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Sample records for zero-temperature phase transition

  1. Evolution from BCS superconductivity to Bose condensation: Calculation of the zero-temperature phase coherence length

    SciT

    Pistolesi, F.; Strinati, G.C.

    1996-06-01

    We consider a fermionic system at zero temperature interacting through an effective nonretarded potential of the type introduced by Nozi{grave e}res and Schmitt-Rink, and calculate the {ital phase} coherence length {xi}{sub phase} (associated with the spatial fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter) by exploiting a functional-integral formulation for the correlation functions and the associated loop expansion. This formulation is especially suited to follow the evolution of the fermionic system from a BCS-type superconductor for weak coupling to a Bose-condensed system for strong coupling, since in the latter limit a {ital direct} mapping of the original fermionic system onto an effectivemore » system of bosons with a residual boson-boson interaction can be established. Explicit calculations are performed at the one-loop order. The phase coherence length {xi}{sub phase} is compared with the coherence length {xi}{sub pair} for two-electron correlation, which is relevant to distinguish the weak- ({ital k}{sub {ital F}}{xi}{sub pair}{gt}1) from the strong- ({ital k}{sub {ital F}}{xi}{sub pair}{lt}1) coupling limits ({ital k}{sub {ital F}} being the Fermi wave vector) {ital as} {ital well} {ital as} to follow the crossover in between. It is shown that {xi}{sub phase} coincides with {xi}{sub pair} down to {ital k}{sub {ital F}}{xi}{sub pair}{approx_equal}10, {xi}{sub pair} in turn coinciding with the Pippard coherence length. In the strong-coupling limit we find instead that {xi}{sub phase}{gt}{xi}{sub pair}, with {xi}{sub pair} coinciding with the radius of the bound-electron pair. From the mapping onto an effective system of bosons in the strong-coupling limit we further relate {xi}{sub pair} with the {open_quote}{open_quote}range{close_quote}{close_quote} of the residual boson-boson interaction, which is physically the only significant length associated with the dynamics of the bosonic system. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}« less

  2. Zero-temperature quantum annealing bottlenecks in the spin-glass phase.

    PubMed

    Knysh, Sergey

    2016-08-05

    A promising approach to solving hard binary optimization problems is quantum adiabatic annealing in a transverse magnetic field. An instantaneous ground state-initially a symmetric superposition of all possible assignments of N qubits-is closely tracked as it becomes more and more localized near the global minimum of the classical energy. Regions where the energy gap to excited states is small (for instance at the phase transition) are the algorithm's bottlenecks. Here I show how for large problems the complexity becomes dominated by O(log N) bottlenecks inside the spin-glass phase, where the gap scales as a stretched exponential. For smaller N, only the gap at the critical point is relevant, where it scales polynomially, as long as the phase transition is second order. This phenomenon is demonstrated rigorously for the two-pattern Gaussian Hopfield model. Qualitative comparison with the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model leads to similar conclusions.

  3. Vanishing Hall conductance in the phase-glass Bose metal at zero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May-Mann, Julian; Phillips, Philip W.

    2018-01-01

    Motivated in part by numerical simulations [H. G. Katzgraber and A. P. Young, Phys. Rev. B 66, 224507 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.66.224507; J. M. Kosterlitz and N. Akino, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4672 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.81.4672; Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4672 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.81.4672] that reveal that the energy to create a defect in a gauge or phase glass scales as Lθ with θ <0 for two dimensions, thereby implying a vanishing stiffness, we reexamine the relevance of these kinds of models to the Bose metal in light of the new experiments [N. P. Breznay and Kapitulnik (unpublished); Y. Wang, I. Tamir, D. Shahar, and N. P. Armitage, arXiv:1708.01908 [cond-mat.supr-con

  4. A density-functional study of the phase diagram of cementite-type (Fe,Mn)3C at absolute zero temperature.

    PubMed

    Von Appen, Jörg; Eck, Bernhard; Dronskowski, Richard

    2010-11-15

    The phase diagram of (Fe(1-x) Mn(x))(3)C has been investigated by means of density-functional theory (DFT) calculations at absolute zero temperature. The atomic distributions of the metal atoms are not random-like as previously proposed but we find three different, ordered regions within the phase range. The key role is played by the 8d metal site which forms, as a function of the composition, differing magnetic layers, and these dominate the physical properties. We calculated the magnetic moments, the volumes, the enthalpies of mixing and formation of 13 different compositions and explain the changes of the macroscopic properties with changes in the electronic and magnetic structures by means of bonding analyses using the Crystal Orbital Hamilton Population (COHP) technique. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quantum Quench Dynamics in the Transverse Field Ising Model at Non-zero Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeling, Nils; Kehrein, Stefan

    The recently discovered Dynamical Phase Transition denotes non-analytic behavior in the real time evolution of quantum systems in the thermodynamic limit and has been shown to occur in different systems at zero temperature [Heyl et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 135704 (2013)]. In this talk we present the extension of the analysis to non-zero temperature by studying a generalized form of the Loschmidt echo, the work distribution function, of a quantum quench in the transverse field Ising model. Although the quantitative behavior at non-zero temperatures still displays features derived from the zero temperature non-analyticities, it is shown that in this model dynamical phase transitions do not exist if T > 0 . This is a consequence of the system being initialized in a thermal state. Moreover, we elucidate how the Tasaki-Crooks-Jarzynski relation can be exploited as a symmetry relation for a global quench or to obtain the change of the equilibrium free energy density. This work was supported through CRC SFB 1073 (Project B03) of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

  6. Quantum phase transition with dissipative frustration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maile, D.; Andergassen, S.; Belzig, W.; Rastelli, G.

    2018-04-01

    We study the quantum phase transition of the one-dimensional phase model in the presence of dissipative frustration, provided by an interaction of the system with the environment through two noncommuting operators. Such a model can be realized in Josephson junction chains with shunt resistances and resistances between the chain and the ground. Using a self-consistent harmonic approximation, we determine the phase diagram at zero temperature which exhibits a quantum phase transition between an ordered phase, corresponding to the superconducting state, and a disordered phase, corresponding to the insulating state with localized superconducting charge. Interestingly, we find that the critical line separating the two phases has a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the dissipative coupling strength. This result is a consequence of the frustration between (i) one dissipative coupling that quenches the quantum phase fluctuations favoring the ordered phase and (ii) one that quenches the quantum momentum (charge) fluctuations leading to a vanishing phase coherence. Moreover, within the self-consistent harmonic approximation, we analyze the dissipation induced crossover between a first and second order phase transition, showing that quantum frustration increases the range in which the phase transition is second order. The nonmonotonic behavior is reflected also in the purity of the system that quantifies the degree of correlation between the system and the environment, and in the logarithmic negativity as an entanglement measure that encodes the internal quantum correlations in the chain.

  7. Eigenstate Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo

    Phase transitions are one of the most exciting physical phenomena ever discovered. The understanding of phase transitions has long been of interest. Recently eigenstate phase transitions have been discovered and studied; they are drastically different from traditional thermal phase transitions. In eigenstate phase transitions, a sharp change is exhibited in properties of the many-body eigenstates of the Hamiltonian of a quantum system, but not the thermal equilibrium properties of the same system. In this thesis, we study two different types of eigenstate phase transitions. The first is the eigenstate phase transition within the ferromagnetic phase of an infinite-range spin model. By studying the interplay of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis and Ising symmetry breaking, we find two eigenstate phase transitions within the ferromagnetic phase: In the lowest-temperature phase the magnetization can macroscopically oscillate by quantum tunneling between up and down. The relaxation of the magnetization is always overdamped in the remainder of the ferromagnetic phase, which is further divided into phases where the system thermally activates itself over the barrier between the up and down states, and where it quantum tunnels. The second is the many-body localization phase transition. The eigenstates on one side of the transition obey the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis; the eigenstates on the other side are many-body localized, and thus thermal equilibrium need not be achieved for an initial state even after evolving for an arbitrary long time. We study this many-body localization phase transition in the strong disorder renormalization group framework. After setting up a set of coarse-graining rules for a general one dimensional chain, we get a simple "toy model'' and obtain an almost purely analytical solution to the infinite-randomness critical fixed point renormalization group equation. We also get an estimate of the correlation length critical exponent nu

  8. Do semiclassical zero temperature black holes exist?

    PubMed

    Anderson, P R; Hiscock, W A; Taylor, B E

    2000-09-18

    The semiclassical Einstein equations are solved to first order in epsilon = Planck's over 2pi/M2 for the case of a Reissner-Nordström black hole perturbed by the vacuum stress energy of quantized free fields. Massless and massive fields of spin 0, 1/2, and 1 are considered. We show that in all physically realistic cases, macroscopic zero temperature black hole solutions do not exist. Any static zero temperature semiclassical black hole solutions must then be microscopic and isolated in the space of solutions; they do not join smoothly onto the classical extreme Reissner-Nordström solution as epsilon-->0.

  9. Isothermal lipid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Cevc, G

    1991-03-01

    In liotropic lipid systems phase transitions can be induced isothermally by changing the solvent concentration or composition; alternatively, lipid composition can be modified by (bio)chemical means. The probability for isothermal phase transitions increases with the decreasing transition entropy; it is proportional to the magnitude of the transition temperature shift caused by transformation-inducing system variation. Manipulations causing large thermodynamic effects, such as lipid (de)hydration, binding of protons or divalent ions and macromolecular adsorption, but also close bilayer approach are, therefore, likely to cause structural lipid change(s) at a constant temperature. Net lipid charges enhance the membrane susceptibility to salt-induced isothermal phase transitions; a large proportion of this effect is due to the bilayer dehydration, however, rather than being a consequence of the decreased Coulombic electrostatic interactions. Membrane propensity for isothermal phase transitions, consequently, always increases with the hydrophilicity of the lipid heads, as well as with the desaturation and shortening of the lipid chains. Upon a phase change at a constant temperature, some of the interfacially bound solutes (e.g. protons or calcium) are released in the solution. Membrane permeability and fusogenicity simultaneously increase. In mixed systems, isothermal phase transitions, moreover, may result in lateral phase separation. All this opens up ways for the involvement of isothermal phase transitions in the regulation of biological processes.

  10. A Local Quantum Phase Transition in YFe 2Al 10

    SciT

    Gannon, W J.; Zaliznyak, Igor A.; Wu, L. S.

    Here, a phase transition occurs when correlated regions of a new phase grow to span the system and the fluctuations within the correlated regions become long-lived. Here we present neutron scattering measurements showing that this conventional picture must be replaced by a new paradigm in YFe 2Al 10, a compound that forms naturally very close to a T = 0 quantum phase transition. Fully quantum mechanical fluctuations of localized moments are found to diverge at low energies and temperatures, however the fluctuating moments are entirely without spatial correlations. Zero temperature order in YFe 2Al 10 is achieved by a newmore » and entirely local type of quantum phase transition that may originate with the creation of the moments themselves.« less

  11. A Local Quantum Phase Transition in YFe 2Al 10

    DOE PAGES

    Gannon, W J.; Zaliznyak, Igor A.; Wu, L. S.; ...

    2018-06-29

    Here, a phase transition occurs when correlated regions of a new phase grow to span the system and the fluctuations within the correlated regions become long-lived. Here we present neutron scattering measurements showing that this conventional picture must be replaced by a new paradigm in YFe 2Al 10, a compound that forms naturally very close to a T = 0 quantum phase transition. Fully quantum mechanical fluctuations of localized moments are found to diverge at low energies and temperatures, however the fluctuating moments are entirely without spatial correlations. Zero temperature order in YFe 2Al 10 is achieved by a newmore » and entirely local type of quantum phase transition that may originate with the creation of the moments themselves.« less

  12. Note on zero temperature holographic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Minyong; Lan, Shanquan; Niu, Chao; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-06-01

    In this note, we have addressed various issues on zero temperature holographic superfluids. First, inspired by our numerical evidence for the equality between the superfluid density and particle density, we provide an elegant analytic proof for this equality by a boost trick. Second, using not only the frequency domain analysis but also the time domain analysis from numerical relativity, we identify the hydrodynamic normal modes and calculate out the sound speed, which is shown to increase with the chemical potential and saturate to the value predicted by the conformal field theory in the large chemical potential limit. Third, the generic non-thermalization is demonstrated by the fully nonlinear time evolution from a non-equilibrium state for our zero temperature holographic superfluid. Furthermore, a conserved Noether charge is proposed in support of this behavior.

  13. String theory, quantum phase transitions, and the emergent Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Cubrović, Mihailo; Zaanen, Jan; Schalm, Koenraad

    2009-07-24

    A central problem in quantum condensed matter physics is the critical theory governing the zero-temperature quantum phase transition between strongly renormalized Fermi liquids as found in heavy fermion intermetallics and possibly in high-critical temperature superconductors. We found that the mathematics of string theory is capable of describing such fermionic quantum critical states. Using the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence to relate fermionic quantum critical fields to a gravitational problem, we computed the spectral functions of fermions in the field theory. By increasing the fermion density away from the relativistic quantum critical point, a state emerges with all the features of the Fermi liquid.

  14. Dynamical conductivity at the dirty superconductor-metal quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Del Maestro, Adrian; Rosenow, Bernd; Hoyos, José A; Vojta, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    We study the transport properties of ultrathin disordered nanowires in the neighborhood of the superconductor-metal quantum phase transition. To this end we combine numerical calculations with analytical strong-disorder renormalization group results. The quantum critical conductivity at zero temperature diverges logarithmically as a function of frequency. In the metallic phase, it obeys activated scaling associated with an infinite-randomness quantum critical point. We extend the scaling theory to higher dimensions and discuss implications for experiments.

  15. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  16. Negative thermal expansion near two structural quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhialini, Connor A.; Handunkanda, Sahan U.; Said, Ayman; Trivedi, Sudhir; Guzmán-Verri, G. G.; Hancock, Jason N.

    2017-12-01

    Recent experimental work has revealed that the unusually strong, isotropic structural negative thermal expansion in cubic perovskite ionic insulator ScF3 occurs in excited states above a ground state tuned very near a structural quantum phase transition, posing a question of fundamental interest as to whether this special circumstance is related to the anomalous behavior. To test this hypothesis, we report an elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering study of a second system Hg2I2 also tuned near a structural quantum phase transition while retaining stoichiometric composition and high crystallinity. We find similar behavior and significant negative thermal expansion below 100 K for dimensions along the body-centered-tetragonal c axis, bolstering the connection between negative thermal expansion and zero-temperature structural transitions. We identify the common traits between these systems and propose a set of materials design principles that can guide discovery of new materials exhibiting negative thermal expansion.

  17. Quantum percolation phase transition and magnetoelectric dipole glass in hexagonal ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, S. E.; Vojta, T.; Jones, A. T.; Guo, W.; Oliveira, J.; Morrison, F. D.; Lindfield, N.; Baggio Saitovitch, E.; Watts, B. E.; Scott, J. F.

    2017-07-01

    Hexagonal ferrites not only have enormous commercial impact (£2 billion/year in sales) due to applications that include ultrahigh-density memories, credit-card stripes, magnetic bar codes, small motors, and low-loss microwave devices, they also have fascinating magnetic and ferroelectric quantum properties at low temperatures. Here we report the results of tuning the magnetic ordering temperature in PbF e12 -xG axO19 to zero by chemical substitution x . The phase transition boundary is found to vary as TN˜(1-x /xc ) 2 /3 with xc very close to the calculated spin percolation threshold, which we determine by Monte Carlo simulations, indicating that the zero-temperature phase transition is geometrically driven. We find that this produces a form of compositionally tuned, insulating, ferrimagnetic quantum criticality. Close to the zero-temperature phase transition, we observe the emergence of an electric dipole glass induced by magnetoelectric coupling. The strong frequency behavior of the glass freezing temperature Tm has a Vogel-Fulcher dependence with Tm finite, or suppressed below zero in the zero-frequency limit, depending on composition x . These quantum-mechanical properties, along with the multiplicity of low-lying modes near the zero-temperature phase transition, are likely to greatly extend applications of hexaferrites into the realm of quantum and cryogenic technologies.

  18. Emergence and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Phase transitions are well defined in physics through concepts such as spontaneous symmetry breaking, order parameter, entropy, and critical exponents. But emergence --- also exhibiting whole-part relations (such as top-down influence), unpredictability, and insensitivity to microscopic detail --- is a loosely-defined concept being used in many disciplines, particularly in psychology, biology, philosophy, as well as in physics[1,2]. I will review the concepts of emergence as used in the various fields and consider the extent to which the methods of phase transitions can clarify the usefulness of the concept of emergence both within the discipline of physics and beyond.1. Robert B. Laughlin, A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 2. George F.R. Ellis, ``Physics and the Real World'', Physics Today, vol. 58, no. 7 (July 2005) pp. 49-54.

  19. Dynamical phase transitions at finite temperature from fidelity and interferometric Loschmidt echo induced metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera, Bruno; Vlachou, Chrysoula; Paunković, Nikola; Vieira, Vítor R.; Viyuela, Oscar

    2018-03-01

    We study finite-temperature dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs) by means of the fidelity and the interferometric Loschmidt echo (LE) induced metrics. We analyze the associated dynamical susceptibilities (Riemannian metrics), and derive analytic expressions for the case of two-band Hamiltonians. At zero temperature, the two quantities are identical, nevertheless, at finite temperatures they behave very differently. Using the fidelity LE, the zero-temperature DQPTs are gradually washed away with temperature, while the interferometric counterpart exhibits finite-temperature phase transitions. We analyze the physical differences between the two finite-temperature LE generalizations, and argue that, while the interferometric one is more sensitive and can therefore provide more information when applied to genuine quantum (microscopic) systems, when analyzing many-body macroscopic systems, the fidelity-based counterpart is a more suitable quantity to study. Finally, we apply the previous results to two representative models of topological insulators in one and two dimensions.

  20. Phase Transitions in Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C. P.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Landscapes are patterns in a dynamic steady-state, due to competing processes that smooth or sharpen features over large distances and times. Geomorphic transport laws have been developed to model the mass-flux due to different processes, but are unreasonably effective at recovering the scaling relations of landscape features. Using a continuum approximation to compare experimental landscapes and the observed landscapes of the earth, one finds they share similar morphodynamics despite a breakdown of classical dynamical similarity between the two. We propose the origin of this effectiveness is a different kind of dynamic similarity in the statistics of initiation and cessation of motion of groups of grains, which is common to disordered systems of grains under external driving. We will show how the existing data of sediment transport points to common signatures with dynamical phase transitions between "mobile" and "immobile" phases in other disordered systems, particularly granular materials, colloids, and foams. Viewing landscape evolution from the lens of non-equilibrium statistical physics of disordered systems leads to predictions that the transition of bulk measurements such as particle flux is continuous from one phase to another, that the collective nature of the particle dynamics leads to very slow aging of bulk properties, and that the dynamics are history-dependent. Recent results from sediment transport experiments support these predictions, suggesting that existing geomorphic transport laws may need to be replaced by a new generation of stochastic models with ingredients based on the physics of disordered phase transitions. We discuss possible strategies for extracting the necessary information to develop these models from measurements of geomorphic transport noise by connecting particle-scale collective dynamics and space-time fluctuations over landscape features.

  1. Phase transitions in Ising models on directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowski, Adam; Ferreira, António Luis; Lipowska, Dorota; Gontarek, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    We examine Ising models with heat-bath dynamics on directed networks. Our simulations show that Ising models on directed triangular and simple cubic lattices undergo a phase transition that most likely belongs to the Ising universality class. On the directed square lattice the model remains paramagnetic at any positive temperature as already reported in some previous studies. We also examine random directed graphs and show that contrary to undirected ones, percolation of directed bonds does not guarantee ferromagnetic ordering. Only above a certain threshold can a random directed graph support finite-temperature ferromagnetic ordering. Such behavior is found also for out-homogeneous random graphs, but in this case the analysis of magnetic and percolative properties can be done exactly. Directed random graphs also differ from undirected ones with respect to zero-temperature freezing. Only at low connectivity do they remain trapped in a disordered configuration. Above a certain threshold, however, the zero-temperature dynamics quickly drives the model toward a broken symmetry (magnetized) state. Only above this threshold, which is almost twice as large as the percolation threshold, do we expect the Ising model to have a positive critical temperature. With a very good accuracy, the behavior on directed random graphs is reproduced within a certain approximate scheme.

  2. First- and second-order metal-insulator phase transitions and topological aspects of a Hubbard-Rashba system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelino, Edgar

    2017-05-01

    This paper considers a model consisting of a kinetic term, Rashba spin-orbit coupling and short-range Coulomb interaction at zero temperature. The Coulomb interaction is decoupled by a mean-field approximation in the spin channel using field theory methods. The results feature a first-order phase transition for any finite value of the chemical potential and quantum criticality for vanishing chemical potential. The Hall conductivity is also computed using the Kubo formula in a mean-field effective Hamiltonian. In the limit of infinite mass the kinetic term vanishes and all the phase transitions are of second order; in this case the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism adds a ferromagnetic metallic phase to the system and features a zero-temperature quantization of the Hall conductivity in the insulating one.

  3. Learning phase transitions by confusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nieuwenburg, Evert; Liu, Ye-Hua; Huber, Sebastian

    Classifying phases of matter is a central problem in physics. For quantum mechanical systems, this task can be daunting owing to the exponentially large Hilbert space. Thanks to the available computing power and access to ever larger data sets, classification problems are now routinely solved using machine learning techniques. Here, we propose to use a neural network based approach to find transitions depending on the performance of the neural network after training it with deliberately incorrectly labelled data. We demonstrate the success of this method on the topological phase transition in the Kitaev chain, the thermal phase transition in the classical Ising model, and the many-body-localization transition in a disordered quantum spin chain. Our method does not depend on order parameters, knowledge of the topological content of the phases, or any other specifics of the transition at hand. It therefore paves the way to a generic tool to identify unexplored transitions.

  4. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  5. Anomaly constraints on deconfinement and chiral phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Yonekura, Kazuya

    2018-05-01

    We study the constraints on thermal phase transitions of SU (Nc) gauge theories by using the 't Hooft anomaly involving the center symmetry and chiral symmetry. We consider two cases of massless fermions: (i) adjoint fermions and (ii) Nf flavors of fundamental fermions with a nontrivial greatest common divisor, gcd (Nc,Nf)≠1 . For the first case (i), we show that the chiral symmetry restoration in terms of the standard Landau-Ginzburg effective action is impossible at a temperature lower than that of deconfinement. For the second case (ii), we introduce a modified version of the center symmetry, which we call center-flavor symmetry, and draw similar conclusions under a certain definition of confinement. Moreover, at zero temperature, our results give a partial explanation of the appearance of dual magnetic gauge groups in (supersymmetric) QCD when gcd (Nc,Nf)≠1 .

  6. Phase transitions in community detection: A solvable toy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ver Steeg, Greg; Moore, Cristopher; Galstyan, Aram; Allahverdyan, Armen

    2014-05-01

    Recently, it was shown that there is a phase transition in the community detection problem. This transition was first computed using the cavity method, and has been proved rigorously in the case of q = 2 groups. However, analytic calculations using the cavity method are challenging since they require us to understand probability distributions of messages. We study analogous transitions in the so-called “zero-temperature inference” model, where this distribution is supported only on the most likely messages. Furthermore, whenever several messages are equally likely, we break the tie by choosing among them with equal probability, corresponding to an infinitesimal random external field. While the resulting analysis overestimates the thresholds, it reproduces some of the qualitative features of the system. It predicts a first-order detectability transition whenever q > 2 (as opposed to q > 4 according to the finite-temperature cavity method). It also has a regime analogous to the “hard but detectable” phase, where the community structure can be recovered, but only when the initial messages are sufficiently accurate. Finally, we study a semisupervised setting where we are given the correct labels for a fraction ρ of the nodes. For q > 2, we find a regime where the accuracy jumps discontinuously at a critical value of ρ.

  7. Dynamical conductivity at the dirty superconductor-metal quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, J. A.; Del Maestro, Adrian; Rosenow, Bernd; Vojta, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    We study the transport properties of ultrathin disordered nanowires in the neighborhood of the superconductor-metal quantum phase transition. To this end we combine numerical calculations with analytical strong-disorder renormalization group results. The quantum critical conductivity at zero temperature diverges logarithmically as a function of frequency. In the metallic phase, it obeys activated scaling associated with an infinite-randomness quantum critical point. We extend the scaling theory to higher dimensions and discuss implications for experiments. Financial support: Fapesp, CNPq, NSF, and Research Corporation.

  8. Learning phase transitions by confusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nieuwenburg, Evert P. L.; Liu, Ye-Hua; Huber, Sebastian D.

    2017-02-01

    Classifying phases of matter is key to our understanding of many problems in physics. For quantum-mechanical systems in particular, the task can be daunting due to the exponentially large Hilbert space. With modern computing power and access to ever-larger data sets, classification problems are now routinely solved using machine-learning techniques. Here, we propose a neural-network approach to finding phase transitions, based on the performance of a neural network after it is trained with data that are deliberately labelled incorrectly. We demonstrate the success of this method on the topological phase transition in the Kitaev chain, the thermal phase transition in the classical Ising model, and the many-body-localization transition in a disordered quantum spin chain. Our method does not depend on order parameters, knowledge of the topological content of the phases, or any other specifics of the transition at hand. It therefore paves the way to the development of a generic tool for identifying unexplored phase transitions.

  9. Negative thermal expansion near two structural quantum phase transitions

    SciT

    Occhialini, Connor A.; Handunkanda, Sahan U.; Said, Ayman

    Recent experimental work has revealed that the unusually strong, isotropic structural negative thermal expansion in cubic perovskite ionic insulator ScF3 occurs in excited states above a ground state tuned very near a structural quantum phase transition, posing a question of fundamental interest as to whether this special circumstance is related to the anomalous behavior. To test this hypothesis, we report an elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering study of a second system Hg2I2 also tuned near a structural quantum phase transition while retaining stoichiometric composition and high crystallinity. We find similar behavior and significant negative thermal expansion below 100 K formore » dimensions along the body-centered-tetragonal c axis, bolstering the connection between negative thermal expansion and zero-temperature structural transitions.We identify the common traits between these systems and propose a set of materials design principles that can guide discovery of newmaterials exhibiting negative thermal expansion« less

  10. Berni Alder and Phase Transitions in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosterlitz, J. Michael

    I do not know Berni Alder as a person, but I feel that I know him well through his seminal paper "Phase Transition in Elastic Disks𠇍 by B. J. Alder and T. E. Wainwright [1962], which was essential in motivating David Thouless and myself to think about phase transitions in two dimensional systems with a continuous symmetry. In the early 1970's, the conventional wisdom was that a crystalline solid could not exist in a two dimensional world because of the rigorous Mermin-Wagner theorem prohibiting true long range translational order at any non-zero temperature. This contradiction was settled by the theory of dislocation mediated melting to an intermediate hexatic phase followed by a second transition to the isotropic fluid at a higher temperature. This scenario, with its associated sophisticated theory, seemed to settle the controversy of two dimensional melting once and for all. However, in our elation at understanding the fundamental physics and the essential excitations of melting in 2D, we had all forgotten that the early work of Berni Alder also showed that this melting involved a weak first order transition while theory now predicted melting by two successive continuous transitions with no discontinuity in area at the critical pressure. This discrepancy could be hand waved away by arguing that Berni's system was far too small and his computers far too slow so that the areal discontinuity could be due to finite size effects or to failing to equilibrate the system. Experiments were not able to resolve the order of the transitions, but seemed to agree quantitatively with theory…

  11. Dissipative phases across the superconductor-to-insulator transition

    PubMed Central

    Couëdo, F.; Crauste, O.; Drillien, A. A.; Humbert, V.; Bergé, L.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C. A.; Dumoulin, L.

    2016-01-01

    Competing phenomena in low dimensional systems can generate exotic electronic phases, either through symmetry breaking or a non-trivial topology. In two-dimensional (2D) systems, the interplay between superfluidity, disorder and repulsive interactions is especially fruitful in this respect although both the exact nature of the phases and the microscopic processes at play are still open questions. In particular, in 2D, once superconductivity is destroyed by disorder, an insulating ground state is expected to emerge, as a result of a direct superconductor-to-insulator quantum phase transition. In such systems, no metallic state is theoretically expected to survive to the slightest disorder. Here we map out the phase diagram of amorphous NbSi thin films as functions of disorder and film thickness, with two metallic phases in between the superconducting and insulating ones. These two dissipative states, defined by a resistance which extrapolates to a finite value in the zero temperature limit, each bear a specific dependence on disorder. We argue that they originate from an inhomogeneous destruction of superconductivity, even if the system is morphologically homogeneous. Our results suggest that superconducting fluctuations can favor metallic states that would not otherwise exist. PMID:27786260

  12. Controlling dynamical quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennes, D. M.; Schuricht, D.; Karrasch, C.

    2018-05-01

    We study the dynamics arising from a double quantum quench where the parameters of a given Hamiltonian are abruptly changed from being in an equilibrium phase A to a different phase B and back (A →B →A ). As prototype models, we consider the (integrable) transverse Ising field as well as the (nonintegrable) ANNNI model. The return amplitude features nonanalyticities after the first quench through the equilibrium quantum critical point (A →B ), which is routinely taken as a signature of passing through a so-called dynamical quantum phase transition. We demonstrate that nonanalyticities after the second quench (B →A ) can be avoided and reestablished in a recurring manner upon increasing the time T spent in phase B. The system retains an infinite memory of its past state, and one has the intriguing opportunity to control at will whether or not dynamical quantum phase transitions appear after the second quench.

  13. Chiral density wave versus pion condensation at finite density and zero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jens O.; Kneschke, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    The quark-meson model is often used as a low-energy effective model for QCD to study the chiral transition at finite temperature T , baryon chemical potential μB , and isospin chemical potential μI . We determine the parameters of the model by matching the meson and quark masses, as well as the pion decay constant to their physical values using the on shell (OS) and modified minimal subtraction (MS ¯ ) schemes. In this paper, the existence of different phases at zero temperature is studied. In particular, we investigate the competition between an inhomogeneous chiral condensate and a homogeneous pion condensate. For the inhomogeneity, we use a chiral-density wave ansatz. For a sigma mass of 600 MeV, we find that an inhomogeneous chiral condensate exists only for pion masses below approximately 37 MeV. We also show that due to our parameter fixing, the onset of pion condensation takes place exactly at μIc=1/2 mπ in accordance with exact results.

  14. Yang-Mills correlators across the deconfinement phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinosa, U.; Serreau, J.; Tissier, M.; Tresmontant, A.

    2017-02-01

    We compute the finite temperature ghost and gluon propagators of Yang-Mills theory in the Landau-DeWitt gauge. The background field that enters the definition of the latter is intimately related with the (gauge-invariant) Polyakov loop and serves as an equivalent order parameter for the deconfinement transition. We use an effective gauge-fixed description where the nonperturbative infrared dynamics of the theory is parametrized by a gluon mass which, as argued elsewhere, may originate from the Gribov ambiguity. In this scheme, one can perform consistent perturbative calculations down to infrared momenta, which have been shown to correctly describe the phase diagram of Yang-Mills theories in four dimensions as well as the zero-temperature correlators computed in lattice simulations. In this article, we provide the one-loop expressions of the finite temperature Landau-DeWitt ghost and gluon propagators for a large class of gauge groups and present explicit results for the SU(2) case. These are substantially different from those previously obtained in the Landau gauge, which corresponds to a vanishing background field. The nonanalyticity of the order parameter across the transition is directly imprinted onto the propagators in the various color modes. In the SU(2) case, this leads, for instance, to a cusp in the electric and magnetic gluon susceptibilities as well as similar signatures in the ghost sector. We mention the possibility that such distinctive features of the transition could be measured in lattice simulations in the background field gauge studied here.

  15. Extremal black holes, Stueckelberg scalars and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrani, Alessio; Miskovic, Olivera; Leon, Paula Quezada

    2018-02-01

    We calculate the entropy of a static extremal black hole in 4D gravity, non-linearly coupled to a massive Stueckelberg scalar. We find that the scalar field does not allow the black hole to be magnetically charged. We also show that the system can exhibit a phase transition due to electric charge variations. For spherical and hyperbolic horizons, the critical point exists only in presence of a cosmological constant, and if the scalar is massive and non-linearly coupled to electromagnetic field. On one side of the critical point, two extremal solutions coexist: Reissner-Nordström (A)dS black hole and the charged hairy (A)dS black hole, while on the other side of the critical point the black hole does not have hair. A near-critical analysis reveals that the hairy black hole has larger entropy, thus giving rise to a zero temperature phase transition. This is characterized by a discontinuous second derivative of the entropy with respect to the electric charge at the critical point. The results obtained here are analytical and based on the entropy function formalism and the second law of thermodynamics.

  16. 0 - π Quantum transition in a carbon nanotube Josephson junction: Universal phase dependence and orbital degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delagrange, R.; Weil, R.; Kasumov, A.; Ferrier, M.; Bouchiat, H.; Deblock, R.

    2018-05-01

    In a quantum dot hybrid superconducting junction, the behavior of the supercurrent is dominated by Coulomb blockade physics, which determines the magnetic state of the dot. In particular, in a single level quantum dot singly occupied, the sign of the supercurrent can be reversed, giving rise to a π-junction. This 0 - π transition, corresponding to a singlet-doublet transition, is then driven by the gate voltage or by the superconducting phase in the case of strong competition between the superconducting proximity effect and Kondo correlations. In a two-level quantum dot, such as a clean carbon nanotube, 0- π transitions exist as well but, because more cotunneling processes are allowed, are not necessarily associated to a magnetic state transition of the dot. In this proceeding, after a review of 0- π transitions in Josephson junctions, we present measurements of current-phase relation in a clean carbon nanotube quantum dot, in the single and two-level regimes. In the single level regime, close to orbital degeneracy and in a regime of strong competition between local electronic correlations and superconducting proximity effect, we find that the phase diagram of the phase-dependent transition is a universal characteristic of a discontinuous level-crossing quantum transition at zero temperature. In the case where the two levels are involved, the nanotube Josephson current exhibits a continuous 0 - π transition, independent of the superconducting phase, revealing a different physical mechanism of the transition.

  17. Phase Transitions in Finite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomaz, Philippe; Gulminelli, Francesca

    In this series of lectures we will first review the general theory of phase transition in the framework of information theory and briefly address some of the well known mean field solutions of three dimensional problems. The theory of phase transitions in finite systems will then be discussed, with a special emphasis to the conceptual problems linked to a thermodynamical description for small, short-lived, open systems as metal clusters and data samples coming from nuclear collisions. The concept of negative heat capacity developed in the early seventies in the context of self-gravitating systems will be reinterpreted in the general framework of convexity anomalies of thermostatistical potentials. The connection with the distribution of the order parameter will lead us to a definition of first order phase transitions in finite systems based on topology anomalies of the event distribution in the space of observations. Finally a careful study of the thermodynamical limit will provide a bridge with the standard theory of phase transitions and show that in a wide class of physical situations the different statistical ensembles are irreducibly inequivalent.

  18. Phase transitions in dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexheimer, Veronica; Hempel, Matthias; Iosilevskiy, Igor; Schramm, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    As the density of matter increases, atomic nuclei disintegrate into nucleons and, eventually, the nucleons themselves disintegrate into quarks. The phase transitions (PT's) between these phases can vary from steep first order to smooth crossovers, depending on certain conditions. First-order PT's with more than one globally conserved charge, so-called non-congruent PT's, have characteristic differences compared to congruent PT's. In this conference proceeding we discuss the non-congruence of the quark deconfinement PT at high densities and/or temperatures relevant for heavy-ion collisions, neutron stars, proto-neutron stars, supernova explosions, and compact-star mergers.

  19. Chiral and deconfinement phase transition in the Hamiltonian approach to QCD in Coulomb gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, H.; Vastag, P.

    2016-11-01

    The chiral and deconfinement phase transitions are investigated within the variational Hamiltonian approach to QCD in Coulomb gauge. The temperature β-1 is introduced by compactifying a spatial dimension. Thereby the whole temperature dependence is encoded in the vacuum state on the spatial manifold R2×S1(β ) . The chiral quark condensate and the dual quark condensate (dressed Polyakov loop) are calculated as a function of the temperature. From their inflection points the pseudocritical temperatures for the chiral and deconfinement crossover transitions are determined. Using the zero-temperature quark and gluon propagators obtained within the variational approach as input, we find 170 and 198 MeV, respectively, for the chiral and deconfinement transition.

  20. Phase transition thermodynamics of bisphenols.

    PubMed

    Costa, José C S; Dávalos, Juan Z; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2014-10-16

    Herein we have studied, presented, and analyzed the phase equilibria thermodynamics of a bisphenols (BP-A, BP-E, BP-F, BP-AP, and BP-S) series. In particular, the heat capacities, melting temperatures, and vapor pressures at different temperatures as well as the standard enthalpies, entropies, and Gibbs energies of phase transition (fusion and sublimation) were experimentally determined. Also, we have presented the phase diagrams of each bisphenol derivative and investigated the key parameters related to the thermodynamic stability of the condensed phases. When all the bisphenol derivatives are compared at the same conditions, solids BP-AP and BP-S present lower volatilities (higher Gibbs energy of sublimation) and high melting temperatures due to the higher stability of their solid phases. Solids BP-A and BP-F present similar stabilities, whereas BP-E is more volatile. The introduction of -CH3 groups in BP-F (giving BP-E and BP-A) leads an entropic differentiation in the solid phase, whereas in the isotropic liquids the enthalpic and entropic differentiations are negligible.

  1. Brain Performance versus Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Joaquín J.; Marro, J.

    2015-07-01

    We here illustrate how a well-founded study of the brain may originate in assuming analogies with phase-transition phenomena. Analyzing to what extent a weak signal endures in noisy environments, we identify the underlying mechanisms, and it results a description of how the excitability associated to (non-equilibrium) phase changes and criticality optimizes the processing of the signal. Our setting is a network of integrate-and-fire nodes in which connections are heterogeneous with rapid time-varying intensities mimicking fatigue and potentiation. Emergence then becomes quite robust against wiring topology modification—in fact, we considered from a fully connected network to the Homo sapiens connectome—showing the essential role of synaptic flickering on computations. We also suggest how to experimentally disclose significant changes during actual brain operation.

  2. Phase Transition to Exact Susy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavelli, L.

    2007-04-01

    The anthropic principle is based on the observation that, within narrow bounds, the laws of physics are such as to have allowed the evolution of life. The string theoretic approach to understanding this observation is based on the expectation that the effective potential has an enormous number of local minima with different particle masses and perhaps totally different fundamental couplings and space time topology. The vast majority of these alternative universes are totally inhospitable to life, having, for example, vacuum energies near the natural (Planck) scale. The statistics, however, are assumed to be such that a few of these local minima (and not more) have a low enough vacuum energy and suitable other properties to support life. In the inflationary era, the "multiverse" made successive transitions between the available minima until arriving at our current state of low vacuum energy. String theory, however, also suggests that the absolute minimum of the effective potential is exactly supersymmetric. Questions then arise as to why the inflationary era did not end by a transition to one of these, when will the universe make the phase transition to the exactly supersymmetric ground state, and what will be the properties of this final state.

  3. A new insight into the phase transition in the early Universe with two Higgs doublets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernon, Jérémy; Bian, Ligong; Jiang, Yun

    2018-05-01

    We study the electroweak phase transition in the alignment limit of the CP-conserving two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) of Type I and Type II. The effective potential is evaluated at one-loop, where the thermal potential includes Daisy corrections and is reliably approximated by means of a sum of Bessel functions. Both 1-stage and 2-stage electroweak phase transitions are shown to be possible, depending on the pattern of the vacuum development as the Universe cools down. For the 1-stage case focused on in this paper, we analyze the properties of phase transition and discover that the field value of the electroweak symmetry breaking vacuum at the critical temperature at which the first order phase transition occurs is largely correlated with the vacuum depth of the 1-loop potential at zero temperature. We demonstrate that a strong first order electroweak phase transition (SFOEWPT) in the 2HDM is achievable and establish benchmark scenarios leading to different testable signatures at colliders. In addition, we verify that an enhanced triple Higgs coupling (including loop corrections) is a typical feature of the SFOPT driven by the additional doublet. As a result, SFOEWPT might be able to be probed at the LHC and future lepton colliders through Higgs pair production.

  4. Low temperature electroweak phase transition in the Standard Model with hidden scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunasalam, Suntharan; Kobakhidze, Archil; Lagger, Cyril; Liang, Shelley; Zhou, Albert

    2018-01-01

    We discuss a cosmological phase transition within the Standard Model which incorporates spontaneously broken scale invariance as a low-energy theory. In addition to the Standard Model fields, the minimal model involves a light dilaton, which acquires a large vacuum expectation value (VEV) through the mechanism of dimensional transmutation. Under the assumption of the cancellation of the vacuum energy, the dilaton develops a very small mass at 2-loop order. As a result, a flat direction is present in the classical dilaton-Higgs potential at zero temperature while the quantum potential admits two (almost) degenerate local minima with unbroken and broken electroweak symmetry. We found that the cosmological electroweak phase transition in this model can only be triggered by a QCD chiral symmetry breaking phase transition at low temperatures, T ≲ 132 MeV. Furthermore, unlike the standard case, the universe settles into the chiral symmetry breaking vacuum via a first-order phase transition which gives rise to a stochastic gravitational background with a peak frequency ∼10-8 Hz as well as triggers the production of approximately solar mass primordial black holes. The observation of these signatures of cosmological phase transitions together with the detection of a light dilaton would provide a strong hint of the fundamental role of scale invariance in particle physics.

  5. QCD Phase Transitions, Volume 15

    SciT

    Schaefer, T.; Shuryak, E.

    1999-03-20

    The title of the workshop, ''The QCD Phase Transitions'', in fact happened to be too narrow for its real contents. It would be more accurate to say that it was devoted to different phases of QCD and QCD-related gauge theories, with strong emphasis on discussion of the underlying non-perturbative mechanisms which manifest themselves as all those phases. Before we go to specifics, let us emphasize one important aspect of the present status of non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory in general. It remains true that its studies do not get attention proportional to the intellectual challenge they deserve, and that the theoristsmore » working on it remain very fragmented. The efforts to create Theory of Everything including Quantum Gravity have attracted the lion share of attention and young talent. Nevertheless, in the last few years there was also a tremendous progress and even some shift of attention toward emphasis on the unity of non-perturbative phenomena. For example, we have seen some efforts to connect the lessons from recent progress in Supersymmetric theories with that in QCD, as derived from phenomenology and lattice. Another example is Maldacena conjecture and related development, which connect three things together, string theory, super-gravity and the (N=4) supersymmetric gauge theory. Although the progress mentioned is remarkable by itself, if we would listen to each other more we may have chance to strengthen the field and reach better understanding of the spectacular non-perturbative physics.« less

  6. Zero Thermal Noise in Resistors at Zero Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2016-06-01

    The bandwidth of transistors in logic devices approaches the quantum limit, where Johnson noise and associated error rates are supposed to be strongly enhanced. However, the related theory — asserting a temperature-independent quantum zero-point (ZP) contribution to Johnson noise, which dominates the quantum regime — is controversial and resolution of the controversy is essential to determine the real error rate and fundamental energy dissipation limits of logic gates in the quantum limit. The Callen-Welton formula (fluctuation-dissipation theorem) of voltage and current noise for a resistance is the sum of Nyquist’s classical Johnson noise equation and a quantum ZP term with a power density spectrum proportional to frequency and independent of temperature. The classical Johnson-Nyquist formula vanishes at the approach of zero temperature, but the quantum ZP term still predicts non-zero noise voltage and current. Here, we show that this noise cannot be reconciled with the Fermi-Dirac distribution, which defines the thermodynamics of electrons according to quantum-statistical physics. Consequently, Johnson noise must be nil at zero temperature, and non-zero noise found for certain experimental arrangements may be a measurement artifact, such as the one mentioned in Kleen’s uncertainty relation argument.

  7. Quantum phase transition in strongly correlated many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Wenlong

    The past decade has seen a substantial rejuvenation of interest in the study of quantum phase transitions (QPTs), driven by experimental advance on the cuprate superconductors, the heavy fermion materials, organic conductors, Quantum Hall effect, Fe-As based superconductors and other related compounds. It is clear that strong electronic interactions play a crucial role in the systems of current interest, and simple paradigms for the behavior of such systems near quantum critical points remain unclear. Furthermore, the rapid progress in Feshbach resonance and optical lattice provides a flexible platform to study QPT. Quantum Phase Transition (QPT) describes the non-analytic behaviors of the ground-state properties in a many-body system by varying a physical parameter at absolute zero temperature - such as magnetic field or pressure, driven by quantum fluctuations. Such quantum phase transitions can be first-order phase transition or continuous. The phase transition is usually accompanied by a qualitative change in the nature of the correlations in the ground state, and describing this change shall clearly be one of our major interests. We address this issue from three prospects in a few strong correlated many-body systems in this thesis, i.e., identifying the ordered phases, studying the properties of different phases, characterizing the QPT points. In chapter 1, we give an introduction to QPT, and take one-dimensional XXZ model as an example to illustrate the QPT therein. Through this simple example, we would show that when the tunable parameter is varied, the system evolves into different phases, across two quantum QPT points. The distinct phases exhibit very different behaviors. Also a schematic phase diagram is appended. In chapter 2, we are engaged in research on ordered phases. Originating in the work of Landau and Ginzburg on second-order phase transition, the spontaneous symmetry breaking induces nonzero expectation of field operator, e.g., magnetization M

  8. Observing a scale anomaly and a universal quantum phase transition in graphene.

    PubMed

    Ovdat, O; Mao, Jinhai; Jiang, Yuhang; Andrei, E Y; Akkermans, E

    2017-09-11

    One of the most interesting predictions resulting from quantum physics, is the violation of classical symmetries, collectively referred to as anomalies. A remarkable class of anomalies occurs when the continuous scale symmetry of a scale-free quantum system is broken into a discrete scale symmetry for a critical value of a control parameter. This is an example of a (zero temperature) quantum phase transition. Such an anomaly takes place for the quantum inverse square potential known to describe 'Efimov physics'. Broken continuous scale symmetry into discrete scale symmetry also appears for a charged and massless Dirac fermion in an attractive 1/r Coulomb potential. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the universality of this quantum phase transition and to present convincing experimental evidence of its existence for a charged and massless fermion in an attractive Coulomb potential as realized in graphene.When the continuous scale symmetry of a quantum system is broken, anomalies occur which may lead to quantum phase transitions. Here, the authors provide evidence for such a quantum phase transition in the attractive Coulomb potential of vacancies in graphene, and further envision its universality for diverse physical systems.

  9. Cloud regimes as phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, Samuel; Hottovy, Scott

    2017-11-01

    Clouds are repeatedly identified as a leading source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Of particular importance are stratocumulus clouds, which can appear as either (i) closed cells that reflect solar radiation back to space or (ii) open cells that allow solar radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Here we show that these clouds regimes - open versus closed cells - fit the paradigm of a phase transition. In addition, this paradigm characterizes pockets of open cells (POCs) as the interface between the open- and closed-cell regimes, and it identifies shallow cumulus clouds as a regime of higher variability. This behavior can be understood using an idealized model for the dynamics of atmospheric water as a stochastic diffusion process. Similar viewpoints of deep convection and self-organized criticality will also be discussed. With these new conceptual viewpoints, ideas from statistical mechanics could potentially be used for understanding uncertainties related to clouds in the climate system and climate predictions. The research of S.N.S. is partially supported by a Sloan Research Fellowship, ONR Young Investigator Award N00014-12-1-0744, and ONR MURI Grant N00014-12-1-0912.

  10. Microwave spectroscopy evidence of superconducting pairing in the magnetic-field-induced metallic state of InO(x) films at zero temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Pan, LiDong; Wen, Jiajia; Kim, Minsoo; Sambandamurthy, G; Armitage, N P

    2013-08-09

    We investigate the field-tuned quantum phase transition in a 2D low-disorder amorphous InO(x) film in the frequency range of 0.05 to 16 GHz employing microwave spectroscopy. In the zero-temperature limit, the ac data are consistent with a scenario where this transition is from a superconductor to a metal instead of a direct transition to an insulator. The intervening metallic phase is unusual with a small but finite resistance that is much smaller than the normal state sheet resistance at the lowest measured temperatures. Moreover, it exhibits a superconducting response on short length and time scales while global superconductivity is destroyed. We present evidence that the true quantum critical point of this 2D superconductor metal transition is located at a field B(sm) far below the conventionally defined critical field B(cross) where different isotherms of magnetoresistance cross each other. The superfluid stiffness in the low-frequency limit and the superconducting fluctuation frequency from opposite sides of the transition both vanish at B≈B(sm). The lack of evidence for finite-frequency superfluid stiffness surviving B(cross) signifies that B(cross) is a crossover above which superconducting fluctuations make a vanishing contribution to dc and ac measurements.

  11. Local bias-induced phase transitions

    DOE PAGES

    Seal, Katyayani; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2008-11-27

    Electrical bias-induced phase transitions underpin a wide range of applications from data storage to energy generation and conversion. The mechanisms behind these transitions are often quite complex and in many cases are extremely sensitive to local defects that act as centers for local transformations or pinning. Furthermore, using ferroelectrics as an example, we review methods for probing bias-induced phase transitions and discuss the current limitations and challenges for extending the methods to field-induced phase transitions and electrochemical reactions in energy storage, biological and molecular systems.

  12. Zero temperature coefficient of resistance of the electrical-breakdown path in ultrathin hafnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. Z.; Ang, D. S.

    2017-09-01

    The recent widespread attention on the use of the non-volatile resistance switching property of a microscopic oxide region after electrical breakdown for memory applications has prompted basic interest in the conduction properties of the breakdown region. Here, we report an interesting crossover from a negative to a positive temperature dependence of the resistance of a breakdown region in ultrathin hafnia as the applied voltage is increased. As a consequence, a near-zero temperature coefficient of resistance is obtained at the crossover voltage. The behavior may be modeled by (1) a tunneling-limited transport involving two farthest-spaced defects along the conduction path at low voltage and (2) a subsequent transition to a scattering-limited transport after the barrier is overcome by a larger applied voltage.

  13. Fermi surface reconstruction and multiple quantum phase transitions in the antiferromagnet CeRhIn5

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Lin; Chen, Ye; Kohama, Yoshimitsu; Graf, David; Bauer, E. D.; Singleton, John; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Weng, Zongfa; Pang, Guiming; Shang, Tian; Zhang, Jinglei; Lee, Han-Oh; Park, Tuson; Jaime, Marcelo; Thompson, J. D.; Steglich, Frank; Si, Qimiao; Yuan, H. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional, thermally driven continuous phase transitions are described by universal critical behavior that is independent of the specific microscopic details of a material. However, many current studies focus on materials that exhibit quantum-driven continuous phase transitions (quantum critical points, or QCPs) at absolute zero temperature. The classification of such QCPs and the question of whether they show universal behavior remain open issues. Here we report measurements of heat capacity and de Haas–van Alphen (dHvA) oscillations at low temperatures across a field-induced antiferromagnetic QCP (Bc0 ≈ 50 T) in the heavy-fermion metal CeRhIn5. A sharp, magnetic-field-induced change in Fermi surface is detected both in the dHvA effect and Hall resistivity at B0* ≈ 30 T, well inside the antiferromagnetic phase. Comparisons with band-structure calculations and properties of isostructural CeCoIn5 suggest that the Fermi-surface change at B0* is associated with a localized-to-itinerant transition of the Ce-4f electrons in CeRhIn5. Taken in conjunction with pressure experiments, our results demonstrate that at least two distinct classes of QCP are observable in CeRhIn5, a significant step toward the derivation of a universal phase diagram for QCPs. PMID:25561536

  14. Origin of phase transition in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Raktima; Sardar, Manas; Dhara, Sandip

    2018-04-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) exhibits a reversible first-order metal to insulator transition (MIT) along with a structural phase transition (SPT) from monoclinic M1 to rutile tetragonal R via another two intermediate phases of monoclinic M2 and triclinic T at a technologically important temperature of 340K. In the present work, besides synthesizing M1 phase of VO2, we also stabilized M2 and T phases at room temperature by introducing native defects in the system and observed an increase in transition temperature with increase in native defects. Raman spectroscopic measurements were carried out to confirm the pure VO2 phases. Since the MIT is accompanied by SPT in these systems, the origin of the phase transition is still under debate. The controversy between MIT and SPT, whether electron-phonon coupling or strong electron-electron correlation triggers the phase transition in VO2 is also resolved by examining the presence of intermediate phase M2 during phase transition.

  15. Unconventional phase transitions in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.

    2017-12-01

    According to classical textbooks on thermodynamics or statistical physics, there are only two types of phase transitions: continuous, or second-order, in which the latent heat L is zero, and first-order, in which L ≠ 0. Present-day textbooks and monographs also mention another, stand-alone type—the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, which exists only in two dimensions and shares some features with first- and second-order phase transitions. We discuss examples of non-conventional thermodynamic behavior (i.e., which is inconsistent with the theoretical phase transition paradigm now universally accepted). For phase transitions in smectic liquid crystals, mechanisms for nonconventional behavior are proposed and the predictions they imply are examined.

