the moduli problem requires the inflationary scale to be much smaller than 10{sup 13} GeV.« less

  13. Vacuum Chamber Documentation for U of H Collection

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-16

    Documentation for the University of Houston (UH) Clear Lake collection of their library books after the Vacuum Chamber runs were performed to remove the water from them. Vacuum Chamber B in Building 32 was used.

  14. Safety shield for vacuum/pressure-chamber windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimansky, R. A.; Spencer, R.

    1980-01-01

    Optically-clear shatter-resistant safety shield protects workers from implosion and explosion of vacuum and pressure windows. Plastic shield is inexpensive and may be added to vacuum chambers, pressure chambers, and gas-filling systems.

  15. Development of a MEMS-Scale Turbomachinery Based Vacuum Pump

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    MEMS -SCALE TURBOMACHINERY BASED VACUUM PUMP by Michael J. Shea June 2012 Thesis Advisor: Anthony J. Gannon Second Reader...June 2012 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of a MEMS -Scale Turbomachinery Based Vacuum Pump 5...to develop a MEMS scale turbomachinery based vacuum pump. This would allow very high vacuum to be drawn for handheld mass spectroscopy. This

  16. 21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

  17. 7 CFR 58.423 - Cheese vacuumizing chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese vacuumizing chamber. 58.423 Section 58.423 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....423 Cheese vacuumizing chamber. The vacuum chamber shall be satisfactorily constructed and maintained...

  18. 7 CFR 58.423 - Cheese vacuumizing chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cheese vacuumizing chamber. 58.423 Section 58.423 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....423 Cheese vacuumizing chamber. The vacuum chamber shall be satisfactorily constructed and maintained...

  19. Vacuum transfer system increases sugar maple sap yield

    Treesearch

    Russell S. Walters

    1978-01-01

    Yields of sugar maple sap collected from three plastic pipeline systems by gravity, vacuum pump, and a vacuum pump with a transfer tank were compared during 2 years in northern Vermont. The transfer system yielded 27 percent more sap one year and 17 percent more the next year. Higher vacuum levels at the tapholes were observed in the transfer system.

  20. Dark matter as an effect of the quantum vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Emilio

    2018-04-01

    The interaction between the quantum vacuum and a weak gravitational field is calculated for the vacuum fields of quantum electrodynamics. The result shows that the vacuum state is modified by the gravitational field, giving rise to a nonzero interaction energy. This suggests a model that fits in the main properties of the hypothetical dark matter in galactic haloes.

  1. Feed-through connector couples RF power into vacuum chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandy, G. L.

    1967-01-01

    Feed-through device connects RF power to an RF coil in a vacuum chamber. The coil and leads are water cooled and vacuum tight seals are provided at the junctions. The device incorporates silver soldered copper tubes, polytetrafluoroethylene electrical insulators, and O-ring vacuum seals.

  2. 21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

  3. 21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

  4. 21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

  5. 21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

  6. 46 CFR 153.368 - Pressure-vacuum valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure-vacuum valves. 153.368 Section 153.368 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.368 Pressure-vacuum valves. (a) The pressure side of a required pressure-vacuum relief valve...

  7. 46 CFR 153.368 - Pressure-vacuum valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure-vacuum valves. 153.368 Section 153.368 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.368 Pressure-vacuum valves. (a) The pressure side of a required pressure-vacuum relief valve...

  8. 46 CFR 153.368 - Pressure-vacuum valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure-vacuum valves. 153.368 Section 153.368 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.368 Pressure-vacuum valves. (a) The pressure side of a required pressure-vacuum relief valve...

  9. 46 CFR 153.368 - Pressure-vacuum valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure-vacuum valves. 153.368 Section 153.368 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.368 Pressure-vacuum valves. (a) The pressure side of a required pressure-vacuum relief valve...

  10. 46 CFR 153.368 - Pressure-vacuum valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure-vacuum valves. 153.368 Section 153.368 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.368 Pressure-vacuum valves. (a) The pressure side of a required pressure-vacuum relief valve...

  11. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans. ...