  16. Magnetic structure and magnetization of helical antiferromagnets in high magnetic fields perpendicular to the helix axis at zero temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Johnston, David

    2017-09-05

    The zero-temperature angles of magnetic moments in a helix or sinusoidal fan confined to the x y plane, with respect to an in-plane magnetic field H x applied perpendicular to the z axis of a helix or fan, are calculated for commensurate helices and fans with field-independent turn angles k d between moments in adjacent layers of the helix or fan using the classical J 0 - J 1 - J 2 Heisenberg model. For 0 < k d < 4 π / 9 , first-order transitions from helix to a fan structure occur at fields H t as previouslymore » inferred, where the fan is found to be approximately sinusoidal. However, for 4 π / 9 ≤ k d ≤ π , different behaviors are found depending on the value of k d and these properties vary nonmonotonically with k d . In this k d range, the change from helix to fanlike structure is usually a crossover with no phase transition between them, although first-order transitions are found for k d = 3 π / 5 and 8 π / 11 and a second-order transition for k d = 3 π / 4 . At a critical field H c , the fan or fanlike structures exhibit a second-order transition to the paramagnetic state. The H c for a helix undergoing a field-induced change to a fan or fanlike structure is found to be the same as for a sinusoidal fan with the same k d and interlayer interactions. We present analytical expressions for H c versus k d. We also calculated the average x -axis moment per spin μ x ave versus H x for helices and fans with crossovers and phase transitions between them. When smooth helix to fanlike crossovers occur in the range 4 π / 9 ≤ k d ≤ π , μ x ave exhibits an S-shape behavior with increasing H x . The behavior we predict is consistent with μ x ave ( H x ) data previously reported by Sangeetha et al. [Phys. Rev. B 94, 014422 (2016)] for single-crystal EuCo 2 P 2 possessing a helix ground state with k d ≈ 0.85 π . The low-field magnetic susceptibility and the ratio H t / H c are calculated analytically or numerically versus k d for helices, and are

  17. Magnetic structure and magnetization of helical antiferromagnets in high magnetic fields perpendicular to the helix axis at zero temperature

    SciT

    Johnston, David

    The zero-temperature angles of magnetic moments in a helix or sinusoidal fan confined to the x y plane, with respect to an in-plane magnetic field H x applied perpendicular to the z axis of a helix or fan, are calculated for commensurate helices and fans with field-independent turn angles k d between moments in adjacent layers of the helix or fan using the classical J 0 - J 1 - J 2 Heisenberg model. For 0 < k d < 4 π / 9 , first-order transitions from helix to a fan structure occur at fields H t as previouslymore » inferred, where the fan is found to be approximately sinusoidal. However, for 4 π / 9 ≤ k d ≤ π , different behaviors are found depending on the value of k d and these properties vary nonmonotonically with k d . In this k d range, the change from helix to fanlike structure is usually a crossover with no phase transition between them, although first-order transitions are found for k d = 3 π / 5 and 8 π / 11 and a second-order transition for k d = 3 π / 4 . At a critical field H c , the fan or fanlike structures exhibit a second-order transition to the paramagnetic state. The H c for a helix undergoing a field-induced change to a fan or fanlike structure is found to be the same as for a sinusoidal fan with the same k d and interlayer interactions. We present analytical expressions for H c versus k d. We also calculated the average x -axis moment per spin μ x ave versus H x for helices and fans with crossovers and phase transitions between them. When smooth helix to fanlike crossovers occur in the range 4 π / 9 ≤ k d ≤ π , μ x ave exhibits an S-shape behavior with increasing H x . The behavior we predict is consistent with μ x ave ( H x ) data previously reported by Sangeetha et al. [Phys. Rev. B 94, 014422 (2016)] for single-crystal EuCo 2 P 2 possessing a helix ground state with k d ≈ 0.85 π . The low-field magnetic susceptibility and the ratio H t / H c are calculated analytically or numerically versus k d for helices, and are

  18. Instability of Insulators near Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doron, A.; Tamir, I.; Levinson, T.; Ovadia, M.; Sacépé, B.; Shahar, D.

    2017-12-01

    Thin films of amorphous indium oxide undergo a magnetic field driven superconducting to insulator quantum phase transition. In the insulating phase, the current-voltage characteristics show large current discontinuities due to overheating of electrons. We show that the onset voltage for the discontinuities vanishes as we approach the quantum critical point. As a result, the insulating phase becomes unstable with respect to any applied voltage making it, at least experimentally, immeasurable. We emphasize that unlike previous reports of the absence of linear response near quantum phase transitions, in our system, the departure from equilibrium is discontinuous. Because the conditions for these discontinuities are satisfied in most insulators at low temperatures, and due to the decay of all characteristic energy scales near quantum phase transitions, we believe that this instability is general and should occur in various systems while approaching their quantum critical point. Accounting for this instability is crucial for determining the critical behavior of systems near the transition.

  19. Phase diagram of electron systems near the superconductor-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Pokrovsky, V L; Falco, G M; Nattermann, T

    2010-12-31

    The zero temperature phase diagram of Cooper pairs exposed to disorder and a magnetic field is determined theoretically from a variational approach. Four distinct phases are found: a Bose and a Fermi insulating, a metallic, and a superconducting phase, respectively. The results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance found experimentally in In-O, TiN, Be and high-T(c) materials.

  20. Phase transitions in tumor growth VI: Epithelial-Mesenchymal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, A.; Rodriguez, D. J.; Montero, S.; Betancourt-Mar, J. A.; Martin, R. R.; Silva, E.; Bizzarri, M.; Cocho, G.; Mansilla, R.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2018-06-01

    Herewith we discuss a network model of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) based on our previous proposed framework. The EMT appears as a "first order" phase transition process, analogous to the transitions observed in the chemical-physical field. Chiefly, EMT should be considered a transition characterized by a supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, with the emergence of limit cycle and, consequently, a cascade of saddle-foci Shilnikov's bifurcations. We eventually show that the entropy production rate is an EMT-dependent function and, as such, its formalism reminds the van der Waals equation.

  1. Phase transition of aragonite in abalone nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yuanlin; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian

    2013-04-01

    Nacre is composed of about 95 vol.% aragonite and 5 vol.% biopolymer and famous for its "brick and mortar" microstructure. The phase transition temperature of aragonite in nacre is lower than the pure aragonite. In situ XRD was used to identify the phase transition temperature from aragonite to calcite in nacre, based on the analysis of TG-DSC of fresh nacre and demineralized nacre. The results indicate that the microstructure and biopolymer are the two main factors that influence the phase transition temperature of aragonite in nacre.

  2. The quantum phase-transitions of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillaux, François

    2017-08-01

    It is shown that hexagonal ices and steam are macroscopically quantum condensates, with continuous spacetime-translation symmetry, whereas liquid water is a quantum fluid with broken time-translation symmetry. Fusion and vaporization are quantum phase-transitions. The heat capacities, the latent heats, the phase-transition temperatures, the critical temperature, the molar volume expansion of ice relative to water, as well as neutron scattering data and dielectric measurements are explained. The phase-transition mechanisms along with the key role of quantum interferences and that of Hartley-Shannon's entropy are enlightened. The notions of chemical bond and force-field are questioned.

  3. Phase transitions in high magnetic fields

    SciT

    Arko, A.J.; Beers, C.J.; van Deursen, A.P.J.

    1982-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize some of the research activities recently performed at the Laboratorium voor Hoge Magneetvelden at the University of Nijmegen. The scope here and unifying aspect is magnetically induced phase transitions. Here we summarize transitions in the settling velocity of paramagnetic aggregates, suppression of spin fluctuations in UAl/sub 2/, the phase diagram of a ferroelectric chiral smectic liquid crystal near the Lifshitz point and the transition from 3D to 2D conduction in a GaAs FET. In no way does this represent a complete review of transitions, but rather a summary of phase transitions observedmore » at the magnet laboratory during the past year. 6 figures.« less

  4. Phase transition phenomenon: A compound measure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bo Soo; Park, Chanhi; Ryu, Doojin; Song, Wonho

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the well-documented phenomenon of phase transition in financial markets using combined information from both return and volume changes within short time intervals. We suggest a new measure for the phase transition behaviour of markets, calculated as a return distribution conditional on local variance in volume imbalance, and show that this measure successfully captures phase transition behaviour under various conditions. We analyse the intraday trade and quote dataset from the KOSPI 200 index futures, which includes detailed information on the original order size and the type of each initiating investor. We find that among these two competing factors, the submitted order size yields more explanatory power on the phenomenon of market phase transition than the investor type.

  5. Modelling Phase Transition Phenomena in Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Sublimation line r @@I Triple point ? Vapourisation liner @@I Critical point -Fusion line Solid Liquid Gas Figure 1: Schematic of a phase diagram means that the...velocity field can be set zero, and only the balance of energy constitutes the Stefan model. In contrast to this the liquid - gas phase transitions...defined by requiring that the phase-transition line is crossed in a direction from solid to liquid or from liquid to gas (vapour) phases. The term T∗ δs is

  6. Discriminative Cooperative Networks for Detecting Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ye-Hua; van Nieuwenburg, Evert P. L.

    2018-04-01

    The classification of states of matter and their corresponding phase transitions is a special kind of machine-learning task, where physical data allow for the analysis of new algorithms, which have not been considered in the general computer-science setting so far. Here we introduce an unsupervised machine-learning scheme for detecting phase transitions with a pair of discriminative cooperative networks (DCNs). In this scheme, a guesser network and a learner network cooperate to detect phase transitions from fully unlabeled data. The new scheme is efficient enough for dealing with phase diagrams in two-dimensional parameter spaces, where we can utilize an active contour model—the snake—from computer vision to host the two networks. The snake, with a DCN "brain," moves and learns actively in the parameter space, and locates phase boundaries automatically.

  7. A remark on the phase transitions of modified action spin and gauge models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiberg, Nathan; Solomon, Sorin

    1983-06-01

    We consider the phase diagrams of modified action gauge and spin models and concentrate on their periphery - infinitely far from their origins (zero temperature - β-1 = 0). In this limit the exact positions of the phase transitions are found by looking for the global minimum of the single plaquette action (for a spin system - the single link energy). As the parameters of the model are varied, the position of such a global minimum is in general changed. When this changed is non-analytic, a phase transition takes place. The phase structure for finite β is clearly similar, but not identical to the infinite β one. We discuss several finite β corrections that should be applied to the exactly known infinite β picture. We confront our analysis for infinite β2 = ∑ iβ2i with the Monte Carlo simulations for two four-dimensional gauge systems: an SU(3) gauge model with action S=-Re∑ p( β1tr Up+ β2(tr Up) 2) and an SU(2) model with S=- Re Σ p[β 1{1}/{2}trU p+β 2( {1}/{2}trU p) 2+β 3( {1}/{2}trU p) 3] .

  8. Quantum trajectory phase transitions in the micromaser.

    PubMed

    Garrahan, Juan P; Armour, Andrew D; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2011-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the single-atom maser, or micromaser, by means of the recently introduced method of thermodynamics of quantum jump trajectories. We find that the dynamics of the micromaser displays multiple space-time phase transitions, i.e., phase transitions in ensembles of quantum jump trajectories. This rich dynamical phase structure becomes apparent when trajectories are classified by dynamical observables that quantify dynamical activity, such as the number of atoms that have changed state while traversing the cavity. The space-time transitions can be either first order or continuous, and are controlled not just by standard parameters of the micromaser but also by nonequilibrium "counting" fields. We discuss how the dynamical phase behavior relates to the better known stationary-state properties of the micromaser.

  9. Superfluid--Solid Quantum Phase Transitions and Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklov, A. B.; Prokof'ev, N. V.

    2005-03-01

    We study superfluid (SF)--solid zero-temperature transitions in 2d lattice boson/spin models by Worm-Algorithm Monte Carlo simulations. The SF -- Valence Bond Solid (VBS) transition was recently argued to be generically of II order in violation of the Ginzburg-Landau- Wilson (GLW) paradigm [1]. We simulate the J-current model on lattices up to 64x64x64, and observe that SF- columnar VBS and SF-checkerboard solid transitions are typically weak I-order ones and in small systems they may be confused with the continuous or high-symmetry points [2]. Thus, in the simulated model, the SF-VBS transition proceeds in agreement with the GLW paradigm. We explain this by dominance of standard particle and hole excitations, as opposed to fractionalized (spinon) excitations [1]. We developed a technique based on tunneling events (instantons) in the insulating phase which reveals charges of the revelant long-wave modes. While in 1d systems spinons are clearly seen in tunneling events, in two spatial dimensions tunneling is solely controlled by particles and holes in our system. This work is supported by NSF grant ITR-405460001 and PSC-CUNY- 665560035. [1] T. Senthil, A. Vishwanath, L. Balents, S. Sachdev, and M.P.A. Fisher, Science 303, 1490 (2004); [2] A.B. Kuklov, N.V. Prokof'ev, B.V. Svistunov, condmat/0406061; PRL, to be published.

  10. Prospects and applications near ferroelectric quantum phase transitions: a key issues review.

    PubMed

    Chandra, P; Lonzarich, G G; Rowley, S E; Scott, J F

    2017-11-01

    The emergence of complex and fascinating states of quantum matter in the neighborhood of zero temperature phase transitions suggests that such quantum phenomena should be studied in a variety of settings. Advanced technologies of the future may be fabricated from materials where the cooperative behavior of charge, spin and current can be manipulated at cryogenic temperatures. The progagating lattice dynamics of displacive ferroelectrics make them appealing for the study of quantum critical phenomena that is characterized by both space- and time-dependent quantities. In this key issues article we aim to provide a self-contained overview of ferroelectrics near quantum phase transitions. Unlike most magnetic cases, the ferroelectric quantum critical point can be tuned experimentally to reside at, above or below its upper critical dimension; this feature allows for detailed interplay between experiment and theory using both scaling and self-consistent field models. Empirically the sensitivity of the ferroelectric T c 's to external and to chemical pressure gives practical access to a broad range of temperature behavior over several hundreds of Kelvin. Additional degrees of freedom like charge and spin can be added and characterized systematically. Satellite memories, electrocaloric cooling and low-loss phased-array radar are among possible applications of low-temperature ferroelectrics. We end with open questions for future research that include textured polarization states and unusual forms of superconductivity that remain to be understood theoretically.

  11. First-principles study of high-pressure structural phase transitions of magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuxiang; Fan, Changzeng; Zhang, Ruijun

    2009-06-01

    The structural phase transitions for the hcp, bcc, dhcp, and fcc of magnesium at hydrostatic pressures larger than about 200 GPa at zero temperature are studied by first-principles total energy calculations. The plane-wave basis pseudopotential method has been adopted, in which the generalized gradient approximation implanted in the CASTEP code is employed. By comparing the enthalpy differences of the hcp structure with other three structures under different pressures, it can be seen that when the pressure becomes higher than about 65, 130, and 190 GPa, the bcc, dhcp, and fcc structures become more stable relative to the hcp structure, respectively. Due to the lowest enthalpy value of the bcc structure above 65 GPa, it can be deduced that magnesium may transform to the bcc structure from the ground state hcp structure around 65 GPa, but no further phase transitions occur without additionally applying high temperature. In addition, the equation of state of magnesium is calculated, indicating that bcc structure is the softest phase.

  12. Prospects and applications near ferroelectric quantum phase transitions: a key issues review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, P.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Rowley, S. E.; Scott, J. F.

    2017-11-01

    The emergence of complex and fascinating states of quantum matter in the neighborhood of zero temperature phase transitions suggests that such quantum phenomena should be studied in a variety of settings. Advanced technologies of the future may be fabricated from materials where the cooperative behavior of charge, spin and current can be manipulated at cryogenic temperatures. The progagating lattice dynamics of displacive ferroelectrics make them appealing for the study of quantum critical phenomena that is characterized by both space- and time-dependent quantities. In this key issues article we aim to provide a self-contained overview of ferroelectrics near quantum phase transitions. Unlike most magnetic cases, the ferroelectric quantum critical point can be tuned experimentally to reside at, above or below its upper critical dimension; this feature allows for detailed interplay between experiment and theory using both scaling and self-consistent field models. Empirically the sensitivity of the ferroelectric T c’s to external and to chemical pressure gives practical access to a broad range of temperature behavior over several hundreds of Kelvin. Additional degrees of freedom like charge and spin can be added and characterized systematically. Satellite memories, electrocaloric cooling and low-loss phased-array radar are among possible applications of low-temperature ferroelectrics. We end with open questions for future research that include textured polarization states and unusual forms of superconductivity that remain to be understood theoretically.

  13. Shaping Crystal-Crystal Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiyu; van Anders, Greg; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon

    Previous computational and experimental studies have shown self-assembled structure depends strongly on building block shape. New synthesis techniques have led to building blocks with reconfigurable shape and it has been demonstrated that building block reconfiguration can induce bulk structural reconfiguration. However, we do not understand systematically how this transition happens as a function of building block shape. Using a recently developed ``digital alchemy'' framework, we study the thermodynamics of shape-driven crystal-crystal transitions. We find examples of shape-driven bulk reconfiguration that are accompanied by first-order phase transitions, and bulk reconfiguration that occurs without any thermodynamic phase transition. Our results suggest that for well-chosen shapes and structures, there exist facile means of bulk reconfiguration, and that shape-driven bulk reconfiguration provides a viable mechanism for developing functional materials.

  14. Sensitivity to perturbations and quantum phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Wisniacki, D A; Roncaglia, A J

    2013-05-01

    The local density of states or its Fourier transform, usually called fidelity amplitude, are important measures of quantum irreversibility due to imperfect evolution. In this Rapid Communication we study both quantities in a paradigmatic many body system, the Dicke Hamiltonian, where a single-mode bosonic field interacts with an ensemble of N two-level atoms. This model exhibits a quantum phase transition in the thermodynamic limit, while for finite instances the system undergoes a transition from quasi-integrability to quantum chaotic. We show that the width of the local density of states clearly points out the imprints of the transition from integrability to chaos but no trace remains of the quantum phase transition. The connection with the decay of the fidelity amplitude is also established.

  15. Polarons and Mobile Impurities Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkhoo, Shahriar

    derives the effective Euclidean action from the classical equation of motion. We calculate the effective mass of the polaron in the model polar liquid at zero and finite temperatures. The self-trapping transition of this polaron turns out to be discontinuous in certain regions of the phase diagram. In order to systematically investigate the role of quantum fluctuations on the polaron properties, we adopt a quantum field theory which supports nearly-critical local modes: the quantum Landau-Brazovskii (QLB) model, which exhibits fluctuation-induced first order transition (weak crystallization). In the vicinity of the phase transition, the quantum fluctuations are strongly correlated; one can in principle tune the strength of these fluctuations, by adjusting the parameters close to or away from the transition point. Furthermore, sufficiently close to the transition, the theory accommodates "soliton'' solutions, signaling the nonlinear response of the system. Therefore, the model seems to be a promising candidate for studying the effects of strong quantum fluctuations and also failure of linear response theory, in the polaron problem. We observe that at zero temperature, and away from the Brazovskii transition where the linear response approximation is valid, the localization transition of the polaron is discontinuous. Upon enhancing fluctuations---of either thermal or quantum nature---the gap of the effective mass closes at distinct second-order critical points. Sufficiently close to the Brazovskii transition where the nonlinear contributions of the field are significantly large, a new state appears in addition to extended and self-trapped polarons: an impurity-induced soliton. We interpret this as the break-down of linear response, reminiscent of what we observe in a polar liquid. Quantum LB model has been proposed to be realizable in ultracold Bose gases in cavities. We thus discuss the experimental feasibility, and propose a setup which is believed to exhibit the

  16. Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions in Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, David; Chandler, David

    2012-02-01

    We present results of a simulation study of water driven out of equilibrium. Using transition path sampling, we can probe stationary path distributions parameterize by order parameters that are extensive in space and time. We find that by coupling external fields to these parameters, we can drive water through a first order dynamical phase transition into amorphous ice. By varying the initial equilibrium distributions we can probe pathways for the creation of amorphous ices of low and high densities.

  17. Analyzing phase diagrams and phase transitions in networked competing populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y.-C.; Yin, H. P.; Xu, C.; Hui, P. M.

    2011-03-01

    Phase diagrams exhibiting the extent of cooperation in an evolutionary snowdrift game implemented in different networks are studied in detail. We invoke two independent payoff parameters, unlike a single payoff often used in most previous works that restricts the two payoffs to vary in a correlated way. In addition to the phase transition points when a single payoff parameter is used, phase boundaries separating homogeneous phases consisting of agents using the same strategy and a mixed phase consisting of agents using different strategies are found. Analytic expressions of the phase boundaries are obtained by invoking the ideas of the last surviving patterns and the relative alignments of the spectra of payoff values to agents using different strategies. In a Watts-Strogatz regular network, there exists a re-entrant phenomenon in which the system goes from a homogeneous phase into a mixed phase and re-enters the homogeneous phase as one of the two payoff parameters is varied. The non-trivial phase diagram accompanying this re-entrant phenomenon is quantitatively analyzed. The effects of noise and cooperation in randomly rewired Watts-Strogatz networks are also studied. The transition between a mixed phase and a homogeneous phase is identify to belong to the directed percolation universality class. The methods used in the present work are applicable to a wide range of problems in competing populations of networked agents.

  18. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z approx. greater than 5), structures existing on scales of 100 M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ((Delta)T/T) (approx. less than 10(exp -5)) can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random Gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of approx. 100 M pc for large scale structure as well as approx. 1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition.

  19. Reconstructive structural phase transitions in dense Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yansun; Klug, Dennis D.

    2012-07-01

    The question raised recently about whether the high-pressure phase transitions of Mg follow a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) → body centered cubic (bcc) or hcp → double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp) → bcc sequence at room temperature is examined by the use of first principles density functional methods. Enthalpy calculations show that the bcc structure replaces the hcp structure to become the most stable structure near 48 GPa, whereas the dhcp structure is never the most stable structure in the pressure range of interest. The characterized phase-transition mechanisms indicate that the hcp → dhcp transition is also associated with a higher enthalpy barrier. At room temperature, the structural sequence hcp → bcc is therefore more energetically favorable for Mg. The same conclusion is also reached from the simulations of the phase transitions using metadynamics methods. At room temperature, the metadynamics simulations predict the onset of a hcp → bcc transition at 40 GPa and the transition becomes more prominent upon further compression. At high temperatures, the metadynamics simulations reveal a structural fluctuation among the hcp, dhcp, and bcc structures at 15 GPa. With increasing pressure, the structural evolution at high temperatures becomes more unambiguous and eventually settles to a bcc structure once sufficient pressure is applied.

  20. Reconstructive structural phase transitions in dense Mg.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yansun; Klug, Dennis D

    2012-07-04

    The question raised recently about whether the high-pressure phase transitions of Mg follow a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) → body centered cubic (bcc) or hcp → double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp) → bcc sequence at room temperature is examined by the use of first principles density functional methods. Enthalpy calculations show that the bcc structure replaces the hcp structure to become the most stable structure near 48 GPa, whereas the dhcp structure is never the most stable structure in the pressure range of interest. The characterized phase-transition mechanisms indicate that the hcp → dhcp transition is also associated with a higher enthalpy barrier. At room temperature, the structural sequence hcp → bcc is therefore more energetically favorable for Mg. The same conclusion is also reached from the simulations of the phase transitions using metadynamics methods. At room temperature, the metadynamics simulations predict the onset of a hcp → bcc transition at 40 GPa and the transition becomes more prominent upon further compression. At high temperatures, the metadynamics simulations reveal a structural fluctuation among the hcp, dhcp, and bcc structures at 15 GPa. With increasing pressure, the structural evolution at high temperatures becomes more unambiguous and eventually settles to a bcc structure once sufficient pressure is applied.

  1. Network traffic behaviour near phase transition point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawniczak, A. T.; Tang, X.

    2006-03-01

    We explore packet traffic dynamics in a data network model near phase transition point from free flow to congestion. The model of data network is an abstraction of the Network Layer of the OSI (Open Systems Interconnect) Reference Model of packet switching networks. The Network Layer is responsible for routing packets across the network from their sources to their destinations and for control of congestion in data networks. Using the model we investigate spatio-temporal packets traffic dynamics near the phase transition point for various network connection topologies, and static and adaptive routing algorithms. We present selected simulation results and analyze them.

  2. Dimension changing phase transitions in instanton crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2014-04-01

    We investigate lattices of instantons and the dimension-changing transitions between them. Our ultimate goal is the 3D → 4D transition, which is holographically dual to the phase transition between the baryonic and the quarkyonic phases of cold nuclear matter. However, in this paper (just as in [1]) we focus on lower dimensions — the 1D lattice of instantons in a harmonic potential V ∝ , and the zigzag-shaped lattice as a first stage of the 1D → 2D transition. We prove that in the low- and moderate-density regimes, interactions between the instantons are dominated by two-body forces. This drastically simplifies finding the ground state of the instantons' orientations, so we made a numeric scan of the whole orientation space instead of assuming any particular ansatz. We find that depending on the M 2 /M 3 /M 4 ratios, the ground state of instanton orientations can follow a wide variety of patterns. For the straight 1D lattices, we found orientations periodically running over elements of a , Klein, prismatic, or dihedral subgroup of the , as well as irrational but link-periodic patterns. For the zigzag-shaped lattices, we detected 4 distinct orientation phases — the anti-ferromagnet, another abelian phase, and two non-abelian phases. Allowing the zigzag amplitude to vary as a function of increasing compression force, we obtained the phase diagrams for the straight and zigzag-shaped lattices in the (force , M 3 /M 4), (chemical potential , M 3 /M 4), and (density , M 3 /M 4) planes. Some of the transitions between these phases are second-order while others are first-order. Our techniques can be applied to other types of non-abelian crystals.

  3. Benford's law gives better scaling exponents in phase transitions of quantum XY models.

    PubMed

    Rane, Ameya Deepak; Mishra, Utkarsh; Biswas, Anindya; Sen De, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2014-08-01

    Benford's law is an empirical law predicting the distribution of the first significant digits of numbers obtained from natural phenomena and mathematical tables. It has been found to be applicable for numbers coming from a plethora of sources, varying from seismographic, biological, financial, to astronomical. We apply this law to analyze the data obtained from physical many-body systems described by the one-dimensional anisotropic quantum XY models in a transverse magnetic field. We detect the zero-temperature quantum phase transition and find that our method gives better finite-size scaling exponents for the critical point than many other known scaling exponents using measurable quantities like magnetization, entanglement, and quantum discord. We extend our analysis to the same system but at finite temperature and find that it also detects the finite-temperature phase transition in the model. Moreover, we compare the Benford distribution analysis with the same obtained from the uniform and Poisson distributions. The analysis is furthermore important in that the high-precision detection of the cooperative physical phenomena is possible even from low-precision experimental data.

  4. Phase transitions and baryogenesis from decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuve, Brian; Tamarit, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    We study scenarios in which the baryon asymmetry is generated from the decay of a particle whose mass originates from the spontaneous breakdown of a symmetry. This is realized in many models, including low-scale leptogenesis and theories with classical scale invariance. Symmetry breaking in the early universe proceeds through a phase transition that gives the parent particle a time-dependent mass, which provides an additional departure from thermal equilibrium that could modify the efficiency of baryogenesis from out-of-equilibrium decays. We characterize the effects of various types of phase transitions and show that an enhancement in the baryon asymmetry from decays is possible if the phase transition is of the second order, although such models are typically fine-tuned. We also stress the role of new annihilation modes that deplete the parent particle abundance in models realizing such a phase transition, reducing the efficacy of baryogenesis. A proper treatment of baryogenesis in such models therefore requires the inclusion of the effects we study in this paper.

  5. Entropy-driven phase transitions of entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Parisi, Giorgio; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2013-05-01

    We study the behavior of bipartite entanglement at fixed von Neumann entropy. We look at the distribution of the entanglement spectrum, that is, the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix of a quantum system in a pure state. We report the presence of two continuous phase transitions, characterized by different entanglement spectra, which are deformations of classical eigenvalue distributions.

  6. Phase transitions and baryogenesis from decays

    DOE PAGES

    Shuve, Brian; Tamarit, Carlos

    2017-10-18

    Here, we study scenarios in which the baryon asymmetry is generated from the decay of a particle whose mass originates from the spontaneous breakdown of a symmetry. This is realized in many models, including low-scale leptogenesis and theories with classical scale invariance. Symmetry breaking in the early universe proceeds through a phase transition that gives the parent particle a time-dependent mass, which provides an additional departure from thermal equilibrium that could modify the efficiency of baryogenesis from out-of-equilibrium decays. We characterize the effects of various types of phase transitions and show that an enhancement in the baryon asymmetry from decaysmore » is possible if the phase transition is of the second order, although such models are typically fine-tuned. We also stress the role of new annihilation modes that deplete the parent particle abundance in models realizing such a phase transition, reducing the efficacy of baryogenesis. A proper treatment of baryogenesis in such models therefore requires the inclusion of the effects we study in this paper.« less

  7. Dynamical quantum phase transitions: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyl, Markus

    2018-05-01

    Quantum theory provides an extensive framework for the description of the equilibrium properties of quantum matter. Yet experiments in quantum simulators have now opened up a route towards the generation of quantum states beyond this equilibrium paradigm. While these states promise to show properties not constrained by equilibrium principles, such as the equal a priori probability of the microcanonical ensemble, identifying the general properties of nonequilibrium quantum dynamics remains a major challenge, especially in view of the lack of conventional concepts such as free energies. The theory of dynamical quantum phase transitions attempts to identify such general principles by lifting the concept of phase transitions to coherent quantum real-time evolution. This review provides a pedagogical introduction to this field. Starting from the general setting of nonequilibrium dynamics in closed quantum many-body systems, we give the definition of dynamical quantum phase transitions as phase transitions in time with physical quantities becoming nonanalytic at critical times. We summarize the achieved theoretical advances as well as the first experimental observations, and furthermore provide an outlook to major open questions as well as future directions of research.

  8. Dynamical quantum phase transitions: a review.

    PubMed

    Heyl, Markus

    2018-05-01

    Quantum theory provides an extensive framework for the description of the equilibrium properties of quantum matter. Yet experiments in quantum simulators have now opened up a route towards the generation of quantum states beyond this equilibrium paradigm. While these states promise to show properties not constrained by equilibrium principles, such as the equal a priori probability of the microcanonical ensemble, identifying the general properties of nonequilibrium quantum dynamics remains a major challenge, especially in view of the lack of conventional concepts such as free energies. The theory of dynamical quantum phase transitions attempts to identify such general principles by lifting the concept of phase transitions to coherent quantum real-time evolution. This review provides a pedagogical introduction to this field. Starting from the general setting of nonequilibrium dynamics in closed quantum many-body systems, we give the definition of dynamical quantum phase transitions as phase transitions in time with physical quantities becoming nonanalytic at critical times. We summarize the achieved theoretical advances as well as the first experimental observations, and furthermore provide an outlook to major open questions as well as future directions of research.

  9. Hysteresis in the phase transition of chocolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ruilong; Lu, Qunfeng; Lin, Sihua; Dong, Xiaoyan; Fu, Hao; Wu, Shaoyi; Wu, Minghe; Teng, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    We designed an experiment to reproduce the hysteresis phenomenon of chocolate appearing in the heating and cooling process, and then established a model to relate the solidification degree to the order parameter. Based on the Landau-Devonshire theory, our model gave a description of the hysteresis phenomenon in chocolate, which lays the foundations for the study of the phase transition behavior of chocolate.

  10. Remarks on the Phase Transition in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    The significance of the question of the order of the phase transition in QCD, and recent evidence that real-world QCD is probably close to having a single second order transition as a function of temperature, is reviewed. Although this circumstance seems to remove the possibility that the QCD transition during the big bang might have had spectacular cosmological consequences, there is some good news: it allows highly non-trivial yet reliable quantitative predictions to be made for the behavior near the transition. These predictions can be tested in numerical simulations and perhaps even eventually in heavy ion collisions. The present paper is a very elementary discussion of the relevant concepts, meant to be an accessible introduction for those innocent of the renormalization group approach to critical phenomena and/or the details of QCD.

  11. Phase transition in conservative diffusive contact processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Carlos E.; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2004-10-01

    We determine the phase diagrams of conservative diffusive contact processes by means of numerical simulations. These models are versions of the ordinary diffusive single-creation, pair-creation, and triplet-creation contact processes in which the particle number is conserved. The transition between the frozen and active states was determined by studying the system in the subcritical regime, and the nature of the transition, whether continuous or first order, was determined by looking at the fractal dimension of the critical cluster. For the single-creation model the transition remains continuous for any diffusion rate. For pair- and triplet-creation models, however, the transition becomes first order for high enough diffusion rate. Our results indicate that in the limit of infinite diffusion rate the jump in density equals 2/3 for the pair-creation model and 5/6 for the triplet-creation model.

  12. Quantum Phase Transitions in the Bose Hubbard Model and in a Bose-Fermi Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchon, Eric Nicholas

    Ultracold atomic gases may be the ultimate quantum simulator. These isolated systems have the lowest temperatures in the observable universe, and their properties and interactions can be precisely and accurately tuned across a full spectrum of behaviors, from few-body physics to highly-correlated many-body effects. The ability to impose potentials on and tune interactions within ultracold gases to mimic complex systems mean they could become a theorist's playground. One of their great strengths, however, is also one of the largest obstacles to this dream: isolation. This thesis touches on both of these themes. First, methods to characterize phases and quantum critical points, and to construct finite temperature phase diagrams using experimentally accessible observables in the Bose Hubbard model are discussed. Then, the transition from a weakly to a strongly interacting Bose-Fermi mixture in the continuum is analyzed using zero temperature numerical techniques. Real materials can be emulated by ultracold atomic gases loaded into optical lattice potentials. We discuss the characteristics of a single boson species trapped in an optical lattice (described by the Bose Hubbard model) and the hallmarks of the quantum critical region that separates the superfluid and the Mott insulator ground states. We propose a method to map the quantum critical region using the single, experimentally accessible, local quantity R, the ratio of compressibility to local number fluctuations. The procedure to map a phase diagram with R is easily generalized to inhomogeneous systems and generic many-body Hamiltonians. We illustrate it here using quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the 2D Bose Hubbard model. Secondly, we investigate the transition from a degenerate Fermi gas weakly coupled to a Bose Einstein condensate to the strong coupling limit of composite boson-fermion molecules. We propose a variational wave function to investigate the ground state properties of such a Bose-Fermi mixture

  13. News and views in discontinuous phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Recent progress in the theory of discontinuous percolation allow us to better understand the the sudden emergence of large-scale connectedness both in networked systems and on the lattice. We analytically study mechanisms for the amplification of critical fluctuations at the phase transition point, non-self-averaging and power law fluctuations. A single event analysis allow to establish criteria for discontinuous percolation transitions, even on the high-dimensional lattice. Some applications such as salad bowl percolation, and inverse fragmentation are discussed.

  14. Phase transitions in Pareto optimal complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoane, Luís F.; Solé, Ricard

    2015-09-01

    The organization of interactions in complex systems can be described by networks connecting different units. These graphs are useful representations of the local and global complexity of the underlying systems. The origin of their topological structure can be diverse, resulting from different mechanisms including multiplicative processes and optimization. In spatial networks or in graphs where cost constraints are at work, as it occurs in a plethora of situations from power grids to the wiring of neurons in the brain, optimization plays an important part in shaping their organization. In this paper we study network designs resulting from a Pareto optimization process, where different simultaneous constraints are the targets of selection. We analyze three variations on a problem, finding phase transitions of different kinds. Distinct phases are associated with different arrangements of the connections, but the need of drastic topological changes does not determine the presence or the nature of the phase transitions encountered. Instead, the functions under optimization do play a determinant role. This reinforces the view that phase transitions do not arise from intrinsic properties of a system alone, but from the interplay of that system with its external constraints.

  15. Understanding topological phase transition in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha-Jun; Chang, K. J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite considerable interest in layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as M X2 with M =(Mo ,W ) and X =(S ,Se ,Te ) , the physical origin of their topological nature is still poorly understood. In the conventional view of topological phase transition (TPT), the nontrivial topology of electron bands in TMDs is caused by the band inversion between metal d - and chalcogen p -orbital bands where the former is pulled down below the latter. Here, we show that, in TMDs, the TPT is entirely different from the conventional speculation. In particular, M S2 and M S e2 exhibits the opposite behavior of TPT such that the chalcogen p -orbital band moves down below the metal d -orbital band. More interestingly, in M T e2 , the band inversion occurs between the metal d -orbital bands. Our findings cast doubts on the common view of TPT and provide clear guidelines for understanding the topological nature in new topological materials to be discovered.

  16. Phase transition to turbulence in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    Leo Kadanoff taught us much about phase transitions, turbulence and collective behavior. Here I explore the transition to turbulence in a pipe, showing how a collective mode determines the universality class. Near the transition, turbulent puffs decay either directly or through splitting, with characteristic time-scales that exhibit a super-exponential dependence on Reynolds number. Direct numerical simulations reveal that a collective mode, a so-called zonal flow emerges at large scales, activated by anisotropic turbulent fluctuations, as represented by Reynolds stress. This zonal flow imposes a shear on the turbulent fluctuations that tends to suppress their anisotropy, leading to a Landau theory of predator-prey type, in the directed percolation universality class. Stochastic simulations of this model reproduce the functional form and phenomenology of pipe flow experiments. Talk based on work performed with Hong-Yan Shih and Tsung-Lin Hsieh. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation through Grant NSF-DMR-1044901.

  17. Phase transition in the countdown problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Lucas; Luque, Bartolo

    2012-07-01

    We present a combinatorial decision problem, inspired by the celebrated quiz show called Countdown, that involves the computation of a given target number T from a set of k randomly chosen integers along with a set of arithmetic operations. We find that the probability of winning the game evidences a threshold phenomenon that can be understood in the terms of an algorithmic phase transition as a function of the set size k. Numerical simulations show that such probability sharply transitions from zero to one at some critical value of the control parameter, hence separating the algorithm's parameter space in different phases. We also find that the system is maximally efficient close to the critical point. We derive analytical expressions that match the numerical results for finite size and permit us to extrapolate the behavior in the thermodynamic limit.

  18. Structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuvakkumar, R.; Hong, Sun Ig

    2015-09-01

    Niobium oxide nanocrystals were successfully synthesized employing the green synthesis method. Phase formation, microstructure and compositional properties of 1, 4 and 7 days incubation treated samples after calcinations at 450 °C were examined using X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence (PL), infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron microscopic characterizations. It was observed that phase formation of Nb2O5 nanocrystals was dependent upon the incubation period required to form stable metal oxides. The characteristic results clearly revealed that with increasing incubation and aging, the transformation of cubic, orthorhombic and monoclinic phases were observed. The uniform heating at room temperature (32 °C) and the ligation of niobium atoms due to higher phenolic constituents of utilized rambutan during aging processing plays a vital role in structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals. The defects over a period of incubation and the intensities of the PL spectra changing over a period of aging were related to the amount of the defects induced by the phase transition.

  19. Structural phase transitions in monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha June; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-03-01

    The recent discovery of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) has provided opportunities to develop ultimate thin channel devices. In contrast to graphene, the existence of moderate band gap and strong spin-orbit coupling gives rise to exotic electronic properties which vary with layer thickness, lattice structure, and symmetry. TMDs commonly appear in two structures with distinct symmetries, trigonal prismatic 2H and octahedral 1T phases which are semiconducting and metallic, respectively. In this work, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides (MoX2, where X = S, Se, Te) through first-principles density functional calculations. We find a tendency that the semiconducting 2H phase is more stable than the metallic 1T phase. We show that a spontaneous symmetry breaking of 1T phase leads to various distorted octahedral (1T') phases, thus inducing a metal-to-semiconductor transition. We discuss the effects of carrier doping on the structural stability and the modification of the electronic structure. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) under Grant No. NRF-2005-0093845 and Samsung Science and Technology Foundation under Grant No. SSTFBA1401-08.

  20. Extracellular ice phase transitions in insects.

    PubMed

    Hawes, T C

    2014-01-01

    At temperatures below their temperature of crystallization (Tc), the extracellular body fluids of insects undergo a phase transition from liquid to solid. Insects that survive the transition to equilibrium (complete freezing of the body fluids) are designated as freeze tolerant. Although this phenomenon has been reported and described in many Insecta, current nomenclature and theory does not clearly delineate between the process of transition (freezing) and the final solid phase itself (the frozen state). Thus freeze tolerant insects are currently, by convention, described in terms of the temperature at which the crystallization of their body fluids is initiated, Tc. In fact, the correct descriptor for insects that tolerate freezing is the temperature of equilibrium freezing, Tef. The process of freezing is itself a separate physical event with unique physiological stresses that are associated with ice growth. Correspondingly there are a number of insects whose physiological cryo-limits are very specifically delineated by this transitional envelope. The distinction also has considerable significance for our understanding of insect cryobiology: firstly, because the ability to manage endogenous ice growth is a fundamental segregator of cryotype; and secondly, because our understanding of internal ice management is still largely nascent.

  1. Multiple Phase Transitions in the Culture Dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Han, Yuexing; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    We study the coevolution process in the Axelrod’s model with the consideration of agents’ abilities to access to the information. With a parameter to control the ability of communication, we observe two kinds of phase transitions both for cultural domains and network fragments, respectively. With the simulation results, we find the relationship between the critical value and the controlled parameter. The results indicate that the powerful ability to access to the information benefits the dissemination of culture in the system.

  2. Phase transitions in Nowak Sznajd opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołoszyn, Maciej; Stauffer, Dietrich; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2007-05-01

    The Nowak modification of the Sznajd opinion dynamics model on the square lattice assumes that with probability β the opinions flip due to mass-media advertising from down to up, and vice versa. Besides, with probability α the Sznajd rule applies that a neighbour pair agreeing in its two opinions convinces all its six neighbours of that opinion. Our Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field theory find sharp phase transitions in the parameter space.

  3. Recent theoretical advances on superradiant phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksic, Alexandre; Nataf, Pierre; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2013-03-01

    The Dicke model describing a single-mode boson field coupled to two-level systems is an important paradigm in quantum optics. In particular, the physics of ``superradiant phase transitions'' in the ultrastrong coupling regime is the subject of a vigorous research activity in both cavity and circuit QED. Recently, we explored the rich physics of two interesting generalizations of the Dicke model: (i) A model describing the coupling of a boson mode to two independent chains A and B of two-level systems, where chain A is coupled to one quadrature of the boson field and chain B to the orthogonal quadrature. This original model leads to a quantum phase transition with a double symmetry breaking and a fourfold ground state degeneracy. (ii) A generalized Dicke model with three-level systems including the diamagnetic term. In contrast to the case of two-level atoms for which no-go theorems exist, in the case of three-level system we prove that the Thomas-Reich-Kuhn sum rule does not always prevent a superradiant phase transition.

  4. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  5. Composition induced metal-insulator quantum phase transition in the Heusler type Fe2VAl.

    PubMed

    Naka, Takashi; Nikitin, Artem M; Pan, Yu; de Visser, Anne; Nakane, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Yamada, Yuh; Imai, Motoharu; Matsushita, Akiyuki

    2016-07-20

    We report the magnetism and transport properties of the Heusler compound Fe2+x V1-x Al at  -0.10  ⩽  x  ⩽  0.20 under pressure and a magnetic field. A metal-insulator quantum phase transition occurred at x  ≈  -0.05. Application of pressure or a magnetic field facilitated the emergence of finite zero-temperature conductivity σ 0 around the critical point, which scaled approximately according to the power law (P  -  P c ) (γ) . At x  ⩽  -0.05, a localized paramagnetic spin appeared, whereas above the ferromagnetic quantum critical point at x  ≈  0.05, itinerant ferromagnetism was established. At the quantum critical points at x  =  -0.05 and 0.05, the resistivity and specific heat exhibited singularities characteristic of a Griffiths phase appearing as an inhomogeneous electronic state.

  6. Compact Stars with Sequential QCD Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Alford, Mark; Sedrakian, Armen

    2017-10-20

    Compact stars may contain quark matter in their interiors at densities exceeding several times the nuclear saturation density. We explore models of such compact stars where there are two first-order phase transitions: the first from nuclear matter to a quark-matter phase, followed at a higher density by another first-order transition to a different quark-matter phase [e.g., from the two-flavor color-superconducting (2SC) to the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase]. We show that this can give rise to two separate branches of hybrid stars, separated from each other and from the nuclear branch by instability regions, and, therefore, to a new family of compact stars, denser than the ordinary hybrid stars. In a range of parameters, one may obtain twin hybrid stars (hybrid stars with the same masses but different radii) and even triplets where three stars, with inner cores of nuclear matter, 2SC matter, and CFL matter, respectively, all have the same mass but different radii.

  7. Phase transitions in shocked porous quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, M. C.; Crum, R. S.; Lind, J.; Pagan, D. C.; Homel, M. A.; Hurley, R. C.; Herbold, E. B.

    2017-06-01

    The presence of porosity in granular media provides the means to probe regions of the phase diagram that do not coincide with the principal Hugoniot. In particular, the potential for increased heating is likely to lead to observable changes in phase boundaries. 55% dense quartz and forsterite were prepared by tap filling. These samples were shock compressed using the two stage light gas gun at DCS-APS to examine the impact of the increased porosity on the phase boundary. Here we discuss the observed changes to phase in quartz and forsterite compared to the fully dense materials, the effects of porosity upon compaction and phase transitions, and the implications for constructing the phase diagram. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Work was supported by LLNL's LDRD program under Grant 16-ERD-010. The Dynamic Compression Sector (35) is supported by Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0002442. This research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Phase stability of transition metals and alloys

    SciT

    Hixson, R.S.; Schiferl, D.; Wills, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project was focused on resolving unexplained differences in calculated and measured phase transition pressures in transition metals. Part of the approach was to do new, higher accuracy calculations of transmission pressures for group 4B and group 6B metals. Theory indicates that the transition pressures for these baseline metals should change if alloyed with a d-electron donor metal, and calculations done using the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Virtual Crystal Approximation (VCA) indicate that this is true. Alloymore » systems were calculated for Ti, Zr and Hf based alloys with various solute concentrations. The second part of the program was to do new Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) measurements to experimentally verify calculational results. Alloys were prepared for these systems with grain size suitable for Diamond Anvil Cell experiments. Experiments were done on pure Ti as well as Ti-V and Ti-Ta alloys. Measuring unambiguous transition pressures for these systems proved difficult, but a new technique developed yielded good results.« less

  9. Novel phase transitions in coupled dipolar chains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Paula

    We study the properties of a classical magnetic system realized by two chains of U(1) rotors coupled via Coulomb interactions in the dumbbell approach. Magnets in chain I and chain II rotate in the x-z and y-z planes respectively. Ground state correlations and the system wave excitation spectrum are found using spin wave theory. The displacement ''d'' of chain II from chain I induces dynamics in the system and yields two first order magnetic phase transitions. The transitions happen at critical displacements, which notably, are independent of the magnetic charge at the tips of the magnets, suggesting a geometrical origin. This work was supported by Fondecyt under Grant No. 1160239.

  10. Optical Properties in Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions

    SciT

    Ao, T.; Lee, E.; Tam, H.

    An open question about the dynamical behavior of materials is how phase transition occurs in highly nonequilibrium systems. One important class of study is the excitation of a solid by an ultrafast, intense laser. The preferential heating of electrons by the laser field gives rise to initial states dominated by hot electrons in a cold lattice. Using a femtosecond laser pump-probe approach, we have followed the temporal evolution of the optical properties of such a system. The results show interesting correlation to nonthermal melting and lattice disordering processes. They also reveal a liquid-plasma transition when the lattice energy density reachesmore » a critical value.« less

  11. Mixed state dynamical quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Utso; Bandyopadhyay, Souvik; Dutta, Amit

    2017-11-01

    Preparing an integrable system in a mixed state described by a thermal density matrix, we subject it to a sudden quench and explore the subsequent unitary dynamics. To address the question of whether the nonanalyticities, namely, the dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs), persist when the initial state is mixed, we consider two versions of the generalized Loschmidt overlap amplitude (GLOA). Our study shows that the GLOA constructed using the Uhlmann approach does not show any signature of DQPTs at any nonzero initial temperature. On the other hand, a GLOA defined in the interferometric phase approach through the purifications of the time-evolved density matrix, indeed shows that nonanalyiticies in the corresponding "dynamical free-energy density" persist, thereby establishing the existence of mixed state dynamical quantum phase transitions (MSDQPTs). Our work provides a framework that perfectly reproduces both the nonanalyticities and also the emergent topological structure in the pure state limit. These claims are corroborated by analyzing the nonequilibrium dynamics of a transverse Ising chain initially prepared in a thermal state and subjected to a sudden quench of the transverse field.

  12. Phase transitions in huddling emperor penguins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, S.; Gerum, R.; Winterl, A.; Houstin, A.; Seifert, M.; Peschel, J.; Fabry, B.; Le Bohec, C.; Zitterbart, D. P.

    2018-05-01

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) are highly adapted to the harsh conditions of the Antarctic winter: they are able to fast for up to 134 days during breeding. To conserve energy, emperor penguins form tight groups (huddles), which is key for their reproductive success. The effect of different meteorological factors on the huddling behaviour, however, is not well understood. Using time-lapse image recordings of an emperor penguin colony, we show that huddling can be described as a phase transition from a fluid to a solid state. We use the colony density as order parameter, and an apparent temperature that is perceived by the penguins as the thermodynamic variable. We approximate the apparent temperature as a linear combination of four meteorological parameters: ambient temperature, wind speed, global radiation and relative humidity. We find a wind chill factor of  ‑2.9 , a humidity chill factor of  ‑0.5 rel. humidity, and a solar radiation heating factor of 0.3 . In the absence of wind, humidity and solar radiation, the phase transition temperature (50% huddling probability) is  ‑48.2 °C for the investigated time period (May 2014). We propose that higher phase transition temperatures indicate a shrinking thermal insulation and thus can serve as a proxy for lower energy reserves of the colony, integrating pre-breeding foraging success at sea and energy expenditure at land due to environmental conditions. As current global change is predicted to have strong detrimental effects on emperor penguins within the next decades, our approach may thus contribute towards an urgently needed long-term monitoring system for assessing colony health.

  13. Swarms, phase transitions, and collective intelligence

    SciT

    Millonas, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    A model of the collective behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The model is intended to be realistic, but turns out to fit naturally into the category of connectionist models, Like all connectionist models, its properties can be divided into the categories of structure, dynamics, and learning. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell hag a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, butmore » with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding constitutes of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters. It is hoped that the present mode; might serve as a paradigmatic example of a complex cooperative system in nature. In particular this model can be used to explore the relation of phase transitions to at least three important issues encountered in artificial life. Firstly, that of emergence as complex adaptive behavior. Secondly, as an exploration of second order phase transitions in biological systems. Lastly, to derive behavioral criteria for the evolution of collective behavior in social organisms. The model is then applied to the specific case of ants moving on a lattice. The local behavior of the ants is inspired by the actual behavior observed in the laboratory, and analytic results for the collective behavior are compared to the corresponding laboratory results. Monte carlo simulations are used as illustrations.« less

  14. Swarms, phase transitions, and collective intelligence

    SciT

    Millonas, M.M.

    1992-12-31

    A model of the collective behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The model is intended to be realistic, but turns out to fit naturally into the category of connectionist models, Like all connectionist models, its properties can be divided into the categories of structure, dynamics, and learning. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell hag a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, butmore » with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding constitutes of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters. It is hoped that the present mode; might serve as a paradigmatic example of a complex cooperative system in nature. In particular this model can be used to explore the relation of phase transitions to at least three important issues encountered in artificial life. Firstly, that of emergence as complex adaptive behavior. Secondly, as an exploration of second order phase transitions in biological systems. Lastly, to derive behavioral criteria for the evolution of collective behavior in social organisms. The model is then applied to the specific case of ants moving on a lattice. The local behavior of the ants is inspired by the actual behavior observed in the laboratory, and analytic results for the collective behavior are compared to the corresponding laboratory results. Monte carlo simulations are used as illustrations.« less

  15. Melonic Phase Transition in Group Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratin, Aristide; Carrozza, Sylvain; Oriti, Daniele; Ryan, James; Smerlak, Matteo

    2014-08-01

    Group field theories have recently been shown to admit a 1/N expansion dominated by so-called `melonic graphs', dual to triangulated spheres. In this note, we deepen the analysis of this melonic sector. We obtain a combinatorial formula for the melonic amplitudes in terms of a graph polynomial related to a higher-dimensional generalization of the Kirchhoff tree-matrix theorem. Simple bounds on these amplitudes show the existence of a phase transition driven by melonic interaction processes. We restrict our study to the Boulatov-Ooguri models, which describe topological BF theories and are the basis for the construction of 4-dimensional models of quantum gravity.

  16. Chiral phase transition from string theory.

    PubMed

    Parnachev, Andrei; Sahakyan, David A

    2006-09-15

    The low energy dynamics of a certain D-brane configuration in string theory is described at weak t'Hooft coupling by a nonlocal version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We study this system at finite temperature and strong t'Hooft coupling, using the string theory dual. We show that for sufficiently low temperatures chiral symmetry is broken, while for temperatures larger then the critical value, it gets restored. We compute the latent heat and observe that the phase transition is of the first order.

  17. Traders' behavioral coupling and market phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rong; Zhang, Yin; Li, Honggang

    2017-11-01

    Traditional economic theory is based on the assumption that traders are completely independent and rational; however, trading behavior in the real market is often coupled by various factors. This paper discusses behavioral coupling based on the stock index in the stock market, focusing on the convergence of traders' behavior, its effect on the correlation of stock returns and market volatility. We find that the behavioral consensus in the stock market, the correlation degree of stock returns, and the market volatility all exhibit significant phase transitions with stronger coupling.

  18. Phase Transition in Protocols Minimizing Work Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solon, Alexandre P.; Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2018-05-01

    For two canonical examples of driven mesoscopic systems—a harmonically trapped Brownian particle and a quantum dot—we numerically determine the finite-time protocols that optimize the compromise between the standard deviation and the mean of the dissipated work. In the case of the oscillator, we observe a collection of protocols that smoothly trade off between average work and its fluctuations. However, for the quantum dot, we find that as we shift the weight of our optimization objective from average work to work standard deviation, there is an analog of a first-order phase transition in protocol space: two distinct protocols exchange global optimality with mixed protocols akin to phase coexistence. As a result, the two types of protocols possess qualitatively different properties and remain distinct even in the infinite duration limit: optimal-work-fluctuation protocols never coalesce with the minimal-work protocols, which therefore never become quasistatic.

  19. The infinite limit as an eliminable approximation for phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardourel, Vincent

    2018-05-01

    It is generally claimed that infinite idealizations are required for explaining phase transitions within statistical mechanics (e.g. Batterman 2011). Nevertheless, Menon and Callender (2013) have outlined theoretical approaches that describe phase transitions without using the infinite limit. This paper closely investigates one of these approaches, which consists of studying the complex zeros of the partition function (Borrmann et al., 2000). Based on this theory, I argue for the plausibility for eliminating the infinite limit for studying phase transitions. I offer a new account for phase transitions in finite systems, and I argue for the use of the infinite limit as an approximation for studying phase transitions in large systems.

  20. Three dimensional finite temperature SU(3) gauge theory near the phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, P.; Daniel, L.; Morel, A.; Petersson, B.

    2013-06-01

    We have measured the correlation function of Polyakov loops on the lattice in three dimensional SU(3) gauge theory near its finite temperature phase transition. Using a new and powerful application of finite size scaling, we furthermore extend the measurements of the critical couplings to considerably larger values of the lattice sizes, both in the temperature and space directions, than was investigated earlier in this theory. With the help of these measurements we perform a detailed finite size scaling analysis, showing that for the critical exponents of the two dimensional three state Potts model the mass and the susceptibility fall on unique scaling curves. This strongly supports the expectation that the gauge theory is in the same universality class. The Nambu-Goto string model on the other hand predicts that the exponent ν has the mean field value, which is quite different from the value in the abovementioned Potts model. Using our values of the critical couplings we also determine the continuum limit of the value of the critical temperature in terms of the square root of the zero temperature string tension. This value is very near to the prediction of the Nambu-Goto string model in spite of the different critical behaviour.

  1. Multifractality and Network Analysis of Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yang, Chunbin; Han, Jihui; Su, Zhu; Zou, Yijiang

    2017-01-01

    Many models and real complex systems possess critical thresholds at which the systems shift dramatically from one sate to another. The discovery of early-warnings in the vicinity of critical points are of great importance to estimate how far the systems are away from the critical states. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) and visibility graph method have been employed to investigate the multifractal and geometrical properties of the magnetization time series of the two-dimensional Ising model. Multifractality of the time series near the critical point has been uncovered from the generalized Hurst exponents and singularity spectrum. Both long-term correlation and broad probability density function are identified to be the sources of multifractality. Heterogeneous nature of the networks constructed from magnetization time series have validated the fractal properties. Evolution of the topological quantities of the visibility graph, along with the variation of multifractality, serve as new early-warnings of phase transition. Those methods and results may provide new insights about the analysis of phase transition problems and can be used as early-warnings for a variety of complex systems. PMID:28107414

  2. Stress induced phase transitions in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnitzki, M.; Kuna, M.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon has a tremendous importance as an electronic, structural and optical material. Modeling the interaction of a silicon surface with a pointed asperity at room temperature is a major step towards the understanding of various phenomena related to brittle as well as ductile regime machining of this semiconductor. If subjected to pressure or contact loading, silicon undergoes a series of stress-driven phase transitions accompanied by large volume changes. In order to understand the material's response for complex non-hydrostatic loading situations, dedicated constitutive models are required. While a significant body of literature exists for the dislocation dominated high-temperature deformation regime, the constitutive laws used for the technologically relevant rapid low-temperature loading have severe limitations, as they do not account for the relevant phase transitions. We developed a novel finite deformation constitutive model set within the framework of thermodynamics with internal variables that captures the stress induced semiconductor-to-metal (cd-Si → β-Si), metal-to-amorphous (β-Si → a-Si) as well as amorphous-to-amorphous (a-Si → hda-Si, hda-Si → a-Si) transitions. The model parameters were identified in part directly from diamond anvil cell data and in part from instrumented indentation by the solution of an inverse problem. The constitutive model was verified by successfully predicting the transformation stress under uniaxial compression and load-displacement curves for different indenters for single loading-unloading cycles as well as repeated indentation. To the authors' knowledge this is the first constitutive model that is able to adequately describe cyclic indentation in silicon.

  3. Does sex induce a phase transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; Cebrat, S.; Pękalski, A.

    2008-05-01

    We discovered a dynamic phase transition induced by sexual reproduction. The dynamics is a pure Darwinian rule applied to diploid bit-strings with both fundamental ingredients to drive Darwin's evolution: (1) random mutations and crossings which act in the sense of increasing the entropy (or diversity); and (2) selection which acts in the opposite sense by limiting the entropy explosion. Selection wins this competition if mutations performed at birth are few enough, and thus the wild genotype dominates the steady-state population. By slowly increasing the average number m of mutations, however, the population suddenly undergoes a mutational degradation precisely at a transition point mc. Above this point, the “bad” alleles (represented by 1-bits) spread over the genetic pool of the population, overcoming the selection pressure. Individuals become selectively alike, and evolution stops. Only below this point, m < mc, evolutionary life is possible. The finite-size-scaling behaviour of this transition is exhibited for large enough “chromosome” lengths L, through lengthy computer simulations. One important and surprising observation is the L-independence of the transition curves, for large L. They are also independent on the population size. Another is that mc is near unity, i.e. life cannot be stable with much more than one mutation per diploid genome, independent of the chromosome length, in agreement with reality. One possible consequence is that an eventual evolutionary jump towards larger L enabling the storage of more genetic information would demand an improved DNA copying machinery in order to keep the same total number of mutations per offspring.

  4. Fast, Computer Supported Experimental Determination of Absolute Zero Temperature at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and fast experimental method of determining absolute zero temperature is presented. Air gas thermometer coupled with pressure sensor and data acquisition system COACH is applied in a wide range of temperature. By constructing a pressure vs temperature plot for air under constant volume it is possible to obtain--by extrapolation to zero…

  5. High-pressure phase transitions of strontianite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziale, S.; Biedermann, N.; Reichmann, H. J.; Koch-Mueller, M.; Heide, G.

    2015-12-01

    Strontianite (SrCO3) is isostructural to aragonite, a major high-pressure polymorph of calcite. Thus it is a material of interest to investigate the high-pressure phase behavior of aragonite-group minerals. SrCO3 is a common component of natural carbonates and knowing its physical properties at high pressures is necessary to properly model the thermodynamic properties of complex carbonates, which are major crustal minerals but are also present in the deep Earth [Brenker et al., 2007] and control carbon cycling in the Earth's mantle. The few available high-pressure studies of SrCO3 disagree regarding both pressure stability and structure of the post-aragonite phase [Lin & Liu, 1997; Ono et al., 2005; Wang et al. 2015]. To clarify such controversies we investigated the high-pressure behavior of synthetic SrCO3 by Raman spectroscopy. Using a diamond anvil cell we compressed single-crystals or powder of strontianite (synthesized at 4 GPa and 1273 K for 24h in a multi anvil apparatus), and measured Raman scattering up to 78 GPa. SrCO3 presents a complex high-pressure behavior. We observe mode softening above 20 GPa and a phase transition at 25 - 26.9 GPa, which we interpret due to the CO3 groups rotation, in agreement with Lin & Liu [1997]. The lattice modes in the high-pressure phase show dramatic changes which may indicate a change from 9-fold coordinated Sr to a 12-fold-coordination [Ono, 2007]. Our results confirm that the high-pressure phase of strontianite is compatible with Pmmn symmetry. References Brenker, F.E. et al. (2007) Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 260, 1; Lin, C.-C. & Liu, L.-G. (1997) J. Phys. Chem. Solids, 58, 977; Ono, S. et al. (2005) Phys. Chem. Minerals, 32, 8; Ono, S. (2007) Phys. Chem. Minerals, 34, 215; Wang, M. et al. (2015) Phys Chem Minerals 42, 517.

  6. Phase Transitions of Thermoelectric TAGS-85.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Vermeulen, Paul A; Kooi, Bart J; Rao, Jiancun; van Eijck, Lambert; Schwarzmüller, Stefan; Oeckler, Oliver; Blake, Graeme R

    2017-12-18

    The alloys (GeTe) x (AgSbTe 2 ) 100-x , commonly known as TAGS-x, are among the best performing p-type thermoelectric materials for the composition range 80 ≤ x ≤ 90 and in the temperature range 200-500 °C. They adopt a rhombohedrally distorted rocksalt structure at room temperature and are reported to undergo a reversible phase transition to a cubic structure at ∼250 °C. However, we show that, for the optimal x = 85 composition (TAGS-85), both the structural and thermoelectric properties are highly sensitive to the initial synthesis method employed. Single-phase rhombohedral samples exhibit the best thermoelectric properties but can only be obtained after an annealing step at 600 °C during initial cooling from the melt. Under faster cooling conditions, the samples obtained are inhomogeneous, containing multiple rhombohedral phases with a range of lattice parameters and exhibiting inferior thermoelectric properties. We also find that when the room-temperature rhombohedral phase is heated, an intermediate trigonal structure containing ordered cation vacancy layers is formed at ∼200 °C, driven by the spontaneous precipitation of argyrodite-type Ag 8 GeTe 6 which alters the stoichiometry of the TAGS-85 matrix. The rhombohedral and trigonal phases of TAGS-85 coexist up to 380 °C, above which a single cubic phase is obtained and the Ag 8 GeTe 6 precipitates redissolve into the matrix. On subsequent cooling a mixture of rhombohedral, trigonal, and Ag 8 GeTe 6 phases is again obtained. Initially single-phase samples exhibit thermoelectric power factors of up to 0.0035 W m -1 K -2 at 500 °C, a value that is maintained on subsequent thermal cycling and which represents the highest power factor yet reported for undoped TAGS-85. Therefore, control over the structural homogeneity of TAGS-85 as demonstrated here is essential in order to optimize the thermoelectric performance.

  7. Quarantine generated phase transition in epidemic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicksion, Mark; Lagorio, Cecilia; Vazquez, F.; Braunstein, L.; Macri, P. A.; Migueles, M. V.; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.

    2011-03-01

    We study the critical effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible individuals protect themselves by disconnecting their links to infected neighbors with probability w, and reconnecting them to other susceptible individuals chosen at random. Starting from a single infected individual, we show by an analytical approach and simulations that there is a phase transition at a critical rewiring (quarantine) threshold wc separating a phase (w phase (w > =wc) where the disease does not spread out. We find that in our model the topology of the network strongly affects the size of the propagation, and that wc increases with the mean degree and heterogeneity of the network. We also find that wc is reduced if we perform a preferential rewiring, in which the rewiring probability is proportional to the degree of infected nodes.

  8. QCD PHASE TRANSITIONS-VOLUME 15.

    SciT

    SCHAFER,T.

    1998-11-04

    The title of the workshop, ''The QCD Phase Transitions'', in fact happened to be too narrow for its real contents. It would be more accurate to say that it was devoted to different phases of QCD and QCD-related gauge theories, with strong emphasis on discussion of the underlying non-perturbative mechanisms which manifest themselves as all those phases. Before we go to specifics, let us emphasize one important aspect of the present status of non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory in general. It remains true that its studies do not get attention proportional to the intellectual challenge they deserve, and that the theoristsmore » working on it remain very fragmented. The efforts to create Theory of Everything including Quantum Gravity have attracted the lion share of attention and young talent. Nevertheless, in the last few years there was also a tremendous progress and even some shift of attention toward emphasis on the unity of non-perturbative phenomena. For example, we have seen some. efforts to connect the lessons from recent progress in Supersymmetric theories with that in QCD, as derived from phenomenology and lattice. Another example is Maldacena conjecture and related development, which connect three things together, string theory, super-gravity and the (N=4) supersymmetric gauge theory. Although the progress mentioned is remarkable by itself, if we would listen to each other more we may have chance to strengthen the field and reach better understanding of the spectacular non-perturbative physics.« less

  9. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  10. Wilson loop's phase transition probed by non-local observable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Ling; Feng, Zhong-Wen; Yang, Shu-Zheng; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2018-04-01

    In order to give further insights into the holographic Van der Waals phase transition, it would be of great interest to investigate the behavior of Wilson loop across the holographic phase transition for a higher dimensional hairy black hole. We offer a possibility to proceed with a numerical calculation in order to discussion on the hairy black hole's phase transition, and show that Wilson loop can serve as a probe to detect a phase structure of the black hole. Furthermore, for a first order phase transition, we calculate numerically the Maxwell's equal area construction; and for a second order phase transition, we also study the critical exponent in order to characterize the Wilson loop's phase transition.

  11. Thermodynamic signature of a magnetic-field-driven phase transition within the superconducting state of an underdoped cuprate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, J. B.; Vafek, O.; Betts, J. B.; Balakirev, F. F.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Boebinger, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    More than a quarter century after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) YBa2Cu3O6+δ (YBCO; ref. ), studies continue to uncover complexity in its phase diagram. In addition to HTS and the pseudogap, there is growing evidence for multiple phases with boundaries which are functions of temperature (T), doping (p) and magnetic field. Here we report the low-temperature electronic specific heat (Celec) of YBa2Cu3O6.43 and YBa2Cu3O6.47 (p = 0.076 and 0.084) up to a magnetic field (H) of 34.5 T, a poorly understood region of the underdoped H-T-p phase space. We observe two regimes in the low-temperature limit: below a characteristic magnetic field H' ~ 12-15 T, Celec/T obeys an expected H1/2 behaviour; however, near H' there is a sharp inflection followed by a linear-in-H behaviour. H' rests deep within the superconducting phase and, thus, the linear-in-H behaviour is observed in the zero-resistance regime. In the limit of zero temperature, Celec/T is proportional to the zero-energy electronic density of states. At one of our dopings, the inflection is sharp only at lowest temperatures, and we thus conclude that this inflection is evidence of a magnetic-field-driven quantum phase transition.

  12. Characterizing quantum phase transition by teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng-He; Ling, Yi; Shu, Fu-Wen; Gan, Wen-Cong

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we provide a novel way to explore the relation between quantum teleportation and quantum phase transition. We construct a quantum channel with a mixed state which is made from one dimensional quantum Ising chain with infinite length, and then consider the teleportation with the use of entangled Werner states as input qubits. The fidelity as a figure of merit to measure how well the quantum state is transferred is studied numerically. Remarkably we find the first-order derivative of the fidelity with respect to the parameter in quantum Ising chain exhibits a logarithmic divergence at the quantum critical point. The implications of this phenomenon and possible applications are also briefly discussed.

  13. Deep Neural Network Detects Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Shunta; Ohzeki, Masayuki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2018-03-01

    We detect the quantum phase transition of a quantum many-body system by mapping the observed results of the quantum state onto a neural network. In the present study, we utilized the simplest case of a quantum many-body system, namely a one-dimensional chain of Ising spins with the transverse Ising model. We prepared several spin configurations, which were obtained using repeated observations of the model for a particular strength of the transverse field, as input data for the neural network. Although the proposed method can be employed using experimental observations of quantum many-body systems, we tested our technique with spin configurations generated by a quantum Monte Carlo simulation without initial relaxation. The neural network successfully identified the strength of transverse field only from the spin configurations, leading to consistent estimations of the critical point of our model Γc = J.

  14. Scaling theory of topological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Topologically ordered systems are characterized by topological invariants that are often calculated from the momentum space integration of a certain function that represents the curvature of the many-body state. The curvature function may be Berry curvature, Berry connection, or other quantities depending on the system. Akin to stretching a messy string to reveal the number of knots it contains, a scaling procedure is proposed for the curvature function in inversion symmetric systems, from which the topological phase transition can be identified from the flow of the driving energy parameters that control the topology (hopping, chemical potential, etc) under scaling. At an infinitesimal operation, one obtains the renormalization group (RG) equations for the driving energy parameters. A length scale defined from the curvature function near the gap-closing momentum is suggested to characterize the scale invariance at critical points and fixed points, and displays a universal critical behavior in a variety of systems examined.

  15. Single-Photon-Triggered Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Xin-You; Zheng, Li-Li; Zhu, Gui-Lei; Wu, Ying

    2018-06-01

    We propose a hybrid quantum model combining cavity QED and optomechanics, which allows the occurrence of an equilibrium superradiant quantum phase transition (QPT) triggered by a single photon. This single-photon-triggered QPT exists in the cases of both ignoring and including the so-called A2 term; i.e., it is immune to the no-go theorem. It originally comes from the photon-dependent quantum criticality featured by the proposed hybrid quantum model. Moreover, a reversed superradiant QPT is induced by the competition between the introduced A2 term and the optomechanical interaction. This work offers an approach to manipulate QPT with a single photon, which should inspire the exploration of single-photon quantum-criticality physics and the engineering of new single-photon quantum devices.

  16. Phase Transitions in Living Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Garcia, Rashid Vladimir

    Our nervous systems are composed of intricate webs of interconnected neurons interacting in complex ways. These complex interactions result in a wide range of collective behaviors with implications for features of brain function, e.g., information processing. Under certain conditions, such interactions can drive neural network dynamics towards critical phase transitions, where power-law scaling is conjectured to allow optimal behavior. Recent experimental evidence is consistent with this idea and it seems plausible that healthy neural networks would tend towards optimality. This hypothesis, however, is based on two problematic assumptions, which I describe and for which I present alternatives in this thesis. First, critical transitions may vanish due to the influence of an environment, e.g., a sensory stimulus, and so living neural networks may be incapable of achieving "critical" optimality. I develop a framework known as quasicriticality, in which a relative optimality can be achieved depending on the strength of the environmental influence. Second, the power-law scaling supporting this hypothesis is based on statistical analysis of cascades of activity known as neuronal avalanches, which conflate causal and non-causal activity, thus confounding important dynamical information. In this thesis, I present a new method to unveil causal links, known as causal webs, between neuronal activations, thus allowing for experimental tests of the quasicriticality hypothesis and other practical applications.

  17. Survey of CRISM Transition Phase Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelos, F. P.; Murchie, S. L.; Choo, T. H.; McGovern, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) transition phase extends from the end of aerobraking (08/30/06) to the start of the Primary Science Phase (PSP) (11/08/2006). Within this timeframe, the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) will acquire Mars scene observations in association with the deployment of the telescope cover (09/27/06) and during the operational checkout of the full science payload (09/29/06 - 10/05/06). The CRISM cover opening sequence includes scene observations that will be used to verify deployment and to validate the on-orbit instrument wavelength calibration. The limited cover opening observation set consists of: 1. A hyperspectral nadir scan acquired as the cover is deployed (first light) 2. A single targeted (gimbaled) hyperspectral observation in the northern plains 3. A restricted duration nadir multispectral strip The high level objectives for the science payload checkout are to obtain observations in support of in-flight wavelength, radiometric, and geometric instrument calibration, to acquire data that will contribute to the development of a first-order hyperspectral atmospheric correction, and to exercise numerous spacecraft and instrument observing modes and strategies that will be employed during PSP. The science payload checkout also enables a unique collaboration between the Mars Express OMEGA and CRISM teams, with both spectrometers slated to observe common target locations with a minimal time offset for the purpose of instrument cross-calibration. The priority CRISM observations for the payload checkout include: 1. Multispectral nadir and hyperspectral off-nadir targeted observations in support of the cross-calibration experiment with OMEGA 2. Terminator-to-terminator multispectral data acquisition demonstrating the strategy that will be used to construct the global multispectral survey map 3. Terminator-to-terminator atmospheric emission phase function (EPF) data acquisition demonstrating the observation

  18. A Direct Method for Viewing Ferromagnetic Phase Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lue, Chin-Shan

    1994-01-01

    Provides a method, using the Rowland ring as a specimen, to observe the phase transition process directly on the oscilloscope and even extract the critical exponent of ferromagnetic transition. Includes theory, experimental setup, and results. (MVL)

  19. Cold pasta phase in the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avancini, S. S.; Bertolino, B. P.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we aim to obtain more accurate values for the transition density to the homogenous phase in the nuclear pasta that occurs in the inner crust of neutron stars. To that end, we use the nonlinear Walecka model at zero temperature and an approach based on the extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) approximation.

  20. Mixed-order phase transition in a colloidal crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alert, Ricard; Tierno, Pietro; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-12-01

    Mixed-order phase transitions display a discontinuity in the order parameter like first-order transitions yet feature critical behavior like second-order transitions. Such transitions have been predicted for a broad range of equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems, but their experimental observation has remained elusive. Here, we analytically predict and experimentally realize a mixed-order equilibrium phase transition. Specifically, a discontinuous solid-solid transition in a 2D crystal of paramagnetic colloidal particles is induced by a magnetic field H. At the transition field Hs, the energy landscape of the system becomes completely flat, which causes diverging fluctuations and correlation length ξ∝|H2-Hs2|-1/2. Mean-field critical exponents are predicted, since the upper critical dimension of the transition is du=2. Our colloidal system provides an experimental test bed to probe the unconventional properties of mixed-order phase transitions.

  1. Mixed-order phase transition in a colloidal crystal.

    PubMed

    Alert, Ricard; Tierno, Pietro; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-12-05

    Mixed-order phase transitions display a discontinuity in the order parameter like first-order transitions yet feature critical behavior like second-order transitions. Such transitions have been predicted for a broad range of equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems, but their experimental observation has remained elusive. Here, we analytically predict and experimentally realize a mixed-order equilibrium phase transition. Specifically, a discontinuous solid-solid transition in a 2D crystal of paramagnetic colloidal particles is induced by a magnetic field [Formula: see text] At the transition field [Formula: see text], the energy landscape of the system becomes completely flat, which causes diverging fluctuations and correlation length [Formula: see text] Mean-field critical exponents are predicted, since the upper critical dimension of the transition is [Formula: see text] Our colloidal system provides an experimental test bed to probe the unconventional properties of mixed-order phase transitions.

  2. Mixed-order phase transition in a colloidal crystal

    PubMed Central

    Tierno, Pietro; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    Mixed-order phase transitions display a discontinuity in the order parameter like first-order transitions yet feature critical behavior like second-order transitions. Such transitions have been predicted for a broad range of equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems, but their experimental observation has remained elusive. Here, we analytically predict and experimentally realize a mixed-order equilibrium phase transition. Specifically, a discontinuous solid–solid transition in a 2D crystal of paramagnetic colloidal particles is induced by a magnetic field H. At the transition field Hs, the energy landscape of the system becomes completely flat, which causes diverging fluctuations and correlation length ξ∝|H2−Hs2|−1/2. Mean-field critical exponents are predicted, since the upper critical dimension of the transition is du=2. Our colloidal system provides an experimental test bed to probe the unconventional properties of mixed-order phase transitions. PMID:29158388

  3. Gravitational waves and Higgs boson couplings for exploring first order phase transition in the model with a singlet scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashino, Katsuya; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Kanemura, Shinya; Ko, Pyungwon; Matsui, Toshinori

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves originated from strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the extended Higgs model with a real singlet scalar field. In order to calculate the bubble nucleation rate, we perform a two-field analysis and evaluate bounce solutions connecting the true and the false vacua using the one-loop effective potential at finite temperatures. Imposing the Sakharov condition of the departure from thermal equilibrium for baryogenesis, we survey allowed regions of parameters of the model. We then investigate the gravitational waves produced at electroweak bubble collisions in the early Universe, such as the sound wave, the bubble wall collision and the plasma turbulence. We find that the strength at the peak frequency can be large enough to be detected at future space-based gravitational interferometers such as eLISA, DECIGO and BBO. Predicted deviations in the various Higgs boson couplings are also evaluated at the zero temperature, and are shown to be large enough too. Therefore, in this model strongly first order electroweak phase transition can be tested by the combination of the precision study of various Higgs boson couplings at the LHC, the measurement of the triple Higgs boson coupling at future lepton colliders and the shape of the spectrum of gravitational wave detectable at future gravitational interferometers.

  4. Pressure induced phase transitions in ceramic compounds containing tetragonal zirconia

    SciT

    Sparks, R.G.; Pfeiffer, G.; Paesler, M.A.

    Stabilized tetragonal zirconia compounds exhibit a transformation toughening process in which stress applied to the material induces a crystallographic phase transition. The phase transition is accompanied by a volume expansion in the stressed region thereby dissipating stress and increasing the fracture strength of the material. The hydrostatic component of the stress required to induce the phase transition can be investigated by the use of a high pressure technique in combination with Micro-Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of Raman lines characteristic for the crystallographic phases can be used to calculate the amount of material that has undergone the transition as a functionmore » of pressure. It was found that pressures on the order of 2-5 kBar were sufficient to produce an almost complete transition from the original tetragonal to the less dense monoclinic phase; while a further increase in pressure caused a gradual reversal of the transition back to the original tetragonal structure.« less

  5. Dynamical Phase Transition in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, R.; Mallick, Ritam

    2018-05-01

    We have studied the dynamical evolution of the shock in a neutron star (NS). The conversion of nuclear to quark matter (QM) is assumed to take place at the shock discontinuity. The density and pressure discontinuity is studied both spatially and temporally as it starts near the center of the star and moves toward the surface. Polytropic equations of state (EoS), which mimic original nuclear and QM EoS, are used to study such dynamical phase transition (PT). Solving relativistic hydrodynamic equations for a spherically symmetric star, we study the PT, assuming a considerable density discontinuity near the center. We find that as the shock wave propagates outward, its intensity decreases with time; however, the shock velocity peaks up and reaches a value close to that of light. Such fast shock velocity indicates rapid PT in NS taking place on a timescale of some 10s of microseconds. Such a result is quite interesting, and it differs from previous calculations that the PT in NSs takes at least some 10s of milliseconds. Rapid PT can have significant observational significance, because such fast PT would imply rather strong gravitational wave (GW) signals that are rather short lived. Such short-lived GW signals would be accompanied with short-lived gamma-ray bursts and neutrino signals originating from the neutrino and gamma-ray generation from the PT of nuclear matter to QM.

  6. Phase transitions in models of human cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perc, Matjaž

    2016-08-01

    If only the fittest survive, why should one cooperate? Why should one sacrifice personal benefits for the common good? Recent research indicates that a comprehensive answer to such questions requires that we look beyond the individual and focus on the collective behavior that emerges as a result of the interactions among individuals, groups, and societies. Although undoubtedly driven also by culture and cognition, human cooperation is just as well an emergent, collective phenomenon in a complex system. Nonequilibrium statistical physics, in particular the collective behavior of interacting particles near phase transitions, has already been recognized as very valuable for understanding counterintuitive evolutionary outcomes. However, unlike pairwise interactions among particles that typically govern solid-state physics systems, interactions among humans often involve group interactions, and they also involve a larger number of possible states even for the most simplified description of reality. Here we briefly review research done in the realm of the public goods game, and we outline future research directions with an emphasis on merging the most recent advances in the social sciences with methods of nonequilibrium statistical physics. By having a firm theoretical grip on human cooperation, we can hope to engineer better social systems and develop more efficient policies for a sustainable and better future.

  7. Phononic Crystal Tunable via Ferroelectric Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaowei; Cai, Feiyan; Xie, Shuhong; Li, Fei; Sun, Rong; Fu, Xianzhu; Xiong, Rengen; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Hairong; Li, Jiangyu

    2015-09-01

    Phononic crystals (PCs) consisting of periodic materials with different acoustic properties have potential applications in functional devices. To realize more smart functions, it is desirable to actively control the properties of PCs on demand, ideally within the same fabricated system. Here, we report a tunable PC made of Ba0.7Sr0.3Ti O3 (BST) ceramics, wherein a 20-K temperature change near room temperature results in a 20% frequency shift in the transmission spectra induced by a ferroelectric phase transition. The tunability phenomenon is attributed to the structure-induced resonant excitation of A0 and A1 Lamb modes that exist intrinsically in the uniform BST plate, while these Lamb modes are sensitive to the elastic properties of the plate and can be modulated by temperature in a BST plate around the Curie temperature. The study finds opportunities for creating tunable PCs and enables smart temperature-tuned devices such as the Lamb wave filter or sensor.

  8. Method for identifying and probing phase transitions in materials

    DOEpatents

    Asay, Blaine W.; Henson, Bryan F.; Sander, Robert K.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Son, Steven F.; Dickson, Peter M.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a method for identifying and probing phase transitions in materials. A polymorphic material capable of existing in at least one non-centrosymmetric phase is interrogated with a beam of laser light at a chosen wavelength and frequency. A phase transition is induced in the material while it is interrogated. The intensity of light scattered by the material and having a wavelength equal to one half the wavelength of the interrogating laser light is detected. If the phase transition results in the production of a non-centrosymmetric phase, the intensity of this scattered light increases; if the phase transition results in the disappearance of a non-centrosymmetric phase, the intensity of this scattered light decreases.

  9. Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions of n-Tridecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Motoi

    Pressure-induced phase transition behavior of n-tridecane from the ordered phase through the rotator phase into the liquid phase has been investigated by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy at 25 °C. The transition between the ordered and rotator phases has been observed in the pressure range of 270-220 MPa and the transition between the rotator and liquid phases has been observed in the pressure range of 171-112 MPa, within the experimental error of ±50 MPa. The populations of the -gtg- + -gtg'-, -gg- and gt- defects determined from the methylene wagging mode are smaller in the rotator phase than in the liquid phase and are smaller under higher pressure in both of the rotator and liquid phases. A relationship has been found between the conformation and the intensity of the 890 cm-1 band, which has been assigned as the methyl rocking mode and has been considered as insensitive to conformation.

  10. Microscopic origin of black hole reentrant phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, M. Kord; Dehyadegari, A.; Sheykhi, A.; Mann, R. B.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the microscopic behavior of the black hole ingredients has been one of the important challenges in black hole physics during the past decades. In order to shed some light on the microscopic structure of black holes, in this paper, we explore a recently observed phenomenon for black holes namely reentrant phase transition, by employing the Ruppeiner geometry. Interestingly enough, we observe two properties for the phase behavior of small black holes that leads to reentrant phase transition. They are correlated and they are of the interaction type. For the range of pressure in which the system underlies reentrant phase transition, it transits from the large black holes phase to the small one which possesses higher correlation than the other ranges of pressures. On the other hand, the type of interaction between small black holes near the large/small transition line differs for usual and reentrant phase transitions. Indeed, for the usual case, the dominant interaction is repulsive whereas for the reentrant case we encounter an attractive interaction. We show that in the reentrant phase transition case, the small black holes behave like a bosonic gas whereas in the usual phase transition case, they behave like a quantum anyon gas.

  11. Multipartite entanglement characterization of a quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, G.; Facchi, P.; Florio, G.; Pascazio, S.

    2007-07-01

    A probability density characterization of multipartite entanglement is tested on the one-dimensional quantum Ising model in a transverse field. The average and second moment of the probability distribution are numerically shown to be good indicators of the quantum phase transition. We comment on multipartite entanglement generation at a quantum phase transition.

  12. On the Phase Transition of N-Isopropylcarbazole.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    vacinity of the phase transition (ca. T 137 + 40 K). We propose a semiquantitative interpretation of the phase transition in NIPC based on this assumption...the order parameter fluctuations in the vacinity of TO . V. Conclusions. The elastic properties of NIPC in the temperature range 90 K - 295 K have

  13. Two kinds of phase transitions in a voting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisakado, M.; Mori, S.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model with two candidates, C0 and C1. We consider two types of voters—herders and independents. The voting of independents is based on their fundamental values, while the voting of herders is based on the number of previous votes. We can identify two kinds of phase transitions. One is an information cascade transition similar to a phase transition seen in the Ising model. The other is a transition of super and normal diffusions. These phase transitions coexist. We compared our results to the conclusions of experiments and identified the phase transitions in the upper limit of the time t by using the analysis of human behavior obtained from experiments.

  14. Thermodynamic phase transition of a black hole in rainbow gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhong-Wen; Yang, Shu-Zheng

    2017-09-01

    In this letter, using the rainbow functions that were proposed by Magueijo and Smolin, we investigate the thermodynamics and the phase transition of rainbow Schwarzschild black hole. First, we calculate the rainbow gravity corrected Hawking temperature. From this modification, we then derive the local temperature, free energy, and other thermodynamic quantities in an isothermal cavity. Finally, we analyze the critical behavior, thermodynamic stability, and phase transition of the rainbow Schwarzschild black hole. The results show that the rainbow gravity can stop the Hawking radiation in the final stages of black holes' evolution and lead to the remnants of black holes. Furthermore, one can observe that the rainbow Schwarzschild black hole has one first-order phase transition, two second-order phase transitions, and three Hawking-Page-type phase transitions in the framework of rainbow gravity theory.

  15. Thermodynamics and glassy phase transition of regular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Wajiha; Yousaf, Z.; Akhtar, Zunaira

    2018-05-01

    This paper is aimed to study thermodynamical properties of phase transition for regular charged black holes (BHs). In this context, we have considered two different forms of BH metrics supplemented with exponential and logistic distribution functions and investigated the recent expansion of phase transition through grand canonical ensemble. After exploring the corresponding Ehrenfest’s equation, we found the second-order background of phase transition at critical points. In order to check the critical behavior of regular BHs, we have evaluated some corresponding explicit relations for the critical temperature, pressure and volume and draw certain graphs with constant values of Smarr’s mass. We found that for the BH metric with exponential configuration function, the phase transition curves are divergent near the critical points, while glassy phase transition has been observed for the Ayón-Beato-García-Bronnikov (ABGB) BH in n = 5 dimensions.

  16. Phase transitions and domain structures in multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Eftihia

    2011-12-01

    Thin film ferroelectrics and multiferroics are two important classes of materials interesting both from a scientific and a technological prospective. The volatility of lead and bismuth as well as environmental issues regarding the toxicity of lead are two disadvantages of the most commonly used ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) materials such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and SrBi2Ta2O9. Therefore lead-free thin film ferroelectrics are promising substitutes as long as (a) they can be grown on technologically important substrates such as silicon, and (b) their T c and Pr become comparable to that of well established ferroelectrics. On the other hand, the development of functional room temperature ferroelectric ferromagnetic multiferroics could lead to very interesting phenomena such as control of magnetism with electric fields and control of electrical polarization with magnetic fields. This thesis focuses on the understanding of material structure-property relations using nonlinear optical spectroscopy. Nonlinear spectroscopy is an excellent tool for probing the onset of ferroelectricity, and domain dynamics in strained ferroelectrics and multiferroics. Second harmonic generation was used to detect ferroelectricity and the antiferrodistortive phase transition in thin film SrTiO3. Incipient ferroelectric CaTiO3 has been shown to become ferroelectric when strained with a combination of SHG and dielectric measurements. The tensorial nature of the induced nonlinear polarization allows for probing of the BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 polarization contributions in nanoscale BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices. In addition, nonlinear optics was used to demonstrate ferroelectricity in multiferroic EuTiO3. Finally, confocal SHG and Raman microscopy were utilized to visualize polar domains in incipient ferroelectric and ferroelastic CaTiO3.

  17. Nonequilibrium Phase Transition in a Model for Social Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Claudio; Marsili, Matteo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2000-10-01

    We present extensive numerical simulations of the Axelrod's model for social influence, aimed at understanding the formation of cultural domains. This is a nonequilibrium model with short range interactions and a remarkably rich dynamical behavior. We study the phase diagram of the model and uncover a nonequilibrium phase transition separating an ordered (culturally polarized) phase from a disordered (culturally fragmented) one. The nature of the phase transition can be continuous or discontinuous depending on the model parameters. At the transition, the size of cultural regions is power-law distributed.

  18. Fluctuation-driven electroweak phase transition. [in early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1992-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  19. Quantum phase transition in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Longhua

    In this thesis, we investigated the strongly correlated phenomena in bilayer quantum Hall effect, inhomogeneous superconductivity and Boson Hubbard model. Bilayer quantum Hall system is studied in chapter 2. By using the Composite Boson (CB) theory developed by J. Ye, we derive the ground state, quasihole and a quasihole-pair wave functions from the CB theory and its dual action. We find that the ground state wave function is the product of two parts, one in the charge sector which is the well known Halperin's (111) wave function and the other in the spin sector which is non-trivial at any finite d due to the gapless mode. So the total groundstate wave function differs from the well known (111) wave function at any finite d. In addition to commonly known multiplicative factors, the quasihole and quasihole-pair wave functions also contain non-trivial normalization factors multiplying the correct ground state wave function. Then we continue to study the quantum phase transition from the excitonic superfluid (ESF) to a possible pseudo-spin density wave (PSDW) at some intermediate distances driven by the magneto-roton minimum collapsing at a finite wavevector. We analyze the properties of the PSDW and explicitly show that a square lattice is the favored lattice. We suggest that correlated hopping of vacancies in the active and passive layers in the PSDW state leads to very large and temperature-dependent drag, consistent with the experimental data. Comparisons with previous microscopic numerical calculations are made. Further experimental implications are given. In chapter 3, we investigate inhomogeneous superconductivity. Starting from the Ginzburg-Landau free energy describing the normal state to Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state transition, we evaluate the free energy of seven most common lattice structures: stripe, square, triangular, Simple Cubic (SC), Face centered Cubic (FCC), Body centered Cubic (BCC) and Quasicrystal (QC). We find that the stripe

  20. Deviatoric stress-induced phase transitions in diamantane

    SciT

    Yang, Fan; Lin, Yu; Dahl, Jeremy E. P.

    2014-10-21

    The high-pressure behavior of diamantane was investigated using angle-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy in diamond anvil cells. Our experiments revealed that the structural transitions in diamantane were extremely sensitive to deviatoric stress. Under non-hydrostatic conditions, diamantane underwent a cubic (space group Pa3) to a monoclinic phase transition at below 0.15 GPa, the lowest pressure we were able to measure. Upon further compression to 3.5 GPa, this monoclinic phase transformed into another high-pressure monoclinic phase which persisted to 32 GPa, the highest pressure studied in our experiments. However, under more hydrostatic conditions using silicone oil as a pressuremore » medium, the transition pressure to the first high-pressure monoclinic phase was elevated to 7–10 GPa, which coincided with the hydrostatic limit of silicone oil. In another experiment using helium as a pressure medium, no phase transitions were observed to the highest pressure we reached (13 GPa). In addition, large hysteresis and sluggish transition kinetics were observed upon decompression. Over the pressure range where phase transitions were confirmed by XRD, only continuous changes in the Raman spectra were observed. This suggests that these phase transitions are associated with unit cell distortions and modifications in molecular packing rather than the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds under pressure.« less

  1. High-pressure phase transitions - Examples of classical predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebonovic, Vladan

    1992-09-01

    The applicability of the Savic and Kasanin (1962-1967) classical theory of dense matter to laboratory experiments requiring estimates of high-pressure phase transitions was examined by determining phase transition pressures for a set of 19 chemical substances (including elements, hydrocarbons, metal oxides, and salts) for which experimental data were available. A comparison between experimental and transition points and those predicted by the Savic-Kasanin theory showed that the theory can be used for estimating values of transition pressures. The results also support conclusions obtained in previous astronomical applications of the Savic-Kasanin theory.

  2. Global quantum discord and quantum phase transition in XY model

    SciT

    Liu, Si-Yuan; Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190; Zhang, Yu-Ran, E-mail: yrzhang@iphy.ac.cn

    We study the relationship between the behavior of global quantum correlations and quantum phase transitions in XY model. We find that the two kinds of phase transitions in the studied model can be characterized by the features of global quantum discord (GQD) and the corresponding quantum correlations. We demonstrate that the maximum of the sum of all the nearest neighbor bipartite GQDs is effective and accurate for signaling the Ising quantum phase transition, in contrast, the sudden change of GQD is very suitable for characterizing another phase transition in the XY model. This may shed lights on the study ofmore » properties of quantum correlations in different quantum phases.« less

  3. Problem-Solving Phase Transitions During Team Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Travis J; Butner, Jonathan E; Fiore, Stephen M

    2018-01-01

    Multiple theories of problem-solving hypothesize that there are distinct qualitative phases exhibited during effective problem-solving. However, limited research has attempted to identify when transitions between phases occur. We integrate theory on collaborative problem-solving (CPS) with dynamical systems theory suggesting that when a system is undergoing a phase transition it should exhibit a peak in entropy and that entropy levels should also relate to team performance. Communications from 40 teams that collaborated on a complex problem were coded for occurrence of problem-solving processes. We applied a sliding window entropy technique to each team's communications and specified criteria for (a) identifying data points that qualify as peaks and (b) determining which peaks were robust. We used multilevel modeling, and provide a qualitative example, to evaluate whether phases exhibit distinct distributions of communication processes. We also tested whether there was a relationship between entropy values at transition points and CPS performance. We found that a proportion of entropy peaks was robust and that the relative occurrence of communication codes varied significantly across phases. Peaks in entropy thus corresponded to qualitative shifts in teams' CPS communications, providing empirical evidence that teams exhibit phase transitions during CPS. Also, lower average levels of entropy at the phase transition points predicted better CPS performance. We specify future directions to improve understanding of phase transitions during CPS, and collaborative cognition, more broadly. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  4. Phase transitions in samarium at high pressures

    SciT

    Dong, W.Y.; Lin, T.H.; Dunn, K.J.

    1987-01-15

    The electrical behavior of Sm was studied for pressures up to 43 GPa and temperatures from 430 down to 2 K. The two Neel temperatures at ambient pressure are found to move toward each other as the pressure increases and finally merge into one at the dhcp phase. At room temperature, we found that Sm transforms to a new phase, presumably fcc, at about 12 GPa. The phase line between the dhcp and the new phase appears to tie with the cusp of the bcc phase line.

  5. Tunable Bragg filters with a phase transition material defect layer

    SciT

    Wang, Xi; Gong, Zilun; Dong, Kaichen

    We propose an all-solid-state tunable Bragg filter with a phase transition material as the defect layer. Bragg filters based on a vanadium dioxide defect layer sandwiched between silicon dioxide/titanium dioxide Bragg gratings are experimentally demonstrated. Temperature dependent reflection spectroscopy shows the dynamic tunability and hysteresis properties of the Bragg filter. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy reveals the connection between the tunability and the phase transition of the vanadium dioxide defect layer. This work paves a new avenue in tunable Bragg filter designs and promises more applications by combining phase transition materials and optical cavities.

  6. Tunable Bragg filters with a phase transition material defect layer

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xi; Gong, Zilun; Dong, Kaichen; ...

    2016-01-01

    We propose an all-solid-state tunable Bragg filter with a phase transition material as the defect layer. Bragg filters based on a vanadium dioxide defect layer sandwiched between silicon dioxide/titanium dioxide Bragg gratings are experimentally demonstrated. Temperature dependent reflection spectroscopy shows the dynamic tunability and hysteresis properties of the Bragg filter. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy reveals the connection between the tunability and the phase transition of the vanadium dioxide defect layer. This work paves a new avenue in tunable Bragg filter designs and promises more applications by combining phase transition materials and optical cavities.

  7. Superradiant phase transitions with three-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksic, Alexandre; Nataf, Pierre; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2013-02-01

    We determine the phase diagram of N identical three-level systems interacting with a single photonic mode in the thermodynamical limit (N→∞) by accounting for the so-called diamagnetic term and the inequalities imposed by the Thomas-Reich-Kuhn (TRK) oscillator strength sum rule. The key role of transitions between excited levels and the occurrence of first-order phase transitions is discussed. We show that, in contrast to two-level systems, in the three-level case the TRK inequalities do not always prevent a superradiant phase transition in the presence of a diamagnetic term.

  8. How to quantify the transition phase during golf swing performance: Torsional load affects low back complaints during the transition phase.

    PubMed

    Sim, Taeyong; Choi, Ahnryul; Lee, Soeun; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2017-10-01

    The transition phase of a golf swing is considered to be a decisive instant required for a powerful swing. However, at the same time, the low back torsional loads during this phase can have a considerable effect on golf-related low back pain (LBP). Previous efforts to quantify the transition phase were hampered by problems with accuracy due to methodological limitations. In this study, vector-coding technique (VCT) method was proposed as a comprehensive methodology to quantify the precise transition phase and examine low back torsional load. Towards this end, transition phases were assessed using three different methods (VCT, lead hand speed and X-factor stretch) and compared; then, low back torsional load during the transition phase was examined. As a result, the importance of accurate transition phase quantification has been documented. The largest torsional loads were observed in healthy professional golfers (10.23 ± 1.69 N · kg -1 ), followed by professional golfers with a history of LBP (7.93 ± 1.79 N · kg -1 ), healthy amateur golfers (1.79 ± 1.05 N · kg -1 ) and amateur golfers with a history of LBP (0.99 ± 0.87 N · kg -1 ), which order was equal to that of the transition phase magnitudes of each group. These results indicate the relationship between the transition phase and LBP history and the dependency of the torsional load magnitude on the transition phase.

  9. Safety performance of traffic phases and phase transitions in three phase traffic theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengcheng; Liu, Pan; Wang, Wei; Li, Zhibin

    2015-12-01

    Crash risk prediction models were developed to link safety to various phases and phase transitions defined by the three phase traffic theory. Results of the Bayesian conditional logit analysis showed that different traffic states differed distinctly with respect to safety performance. The random-parameter logit approach was utilized to account for the heterogeneity caused by unobserved factors. The Bayesian inference approach based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method was used for the estimation of the random-parameter logit model. The proposed approach increased the prediction performance of the crash risk models as compared with the conventional logit model. The three phase traffic theory can help us better understand the mechanism of crash occurrences in various traffic states. The contributing factors to crash likelihood can be well explained by the mechanism of phase transitions. We further discovered that the free flow state can be divided into two sub-phases on the basis of safety performance, including a true free flow state in which the interactions between vehicles are minor, and a platooned traffic state in which bunched vehicles travel in successions. The results of this study suggest that a safety perspective can be added to the three phase traffic theory. The results also suggest that the heterogeneity between different traffic states should be considered when estimating the risks of crash occurrences on freeways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PLA and single component silicone rubber blends for sub-zero temperature blown film packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meekum, Utai; Khiansanoi, Apichart

    2018-06-01

    The poly(lactic acid) (PLA) blend with single component silicone rubber in the presence of reactive amino silane coupling agent and polyester polyols plasticizer were studied. The manufacturing of film packaging for sub-zero temperature applications from the PLA blend was the main objective. The mechanical properties, especially the impact strengths, of PLA/silicone blends were significantly depended on the silicone loading. The outstanding impact strengths, tested at sub-zero temperature, of the blend having silicone content of 8.0 phr was achieved. It was chosen as the best candidate for the processability improvement. Adding the talc filler into the PLA/silicone blend to enhance the rheological properties was investigated. The ductility of the talc filled blends were decreased with increasing the filler contents. However, the shear viscosity of the blend was raised with talc loading. The blend loaded with 40 phr of talc filler was justified as the optimal formula for the blown film process testing and it was successfully performed with a few difficulties. The obtained blown film showed relative good flexibility in comparison with LDPE but it has low transparency.

  11. A Bayesian Interpretation of First-Order Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; Peralta, Joaquín; Navarrete, Yasmín; González, Diego; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-03-01

    In this work we review the formalism used in describing the thermodynamics of first-order phase transitions from the point of view of maximum entropy inference. We present the concepts of transition temperature, latent heat and entropy difference between phases as emergent from the more fundamental concept of internal energy, after a statistical inference analysis. We explicitly demonstrate this point of view by making inferences on a simple game, resulting in the same formalism as in thermodynamical phase transitions. We show that analogous quantities will inevitably arise in any problem of inferring the result of a yes/no question, given two different states of knowledge and information in the form of expectation values. This exposition may help to clarify the role of these thermodynamical quantities in the context of different first-order phase transitions such as the case of magnetic Hamiltonians (e.g. the Potts model).

  12. Transit Performance Monitoring System (TPMS) results : summary report, phase 3

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-06-01

    This report presents the results of the third phase of a project to implement a transit performance monitoring system (TPMS). The TPMS was designed to collect data on transit customers through the use of on-board surveys. The long-term goal of the TP...

  13. Baryogenesis via leptonic CP-violating phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoli, Silvia; Turner, Jessica; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2018-05-01

    We propose a new mechanism to generate a lepton asymmetry based on the vacuum CP-violating phase transition (CPPT). This approach differs from classical thermal leptogenesis as a specific seesaw model, and its UV completion, need not be specified. The lepton asymmetry is generated via the dynamically realised coupling of the Weinberg operator during the phase transition. This mechanism provides a connection with low-energy neutrino observables.

  14. A surface phase transition of supported gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Plech, Anton; Cerna, Roland; Kotaidis, Vassilios; Hudert, Florian; Bartels, Albrecht; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    A thermal phase transition has been resolved in gold nanoparticles supported on a surface. By use of asynchronous optical sampling with coupled femtosecond oscillators, the Lamb vibrational modes could be resolved as a function of annealing temperature. At a temperature of 104 degrees C the damping rate and phase changes abruptly, indicating a structural transition in the particle, which is explained as the onset of surface melting.

  15. Effect of point defects and disorder on structural phase transitions

    SciT

    Toulouse, J.

    1997-06-01

    Since the beginning in 1986, the object of this project has been Structural Phase Transitions (SPT) in real as opposed to ideal materials. The first stage of the study has been centered around the role of Point Defects in SPT`s. Our intent was to use the previous knowledge we had acquired in the study of point defects in non-transforming insulators and apply it to the study of point defects in insulators undergoing phase transitions. In non-transforming insulators, point defects, in low concentrations, marginally affect the bulk properties of the host. It is nevertheless possible by resonance or relaxation methods tomore » study the point defects themselves via their local motion. In transforming solids, however, close to a phase transition, atomic motions become correlated over very large distances; there, even point defects far removed from one another can undergo correlated motions which may strongly affect the transition behavior of the host. Near a structural transition, the elastic properties win be most strongly affected so as to either raise or decrease the transition temperature, prevent the transition from taking place altogether, or simply modify its nature and the microstructure or domain structure of the resulting phase. One of the well known practical examples is calcium-stabilized zirconia in which the high temperature cubic phase is stabilized at room temperature with greatly improved mechanical properties.« less

  16. Signatures of a dissipative phase transition in photon correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Thomas; Schade, Anne; Höfling, Sven; Schneider, Christian; Imamoglu, Ataç

    2018-04-01

    Understanding and characterizing phase transitions in driven-dissipative systems constitutes a new frontier for many-body physics1-8. A generic feature of dissipative phase transitions is a vanishing gap in the Liouvillian spectrum9, which leads to long-lived deviations from the steady state as the system is driven towards the transition. Here, we show that photon correlation measurements can be used to characterize the corresponding critical slowing down of non-equilibrium dynamics. We focus on the extensively studied phenomenon of optical bistability in GaAs cavity polaritons10,11, which can be described as a first-order dissipative phase transition12-14. Increasing the excitation strength towards the bistable range results in an increasing photon-bunching signal along with a decay time that is prolonged by more than nine orders of magnitude as compared with that of single polaritons. In the limit of strong polariton interactions leading to pronounced quantum fluctuations, the mean-field bistability threshold is washed out. Nevertheless, the functional form with which the Liouvillian gap closes as the thermodynamic limit is approached provides a signature of the emerging dissipative phase transition. Our results establish photon correlation measurements as an invaluable tool for studying dynamical properties of dissipative phase transitions without requiring phase-sensitive interferometric measurements.

  17. Gravitation waves from QCD and electroweak phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yidian; Huang, Mei; Yan, Qi-Shu

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the gravitation waves produced from QCD and electroweak phase transitions in the early universe by using a 5-dimension holographic QCD model and a holographic technicolor model. The dynamical holographic QCD model is to describe the pure gluon system, where a first order confinement-deconfinement phase transition can happen at the critical temperature around 250 MeV. The minimal holographic technicolor model is introduced to model the strong dynamics of electroweak, it can give a first order electroweak phase transition at the critical temperature around 100-360 GeV. We find that for both GW signals produced from QCD and EW phase transitions, in the peak frequency region, the dominant contribution comes from the sound waves, while away from the peak frequency region the contribution from the bubble collision is dominant. The peak frequency of gravitation wave determined by the QCD phase transition is located around 10-7 Hz which is within the detectability of FAST and SKA, and the peak frequency of gravitational wave predicted by EW phase transition is located at 0.002 - 0.007 Hz, which might be detectable by BBO, DECIGO, LISA and ELISA.

  18. High pressure spectroscopic studies of phase transition in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Raktima; Mishra, K. K.; Ravindran, T. R.; Dhara, Sandip

    2018-04-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) exhibits a reversible first-order metal to insulator transition (MIT) at a technologically important temperature of 340K. A structural phase transition (SPT) from monoclinic M1 to rutile tetragonal R is also reported via another two intermediate phases of monoclinic M2 and triclinic T. Metastable monoclinic M2 phase of VO2 was synthesized by Mg doping in the vapour transport process. Raman spectroscopic measurements were carried out at high pressure on V1-xMgxO2 microrods. Two reversible structural phase transitions from monoclinic M2 to triclinic T at 1.6 GPa and T to monoclinic M1 at 3.2 GPa are observed and are explained by structural relaxation of the strained phases.

  19. Mapping the phase inhomogeneity across first order spin flop transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Malvika; Majumder, Supriyo; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.

    2018-04-01

    As a consequence of spin reorientation phase transition (SRPT, TSRPT = 34K) in SmCrO3, the two phases, high temperature uncompensated anti-ferromagnetic Γ4 configuration and low temperature collinear anti-ferromagnetic phase Γ1 coexist in the vicinity of transition. The observed unexpectedly huge coercivity (Hc ˜2T) below SRPT at 25K questions on the behavior of two co-existing phases. In the present study, we have used the FORC diagrams to monitor the distribution of clusters related to different phases and to understand the nature of interaction among the clusters of distinct phases. We observed that the nature of interaction has indeed magnetic effect and the pining across phase boundaries may cause the enhancement of coercivity at 25K.

  20. Paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition in achiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pociecha, Damian; Gorecka, Ewa; Čepič, Mojca; Vaupotič, Nataša; Gomola, Kinga; Mieczkowski, Jozef

    2005-12-01

    Critical freezing of molecular rotation in an achiral smectic phase, which leads to polar ordering through the second order paraelectric-antiferroelectric (Sm-A→Sm-APA) phase transition is studied theoretically and experimentally. Strong softening of the polar mode in the Sm-A phase and highly intensive dielectric mode in the Sm-APA phase are observed due to weak antiferroelectric interactions in the system. In the Sm-APA phase the dielectric response behaves critically upon biasing by a dc electric field. Such a behavior is found general for the antiferroelectric smectic phase with significant quadrupolar interlayer coupling.

  1. Phase Transitions in Antibody Solutions: from Pharmaceuticals to Human Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George; Dana Farber Cancer Institute Collaboration; Amgen Inc. Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Antibodies are very important proteins. Natural antibodies play essential role in the immune system of human body. Pharmaceutical antibodies are used as drugs. Antibodies are also indispensable tools in biomedical research and diagnostics. Recently, a number of observations of phase transitions of pharmaceutical antibodies have been reported. These phase transitions are undesirable from the perspective of colloid stability of drug solutions in processing and storage, but can be used for protein purification, X-ray crystallography, and improving pharmokinetics of drugs. Phase transitions of antibodies can also take place in human body, particularly in multiple myeloma patients who overproduce monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies, in some cases, crystallize at body temperature and cause severe complications called cryoglobulinemia. I will present the results of our current studies on phase transitions of both pharmaceutical antibodies and cryoglobulinemia-associated antibodies. These studies have shown that different antibodies have different propensity to undergo phase transitions, but their phase behavior has universal features which are remarkably different from those of spherical proteins. I will discuss how studies of phase behavior can be useful in assessing colloid stability of pharmaceutical antibodies and in early diagnostics of cryoglobulinemia, as well as general implications of the fact that some antibodies can precipitate at physiological conditions.

  2. Langmuir-Gibbs Surface Phases and Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Benjamin; Sloutskin, Eli; Sapir, Zvi; Tamam, Lilach; Deutsch, Moshe; Bain, Colin

    2007-03-01

    Recent synchrotron x-ray measurements reveal surface ordering transitions in films of medium-length linear hydrocarbons (alkanes), spread on the water surface. Alkanes longer than hexane do not spread on the free surface of water. However, sub-mM concentrations of some anionic surfactants (e.g. CTAB) induce formation of thermodynamically stable alkane monolayers, through a ``pseudo-partial wetting'' phenomenon[1]. The monolayers, incorporating both water-insoluble alkanes (Langmuir) and water-soluble CTAB molecules (Gibbs) are called Langmuir-Gibbs (LG) films. The films formed by alkanes with n <=17 exhibit ordering transition upon cooling [2], below which the molecules are normal to the water surface and hexagonally packed, with CTAB molecules randomly mixed inside the quasi-2D crystal. Alkanes with n>17 can not form ordered LG monolayers, due to the repulsion from the n=16 tails of CTAB. This repulsion arises from the two chains' length mismatch. A demixing transition occurs upon ordering, with a pure alkane quasi-2D crystal forming on top of disordered alkyl tails of CTAB molecules. [1] K.M. Wilkinson et al., Chem. Phys. Phys. Chem. 6, 547 (2005). [2] E. Sloutskin, Z. Sapir, L. Tamam, B.M. Ocko, C.D. Bain, and M. Deutsch, Thin Solid Films, in press; K.M. Wilkinson, L. Qunfang, and C.D. Bain, Soft Matter 2, 66 (2006).