  12. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans. ...

  13. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans. ...

  14. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans. ...

  15. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans. ...

  16. 92. VIEW OF PRECIPITATION AREA FROM SOUTHWEST. VACUUM CLARIFIER TANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. VIEW OF PRECIPITATION AREA FROM SOUTHWEST. VACUUM CLARIFIER TANK No. 1 AT LOWER LEFT, UNDER LAUNDER FEED TO GOLD TANK No. 2, AND VACUUM CLARIFIER TANK No. 2, AT MIDRIGHT. VACUUM RECEIVER TANK ON UPPER LEFT. PIPE TO TOP CENTER OF TANK TAKES OUTFLOW FROM CLARIFIER LEAVES. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  17. Moving characteristics of electrodes for vacuum circuit breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shun; Wang, Jimei

    1994-05-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of the gap of electrodes on the state of vacuum arc by experiment and theory. And the model of vacuum arc is set up. The optimal gap can be deduced from controlling the vacuum arc to be diffusion state, in order to get the optimal moving characteristics of electrodes.

  18. Scaling Behavior in Mitochondrial Redox Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Biener, Gabriel; Herman, Brian A.

    2006-01-01

    Scale-invariant long-range correlations have been reported in fluctuations of time-series signals originating from diverse processes such as heart beat dynamics, earthquakes, and stock market data. The common denominator of these apparently different processes is a highly nonlinear dynamics with competing forces and distinct feedback species. We report for the first time an experimental evidence for scaling behavior in NAD(P)H signal fluctuations in isolated mitochondria and intact cells isolated from the liver of a young (5-month-old) mouse. Time-series data were collected by two-photon imaging of mitochondrial NAD(P)H fluorescence and signal fluctuations were quantitatively analyzed for statistical correlations by detrended fluctuation analysis and spectral power analysis. Redox [NAD(P)H / NAD(P)+] fluctuations in isolated mitochondria and intact liver cells were found to display nonrandom, long-range correlations. These correlations are interpreted as arising due to the regulatory dynamics operative in Krebs' cycle enzyme network and electron transport chain in the mitochondria. This finding may provide a novel basis for understanding similar regulatory networks that govern the nonequilibrium properties of living cells. PMID:16565066

  19. Fluctuation dynamics in reconnecting current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Stechow, Adrian; Grulke, Olaf; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki; Klinger, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    During magnetic reconnection, a highly localized current sheet forms at the boundary between opposed magnetic fields. Its steep perpendicular gradients and fast parallel drifts can give rise to a range of instabilities which can contribute to the overall reconnection dynamics. In two complementary laboratory reconnection experiments, MRX (PPPL, Princeton) and VINETA.II (IPP, Greifswald, Germany), magnetic fluctuations are observed within the current sheet. Despite the large differences in geometries (toroidal vs. linear), plasma parameters (high vs. low beta) and magnetic configuration (low vs. high magnetic guide field), similar broadband fluctuation characteristics are observed in both experiments. These are identified as Whistler-like fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range that propagate along the current sheet in the electron drift direction. They are intrinsic to the localized current sheet and largely independent of the slower reconnection dynamics. This contribution characterizes these magnetic fluctuations within the wide parameter range accessible by both experiments. Specifically, the fluctuation spectra and wave dispersion are characterized with respect to the magnetic topology and plasma parameters of the reconnecting current sheet.

  20. Fluid leakage detector for vacuum applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ngoc (Inventor); Farkas, Tibor (Inventor); Kim, Brian Byungkyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A leak detection system for use with a fluid conducting system in a vacuum environment, such as space, is described. The system preferably includes a mesh-like member substantially disposed about the fluid conducting system, and at least one sensor disposed within the mesh-like member. The sensor is capable of detecting a decrease in temperature of the mesh-like member when a leak condition causes the fluid of the fluid conducting system to freeze when exposed to the vacuum environment. Additionally, a signal processor in preferably in communication with the sensor. The sensor transmits an electrical signal to the signal processor such that the signal processor is capable of indicating the location of the fluid leak in the fluid conducting system.