  3. Universal monopole scaling near transitions from the Coulomb phase.

    PubMed

    Powell, Stephen

    2012-08-10

    Certain frustrated systems, including spin ice and dimer models, exhibit a Coulomb phase at low temperatures, with power-law correlations and fractionalized monopole excitations. Transitions out of this phase, at which the effective gauge theory becomes confining, provide examples of unconventional criticality. This Letter studies the behavior at nonzero monopole density near such transitions, using scaling theory to arrive at universal expressions for the crossover phenomena. For a particular transition in spin ice, quantitative predictions are made by mapping to the XY model and confirmed using Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Electroweak phase transition in the {mu}{nu}SSM

    SciT

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 207-43, Cheongnyangni2-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722; Long, Andrew J.

    2010-06-15

    An extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model called the {mu}{nu}SSM does not allow a conventional thermal leptogenesis scenario because of the low scale seesaw that it utilizes. Hence, we investigate the possibility of electroweak baryogenesis. Specifically, we identify a parameter region for which the electroweak phase transition is sufficiently strongly first order to realize electroweak baryogenesis. In addition to transitions that are similar to those in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, we find a novel class of phase transitions in which there is a rotation in the singlet vector space.

  5. Effect of three-body interactions on the zero-temperature equation of state of HCP solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Ashleigh L.; Hinde, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have pointed to the importance of three-body interactions in high density 4He solids. However the computational cost often makes it unfeasible to incorporate these interactions into the simulation of large systems. We report the implementation and evaluation of a computationally efficient perturbative treatment of three-body interactions in hexagonal close packed solid 4He utilizing the recently developed nonadditive three-body potential of Cencek et al. This study represents the first application of the Cencek three-body potential to condensed phase 4He systems. Ground state energies from quantum Monte Carlo simulations, with either fully incorporated or perturbatively treated three-body interactions, are calculated in systems with molar volumes ranging from 21.3 cm3/mol down to 2.5 cm3/mol. These energies are used to derive the zero-temperature equation of state for comparison against existing experimental and theoretical data. The equations of state derived from both perturbative and fully incorporated three-body interactions are found to be in very good agreement with one another, and reproduce the experimental pressure-volume data with significantly better accuracy than is obtained when only two-body interactions are considered. At molar volumes below approximately 4.0 cm3/mol, neither two-body nor three-body equations of state are able to accurately reproduce the experimental pressure-volume data, suggesting that below this molar volume four-body and higher many-body interactions are becoming important.

  6. Surface Premelting Coupled with Bulk Phase Transitions in Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Di; Cao, Xin; Peng, Yi; Ni, Ran; Liao, Maijia; Han, Yilong

    2015-03-01

    Colloids have been used as outstanding model systems for the studies of various phase transitions in bulk, but not at interface yet. Here we obtained equilibrium crystal-vapor interfaces using tunable attractive colloidal spheres and studied the surface premelting at the single-particle level by video microscopy. We found that monolayer crystals exhibit a bulk isostructural solid-solid transition which triggers the surface premelting. The premelting is incomplete due to the interruption of a mechanical-instability-induced bulk melting. By contrast, two- or multilayer crystals do not have the solid-solid transition and the mechanical instability, hence they exhibit complete premelting with divergent surface-liquid thickness. These novel interplays between bulk and surface phase transitions cast new lights for both types of transitions.

  7. Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Li, Jia; Hou, Dazhi; ...

    2016-08-30

    Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of the central topics of magnetism and condensed matter science. Experimentally, the spin fluctuation is found transcribed onto scattering intensity in the neutron-scattering process, which is represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility and maximized at phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and therefore it can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy. However, large facilities such as a nuclear reactor are necessary. Here we present that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop microprobe for spin transition; spin current is amore » flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin excitation. Additionally, we demonstrate detection of antiferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency-dependent spin-current transmission measurements, which provides a versatile probe for phase transition in an electric manner in minute devices.« less

  8. Role of phonons in the metal-insulator phase transition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review, for the transition series oxides, of the Mattis and Lander model, which is one of electrons interacting with lattice vibrations (electron and phonon interaction). The model displays superconducting, insulating, and metallic phases. Its basic properties evolve from a finite crystallographic distortion associated with a dominant phonon mode and the splitting of the Brillouin zone into two subzones, a property of simple cubic and body centered cubic lattices. The order of the metal-insulator phase transition is examined. The basic model has a second-order phase transition and the effects of additional mechanisms on the model are calculated. The way in which these mechanisms affect the magnetically ordered transition series oxides as described by the Hubbard model is discussed.

  9. Domain wall formation in late-time phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Wang, Yun

    1992-01-01

    We examine domain wall formulation in late time phase transitions. We find that in the invisible axion domain wall phenomenon, thermal effects alone are insufficient to drive different parts of the disconnected vacuum manifold. This suggests that domain walls do not form unless either there is some supplemental (but perhaps not unreasonable) dynamics to localize the scalar field responsible for the phase transition to the low temperature maximum (to an extraordinary precision) before the onset of the phase transition, or there is some non-thermal mechanism to produce large fluctuations in the scalar field. The fact that domain wall production is not a robust prediction of late time transitions may suggest future directions in model building.

  10. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yutao U T; Killian, Christopher E; Olson, Ian C; Appathurai, Narayana P; Amasino, Audra L; Martin, Michael C; Holt, Liam J; Wilt, Fred H; Gilbert, P U P A

    2012-04-17

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC · H(2)O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC · H(2)O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC · H(2)O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC · H(2)O in vitro.

  11. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yutao U. T.; Killian, Christopher E.; Olson, Ian C.; Appathurai, Narayana P.; Amasino, Audra L.; Martin, Michael C.; Holt, Liam J.; Wilt, Fred H.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC·H2O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC·H2O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC·H2O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC·H2O in vitro. PMID:22492931

  12. Notes on phase transitions and the role of spin fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stishov, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    The physical properties of two chiral systems with localized and delocalized magnetic moments, {\\text{Cu}}2{\\text{OSeO}}3 and MnSi, are reviewed. It is concluded that the longitudinal fluctuations of magnetic moments have no strong effect on the qualitative picture of phase transitions and the magnetic phase diagrams of chiral systems.

  13. Synchronization of Oscillators: An Ideal Introduction to Phase Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, L. Q.

    2008-01-01

    The spontaneous synchronization of phase-coupled, non-identical oscillators is explored numerically via the famous Kuramoto model. The conditions for synchronization are examined as a function of the coupling network. I argue that such a numerical exploration provides a feasible way to introduce the topic of phase transitions early in the physics…

  14. The deconfining phase transition in and out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, Oleksiy

    Recent experiments carried out at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at the Brookhaven National Laboratory provide strong evidence that a matter can be driven from a confined, low-temperature phase, observed in our every day world into a deconfined high-temperature phase of liberated quarks and gluons. The equilibrium and dynamical properties of the deconfining phase transition are thus of great theoretical interest, since they also provide an information about the first femtoseconds of the evolution of our Universe, when the hot primordial soup while cooling has undergone a chain of phase transitions. The aspects of the deconfining phase transition studied in this work include: the dynamics of the SU(3) gauge theory after the heating quench (which models rapid heating in the heavy-ion collisions), equilibrium properties of the phase transition in the SU(3) gauge theory with boundaries at low temperature (small volumes at RHIC suggest that boundary effects cannot be neglected and periodic boundary conditions normally used in lattice simulations do not correspond to the experimental situation), and a study of the order of the transition in U(1) gauge theory.

  15. Non-equilibrium quantum phase transition via entanglement decoherence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chen; Yang, Pei-Yun; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2016-10-07

    We investigate the decoherence dynamics of continuous variable entanglement as the system-environment coupling strength varies from the weak-coupling to the strong-coupling regimes. Due to the existence of localized modes in the strong-coupling regime, the system cannot approach equilibrium with its environment, which induces a nonequilibrium quantum phase transition. We analytically solve the entanglement decoherence dynamics for an arbitrary spectral density. The nonequilibrium quantum phase transition is demonstrated as the system-environment coupling strength varies for all the Ohmic-type spectral densities. The 3-D entanglement quantum phase diagram is obtained.

  16. Non-equilibrium quantum phase transition via entanglement decoherence dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chen; Yang, Pei-Yun; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the decoherence dynamics of continuous variable entanglement as the system-environment coupling strength varies from the weak-coupling to the strong-coupling regimes. Due to the existence of localized modes in the strong-coupling regime, the system cannot approach equilibrium with its environment, which induces a nonequilibrium quantum phase transition. We analytically solve the entanglement decoherence dynamics for an arbitrary spectral density. The nonequilibrium quantum phase transition is demonstrated as the system-environment coupling strength varies for all the Ohmic-type spectral densities. The 3-D entanglement quantum phase diagram is obtained. PMID:27713556

  17. Double-Paddle Oscillators as Probes of Quantum Turbulence in the Zero Temperature Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoranzer, David; Jackson, Martin; Zemma, Elisa; Luzuriaga, Javier

    2017-06-01

    We present a technical report on our tests of a double-paddle oscillator as a detector of quantum turbulence in superfluid 4He at low temperatures ranging from 20 to 1100 mK. The device, known to operate well in the two-fluid regime (Zemma and Luzuriaga in J Low Temp Phys 166:171-181, 2012), is also capable of detecting quantum turbulence in the zero temperature limit. The oscillator demonstrated Lorentzian responses with quality factors of order 10^5 in vacuum, and displayed negative-Duffing resonances in liquid, even at moderate drives. In superfluid He-II at low temperatures, its sensitivity was adversely affected by acoustic damping at higher harmonics. While it successfully created and detected the quantum turbulence, its overall performance does not compare favourably with other oscillators such as tuning forks.

  18. Zero-temperature directed polymer in random potential in 4+1 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Min

    2016-12-01

    Zero-temperature directed polymer in random potential in 4+1 dimensions is described. The fluctuation ΔE(t) of the lowest energy of the polymer varies as t^{β} with β=0.159±0.007 for polymer length t and ΔE follows ΔE(L)∼L^{α} at saturation with α=0.275±0.009, where L is the system size. The dynamic exponent z≈1.73 is obtained from z=α/β. The estimated values of the exponents satisfy the scaling relation α+z=2 very well. We also monitor the end to end distance of the polymer and obtain z independently. Our results show that the upper critical dimension of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation is higher than d=4+1 dimensions.

  19. Thin Film Phase Transition Materials Development Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    and ̂ from f are consistent with a real, positive film thickness d. These conditions are written IP( td /4) = 0, d > 0, (49) where IP denotes...surface of the substrate of the form . aAC(a) + bBD (a) >< cAB(a) + dCD(a) where (a) represents a phase adsorbed on the substrate surface, and the

  20. Experimental observation of phase-flip transitions in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotson, Nicholas M.; Gray, Charles M.

    2016-10-01

    The phase-flip transition has been demonstrated in a host of coupled nonlinear oscillator models, many pertaining directly to understanding neural dynamics. However, there is little evidence that this phenomenon occurs in the brain. Using simultaneous microelectrode recordings in the nonhuman primate cerebral cortex, we demonstrate the presence of phase-flip transitions between oscillatory narrow-band local field potential signals separated by several centimeters. Specifically, we show that sharp transitions between in-phase and antiphase synchronization are accompanied by a jump in synchronization frequency. These findings are significant for two reasons. First, they validate predictions made by model systems. Second, they have potentially far reaching implications for our understanding of the mechanisms underlying corticocortical communication, which are thought to rely on narrow-band oscillatory synchronization with specific relative phase relationships.

  1. Quantum phase transitions in the noncommutative Dirac oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panella, O.; Roy, P.

    2014-10-01

    We study the (2 + 1)-dimensional Dirac oscillator in a homogeneous magnetic field in the noncommutative plane. It is shown that the effect of noncommutativity is twofold: (i) momentum noncommuting coordinates simply shift the critical value (Bcr) of the magnetic field at which the well known left-right chiral quantum phase transition takes place (in the commuting phase); (ii) noncommutativity in the space coordinates induces a new critical value of the magnetic field, Bcr*, where there is a second quantum phase transition (right-left): this critical point disappears in the commutative limit. The change in chirality associated with the magnitude of the magnetic field is examined in detail for both critical points. The phase transitions are described in terms of the magnetization of the system. Possible applications to the physics of silicene and graphene are briefly discussed.

  2. Shear induced phase transitions induced in edible fats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    The food industry crystallizes fats under different conditions of temperature and shear to obtain products with desired crystalline phases. Milk fat, palm oil, cocoa butter and chocolate were crystallized from the melt in a temperature controlled Couette cell. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies were conducted to examine the role of shear on the phase transitions seen in edible fats. The shear forces on the crystals induced acceleration of the alpha to beta-prime phase transition with increasing shear rate in milk fat and palm oil. The increase was slow at low shear rates and became very strong above 360 s-1. In cocoa butter the acceleration between beta-prime-III and beta-V phase transition increased until a maximum of at 360 s-1, and then decreased, showing competition between enhanced heat transfer and viscous heat generation.

  3. Three-dimensional mantle dynamics with an endothermic phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, S.; Balachandar, S.; Yuen, D. A.; Reuteler, D.

    1993-01-01

    3D convection for the spinel to perovskite phase change has been simulated numerically. Results for Rayleigh (Ra) numbers of 0(10 exp 6) show intermittent layering with a strong robust plume rising through the phase boundary. Many descending instabilities are deflected but merging cold sheets come together at a junction. A pool of cold material accumulates underneath in the phase-transition zone. A strong gravitational instability results, which precipitates a rapid and massive discharge of upper-mantle material.

  4. Quantum phase transitions and local magnetism in Mott insulators: A local probe investigation using muons, neutrons, and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A.

    Mott insulators are materials in which strong correlations among the electrons induce an unconventional insulating state. Rich interplay between the structural, magnetic, and electronic degrees of freedom resulting from the electron correlation can lead to unusual complexity of Mott materials on the atomic scale, such as microscopically heterogeneous phases or local structural correlations that deviate significantly from the average structure. Such behavior must be studied by suitable experimental techniques, i.e. "local probes", that are sensitive to this local behavior rather than just the bulk, average properties. In this thesis, I will present results from our studies of multiple families of Mott insulators using two such local probes: muon spin relaxation (muSR), a probe of local magnetism; and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of x-ray and neutron total scattering, a probe of local atomic structure. In addition, I will present the development of magnetic pair distribution function analysis, a novel method for studying local magnetic correlations that is highly complementary to the muSR and atomic PDF techniques. We used muSR to study the phase transition from Mott insulator to metal in two archetypal Mott insulating systems: RENiO3 (RE = rare earth element) and V2O3. In both of these systems, the Mott insulating state can be suppressed by tuning a nonthermal parameter, resulting in a "quantum" phase transition at zero temperature from the Mott insulating state to a metallic state. In RENiO3, this occurs through variation of the rare-earth element in the chemical composition; in V 2O3, through the application of hydrostatic pressure. Our results show that the metallic and Mott insulating states unexpectedly coexist in phase-separated regions across a large portion of parameter space near the Mott quantum phase transition and that the magnitude of the ordered antiferromagnetic moment remains constant across the phase diagram until it is abruptly

  5. Mapping the QCD Phase Transition with Accreting Compact Stars

    SciT

    Blaschke, D.; Bogoliubov Laboratory for Theoretical Physics, JINR Dubna, Joliot-Curie str. 6, 141980 Dubna; Poghosyan, G.

    2008-10-29

    We discuss an idea for how accreting millisecond pulsars could contribute to the understanding of the QCD phase transition in the high-density nuclear matter equation of state (EoS). It is based on two ingredients, the first one being a ''phase diagram'' of rapidly rotating compact star configurations in the plane of spin frequency and mass, determined with state-of-the-art hybrid equations of state, allowing for a transition to color superconducting quark matter. The second is the study of spin-up and accretion evolution in this phase diagram. We show that the quark matter phase transition leads to a characteristic line in themore » {omega}-M plane, the phase border between neutron stars and hybrid stars with a quark matter core. Along this line a drop in the pulsar's moment of inertia entails a waiting point phenomenon in the accreting millisecond pulsar (AMXP) evolution: most of these objects should therefore be found along the phase border in the {omega}-M plane, which may be viewed as the AMXP analog of the main sequence in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for normal stars. In order to prove the existence of a high-density phase transition in the cores of compact stars we need population statistics for AMXPs with sufficiently accurate determination of their masses, spin frequencies and magnetic fields.« less

  6. More is the Same; Phase Transitions and Mean Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadanoff, Leo P.

    2009-12-01

    This paper is the first in a series that will look at the theory of phase transitions from the perspectives of physics and the philosophy of science. The series will consider a group of related concepts derived from condensed matter and statistical physics. The key technical ideas go under the names of "singularity", "order parameter", "mean field theory", "variational method", "correlation length", "universality class", "scale changes", and "renormalization". The first four of these will be considered here. In a less technical vein, the question here is how can matter, ordinary matter, support a diversity of forms. We see this diversity each time we observe ice in contact with liquid water or see water vapor (steam) come up from a pot of heated water. Different phases can be qualitatively different in that walking on ice is well within human capacity, but walking on liquid water is proverbially forbidden to ordinary humans. These differences have been apparent to humankind for millennia, but only brought within the domain of scientific understanding since the 1880s. A phase transition is a change from one behavior to another. A first order phase transition involves a discontinuous jump in some statistical variable. The discontinuous property is called the order parameter. Each phase transition has its own order parameter. The possible order parameters range over a tremendous variety of physical properties. These properties include the density of a liquid-gas transition, the magnetization in a ferromagnet, the size of a connected cluster in a percolation transition, and a condensate wave function in a superfluid or superconductor. A continuous transition occurs when the discontinuity in the jump approaches zero. This article is about statistical mechanics and the development of mean field theory as a basis for a partial understanding of phase transition phenomena. Much of the material in this review was first prepared for the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and

  7. Discrete-to-continuous transition in quantum phase estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rządkowski, Wojciech; Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafał

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the problem of quantum phase estimation in which the set of allowed phases forms a discrete N -element subset of the whole [0 ,2 π ] interval, φn=2 π n /N , n =0 ,⋯,N -1 , and study the discrete-to-continuous transition N →∞ for various cost functions as well as the mutual information. We also analyze the relation between the problems of phase discrimination and estimation by considering a step cost function of a given width σ around the true estimated value. We show that in general a direct application of the theory of covariant measurements for a discrete subgroup of the U(1 ) group leads to suboptimal strategies due to an implicit requirement of estimating only the phases that appear in the prior distribution. We develop the theory of subcovariant measurements to remedy this situation and demonstrate truly optimal estimation strategies when performing a transition from discrete to continuous phase estimation.

  8. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min-1, consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min-1 and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  9. Local phase transitions in driven colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scacchi, A.; Brader, J. M.

    2018-02-01

    Using dynamical density functional theory and Brownian dynamics simulations, we investigate the influence of a driven tracer particle on the density distribution of a colloidal suspension at a thermodynamic state point close to the liquid side of the binodal. In bulk systems, we find that a localised region of the colloid-poor phase, a 'cavitation bubble', forms behind the moving tracer. The extent of the cavitation bubble is investigated as a function of both the size and velocity of the tracer. The addition of a confining boundary enables us to investigate the interaction between the local phase instability at the substrate and that at the particle surface. When both the substrate and tracer interact repulsively with the colloids we observe the formation of a colloid-poor bridge between the substrate and the tracer. When a shear flow is applied parallel to the substrate the bridge becomes distorted and, at sufficiently high shear-rates, disconnects from the substrate to form a cavitation bubble.

  10. How tetraquarks can generate a second chiral phase transition

    DOE PAGES

    Pisarski, Robert D.; Skokov, Vladimir V.

    2016-09-09

    We consider how tetraquarks can affect the chiral phase transition in theories like QCD, with light quarks coupled to three colors. For two flavors the tetraquark field is an isosinglet, and its effect is minimal. For three flavors, however, the tetraquark field transforms in the same representation of the chiral symmetry group as the usual chiral order parameter, and so for very light quarks there may be two chiral phase transitions, which are both of first order. In QCD, results from the lattice indicate that any transition from the tetraquark condensate is a smooth crossover. In the plane of temperature,more » T, and quark chemical potential, μ, though, a crossover line for the tetraquark condensate is naturally related to the transition line for color superconductivity. For four flavors we suggest that a triquark field, antisymmetric in both flavor and color, combine to form hexaquarks.« less

  11. Understanding crumpling lipid vesicles at the gel phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda; Ossowski, Adam; Fraser, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Wrinkling and crumpling transitions in different membrane types have been studied extensively in recent years both theoretically and computationally. There has also been very interesting recent work on defects in liquid crystalline shells. Lipid bilayer vesicles, widely used in biophysical research can be considered as a single layer smectic shell in the liquid crystalline phase. On cooling the lipid vesicle a transition to the gel phase may take place in which the lipid chains tilt and assume a more ordered packing arrangement. We observe large scale morphological changes in vesicles close to this transition point using fluorescence microscopy and investigate the possible mechanisms for this transition. Confocal microscopy is used to map 3D vesicle shape and crumpling length-scales. We also employ the molecular tilt sensitive dye, Laurdan to investigate the role of tilt domain formation on macroscopic structure. Funded by NSF CAREER award (DMR - BMAT #0852791).

  12. Phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Boris S; Klenov, Sergey L

    2009-11-01

    Based on empirical and numerical analyses of vehicular traffic, the physics of spatiotemporal phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads is revealed. The complex dynamics of moving jams observed in single vehicle data measured by video cameras on American highways is explained by the nucleation-interruption effect in synchronized flow, i.e., the spontaneous nucleation of a narrow moving jam with the subsequent jam dissolution. We find that (i) lane changing, vehicle merging from on-ramps, and vehicle leaving to off-ramps result in different traffic phases-free flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving jams-occurring and coexisting in different road lanes as well as in diverse phase transitions between the traffic phases; (ii) in synchronized flow, the phase transitions are responsible for a non-regular moving jam dynamics that explains measured single vehicle data: moving jams emerge and dissolve randomly at various road locations in different lanes; (iii) the phase transitions result also in diverse expanded general congested patterns occurring at closely located bottlenecks.

  13. Origin of nonlinear transport across the magnetically induced superconductor-metal-insulator transition in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Y; Qin, Y; Vicente, C L; Choi, K S; Yoon, Jongsoo

    2006-08-04

    We have studied the effect of perpendicular magnetic fields and temperatures on nonlinear electronic transport in amorphous Ta superconducting thin films. The films exhibit a magnetic field-induced metallic behavior intervening the superconductor-insulator transition in the zero temperature limit. We show that the phase-identifying nonlinear transport in the superconducting and metallic phases arises from an intrinsic origin, not from an electron heating effect. The nonlinear transport is found to accompany an extraordinarily long voltage response time.

  14. Dynamic depinning phase transition in magnetic thin film with anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, L.; Zheng, B.; Jin, M. H.; Wang, L.; Zhou, N. J.

    2018-02-01

    The dynamic pinning effects induced by quenched disorder are significant in manipulating the domain-wall motion in nano-magnetic materials. Through numerical simulations of the nonstationary domain-wall dynamics with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, we confidently detect a dynamic depinning phase transition in a magnetic thin film with anisotropy, which is of second order. The transition field, static and dynamic exponents are accurately determined, based on the dynamic scaling behavior far from stationary.

  15. Electroweak phase transition and entropy release in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Dolgov, A.

    2018-01-01

    It is shown that the vacuum-like energy of the Higgs potential at non-zero temperatures leads, in the course of the cosmological expansion, to a small but non-negligible rise of the entropy density in the comoving volume. This increase is calculated in the frameworks of the minimal standard model. The result can have a noticeable effect on the outcome of baryo-through-leptogenesis.

  16. Quantum phase transition between cluster and antiferromagnetic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, W.; Amico, L.; Fazio, R.; Hamma, A.; Pascazio, S.; Vedral, V.

    2011-09-01

    We study a Hamiltonian system describing a three-spin-1/2 cluster-like interaction competing with an Ising-like exchange. We show that the ground state in the cluster phase possesses symmetry protected topological order. A continuous quantum phase transition occurs as result of the competition between the cluster and Ising terms. At the critical point the Hamiltonian is self-dual. The geometric entanglement is also studied and used to investigate the quantum phase transition. Our findings in one dimension corroborate the analysis of the two-dimensional generalization of the system, indicating, at a mean-field level, the presence of a direct transition between an antiferromagnetic and a valence bond solid ground state.

  17. Proper time regularization and the QCD chiral phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhu-Fang; Zhang, Jin-Li; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2017-01-01

    We study the QCD chiral phase transition at finite temperature and finite quark chemical potential within the two flavor Nambu–Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, where a generalization of the proper-time regularization scheme is motivated and implemented. We find that in the chiral limit the whole transition line in the phase diagram is of second order, whereas for finite quark masses a crossover is observed. Moreover, if we take into account the influence of quark condensate to the coupling strength (which also provides a possible way of how the effective coupling varies with temperature and quark chemical potential), it is found that a CEP may appear. These findings differ substantially from other NJL results which use alternative regularization schemes, some explanation and discussion are given at the end. This indicates that the regularization scheme can have a dramatic impact on the study of the QCD phase transition within the NJL model. PMID:28401889

  18. Phase transition studies of germanium to 1. 25 Mbar

    SciT

    Vohra, Y.K.; Brister, K.E.; Desgreniers, S.

    1986-05-05

    New phase transitions in Ge were observed by energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction techniques for pressures up to 125 GPa (1.25 Mbar) as follows: the ..beta..-Sn structure to the simple hexagonal (sh) phase at 75 +- 3 GPa and to the double hexagonal close-packed structure (dhcp) at 102 +- 5 GPa. These are the highest pressures for which a crystalline structure change has been directly observed in any material by x-ray diffraction. Total-energy pseudopotential calculations predict 84 +- 10 GPa for the ..beta..-Sn to sh phase transition and 105 +- 21 GPa for sh to hcp (not dhcp) transition. The role ofmore » 3d core electrons in increasing the transformation pressures in Ge, as compared to Si, is emphasized.« less

  19. Microrheology close to an equilibrium phase transition

    SciT

    Reinhardt, J.; Scacchi, A.; Brader, J. M., E-mail: joseph.brader@unifr.ch

    2014-04-14

    We investigate the microstructural and microrheological response to a tracer particle of a two-dimensional colloidal suspension under thermodynamic conditions close to a liquid-gas phase boundary. On the liquid side of the binodal, increasing the velocity of the (repulsive) tracer leads to the development of a pronounced cavitation bubble, within which the concentration of colloidal particles is strongly depleted. The tendency of the liquid to cavitate is characterized by a dimensionless “colloidal cavitation” number. On the gas side of the binodal, a pulled (attractive) tracer leaves behind it an extended trail of colloidal liquid, arising from downstream advection of a wettingmore » layer on its surface. For both situations the velocity dependent friction is calculated.« less

  20. Structural and topological phase transitions on the German Stock Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiliński, M.; Sienkiewicz, A.; Gubiec, T.; Kutner, R.; Struzik, Z. R.

    2013-12-01

    We find numerical and empirical evidence for dynamical, structural and topological phase transitions on the (German) Frankfurt Stock Exchange (FSE) in the temporal vicinity of the worldwide financial crash. Using the Minimal Spanning Tree (MST) technique, a particularly useful canonical tool of the graph theory, two transitions of the topology of a complex network representing the FSE were found. The first transition is from a hierarchical scale-free MST representing the stock market before the recent worldwide financial crash, to a superstar-like MST decorated by a scale-free hierarchy of trees representing the market’s state for the period containing the crash. Subsequently, a transition is observed from this transient, (meta)stable state of the crash to a hierarchical scale-free MST decorated by several star-like trees after the worldwide financial crash. The phase transitions observed are analogous to the ones we obtained earlier for the Warsaw Stock Exchange and more pronounced than those found by Onnela-Chakraborti-Kaski-Kertész for the S&P 500 index in the vicinity of Black Monday (October 19, 1987) and also in the vicinity of January 1, 1998. Our results provide an empirical foundation for the future theory of dynamical, structural and topological phase transitions on financial markets.

  1. The α–β phase transition in volcanic cristobalite

    PubMed Central

    Damby, David E.; Llewellin, Edward W.; Horwell, Claire J.; Williamson, Ben J.; Najorka, Jens; Cressey, Gordon; Carpenter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cristobalite is a common mineral in volcanic ash produced from dome-forming eruptions. Assessment of the respiratory hazard posed by volcanic ash requires understanding the nature of the cristobalite it contains. Volcanic cristobalite contains coupled substitutions of Al3+ and Na+ for Si4+; similar co-substitutions in synthetic cristobalite are known to modify the crystal structure, affecting the stability of the α and β forms and the observed transition between them. Here, for the first time, the dynamics and energy changes associated with the α–β phase transition in volcanic cristobalite are investigated using X-ray powder diffraction with simultaneous in situ heating and differential scanning calorimetry. At ambient temperature, volcanic cristobalite exists in the α form and has a larger cell volume than synthetic α-cristobalite; as a result, its diffraction pattern sits between ICDD α- and β-cristobalite library patterns, which could cause ambiguity in phase identification. On heating from ambient temperature, volcanic cristobalite exhibits a lower degree of thermal expansion than synthetic cristobalite, and it also has a lower α–β transition temperature (∼473 K) compared with synthetic cristobalite (upwards of 543 K); these observations are discussed in relation to the presence of Al3+ and Na+ defects. The transition shows a stable and reproducible hysteresis loop with α and β phases coexisting through the transition, suggesting that discrete crystals in the sample have different transition temperatures. PMID:25242910

  2. The α-β phase transition in volcanic cristobalite.

    PubMed

    Damby, David E; Llewellin, Edward W; Horwell, Claire J; Williamson, Ben J; Najorka, Jens; Cressey, Gordon; Carpenter, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Cristobalite is a common mineral in volcanic ash produced from dome-forming eruptions. Assessment of the respiratory hazard posed by volcanic ash requires understanding the nature of the cristobalite it contains. Volcanic cristobalite contains coupled substitutions of Al 3+ and Na + for Si 4+ ; similar co-substitutions in synthetic cristobalite are known to modify the crystal structure, affecting the stability of the α and β forms and the observed transition between them. Here, for the first time, the dynamics and energy changes associated with the α-β phase transition in volcanic cristobalite are investigated using X-ray powder diffraction with simultaneous in situ heating and differential scanning calorimetry. At ambient temperature, volcanic cristobalite exists in the α form and has a larger cell volume than synthetic α-cristobalite; as a result, its diffraction pattern sits between ICDD α- and β-cristobalite library patterns, which could cause ambiguity in phase identification. On heating from ambient temperature, volcanic cristobalite exhibits a lower degree of thermal expansion than synthetic cristobalite, and it also has a lower α-β transition temperature (∼473 K) compared with synthetic cristobalite (upwards of 543 K); these observations are discussed in relation to the presence of Al 3+ and Na + defects. The transition shows a stable and reproducible hysteresis loop with α and β phases coexisting through the transition, suggesting that discrete crystals in the sample have different transition temperatures.

  3. Studies of phase transitions in the aripiprazole solid dosage form.

    PubMed

    Łaszcz, Marta; Witkowska, Anna

    2016-01-05

    Studies of the phase transitions in an active substance contained in a solid dosage form are very complicated but essential, especially if an active substance is classified as a BCS Class IV drug. The purpose of this work was the development of sensitive methods for the detection of the phase transitions in the aripiprazole tablets containing initially its form III. Aripiprazole exhibits polymorphism and pseudopolymorphism. Powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry methods were developed for the detection of the polymorphic transition between forms III and I as well as the phase transition of form III into aripiprazole monohydrate in tablets. The study involved the initial 10 mg and 30 mg tablets, as well as those stored in Al/Al blisters, a triplex blister pack and HDPE bottles (with and without desiccant) under accelerated and long term conditions. The polymorphic transition was not observed in the initial and stored tablets but it was visible on the DSC curve of the Abilify(®) 10 mg reference tablets. The formation of the monohydrate was observed in the diffractograms and Raman spectra in the tablets stored under accelerated conditions. The monohydrate phase was not detected in the tablets stored in the Al/Al blisters under long term conditions. The results showed that the Al/Al blisters can be recommended as the packaging of the aripiprazole tablets containing form III. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The quark-hadron phase transition and primordial nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1987-01-01

    After presenting the current view of the processes taking place during the cosmological transition from 'quark soup' to normal hadron matter, attention is given to what happens to cosmological nucleosynthesis in the presence of small-scale baryon inhomogeneities. The QCD phase transition is among the plausible sources of this inhomogeneity. It is concluded that the formation of primordial 'quark nuggets' and other cold exotica requires very low entropy regions at the outset, and that even the more modest nonlinearities perturbing nucleosynthesis probably require some ingredient in addition to a quiescent, mildly supercooled transition.

  5. Finite-size scaling for discontinuous nonequilibrium phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcelo M.; da Luz, M. G. E.; Fiore, Carlos E.

    2018-06-01

    A finite-size scaling theory, originally developed only for transitions to absorbing states [Phys. Rev. E 92, 062126 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.062126], is extended to distinct sorts of discontinuous nonequilibrium phase transitions. Expressions for quantities such as response functions, reduced cumulants, and equal area probability distributions are derived from phenomenological arguments. Irrespective of system details, all these quantities scale with the volume, establishing the dependence on size. The approach generality is illustrated through the analysis of different models. The present results are a relevant step in trying to unify the scaling behavior description of nonequilibrium transition processes.

  6. Quantum spin liquids and the metal-insulator transition in doped semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Potter, Andrew C; Barkeshli, Maissam; McGreevy, John; Senthil, T

    2012-08-17

    We describe a new possible route to the metal-insulator transition in doped semiconductors such as Si:P or Si:B. We explore the possibility that the loss of metallic transport occurs through Mott localization of electrons into a quantum spin liquid state with diffusive charge neutral "spinon" excitations. Such a quantum spin liquid state can appear as an intermediate phase between the metal and the Anderson-Mott insulator. An immediate testable consequence is the presence of metallic thermal conductivity at low temperature in the electrical insulator near the metal-insulator transition. Further, we show that though the transition is second order, the zero temperature residual electrical conductivity will jump as the transition is approached from the metallic side. However, the electrical conductivity will have a nonmonotonic temperature dependence that may complicate the extrapolation to zero temperature. Signatures in other experiments and some comparisons with existing data are made.

  7. Theoretical study of superionic phase transition in Li2S.

    PubMed

    Jand, Sara Panahian; Zhang, Qian; Kaghazchi, Payam

    2017-07-19

    We have studied temperature-induced superionic phase transition in Li 2 S, which is one of the most promising Li-S battery cathode material. Concentration of ionic carriers at low and high temperature was evaluated from thermodynamics of defects (using density functional theory) and detailed balance condition (using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD)), respectively. Diffusion coefficients were also obtained using AIMD simulations. Calculated ionic conductivity shows that superionic phase transition occurs at T = 900 K, which is in agreement with reported experimental values. The superionic behavior of Li 2 S is found to be due to thermodynamic reason (i.e. a large concentration of disordered defects).

  8. Phase transition to an opaque plasma in a sonoluminescing bubble.

    PubMed

    Kappus, Brian; Khalid, Shahzad; Chakravarty, Avik; Putterman, Seth

    2011-06-10

    Time-resolved spectrum measurements of a sonoluminescing Xe bubble reveal a transition from transparency to an opaque Planck blackbody. As the temperature is <10 000  K and the density is below liquid density, the photon scattering length is 10 000 times too large to explain its opacity. We resolve this issue with a model that reduces the ionization potential. According to this model, sonoluminescence originates in a new phase of matter with high ionization. Analysis of line emission from Xe* also yields evidence of phase segregation for this first-order transition inside a bubble.

  9. Phase Transition to an Opaque Plasma in a Sonoluminescing Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappus, Brian; Khalid, Shahzad; Chakravarty, Avik; Putterman, Seth

    2011-06-01

    Time-resolved spectrum measurements of a sonoluminescing Xe bubble reveal a transition from transparency to an opaque Planck blackbody. As the temperature is <10000K and the density is below liquid density, the photon scattering length is 10 000 times too large to explain its opacity. We resolve this issue with a model that reduces the ionization potential. According to this model, sonoluminescence originates in a new phase of matter with high ionization. Analysis of line emission from Xe* also yields evidence of phase segregation for this first-order transition inside a bubble.

  10. Extragalactic magnetic fields unlikely generated at the electroweak phase transition

    SciT

    Wagstaff, Jacques M.; Banerjee, Robi, E-mail: jwagstaff@hs.uni-hamburg.de, E-mail: banerjee@hs.uni-hamburg.de

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we show that magnetic fields generated at the electroweak phase transition are most likely too weak to explain the void magnetic fields apparently observed today unless they have considerable helicity. We show that, in the simplest estimates, the helicity naturally produced in conjunction with the baryon asymmetry is too small to explain observations, which require a helicity fraction at least of order 10{sup −14}–10{sup −10} depending on the void fields constraint used. Therefore new mechanisms to generate primordial helicity are required if magnetic fields generated during the electroweak phase transition should explain the extragalactic fields.

  11. Phase Transition in a Healthy Human Heart Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-07-01

    A healthy human heart rate displays complex fluctuations which share characteristics of physical systems in a critical state. We demonstrate that the human heart rate in healthy individuals undergoes a dramatic breakdown of criticality characteristics, reminiscent of continuous second order phase transitions. By studying the germane determinants, we show that the hallmark of criticality—highly correlated fluctuations—is observed only during usual daily activity, and a breakdown of these characteristics occurs in prolonged, strenuous exercise and sleep. This finding is the first reported discovery of the dynamical phase transition phenomenon in a biological control system and will be a key to understanding the heart rate control system in health and disease.

  12. Ordering phase transition in the one-dimensional Axelrod model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilone, D.; Vespignani, A.; Castellano, C.

    2002-12-01

    We study the one-dimensional behavior of a cellular automaton aimed at the description of the formation and evolution of cultural domains. The model exhibits a non-equilibrium transition between a phase with all the system sharing the same culture and a disordered phase of coexisting regions with different cultural features. Depending on the initial distribution of the disorder the transition occurs at different values of the model parameters. This phenomenology is qualitatively captured by a mean-field approach, which maps the dynamics into a multi-species reaction-diffusion problem.

  13. Classical analysis of quantum phase transitions in a bilayer model.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Mariane Camargos; Cotta, Tathiana Moreira; Pellegrino, Giancarlo Queiroz

    2010-01-01

    In this Brief Report we extend the classical analysis performed on the schematic model proposed in [T. Moreira, G. Q. Pellegrino, J. G. Peixoto de Faria, M. C. Nemes, F. Camargo, and A. F. R. Toledo Piza, Phys. Rev. E 77, 051102 (2008)] concerning quantum phase transitions in a bilayer system. We show that appropriate integrations along the classical periodic orbits reproduce with excellent agreement both the quantum spectrum and the expected mean value for the number of excitons in the system, quantities which are directly related to the observed boson-fermion quantum phase transition.

  14. First-Order Phase Transition in the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-14

    London) 400, 133 (1999). [19] T. Jörg, F. Krzakala, G . Semerjian, and F. Zamponi, arXiv:0911.3438. PRL 104, 020502 (2010) P HY S I CA L R EV I EW LE T T E R S week ending 15 JANUARY 2010 020502-4 ...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm, Monte Carlo, Quantum Phase Transition A. P . Young, V...documentation. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ... 56290.2-PH-QC First-Order Phase Transition in the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm A. P

  15. Classification of Phase Transitions by Microcanonical Inflection-Point Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Kai; Bachmann, Michael

    2018-05-01

    By means of the principle of minimal sensitivity we generalize the microcanonical inflection-point analysis method by probing derivatives of the microcanonical entropy for signals of transitions in complex systems. A strategy of systematically identifying and locating independent and dependent phase transitions of any order is proposed. The power of the generalized method is demonstrated in applications to the ferromagnetic Ising model and a coarse-grained model for polymer adsorption onto a substrate. The results shed new light on the intrinsic phase structure of systems with cooperative behavior.

  16. Perturbation theory of a superconducting 0 - π impurity quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Žonda, M; Pokorný, V; Janiš, V; Novotný, T

    2015-03-06

    A single-level quantum dot with Coulomb repulsion attached to two superconducting leads is studied via the perturbation expansion in the interaction strength. We use the Nambu formalism and the standard many-body diagrammatic representation of the impurity Green functions to formulate the Matsubara self-consistent perturbation expansion. We show that at zero temperature second order of the expansion in its spin-symmetric version yields a nearly perfect agreement with the numerically exact calculations for the position of the 0 - π phase boundary at which the Andreev bound states reach the Fermi energy as well as for the values of single-particle quantities in the 0-phase. We present results for phase diagrams, level occupation, induced local superconducting gap, Josephson current, and energy of the Andreev bound states with the precision surpassing any (semi)analytical approaches employed thus far.

  17. Electric field driven mesoscale phase transition in polarized colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusid, Boris; Elele, Ezinwa; Lei, Qian

    2016-11-01

    A mesoscale phase transition in a polarized suspension was reported by Kumar, Khusid, Acrivos, PRL95, 2005 and Agarwal, Yethiraj, PRL102, 2009. Following the application of a strong AC field, particles aggregated head-to-tail into chains that bridged the interelectrode gap and then formed a cellular pattern, in which large particle-free domains were enclosed by particle-rich thin walls. Cellular structures were not observed in numerous simulations of field induced phase transitions in a polarized suspension. A requirement for matching the particle and fluid densities to avoid particle settling limits terrestrial experiments to negatively polarized particles. We present data on the phase diagram and kinetics of the phase transition in a neutrally buoyant, negatively polarized suspension subjected to a combination of AC and DC. Surprisingly, a weak DC component drastically speeds up the formation of a cellular pattern but does not affect its key characteristic. However, the application of a strong DC field destroys the cellular pattern, but it restores as the DC field strength is reduced. We also discuss the design of experiments to study phase transitions in a suspension of positively polarized, non-buoyancy-matched particles in the International Space Station. Supported by NASA's Physical Science Research Program, NNX13AQ53G.

  18. Efimov-driven phase transitions of the unitary Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Piatecki, Swann; Krauth, Werner

    2014-03-20

    Initially predicted in nuclear physics, Efimov trimers are bound configurations of three quantum particles that fall apart when any one of them is removed. They open a window into a rich quantum world that has become the focus of intense experimental and theoretical research, as the region of 'unitary' interactions, where Efimov trimers form, is now accessible in cold-atom experiments. Here we use a path-integral Monte Carlo algorithm backed up by theoretical arguments to show that unitary bosons undergo a first-order phase transition from a normal gas to a superfluid Efimov liquid, bound by the same effects as Efimov trimers. A triple point separates these two phases and another superfluid phase, the conventional Bose-Einstein condensate, whose coexistence line with the Efimov liquid ends in a critical point. We discuss the prospects of observing the proposed phase transitions in cold-atom systems.

  19. Phase transition solutions in geometrically constrained magnetic domain wall models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouxin; Yang, Yisong

    2010-02-01

    Recent work on magnetic phase transition in nanoscale systems indicates that new physical phenomena, in particular, the Bloch wall width narrowing, arise as a consequence of geometrical confinement of magnetization and leads to the introduction of geometrically constrained domain wall models. In this paper, we present a systematic mathematical analysis on the existence of the solutions of the basic governing equations in such domain wall models. We show that, when the cross section of the geometric constriction is a simple step function, the solutions may be obtained by minimizing the domain wall energy over the constriction and solving the Bogomol'nyi equation outside the constriction. When the cross section and potential density are both even, we establish the existence of an odd domain wall solution realizing the phase transition process between two adjacent domain phases. When the cross section satisfies a certain integrability condition, we prove that a domain wall solution always exists which links two arbitrarily designated domain phases.

  20. Polymorphic phase transitions and molecular motion in pyridinium chlorochromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajaķ, Z.; Szafrańska, B.; Czarnecki, P.; Mayer, J.; Kozak, A.

    1997-08-01

    DTA, DSC, NMR and dielectric studies have been performed for pyridinium chlorochromate over a wide temperature range. A sequence of four solid-solid phase transitions was discovered. The in-plane complex reorientation of the cation is described by a three-well potential model with two correlation times. At higher temperatures one observes simultaneous cation tumbling and diffusion. Thus existence of a new ionic plastic phase is revealed. The domain structure observed suggests ferroelastic properties of the compound.

  1. Kinetics of ikaite precipitation and dissolution in seawater-derived brines at sub-zero temperatures to 265 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Stathys; Kennedy, Hilary; Kennedy, Paul; Thomas, David N.

    2014-09-01

    The kinetics of calcium carbonate hexahydrate (ikaite) precipitation and dissolution were investigated in seawater and seawater-derived brines at sub-zero temperatures using the constant addition experimental technique. The steady state rate of these two processes was found to be a function of the deviation of the solution from equilibrium with respect to ikaite and conformed to the same empirical rate law as the anhydrous CaCO3 polymorphs, calcite and aragonite. In addition to the saturation state of the brine with respect to ikaite, the salinity of the brine and the temperature of the reaction evidently exerted some control on the ikaite precipitation kinetics, while the dissolution kinetics of the polymorph were not noticeably influenced by these two parameters. The experimental salinity and temperature conditions were equivalent to those at thermal equilibrium between brine and ice in the sea ice cover of polar seas. Simple modelling of the CO2 system by extrapolation of the oceanic equivalent to sea ice brines showed that the physical concentration of seawater ions and the changes in ikaite solubility as a function of salinity and temperature, both inherent in the sea ice system, would be insufficient to drive the emergent brines to ikaite supersaturation and precipitation in sea ice down to -8 °C. The loss of dissolved inorganic carbon to the gas phase of sea ice and to sympagic autotrophs are two independent mechanisms which, in nature, could prompt the brine CO2 system towards ikaite supersaturation and precipitation. Under these conditions, the steady state precipitation rate of ikaite was found to be fast enough for rapid formation within short time scales (days to weeks) in sea ice. The observed ikaite dissolution kinetics were also found conducive to short turn-over time scales of a few hours to a few days in corrosive solutions, such as surface seawater.

  2. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiH x , which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  3. Phase transitions in semisupervised clustering of sparse networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pan; Moore, Cristopher; Zdeborová, Lenka

    2014-11-01

    Predicting labels of nodes in a network, such as community memberships or demographic variables, is an important problem with applications in social and biological networks. A recently discovered phase transition puts fundamental limits on the accuracy of these predictions if we have access only to the network topology. However, if we know the correct labels of some fraction α of the nodes, we can do better. We study the phase diagram of this semisupervised learning problem for networks generated by the stochastic block model. We use the cavity method and the associated belief propagation algorithm to study what accuracy can be achieved as a function of α . For k =2 groups, we find that the detectability transition disappears for any α >0 , in agreement with previous work. For larger k where a hard but detectable regime exists, we find that the easy/hard transition (the point at which efficient algorithms can do better than chance) becomes a line of transitions where the accuracy jumps discontinuously at a critical value of α . This line ends in a critical point with a second-order transition, beyond which the accuracy is a continuous function of α . We demonstrate qualitatively similar transitions in two real-world networks.

  4. Number statistics for β-ensembles of random matrices: Applications to trapped fermions at zero temperature.

    PubMed

    Marino, Ricardo; Majumdar, Satya N; Schehr, Grégory; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2016-09-01

    Let P_{β}^{(V)}(N_{I}) be the probability that a N×Nβ-ensemble of random matrices with confining potential V(x) has N_{I} eigenvalues inside an interval I=[a,b] on the real line. We introduce a general formalism, based on the Coulomb gas technique and the resolvent method, to compute analytically P_{β}^{(V)}(N_{I}) for large N. We show that this probability scales for large N as P_{β}^{(V)}(N_{I})≈exp[-βN^{2}ψ^{(V)}(N_{I}/N)], where β is the Dyson index of the ensemble. The rate function ψ^{(V)}(k_{I}), independent of β, is computed in terms of single integrals that can be easily evaluated numerically. The general formalism is then applied to the classical β-Gaussian (I=[-L,L]), β-Wishart (I=[1,L]), and β-Cauchy (I=[-L,L]) ensembles. Expanding the rate function around its minimum, we find that generically the number variance var(N_{I}) exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the size of the interval, with a maximum that can be precisely characterized. These analytical results, corroborated by numerical simulations, provide the full counting statistics of many systems where random matrix models apply. In particular, we present results for the full counting statistics of zero-temperature one-dimensional spinless fermions in a harmonic trap.

  5. New insights in the electroweak phase transition in the NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weicong; Kang, Zhaofeng; Shu, Jing; Wu, Peiwen; Yang, Jin Min

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed semianalytical analysis of the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) property in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric standard model, which serves as a good benchmark model in which the 126 GeV Higgs mixes with a singlet. In this case, a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition (SFOEWPT) is achieved by the tree-level effects, and the phase transition strength γc is determined by the vacua energy gap at T =0 . We make an anatomy of the energy gap at both tree level and loop level and extract out a dimensionless phase transition parameter Rκ≡4 κ vs/Aκ, which can replace Aκ in the parameterization and affect the light CP-odd/even Higgs spectra. We find that SFOEWPT only occurs in Rκ˜-1 and positive Rκ≲O (10 ), which in the non-PQ limit case would prefer either a relatively light CP-odd or CP-even Higgs boson ˜(60 ,100 ) GeV , and therefore serves as a smoking gun signal and requires new search strategies at the LHC.

  6. Gravitational waves from phase transition in split NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2018-04-01

    We discuss gravitational wave signal from the strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the split NMSSM. We find that for sets of parameters predicting successful electroweak baryogenesis the gravitational wave signal can be within the reach of future experiments LISA, BBO and Ultimate DECIGO.

  7. Acoustic Detection of Phase Transitions at the Nanoscale

    DOE PAGES

    Vasudevan, Rama K.; Khassaf, Hamidreza; Cao, Ye; ...

    2016-01-25

    On page 478, N. Bassiri-Gharb and co-workers demonstrate acoustic detection in nanoscale volumes by use of an atomic force microscope tip technique. Elastic changes in volume are measured by detecting changes in resonance of the cantilever. Also, the electric field in this case causes a phase transition, which is modeled by Landau theory.

  8. Dynamical quantum phase transitions in discrete time crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosior, Arkadiusz; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2018-05-01

    Discrete time crystals are related to nonequilibrium dynamics of periodically driven quantum many-body systems where the discrete time-translation symmetry of the Hamiltonian is spontaneously broken into another discrete symmetry. Recently, the concept of phase transitions has been extended to nonequilibrium dynamics of time-independent systems induced by a quantum quench, i.e., a sudden change of some parameter of the Hamiltonian. There, the return probability of a system to the ground state reveals singularities in time which are dubbed dynamical quantum phase transitions. We show that the quantum quench in a discrete time crystal leads to dynamical quantum phase transitions where the return probability of a periodically driven system to a Floquet eigenstate before the quench reveals singularities in time. It indicates that dynamical quantum phase transitions are not restricted to time-independent systems and can be also observed in systems that are periodically driven. We discuss how the phenomenon can be observed in ultracold atomic gases.

  9. Phase Transition in Opinion Diffusion in Social Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    the opinions of social agents diffuse in a network under a so-called hard-interaction model, in which the agents inter- act more strongly with...gent behavior. Index Terms— opinion diffusion , opinion dynamics, social net- works, phase transition, herding. 1. INTRODUCTION The study of the

  10. Phase Transition Behavior in a Neutral Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Dawn; Scott, Adam; Maric, Nevena; Bahar, Sonya

    2014-03-01

    The complexity of interactions among individuals and between individuals and the environment make agent based modeling ideal for studying emergent speciation. This is a dynamically complex problem that can be characterized via the critical behavior of a continuous phase transition. Concomitant with the main tenets of natural selection, we allow organisms to reproduce, mutate, and die within a neutral phenotype space. Previous work has shown phase transition behavior in an assortative mating model with variable fitness landscapes as the maximum mutation size (μ) was varied (Dees and Bahar, 2010). Similarly, this behavior was recently presented in the work of Scott et al. (2013), even on a completely neutral landscape, for bacterial-like fission as well as for assortative mating. Here we present another neutral model to investigate the `critical' phase transition behavior of three mating types - assortative, bacterial, and random - in a phenotype space as a function of the percentage of random death. Results show two types of phase transitions occurring for the parameters of the population size and the number of clusters (an analogue of species), indicating different evolutionary dynamics for system survival and clustering. This research was supported by funding from: University of Missouri Research Board and James S. McDonnell Foundation.

  11. Phase transitions in 3D gravity and fractal dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xi; Maguire, Shaun; Maloney, Alexander; Maxfield, Henry

    2018-05-01

    We show that for three dimensional gravity with higher genus boundary conditions, if the theory possesses a sufficiently light scalar, there is a second order phase transition where the scalar field condenses. This three dimensional version of the holographic superconducting phase transition occurs even though the pure gravity solutions are locally AdS3. This is in addition to the first order Hawking-Page-like phase transitions between different locally AdS3 handlebodies. This implies that the Rényi entropies of holographic CFTs will undergo phase transitions as the Rényi parameter is varied, as long as the theory possesses a scalar operator which is lighter than a certain critical dimension. We show that this critical dimension has an elegant mathematical interpretation as the Hausdorff dimension of the limit set of a quotient group of AdS3, and use this to compute it, analytically near the boundary of moduli space and numerically in the interior of moduli space. We compare this to a CFT computation generalizing recent work of Belin, Keller and Zadeh, bounding the critical dimension using higher genus conformal blocks, and find a surprisingly good match.

  12. Aggregation and folding phase transitions of RNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2007-03-01

    RNA is a biomolecule that is involved in nearly all aspects of cellular functions. In order to perform many of these functions, RNA molecules have to fold into specific secondary structures. This folding is driven by the tendency of the bases to form Watson-Crick base pairs. Beyond the biological importance of RNA, the relatively simple rules for structure formation of RNA make it a very interesting system from the statistical physics point of view. We will present examples of phase transitions in RNA secondary structure formation that are amenable to analytical descriptions. A special focus will be on aggregation between several RNA molecules which is important for some regulatory circuits based on RNA structure, triplet repeat diseases like Huntington's, and as a model for prion diseases. We show that depending on the relative strength of the intramolecular and the intermolecular base pairing, RNA molecules undergo a transition into an aggregated phase and quantitatively characterize this transition.

  13. Loop corrections to primordial fluctuations from inflationary phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Peng; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2018-05-01

    We investigate loop corrections to the primordial fluctuations in the single-field inflationary paradigm from spectator fields that experience a smooth transition of their vacuum expectation values. We show that when the phase transition involves a classical evolution effectively driven by a negative mass term from the potential, important corrections to the curvature perturbation can be generated by field perturbations that are frozen outside the horizon by the time of the phase transition, yet the correction to tensor perturbation is naturally suppressed by the spatial derivative couplings between spectator fields and graviton. At one-loop level, the dominant channel for the production of primordial fluctuations comes from a pair-scattering of free spectator fields that decay into the curvature perturbations, and this decay process is only sensitive to field masses comparable to the Hubble scale of inflation.

  14. Femtosecond resolution of soft mode dynamics in structural phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Thomas P.; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Nelson, Keith A.; Garrett, Mark H.; Jensen, Hans P.; Warde, Cardinal

    1992-01-01

    The microscopic pathway along which ions or molecules in a crystal move during structural phase transition can often be described in terms of a collective vibrational mode of the lattice. In many cases, this mode, called a 'soft' phonon mode because of its characteristically low frequency near the phase transition temperature, is difficult to characterize through conventional frequency-domain spectroscopies such as light or neutron scattering. A femtosecond time-domain analog of light-scattering spectroscopy called impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) has been used to examine the soft modes of two perovskite ferroelectric crystals. The low-frequency lattice dynamics of KNbO3 and BaTiO3 are clarified in a manner that permits critical evaluation of microscopic models for their ferroelectric transitions. The results illustrate the advantages of ISRS over conventional Raman spectroscopy of low-frequency, heavily damped soft modes.

  15. Novel quantum phase transition from bounded to extensive entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhao; Ahmadain, Amr

    2017-01-01

    The nature of entanglement in many-body systems is a focus of intense research with the observation that entanglement holds interesting information about quantum correlations in large systems and their relation to phase transitions. In particular, it is well known that although generic, many-body states have large, extensive entropy, ground states of reasonable local Hamiltonians carry much smaller entropy, often associated with the boundary length through the so-called area law. Here we introduce a continuous family of frustration-free Hamiltonians with exactly solvable ground states and uncover a remarkable quantum phase transition whereby the entanglement scaling changes from area law into extensively large entropy. This transition shows that entanglement in many-body systems may be enhanced under special circumstances with a potential for generating “useful” entanglement for the purpose of quantum computing and that the full implications of locality and its restrictions on possible ground states may hold further surprises. PMID:28461464

  16. Novel quantum phase transition from bounded to extensive entanglement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Ahmadain, Amr; Klich, Israel

    2017-05-16

    The nature of entanglement in many-body systems is a focus of intense research with the observation that entanglement holds interesting information about quantum correlations in large systems and their relation to phase transitions. In particular, it is well known that although generic, many-body states have large, extensive entropy, ground states of reasonable local Hamiltonians carry much smaller entropy, often associated with the boundary length through the so-called area law. Here we introduce a continuous family of frustration-free Hamiltonians with exactly solvable ground states and uncover a remarkable quantum phase transition whereby the entanglement scaling changes from area law into extensively large entropy. This transition shows that entanglement in many-body systems may be enhanced under special circumstances with a potential for generating "useful" entanglement for the purpose of quantum computing and that the full implications of locality and its restrictions on possible ground states may hold further surprises.

  17. Universality of phase transition dynamics: topological defects from symmetry breaking

    SciT

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Del Campo, Adolfo

    In the course of a non-equilibrium continuous phase transition, the dynamics ceases to be adiabatic in the vicinity of the critical point as a result of the critical slowing down (the divergence of the relaxation time in the neighborhood of the critical point). This enforces a local choice of the broken symmetry and can lead to the formation of topological defects. The Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) was developed to describe the associated nonequilibrium dynamics and to estimate the density of defects as a function of the quench rate through the transition. During recent years, several new experiments investigating formation of defectsmore » in phase transitions induced by a quench both in classical and quantum mechanical systems were carried out. At the same time, some established results were called into question. We review and analyze the Kibble-Zurek mechanism focusing in particular on this surge of activity, and suggest possible directions for further progress.« less

  18. Realization of a topological phase transition in a gyroscopic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Noah P.; Nash, Lisa M.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2018-03-01

    Topological metamaterials exhibit unusual behaviors at their boundaries, such as unidirectional chiral waves, that are protected by a topological feature of their band structures. The ability to tune such a material through a topological phase transition in real time could enable the use of protected waves for information storage and readout. Here we dynamically tune through a topological phase transition by breaking inversion symmetry in a metamaterial composed of interacting gyroscopes. Through the transition, we track the divergence of the edge modes' localization length and the change in Chern number characterizing the topology of the material's band structure. This Rapid Communication provides a new axis with which to tune the response of mechanical topological metamaterials.

  19. Entanglement scaling at first order quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuste, A.; Cartwright, C.; De Chiara, G.; Sanpera, A.

    2018-04-01

    First order quantum phase transitions (1QPTs) are signalled, in the thermodynamic limit, by discontinuous changes in the ground state properties. These discontinuities affect expectation values of observables, including spatial correlations. When a 1QPT is crossed in the vicinity of a second order one, due to the correlation length divergence of the latter, the corresponding ground state is modified and it becomes increasingly difficult to determine the order of the transition when the size of the system is finite. Here we show that, in such situations, it is possible to apply finite size scaling (FSS) to entanglement measures, as it has recently been done for the order parameters and the energy gap, in order to recover the correct thermodynamic limit (Campostrini et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 070402). Such a FSS can unambiguously discriminate between first and second order phase transitions in the vicinity of multicritical points even when the singularities displayed by entanglement measures lead to controversial results.

  20. Phase Transitions in a Model of Y-Molecules Abstract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Danielle; Ruth, Donovan; Toral, Raul; Gunton, James

    Immunoglobulin is a Y-shaped molecule that functions as an antibody to neutralize pathogens. In special cases where there is a high concentration of immunoglobulin molecules, self-aggregation can occur and the molecules undergo phase transitions. This prevents the molecules from completing their function. We used a simplified model of 2-Dimensional Y-molecules with three identical arms on a triangular lattice with 2-dimensional Grand Canonical Ensemble. The molecules were permitted to be placed, removed, rotated or moved on the lattice. Once phase coexistence was found, we used histogram reweighting and multicanonical sampling to calculate our phase diagram.

  1. Sign phase transition in the problem of interfering directed paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, C. L.; Laumann, C. R.; Spivak, B.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of interfering directed paths in disordered media. At long distance, the average sign of the sum over paths may tend to zero (sign disordered) or remain finite (sign ordered) depending on dimensionality and the concentration of negative scattering sites x . We show that in two dimensions the sign-ordered phase is unstable even for arbitrarily small x by identifying rare destabilizing events. In three dimensions, we present strong evidence that there is a sign phase transition at a finite xc>0 . These results have consequences for several different physical systems. In two-dimensional insulators at low temperature, the variable-range-hopping magnetoresistance is always negative, while in three dimensions, it changes sign at the point of the sign phase transition. We also show that in the sign-disordered regime a small magnetic field may enhance superconductivity in a random system of D -wave superconducting grains embedded in a metallic matrix. Finally, the existence of the sign phase transition in three dimensions implies new features in the spin-glass phase diagram at high temperature.

  2. Geometry-induced phase transition in fluids: Capillary prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, Petr; Savva, Nikos; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2013-02-01

    We report a new first-order phase transition preceding capillary condensation and corresponding to the discontinuous formation of a curved liquid meniscus. Using a mean-field microscopic approach based on the density functional theory we compute the complete phase diagram of a prototypical two-dimensional system exhibiting capillary condensation, namely that of a fluid with long-ranged dispersion intermolecular forces which is spatially confined by a substrate forming a semi-infinite rectangular pore exerting long-ranged dispersion forces on the fluid. In the T-μ plane the phase line of the new transition is tangential to the capillary condensation line at the capillary wetting temperature Tcw. The surface phase behavior of the system maps to planar wetting with the phase line of the new transition, termed capillary prewetting, mapping to the planar prewetting line. If capillary condensation is approached isothermally with T>Tcw, the meniscus forms at the capping wall and unbinds continuously, making capillary condensation a second-order phenomenon. We compute the corresponding critical exponent for the divergence of adsorption.

  3. Multiple reentrant phase transitions and triple points in Lovelock thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassino, Antonia M.; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.; Simovic, Fil

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the effects of higher curvature corrections from Lovelock gravity on the phase structure of asymptotically AdS black holes, treating the cosmological constant as a thermodynamic pressure. We examine how various thermodynamic phenomena, such as Van der Waals behaviour, reentrant phase transitions (RPT), and tricritical points are manifest for U(1) charged black holes in Gauss-Bonnet and 3rd-order Lovelock gravities. We furthermore observe a new phenomenon of `multiple RPT' behaviour, in which for fixed pressure the small/large/small/large black hole phase transition occurs as the temperature of the system increases. We also find that when the higher-order Lovelock couplings are related in a particular way, a peculiar isolated critical point emerges for hyperbolic black holes and is characterized by non-standard critical exponents.

  4. Phase transitions and their energetics in calcite biominerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Pupa

    2013-03-01

    Biominerals include mollusk shells and the skeletons of algae, sponges, corals, sea urchins and most other animals. The function of biominerals are diverse: mechanical support, attack, defense, grinding, biting, and chewing, gravitational and magnetic field sensing, light focusing, and many others. The exquisite nanostructure of biominerals is directly controlled by the organisms, which have evolved to master the chemico-physical aspects of mineralization. By controlling the inorganic precursor nanoparticle size, packing, and phase transitions, organisms efficiently fill space, produce tough and hard structures, with micro- or macroscopic morphology optimized for their functions. Specifically, this talk will address two key questions: Q: How are the beautiful biomineral morphologies achieved? A: Using amorphous precursor phases, with phase transitions kinetically regulated (retarded) by proteins. Q: How do organisms co-orient their single-crystalline biominerals? A: Controlling the propagation of crystallinity one nanoparticle at a time, not atom-by-atom.

  5. Four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy of phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Grinolds, Michael S.; Lobastov, Vladimir A.; Weissenrieder, Jonas; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-01-01

    Reported here is direct imaging (and diffraction) by using 4D ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) with combined spatial and temporal resolutions. In the first phase of UEM, it was possible to obtain snapshot images by using timed, single-electron packets; each packet is free of space–charge effects. Here, we demonstrate the ability to obtain sequences of snapshots (“movies”) with atomic-scale spatial resolution and ultrashort temporal resolution. Specifically, it is shown that ultrafast metal–insulator phase transitions can be studied with these achieved spatial and temporal resolutions. The diffraction (atomic scale) and images (nanometer scale) we obtained manifest the structural phase transition with its characteristic hysteresis, and the time scale involved (100 fs) is now studied by directly monitoring coordinates of the atoms themselves. PMID:17130445

  6. Crystal structure and phase transitions of sodium potassium niobate perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellier, J.; Malic, B.; Dkhil, B.; Jenko, D.; Cilensek, J.; Kosec, M.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the crystal structure and the phase transitions of K xNa 1- xNbO 3 (0.4 ≤ x ≤ 0.6). X-ray diffraction measurements were used to follow the change of the unit-cell parameters and the symmetry in the temperature range 100-800 K. At room temperature all the compositions exhibited a monoclinic metric of the unit cell with a small monoclinic distortion (90.32° ≤ β ≤ 90.34°). No major change of symmetry was evidenced in the investigated compositional range, which should be characteristic of the morphotropic phase-boundary region. With increasing temperature, the samples underwent first-order monoclinic-tetragonal and tetragonal-cubic transitions. Only the potassium-rich phases were rhombohedral at 100 K.

  7. Identifying quantum phase transitions with adversarial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huembeli, Patrick; Dauphin, Alexandre; Wittek, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The identification of phases of matter is a challenging task, especially in quantum mechanics, where the complexity of the ground state appears to grow exponentially with the size of the system. Traditionally, physicists have to identify the relevant order parameters for the classification of the different phases. We here follow a radically different approach: we address this problem with a state-of-the-art deep learning technique, adversarial domain adaptation. We derive the phase diagram of the whole parameter space starting from a fixed and known subspace using unsupervised learning. This method has the advantage that the input of the algorithm can be directly the ground state without any ad hoc feature engineering. Furthermore, the dimension of the parameter space is unrestricted. More specifically, the input data set contains both labeled and unlabeled data instances. The first kind is a system that admits an accurate analytical or numerical solution, and one can recover its phase diagram. The second type is the physical system with an unknown phase diagram. Adversarial domain adaptation uses both types of data to create invariant feature extracting layers in a deep learning architecture. Once these layers are trained, we can attach an unsupervised learner to the network to find phase transitions. We show the success of this technique by applying it on several paradigmatic models: the Ising model with different temperatures, the Bose-Hubbard model, and the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model with disorder. The method finds unknown transitions successfully and predicts transition points in close agreement with standard methods. This study opens the door to the classification of physical systems where the phase boundaries are complex such as the many-body localization problem or the Bose glass phase.

  8. Transitions between homogeneous phases of polar active liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauchot, Olivier; Nguyen Thu Lam, Khanh Dang; Schindler, Michael; EC2M Team; PCT Team

    2015-03-01

    Polar active liquids, composed of aligning self-propelled particle exhibit large scale collective motion. Simulations of Vicsek-like models of constant-speed point particles, aligning with their neighbors in the presence of noise, have revealed the existence of a transition towards a true long range order polar-motion phase. Generically, the homogenous polar state is unstable; non-linear propagative structures develop; and the transition is discontinuous. The long range dynamics of these systems has been successfully captured using various scheme of kinetic theories. However the complexity of the dynamics close to the transition has somewhat hindered more basics questions. Is there a simple way to predict the existence and the order of a transition to collective motion for a given microscopic dynamics? What would be the physically meaningful and relevant quantity to answer this question? Here, we tackle these questions, restricting ourselves to the study of the homogeneous phases of polar active liquids in the low density limit and obtain a very intuitive understanding of the conditions which particle interaction must satisfy to induce a transition towards collective motion.

  9. Critical phenomena at the complex tensor ordering phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Igor; Herbut, Igor F.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the critical properties of the phase transition towards complex tensor order that has been proposed to occur in spin-orbit-coupled superconductors. For this purpose, we formulate the bosonic field theory for fluctuations of the complex irreducible second-rank tensor order parameter close to the transition. We then determine the scale dependence of the couplings of the theory by means of the perturbative renormalization group (RG). For the isotropic system, we generically detect a fluctuation-induced first-order phase transition. The initial values for the running couplings are determined by the underlying microscopic model for the tensorial order. As an example, we study three-dimensional Luttinger semimetals with electrons at a quadratic band-touching point. Whereas the strong-coupling transition of the model receives substantial fluctuation corrections, the weak-coupling transition at low temperatures is rendered only weakly first order due to the presence of a fixed point in the vicinity of the RG trajectory. If the number of fluctuating complex components of the order parameter is reduced by cubic anisotropy, the theory maps onto the field theory for frustrated magnetism.

  10. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions

    SciT

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N{sub 1114}][NTf{sub 2}], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N{sub 1114}][NTf{sub 2}] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picturemore » of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.« less

  11. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thamires A; Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Ferreira, Fabio F; Costa, Fanny N; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-14

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  12. Gravitational waves from a very strong electroweak phase transition

    SciT

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel, E-mail: lleitao@mdp.edu.ar, E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar

    We investigate the production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the electroweak phase transition. We consider extensions of the Standard Model which can give very strongly first-order phase transitions, such that the transition fronts either propagate as detonations or run away. To compute the bubble wall velocity, we estimate the friction with the plasma and take into account the hydrodynamics. We track the development of the phase transition up to the percolation time, and we calculate the gravitational wave spectrum generated by bubble collisions, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and sound waves. For the kinds of models we consider, we findmore » parameter regions for which the gravitational waves are potentially observable at the planned space-based interferometer eLISA. In such cases, the signal from sound waves is generally dominant, while that from bubble collisions is the least significant of them. Since the sound waves and turbulence mechanisms are diminished for runaway walls, the models with the best prospects of detection at eLISA are those which do not have such solutions. In particular, we find that heavy extra bosons provide stronger gravitational wave signals than tree-level terms.« less

  13. Partial information, market efficiency, and anomalous continuous phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Zheng, Wenzhi; Huang, Jiping

    2014-04-01

    It is a common belief in economics and social science that if there is more information available for agents to gather in a human system, the system can become more efficient. The belief can be easily understood according to the well-known efficient market hypothesis. In this work, we attempt to challenge this belief by investigating a complex adaptive system, which is modeled by a market-directed resource-allocation game with a directed random network. We conduct a series of controlled human experiments in the laboratory to show the reliability of the model design. As a result, we find that even under a small information concentration, the system can still almost reach the optimal (balanced) state. Furthermore, the ensemble average of the system’s fluctuation level goes through a continuous phase transition. This behavior means that in the second phase if too much information is shared among agents, the system’s stability will be harmed instead, which differs from the belief mentioned above. Also, at the transition point, the ensemble fluctuations of the fluctuation level remain at a low value. This phenomenon is in contrast to the textbook knowledge about continuous phase transitions in traditional physical systems, namely, fluctuations will rise abnormally around a transition point since the correlation length becomes infinite. Thus, this work is of potential value to a variety of fields, such as physics, economics, complexity science, and artificial intelligence.

  14. Characterizing Phase Transitions in a Model of Neutral Evolutionary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Adam; King, Dawn; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-03-01

    An evolutionary model was recently introduced for sympatric, phenotypic evolution over a variable fitness landscape with assortative mating (Dees & Bahar 2010). Organisms in the model are described by coordinates in a two-dimensional phenotype space, born at random coordinates with limited variation from their parents as determined by a mutation parameter, mutability. The model has been extended to include both neutral evolution and asexual reproduction in Scott et al (submitted). It has been demonstrated that a second order, non-equilibrium phase transition occurs for the temporal dynamics as the mutability is varied, for both the original model and for neutral conditions. This transition likely belongs to the directed percolation universality class. In contrast, the spatial dynamics of the model shows characteristics of an ordinary percolation phase transition. Here, we characterize the phase transitions exhibited by this model by determining critical exponents for the relaxation times, characteristic lengths, and cluster (species) mass distributions. Missouri Research Board; J.S. McDonnell Foundation

  15. Absorbing phase transitions in deterministic fixed-energy sandpile models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su-Chan

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the origin of the difference, which was noticed by Fey et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 145703 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.145703], between the steady state density of an Abelian sandpile model (ASM) and the transition point of its corresponding deterministic fixed-energy sandpile model (DFES). Being deterministic, the configuration space of a DFES can be divided into two disjoint classes such that every configuration in one class should evolve into one of absorbing states, whereas no configurations in the other class can reach an absorbing state. Since the two classes are separated in terms of toppling dynamics, the system can be made to exhibit an absorbing phase transition (APT) at various points that depend on the initial probability distribution of the configurations. Furthermore, we show that in general the transition point also depends on whether an infinite-size limit is taken before or after the infinite-time limit. To demonstrate, we numerically study the two-dimensional DFES with Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld toppling rule (BTW-FES). We confirm that there are indeed many thresholds. Nonetheless, the critical phenomena at various transition points are found to be universal. We furthermore discuss a microscopic absorbing phase transition, or a so-called spreading dynamics, of the BTW-FES, to find that the phase transition in this setting is related to the dynamical isotropic percolation process rather than self-organized criticality. In particular, we argue that choosing recurrent configurations of the corresponding ASM as an initial configuration does not allow for a nontrivial APT in the DFES.

  16. Critical phase transitions during ablation of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iravanian, Shahriar; Langberg, Jonathan J.

    2017-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia with significant morbidity and mortality. Pharmacological agents are not very effective in the management of AF. Therefore, ablation procedures have become the mainstay of AF management. The irregular and seemingly chaotic atrial activity in AF is caused by one or more meandering spiral waves. Previously, we have shown the presence of sudden rhythm organization during ablation of persistent AF. We hypothesize that the observed transitions from a disorganized to an organized rhythm is a critical phase transition. Here, we explore this hypothesis by simulating ablation in an anatomically-correct 3D AF model. In 722 out of 2160 simulated ablation, at least one sudden transition from AF to an organized rhythm (flutter) was noted (33%). They were marked by a sudden decrease in the cycle length entropy and increase in the mean cycle length. At the same time, the number of reentrant wavelets decreased from 2.99 ± 0.06 in AF to 1.76 ± 0.05 during flutter, and the correlation length scale increased from 13.3 ± 1.0 mm to 196.5 ± 86.6 mm (both P < 0.0001). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that transitions from AF to an anatomical flutter behave as phase transitions in complex non-equilibrium dynamical systems with flutter acting as an absorbing state. Clinically, the facilitation of phase transition should be considered a novel mechanism of ablation and may help to design effective ablation strategies.

  17. Absorbing phase transitions in deterministic fixed-energy sandpile models.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Chan

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the origin of the difference, which was noticed by Fey et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 145703 (2010)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.145703], between the steady state density of an Abelian sandpile model (ASM) and the transition point of its corresponding deterministic fixed-energy sandpile model (DFES). Being deterministic, the configuration space of a DFES can be divided into two disjoint classes such that every configuration in one class should evolve into one of absorbing states, whereas no configurations in the other class can reach an absorbing state. Since the two classes are separated in terms of toppling dynamics, the system can be made to exhibit an absorbing phase transition (APT) at various points that depend on the initial probability distribution of the configurations. Furthermore, we show that in general the transition point also depends on whether an infinite-size limit is taken before or after the infinite-time limit. To demonstrate, we numerically study the two-dimensional DFES with Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld toppling rule (BTW-FES). We confirm that there are indeed many thresholds. Nonetheless, the critical phenomena at various transition points are found to be universal. We furthermore discuss a microscopic absorbing phase transition, or a so-called spreading dynamics, of the BTW-FES, to find that the phase transition in this setting is related to the dynamical isotropic percolation process rather than self-organized criticality. In particular, we argue that choosing recurrent configurations of the corresponding ASM as an initial configuration does not allow for a nontrivial APT in the DFES.

  18. Ultrafast dynamics during the photoinduced phase transition in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegkamp, Daniel; Stähler, Julia

    2015-12-01

    The phase transition of VO2 from a monoclinic insulator to a rutile metal, which occurs thermally at TC = 340 K, can also be driven by strong photoexcitation. The ultrafast dynamics during this photoinduced phase transition (PIPT) have attracted great scientific attention for decades, as this approach promises to answer the question of whether the insulator-to-metal (IMT) transition is caused by electronic or crystallographic processes through disentanglement of the different contributions in the time domain. We review our recent results achieved by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron, optical, and coherent phonon spectroscopy and discuss them within the framework of a selection of latest, complementary studies of the ultrafast PIPT in VO2. We show that the population change of electrons and holes caused by photoexcitation launches a highly non-equilibrium plasma phase characterized by enhanced screening due to quasi-free carriers and followed by two branches of non-equilibrium dynamics: (i) an instantaneous (within the time resolution) collapse of the insulating gap that precedes charge carrier relaxation and significant ionic motion and (ii) an instantaneous lattice potential symmetry change that represents the onset of the crystallographic phase transition through ionic motion on longer timescales. We discuss the interconnection between these two non-thermal pathways with particular focus on the meaning of the critical fluence of the PIPT in different types of experiments. Based on this, we conclude that the PIPT threshold identified in optical experiments is most probably determined by the excitation density required to drive the lattice potential change rather than the IMT. These considerations suggest that the IMT can be driven by weaker excitation, predicting a transiently metallic, monoclinic state of VO2 that is not stabilized by the non-thermal structural transition and, thus, decays on ultrafast timescales.

  19. Microscopic Studies of Quantum Phase Transitions in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr, Waseem S.

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis, I report on experiments that microscopically probe quantum phase transitions of ultracold atoms in optical lattices. We have developed a "quantum gas microscope" that allowed, for the first time, optical imaging and manipulation of single atoms in a quantum-degenerate gas on individual sites of an optical lattice. This system acts as a quantum simulator of strongly correlated materials, which are currently the subject of intense research because of the technological potential of high--T c superconductors and spintronic materials. We have used our microscope to study the superfluid to Mott insulator transition in bosons and a magnetic quantum phase transition in a spin system. In our microscopic study of the superfluid-insulator transition, we have characterized the on-site number statistics in a space- and time-resolved manner. We observed Mott insulators with fidelities as high as 99%, corresponding to entropies of 0.06kB per particle. We also measured local quantum dynamics and directly imaged the shell structure of the Mott insulator. I report on the first quantum magnetism experiments in optical lattices. We have realized a quantum Ising chain in a magnetic field, and observed a quantum phase transition between a paramagnet and antiferromagnet. We achieved strong spin interactions by encoding spins in excitations of a Mott insulator in a tilted lattice. We detected the transition by measuring the total magnetization of the system across the transition using in-situ measurements as well as the Neel ordering in the antiferromagnetic state using noise-correlation techniques. We characterized the dynamics of domain formation in the system. The spin mapping introduced opens up a new path to realizing more exotic states in optical lattices including spin liquids and quantum valence bond solids. As our system sizes become larger, simulating their physics on classical computers will require exponentially larger resources because of entanglement build

  20. High pressure phase transitions in tetrahedrally coordinated semiconducting compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, S. C.; Spain, I. L.; Skelton, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    New experimental results are reported for structural transitions at high pressure in several III-V compounds and two II-VI compounds. These data, together with earlier results, are then compared with the predictions of model calculations of Van Vechten. Experimental transition pressures are often at variance with calculated values. However, his calculation assumes that the high pressure phase is metallic, with the beta-Sn structure. The present results show that several compounds assume an ionic NaCl structure at high pressure, while others have neither the beta-Sn nor NaCl structure.

  1. Solid-Solid Phase Transition Kinetics of FOX-7

    SciT

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K; Wang, R

    Since it was developed in the late 1990s, 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (FOX-7), with lower sensitivity and comparable performance to RDX, has received increasing interest. This paper will present our results for the phase changes of FOX-7 using DSC and HFC (Heat Flow Calorimetry). DSC thermal curves recorded at linear heating rates of 0.10, 0.35 and 1.0 C min{sup -1} show two endothermic peaks and two exothermic peaks. The two endothermic peaks represent solid-solid phase transitions, which have been observed in the literature at 114 C ({beta}-{gamma}) and 159 C ({gamma}-{delta}) by both DSC and XPD (X-ray powder diffraction) measurements. The first transitionmore » shifts from 114.5 to 115.8 C as the heating rate increases from 0.10 to 1.0 C min{sup -1}, while the second transition shifts from 158.5 to 160.4 C. Cyclical heating experiments show the endotherms and exotherms for a first heating through the {gamma} phase to the {delta} phase, a cooling and reversion to the {alpha} or {beta} phase, and a second heating to the {gamma} and {delta} phases. The data are interpreted using kinetic models with thermodynamic constraints.« less

  2. Amplitude Excitations in a Symmetry-Breaking Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; H M, Bharath; Barrios, Maryrose; Chapman, Michael

    Quantum phase transitions (QPT) can be characterized using a local order parameter. In a symmetry-breaking phase transition, this order parameter spontaneously breaks one or more of the symmetries of the Hamiltonian while crossing the quantum critical point (QCP). A spin-1 Bose Einstein condensate, in a single spatial mode, undergoes a QPT when the applied magnetic field is quenched through a critical value. The transverse spin component is an order parameter characterizing this QPT. It shares a U(1)Ã'SO(2) symmetry with the Hamiltonian, but one of these two symmetries is broken when the system is quenched through the QCP. As a result, two massless, coupled phonon-magnon modes are present along with a single massive, or Higgs-like mode which has the form of amplitude excitations of the order parameter. Here, we experimentally characterize this phase transition and the resulting amplitude excitations by inducing coherent oscillation in the spin population. We further use the amplitude oscillations to measure the energy gap between the ground state and the first excited state for different phases of the QPT. At the QCP, finite size effects lead to a non-zero gap, and our measurements are consistent with this prediction.

  3. Polymorphic phase transitions: Macroscopic theory and molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Jamshed; Zahn, Dirk

    2017-08-01

    Transformations in the solid state are of considerable interest, both for fundamental reasons and because they underpin important technological applications. The interest spans a wide spectrum of disciplines and application domains. For pharmaceuticals, a common issue is unexpected polymorphic transformation of the drug or excipient during processing or on storage, which can result in product failure. A more ambitious goal is that of exploiting the advantages of metastable polymorphs (e.g. higher solubility and dissolution rate) while ensuring their stability with respect to solid state transformation. To address these issues and to advance technology, there is an urgent need for significant insights that can only come from a detailed molecular level understanding of the involved processes. Whilst experimental approaches at best yield time- and space-averaged structural information, molecular simulation offers unprecedented, time-resolved molecular-level resolution of the processes taking place. This review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical account of state-of-the-art methods for modelling polymorph stability and transitions between solid phases. This is flanked by revisiting the associated macroscopic theoretical framework for phase transitions, including their classification, proposed molecular mechanisms, and kinetics. The simulation methods are presented in tutorial form, focusing on their application to phase transition phenomena. We describe molecular simulation studies for crystal structure prediction and polymorph screening, phase coexistence and phase diagrams, simulations of crystal-crystal transitions of various types (displacive/martensitic, reconstructive and diffusive), effects of defects, and phase stability and transitions at the nanoscale. Our selection of literature is intended to illustrate significant insights, concepts and understanding, as well as the current scope of using molecular simulations for understanding polymorphic

  4. Higher-order phase transitions on financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, A.; Kutner, R.; Perelló, J.; Masoliver, J.

    2010-08-01

    Statistical and thermodynamic properties of the anomalous multifractal structure of random interevent (or intertransaction) times were thoroughly studied by using the extended continuous-time random walk (CTRW) formalism of Montroll, Weiss, Scher, and Lax. Although this formalism is quite general (and can be applied to any interhuman communication with nontrivial priority), we consider it in the context of a financial market where heterogeneous agent activities can occur within a wide spectrum of time scales. As the main general consequence, we found (by additionally using the Saddle-Point Approximation) the scaling or power-dependent form of the partition function, Z(q'). It diverges for any negative scaling powers q' (which justifies the name anomalous) while for positive ones it shows the scaling with the general exponent τ(q'). This exponent is the nonanalytic (singular) or noninteger power of q', which is one of the pilar of higher-order phase transitions. In definition of the partition function we used the pausing-time distribution (PTD) as the central one, which takes the form of convolution (or superstatistics used, e.g. for describing turbulence as well as the financial market). Its integral kernel is given by the stretched exponential distribution (often used in disordered systems). This kernel extends both the exponential distribution assumed in the original version of the CTRW formalism (for description of the transient photocurrent measured in amorphous glassy material) as well as the Gaussian one sometimes used in this context (e.g. for diffusion of hydrogen in amorphous metals or for aging effects in glasses). Our most important finding is the third- and higher-order phase transitions, which can be roughly interpreted as transitions between the phase where high frequency trading is most visible and the phase defined by low frequency trading. The specific order of the phase transition directly depends upon the shape exponent α defining the stretched

  5. Astrobiological Phase Transition: Towards Resolution of Fermi's Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćirković, Milan M.; Vukotić, Branislav

    2008-12-01

    Can astrophysics explain Fermi’s paradox or the “Great Silence” problem? If available, such explanation would be advantageous over most of those suggested in literature which rely on unverifiable cultural and/or sociological assumptions. We suggest, instead, a general astrobiological paradigm which might offer a physical and empirically testable paradox resolution. Based on the idea of James Annis, we develop a model of an astrobiological phase transition of the Milky Way, based on the concept of the global regulation mechanism(s). The dominant regulation mechanisms, arguably, are γ-ray bursts, whose properties and cosmological evolution are becoming well-understood. Secular evolution of regulation mechanisms leads to the brief epoch of phase transition: from an essentially dead place, with pockets of low-complexity life restricted to planetary surfaces, it will, on a short (Fermi-Hart) timescale, become filled with high-complexity life. An observation selection effect explains why we are not, in spite of the very small prior probability, to be surprised at being located in that brief phase of disequilibrium. In addition, we show that, although the phase-transition model may explain the “Great Silence”, it is not supportive of the “contact pessimist” position. To the contrary, the phase-transition model offers a rational motivation for continuation and extension of our present-day Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) endeavours. Some of the unequivocal and testable predictions of our model include the decrease of extinction risk in the history of terrestrial life, the absence of any traces of Galactic societies significantly older than human society, complete lack of any extragalactic intelligent signals or phenomena, and the presence of ubiquitous low-complexity life in the Milky Way.

  6. Astrobiological phase transition: towards resolution of Fermi's paradox.

    PubMed

    Cirković, Milan M; Vukotić, Branislav

    2008-12-01

    Can astrophysics explain Fermi's paradox or the "Great Silence" problem? If available, such explanation would be advantageous over most of those suggested in literature which rely on unverifiable cultural and/or sociological assumptions. We suggest, instead, a general astrobiological paradigm which might offer a physical and empirically testable paradox resolution. Based on the idea of James Annis, we develop a model of an astrobiological phase transition of the Milky Way, based on the concept of the global regulation mechanism(s). The dominant regulation mechanisms, arguably, are gamma-ray bursts, whose properties and cosmological evolution are becoming well-understood. Secular evolution of regulation mechanisms leads to the brief epoch of phase transition: from an essentially dead place, with pockets of low-complexity life restricted to planetary surfaces, it will, on a short (Fermi-Hart) timescale, become filled with high-complexity life. An observation selection effect explains why we are not, in spite of the very small prior probability, to be surprised at being located in that brief phase of disequilibrium. In addition, we show that, although the phase-transition model may explain the "Great Silence", it is not supportive of the "contact pessimist" position. To the contrary, the phase-transition model offers a rational motivation for continuation and extension of our present-day Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) endeavours. Some of the unequivocal and testable predictions of our model include the decrease of extinction risk in the history of terrestrial life, the absence of any traces of Galactic societies significantly older than human society, complete lack of any extragalactic intelligent signals or phenomena, and the presence of ubiquitous low-complexity life in the Milky Way.

  7. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciT

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram, E-mail: netramkaurav@yahoo.co.uk; Jain, A.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbormore » ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.« less

  8. A Transition to Metallic Hydrogen: Evidence of the Plasma Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    The insulator-metal transition in hydrogen is one of the most outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. The high-pressure metallic phase is now predicted to be liquid atomic from T =0 K to very high temperatures. We have conducted measurements of optical properties of hot dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K in a diamond anvil cell using pulsed laser heating of the sample. We present evidence in two forms: a plateau in the heating curves (average laser power vs temperature) characteristic of a first-order phase transition with latent heat, and changes in transmittance and reflectance characteristic of a metal for temperatures above the plateau temperature. For thick films the reflectance saturates at ~0.5. The phase line of this transition has a negative slope in agreement with theories of the so-called plasma phase transition. The NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H supported this research.

  9. CosmoTransitions: Computing cosmological phase transition temperatures and bubble profiles with multiple fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, Carroll L.

    2012-09-01

    I present a numerical package (CosmoTransitions) for analyzing finite-temperature cosmological phase transitions driven by single or multiple scalar fields. The package analyzes the different vacua of a theory to determine their critical temperatures (where the vacuum energy levels are degenerate), their supercooling temperatures, and the bubble wall profiles which separate the phases and describe their tunneling dynamics. I introduce a new method of path deformation to find the profiles of both thin- and thick-walled bubbles. CosmoTransitions is freely available for public use.Program summaryProgram Title: CosmoTransitionsCatalogue identifier: AEML_v1_0Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEML_v1_0.htmlProgram obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. IrelandLicensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.htmlNo. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8775No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 621096Distribution format: tar.gzProgramming language: Python.Computer: Developed on a 2009 MacBook Pro. No computer-specific optimization was performed.Operating system: Designed and tested on Mac OS X 10.6.8. Compatible with any OS with Python installed.RAM: Approximately 50 MB, mostly for loading plotting packages.Classification: 1.9, 11.1.External routines: SciPy, NumPy, matplotLibNature of problem: I describe a program to analyze early-Universe finite-temperature phase transitions with multiple scalar fields. The goal is to analyze the phase structure of an input theory, determine the amount of supercooling at each phase transition, and find the bubble-wall profiles of the nucleated bubbles that drive the transitions.Solution method: To find the bubble-wall profile, the program assumes that tunneling happens along a fixed path in field space. This reduces the equations of motion to one dimension, which can then be solved using the overshoot

  10. Dynamical phase transitions in generalized Kuramoto model with distributed Sakaguchi phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amitava

    2017-11-01

    In this numerical work, we have systematically studied the dynamical phase transitions in the Kuramoto-Sakaguchi model of synchronizing phase oscillators controlled by disorder in the Sakaguchi phases. We derive the numerical steady state phase diagrams for quenched and annealed kinds of disorder in the Sakaguchi parameters, using the conventional order parameter and other such statistical quantities as strength of incoherence and discontinuity measures. We have also considered the correlation profile of the local order parameter fluctuations in the various phases identified. The phase diagrams for quenched disorder are qualitatively much different from those in the global coupling regime. The order of various transitions is confirmed by a study of the distribution of the order parameter and its fourth order Binder’s cumulant across the transition for an ensemble of initial distribution of phases. For the annealed type of disorder, in contrast to the case with quenched disorder, the system is almost insensitive to the amount of disorder. We also elucidate the role of chimeralike states in the synchronizing transition of the system, and study the effect of disorder on these states. Finally, we seek justification of our results from simulations guided by the Ott-Antonsen ansatz.

  11. On signals of phase transitions in salmon population dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Krkošek, Martin; Drake, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Critical slowing down (CSD) reflects the decline in resilience of equilibria near a bifurcation and may reveal early warning signals (EWS) of ecological phase transitions. We studied CSD in the recruitment dynamics of 120 stocks of three Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) species in relation to critical transitions in fishery models. Pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) exhibited increased variability and autocorrelation in populations that had a growth parameter, r, close to zero, consistent with EWS of extinction. However, models and data for sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) indicate that portfolio effects from heterogeneity in age-at-maturity may obscure EWS. Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) show intermediate results. The data do not reveal EWS of Ricker-type bifurcations that cause oscillations and chaos at high r. These results not only provide empirical support for CSD in some ecological systems, but also indicate that portfolio effects of age structure may conceal EWS of some critical transitions. PMID:24759855

  12. Thermal phase transition with full 2-loop effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, M.; Meyer, M.; Nardini, G.

    2017-07-01

    Theories with extended Higgs sectors constructed in view of cosmological ramifications (gravitational wave signal, baryogenesis, dark matter) are often faced with conflicting requirements for their couplings; in particular those influencing the strength of a phase transition may be large. Large couplings compromise perturbative studies, as well as the high-temperature expansion that is invoked in dimensionally reduced lattice investigations. With the example of the inert doublet extension of the Standard Model (IDM), we show how a resummed 2-loop effective potential can be computed without a high-T expansion, and use the result to scrutinize its accuracy. With the exception of Tc, which is sensitive to contributions from heavy modes, the high-T expansion is found to perform well. 2-loop corrections weaken the transition in IDM, but they are moderate, whereby a strong transition remains an option.

  13. Employment, Production and Consumption model: Patterns of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavička, H.; Lin, L.; Novotný, J.

    2010-04-01

    We have simulated the model of Employment, Production and Consumption (EPC) using Monte Carlo. The EPC model is an agent based model that mimics very basic rules of industrial economy. From the perspective of physics, the nature of the interactions in the EPC model represents multi-agent interactions where the relations among agents follow the key laws for circulation of capital and money. Monte Carlo simulations of the stochastic model reveal phase transition in the model economy. The two phases are the phase with full unemployment and the phase with nearly full employment. The economy switches between these two states suddenly as a reaction to a slight variation in the exogenous parameter, thus the system exhibits strong non-linear behavior as a response to the change of the exogenous parameters.

  14. Pressure-induced phase transition in titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugeswari, R.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2018-05-01

    The structural, elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of titanium-based ferromagnetic (FM) TiX (X = Fe, Co, Ni) alloys are investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory using the Vienna ab initio simulation code. At ambient pressure, all the three alloys TiFe, TiCo and TiNi are highly stable in CsCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters and ground state properties are in good agreement with the available theoretical and experimental results. The density of states explains that these alloys possess the metallic nature at normal and high pressures. A pressure-induced structural phase transitions from CsCl to NaCl phase at 46 GPa and NaCl to ZB phase at 49 GPa in TiFe, CsCl to ZB phase in TiCo at 52 GPa, CsCl to hexagonal phase at 22 GPa and hexagonal to ZB phase at 66 GPa in TiNi are observed. The calculated Debye temperatures of TiX (X = Fe, Co, Ni) alloys are in good agreement with earlier reports. Binding energy shows that the TiCo is the most stable alloy. The magnetic property of TiX (X = Fe, Co, Ni) alloys reveals that TiFe is stable in nonmagnetic phase and the other two alloys, TiCo and TiNi, are stable in FM phase at normal pressure.

  15. Metamaterials based on the phase transition of VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwei; Lu, Junpeng; Renshaw Wang, Xiao

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we present a comprehensive review on recent research progress in design and fabrication of active tunable metamaterials and devices based on phase transition of VO2. Firstly, we introduce mechanisms of the metal-to-insulator phase transition (MIPT) in VO2 investigated by ultrafast THz spectroscopies. By analyzing the THz spectra, the evolutions of MIPT in VO2 induced by different external excitations are described. The superiorities of using VO2 as building blocks to construct highly tunable metamaterials are discussed. Subsequently, the recently demonstrated metamaterial devices based on VO2 are reviewed. These metamaterials devices are summarized and described in the categories of working frequency. In each working frequency range, representative metamaterials based on VO2 with different architectures and functionalities are reviewed and the contributions of the MIPT of VO2 are emphasized. Finally, we conclude the recent reports and provide a prospect on the strategies of developing future tunable metamaterials based on VO2.

  16. Nonequilibrium phase transitions in cuprates observed by ultrafast electron crystallography.

    PubMed

    Gedik, Nuh; Yang, Ding-Shyue; Logvenov, Gennady; Bozovic, Ivan; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2007-04-20

    Nonequilibrium phase transitions, which are defined by the formation of macroscopic transient domains, are optically dark and cannot be observed through conventional temperature- or pressure-change studies. We have directly determined the structural dynamics of such a nonequilibrium phase transition in a cuprate superconductor. Ultrafast electron crystallography with the use of a tilted optical geometry technique afforded the necessary atomic-scale spatial and temporal resolutions. The observed transient behavior displays a notable "structural isosbestic" point and a threshold effect for the dependence of c-axis expansion (Deltac) on fluence (F), with Deltac/F = 0.02 angstrom/(millijoule per square centimeter). This threshold for photon doping occurs at approximately 0.12 photons per copper site, which is unexpectedly close to the density (per site) of chemically doped carriers needed to induce superconductivity.

  17. Phase transitions in the sdg interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Bouldjedri, A.; Zerguine, S.

    2010-05-01

    A geometric analysis of the sdg interacting boson model is performed. A coherent state is used in terms of three types of deformation: axial quadrupole ( β), axial hexadecapole ( β) and triaxial ( γ). The phase-transitional structure is established for a schematic sdg Hamiltonian which is intermediate between four dynamical symmetries of U(15), namely the spherical U(5)⊗U(9), the (prolate and oblate) deformed SU(3) and the γ-soft SO(15) limits. For realistic choices of the Hamiltonian parameters the resulting phase diagram has properties close to what is obtained in the sd version of the model and, in particular, no transition towards a stable triaxial shape is found.

  18. Statistical mechanics of soft-boson phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Arun K.; Hill, Christopher T.; Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    The existence of structure on large (100 Mpc) scales, and limits to anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), have imperiled models of structure formation based solely upon the standard cold dark matter scenario. Novel scenarios, which may be compatible with large scale structure and small CMBR anisotropies, invoke nonlinear fluctuations in the density appearing after recombination, accomplished via the use of late time phase transitions involving ultralow mass scalar bosons. Herein, the statistical mechanics are studied of such phase transitions in several models involving naturally ultralow mass pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons (pNGB's). These models can exhibit several interesting effects at high temperature, which is believed to be the most general possibilities for pNGB's.

  19. Baryogenesis at a lepton-number-breaking phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Andrew J.; Tesi, Andrea; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2017-10-01

    We study a scenario in which the baryon asymmetry of the universe arises from a cosmological phase transition where lepton-number is spontaneously broken. If the phase transition is first order, a lepton-number asymmetry can arise at the bubble wall, through dynamics similar to electroweak baryogenesis, but involving right-handed neutrinos. In addition to the usual neutrinoless double beta decay in nuclear experiments, the model may be probed through a variety of "baryogenesis by-products", which include a stochastic background of gravitational waves created by the colliding bubbles. Depending on the model, other aspects may include a network of topological defects that produce their own gravitational waves, additional contribution to dark radiation, and a light pseudo-Goldstone boson (majoron) as dark matter candidate.

  20. Isotropic-nematic phase transition in aqueous sepiolite suspensions.

    PubMed

    Woolston, Phillip; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous suspensions of sepiolite clay rods in water tend to form gels on increase of concentration. Here it is shown how addition of a small amount (0.1% of the clay mass) of a common stabiliser for clay suspensions, sodium polyacrylate, can allow the observation of an isotropic-nematic liquid crystal phase transition. This transition was found to move to higher clay concentrations upon adding NaCl, with samples containing 10(-3) M salt or above only displaying a gel phase. Even samples that initially formed liquid crystals had a tendency to form gels after several weeks, possibly due to Mg(2+) ions leaching from the clay mineral. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Volume phase transitions of cholesteric liquid crystalline gels.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2015-05-07

    We present a mean field theory to describe anisotropic deformations of a cholesteric elastomer without solvent molecules and a cholesteric liquid crystalline gel immersed in isotropic solvents at a thermal equilibrium state. Based on the neoclassical rubber theory of nematic elastomers, we derive an elastic energy and a twist distortion energy, which are important to determine the shape of a cholesteric elastomer (or gel). We demonstrate that when the elastic energy dominates in the free energy, the cholesteric elastomer causes a spontaneous compression in the pitch axis and elongates along the director on the plane perpendicular to the pitch axis. Our theory can qualitatively describe the experimental results of a cholesteric elastomer. We also predict the first-order volume phase transitions and anisotropic deformations of a gel at the cholesteric-isotropic phase transition temperature. Depending on a chirality of a gel, we find a prolate or oblate shape of cholesteric gels.

  2. Covalent functionalization of monolayered transition metal dichalcogenides by phase engineering.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Goswami, Anandarup; Kappera, Rajesh; e Silva, Cecilia de Carvalho Castro; Kaplan, Daniel; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Chemical functionalization of low-dimensional materials such as nanotubes, nanowires and graphene leads to profound changes in their properties and is essential for solubilizing them in common solvents. Covalent attachment of functional groups is generally achieved at defect sites, which facilitate electron transfer. Here, we describe a simple and general method for covalent functionalization of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets (MoS₂, WS₂ and MoSe₂), which does not rely on defect engineering. The functionalization reaction is instead facilitated by electron transfer between the electron-rich metallic 1T phase and an organohalide reactant, resulting in functional groups that are covalently attached to the chalcogen atoms of the transition metal dichalcogenide. The attachment of functional groups leads to dramatic changes in the optoelectronic properties of the material. For example, we show that it renders the metallic 1T phase semiconducting, and gives it strong and tunable photoluminescence and gate modulation in field-effect transistors.

  3. Nonequilibrium phase transition in a self-activated biological network.

    PubMed

    Berry, Hugues

    2003-03-01

    We present a lattice model for a two-dimensional network of self-activated biological structures with a diffusive activating agent. The model retains basic and simple properties shared by biological systems at various observation scales, so that the structures can consist of individuals, tissues, cells, or enzymes. Upon activation, a structure emits a new mobile activator and remains in a transient refractory state before it can be activated again. Varying the activation probability, the system undergoes a nonequilibrium second-order phase transition from an active state, where activators are present, to an absorbing, activator-free state, where each structure remains in the deactivated state. We study the phase transition using Monte Carlo simulations and evaluate the critical exponents. As they do not seem to correspond to known values, the results suggest the possibility of a separate universality class.

  4. Hydrodynamic effects on phase transition in active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidituri, Harinadha; Akella, V. S.; Panchagnula, Mahesh; Vedantam, Srikanth; Multiphase flow physics lab Team

    2017-11-01

    Organized motion of active (self-propelled) objects are ubiquitous in nature. The objective of this study to investigate the effect of hydrodynamics on the coherent structures in active and passive particle mixtures. We use a mesoscopic method Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD). The system shows three different states viz. meso-turbulent (disordered state), polar flock and vortical (ordered state) for different values of activity and volume fraction of active particles. From our numerical simulations we construct a phase diagram between activity co-efficient, volume fraction and viscosity of the passive fluid. Transition from vortical to polar is triggered by increasing the viscosity of passive fluid which causes strong short-range hydrodynamic interactions. However, as the viscosity of the fluid decreases, both vortical and meso-turbulent states transition to polar flock phase. We also calculated the diffusion co-efficients via mean square displacement (MSD) for passive and active particles. We observe ballistic and diffusive regimes in the present system.

  5. Emergence of coherence and the dynamics of quantum phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Simon; Friesdorf, Mathis; Hodgman, Sean S.; Schreiber, Michael; Ronzheimer, Jens Philipp; Riera, Arnau; del Rey, Marco; Bloch, Immanuel; Eisert, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of quantum phase transitions pose one of the most challenging problems in modern many-body physics. Here, we study a prototypical example in a clean and well-controlled ultracold atom setup by observing the emergence of coherence when crossing the Mott insulator to superfluid quantum phase transition. In the 1D Bose–Hubbard model, we find perfect agreement between experimental observations and numerical simulations for the resulting coherence length. We, thereby, perform a largely certified analog quantum simulation of this strongly correlated system reaching beyond the regime of free quasiparticles. Experimentally, we additionally explore the emergence of coherence in higher dimensions, where no classical simulations are available, as well as for negative temperatures. For intermediate quench velocities, we observe a power-law behavior of the coherence length, reminiscent of the Kibble–Zurek mechanism. However, we find nonuniversal exponents that cannot be captured by this mechanism or any other known model. PMID:25775515

  6. Can biological homochirality result from a phase transition?

    PubMed

    Figureau, A; Duval, E; Boukenter, A

    1995-06-01

    The problem of chiral purity in living organisms is still one of the prominent difficulties in the study of the origins of life. In particular the parity non-conservation known to occur in weak interactions could not be related to this lack of symmetry: these physical forces, though universal, are very weak and up to now no amplification process had been proposed. In 1991, A. Salam remarked that, due to the attractive character of the parity violating force in electro-weak interactions, a phase transition at low temperature should exist, leading eventually to enantiomeric purity. We undertook then a series of experimental tests, looking for a sizeable change in the optical activity of cystine molecules. We found no evidence for the phase transition down to 0.01 K. The interpretation of these negative results will be discussed, and future experiments proposed.

  7. Generic first-order phase transitions between isotropic and orientational phases with polyhedral symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Greitemann, Jonas; Pollet, Lode

    2018-01-01

    Polyhedral nematics are examples of exotic orientational phases that possess a complex internal symmetry, representing highly nontrivial ways of rotational symmetry breaking, and are subject to current experimental pursuits in colloidal and molecular systems. The classification of these phases has been known for a long time; however, their transitions to the disordered isotropic liquid phase remain largely unexplored, except for a few symmetries. In this work, we utilize a recently introduced non-Abelian gauge theory to explore the nature of the underlying nematic-isotropic transition for all three-dimensional polyhedral nematics. The gauge theory can readily be applied to nematic phases with an arbitrary point-group symmetry, including those where traditional Landau methods and the associated lattice models may become too involved to implement owing to a prohibitive order-parameter tensor of high rank or (the absence of) mirror symmetries. By means of exhaustive Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the nematic-isotropic transition is generically first-order for all polyhedral symmetries. Moreover, we show that this universal result is fully consistent with our expectation from a renormalization group approach, as well as with other lattice models for symmetries already studied in the literature. We argue that extreme fine tuning is required to promote those transitions to second-order ones. We also comment on the nature of phase transitions breaking the O(3 ) symmetry in general cases.

  8. Holographic cosmology and phase transitions of SYM theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoroku, Kazuo; Meyer, René; Toyoda, Fumihiko

    2017-10-01

    We study the time development of strongly coupled N =4 supersymmetric Yang Mills (SYM) theory on cosmological Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) backgrounds via the AdS/CFT correspondence. We implement the cosmological background as a boundary metric fulfilling the Friedmann equation with a four-dimensional cosmological constant and a dark radiation term. We analyze the dual bulk solution of the type IIB supergravity and find that the time dependence of the FRW background strongly influences the dynamical properties of the SYM theory. We in particular find a phase transition between a confined and a deconfined phase. We also argue that some cosmological solutions could be related to the inflationary scenario.

  9. Nature of Continuous Phase Transitions in Interacting Topological Insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Tian-sheng; Zhu, Wei; Zhu, Jianxin; ...

    2017-11-08

    Here, we revisit the effects of the Hubbard repulsion on quantum spin Hall effects (QSHE) in two-dimensional quantum lattice models. We present both unbiased exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization group simulations with numerical evidence for a continuous quantum phase transition (CQPT) separating QSHE from the topologically trivial antiferromagnetic phase. Our numerical results suggest that the nature of CQPT exhibits distinct finite-size scaling behaviors, which may be consistent with either Ising or XY universality classes for different time-reversal symmetric QSHE systems.

  10. Phase transitions, interparticle correlations, and elementary processes in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimaru, Setsuo

    2017-12-01

    Astrophysical dense plasmas are those we find in the interiors, surfaces, and outer envelopes of stellar objects such as neutron stars, white dwarfs, the Sun, and giant planets. Condensed plasmas in the laboratory settings include those in ultrahigh-pressure metal-physics experiments undertaken for realization of metallic hydrogen. We review basic physics issues studied in the past 60 some years on the phase transitions, the interparticle correlations, and the elementary processes in dense plasmas, through survey on scattering of electromagnetic waves, equations of state, phase diagrams, transport processes, stellar and planetary magnetisms, and thermo- and pycnonuclear reactions.

  11. Collective firm bankruptcies and phase transition in rating dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieczka, P.; Hołyst, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a simple model of firm rating evolution. We consider two sources of defaults: individual dynamics of economic development and Potts-like interactions between firms. We show that such a defined model leads to phase transition, which results in collective defaults. The existence of the collective phase depends on the mean interaction strength. For small interaction strength parameters, there are many independent bankruptcies of individual companies. For large parameters, there are giant collective defaults of firm clusters. In the case when the individual firm dynamics favors dumping of rating changes, there is an optimal strength of the firm's interactions from the systemic risk point of view. in here

  12. Nature of Continuous Phase Transitions in Interacting Topological Insulators

    SciT

    Zeng, Tian-sheng; Zhu, Wei; Zhu, Jianxin

    Here, we revisit the effects of the Hubbard repulsion on quantum spin Hall effects (QSHE) in two-dimensional quantum lattice models. We present both unbiased exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization group simulations with numerical evidence for a continuous quantum phase transition (CQPT) separating QSHE from the topologically trivial antiferromagnetic phase. Our numerical results suggest that the nature of CQPT exhibits distinct finite-size scaling behaviors, which may be consistent with either Ising or XY universality classes for different time-reversal symmetric QSHE systems.

  13. Pressure-induced phase transition in GaN nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Q.; Pan, Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, X.; Zhang, J.; Cui, T.; Xie, Y.; Liu, J.; Zou, G.

    2002-11-01

    High-pressure in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments on GaN nanocrystals with 50 nm diameter have been carried out using a synchrotron x-ray source and a diamond-anvil cell up to about 79 GPa at room temperature. A pressure-induced first-order structural phase transition from the wurtzite-type structure to the rock-salt-type structure starts at about 48.8 GPa. The rock-salt-type phase persists to the highest pressure in our experimental range.

  14. Evaluating the Liquid Liquid Phase Transition Hypothesis of Supercoooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, David; Chandler, David

    2011-03-01

    To explain the anomalous behavior of supercooled water it has been conjectured that buried within an experimentally inaccessible region of liquid water's phase diagram there exists a second critical point, which is the terminus of a first order transition line between two distinct liquid phases. The so-called liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) has since generated much study, though to date there is no consensus on its existence. In this talk, we will discuss our efforts to systematically study the metastable phase diagram of supercooled water through computer simulation. By employing importance-sampling techniques, we have calculated free energies as a function of the density and long-range order to determine unambiguously if two distinct liquid phases exist. We will argue that, contrary to the LLPT hypothesis, the observed phenomenology can be understood as a consequence of the limit of stability of the liquid far away from coexistence. Our results suggest that homogeneous nucleation is the cause of the increased fluctuations present upon supercooling. Further we will show how this understanding can be extended to explain experimental observations of hysteresis in confined supercooled water systems.

  15. Novel Quantum Criticality in Two Dimensional Topological Phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Gil Young; Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-01-01

    Topological quantum phase transitions intrinsically intertwine self-similarity and topology of many-electron wave-functions, and divining them is one of the most significant ways to advance understanding in condensed matter physics. Our focus is to investigate an unconventional class of the transitions between insulators and Dirac semimetals whose description is beyond conventional pseudo relativistic Dirac Hamiltonian. At the transition without the long-range Coulomb interaction, the electronic energy dispersion along one direction behaves like a relativistic particle, linear in momentum, but along the other direction it behaves like a non-relativistic particle, quadratic in momentum. Various physical systems ranging from TiO2-VO2 heterostructure to organic material α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 under pressure have been proposed to have such anisotropic dispersion relation. Here, we discover a novel quantum criticality at the phase transition by incorporating the long range Coulomb interaction. Unique interplay between the Coulomb interaction and electronic critical modes enforces not only the anisotropic renormalization of the Coulomb interaction but also marginally modified electronic excitation. In connection with experiments, we investigate several striking effects in physical observables of our novel criticality. PMID:26791803

  16. Still states of bistable lattices, compatibility, and phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkaev, Andrej; Kouznetsov, Andrei; Panchenko, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    We study a two-dimensional triangular lattice made of bistable rods. Each rod has two equilibrium lengths, and thus its energy has two equal minima. A rod undergoes a phase transition when its elongation exceeds a critical value. The lattice is subject to a homogeneous strain and is periodic with a sufficiently large period. The effective strain of a periodic element is defined. After phase transitions, the lattice rods are in two different states and lattice strain is inhomogeneous, the Cauchy-Born rule is not applicable. We show that the lattice has a number of deformed still states that carry no stresses. These states densely cover a neutral region in the space of entries of effective strains. In this region, the minimal energy of the periodic lattice is asymptotically close to zero. When the period goes to infinity, the effective energy of such lattices has the “flat bottom” which we explicitly describe. The compatibility of the partially transited lattice is studied. We derive compatibility conditions for lattices and demonstrate a family of compatible lattices (strips) that densely covers the flat bottom region. Under an additional assumption of the small difference of two equilibrium lengths, we demonstrate that the still structures continuously vary with the effective strain and prove a linear dependence of the average strain on the concentration of transited rods.

  17. Structure and phase transitions of asphaltenes in solutions

    SciT

    Tar, M.M. de; Sheu, E.Y.; Storm, D.A.

    The authors investigated the rheological properties of two vacuum resid fractions in a series of solvents. The authors measured the viscosity as a function of concentration and temperature respectively. In this study, two aspects were focused: (1) the concentration dependence of viscosity for the pentane soluble fractions in a series of n-alkane solvents for study of the particle structure, and (2) the temperature dependence of viscosity of the heptane insoluble fraction in toluene at various concentrations for the study of the phase transitions. From their results it was found that all the systems studied are Newtonian. The results for (1)more » show that the particles are approximately spherical and as the carbon number of the n-alkane solvent increases, the quality of the solvent increases, thereby increasing the particle solvation. This result is consistent with that reported in a recent paper by Ali and Saleem. Also, the particles were found to behave similarly to colloidal particles. As for (2), a glass-like transition was observed at 50% concentration (0.31 volume fraction) with glass transition temperature at about 254 K, while no structural or phase transitions were observed for concentrations below 50%.« less

  18. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  19. Phase transitions triggered by quantum fluctuations in the inflationary universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasawa, Michiyasu; Yokoyama, Junichi

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics of a second-order phase transition during inflation, which is induced by time-variation of spacetime curvature, is studied as a natural mechanism to produce topological defects of typical grand unification scales such as cosmic strings or global textures. It is shown that their distribution is almost scale-invariant with small- and large-scale cutoffs. Also discussed is how these cutoffs are given.

  20. Shock wave-induced phase transition in RDX single crystals.

    PubMed

    Patterson, James E; Dreger, Zbigniew A; Gupta, Yogendra M

    2007-09-20

    The real-time, molecular-level response of oriented single crystals of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) to shock compression was examined using Raman spectroscopy. Single crystals of [111], [210], or [100] orientation were shocked under stepwise loading to peak stresses from 3.0 to 5.5 GPa. Two types of measurements were performed: (i) high-resolution Raman spectroscopy to probe the material at peak stress and (ii) time-resolved Raman spectroscopy to monitor the evolution of molecular changes as the shock wave reverberated through the material. The frequency shift of the CH stretching modes under shock loading appeared to be similar for all three crystal orientations below 3.5 GPa. Significant spectral changes were observed in crystals shocked above 4.5 GPa. These changes were similar to those observed in static pressure measurements, indicating the occurrence of the alpha-gamma phase transition in shocked RDX crystals. No apparent orientation dependence in the molecular response of RDX to shock compression up to 5.5 GPa was observed. The phase transition had an incubation time of approximately 100 ns when RDX was shocked to 5.5 GPa peak stress. The observation of the alpha-gamma phase transition under shock wave loading is briefly discussed in connection with the onset of chemical decomposition in shocked RDX.

  1. On simulated annealing phase transitions in phylogeny reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Strobl, Maximilian A R; Barker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Phylogeny reconstruction with global criteria is NP-complete or NP-hard, hence in general requires a heuristic search. We investigate the powerful, physically inspired, general-purpose heuristic simulated annealing, applied to phylogeny reconstruction. Simulated annealing mimics the physical process of annealing, where a liquid is gently cooled to form a crystal. During the search, periods of elevated specific heat occur, analogous to physical phase transitions. These simulated annealing phase transitions play a crucial role in the outcome of the search. Nevertheless, they have received comparably little attention, for phylogeny or other optimisation problems. We analyse simulated annealing phase transitions during searches for the optimal phylogenetic tree for 34 real-world multiple alignments. In the same way in which melting temperatures differ between materials, we observe distinct specific heat profiles for each input file. We propose this reflects differences in the search landscape and can serve as a measure for problem difficulty and for suitability of the algorithm's parameters. We discuss application in algorithmic optimisation and as a diagnostic to assess parameterisation before computationally costly, large phylogeny reconstructions are launched. Whilst the focus here lies on phylogeny reconstruction under maximum parsimony, it is plausible that our results are more widely applicable to optimisation procedures in science and industry. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Network inoculation: Heteroclinics and phase transitions in an epidemic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    In epidemiological modelling, dynamics on networks, and, in particular, adaptive and heterogeneous networks have recently received much interest. Here, we present a detailed analysis of a previously proposed model that combines heterogeneity in the individuals with adaptive rewiring of the network structure in response to a disease. We show that in this model, qualitative changes in the dynamics occur in two phase transitions. In a macroscopic description, one of these corresponds to a local bifurcation, whereas the other one corresponds to a non-local heteroclinic bifurcation. This model thus provides a rare example of a system where a phase transition is caused by a non-local bifurcation, while both micro- and macro-level dynamics are accessible to mathematical analysis. The bifurcation points mark the onset of a behaviour that we call network inoculation. In the respective parameter region, exposure of the system to a pathogen will lead to an outbreak that collapses but leaves the network in a configuration where the disease cannot reinvade, despite every agent returning to the susceptible class. We argue that this behaviour and the associated phase transitions can be expected to occur in a wide class of models of sufficient complexity.

  3. Phase transition of Boolean networks with partially nested canalizing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Kayse; Matache, Mihaela Teodora

    2013-07-01

    We generate the critical condition for the phase transition of a Boolean network governed by partially nested canalizing functions for which a fraction of the inputs are canalizing, while the remaining non-canalizing inputs obey a complementary threshold Boolean function. Past studies have considered the stability of fully or partially nested canalizing functions paired with random choices of the complementary function. In some of those studies conflicting results were found with regard to the presence of chaotic behavior. Moreover, those studies focus mostly on ergodic networks in which initial states are assumed equally likely. We relax that assumption and find the critical condition for the sensitivity of the network under a non-ergodic scenario. We use the proposed mathematical model to determine parameter values for which phase transitions from order to chaos occur. We generate Derrida plots to show that the mathematical model matches the actual network dynamics. The phase transition diagrams indicate that both order and chaos can occur, and that certain parameters induce a larger range of values leading to order versus chaos. The edge-of-chaos curves are identified analytically and numerically. It is shown that the depth of canalization does not cause major dynamical changes once certain thresholds are reached; these thresholds are fairly small in comparison to the connectivity of the nodes.

  4. Digital herders and phase transition in a voting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisakado, M.; Mori, S.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model with two candidates, C1 and C2. We set two types of voters—herders and independents. The voting of independent voters is based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, the voting of herders is based on the number of votes. Herders always select the majority of the previous r votes, which are visible to them. We call them digital herders. We can accurately calculate the distribution of votes for special cases. When r >= 3, we find that a phase transition occurs at the upper limit of t, where t is the discrete time (or number of votes). As the fraction of herders increases, the model features a phase transition beyond which a state where most voters make the correct choice coexists with one where most of them are wrong. On the other hand, when r < 3, there is no phase transition. In this case, the herders' performance is the same as that of the independent voters. Finally, we recognize the behavior of human beings by conducting simple experiments.

  5. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance driven by magnetic phase transition.

    PubMed

    Chen, X Z; Feng, J F; Wang, Z C; Zhang, J; Zhong, X Y; Song, C; Jin, L; Zhang, B; Li, F; Jiang, M; Tan, Y Z; Zhou, X J; Shi, G Y; Zhou, X F; Han, X D; Mao, S C; Chen, Y H; Han, X F; Pan, F

    2017-09-06

    The independent control of two magnetic electrodes and spin-coherent transport in magnetic tunnel junctions are strictly required for tunneling magnetoresistance, while junctions with only one ferromagnetic electrode exhibit tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance dependent on the anisotropic density of states with no room temperature performance so far. Here, we report an alternative approach to obtaining tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in α'-FeRh-based junctions driven by the magnetic phase transition of α'-FeRh and resultantly large variation of the density of states in the vicinity of MgO tunneling barrier, referred to as phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance. The junctions with only one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode show a magnetoresistance ratio up to 20% at room temperature. Both the polarity and magnitude of the phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance can be modulated by interfacial engineering at the α'-FeRh/MgO interface. Besides the fundamental significance, our finding might add a different dimension to magnetic random access memory and antiferromagnet spintronics.Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance is promising for next generation memory devices but limited by the low efficiency and functioning temperature. Here the authors achieved 20% tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions with one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode.

  6. Discovering phases, phase transitions, and crossovers through unsupervised machine learning: A critical examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenjian; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2017-06-01

    We apply unsupervised machine learning techniques, mainly principal component analysis (PCA), to compare and contrast the phase behavior and phase transitions in several classical spin models—the square- and triangular-lattice Ising models, the Blume-Capel model, a highly degenerate biquadratic-exchange spin-1 Ising (BSI) model, and the two-dimensional X Y model—and we examine critically what machine learning is teaching us. We find that quantified principal components from PCA not only allow the exploration of different phases and symmetry-breaking, but they can distinguish phase-transition types and locate critical points. We show that the corresponding weight vectors have a clear physical interpretation, which is particularly interesting in the frustrated models such as the triangular antiferromagnet, where they can point to incipient orders. Unlike the other well-studied models, the properties of the BSI model are less well known. Using both PCA and conventional Monte Carlo analysis, we demonstrate that the BSI model shows an absence of phase transition and macroscopic ground-state degeneracy. The failure to capture the "charge" correlations (vorticity) in the BSI model (X Y model) from raw spin configurations points to some of the limitations of PCA. Finally, we employ a nonlinear unsupervised machine learning procedure, the "autoencoder method," and we demonstrate that it too can be trained to capture phase transitions and critical points.

  7. Discovering phases, phase transitions, and crossovers through unsupervised machine learning: A critical examination

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Wenjian; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2017-06-19

    Here, we apply unsupervised machine learning techniques, mainly principal component analysis (PCA), to compare and contrast the phase behavior and phase transitions in several classical spin models - the square and triangular-lattice Ising models, the Blume-Capel model, a highly degenerate biquadratic-exchange spin-one Ising (BSI) model, and the 2D XY model, and examine critically what machine learning is teaching us. We find that quantified principal components from PCA not only allow exploration of different phases and symmetry-breaking, but can distinguish phase transition types and locate critical points. We show that the corresponding weight vectors have a clear physical interpretation, which ismore » particularly interesting in the frustrated models such as the triangular antiferromagnet, where they can point to incipient orders. Unlike the other well-studied models, the properties of the BSI model are less well known. Using both PCA and conventional Monte Carlo analysis, we demonstrate that the BSI model shows an absence of phase transition and macroscopic ground-state degeneracy. The failure to capture the 'charge' correlations (vorticity) in the BSI model (XY model) from raw spin configurations points to some of the limitations of PCA. Finally, we employ a nonlinear unsupervised machine learning procedure, the 'antoencoder method', and demonstrate that it too can be trained to capture phase transitions and critical points.« less

  8. Discovering phases, phase transitions, and crossovers through unsupervised machine learning: A critical examination

    SciT

    Hu, Wenjian; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    Here, we apply unsupervised machine learning techniques, mainly principal component analysis (PCA), to compare and contrast the phase behavior and phase transitions in several classical spin models - the square and triangular-lattice Ising models, the Blume-Capel model, a highly degenerate biquadratic-exchange spin-one Ising (BSI) model, and the 2D XY model, and examine critically what machine learning is teaching us. We find that quantified principal components from PCA not only allow exploration of different phases and symmetry-breaking, but can distinguish phase transition types and locate critical points. We show that the corresponding weight vectors have a clear physical interpretation, which ismore » particularly interesting in the frustrated models such as the triangular antiferromagnet, where they can point to incipient orders. Unlike the other well-studied models, the properties of the BSI model are less well known. Using both PCA and conventional Monte Carlo analysis, we demonstrate that the BSI model shows an absence of phase transition and macroscopic ground-state degeneracy. The failure to capture the 'charge' correlations (vorticity) in the BSI model (XY model) from raw spin configurations points to some of the limitations of PCA. Finally, we employ a nonlinear unsupervised machine learning procedure, the 'antoencoder method', and demonstrate that it too can be trained to capture phase transitions and critical points.« less

  9. Hybrid phase transition into an absorbing state: Percolation and avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Deokjae; Choi, S.; Stippinger, M.; Kertész, J.; Kahng, B.

    2016-04-01

    Interdependent networks are more fragile under random attacks than simplex networks, because interlayer dependencies lead to cascading failures and finally to a sudden collapse. This is a hybrid phase transition (HPT), meaning that at the transition point the order parameter has a jump but there are also critical phenomena related to it. Here we study these phenomena on the Erdős-Rényi and the two-dimensional interdependent networks and show that the hybrid percolation transition exhibits two kinds of critical behaviors: divergence of the fluctuations of the order parameter and power-law size distribution of finite avalanches at a transition point. At the transition point global or "infinite" avalanches occur, while the finite ones have a power law size distribution; thus the avalanche statistics also has the nature of a HPT. The exponent βm of the order parameter is 1 /2 under general conditions, while the value of the exponent γm characterizing the fluctuations of the order parameter depends on the system. The critical behavior of the finite avalanches can be described by another set of exponents, βa and γa. These two critical behaviors are coupled by a scaling law: 1 -βm=γa .

  10. Quantum magnetic phase transition in square-octagon lattice.

    PubMed

    Bao, An; Tao, Hong-Shuai; Liu, Hai-Di; Zhang, XiaoZhong; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-11-05

    Quantum magnetic phase transition in square-octagon lattice was investigated by cellular dynamical mean field theory combining with continuous time quantum Monte Carlo algorithm. Based on the systematic calculation on the density of states, the double occupancy and the Fermi surface evolution of square-octagon lattice, we presented the phase diagrams of this splendid many particle system. The competition between the temperature and the on-site repulsive interaction in the isotropic square-octagon lattice has shown that both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic order can be found not only in the metal phase, but also in the insulating phase. Antiferromagnetic metal phase disappeared in the phase diagram that consists of the anisotropic parameter λ and the on-site repulsive interaction U while the other phases still can be detected at T = 0.17. The results found in this work may contribute to understand well the properties of some consuming systems that have square-octagon structure, quasi square-octagon structure, such as ZnO.

  11. Dynamical quantum phase transitions in extended transverse Ising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; Dutta, Amit

    2018-04-01

    We study the dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs) manifested in the subsequent unitary dynamics of an extended Ising model with an additional three spin interactions following a sudden quench. Revisiting the equilibrium phase diagram of the model, where different quantum phases are characterized by different winding numbers, we show that in some situations the winding number may not change across a gap closing point in the energy spectrum. Although, usually there exists a one-to-one correspondence between the change in winding number and the number of critical time scales associated with DQPTs, we show that the extended nature of interactions may lead to unusual situations. Importantly, we show that in the limit of the cluster Ising model, three critical modes associated with DQPTs become degenerate, thereby leading to a single critical time scale for a given sector of Fisher zeros.

  12. Unconventional transformation of spin Dirac phase across a topological quantum phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Su-Yang; Neupane, Madhab; Belopolski, Ilya; Liu, Chang; Alidoust, Nasser; Bian, Guang; Jia, Shuang; Landolt, Gabriel; Slomski, Batosz; Dil, J. Hugo; Shibayev, Pavel P.; Basak, Susmita; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Cava, Robert J.; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2015-01-01

    The topology of a topological material can be encoded in its surface states. These surface states can only be removed by a bulk topological quantum phase transition into a trivial phase. Here we use photoemission spectroscopy to image the formation of protected surface states in a topological insulator as we chemically tune the system through a topological transition. Surprisingly, we discover an exotic spin-momentum locked, gapped surface state in the trivial phase that shares many important properties with the actual topological surface state in anticipation of the change of topology. Using a spin-resolved measurement, we show that apart from a surface bandgap these states develop spin textures similar to the topological surface states well before the transition. Our results offer a general paradigm for understanding how surface states in topological phases arise from a quantum phase transition and are suggestive for the future realization of Weyl arcs, condensed matter supersymmetry and other fascinating phenomena in the vicinity of a quantum criticality. PMID:25882717

  13. Unconventional transformation of spin Dirac phase across a topological quantum phase transition

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Su -Yang; Neupane, Madhab; Belopolski, Ilya; ...

    2015-04-17

    The topology of a topological material can be encoded in its surface states. These surface states can only be removed by a bulk topological quantum phase transition into a trivial phase. Here we use photoemission spectroscopy to image the formation of protected surface states in a topological insulator as we chemically tune the system through a topological transition. Surprisingly, we discover an exotic spin-momentum locked, gapped surface state in the trivial phase that shares many important properties with the actual topological surface state in anticipation of the change of topology. Using a spin-resolved measurement, we show that apart from amore » surface bandgap these states develop spin textures similar to the topological surface states well before the transition. Our results provide a general paradigm for understanding how surface states in topological phases arise from a quantum phase transition and are suggestive for the future realization of Weyl arcs, condensed matter supersymmetry and other fascinating phenomena in the vicinity of a quantum criticality.« less

  14. Phase Transition and Structure of Silver Azide at High Pressure

    SciT

    D Hou; F Zhang; C Ji

    2011-12-31

    Silver azide (AgN{sub 3}) was compressed up to 51.3 GPa. The results reveal a reversible second-order orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transformation starting from ambient pressure and completing at 2.7 GPa. The phase transition is accompanied by a proximity of cell parameters a and b, a 3{sup o} rotation of azide anions, and a change of coordination number from 4-4 (four short, four long) to eight fold. The crystal structure of the high pressure phase is determined to be in I4/mcm space group, with Ag at 4a, N{sub 1} at 4d, and N{sub 2} at 8h Wyckoff positions. Both of the two phasesmore » have anisotropic compressibility: the orthorhombic phase exhibits an anomalous expansion under compression along a-axis and is more compressive along b-axis than c-axis; the tetragonal phase is more compressive along the interlayer direction than the intralayer directions. The bulk moduli of the orthorhombic and tetragonal phases are determined to be K{sub OT} = 39{+-}5 GPa with K{sub OT'} = 10{+-}7 and K{sub OT} = 57 {+-}2 GPa with K{sub OT'} = 6.6{+-}0.2, respectively.« less

  15. Phase transitions in colloidal fluids: Kinetically or thermodynamically controlled?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Yatsyshin, Peter; Lutsko, James F.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a flurry of experimental observations suggests that most phase transitions occur in a multistage manner and via intermediate phases. These precursors to the final phase are commonly understood as the local minima of the free energy of the system. Inherently, the classical paradigm of nucleation has no capacity to describe neither the origin nor the role played by these precursors in the nucleation pathway. Here we present a systematic theoretical framework capable of describing the precursor phases in a self-consistent way. We demonstrate that nucleation precursors can appear even in situations involving a single free-energy barrier. This contradicts previous phenomenological approaches, which always characterise intermediate phases as the minima of a complex free-energy landscape. We show that a kinetically-induced mechanism temporarily stabilises an intermediate phase, which thus is not the result of a local minimum of the free energy but a consequence of the entropic cost of cluster formation. Moreover, the appearance of precursors does not seem to influence the overall nucleation time, which is governed by the free-energy barrier. The mechanism uncovered in this study can be used to explain recently reported experimental findings in crystallisation. European Research Council - Advanced Grant No. 247031; Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council - Grant Nos. EP/L020564 and EP/L025159.

  16. Dissipation-driven phase transitions in superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobos, Alejandro; Iucci, Aníbal; Müller, Markus; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2010-03-01

    Narrow superconducting wires with diameter dξ0 (where ξ0 is the bulk superconducting coherence length) are quasi-1D systems in which fluctuations of the order parameter strongly affect low-temperature properties. Indeed, fluctuations cause the magnitude of the order parameter to temporarily vanish at some point along the wire, allowing its phase to slip by 2π, and to produce finite resistivity for all temperatures below Tc. In this work, we show that a weak coupling to a diffusive metallic film reinforces superconductivity in the wire through a quench of phase fluctuations. We analyze the effective phase-only action of the system by a perturbative renormalization-group and a self-consistent variational approach to obtain the critical points and phases at T=0. We predict a quantum phase transition towards a superconducting phase with long-range order as a function of the wire stiffness and coupling to the metal. Finally we discuss implications for the DC resistivity of the wire.

  17. Geometric structure and information change in phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-jin; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    We propose a toy model for a cyclic order-disorder transition and introduce a geometric methodology to understand stochastic processes involved in transitions. Specifically, our model consists of a pair of forward and backward processes (FPs and BPs) for the emergence and disappearance of a structure in a stochastic environment. We calculate time-dependent probability density functions (PDFs) and the information length L , which is the total number of different states that a system undergoes during the transition. Time-dependent PDFs during transient relaxation exhibit strikingly different behavior in FPs and BPs. In particular, FPs driven by instability undergo the broadening of the PDF with a large increase in fluctuations before the transition to the ordered state accompanied by narrowing the PDF width. During this stage, we identify an interesting geodesic solution accompanied by the self-regulation between the growth and nonlinear damping where the time scale τ of information change is constant in time, independent of the strength of the stochastic noise. In comparison, BPs are mainly driven by the macroscopic motion due to the movement of the PDF peak. The total information length L between initial and final states is much larger in BPs than in FPs, increasing linearly with the deviation γ of a control parameter from the critical state in BPs while increasing logarithmically with γ in FPs. L scales as |lnD | and D-1 /2 in FPs and BPs, respectively, where D measures the strength of the stochastic forcing. These differing scalings with γ and D suggest a great utility of L in capturing different underlying processes, specifically, diffusion vs advection in phase transition by geometry. We discuss physical origins of these scalings and comment on implications of our results for bistable systems undergoing repeated order-disorder transitions (e.g., fitness).

  18. Geometric structure and information change in phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jin; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    We propose a toy model for a cyclic order-disorder transition and introduce a geometric methodology to understand stochastic processes involved in transitions. Specifically, our model consists of a pair of forward and backward processes (FPs and BPs) for the emergence and disappearance of a structure in a stochastic environment. We calculate time-dependent probability density functions (PDFs) and the information length L, which is the total number of different states that a system undergoes during the transition. Time-dependent PDFs during transient relaxation exhibit strikingly different behavior in FPs and BPs. In particular, FPs driven by instability undergo the broadening of the PDF with a large increase in fluctuations before the transition to the ordered state accompanied by narrowing the PDF width. During this stage, we identify an interesting geodesic solution accompanied by the self-regulation between the growth and nonlinear damping where the time scale τ of information change is constant in time, independent of the strength of the stochastic noise. In comparison, BPs are mainly driven by the macroscopic motion due to the movement of the PDF peak. The total information length L between initial and final states is much larger in BPs than in FPs, increasing linearly with the deviation γ of a control parameter from the critical state in BPs while increasing logarithmically with γ in FPs. L scales as |lnD| and D^{-1/2} in FPs and BPs, respectively, where D measures the strength of the stochastic forcing. These differing scalings with γ and D suggest a great utility of L in capturing different underlying processes, specifically, diffusion vs advection in phase transition by geometry. We discuss physical origins of these scalings and comment on implications of our results for bistable systems undergoing repeated order-disorder transitions (e.g., fitness).

  19. Novel photoinduced phase transitions in transition metal oxides and diluted magnetic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Mizokawa, Takashi

    2012-10-23

    Some transition metal oxides have frustrated electronic states under multiphase competition due to strongly correlated d electrons with spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom and exhibit drastic responses to external stimuli such as optical excitation. Here, we present photoemission studies on Pr0.55(Ca1 - ySry)0.45MnO3 (y = 0.25), SrTiO3, and Ti1 - xCoxO2 (x = 0.05, 0.10) under laser illumination and discuss electronic structural changes induced by optical excitation in these strongly correlated oxides. We discuss the novel photoinduced phase transitions in these transition metal oxides and diluted magnetic semiconductors on the basis of polaronic pictures such as orbital, ferromagnetic, and ferroelectric polarons.

  20. Magnetic Phase Transitions in NdCoAsO

    SciT

    McGuire, Michael A; Gout, Delphine J; Garlea, Vasile O

    2010-01-01

    NdCoAsO undergoes three magnetic phase transitions below room temperature. Here we report the results of our experimental investigation of this compound, including determination of the crystal and magnetic structures using powder neutron diffraction, as well as measurements of electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, magnetization, and heat capacity. These results show that upon cooling a ferromagnetic state emerges near 69 K with a small saturation moment of -0.2{micro}{sub B}, likely on Co atoms. At 14 K the material enters an antiferromagnetic state with propagation vector (0 0 1/2) and small ordered moments (-0.4{micro}{sub B}) on Co and Nd. Near 3.5more » K a third transition is observed, and corresponds to the antiferromagnetic ordering of larger moments on Nd, with the same propagation vector. The ordered moment on Nd reaches 1.39(5){micro}{sub B} at 300 mK. Anomalies in the magnetization, electrical resistivity, and heat capacity are observed at all three magnetic phase transitions.« less

  1. Magnetism and phase transitions in LaCoO3

    SciT

    Belanger, David P; Durand, Alice M; Booth, C

    2013-01-01

    Neutron scattering and magnetometry measurements have been used to study phase transitions in LaCoO3 (LCO). For H 100 Oe, evidence for a ferromagnetic (FM) transition is observed at Tc 87 K. For 1 kOe H 60 kOe, no transition is apparent. For all H, Curie Weiss analysis shows predominantly antiferromagnetic (AFM) interactions for T > Tc, but the lack of long-range AFM order indicates magnetic frustration. We argue that the weak ferromagnetism in bulk LCO is induced by lattice strain, as is the case with thin films and nanoparticles. The lattice strain is present at the bulk surfaces and atmore » the interfaces between the LCO and a trace cobalt oxide phase. The ferromagnetic ordering in the LCO bulk is strongly affected by the Co O Co angle ( ), in agreement with recent band calculations which predict that ferromagnetic long-range order can only take place above a critical value, C. Consistent with recent thin film estimations, we find C D 162:8. For > C, we observe power-law behavior in the structural parameters. decreases with T until the critical temperature, To 37 K; below To the rate of change becomes very small. For T < To, FM order appears to be confined to regions close to the surfaces, likely due to the lattice strain keeping the local Co O Co angle above C.« less

  2. CP Symmetry, Lee-Yang zeros and Phase Transitions

    SciT

    Aguado, M.; Asorey, M.

    2011-05-23

    We analyze the analytic properties of {theta}-vacuum in QCD and its connection with spontaneous symmetry breaking of CP symmetry. A loss of analyticity in the {theta}-vacuum energy density can only be due to the accumulation of Lee-Yang zeros at some real values of {theta}. In the case of first order transitions these singularities are always associated to and cusp singularities and never to or cusps, which in the case {theta} = 0 are incompatible with the Vafa-Witten diamagnetic inequality This fact provides a key missing link in the Vafa-Witten proof of parity symmetry conservation in vector-like gauge theories like QCD.more » The argument is very similar to that used in the derivation of Bank-Casher formula for chiral symmetry breaking. However, the and behavior does not exclude the existence of a first phase transition at {theta} = {pi}, where a and cusp singularity is not forbidden by any inequality; in this case the topological charge condensate is proportional to the density of Lee-Yang zeros at {theta} = {pi}. Moreover, Lee-Yang zeros could give rise to a second order phase transition at {theta} = 0, which might be very relevant for the interpretation of the anomalous behavior of the topological susceptibility in the CP{sup 1} sigma model.« less

  3. Phase Transitions on Random Lattices: How Random is Topological Disorder?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We study the effects of topological (connectivity) disorder on phase transitions. We identify a broad class of random lattices whose disorder fluctuations decay much faster with increasing length scale than those of generic random systems, yielding a wandering exponent of ω = (d - 1) / (2 d) in d dimensions. The stability of clean critical points is thus governed by the criterion (d + 1) ν > 2 rather than the usual Harris criterion dν > 2 , making topological disorder less relevant than generic randomness. The Imry-Ma criterion is also modified, allowing first-order transitions to survive in all dimensions d > 1 . These results explain a host of puzzling violations of the original criteria for equilibrium and nonequilibrium phase transitions on random lattices. We discuss applications, and we illustrate our theory by computer simulations of random Voronoi and other lattices. This work was supported by the NSF under Grant Nos. DMR-1205803 and PHYS-1066293. We acknowledge the hospitality of the Aspen Center for Physics.

  4. Emergence of the bcc Phase and Phase Transition in Be through Phonon Quasiparticle Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D. B., Sr.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Beryllium (Be) is an important material with applications in a number of areas ranging from aerospace components to X-ray equipment. Yet a precise understanding of the phase diagram of Be remains elusive. We have investigated the phase stability of Be using a recently developed hybrid free energy computation method that accounts for anharmonic effects by invoking phonon quasiparticle properties. We find that the hcp to bcc transition occurs near the melting curve at 0

  5. Dendrimersomes Exhibit Lamellar-to-Sponge Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Wilner, Samantha E; Xiao, Qi; Graber, Zachary T; Sherman, Samuel E; Percec, Virgil; Baumgart, Tobias

    2018-05-15

    Lamellar to nonlamellar membrane shape transitions play essential roles in key cellular processes, such as membrane fusion and fission, and occur in response to external stimuli, including drug treatment and heat. A subset of these transitions can be modeled by means of thermally inducible amphiphile assemblies. We previously reported on mixtures of hydrogenated, fluorinated, and hybrid Janus dendrimers (JDs) that self-assemble into complex dendrimersomes (DMSs), including dumbbells, and serve as promising models for understanding the complexity of biological membranes. Here we show, by means of a variety of complementary techniques, that DMSs formed by single JDs or by mixtures of JDs undergo a thermally induced lamellar-to-sponge transition. Consistent with the formation of a three-dimensional bilayer network, we show that DMSs become more permeable to water-soluble fluorophores after transitioning to the sponge phase. These DMSs may be useful not only in modeling isotropic membrane rearrangements of biological systems but also in drug delivery since nonlamellar delivery vehicles can promote endosomal disruption and cargo release.

  6. Mars Polar Cap During Transition Phase Instrument Checkout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During the last week of September and the first week or so of October 2006, scientific instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter were turned on to acquire test information during the transition phase leading up to full science operations. The mission's primary science phase will begin the first week of November 2006, following superior conjunction. (Superior conjunction is where a planet goes behind the sun as viewed from Earth.) Since it is very difficult to communicate with a spacecraft when it is close to the sun as seen from Earth, this checkout of the instruments was crucial to being ready for the primary science phase of the mission.

    Throughout the transition-phase testing, the Mars Color Imager (MARCI) acquired terminator (transition between nighttime and daytime) to terminator swaths of color images on every dayside orbit, as the spacecraft moved northward in its orbit. The south polar region was deep in winter shadow, but the north polar region was illuminated the entire Martian day. During the primary mission, such swaths will be assembled into global maps that portray the state of the Martian atmosphere -- its weather -- as seen every day and at every place at about 3 p.m. local solar time. After the transition phase completed, most of the instruments were turned off, but the Mars Climate Sounder and MARCI have been left on. Their data will be recorded and played back to Earth following the communications blackout associated with conjunction.

    Combined with wide-angle image mosaics taken by the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor at 2 p.m. local solar time, the MARCI maps will be used to track motions of clouds.

    This image is a composite mosaic of four polar views of Mars, taken at midnight, 6 a.m., noon, and 6 p.m. local Martian time. This is possible because during summer the sun is always shining in the polar region. It shows the mostly water-ice perennial cap (white area), sitting atop the north polar layered

  7. The high-pressure phase transitions of hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, M.; Kuwayama, Y.; Tsuchiya, J.; Tsuchiya, T.; Irifune, T.

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of new high-pressure hydrous minerals has important implications for understanding the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the Earth, since hydrogen significantly affects the physical properties and stabilities of Earth's constituent minerals. Whereas hydrous minerals commonly dehydrate under pressures of around a few tens of gigapascals (GPa) and at temperature around 1,500 K, those with CaCl2-type crystal structure, MgSiO4H2 phase H, δ-AlOOH and ɛ-FeOOH, are known to be stable at pressures corresponding to the lower mantle. However, although the CaCl2-type hydroxides were suggested to form a solid solution owing to their similar crystal structure, there are few experimental studies on the stability of the hydroxide in such multicomponent. Moreover, ab initio calculations have predicted that some CaCl2-type hydroxides transform to pyrite-type structure at higher pressures. Here, we conducted high pressure-temperature experiments on pure AlOOH, FeOOH, and their solid solutions, with the aid of these first-principles predictions. We use in situ X-ray measurements in conjunction with a multi-anvil apparatus to study the high-pressure behaviour of hydroxides in the multicomponent system under middle lower mantle conditions. Solid solutions in wide compositional ranges between CaCl2-type δ-AlOOH and ɛ-FeOOH were recognized from X-ray diffraction patterns. Also, unit cell volume of FeOOH and (Al,Fe)OOH significantly decreased accompanied with the spin transition of iron at 50 GPa. Thus, the wide compositional ranges in CaCl2-type hydroxide are maintained beyond the depth of the middle lower mantle, where the spin transition of iron occurs. We used a laser-heated diamond anvil cell in order to study the stability of AlOOH and FeOOH at higher pressures above 70 GPa. We observed that ɛ-FeOOH transforms to the pyrite-type structure at above 80 GPa, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction. At conditions above 190 GPa and 2,500 K, we observed

  8. Algebraic multigrid preconditioners for two-phase flow in porous media with phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Quan M.; Wang, Lu; Osei-Kuffuor, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    Multiphase flow is a critical process in a wide range of applications, including oil and gas recovery, carbon sequestration, and contaminant remediation. Numerical simulation of multiphase flow requires solving of a large, sparse linear system resulting from the discretization of the partial differential equations modeling the flow. In the case of multiphase multicomponent flow with miscible effect, this is a very challenging task. The problem becomes even more difficult if phase transitions are taken into account. A new approach to handle phase transitions is to formulate the system as a nonlinear complementarity problem (NCP). Unlike in the primary variable switching technique, the set of primary variables in this approach is fixed even when there is phase transition. Not only does this improve the robustness of the nonlinear solver, it opens up the possibility to use multigrid methods to solve the resulting linear system. The disadvantage of the complementarity approach, however, is that when a phase disappears, the linear system has the structure of a saddle point problem and becomes indefinite, and current algebraic multigrid (AMG) algorithms cannot be applied directly. In this study, we explore the effectiveness of a new multilevel strategy, based on the multigrid reduction technique, to deal with problems of this type. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method through numerical results for the case of two-phase, two-component flow with phase appearance/disappearance. We also show that the strategy is efficient and scales optimally with problem size.

  9. Phase transition at N = 92 in 158Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, J. B.

    2016-09-01

    Beyond the shape phase transition from the spherical vibrator to the deformed rotor regime at N = 90, the interplay of β- and γ-degrees of freedom becomes important, which affects the relative positions of the Kπ = 0+β- and Kπ = 2+γ-bands. In the microscopic approach of the dynamic pairing plus quadrupole model, a correlation of the strength of the quadrupole force and the formation of the β- and γ-bands in 158Dy is described. The role of the potential energy surface is illustrated. The E2 transition rates in the lower three K-bands and the multi-phonon bands with Kπ = 0+, 2+ and 4+ are well reproduced. The absolute B(E2, 2i+ = 0 2+) (i = 2, 3) serves as a good measure of the quadrupole strength. The role of the single particle Nilsson orbits is also described.

  10. Broadband planar multilayered absorbers tuned by VO2 phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao; Ji, Chunhui; Lu, Lulu; Li, Zhe; Li, Haoyang; Wang, Jun; Wu, Zhiming; Jiang, Yadong; Xu, Jimmy; Liu, Zhijun

    2017-08-01

    The metal-insulator transition makes vanadium dioxide an attractive material for developing reconfigurable optoelectronic components. Here we report on dynamically tunable broadband absorbers consisting of planar multilayered thin films. By thermally triggering the phase transition of vanadium dioxide, the effective impedance of multilayered structures is tuned in or out of the condition of impedance matching to free-space, leading to switchable broadband absorptions. Two types of absorbers are designed and demonstrated by using either the insulating or metallic state of vanadium dioxide at the impedance matched condition. The planar multilayered absorbers exhibit tunable absorption bands over the wavelength ranges of 5-9.3 μm and 3.9-8.2 μm, respectively. A large modulation depth up to 88% is measured. The demonstrated broadband absorbance tunability is of potential interest for reconfigurable bolometric sensing, camouflaging, and modulation of mid-infrared lights.

  11. Optical Properties in Non-equilibrium Phase Transitions

    SciT

    Ao, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K

    An open question about the dynamical behavior of materials is how phase transition occurs in highly non-equilibrium systems. One important class of study is the excitation of a solid by an ultrafast, intense laser. The preferential heating of electrons by the laser field gives rise to initial states dominated by hot electrons in a cold lattice. Using a femtosecond laser pump-probe approach, we have followed the temporal evolution of the optical properties of such a system. The results show interesting correlation to non-thermal melting and lattice disordering processes. They also reveal a liquid-plasma transition when the lattice energy density reachesmore » a critical value.« less

  12. Cooperative Jahn-Teller phase transition of icosahedral molecular units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrollahi, Seyed H.; Vvedensky, Dimitri D.

    2017-02-01

    Non-linear molecules undergo distortions when the orbital degeneracy of the highest occupied level is lifted by the Jahn-Teller effect. If such molecules or clusters of atoms are coupled to one another, the system may experience a cooperative Jahn-Teller effect (CJTE). In this paper, we describe a model of how the CJTE leads to the crystallization of the disordered phase. The model Hamiltonian is based on a normal mode decomposition of the clusters in order to maintain the symmetry labels. We take account of the electron-strain and the electron-phonon couplings and, by displacing the coordinates of the oscillators, obtain a term that explicitly couples the Jahn-Teller centers, enabling us to perform a mean-field analysis. The calculation of the free energy then becomes straightforward, and obtaining phase diagrams in various regimes follows from the minimization of this free energy. The results show that the character of the phase transition may change from strong to weak first order and even to second-order, depending on the coupling to the vibrational modes. Taken together, these results may serve as a paradigm for crystallization near the transition temperature, where the atoms tend to form clusters of icosahedral symmetry.

  13. RNA transcription modulates phase transition-driven nuclear body assembly

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are RNA and protein-rich, membraneless organelles that play important roles in gene regulation. The largest and most well-known nuclear body is the nucleolus, an organelle whose primary function in ribosome biogenesis makes it key for cell growth and size homeostasis. The nucleolus and other nuclear bodies behave like liquid-phase droplets and appear to condense from the nucleoplasm by concentration-dependent phase separation. However, nucleoli actively consume chemical energy, and it is unclear how such nonequilibrium activity might impact classical liquid–liquid phase separation. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro experiments with theory and simulation to characterize the assembly and disassembly dynamics of nucleoli in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. In addition to classical nucleoli that assemble at the transcriptionally active nucleolar organizing regions, we observe dozens of “extranucleolar droplets” (ENDs) that condense in the nucleoplasm in a transcription-independent manner. We show that growth of nucleoli and ENDs is consistent with a first-order phase transition in which late-stage coarsening dynamics are mediated by Brownian coalescence and, to a lesser degree, Ostwald ripening. By manipulating C. elegans cell size, we change nucleolar component concentration and confirm several key model predictions. Our results show that rRNA transcription and other nonequilibrium biological activity can modulate the effective thermodynamic parameters governing nucleolar and END assembly, but do not appear to fundamentally alter the passive phase separation mechanism. PMID:26351690

  14. Shock induced phase transitions and current generation in ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vinamra; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

    2017-06-01

    Ferroelectric materials are used as ferroelectric generators to obtain pulsed power by subjecting them to a shock loading. The impact induces a phase transition and at high impact speeds, dielectric breakdown. Depending on the loading conditions and the electromechanical boundary conditions, the current or voltage profiles obtained vary. We explore the phenomenon of large deformation dynamic behavior and the associated electro-thermo-mechanical coupling of ferroelectric materials in adiabatic environments. Using conservation laws, Maxwell's equations and second law of thermodynamics, we obtain a set of governing equations for the material and the driving force acting on the propagating phase boundary. We also account for the possibility of surface charges on the phase boundary in case of dielectric breakdown which introduces contribution of curvature of the phase boundary in the equations. Next, the governing equations are used to solve a plate impact problem. The Helmholtz energy of the material is chosen be a combination of piecewise quadratic potential in polarization and thermo-elastic material capable of undergoing phase transformation. We obtain current profiles for short circuit boundary conditions along with strain, particle velocity and temperature maps. US AFOSR through Center of Excellence in High Rate Deformation of Heterogeneous Materials FA 9550-12-1-0091.

  15. Numerical simulation of phase transition problems with explicit interface tracking

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Yijing; Shi, Qiangqiang; de Almeida, Valmor F.; ...

    2015-12-19

    Phase change is ubiquitous in nature and industrial processes. Started from the Stefan problem, it is a topic with a long history in applied mathematics and sciences and continues to generate outstanding mathematical problems. For instance, the explicit tracking of the Gibbs dividing surface between phases is still a grand challenge. Our work has been motivated by such challenge and here we report on progress made in solving the governing equations of continuum transport in the presence of a moving interface by the front tracking method. The most pressing issue is the accounting of topological changes suffered by the interfacemore » between phases wherein break up and/or merge takes place. The underlying physics of topological changes require the incorporation of space-time subscales not at reach at the moment. Therefore we use heuristic geometrical arguments to reconnect phases in space. This heuristic approach provides new insight in various applications and it is extensible to include subscale physics and chemistry in the future. We demonstrate the method on applications such as simulating freezing, melting, dissolution, and precipitation. The later examples also include the coupling of the phase transition solution with the Navier-Stokes equations for the effect of flow convection.« less

  16. Extensional Flow-Induced Dynamic Phase Transitions in Isotactic Polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jianzhu; Wang, Zhen; Su, Fengmei; Ji, Youxin; Yang, Haoran; Chang, Jiarui; Ali, Sarmad; Li, Xiangyang; Li, Liangbin

    2016-09-01

    With a combination of fast extension rheometer and in situ synchrotron radiation ultra-fast small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, flow-induced crystallization (FIC) of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) is studied at temperatures below and above the melting point of α crystals (Tmα). A flow phase diagram of iPP is constructed in strain rate-temperature space, composing of melt, non-crystalline shish, α and α&β coexistence regions, based on which the kinetic and dynamic competitions among these four phases are discussed. Above Tmα , imposing strong flow reverses thermodynamic stabilities of the disordered melt and the ordered phases, leading to the occurrence of FIC of β and α crystals as a dynamic phase transition. Either increasing temperature or stain rate favors the competiveness of the metastable β over the stable α crystals, which is attributed to kinetic rate rather than thermodynamic stability. The violent competitions among four phases near the boundary of crystal-melt may frustrate crystallization and result in the non-crystalline shish winning out. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Structural phase transitions in yttrium under ultrahigh pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2012-09-01

    X-ray diffraction studies were carried out on the rare earth metal yttrium up to 177 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. Yttrium was compressed to 37% of its initial volume at the highest pressure. The rare earth crystal structure sequence hcp → Sm type → dhcp → mixed(dhcp + fcc) → distorted fcc (dfcc) is observed in yttrium below 50 GPa. The dfcc (hR24) phase has been observed to persist in the pressure range of 50-95 GPa. A structural transition from dfcc to a low symmetry phase has been observed in yttrium at 99 ± 4 GPa with a volume change of - 2.6%. This low symmetry phase has been identified as a monoclinic C2/m phase, which has also been observed in other rare earth elements under high pressures. The appearance of this low symmetry monoclinic phase in yttrium shows that its electronic structure under extreme conditions resembles that of heavy rare earth metals, with a significant increase in d-band character of the valence electrons and possibly some f-electron states near the Fermi level.

  18. Structural phase transitions in yttrium under ultrahigh pressures.

    PubMed

    Samudrala, Gopi K; Tsoi, Georgiy M; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2012-09-12

    X-ray diffraction studies were carried out on the rare earth metal yttrium up to 177 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. Yttrium was compressed to 37% of its initial volume at the highest pressure. The rare earth crystal structure sequence hcp → Sm type → dhcp → mixed(dhcp + fcc) → distorted fcc (dfcc) is observed in yttrium below 50 GPa. The dfcc (hR24) phase has been observed to persist in the pressure range of 50-95 GPa. A structural transition from dfcc to a low symmetry phase has been observed in yttrium at 99 ± 4 GPa with a volume change of - 2.6%. This low symmetry phase has been identified as a monoclinic C2/m phase, which has also been observed in other rare earth elements under high pressures. The appearance of this low symmetry monoclinic phase in yttrium shows that its electronic structure under extreme conditions resembles that of heavy rare earth metals, with a significant increase in d-band character of the valence electrons and possibly some f-electron states near the Fermi level.

  19. Holographic anisotropic background with confinement-deconfinement phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, Irina; Rannu, Kristina

    2018-05-01

    We present new anisotropic black brane solutions in 5D Einstein-dilaton-two-Maxwell system. The anisotropic background is specified by an arbitrary dynamical exponent ν, a nontrivial warp factor, a non-zero dilaton field, a non-zero time component of the first Maxwell field and a non-zero longitudinal magnetic component of the second Maxwell field. The blackening function supports the Van der Waals-like phase transition between small and large black holes for a suitable first Maxwell field charge. The isotropic case corresponding to ν = 1 and zero magnetic field reproduces previously known solutions. We investigate the anisotropy influence on the thermodynamic properties of our background, in particular, on the small/large black holes phase transition diagram. We discuss applications of the model to the bottom-up holographic QCD. The RG flow interpolates between the UV section with two suppressed transversal coordinates and the IR section with the suppressed time and longitudinal coordinates due to anisotropic character of our solution. We study the temporal Wilson loops, extended in longitudinal and transversal directions, by calculating the minimal surfaces of the corresponding probing open string world-sheet in anisotropic backgrounds with various temperatures and chemical potentials. We find that dynamical wall locations depend on the orientation of the quark pairs, that gives a crossover transition line between confinement/deconfinement phases in the dual gauge theory. Instability of the background leads to the appearance of the critical points ( μ ϑ,b , T ϑ,b ) depending on the orientation ϑ of quark-antiquark pairs in respect to the heavy ions collision line.

  20. Optical characterization of phase transitions in pure polymers and blends

    SciT

    Mannella, Gianluca A.; Brucato, Valerio; La Carrubba, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.lacarrubba@unipa.it

    2015-12-17

    To study the optical properties of polymeric samples, an experimental apparatus was designed on purpose and set up. The sample is a thin film enclosed between two glass slides and a PTFE frame, with a very thin thermocouple placed on sample for direct temperature measurement. This sample holder was placed between two aluminum slabs, equipped with a narrow slit for optical measurements and with electrical resistances for temperature control. Sample was enlightened by a laser diode, whereas transmitted light was detected with a photodiode. Measurements were carried out on polyethylene-terephtalate (PET) and two different polyamides, tested as pure polymers andmore » blends. The thermal history imposed to the sample consisted in a rapid heating from ambient temperature to a certain temperature below the melting point, a stabilization period, and then a heating at constant rate. After a second stabilization period, the sample was cooled. The data obtained were compared with DSC measurements performed with the same thermal history. In correspondence with transitions detected via DSC (e.g. melting, crystallization and cold crystallization), the optical signal showed a steep variation. In particular, crystallization resulted in a rapid decrease of transmitted light, whereas melting gave up an increase of light transmitted by the sample. Further variations in transmitted light were recorded for blends, after melting: those results may be related to other phase transitions, e.g. liquid-liquid phase separation. All things considered, the apparatus can be used to get reliable data on phase transitions in polymeric systems.« less

  1. Study of a structural phase transition by two dimensional Fourier transform NMR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trokiner, A.; Man, P. P.; Théveneau, H.; Papon, P.

    1985-09-01

    The fluoroperovskite RbCaF 3 undergoes a structural phase transition at 195.5 K, from a cubic phase where the 87Rb nuclei have no quadrupolar interaction ( ωQ= 0) to a tetragonal phase where ω Q ≠ O. The transition is weakly first-order. A two-dimensional FT NMR experiment has been performed on 87Rb ( I = {3}/{2}) in a single crystal in both phases and in the vicinity of the phase transition. Our results show the coexistence of the two phases at the phase transition.

  2. Modeling the solid-liquid phase transition in saturated triglycerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, David A.; Hanna, Charles B.; Sandt, Christophe; MacDonald, Adam J.; MacEachern, Ronald; Corkery, Robert; Rousseau, Dérick

    2010-02-01

    We investigated theoretically two competing published scenarios for the melting transition of the triglyceride trilaurin (TL): those of (1) Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], in which the average state of each TL molecule in the liquid phase is a discotic "Y" conformer whose three chains are dynamically twisted, with an average angle of ˜120° between them, and those of (2) Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid-state conformation of the TL molecule in the liquid phase is a nematic h∗-conformer whose three chains are in a modified "chair" conformation. We developed two competing models for the two scenarios, in which TL molecules are in a nematic compact-chair (or "h") conformation, with extended, possibly all-trans, chains at low-temperatures, and in either a Y conformation or an h∗ conformation in the liquid state at temperatures higher than the phase-transition temperature, T∗=319 K. We defined an h-Y model as a realization of the proposal of Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], and explored its predictions by mapping it onto an Ising model in a temperature-dependent field, performing a mean-field approximation, and calculating the transition enthalpy ΔH. We found that the most plausible realization of the h-Y model, as applied to the solid-liquid phase transition in TL, and likely to all saturated triglycerides, gave a value of ΔH in reasonable agreement with the experiment. We then defined an alternative h-h∗ model as a realization of the proposal of Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid phase exhibits an average symmetry breaking similar to an h conformation, but with twisted chains, to see whether it could describe the TL phase transition. The h-h∗ model gave a value of ΔH that was too small by a factor of ˜3-4. We also predicted the temperature dependence of the 1132 cm-1 Raman band for both models, and performed measurements of the ratios of three TL Raman

  3. Phase transitions in methyl parben doped dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicker, Lata

    2013-02-01

    Influence of the preservative, methyl paraben (MPB), on the thermal properties of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) vesicles was investigated using DSC. DSC measurement of the lipid acyl chain melting transition in DPPE membrane doped with MPB, showed MPB concentration dependant modifications in the membrane thermal properties. The interesting findings are: (1) the presence of parabens increases the membrane fluidity. (2) the MPB molecules seem to be present in the aqueous bilayer interfacial region intercalated between the neighboring lipid polar headgroup (3) high concentration of MPB favored formation of crystalline and glassy phases.

  4. Scaling of the local quantum uncertainty at quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulamy, I. B.; Warnes, J. H.; Sarandy, M. S.; Saguia, A.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the local quantum uncertainty (LQU) between a block of L qubits and one single qubit in a composite system of n qubits driven through a quantum phase transition (QPT). A first-order QPT is analytically considered through a Hamiltonian implementation of the quantum search. In the case of second-order QPTs, we consider the transverse-field Ising chain via a numerical analysis through density matrix renormalization group. For both cases, we compute the LQU for finite-sizes as a function of L and of the coupling parameter, analyzing its pronounced behavior at the QPT.

  5. Multiply Degenerate Exceptional Points and Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Denis I.; Ružička, František; Znojil, Miloslav

    2015-12-01

    The realization of a genuine phase transition in quantum mechanics requires that at least one of the Kato's exceptional-point parameters becomes real. A new family of finite-dimensional and time-parametrized quantum-lattice models with such a property is proposed and studied. All of them exhibit, at a real exceptional-point time t = 0, the Jordan-block spectral degeneracy structure of some of their observables sampled by Hamiltonian H( t) and site-position Q( t). The passes through the critical instant t = 0 are interpreted as schematic simulations of non-equivalent versions of the Big-Bang-like quantum catastrophes.

  6. Structural phase transitions in SrTiO 3 nanoparticles

    SciT

    Zhang, Han; Liu, Sizhan; Scofield, Megan E.

    2017-07-31

    Pressure dependent structural measurements on monodispersed nanoscale SrTiO3 samples with average diameters of 10 to ~80 nm were conducted to enhance the understanding of the structural phase diagram of nanoscale SrTiO3. A robust pressure independent polar structure was found in the 10 nm sample for pressures up to 13 GPa, while a size dependent cubic to tetragonal transition occurs (at P = Pc) for larger particle sizes. The results suggest that the growth of ~10 nm STO particles on substrates with significant lattice mismatch may maintain a polar state for a large range of strain values, possibly enabling device use.

  7. Pressure induced phase transitions studies using advanced synchrotron techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haozhe; Liu, Lisa; Zhao, Jinggeng; HIT Overseas Collaborative Base at Argonne Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    In this presentation, the joint effort on high pressure research through program of Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) Overseas Collaborative Base at Argonne will be introduced. Selected research projects on pressure induced phase transitions at room temperature and high/low temperature conditions, such as A2B3 type topological insulators, iron arsenide superconductors, piezoelectric/ferroelectric materials, ABO3 type single crystals and metallic glasses, will be presented. Recent development on imaging and diffraction tomography techniques in diamond anvil cell will be reviewed as well.

  8. Quantum phase transition in dimerised spin-1/2 chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Aparajita; Bhadra, Sreeparna; Saha, Sonali

    2015-11-01

    Quantum phase transition in dimerised antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin chain has been studied. A staircase structure in the variation of concurrence within strongly coupled pairs with that of external magnetic field has been observed indicating multiple critical (or critical like) points. Emergence of entanglement due to external magnetic field or magnetic entanglement is observed for weakly coupled spin pairs too in the same dimer chain. Though closed dimerised isotropic XXX Heisenberg chains with different dimer strengths were mainly explored, analogous studies on open chains as well as closed anisotropic (XX interaction) chains with tilted external magnetic field have also been studied.

  9. Phase transitions and size scaling of membrane-less organelles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The coordinated growth of cells and their organelles is a fundamental and poorly understood problem, with implications for processes ranging from embryonic development to oncogenesis. Recent experiments have shed light on the cell size–dependent assembly of membrane-less cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic structures, including ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules and other intracellular bodies. Many of these structures behave as condensed liquid-like phases of the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. The phase transitions that appear to govern their assembly exhibit an intrinsic dependence on cell size, and may explain the size scaling reported for a number of structures. This size scaling could, in turn, play a role in cell growth and size control. PMID:24368804

  10. Thermodynamic phase transitions for Pomeau-Manneville maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venegeroles, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We study phase transitions in the thermodynamic description of Pomeau-Manneville intermittent maps from the point of view of infinite ergodic theory, which deals with diverging measure dynamical systems. For such systems, we use a distributional limit theorem to provide both a powerful tool for calculating thermodynamic potentials as also an understanding of the dynamic characteristics at each instability phase. In particular, topological pressure and Rényi entropy are calculated exactly for such systems. Finally, we show the connection of the distributional limit theorem with non-Gaussian fluctuations of the algorithmic complexity proposed by Gaspard and Wang [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA10.1073/pnas.85.13.4591 85, 4591 (1988)].

  11. Phase transition and information cascade in a voting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisakado, M.; Mori, S.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a voting model that is similar to a Keynesian beauty contest and analyse it from a mathematical point of view. There are two types of voters—copycat and independent—and two candidates. Our voting model is a binomial distribution (independent voters) doped in a beta binomial distribution (copycat voters). We find that the phase transition in this system is at the upper limit of t, where t is the time (or the number of the votes). Our model contains three phases. If copycats constitute a majority or even half of the total voters, the voting rate converges more slowly than it would in a binomial distribution. If independents constitute the majority of voters, the voting rate converges at the same rate as it would in a binomial distribution. We also study why it is difficult to estimate the conclusion of a Keynesian beauty contest when there is an information cascade.

  12. Hydroxyapatite: Vibrational spectra and monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepko, Alexander; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-02-01

    Fundamental studies of biomaterials are necessary to deepen our understanding of their degradation and to develop cure for related illnesses. Biomineral hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 is the main mineral constituent of mammal bone, and its synthetic analogues are used in biomedical applications. The mineral can be found in either hexagonal or monoclinic form. The transformation between these two phases is poorly understood, but knowing its mechanism may be critical to reversing processes in bone related to aging. Using density functional theory, we investigate the mechanisms of the phase transformation and estimate the transition temperature to be 680 K in fair agreement with the experimental temperature of 470 K. We also report the heat capacity of hydroxyapatite and a peculiarity in its phonon dispersion that might allow for non-destructive measurements of the crystal composition with applications in preventive medical screening for bone mineral loss.

  13. Phase transition in conjugated oligomers suspended in chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Shikha; Kumar, Anupam; Yadav, S. N. S.; Mishra, Pankaj

    2015-08-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to investigate the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase transition in a system of high aspect ratio conjugated oligomers suspended in chloroform. The interaction between the oligomers is modeled using Gay-Berne potential in which effect of solvent is implicit. Percus-Yevick integral equation theory has been used to evaluate the pair correlation functions of the fluid phase at several temperatures and densities. These pair correlation function has been used in the DFT to evaluate the I-N freezing parameters. Highly oriented nematic is found to stabilize at low density. The results obtained are in qualitative agreement with the simulation and are verifiable.

  14. Geometry induced phase transitions in magnetic spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloika, Mykola I.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Gaididei, Yuri

    2017-12-01

    Equilibrium magnetization states in spherical shells of a magnetically soft ferromagnet form two out-of-surface vortices with codirectionally magnetized vortex cores at the sphere poles: (i) a whirligig state with the in-surface magnetization oriented along parallels is typical for thick shells; (ii) a three dimensional onion state with the in-surface meridional direction of the magnetization is realized in thin shells. The geometry of spherical shell prohibits an existence of spatially homogeneous magnetization distribution, even in the case of small sample radii. By varying geometrical parameters a continuous phase transition between the whirligig and onion states takes place. The detailed analytical description of the phase diagram is well confirmed by micromagnetic simulations.

  15. Phase transitions in four-dimensional binary hard hypersphere mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Marvin; Whitlock, Paula A.

    2013-02-01

    Previous Monte Carlo investigations of binary hard hyperspheres in four-dimensional mixtures are extended to higher densities where the systems may solidify. The ratios of the diameters of the hyperspheres examined were 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6. Only the 0.4 system shows a clear two phase, solid-liquid transition and the larger component solidifies into a D4 crystal state. Its pair correlation function agrees with that of a one component fluid at an appropriately scaled density. The 0.5 systems exhibit states that are a mix of D4 and A4 regions. The 0.6 systems behave similarly to a jammed state rather than solidifying into a crystal. No demixing into two distinct fluid phases was observed for any of the simulations.

  16. Phase Transitions of MgO Along the Hugoniot (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, S.; Shulenburger, L.; Lemke, R. W.; Cochrane, K. R.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of terrestrial planets and planetary structure has become of great interest because of recent exoplanet discoveries of super earths. MgO is a major constituent of Earth's mantle, the rocky cores of gas giants such as Jupiter, and likely constitutes the interiors of many exoplanets. The high pressure - high temperature behavior of MgO directly affects equation of state models for planetary structure and formation. In this work, we examine single crystal MgO under shock compression utilizing experimental and density functional theory (DFT) methods to determine phase transformations along the Hugoniot. We perform plate impact experiments using Sandia's Z - facility on MgO up to 11.6 Mbar. The plate impact experiments generate highly accurate Hugoniot state data. The experimental results show the B1 - B2 solid - solid phase transition occurs near 4 Mbar on the Hugoniot. The solid - liquid transition is determined to be near 7 Mbar with a large region of B2-liquid coexistence. Using DFT methods, we also determine melt along the B1 and B2 solid phase boundaries as well as along the Hugoniot. The combined experimental and DFT results have determined the phase boundaries along the Hugoniot, which can be implemented into new planetary and EOS models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Phase transition of traveling waves in bacterial colony pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Komoto, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Yukio

    2004-05-01

    Depending on the growth condition, bacterial colonies can exhibit different morphologies. Many previous studies have used reaction diffusion equations to reproduce spatial patterns. They have revealed that nonlinear reaction term can produce diverse patterns as well as nonlinear diffusion coefficient. Typical reaction term consists of nutrient consumption, bacterial reproduction, and sporulation. Among them, the functional form of sporulation rate has not been biologically investigated. Here we report experimentally measured sporulation rate. Then, based on the result, a reaction diffusion model is proposed. One-dimensional simulation showed the existence of traveling wave solution. We study the wave form as a function of the initial nutrient concentration and find two distinct types of solution. Moreover, transition between them is very sharp, which is analogous to phase transition. The velocity of traveling wave also shows sharp transition in nonlinear diffusion model, which is consistent with the previous experimental result. The phenomenon can be explained by separatrix in reaction term dynamics. Results of two-dimensional simulation are also shown and discussed.

  18. Phase transition in a spatial Lotka-Volterra model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, György; Czárán, Tamás

    2001-06-01

    Spatial evolution is investigated in a simulated system of nine competing and mutating bacterium strains, which mimics the biochemical war among bacteria capable of producing two different bacteriocins (toxins) at most. Random sequential dynamics on a square lattice is governed by very symmetrical transition rules for neighborhood invasions of sensitive strains by killers, killers by resistants, and resistants by sensitives. The community of the nine possible toxicity/resistance types undergoes a critical phase transition as the uniform transmutation rates between the types decreases below a critical value Pc above that all the nine types of strains coexist with equal frequencies. Passing the critical mutation rate from above, the system collapses into one of three topologically identical (degenerated) states, each consisting of three strain types. Of the three possible final states each accrues with equal probability and all three maintain themselves in a self-organizing polydomain structure via cyclic invasions. Our Monte Carlo simulations support that this symmetry-breaking transition belongs to the universality class of the three-state Potts model.

  19. Crystal structure and phase transition of thermoelectric SnSe.

    PubMed

    Sist, Mattia; Zhang, Jiawei; Brummerstedt Iversen, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Tin selenide-based functional materials are extensively studied in the field of optoelectronic, photovoltaic and thermoelectric devices. Specifically, SnSe has been reported to have an ultrahigh thermoelectric figure of merit of 2.6 ± 0.3 in the high-temperature phase. Here we report the evolution of lattice constants, fractional coordinates, site occupancy factors and atomic displacement factors with temperature by means of high-resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction measured from 100 to 855 K. The structure is shown to be cation defective with a Sn content of 0.982 (4). The anisotropy of the thermal parameters of Sn becomes more pronounced approaching the high-temperature phase transition (∼ 810 K). Anharmonic Gram-Charlier parameters have been refined, but data from single-crystal diffraction appear to be needed to firmly quantify anharmonic features. Based on modelling of the atomic displacement parameters the Debye temperature is found to be 175 (4) K. Conflicting reports concerning the different coordinate system settings in the low-temperature and high-temperature phases are discussed. It is also shown that the high-temperature Cmcm phase is not pseudo-tetragonal as commonly assumed.

  20. Multiple Quantum Phase Transitions in a two-dimensional superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeal, Nicolas; Biscaras, J.; Hurand, S.; Feuillet-Palma, C.; Lesueur, J.; Budhani, R. C.; Rastogi, A.; Caprara, S.; Grilli, M.

    2013-03-01

    We studied the magnetic field driven Quantum Phase Transition (QPT) in electrostatically gated superconducting LaTiO3/SrTiO3 interfaces. Through finite size scaling analysis, we showed that it belongs to the (2 +1)D XY model universality class. The system can be described as a disordered array of superconducting islands coupled by a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Depending on the 2DEG conductance tuned by the gate voltage, the QPT is single (corresponding to the long range phase coherence in the whole array) or double (one related to local phase coherence, the other one to the array). By retrieving the coherence length critical exponent ν, we showed that the QPT can be ``clean'' or ``dirty'' according to the Harris criteria, depending on whether the phase coherence length is smaller or larger than the island size. The overall behaviour is well described by a model of coupled superconducting puddles in the framework of the fermionic scenario of 2D superconducting QPT.

  1. Quantum Phase Transitions in Conventional Matrix Product Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Min; Huang, Fei; Chang, Yan

    2017-02-01

    For matrix product states(MPSs) of one-dimensional spin-1/2 chains, we investigate a new kind of conventional quantum phase transition(QPT). We find that the system has two different ferromagnetic phases; on the line of the two ferromagnetic phases coexisting equally, the system in the thermodynamic limit is in an isolated mediate-coupling state described by a paramagnetic state and is in the same state as the renormalization group fixed point state, the expectation values of the physical quantities are discontinuous, and any two spin blocks of the system have the same geometry quantum discord(GQD) within the range of open interval (0,0.25) and the same classical correlation(CC) within the range of open interval (0,0.75) compared to any phase having no any kind of correlation. We not only realize the control of QPTs but also realize the control of quantum correlation of quantum many-body systems on the critical line by adjusting the environment parameters, which may have potential application in quantum information fields and is helpful to comprehensively and deeply understand the quantum correlation, and the organization and structure of quantum correlation especially for long-range quantum correlation of quantum many-body systems.

  2. Topological Phase Transitions in Line-nodal Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gil Young; Han, Sangeun; Moon, Eun-Gook

    Fathoming interplay between symmetry and topology of many-electron wave-functions deepens our understanding in quantum nature of many particle systems. Topology often protects zero-energy excitation, and in a certain class, symmetry is intrinsically tied to the topological protection. Namely, unless symmetry is broken, topological nature is intact. We study one specific case of such class, symmetry-protected line-nodal superconductors in three spatial dimensions (3d). Mismatch between phase spaces of order parameter fluctuation and line-nodal fermion excitation induces an exotic universality class in a drastic contrast to one of the conventional ϕ4 theory in 3d. Hyper-scaling violation and relativistic dynamic scaling with unusually large quantum critical region are main characteristics, and their implication in experiments is discussed. For example, continuous phase transition out of line-nodal superconductors has a linear phase boundary in a temperature-tuning parameter phase-diagram. This work was supported by the Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project of Korea Government and KAIST start-up funding.

  3. Interplay of the Glass Transition and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas; Lukanov, Boris R.; Starr, Francis W.

    2012-05-01

    Water has multiple glassy states, often called amorphous ices. Low-density (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous ice are separated by a dramatic, first-order like phase transition. It has been argued that the LDA-HDA transformation connects to a first-order liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) above the glass transition temperature Tg. Direct experimental evidence of the LLPT is challenging to obtain, since the LLPT occurs at conditions where water rapidly crystallizes. In this work, we explore the implications of a LLPT on the pressure dependence of Tg(P) for LDA and HDA by performing computer simulations of two water models - one with a LLPT, and one without. In the absence of a LLPT, Tg(P) for all glasses nearly coincide. When there is a LLPT, different glasses exhibit dramatically different Tg(P) which are directly linked with the LLPT. Available experimental data for Tg(P) are only consistent with the scenario including a LLPT.

  4. Interplay of the Glass Transition and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Water

    PubMed Central

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas; Lukanov, Boris R.; Starr, Francis W.

    2012-01-01

    Water has multiple glassy states, often called amorphous ices. Low-density (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous ice are separated by a dramatic, first-order like phase transition. It has been argued that the LDA-HDA transformation connects to a first-order liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) above the glass transition temperature Tg. Direct experimental evidence of the LLPT is challenging to obtain, since the LLPT occurs at conditions where water rapidly crystallizes. In this work, we explore the implications of a LLPT on the pressure dependence of Tg(P) for LDA and HDA by performing computer simulations of two water models – one with a LLPT, and one without. In the absence of a LLPT, Tg(P) for all glasses nearly coincide. When there is a LLPT, different glasses exhibit dramatically different Tg(P) which are directly linked with the LLPT. Available experimental data for Tg(P) are only consistent with the scenario including a LLPT. PMID:22550566

  5. Algebraic multigrid preconditioners for two-phase flow in porous media with phase transitions [Algebraic multigrid preconditioners for multiphase flow in porous media with phase transitions

    SciT

    Bui, Quan M.; Wang, Lu; Osei-Kuffuor, Daniel

    Multiphase flow is a critical process in a wide range of applications, including oil and gas recovery, carbon sequestration, and contaminant remediation. Numerical simulation of multiphase flow requires solving of a large, sparse linear system resulting from the discretization of the partial differential equations modeling the flow. In the case of multiphase multicomponent flow with miscible effect, this is a very challenging task. The problem becomes even more difficult if phase transitions are taken into account. A new approach to handle phase transitions is to formulate the system as a nonlinear complementarity problem (NCP). Unlike in the primary variable switchingmore » technique, the set of primary variables in this approach is fixed even when there is phase transition. Not only does this improve the robustness of the nonlinear solver, it opens up the possibility to use multigrid methods to solve the resulting linear system. The disadvantage of the complementarity approach, however, is that when a phase disappears, the linear system has the structure of a saddle point problem and becomes indefinite, and current algebraic multigrid (AMG) algorithms cannot be applied directly. In this study, we explore the effectiveness of a new multilevel strategy, based on the multigrid reduction technique, to deal with problems of this type. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method through numerical results for the case of two-phase, two-component flow with phase appearance/disappearance. In conclusion, we also show that the strategy is efficient and scales optimally with problem size.« less

  6. Algebraic multigrid preconditioners for two-phase flow in porous media with phase transitions [Algebraic multigrid preconditioners for multiphase flow in porous media with phase transitions

    DOE PAGES

    Bui, Quan M.; Wang, Lu; Osei-Kuffuor, Daniel

    2018-02-06

    Multiphase flow is a critical process in a wide range of applications, including oil and gas recovery, carbon sequestration, and contaminant remediation. Numerical simulation of multiphase flow requires solving of a large, sparse linear system resulting from the discretization of the partial differential equations modeling the flow. In the case of multiphase multicomponent flow with miscible effect, this is a very challenging task. The problem becomes even more difficult if phase transitions are taken into account. A new approach to handle phase transitions is to formulate the system as a nonlinear complementarity problem (NCP). Unlike in the primary variable switchingmore » technique, the set of primary variables in this approach is fixed even when there is phase transition. Not only does this improve the robustness of the nonlinear solver, it opens up the possibility to use multigrid methods to solve the resulting linear system. The disadvantage of the complementarity approach, however, is that when a phase disappears, the linear system has the structure of a saddle point problem and becomes indefinite, and current algebraic multigrid (AMG) algorithms cannot be applied directly. In this study, we explore the effectiveness of a new multilevel strategy, based on the multigrid reduction technique, to deal with problems of this type. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method through numerical results for the case of two-phase, two-component flow with phase appearance/disappearance. In conclusion, we also show that the strategy is efficient and scales optimally with problem size.« less

  7. Thermodynamic phase transition in the rainbow Schwarzschild black hole

    SciT

    Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae, E-mail: yongwan89@sogang.ac.kr, E-mail: wtkim@sogang.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We study the thermodynamic phase transition in the rainbow Schwarzschild black hole where the metric depends on the energy of the test particle. Identifying the black hole temperature with the energy from the modified dispersion relation, we obtain the modified entropy and thermodynamic energy along with the modified local temperature in the cavity to provide well defined black hole states. It is found that apart from the conventional critical temperature related to Hawking-Page phase transition there appears an additional critical temperature which is of relevance to the existence of a locally stable tiny black hole; however, the off-shell free energymore » tells us that this black hole should eventually tunnel into the stable large black hole. Finally, we discuss the reason why the temperature near the horizon is finite in the rainbow black hole by employing the running gravitational coupling constant, whereas it is divergent near the horizon in the ordinary Schwarzschild black hole.« less

  8. Strain-induced topological quantum phase transition in phosphorene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seoung-Hun; Park, Jejune; Woo, Sungjong; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    Using ab initio density functional theory, we investigate the structural stability and electronic properties of phosphorene oxides (POx) with different oxygen compositions x. A variety of configurations are modeled and optimized geometrically to search for the equilibrium structure for each x value. Our electronic structure calculations on the equilibrium configuration obtained for each x reveal that the band gap tends to increase with the oxygen composition of x < 0.5, and then to decrease with x > 0.5. We further explore the strain effect on the electronic structure of the fully oxidized phosphorene, PO, with x = 1. At a particular strain without spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is observed a band gap closure near the Γ point in the k space. We further find the strain in tandem with SOC induces an interesting band inversion with a reopened very small band gap (5 meV), and thus gives rise to a topological quantum phase transition from a normal insulator to a topological insulator. Such a topological phase transition is confirmed by the wave function analysis and the band topology identified by the Z2 invariant calculation.

  9. Scaling of Tripartite Entanglement at Impurity Quantum Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Abolfazl

    2017-01-20

    The emergence of a diverging length scale in many-body systems at a quantum phase transition implies that total entanglement has to reach its maximum there. In order to fully characterize this, one has to consider multipartite entanglement as, for instance, bipartite entanglement between individual particles fails to signal this effect. However, quantification of multipartite entanglement is very hard, and detecting it may not be possible due to the lack of accessibility to all individual particles. For these reasons it will be more sensible to partition the system into relevant subsystems, each containing a few to many spins, and study entanglement between those constituents as a coarse-grain picture of multipartite entanglement between individual particles. In impurity systems, famously exemplified by two-impurity and two-channel Kondo models, it is natural to divide the system into three parts, namely, impurities and the left and right bulks. By exploiting two tripartite entanglement measures, based on negativity, we show that at impurity quantum phase transitions the tripartite entanglement diverges and shows scaling behavior. While the critical exponents are different for each tripartite entanglement measure, they both provide very similar critical exponents for the two-impurity and the two-channel Kondo models, suggesting that they belong to the same universality class.

  10. QCD phase transition with chiral quarks and physical quark masses.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Buchoff, Michael I; Christ, Norman H; Ding, H-T; Gupta, Rajan; Jung, Chulwoo; Karsch, F; Lin, Zhongjie; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, Greg; Mukherjee, Swagato; Murphy, David; Petreczky, P; Renfrew, Dwight; Schroeder, Chris; Soltz, R A; Vranas, P M; Yin, Hantao

    2014-08-22

    We report on the first lattice calculation of the QCD phase transition using chiral fermions with physical quark masses. This calculation uses 2+1 quark flavors, spatial volumes between (4 fm)(3) and (11 fm)(3) and temperatures between 139 and 196 MeV. Each temperature is calculated at a single lattice spacing corresponding to a temporal Euclidean extent of N(t) = 8. The disconnected chiral susceptibility, χ(disc) shows a pronounced peak whose position and height depend sensitively on the quark mass. We find no metastability near the peak and a peak height which does not change when a 5 fm spatial extent is increased to 10 fm. Each result is strong evidence that the QCD "phase transition" is not first order but a continuous crossover for m(π) = 135 MeV. The peak location determines a pseudocritical temperature T(c) = 155(1)(8) MeV, in agreement with earlier staggered fermion results. However, the peak height is 50% greater than that suggested by previous staggered results. Chiral SU(2)(L) × SU(2)(R) symmetry is fully restored above 164 MeV, but anomalous U(1)(A) symmetry breaking is nonzero above T(c) and vanishes as T is increased to 196 MeV.

  11. Quantum monodromy and quantum phase transitions in floppy molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larese, Danielle

    2012-10-01

    A simple algebraic Hamiltonian has been used to explore the vibrational and rotational spectra of the skeletal bending modes of HCNO, BrCNO, NCNCS, and other "floppy" (quasi-linear or quasi-bent) molecules. These molecules have large-amplitude, low-energy bending modes and champagne-bottle potential surfaces, making them good candidates for observing quantum phase transitions (QPT). We describe the geometric phase transitions from bent to linear in these and other non-rigid molecules, quantitatively analyzing the spectroscopic signatures of ground state QPT, excited state QPT, and quantum monodromy. The algebraic framework is ideal for this work because of its small calculational effort yet robust results. Although these methods have historically found success with tri-and four-atomic molecules, we now address five-atomic and simple branched molecules such as CH3NCO and GeH3NCO. Extraction of potential functions are completed for several molecules, resulting in predictions of barriers to linearity and equilibrium bond angles.

  12. Phase transition in the parametric natural visibility graph.

    PubMed

    Snarskii, A A; Bezsudnov, I V

    2016-10-01

    We investigate time series by mapping them to the complex networks using a parametric natural visibility graph (PNVG) algorithm that generates graphs depending on arbitrary continuous parameter-the angle of view. We study the behavior of the relative number of clusters in PNVG near the critical value of the angle of view. Artificial and experimental time series of different nature are used for numerical PNVG investigations to find critical exponents above and below the critical point as well as the exponent in the finite size scaling regime. Altogether, they allow us to find the critical exponent of the correlation length for PNVG. The set of calculated critical exponents satisfies the basic Widom relation. The PNVG is found to demonstrate scaling behavior. Our results reveal the similarity between the behavior of the relative number of clusters in PNVG and the order parameter in the second-order phase transitions theory. We show that the PNVG is another example of a system (in addition to magnetic, percolation, superconductivity, etc.) with observed second-order phase transition.

  13. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-10-01

    In this article we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model that is only dependent on the diagram representation and is not sequence-specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures, and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point at which the distribution of irreducibles experiences this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and, subsequently, put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe structures leads to a constant time and space reduction, and that the sparsification of the folding of structures with modified parameters leads to a linear time and space reduction. We, furthermore, identify the limit distribution at the phase transition as a Rayleigh distribution.

  14. Exact phase boundaries and topological phase transitions of the X Y Z spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    Within the block spin renormalization group, we give a very simple derivation of the exact phase boundaries of the X Y Z spin chain. First, we identify the Ising order along x ̂ or y ̂ as attractive renormalization group fixed points of the Kitaev chain. Then, in a global phase space composed of the anisotropy λ of the X Y interaction and the coupling Δ of the Δ σzσz interaction, we find that the above fixed points remain attractive in the two-dimesional parameter space. We therefore classify the gapped phases of the X Y Z spin chain as: (1) either attracted to the Ising limit of the Kitaev-chain, which in turn is characterized by winding number ±1 , depending on whether the Ising order parameter is along x ̂ or y ̂ directions; or (2) attracted to the charge density wave (CDW) phases of the underlying Jordan-Wigner fermions, which is characterized by zero winding number. We therefore establish that the exact phase boundaries of the X Y Z model in Baxter's solution indeed correspond to topological phase transitions. The topological nature of the phase transitions of the X Y Z model justifies why our analytical solution of the three-site problem that is at the core of the present renormalization group treatment is able to produce the exact phase boundaries of Baxter's solution. We argue that the distribution of the winding numbers between the three Ising phases is a matter of choice of the coordinate system, and therefore the CDW-Ising phase is entitled to host appropriate form of zero modes. We further observe that in the Kitaev-chain the renormalization group flow can be cast into a geometric progression of a properly identified parameter. We show that this new parameter is actually the size of the (Majorana) zero modes.

  15. Hypopituitarism induced by traumatic brain injury in the transition phase.

    PubMed

    Aimaretti, G; Ambrosio, M R; Di Somma, C; Gasperi, M; Cannavò, S; Scaroni, C; De Marinis, L; Baldelli, R; Bona, G; Giordano, G; Ghigo, E

    2005-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with hypopituitarism in general and GH deficiency (GHD) in particular; the consequences of this on growth and development are likely to be critical in children and adolescents in the so-called "transition phase". In order to verify the consequences of TBI on pituitary function in the transition phase, we studied a population of adolescents and young adults 3 and 12 months after brain injury [no. = 23, 9 females, 14 males; age: 16-25 yr; body mass index (BMI): 21.9 +/- 0.6 kg/m2]. At 3 months, hypopituitarism was present in 34.6%. Total, multiple and isolated deficits were present in 8.6, 4.3 and 21.7%, respectively. Diabetes insipidus (DI) was present in 8.6% patients and mild hyperprolactinemia in 4.3%. At 12 months, hypopituitarism was present in 30.3%. Total, multiple and isolated deficits were present in 8.6, 4.3 and 17.4%, respectively. DI was present in 4.3% of patients and mild hyperprolactinemia in 4.3%. Total hypopituitarism was always confirmed at retesting. Multiple and isolated hypopituitarism were confirmed in 0/1 and 2/5, respectively. Two/23 patients showed isolated hypopituitarism at 12 months only; 1 patient with isolated at 3 months showed multiple hypopituitarism at retesting. GHD and secondary hypogonadism were the most common acquired pituitary deficits. These results show the high risk of TBI-induced hypopituitarism also in the transition age. Thus it is recommended that pediatric endocrinologists follow-up pituitary function of children and adolescents after brain injuries.

  16. The effect of sub-zero temperature on the formation and composition of secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, K; Jensen, L N; Glasius, M; Bilde, M

    2017-10-18

    This study presents a newly constructed temperature controlled cold-room smog chamber at Aarhus University, Denmark. The chamber is herein utilized to study the effect of sub-zero temperature on the formation and chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene. The chemical composition of α-pinene SOA formed from dark ozonolysis of α-pinene at 293 K and 258 K was investigated using High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS) and Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography/Electrospray Ionization Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC/ESI-qToF-MS). For comparison, an OH-initiated oxidation experiment was performed at 293 K. In ozonolysis experiments it was found that oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratios were higher in the particles formed at 293 K compared to 258 K. A total of 16 different organic acids and 30 dimers esters were quantified in the collected particles composing up to 34% of the total α-pinene SOA mass with increased mass fraction of carboxylic acids in particles from α-pinene ozonolysis at 258 K compared to 293 K. In contrast, dimer esters showed suppressed formation at the sub-zero reaction temperature, thus contributing 3% to SOA mass at 258 K while contributing 9% at 293 K. SOA formed in the OH-initiated oxidation of α-pinene at 293 K resulted in low concentrations of dimer esters supporting Criegee intermediates as a possible pathway to dimer ester formation. Vapour pressure estimates of the identified carboxylic acids and dimer esters are presented and show how otherwise semi-volatile carboxylic acids at sufficiently low temperatures may classify as low or even extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOC), thus may add to an enhanced particle formation observed at the sub-zero temperature through gas-to-particle conversion. The change in chemical composition of the SOA particles with temperature is ascribed to a combination of effects: the decreased

  17. Anomalous phase behavior of first-order fluid-liquid phase transition in phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Wang, H.; Hu, D. M.; Ding, M. C.; Zhao, X. G.; Yan, J. L.

    2017-11-01

    Although the existence of liquid-liquid phase transition has become more and more convincing, whether it will terminate at a critical point and what is the order parameter are still open. To explore these questions, we revisit the fluid-liquid phase transition (FLPT) in phosphorus (P) and study its phase behavior by performing extensive first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. The FLPT observed in experiments is well reproduced, and a fluid-liquid critical point (FLCP) at T = 3000 ˜ 3500 K, P = 1.5-2.0 Kbar is found. With decreasing temperature from the FLCP along the transition line, the density difference (Δρ) between two coexisting phases first increases from zero and then anomalously decreases; however, the entropy difference (ΔS) continuously increases from zero. These features suggest that an order parameter containing contributions from both the density and the entropy is needed to describe the FLPT in P, and at least at low temperatures, the entropy, instead of the density, governs the FLPT.

  18. designer phase transitions in lithium-based spinels

    SciT

    Wouter Montfrooij

    When electrons in a metal become correlated with each other, new cooperative behavior can arise. This correlation is magnified when the metal has magnetic ions embedded in it. These atomic magnets try to line up with each other, but in doing so actually create a correlation between the motions of conduction electrons. In turn, these correlated electron motions prevent the magnetic ions from aligning, even at zero Kelvin. When this competition is strongest (at the so-called quantum critical point-QCP) the response of the system can no longer be described using the text book theory for metals. In addition, a rangemore » of new phenomena has been seen to emerge in the vicinity of a QCP, such as heavy-fermion superconductivity, coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity and hyper-scaling. The main goal of our research is to try to unravel the details of the feedback mechanism between electron motion and magnetism that lies at the heart of this new physics. We have chosen lithium-based spinel structures as the most promising family of systems to achieve our goal. Known lithium-based spinels Li{sub x}M{sub 2}O{sub 4} [M=V, Ti and Mn] show a variety of ground states: heavy-fermion, superconducting, or geometrically frustrated local moment systems. Li{sub x}M{sub 2}O{sub 4} should be ideal systems for studying QCPs since their properties can easily be fine-tuned, simply by extracting some Li [which can be done without introducing disorder in the immediate surroundings of the magnetic ions]. The premise of the proposal was that since this Li-extraction can be done both in the metallic as well as in insulating compounds, that we can expand the types of quantum phase transitions that can be studied to beyond transitions in magnetic metals. The project called for developing a better understanding of quantum phase transitions by measuring all aspects of the electronic response of Li{sub x}M{sub 2}O{sub 4} by means of neutron scattering, giving microscopic information

  19. The phase transition of Pb8F14I2.

    PubMed

    Weil, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The reversible phase transition of Pb 8 F 14 I 2 is of continuous type and takes place at about 107 °C as monitored by temperature-dependent single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction measurements, optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The low-temperature ferroelastic phase crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system (23 °C, Bmmb , Z  = 2, a  = 6.0699(6) Å, b  = 6.0165(6) Å, c  = 25.077(2) Å, 1487 structure factors, 41 parameter, R ( F 2 ) = 0.0346, wR ( F 2 ) = 0.0771) and changes its symmetry to the tetragonal crystal system into the high-temperature paraelastic phase (130 °C, I 4/ mmm , Z  = 1, a  = 4.2667(12) Å, c  = 25.388(7) Å, 430 structure factors, 303 parameter, R ( F 2 ) = 0.0575, wR ( F 2 ) = 0.1564). Group-subgroup relationships between the two structures and a hypothetical intermediate structure are presented.

  20. Phase transition of light in cavity QED lattices.

    PubMed

    Schiró, M; Bordyuh, M; Oztop, B; Türeci, H E

    2012-08-03

    Systems of strongly interacting atoms and photons, which can be realized wiring up individual cavity QED systems into lattices, are perceived as a new platform for quantum simulation. While sharing important properties with other systems of interacting quantum particles, here we argue that the nature of light-matter interaction gives rise to unique features with no analogs in condensed matter or atomic physics setups. By discussing the physics of a lattice model of delocalized photons coupled locally with two-level systems through the elementary light-matter interaction described by the Rabi model, we argue that the inclusion of counterrotating terms, so far neglected, is crucial to stabilize finite-density quantum phases of correlated photons out of the vacuum, with no need for an artificially engineered chemical potential. We show that the competition between photon delocalization and Rabi nonlinearity drives the system across a novel Z(2) parity symmetry-breaking quantum criticality between two gapped phases that share similarities with the Dicke transition of quantum optics and the Ising critical point of quantum magnetism. We discuss the phase diagram as well as the low-energy excitation spectrum and present analytic estimates for critical quantities.

  1. Quarantine-generated phase transition in epidemic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagorio, C.; Dickison, M.; Vazquez, F.; Braunstein, L. A.; Macri, P. A.; Migueles, M. V.; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.

    2011-02-01

    We study the critical effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible individuals protect themselves by disconnecting their links to infected neighbors with probability w and reconnecting them to other susceptible individuals chosen at random. Starting from a single infected individual, we show by an analytical approach and simulations that there is a phase transition at a critical rewiring (quarantine) threshold wc separating a phase (wphase (w⩾wc) where the disease does not spread out. We find that in our model the topology of the network strongly affects the size of the propagation and that wc increases with the mean degree and heterogeneity of the network. We also find that wc is reduced if we perform a preferential rewiring, in which the rewiring probability is proportional to the degree of infected nodes.

  2. Quarantine-generated phase transition in epidemic spreading.

    PubMed

    Lagorio, C; Dickison, M; Vazquez, F; Braunstein, L A; Macri, P A; Migueles, M V; Havlin, S; Stanley, H E

    2011-02-01

    We study the critical effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible individuals protect themselves by disconnecting their links to infected neighbors with probability w and reconnecting them to other susceptible individuals chosen at random. Starting from a single infected individual, we show by an analytical approach and simulations that there is a phase transition at a critical rewiring (quarantine) threshold w(c) separating a phase (wphase (w≥w(c)) where the disease does not spread out. We find that in our model the topology of the network strongly affects the size of the propagation and that w(c) increases with the mean degree and heterogeneity of the network. We also find that w(c) is reduced if we perform a preferential rewiring, in which the rewiring probability is proportional to the degree of infected nodes. ©2011 American Physical Society

  3. High-pressure phase transitions of nitinol NiTi to a semiconductor with an unusual topological structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangtao; Liu, Hanyu; Feng, Xiaolei; Redfern, Simon A. T.

    2018-04-01

    Systematic ab initio structure simulations have been used to explore the high-pressure behavior of nitinol (NiTi) at zero temperature. Our crystal structure prediction and first-principles calculations reveal that the known B 19 phase is dynamically unstable, and an orthorhombic structure (Pbcm) and a face-centered-cubic B 32 structure (F d 3 ¯m ) become stable above ˜4 and 29 GPa, respectively. The predicted, highest-pressure, B 32 phase is composed of two interpenetrating diamond structures, with a structural topology that is quite distinct from that of the other phases of NiTi. Interestingly, the B 32 phase shows an unusual semiconducting characteristic as a result of its unique band structure and the nature of 3 d orbitals localization, whose expected synthesis pressure is accessible to current experimental techniques.

  4. Communication: phase transitions, criticality, and three-phase coexistence in constrained cell models.

    PubMed

    Nayhouse, Michael; Kwon, Joseph Sang-Il; Orkoulas, G

    2012-05-28

    In simulation studies of fluid-solid transitions, the solid phase is usually modeled as a constrained system in which each particle is confined to move in a single Wigner-Seitz cell. The constrained cell model has been used in the determination of fluid-solid coexistence via thermodynamic integration and other techniques. In the present work, the phase diagram of such a constrained system of Lennard-Jones particles is determined from constant-pressure simulations. The pressure-density isotherms exhibit inflection points which are interpreted as the mechanical stability limit of the solid phase. The phase diagram of the constrained system contains a critical and a triple point. The temperature and pressure at the critical and the triple point are both higher than those of the unconstrained system due to the reduction in the entropy caused by the single occupancy constraint.

  5. Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Phase Transition of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2000-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enable the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable condensed phase fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new liquid crystal physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and

  6. A stress-induced phase transition model for semi-crystallize shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaogang; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-03-01

    The developments of constitutive models for shape memory polymer (SMP) have been motivated by its increasing applications. During cooling or heating process, the phase transition which is a continuous time-dependent process happens in semi-crystallize SMP and the various individual phases form at different temperature and in different configuration. Then, the transformation between these phases occurred and shape memory effect will emerge. In addition, stress applied on SMP is an important factor for crystal melting during phase transition. In this theory, an ideal phase transition model considering stress or pre-strain is the key to describe the behaviors of shape memory effect. So a normal distributed model was established in this research to characterize the volume fraction of each phase in SMP during phase transition. Generally, the experiment results are partly backward (in heating process) or forward (in cooling process) compared with the ideal situation considering delay effect during phase transition. So, a correction on the normal distributed model is needed. Furthermore, a nonlinear relationship between stress and phase transition temperature Tg is also taken into account for establishing an accurately normal distributed phase transition model. Finally, the constitutive model which taking the stress as an influence factor on phase transition was also established. Compared with the other expressions, this new-type model possesses less parameter and is more accurate. For the sake of verifying the rationality and accuracy of new phase transition and constitutive model, the comparisons between the simulated and experimental results were carried out.

  7. Phases and phase transition in insoluble and adsorbed monolayers of amide amphiphiles: Specific characteristics of the condensed phases.

    PubMed

    Vollhardt, D

    2015-08-01

    For understanding the role of amide containing amphiphiles in inherently complex biological processes, monolayers at the air-water interface are used as simple biomimetic model systems. The specific characteristics of the condensed phases and phase transition in insoluble and adsorbed monolayers of amide amphiphiles are surveyed to highlight the effect of the chemical structure of the amide amphiphiles on the interfacial interactions in model monolayers. The mesoscopic topography and/or two-dimensional lattice structures of selected amino acid amphiphiles, amphiphilic N-alkylaldonamide, amide amphiphiles with specific tailored headgroups, such as amide amphiphiles based on derivatized ethanolamine, e.g. acylethanolamines (NAEs) and N-,O-diacylethanolamines (DAEs) are presented. Special attention is devoted the dominance of N,O-diacylated ethanolamine in mixed amphiphilic acid amide monolayers. The evidence that a first order phase transition can occur in adsorption layers and that condensed phase domains of mesoscopic scale can be formed in adsorption layers was first obtained on the basis of the experimental characteristics of a tailored amide amphiphile. New thermodynamic and kinetic concepts for the theoretical description of the characteristics of amide amphiphile's monolayers were developed. In particular, the equation of state for Langmuir monolayers generalized for the case that one, two or more phase transitions occur, and the new theory for phase transition in adsorbed monolayers are experimentally confirmed at first by amide amphiphile monolayers. Despite the significant progress made towards the understanding the model systems, these model studies are still limited to transfer the gained knowledge to biological systems where the fundamental physical principles are operative in the same way. The study of biomimetic systems, as described in this review, is only a first step in this direction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vapor-crystal phase transition in synthesis of paracetamol films by vacuum evaporation and condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.; Bordei, N. S.; Zarembo, V. I.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the structural and technological investigations of the vapor-crystal phase transition during synthesis of paracetamol films of the monoclinic system by vacuum evaporation and condensation in the temperature range 220-320 K. The complex nature of the transformation accompanied by the formation of a gel-like phase is revealed. The results are interpreted using a model according to which the vapor-crystal phase transition is not a simple first-order phase transition, but is a nonlinear superposition of two phase transitions: a first-order transition with a change in density and a second-order phase transition with a change in ordering. Micrographs of the surface of the films are obtained at different phases of formation.

  9. High-pressure phase transition and phase diagram of gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, J. M.; Itié, J. P.; Polian, A.; Weill, G.; Mansot, J. L.; Gonzalez, J.

    1991-09-01

    Under hydrostatic pressure, cubic GaAs-I undergoes phase transitions to at least two orthorhombic structures. The initial phase transition to GaAs-II has been investigated by optical-transmittance measurements, Raman scattering, and x-ray absorption. The structure of pressurized samples, which are retrieved at ambient, has been studied by x-ray diffraction and high-resolution diffraction microscopy. Various criteria that define the domain of stability of GaAs-I are examined, such as the occurrence of crystalline defects, the local variation in atomic coordination number, or the actual change in crystal structure. These are shown not to occur at the same pressure at 300 K, the latter being observable only several GPa above the actual thermodynamic instability pressure of GaAs-I. Comparison of the evolution of these parameters on increasing and decreasing pressure locates the thermodynamic transition region GaAs-I-->GaAs-II at 12+/-1.5 GPa and at 300 K that is lower than generally reported. The use of thermodynamic relations around the triple point, and of regularities in the properties of isoelectronic and isostructural III-V compounds, yields a phase diagram for GaAs which is consistent with this value.

  10. Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP) Phase I Report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-06-01

    The Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP) is a government initiated program to assist the transit industry in satisfying its need for transit reliability information. TRIP provides this assistance through the operation of a national reliabil...

  11. Materials science of the gel to fluid phase transition in a supported phospholipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Anne Feng; Yamada, Ryo; Gewirth, Andrew A; Granick, Steve

    2002-12-09

    We report the results of in situ AFM measurements examining the phase transition of bilayers formed from the zwitterionic phospholipid, DMPC, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, supported on mica. The images show that the fluid to gel phase transition process features substantial tearing of the bilayer due to the density change between the two phases. The gel to fluid transition is strongly affected by the resultant stress introduced into the gel phase, which changes the degree of cooperativity, the shape of developing fluid phase regions, and the course of the transition.

  12. Criticality and Phase Transition in Stock-Price Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2006-02-01

    We analyze the behavior of the U.S. S&P 500 index from 1984 to 1995, and characterize the non-Gaussian probability density functions (PDF) of the log returns. The temporal dependence of fat tails in the PDF of a ten-minute log return shows a gradual, systematic increase in the probability of the appearance of large increments on approaching black Monday in October 1987, reminiscent of parameter tuning towards criticality. On the occurrence of the black Monday crash, this culminates in an abrupt transition of the scale dependence of the non-Gaussian PDF towards scale-invariance characteristic of critical behavior. These facts suggest the need for revisiting the turbulent cascade paradigm recently proposed for modeling the underlying dynamics of the financial index, to account for time varying—phase transitionlike and scale invariant-critical-like behavior.

  13. Magnetic superlattices and their nanoscale phase transition effects

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jinwoo; Park, Jong-Il; Choi, Jin-sil; Jun, Young-wook; Kim, Sehun; Kim, Min Gyu; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Youn Joong

    2006-01-01

    The systematic assembly of nanoscale constituents into highly ordered superlattices is of significant interest because of the potential of their multifunctionalities and the discovery of new collective properties. However, successful observations of such superlattice-associated nanoscale phenomena are still elusive. Here, we present magnetic superlattices of Co and Fe3O4 nanoparticles with multidimensional symmetry of either AB (NaCl) or AB2 (AlB2). The discovery of significant enhancement (≈25 times) of ferrimagnetism is further revealed by forming previously undescribed superlattices of magnetically soft–hard Fe3O4@CoFe2O4 through the confined geometrical effect of thermally driven intrasuperlattice phase transition between the nanoparticulate components. PMID:16492783

  14. Using trading strategies to detect phase transitions in financial markets.

    PubMed

    Forró, Z; Woodard, R; Sornette, D

    2015-04-01

    We show that the log-periodic power law singularity model (LPPLS), a mathematical embodiment of positive feedbacks between agents and of their hierarchical dynamical organization, has a significant predictive power in financial markets. We find that LPPLS-based strategies significantly outperform the randomized ones and that they are robust with respect to a large selection of assets and time periods. The dynamics of prices thus markedly deviate from randomness in certain pockets of predictability that can be associated with bubble market regimes. Our hybrid approach, marrying finance with the trading strategies, and critical phenomena with LPPLS, demonstrates that targeting information related to phase transitions enables the forecast of financial bubbles and crashes punctuating the dynamics of prices.

  15. Phase diagrams of orientational transitions in absorbing nematic liquid crystals

    SciT

    Zolot’ko, A. S., E-mail: zolotko@lebedev.ru; Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.

    2015-05-15

    A theory of orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), which employs the expansion of optical torques acting on the NLC director with respect to the rotation angle, has been developed for NLCs with additives of conformationally active compounds under the action of optical and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Phase diagrams of NLCs are constructed as a function of the intensity and polarization of the light field, the strength of low-frequency electric field, and a parameter that characterizes the feedback between the rotation of the NLC director and optical torque. Conditions for the occurrence of first- and second-order transitionsmore » are determined. The proposed theory agrees with available experimental data.« less

  16. Holographic RG flows on curved manifolds and quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, J. K.; Kiritsis, E.; Nitti, F.; Witkowski, L. T.

    2018-05-01

    Holographic RG flows dual to QFTs on maximally symmetric curved manifolds (dS d , AdS d , and S d ) are considered in the framework of Einstein-dilaton gravity in d + 1 dimensions. A general dilaton potential is used and the flows are driven by a scalar relevant operator. The general properties of such flows are analyzed and the UV and IR asymptotics computed. New RG flows can appear at finite curvature which do not have a zero curvature counterpart. The so-called `bouncing' flows, where the β-function has a branch cut at which it changes sign, are found to persist at finite curvature. Novel quantum first-order phase transitions are found, triggered by a variation in the d-dimensional curvature in theories allowing multiple ground states.

  17. Casimir force phase transitions in the graphene family

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; ...

    2017-03-15

    The Casimir force is a universal interaction induced by electromagnetic quantum fluctuations between any types of objects. We found that the expansion of the graphene family by adding silicene, germanene and stanene (2D allotropes of Si, Ge, and Sn), lends itself as a platform to probe Dirac-like physics in honeycomb staggered systems in such a ubiquitous interaction. Here, we discover Casimir force phase transitions between these staggered 2D materials induced by the complex interplay between Dirac physics, spin-orbit coupling and externally applied fields. Particularly, we find that the interaction energy experiences different power law distance decays, magnitudes and dependences onmore » characteristic physical constants. Furthermore, due to the topological properties of these materials, repulsive and quantized Casimir interactions become possible.« less

  18. Structural phase transitions in SrTiO 3 nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Han; Liu, Sizhan; Scofield, Megan E.; ...

    2017-08-04

    We present that pressure dependent structural measurements on monodispersed nanoscale SrTiO 3 samples with average diameters of 10 to ~80 nm were conducted to enhance the understanding of the structural phase diagram of nanoscale SrTiO 3. A robust pressure independent polar structure was found in the 10 nm sample for pressures up to 13 GPa, while a size dependent cubic to tetragonal transition occurs (at P = P c) for larger particle sizes. In conclusion, the results suggest that the growth of ~10 nm STO particles on substrates with significant lattice mismatch may maintain a polar state for a largemore » range of strain values, possibly enabling device use.« less

  19. Symmetry-breaking phase transitions in highly concentrated semen

    PubMed Central

    Creppy, Adama; Plouraboué, Franck; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Cazin, Sébastien; Yu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    New experimental evidence of self-motion of a confined active suspension is presented. Depositing fresh semen sample in an annular shaped microfluidic chip leads to a spontaneous vortex state of the fluid at sufficiently large sperm concentration. The rotation occurs unpredictably clockwise or counterclockwise and is robust and stable. Furthermore, for highly active and concentrated semen, richer dynamics can occur such as self-sustained or damped rotation oscillations. Experimental results obtained with systematic dilution provide a clear evidence of a phase transition towards collective motion associated with local alignment of spermatozoa akin to the Vicsek model. A macroscopic theory based on previously derived self-organized hydrodynamics models is adapted to this context and provides predictions consistent with the observed stationary motion. PMID:27733694

  20. Correlation functions in first-order phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, V.; Crespo, D.

    1997-09-01

    Most of the physical properties of systems underlying first-order phase transitions can be obtained from the spatial correlation functions. In this paper, we obtain expressions that allow us to calculate all the correlation functions from the droplet size distribution. Nucleation and growth kinetics is considered, and exact solutions are obtained for the case of isotropic growth by using self-similarity properties. The calculation is performed by using the particle size distribution obtained by a recently developed model (populational Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model). Since this model is less restrictive than that used in previously existing theories, the result is that the correlation functions can be obtained for any dependence of the kinetic parameters. The validity of the method is tested by comparison with the exact correlation functions, which had been obtained in the available cases by the time-cone method. Finally, the correlation functions corresponding to the microstructure developed in partitioning transformations are obtained.

  1. Casimir force phase transitions in the graphene family

    SciT

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    The Casimir force is a universal interaction induced by electromagnetic quantum fluctuations between any types of objects. We found that the expansion of the graphene family by adding silicene, germanene and stanene (2D allotropes of Si, Ge, and Sn), lends itself as a platform to probe Dirac-like physics in honeycomb staggered systems in such a ubiquitous interaction. Here, we discover Casimir force phase transitions between these staggered 2D materials induced by the complex interplay between Dirac physics, spin-orbit coupling and externally applied fields. Particularly, we find that the interaction energy experiences different power law distance decays, magnitudes and dependences onmore » characteristic physical constants. Furthermore, due to the topological properties of these materials, repulsive and quantized Casimir interactions become possible.« less

  2. Evolution of molecular crystal optical phonons near structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michki, Nigel; Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Markelz, Andrea

    Molecular crystals are increasingly important photonic and electronic materials. For example organic semiconductors are lightweight compared to inorganic semiconductors and have inexpensive scale up processing with roll to roll printing. However their implementation is limited by their environmental sensitivity, in part arising from the weak intermolecular interactions of the crystal. These weak interactions result in optical phonons in the terahertz frequency range. We examine the evolution of intermolecular interactions near structural phase transitions by measuring the optical phonons as a function of temperature and crystal orientation using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The measured orientation dependence of the resonances provides an additional constraint for comparison of the observed spectra with the density functional calculations, enabling us to follow specific phonon modes. We observe crystal reorganization near 350 K for oxalic acid as it transforms from dihydrate to anhydrous form. We also report the first THz spectra for the molecular crystal fructose through its melting point.

  3. The dynamics of insight: mathematical discovery as a phase transition.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Damian G; Boncoddo, Rebecca A; Magnuson, James S; Dixon, James A

    2009-12-01

    In recent work in cognitive science, it has been proposed that cognition is a self-organizing, dynamical system. However, capturing the real-time dynamics of cognition has been a formidable challenge. Furthermore, it has been unclear whether dynamics could effectively address the emergence of abstract concepts (e.g., language, mathematics). Here, we provide evidence that a quintessentially cognitive phenomenon-the spontaneous discovery of a mathematical relation-emerges through self-organization. Participants solved a series of gear-system problems while we tracked their eye movements. They initially solved the problems by manually simulating the forces of the gears but then spontaneously discovered a mathematical solution. We show that the discovery of the mathematical relation was predicted by changes in entropy and changes in power-law behavior, two hallmarks of phase transitions. Thus, the present study demonstrates the emergence of higher order cognitive phenomena through the nonlinear dynamics of self-organization.

  4. Evolution of hydromagnetic turbulence from the electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kahniashvili, Tina; Mandal, Sayan; Pol, Alberto Roper; Tevzadze, Alexander G.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2017-12-01

    We present new simulations of decaying hydromagnetic turbulence for a relativistic equation of state relevant to the early Universe. We compare helical and nonhelical cases either with kinetically or magnetically dominated initial fields. Both kinetic and magnetic initial helicities lead to maximally helical magnetic fields after some time, but with different temporal decay laws. Both are relevant to the early Universe, although no mechanisms have yet been identified that produce magnetic helicity with strengths comparable to the big bang nucleosynthesis limit at scales comparable to the Hubble horizon at the electroweak phase transition. Nonhelical magnetically dominated fields could still produce picoGauss magnetic fields under most optimistic conditions. Only helical magnetic fields can potentially have nanoGauss strengths at scales up to 30 kpc today.

  5. Clustering and phase transitions on a neutral landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Adam D.; King, Dawn M.; Marić, Nevena; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-06-01

    Recent computational studies have shown that speciation can occur under neutral conditions, i.e., when the simulated organisms all have identical fitness. These works bear comparison with mathematical studies of clustering on neutral landscapes in the context of branching and coalescing random walks. Here, we show that sympatric clustering/speciation can occur on a neutral landscape whose dimensions specify only the simulated organisms’ phenotypes. We demonstrate that clustering occurs not only in the case of assortative mating, but also in the case of asexual fission; it is not observed in the control case of random mating. We find that the population size and the number of clusters undergo a second-order non-equilibrium phase transition as the maximum mutation size is varied.

  6. Topological phase transitions from Harper to Fibonacci crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amit, Guy; Dana, Itzhack

    2018-02-01

    Topological properties of Harper and generalized Fibonacci chains are studied in crystalline cases, i.e., for rational values of the modulation frequency. The Harper and Fibonacci crystals at fixed frequency are connected by an interpolating one-parameter Hamiltonian. As the parameter is varied, one observes topological phase transitions, i.e., changes in the Chern integers of two bands due to the degeneracy of these bands at some parameter value. For small frequency, corresponding to a semiclassical regime, the degeneracies are shown to occur when the average energy of the two bands is approximately equal to the energy of the classical separatrix. Spectral and topological features of the Fibonacci crystal for small frequency leave a clear imprint on the corresponding Hofstadter butterfly for arbitrary frequency.

  7. Acoustic levitation of liquid drops: Dynamics, manipulation and phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Zang, Duyang; Yu, Yinkai; Chen, Zhen; Li, Xiaoguang; Wu, Hongjing; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-05-01

    The technique of acoustic levitation normally produces a standing wave and the potential well of the sound field can be used to trap small objects. Since no solid surface is involved it has been widely applied for the study of fluid physics, nucleation, bio/chemical processes, and various forms of soft matter. In this article, we survey the works on drop dynamics in acoustic levitation, focus on how the dynamic behavior is related to the rheological properties and discuss the possibility to develop a novel rheometer based on this technique. We review the methods and applications of acoustic levitation for the manipulation of both liquid and solid samples and emphasize the important progress made in the study of phase transitions and bio-chemical analysis. We also highlight the possible open areas for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phase Transitions and Scaling in Systems Far from Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Täuber, Uwe C.

    2017-03-01

    Scaling ideas and renormalization group approaches proved crucial for a deep understanding and classification of critical phenomena in thermal equilibrium. Over the past decades, these powerful conceptual and mathematical tools were extended to continuous phase transitions separating distinct nonequilibrium stationary states in driven classical and quantum systems. In concordance with detailed numerical simulations and laboratory experiments, several prominent dynamical universality classes have emerged that govern large-scale, long-time scaling properties both near and far from thermal equilibrium. These pertain to genuine specific critical points as well as entire parameter space regions for steady states that display generic scale invariance. The exploration of nonstationary relaxation properties and associated physical aging scaling constitutes a complementary potent means to characterize cooperative dynamics in complex out-of-equilibrium systems. This review describes dynamic scaling features through paradigmatic examples that include near-equilibrium critical dynamics, driven lattice gases and growing interfaces, correlation-dominated reaction-diffusion systems, and basic epidemic models.

  9. Phase Transitions of Nanoemulsions Using Ultrasound: Experimental Observations

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ram; Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Pitt, William G.

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasound-induced transformation of perfluorocarbon liquids to gases is of interest in the area of drug and gene delivery. In this study, three independent parameters (temperature, size, and perfluorocarbon species) were selected to investigate the effects of 476-kHz and 20-kHz ultrasound on nanoemulsion phase transition. Two levels of each factor (low and high) were considered at each frequency. The acoustic intensities at gas bubble formation and at the onset of inertial cavitation were recorded and subsequently correlated with the acoustic parameters. Experimental data showed that low frequencies are more effective in forming and collapsing a bubble. Additionally, as the size of the emulsion droplet increased, the intensity required for bubble formation decreased. As expected, perfluorohexane emulsions require greater intensity to form cavitating bubbles than perfluoropentane emulsions. PMID:22444691

  10. Electronic Griffiths Phases and Quantum Criticality at Disordered Mott Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir

    2012-02-01

    The effects of disorder are investigated in strongly correlated electronic systems near the Mott metal-insulator transition. Correlation effects are foundootnotetextE. C. Andrade, E. Miranda, and V. Dobrosavljevic, Phys. Rev. Lett., 102, 206403 (2009). to lead to strong disorder screening, a mechanism restricted to low-lying electronic states, very similar to what is observed in underdoped cuprates. These results suggest, however, that this effect is not specific to disordered d-wave superconductors, but is a generic feature of all disordered Mott systems. In addition, the resulting spatial inhomogeneity rapidly increasesootnotetextE. C. Andrade, E. Miranda, and V. Dobrosavljevic, Phys. Rev. Lett., 104 (23), 236401 (2010). as the Mott insulator is approached at fixed disorder strength. This behavior, which can be described as an Electronic Griffiths Phase, displays all the features expected for disorder-dominated Infinite-Randomness Fixed Point scenario of quantum criticality.

  11. Using trading strategies to detect phase transitions in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forró, Z.; Woodard, R.; Sornette, D.

    2015-04-01

    We show that the log-periodic power law singularity model (LPPLS), a mathematical embodiment of positive feedbacks between agents and of their hierarchical dynamical organization, has a significant predictive power in financial markets. We find that LPPLS-based strategies significantly outperform the randomized ones and that they are robust with respect to a large selection of assets and time periods. The dynamics of prices thus markedly deviate from randomness in certain pockets of predictability that can be associated with bubble market regimes. Our hybrid approach, marrying finance with the trading strategies, and critical phenomena with LPPLS, demonstrates that targeting information related to phase transitions enables the forecast of financial bubbles and crashes punctuating the dynamics of prices.

  12. Topological Phase Transitions in the Photonic Spin Hall Effect

    DOE PAGES

    Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior de Melo

    2017-10-04

    The recent synthesis of two-dimensional staggered materials opens up burgeoning opportunities to study optical spin-orbit interactions in semiconducting Dirac-like systems. In this work, we unveil topological phase transitions in the photonic spin Hall effect in the graphene family materials. It is shown that an external static electric field and a high frequency circularly polarized laser allow for active on-demand manipulation of electromagnetic beam shifts. The spin Hall effect of light presents a rich dependence with radiation degrees of freedom, and material properties, and features nontrivial topological properties. Finally, we discover that photonic Hall shifts are sensitive to spin and valleymore » properties of the charge carriers, providing an unprecedented pathway to investigate spintronics and valleytronics in staggered 2D semiconductors.« less

  13. Black holes as critical point of quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar

    We reformulate the quantum black hole portrait in the language of modern condensed matter physics. We show that black holes can be understood as a graviton Bose-Einstein condensate at the critical point of a quantum phase transition, identical to what has been observed in systems of cold atoms. The Bogoliubov modes that become degenerate and nearly gapless at this point are the holographic quantum degrees of freedom responsible for the black hole entropy and the information storage. They have no (semi)classical counterparts and become inaccessible in this limit. These findings indicate a deep connection between the seemingly remote systems and suggest a new quantum foundation of holography. They also open an intriguing possibility of simulating black hole information processing in table-top labs.

  14. Flexible Dielectric Nanocomposites with Ultrawide Zero-Temperature Coefficient Windows for Electrical Energy Storage and Conversion under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Khurram; Xu, Yang; Gao, Chao; Li, Hanying; Dang, Zhi-Min; Hasan, Tawfique; Luo, Jack; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2017-03-01

    Polymer dielectrics offer key advantages over their ceramic counterparts such as flexibility, scalability, low cost, and high breakdown voltages. However, a major drawback that limits more widespread application of polymer dielectrics is their temperature-dependent dielectric properties. Achieving dielectric constants with low/zero-temperature coefficient (L/0TC) over a broad temperature range is essential for applications in diverse technologies. Here, we report a hybrid filler strategy to produce polymer composites with an ultrawide L/0TC window of dielectric constant, as well as a significantly enhanced dielectric value, maximum energy storage density, thermal conductivity, and stability. By creating a series of percolative polymer composites, we demonstrated hybrid carbon filler based composites can exhibit a zero-temperature coefficient window of 200 °C (from -50 to 150 °C), the widest 0TC window for all polymer composite dielectrics reported to date. We further show the electric and dielectric temperature coefficient of the composites is highly stable against stretching and bending, even under AC electric field with frequency up to 1 MHz. We envision that our method will push the functional limits of polymer dielectrics for flexible electronics in extreme conditions such as in hybrid vehicles, aerospace, power electronics, and oil/gas exploration.

  15. Phase Transitions in the Quadratic Contact Process on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Chris; Durrett, Rick

    2013-03-01

    The quadratic contact process (QCP) is a natural extension of the well studied linear contact process where a single infected (1) individual can infect a susceptible (0) neighbor and infected individuals are allowed to recover (1 --> 0). In the QCP, a combination of two 1's is required to effect a 0 --> 1 change. We extend the study of the QCP, which so far has been limited to lattices, to complex networks as a model for the change in a population via sexual reproduction and death. We define two versions of the QCP - vertex centered (VQCP) and edge centered (EQCP) with birth events 1 - 0 - 1 --> 1 - 1 - 1 and 1 - 1 - 0 --> 1 - 1 - 1 respectively, where ` -' represents an edge. We investigate the effects of network topology by considering the QCP on regular, Erdős-Rényi and power law random graphs. We perform mean field calculations as well as simulations to find the steady state fraction of occupied vertices as a function of the birth rate. We find that on the homogeneous graphs (regular and Erdős-Rényi) there is a discontinuous phase transition with a region of bistability, whereas on the heavy tailed power law graph, the transition is continuous. The critical birth rate is found to be positive in the former but zero in the latter.

  16. Phase transitions in the quadratic contact process on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Chris; Durrett, Rick

    2013-06-01

    The quadratic contact process (QCP) is a natural extension of the well-studied linear contact process where infected (1) individuals infect susceptible (0) neighbors at rate λ and infected individuals recover (10) at rate 1. In the QCP, a combination of two 1's is required to effect a 01 change. We extend the study of the QCP, which so far has been limited to lattices, to complex networks. We define two versions of the QCP: vertex-centered (VQCP) and edge-centered (EQCP) with birth events 1-0-11-1-1 and 1-1-01-1-1, respectively, where “-” represents an edge. We investigate the effects of network topology by considering the QCP on random regular, Erdős-Rényi, and power-law random graphs. We perform mean-field calculations as well as simulations to find the steady-state fraction of occupied vertices as a function of the birth rate. We find that on the random regular and Erdős-Rényi graphs, there is a discontinuous phase transition with a region of bistability, whereas on the heavy-tailed power-law graph, the transition is continuous. The critical birth rate is found to be positive in the former but zero in the latter.

  17. Phase transitions in distributed control systems with multiplicative noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Nicolas; Bamieh, Bassam; Mitra, Partha; Sire, Clément

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary technological challenges often involve many degrees of freedom in a distributed or networked setting. Three aspects are notable: the variables are usually associated with the nodes of a graph with limited communication resources, hindering centralized control; the communication is subject to noise; and the number of variables can be very large. These three aspects make tools and techniques from statistical physics particularly suitable for the performance analysis of such networked systems in the limit of many variables (analogous to the thermodynamic limit in statistical physics). Perhaps not surprisingly, phase-transition like phenomena appear in these systems, where a sharp change in performance can be observed with a smooth parameter variation, with the change becoming discontinuous or singular in the limit of infinite system size. In this paper, we analyze the so called network consensus problem, prototypical of the above considerations, that has previously been analyzed mostly in the context of additive noise. We show that qualitatively new phase-transition like phenomena appear for this problem in the presence of multiplicative noise. Depending on dimensions, and on the presence or absence of a conservation law, the system performance shows a discontinuous change at a threshold value of the multiplicative noise strength. In the absence of the conservation law, and for graph spectral dimension less than two, the multiplicative noise threshold (the stability margin of the control problem) is zero. This is reminiscent of the absence of robust controllers for certain classes of centralized control problems. Although our study involves a ‘toy’ model, we believe that the qualitative features are generic, with implications for the robust stability of distributed control systems, as well as the effect of roundoff errors and communication noise on distributed algorithms.

  18. Interplay of the Glass Transition and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Most liquids can form a single glass or amorphous state when cooled sufficiently fast (in order to prevent crystallization). However, there are a few substances that are relevant to scientific and technological applications which can exist in at least two different amorphous states, a property known as polyamorphism. Examples include silicon, silica, and in particular, water. In the case of water, experiments show the existence of a low-density (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous ice that are separated by a dramatic, first-order like phase transition. It has been argued that the LDA-HDA transformation evolves into a first-order liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) at temperatures above the glass transition temperature Tg. However, obtaining direct experimental evidence of the LLPT has been challenging since the LLPT occurs at conditions where water rapidly crystallizes. In this talk, I will (i) discuss the general phenomenology of polyamorphism in water and its implications, and (ii) explore the effects of a LLPT on the pressure dependence of Tg(P) for LDA and HDA. Our study is based on computer simulations of two water models - one with a LLPT (ST2 model), and one without (SPC/E model). In the absence of a LLPT, Tg(P) for all glasses nearly coincide. Instead, when there is a LLPT, different glasses exhibit dramatically different Tg(P) loci which are directly linked with the LLPT. Available experimental data for Tg(P) are only consistent with the scenario that includes a LLPT (ST2 model) and hence, our results support the view that a LLPT may exist for the case of water.

  19. Phase-field model for isothermal phase transitions in binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, A. A.; Boettinger, W. J.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1992-01-01

    A new phase field model is described which models isothermal phase transitions between ideal binary alloy solution phases. Equations are developed for the temporal and spatial variation of the phase field, which describes the identity of the phase, and of the composition. An asymptotic analysis, as the gradient energy coefficient of the phase field becomes small, was conducted. From the analysis, it is shown that the model recovers classical sharp interface models of this situation when the interfacial layers are thin, and they show how to relate the parameters appearing in the phase field model to material and growth parameters in real systems. Further, three stages of temporal evolution are identified: the first corresponding to interfacial genesis which occurs very rapidly; the second to interfacial motion controlled by the local energy difference across the interface and diffusion; the last taking place on a long time scale in which curvature effects are important and which correspond to Ostwald ripening. The results of the numerical calculations are presented.

  20. Strain and defect engineering on phase transition of monolayer black phosphorene

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Yan; Shi, Xiaoyang; Li, Mingjia; ...

    2018-01-01

    Under biaxial strain, SW-2 defect can move inward the phase boundary of α-P and β-P remarkably and promote the phase transition from α-P to β-P, serving as an excellent ‘phase transition catalyzer’.

  1. Strain and defect engineering on phase transition of monolayer black phosphorene

    SciT

    Chen, Yan; Shi, Xiaoyang; Li, Mingjia

    Under biaxial strain, SW-2 defect can move inward the phase boundary of α-P and β-P remarkably and promote the phase transition from α-P to β-P, serving as an excellent ‘phase transition catalyzer’.

  2. Parameter diagnostics of phases and phase transition learning by neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchsland, Philippe; Wessel, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    We present an analysis of neural network-based machine learning schemes for phases and phase transitions in theoretical condensed matter research, focusing on neural networks with a single hidden layer. Such shallow neural networks were previously found to be efficient in classifying phases and locating phase transitions of various basic model systems. In order to rationalize the emergence of the classification process and for identifying any underlying physical quantities, it is feasible to examine the weight matrices and the convolutional filter kernels that result from the learning process of such shallow networks. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the learning-by-confusing scheme can be used, in combination with a simple threshold-value classification method, to diagnose the learning parameters of neural networks. In particular, we study the classification process of both fully-connected and convolutional neural networks for the two-dimensional Ising model with extended domain wall configurations included in the low-temperature regime. Moreover, we consider the two-dimensional XY model and contrast the performance of the learning-by-confusing scheme and convolutional neural networks trained on bare spin configurations to the case of preprocessed samples with respect to vortex configurations. We discuss these findings in relation to similar recent investigations and possible further applications.

  3. Three-dimensional nanomechanical mapping of amorphous and crystalline phase transitions in phase-change materials.

    PubMed

    Grishin, Ilja; Huey, Bryan D; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2013-11-13

    The nanostructure of micrometer-sized domains (bits) in phase-change materials (PCM) that undergo switching between amorphous and crystalline phases plays a key role in the performance of optical PCM-based memories. Here, we explore the dynamics of such phase transitions by mapping PCM nanostructures in three dimensions with nanoscale resolution by combining precision Ar ion beam cross-sectional polishing and nanomechanical ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) mapping. Surface and bulk phase changes of laser written submicrometer to micrometer sized amorphous-to-crystalline (SET) and crystalline-to-amorphous (RESET) bits in chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 PCM are observed with 10-20 nm lateral and 4 nm depth resolution. UFM mapping shows that the Young's moduli of crystalline SET bits exceed the moduli of amorphous areas by 11 ± 2%, with crystalline content extending from a few nanometers to 50 nm in depth depending on the energy of the switching pulses. The RESET bits written with 50 ps pulses reveal shallower depth penetration and show 30-50 nm lateral and few nanometer vertical wavelike topography that is anticorrelated with the elastic modulus distribution. Reverse switching of amorphous RESET bits results in the full recovery of subsurface nanomechanical properties accompanied with only partial topography recovery, resulting in surface corrugations attributed to quenching. This precision sectioning and nanomechanical mapping approach could be applicable to a wide range of amorphous, nanocrystalline, and glass-forming materials for 3D nanomechanical mapping of amorphous-crystalline transitions.

  4. Avalanche of entanglement and correlations at quantum phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Krutitsky, Konstantin V; Osterloh, Andreas; Schützhold, Ralf

    2017-06-16

    We study the ground-state entanglement in the quantum Ising model with nearest neighbor ferromagnetic coupling J and find a sequential increase of entanglement depth d with growing J. This entanglement avalanche starts with two-point entanglement, as measured by the concurrence, and continues via the three-tangle and four-tangle, until finally, deep in the ferromagnetic phase for J = ∞, arriving at a pure L-partite (GHZ type) entanglement of all L spins. Comparison with the two, three, and four-point correlations reveals a similar sequence and shows strong ties to the above entanglement measures for small J. However, we also find a partial inversion of the hierarchy, where the four-point correlation exceeds the three- and two-point correlations, well before the critical point is reached. Qualitatively similar behavior is also found for the Bose-Hubbard model, suggesting that this is a general feature of a quantum phase transition. This should be taken into account in the approximations starting from a mean-field limit.

  5. Deterministic entanglement generation from driving through quantum phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin-Yu; Zou, Yi-Quan; Wu, Ling-Na; Liu, Qi; Han, Ming-Fei; Tey, Meng Khoon; You, Li

    2017-02-10

    Many-body entanglement is often created through the system evolution, aided by nonlinear interactions between the constituting particles. These very dynamics, however, can also lead to fluctuations and degradation of the entanglement if the interactions cannot be controlled. Here, we demonstrate near-deterministic generation of an entangled twin-Fock condensate of ~11,000 atoms by driving a arubidium-87 Bose-Einstein condensate undergoing spin mixing through two consecutive quantum phase transitions (QPTs). We directly observe number squeezing of 10.7 ± 0.6 decibels and normalized collective spin length of 0.99 ± 0.01. Together, these observations allow us to infer an entanglement-enhanced phase sensitivity of ~6 decibels beyond the standard quantum limit and an entanglement breadth of ~910 atoms. Our work highlights the power of generating large-scale useful entanglement by taking advantage of the different entanglement landscapes separated by QPTs. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. The anisotropic signal of topotaxy during phase transitions in D″

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Andrew M.; Dobson, David P.; Wookey, James; Nowacki, Andy; Forte, Alessandro M.

    2018-03-01

    While observations and modelling of seismic anisotropy in the lowermost mantle offers the possibility of imaging mantle flow close to the core-mantle boundary, current models do not explain all observations. Here, we seek to explain a long-wavelength pattern of shear wave anisotropy observed in anisotropic tomography where vertically polarised shear waves travel faster than horizontally polarised shear waves in the central Pacific and under Africa but this pattern is reversed elsewhere. In particular, we test an explanation derived from experiments on analogues, which suggest that texture may be inherited during phase transitions between bridgmanite (perovskite structured MgSiO3) and post-perovskite, and that such texture inheritance may yield the long-wavelength pattern of anisotropy. We find that models that include this effect correlate better with tomographic models than those that assume deformation due to a single phase in the lowermost mantle, supporting the idea that texture inheritance is an important factor in understanding lowermost mantle anisotropy. It is possible that anisotropy could be used to map the post-perovskite stability field in the lowermost mantle, and thus place constraints on the temperature structure above the core-mantle boundary.

  7. Photoinduced Topological Phase Transitions in Topological Magnon Insulators.

    PubMed

    Owerre, S A

    2018-03-13

    Topological magnon insulators are the bosonic analogs of electronic topological insulators. They are manifested in magnetic materials with topologically nontrivial magnon bands as realized experimentally in a quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) kagomé ferromagnet Cu(1-3, bdc), and they also possess protected magnon edge modes. These topological magnetic materials can transport heat as well as spin currents, hence they can be useful for spintronic applications. Moreover, as magnons are charge-neutral spin-1 bosonic quasiparticles with a magnetic dipole moment, topological magnon materials can also interact with electromagnetic fields through the Aharonov-Casher effect. In this report, we study photoinduced topological phase transitions in intrinsic topological magnon insulators in the kagomé ferromagnets. Using magnonic Floquet-Bloch theory, we show that by varying the light intensity, periodically driven intrinsic topological magnetic materials can be manipulated into different topological phases with different sign of the Berry curvatures and the thermal Hall conductivity. We further show that, under certain conditions, periodically driven gapped topological magnon insulators can also be tuned to synthetic gapless topological magnon semimetals with Dirac-Weyl magnon cones. We envision that this work will pave the way for interesting new potential practical applications in topological magnetic materials.

  8. Andreev rectifier: A nonlocal conductance signature of topological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosdahl, T. Ö.; Vuik, A.; Kjaergaard, M.; Akhmerov, A. R.

    2018-01-01

    The proximity effect in hybrid superconductor-semiconductor structures, crucial for realizing Majorana edge modes, is complicated to control due to its dependence on many unknown microscopic parameters. In addition, defects can spoil the induced superconductivity locally in the proximitized system, which complicates measuring global properties with a local probe. We show how to use the nonlocal conductance between two spatially separated leads to probe three global properties of a proximitized system: the bulk superconducting gap, the induced gap, and the induced coherence length. Unlike local conductance spectroscopy, nonlocal conductance measurements distinguish between nontopological zero-energy modes localized around potential inhomogeneities, and true Majorana edge modes that emerge in the topological phase. In addition, we find that the nonlocal conductance is an odd function of bias at the topological phase transition, acting as a current rectifier in the low-bias limit. More generally, we identify conditions for crossed Andreev reflection to dominate the nonlocal conductance and show how to design a Cooper pair splitter in the open regime.

  9. Roton Excitations and the Fluid-Solid Phase Transition in Superfluid 2D Yukawa Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinelli, S.; Galli, D. E.; Reatto, L.; Motta, M.

    2016-10-01

    We compute several ground-state properties and the dynamical structure factor of a zero-temperature system of Bosons interacting with the 2D screened Coulomb (2D-SC) potential. We resort to the exact shadow path integral ground state (SPIGS) quantum Monte Carlo method to compute the imaginary-time correlation function of the model, and to the genetic algorithm via falsification of theories (GIFT) to retrieve the dynamical structure factor. We provide a detailed comparison of ground-state properties and collective excitations of 2D-SC and ^4He atoms. The roton energy of the 2D-SC system is an increasing function of density, and not a decreasing one as in ^4He. This result is in contrast with the view that the roton is the soft mode of the fluid-solid transition. We uncover a remarkable quasi-universality of backflow and of other properties when expressed in terms of the amount of short-range order as quantified by the height of the first peak of the static structure factor.

  10. Phase transitions in a multistate majority-vote model on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanshuang; Li, Guofeng

    2018-06-01

    We generalize the original majority-vote (MV) model from two states to arbitrary p states and study the order-disorder phase transitions in such a p -state MV model on complex networks. By extensive Monte Carlo simulations and a mean-field theory, we show that for p ≥3 the order of phase transition is essentially different from a continuous second-order phase transition in the original two-state MV model. Instead, for p ≥3 the model displays a discontinuous first-order phase transition, which is manifested by the appearance of the hysteresis phenomenon near the phase transition. Within the hysteresis loop, the ordered phase and disordered phase are coexisting, and rare flips between the two phases can be observed due to the finite-size fluctuation. Moreover, we investigate the type of phase transition under a slightly modified dynamics [Melo et al., J. Stat. Mech. (2010) P11032, 10.1088/1742-5468/2010/11/P11032]. We find that the order of phase transition in the three-state MV model depends on the degree heterogeneity of networks. For p ≥4 , both dynamics produce the first-order phase transitions.

  11. Predicting a new phase (T'') of two-dimensional transition metal di-chalcogenides and strain-controlled topological phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fengxian; Gao, Guoping; Jiao, Yalong; Gu, Yuantong; Bilic, Ante; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Zhongfang; Du, Aijun

    2016-02-01

    Single layered transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted tremendous research interest due to their structural phase diversities. By using a global optimization approach, we have discovered a new phase of transition metal dichalcogenides (labelled as T''), which is confirmed to be energetically, dynamically and kinetically stable by our first-principles calculations. The new T'' MoS2 phase exhibits an intrinsic quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect with a nontrivial gap as large as 0.42 eV, suggesting that a two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator can be achieved at room temperature. Most interestingly, there is a topological phase transition simply driven by a small tensile strain of up to 2%. Furthermore, all the known MX2 (M = Mo or W; X = S, Se or Te) monolayers in the new T'' phase unambiguously display similar band topologies and strain controlled topological phase transitions. Our findings greatly enrich the 2D families of transition metal dichalcogenides and offer a feasible way to control the electronic states of 2D topological insulators for the fabrication of high-speed spintronics devices.Single layered transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted tremendous research interest due to their structural phase diversities. By using a global optimization approach, we have discovered a new phase of transition metal dichalcogenides (labelled as T''), which is confirmed to be energetically, dynamically and kinetically stable by our first-principles calculations. The new T'' MoS2 phase exhibits an intrinsic quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect with a nontrivial gap as large as 0.42 eV, suggesting that a two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator can be achieved at room temperature. Most interestingly, there is a topological phase transition simply driven by a small tensile strain of up to 2%. Furthermore, all the known MX2 (M = Mo or W; X = S, Se or Te) monolayers in the new T'' phase unambiguously display similar band topologies and strain controlled topological

  12. Ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition mechanism in poled PVDF-TrFE copolymer films

    SciT

    Pramanick, A.; T. Misture, Scott; Osti, Naresh C.

    2017-11-01

    Direct experimental insights into the structural and dynamical mechanisms for ferroelectric β to paraelectric α phase transition in a poled PVDF-TrFE copolymer is obtained from in situ x-ray diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering measurements at high temperatures. It is observed that the β-to-α phase transition proceeds through two energetically distinct processes, which are identified here as the nucleation and growth of an intermediate γ phase with random skew linkages followed by a γ-to-α transition. The two energetically distinct microscopic processes can explain the stages of evolution for β-to-α phase transition observed from heat flow measurements.

  13. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition for the dilute planar rotator model on a triangular lattice

    SciT

    Sun Yunzhou; Yi Lin; Wysin, G. M.

    2008-10-15

    The Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition for the dilute planar rotator model on a triangular lattice is studied by using a hybrid Monte Carlo method. The phase-transition temperatures for different nonmagnetic impurity densities are obtained by three approaches: finite-size scaling of plane magnetic susceptibility, helicity modulus, and Binder's fourth cumulant. It is found that the phase-transition temperature decreases with increasing impurity density {rho} and the BKT phase transition vanishes when the magnetic occupancy falls to the site percolation threshold: 1-{rho}{sub c}=p{sub c}=0.5.

  14. THE ROLE OF METASTABLE STATES IN POLYMER PHASE TRANSITIONS: Concepts, Principles, and Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.; Keller, Andrew

    1998-08-01

    Polymer phases can be described in the same way as phases in other condensed matter using a number density operator and its correlation functions. This description requires the understanding of symmetry operations and order at different atomic and molecular levels. Statistical mechanics provides a link between the microscopic description of the structure and motion and the macroscopic thermodynamic properties. Within the limits of the laws of thermodynamics, polymers exhibit a rich variety of phase transition behaviors. By definition, a first-order phase transition describes a transformation that involves a sudden change of thermodynamic properties at its transition temperature, whereas higher-order phase transitions are classified as critical phenomena. Of special interest is the role of metastability in phase and phase transition behaviors. Although a metastable state possesses a local free energy minimum, it is not at the global equilibrium. Furthermore, metastable states can also be associated with phase sizes. Metastable behavior is also observed in phase transformations that are impeded by kinetic limitations along the pathway to thermodynamic equilibrium. This is illustrated in structural and morphological investigations of crystallization and mesophase transitions, liquid-liquid phase separation, vitrification, and gel formation, as well as combinations of transformation processes. In these cases, the metastable state often becomes the dominant state for the entire system and is observed over a range of time and size scales. This review describes the general principles of metastability in polymer phases and phase transitions and provides illustrations from current experimental works in selected areas.

  15. Structural phase transition in monolayer MoTe2 driven by electrostatic doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Xiao, Jun; Zhu, Hanyu; Li, Yao; Alsaid, Yousif; Fong, King Yan; Zhou, Yao; Wang, Siqi; Shi, Wu; Wang, Yuan; Zettl, Alex; Reed, Evan J.; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-10-01

    Monolayers of transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit numerous crystal phases with distinct structures, symmetries and physical properties. Exploring the physics of transitions between these different structural phases in two dimensions may provide a means of switching material properties, with implications for potential applications. Structural phase transitions in TMDs have so far been induced by thermal or chemical means; purely electrostatic control over crystal phases through electrostatic doping was recently proposed as a theoretical possibility, but has not yet been realized. Here we report the experimental demonstration of an electrostatic-doping-driven phase transition between the hexagonal and monoclinic phases of monolayer molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2). We find that the phase transition shows a hysteretic loop in Raman spectra, and can be reversed by increasing or decreasing the gate voltage. We also combine second-harmonic generation spectroscopy with polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopy to show that the induced monoclinic phase preserves the crystal orientation of the original hexagonal phase. Moreover, this structural phase transition occurs simultaneously across the whole sample. This electrostatic-doping control of structural phase transition opens up new possibilities for developing phase-change devices based on atomically thin membranes.

  16. Probabilistic physical characteristics of phase transitions at highway bottlenecks: incommensurability of three-phase and two-phase traffic-flow theories.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Boris S; Klenov, Sergey L; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Physical features of induced phase transitions in a metastable free flow at an on-ramp bottleneck in three-phase and two-phase cellular automaton (CA) traffic-flow models have been revealed. It turns out that at given flow rates at the bottleneck, to induce a moving jam (F → J transition) in the metastable free flow through the application of a time-limited on-ramp inflow impulse, in both two-phase and three-phase CA models the same critical amplitude of the impulse is required. If a smaller impulse than this critical one is applied, neither F → J transition nor other phase transitions can occur in the two-phase CA model. We have found that in contrast with the two-phase CA model, in the three-phase CA model, if the same smaller impulse is applied, then a phase transition from free flow to synchronized flow (F → S transition) can be induced at the bottleneck. This explains why rather than the F → J transition, in the three-phase theory traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck is governed by an F → S transition, as observed in real measured traffic data. None of two-phase traffic-flow theories incorporates an F → S transition in a metastable free flow at the bottleneck that is the main feature of the three-phase theory. On the one hand, this shows the incommensurability of three-phase and two-phase traffic-flow theories. On the other hand, this clarifies why none of the two-phase traffic-flow theories can explain the set of fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at highway bottlenecks.

  17. Phase Transition of Gonococci in Mammalian Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tyeryar, Franklin J.; Quan, Alice L.; Rene, Anthony A.; Weiss, Emilio

    1974-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae was cultivated in mammalian cell cultures in an effort to determine if this environment will elicit a T4 → T1 transition. Of four avirulent (T4) isolates tested, only one, H4, yielded T1 colonies. This change was consistently obtained in HeLa, WI-38, and MK2 cells, even when the multiplicity of the gonococcal infection was less than 1 per culture. Growth of the gonococci took place primarily on the surface of the cells, as demonstrated by light and electron microscopy, but occasional bacteria were undoubtedly intracellular. T1 colonies were seen at 24 h and were the major population at 48 h. This shift was favored by the presence of viable cells, since smaller yields of T1 were obtained when the cells were irradiated or heat inactivated. It was also favored by low pH, since T1 recovery was reduced when the buffering capacity of the medium was increased. Although the results suggest that T1 gonococci derived from H4 have a selective advantage over T4 in cell cultures, this is not true of all T1 and T4 colony types. F62 T4, which does not undergo a T4 → T1 shift, propagated as well as T1 in HeLa cell cultures. The change in colony type of strain H4 to T1 was accompanied by formation of pili and by gain in capacity for deoxyribonucleic acid-mediated transformation. It is concluded that gonococci can undergo T4 → T1 phase transition in mammalian cell cultures, but this property is not retained by all strains. Images PMID:4215765

  18. Phase transition to a two-peak phase in an information-cascade voting experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shintaro; Hisakado, Masato; Takahashi, Taiki

    2012-08-01

    Observational learning is an important information aggregation mechanism. However, it occasionally leads to a state in which an entire population chooses a suboptimal option. When this occurs and whether it is a phase transition remain unanswered. To address these questions we perform a voting experiment in which subjects answer a two-choice quiz sequentially with and without information about the prior subjects’ choices. The subjects who could copy others are called herders. We obtain a microscopic rule regarding how herders copy others. Varying the ratio of herders leads to qualitative changes in the macroscopic behavior of about 50 subjects in the experiment. If the ratio is small, the sequence of choices rapidly converges to the correct one. As the ratio approaches 100%, convergence becomes extremely slow and information aggregation almost terminates. A simulation study of a stochastic model for 106 subjects based on the herder’s microscopic rule shows a phase transition to the two-peak phase, where the convergence completely terminates as the ratio exceeds some critical value.

  19. T-p phase diagrams and the barocaloric effect in materials with successive phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorev, M. V.; Bogdanov, E. V.; Flerov, I. N.

    2017-09-01

    An analysis of the extensive and intensive barocaloric effect (BCE) at successive structural phase transitions in some complex fluorides and oxyfluorides was performed. The high sensitivity of these compounds to a change in the chemical pressure allows one to vary the succession and parameters of the transformations (temperature, entropy, baric coefficient) over a wide range and obtain optimal values of the BCE. A comparison of different types of schematic T-p phase diagrams with the complicated T( p) dependences observed experimentally shows that in some ranges of temperature and pressure the BCE in compounds undergoing successive transformations can be increased due to a summation of caloric effects associated with distinct phase transitions. The maximum values of the extensive and intensive BCE in complex fluorides and oxyfluorides can be realized at rather low pressure (0.1-0.3 GPa). In a narrow temperature range around the triple points conversion from conventional BCE to inverse BCE is observed, which is followed by a gigantic change of both \\vertΔ S_BCE\\vert and \\vertΔ T_AD\\vert .

  20. Controlling the Temperature and Speed of the Phase Transition of VO 2 Microcrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Joonseok; Kim, Howon; Chen, Xian; ...

    2015-12-29

    Here, we investigated the control of two important parameters of vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ) microcrystals, the phase transition temperature and speed, by varying microcrystal width. By using the reflectivity change between insulating and metallic phases, phase transition temperature is measured by optical microscopy. As the width of square cylinder-shaped microcrystals decreases from ~70 to ~1 μm, the phase transition temperature (67 °C for bulk) varied as much as 26.1 °C (19.7 °C) during heating (cooling). In addition, the propagation speed of phase boundary in the microcrystal, i.e., phase transition speed, is monitored at the onset of phase transition bymore » using the high-speed resistance measurement. The phase transition speed increases from 4.6 × 10 2 to 1.7 × 10 4 μm/s as the width decreases from ~50 to ~2 μm. While the statistical description for a heterogeneous nucleation process explains the size dependence on phase transition temperature of VO 2 , the increase of effective thermal exchange process is responsible for the enhancement of phase transition speed of small VO 2 microcrystals. These findings not only enhance the understanding of VO 2 intrinsic properties but also contribute to the development of innovative electronic devices.« less

  1. Controlling the Temperature and Speed of the Phase Transition of VO 2 Microcrystals

    SciT

    Yoon, Joonseok; Kim, Howon; Chen, Xian

    Here, we investigated the control of two important parameters of vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ) microcrystals, the phase transition temperature and speed, by varying microcrystal width. By using the reflectivity change between insulating and metallic phases, phase transition temperature is measured by optical microscopy. As the width of square cylinder-shaped microcrystals decreases from ~70 to ~1 μm, the phase transition temperature (67 °C for bulk) varied as much as 26.1 °C (19.7 °C) during heating (cooling). In addition, the propagation speed of phase boundary in the microcrystal, i.e., phase transition speed, is monitored at the onset of phase transition bymore » using the high-speed resistance measurement. The phase transition speed increases from 4.6 × 10 2 to 1.7 × 10 4 μm/s as the width decreases from ~50 to ~2 μm. While the statistical description for a heterogeneous nucleation process explains the size dependence on phase transition temperature of VO 2 , the increase of effective thermal exchange process is responsible for the enhancement of phase transition speed of small VO 2 microcrystals. These findings not only enhance the understanding of VO 2 intrinsic properties but also contribute to the development of innovative electronic devices.« less

  2. First-order reversal curve of the magnetostructural phase transition in FeTe

    DOE PAGES

    Frampton, M. K.; Crocker, J.; Gilbert, D. A.; ...

    2017-06-05

    We apply the first-order reversal curve (FORC) method, adapted from studies of ferromagnetic materials, to the magnetostructural phase transition of Fe 1+yTe. FORC measurements reveal two features in the hysteretic phase transition, even in samples where traditional temperature measurements display only a single transition. For Fe 1.13Te, the influence of magnetic field suggests that the main feature is primarily structural while a smaller, slightly higher-temperature transition is magnetic in origin. By contrast, Fe 1.03Te has a single transition which shows a uniform response to magnetic field, indicating a stronger coupling of the magnetic and structural phase transitions. We also introducemore » uniaxial stress, which spreads the distribution width without changing the underlying energy barrier of the transformation. Finally, the work shows how FORC can help disentangle the roles of the magnetic and structural phase transitions in FeTe.« less

  3. Critical behaviors and phase transitions of black holes in higher order gravities and extended phase spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherkatghanad, Zeinab; Mirza, Behrouz; Mirzaiyan, Zahra; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    We consider the critical behaviors and phase transitions of Gauss-Bonnet-Born-Infeld-AdS black holes (GB-BI-AdS) for d = 5, 6 and the extended phase space. We assume the cosmological constant, Λ, the coupling coefficient α, and the BI parameter β to be thermodynamic pressures of the system. Having made these assumptions, the critical behaviors are then studied in the two canonical and grand canonical ensembles. We find “reentrant and triple point phase transitions” (RPT-TP) and “multiple reentrant phase transitions” (multiple RPT) with increasing pressure of the system for specific values of the coupling coefficient α in the canonical ensemble. Also, we observe a reentrant phase transition (RPT) of GB-BI-AdS black holes in the grand canonical ensemble and for d = 6. These calculations are then expanded to the critical behavior of Born-Infeld-AdS (BI-AdS) black holes in the third-order of Lovelock gravity and in the grand canonical ensemble to find a van der Waals (vdW) behavior for d = 7 and a RPT for d = 8 for specific values of potential ϕ in the grand canonical ensemble. Furthermore, we obtain a similar behavior for the limit of β →∞, i.e. charged-AdS black holes in the third-order of the Lovelock gravity. Thus, it is shown that the critical behaviors of these black holes are independent of the parameter β in the grand canonical ensemble.

  4. Quasi-phases and pseudo-transitions in one-dimensional models with nearest neighbor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, S. M.; Rojas, Onofre

    2018-01-01

    There are some particular one-dimensional models, such as the Ising-Heisenberg spin models with a variety of chain structures, which exhibit unexpected behaviors quite similar to the first and second order phase transition, which could be confused naively with an authentic phase transition. Through the analysis of the first derivative of free energy, such as entropy, magnetization, and internal energy, a "sudden" jump that closely resembles a first-order phase transition at finite temperature occurs. However, by analyzing the second derivative of free energy, such as specific heat and magnetic susceptibility at finite temperature, it behaves quite similarly to a second-order phase transition exhibiting an astonishingly sharp and fine peak. The correlation length also confirms the evidence of this pseudo-transition temperature, where a sharp peak occurs at the pseudo-critical temperature. We also present the necessary conditions for the emergence of these quasi-phases and pseudo-transitions.

  5. Topological nodal superconducting phases and topological phase transition in the hyperhoneycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhon, Adrien; Schmidt, Johann; Black-Schaffer, Annica M.

    2018-03-01

    We establish the topology of the spin-singlet superconducting states in the bare hyperhoneycomb lattice, and we derive analytically the full phase diagram using only symmetry and topology in combination with simple energy arguments. The phase diagram is dominated by two states preserving time-reversal symmetry. We find a line-nodal state dominating at low doping levels that is topologically nontrivial and exhibits surface Majorana flatbands, which we show perfectly match the bulk-boundary correspondence using the Berry phase approach. At higher doping levels, we find a fully gapped state with trivial topology. By analytically calculating the topological invariant of the nodal lines, we derive the critical point between the line-nodal and fully gapped states as a function of both pairing parameters and doping. We find that the line-nodal state is favored not only at lower doping levels but also if symmetry-allowed deformations of the lattice are present. Adding simple energy arguments, we establish that a fully gapped state with broken time-reversal symmetry likely appears covering the actual phase transition. We find this fully gapped state to be topologically trivial, while we find an additional point-nodal state at very low doing levels that also break time-reversal symmetry and has nontrivial topology with associated Fermi surface arcs. We eventually address the robustness of the phase diagram to generalized models also including adiabatic spin-orbit coupling, and we show how all but the point-nodal state are reasonably stable.

  6. Monterey-Salinas Transit ITS Augmentation Project : Phase III Evaluation Report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the findings from Phase II and Phase III of the Evaluation of the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Augmentation Project that was implemented at the Monterey-Salinas Transit (MST) in Monterey, Califor...

  7. Suppression of Structural Phase Transition in VO2 by Epitaxial Strain in Vicinity of Metal-insulator Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mengmeng; Yang, Yuanjun; Bin Hong; Wang, Liangxin; Hu, Kai; Dong, Yongqi; Xu, Han; Huang, Haoliang; Zhao, Jiangtao; Chen, Haiping; Song, Li; Ju, Huanxin; Zhu, Junfa; Bao, Jun; Li, Xiaoguang; Gu, Yueliang; Yang, Tieying; Gao, Xingyu; Luo, Zhenlin; Gao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Mechanism of metal-insulator transition (MIT) in strained VO2 thin films is very complicated and incompletely understood despite three scenarios with potential explanations including electronic correlation (Mott mechanism), structural transformation (Peierls theory) and collaborative Mott-Peierls transition. Herein, we have decoupled coactions of structural and electronic phase transitions across the MIT by implementing epitaxial strain on 13-nm-thick (001)-VO2 films in comparison to thicker films. The structural evolution during MIT characterized by temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation high-resolution X-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping and Raman spectroscopy suggested that the structural phase transition in the temperature range of vicinity of the MIT is suppressed by epitaxial strain. Furthermore, temperature-dependent Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) revealed the changes in electron occupancy near the Fermi energy EF of V 3d orbital, implying that the electronic transition triggers the MIT in the strained films. Thus the MIT in the bi-axially strained VO2 thin films should be only driven by electronic transition without assistance of structural phase transition. Density functional theoretical calculations further confirmed that the tetragonal phase across the MIT can be both in insulating and metallic states in the strained (001)-VO2/TiO2 thin films. This work offers a better understanding of the mechanism of MIT in the strained VO2 films. PMID:26975328

  8. Detecting critical state before phase transition of complex systems by hidden Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Chen, Pei; Li, Yongjun; Chen, Luonan

    Identifying the critical state or pre-transition state just before the occurrence of a phase transition is a challenging task, because the state of the system may show little apparent change before this critical transition during the gradual parameter variations. Such dynamics of phase transition is generally composed of three stages, i.e., before-transition state, pre-transition state, and after-transition state, which can be considered as three different Markov processes. Thus, based on this dynamical feature, we present a novel computational method, i.e., hidden Markov model (HMM), to detect the switching point of the two Markov processes from the before-transition state (a stationary Markov process) to the pre-transition state (a time-varying Markov process), thereby identifying the pre-transition state or early-warning signals of the phase transition. To validate the effectiveness, we apply this method to detect the signals of the imminent phase transitions of complex systems based on the simulated datasets, and further identify the pre-transition states as well as their critical modules for three real datasets, i.e., the acute lung injury triggered by phosgene inhalation, MCF-7 human breast cancer caused by heregulin, and HCV-induced dysplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Phase transition transistors based on strongly-correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    The field-effect transistor (FET) provides electrical switching functions through linear control of the number of charges at a channel surface by external voltage. Controlling electronic phases of condensed matters in a FET geometry has long been a central issue of physical science. In particular, FET based on a strongly correlated material, namely ``Mott transistor,'' has attracted considerable interest, because it potentially provides gigantic and diverse electronic responses due to a strong interplay between charge, spin, orbital and lattice. We have investigated electric-field effects on such materials aiming at novel physical phenomena and electronic functions originating from strong correlation effects. Here we demonstrate electrical switching of bulk state of matter over the first-order metal-insulator transition. We fabricated FETs based on VO2 with use of a recently developed electric-double-layer transistor technique, and found that the electrostatically induced carriers at a channel surface drive all preexisting localized carriers of 1022 cm-3 even inside a bulk to motion, leading to bulk carrier delocalization beyond the electrostatic screening length. This non-local switching of bulk phases is achieved with just around 1 V, and moreover, a novel non-volatile memory like character emerges in a voltage-sweep measurement. These observations are apparently distinct from those of conventional FETs based on band insulators, capturing the essential feature of collective interactions in strongly correlated materials. This work was done in collaboration with K. Shibuya, D. Okuyama, T. Hatano, S. Ono, M. Kawasaki, Y. Iwasa, and Y. Tokura. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSAP) through its ``Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program).''

  10. Going full circle: phase-transition thermodynamics of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Ulrich; Verevkin, Sergey P; Koslowski, Thorsten; Krossing, Ingo

    2011-05-27

    We present the full enthalpic phase transition cycle for ionic liquids (ILs) as examples of non-classical salts. The cycle was closed for the lattice, solvation, dissociation, and vaporization enthalpies of 30 different ILs, relying on as much experimental data as was available. High-quality dissociation enthalpies were calculated at the G3 MP2 level. From the cycle, we could establish, for the first time, the lattice and solvation enthalpies of ILs with imidazolium ions. For vaporization, lattice, and dissociation enthalpies, we also developed new prediction methods in the course of our investigations. Here, as only single-ion values need to be calculated and the tedious optimization of an ion pair can be circumvented, the computational time is short. For the vaporization enthalpy, a very simple approach was found, using a surface term and the calculated enthalpic correction to the total gas-phase energy. For the lattice enthalpy, the most important constituent proved to be the calculated conductor-like screening model (COSMO) solvation enthalpy in the ideal electric conductor. A similar model was developed for the dissociation enthalpy. According to our assessment, the typical error of the lattice enthalpy would be 9.4 kJ mol(-1), which is less than half the deviation we get when using the (optimized) Kapustinskii equation or the recent volume-based thermodynamics (VBT) theory. In contrast, the non-optimized VBT formula gives lattice enthalpies 20 to 140 kJ mol(-1) lower than the ones we assessed in the cycle, because of the insufficient description of dispersive interactions. Our findings show that quantum-chemical calculations can greatly improve the VBT approaches, which were parameterized for simple, inorganic salts with ideally point-shaped charges. In conclusion, we suggest the term "augmented VBT", or "aVBT", to describe this kind of theoretical approach. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Raman spectra and phase transitions in Rb{sub 2}KInF{sub 6} elpasolite

    SciT

    Krylov, A. S.; Krylova, S. N., E-mail: slanky@iph.krasn.ru; Vtyurin, A. N.

    2011-01-15

    The Raman spectra of Rb{sub 2}KInF{sub 6} elpasolite crystal have been studied in a wide temperature range, including two phase transitions: from the cubic phase to the tetragonal phase and then to the monoclinic phase. Several anomalies of internal modes of InF{sub 6} octahedra and low-frequency lattice vibrations, which are related to the structural changes at the transition points, have been found and quantitatively analyzed. The results of a quantitative analysis of the temperature dependences of the parameters of spectral lines are in good agreement with the thermodynamic data on the phase transitions.

  12. Nonequilibrium Phase Precursors during a Photoexcited Insulator-to-Metal Transition in V2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Andrej; Ramirez, Juan Gabriel; Valmianski, Ilya; Cela, Devin; Hua, Nelson; Kukreja, Roopali; Wingert, James; Kovalchuk, Olesya; Glownia, James M.; Sikorski, Marcin; Chollet, Matthieu; Holt, Martin; Schuller, Ivan K.; Shpyrko, Oleg G.

    2018-05-01

    Here, we photoinduce and directly observe with x-ray scattering an ultrafast enhancement of the structural long-range order in the archetypal Mott system V2O3 . Despite the ultrafast increase in crystal symmetry, the change of unit cell volume occurs an order of magnitude slower and coincides with the insulator-to-metal transition. The decoupling between the two structural responses in the time domain highlights the existence of a transient photoinduced precursor phase, which is distinct from the two structural phases present in equilibrium. X-ray nanoscopy reveals that acoustic phonons trapped in nanoscale twin domains govern the dynamics of the ultrafast transition into the precursor phase, while nucleation and growth of metallic domains dictate the duration of the slower transition into the metallic phase. The enhancement of the long-range order before completion of the electronic transition demonstrates the critical role the nonequilibrium structural phases play during electronic phase transitions in correlated electrons systems.

  13. Boron-tuning transition temperature of vanadium dioxide from rutile to monoclinic phase

    SciT

    Zhang, J. J.; He, H. Y.; Xie, Y.

    2014-11-21

    The effect of the doped boron on the phase transition temperature between the monoclinic phase and the rutile phase of VO{sub 2} has been studied by performing first-principles calculations. It is found that the phase transition temperature decreases linearly with increasing the doping level of B in each system, no matter where the B atom is in the crystal. More importantly, the descent of the transition temperature is predicted to be as large as 83 K/at. % B, indicating that the boron concentration of only 0.5% can cause the phase transition at room temperature. These findings provide a new routinemore » of modulating the phase transition of VO{sub 2} and pave a way for the practicality of VO{sub 2} as an energy-efficient green material.« less

  14. Interactions between coherent twin boundaries and phase transition of iron under dynamic loading and unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Xueyang; Zhu, Wenjun

    2017-09-01

    Phase transitions and deformation twins are constantly reported in many BCC metals under high pressure, whose interactions are of fundamental importance to understand the strengthening mechanism of these metals under extreme conditions. However, the interactions between twins and phase transition in BCC metals remain largely unexplored. In this work, interactions between coherent twin boundaries and α ↔ ɛ phase transition of iron are investigated using both non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and the nudged elastic band method. Mechanisms of both twin-assisted phase transition and reverse phase transition are studied, and orientation relationships between BCC and HCP phases are found to be ⟨"separators="|11 1 ¯ ⟩ B C C||⟨"separators="|1 ¯2 1 ¯ 0 ⟩ H C P and ⟨"separators="|1 1 ¯ 0 ⟩ B C C||⟨"separators="|0001 ⟩ H C P for both cases. The twin boundary corresponds to {"separators="|10 1 ¯ 0 } H C P after the phase transition. It is amazing that the reverse transition seems to be able to "memorize" and recover the initial BCC twins. The memory would be partly lost when plastic slips take place in the HCP phase before the reverse transition. In the recovered initial BCC twins, three major twin spacings are observed, which are well explained in terms of energy barriers of transition from the HCP phase to the BCC twin. Besides, the variant selection rule of the twin assisted phase transition is also discussed. The results of present work could be expected to give some clues for producing ultra-fine grain structures in materials exhibiting martensitic phase transition.

  15. Structures, phase transitions, and magnetic properties of C o3Si from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Yu, Shu; Wu, Shunqing; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2017-07-01

    C o3Si was recently reported to exhibit remarkable magnetic properties in the nanoparticle form [B. Balasubramanian et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 108, 152406 (2016)], 10.1063/1.4945987, yet better understanding of this material should be promoted. Here we report a study on the crystal structures of C o3Si using an adaptive genetic algorithm and discuss its electronic and magnetic properties from first-principles calculations. Several competing phases of C o3Si have been revealed from our calculations. We show that the hexagonal C o3Si structure reported in experiments has lower energy in the nonmagnetic state than in the ferromagnetic state at zero temperature. The ferromagnetic state of the hexagonal structure is dynamically unstable with imaginary phonon modes and transforms into a new orthorhombic structure, which is confirmed by our structure searches to have the lowest energy for both C o3Si and C o3Ge . Magnetic properties of the experimental hexagonal structure and the lowest-energy structures obtained from our structure searches are investigated in detail.

  16. Structure of the BBGKY hierarchy near phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, G. V.; Jedrzejek, C.

    1980-06-01

    A nonperturbative method, as opposed to diagrammatic expansions, is used to study critical phenomena in a fluid with a small hard core and a weak, long-ranged attractive potential. Using the natural small parameter related to the inverse of the range of the attractive potential, spatially uniformly valid asymptotic estimates are made for the magnitudes of all correlations (which are defined as the excess from the generalized superposition approximation) in a region near phase transition in arbitrary number of dimensions. It is shown that if the dimension of the space is larger than four, the correlation hierarchy truncates at the three-body level. The pair correlation satisfies a linear equation. The solution is precisely of Ornstein-Zernike form. For dimensions smaller than four, the hierarchy is still an infinite chain, but considerably simpler than the BBGKY hierarchy. In this case, at the critical point, the correlations are shown to satisfy a scaling law which is the same as that for S4 spin systems.

  17. The formation of topological defects in phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Hardy M.

    1989-01-01

    It was argued, and fought through numerical work that the results of non-dynamical Monte Carlo computer simulations cannot be applied to describe the formation of topological defects when the correlation length at the Ginzburg temperature is significantly smaller than the horizon size. To test the current hypothesis that infinite strings at formation are essentially described by Brownian walks of size the correlation length at the Ginzburg temperature, fields at the Ginzburg temperature were equilibrated. Infinite structure do not exist in equilibrium for reasonable definitions of the Ginzburg temperature, and horizons must be included in a proper treatment. A phase transition, from small-scale to large-scale string or domain wall structure, is found to occur very close to the Ginzburg temperature, in agreement with recent work. The formation process of domain walls and global strings were investigated through the breaking of initially ordered states. To mimic conditions in the early Universe, cooling times are chosen so that horizons exist in the sample volume when topological structure formation occurs. The classical fields are evolved in real-time by the numerical solution of Langevin equations of motion on a three dimensional spatial lattice. The results indicate that it is possible for most of the string energy to be in small loops, rather than in long strings, at formation.

  18. Dark Matter Decay between Phase Transitions at the Weak Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael J.; Kopp, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    We propose a new alternative to the weakly interacting massive particle paradigm for dark matter. Rather than being determined by thermal freeze-out, the dark matter abundance in this scenario is set by dark matter decay, which is allowed for a limited amount of time just before the electroweak phase transition. More specifically, we consider fermionic singlet dark matter particles coupled weakly to a scalar mediator S3 and to auxiliary dark sector fields, charged under the standard model gauge groups. Dark matter freezes out while still relativistic, so its abundance is initially very large. As the Universe cools down, the scalar mediator develops a vacuum expectation value (VEV), which breaks the symmetry that stabilizes dark matter. This allows dark matter to mix with charged fermions and decay. During this epoch, the dark matter abundance is reduced to give the value observed today. Later, the SM Higgs field also develops a VEV, which feeds back into the S3 potential and restores the dark sector symmetry. In a concrete model we show that this "VEV flip-flop" scenario is phenomenologically successful in the most interesting regions of its parameter space. We also comment on detection prospects at the LHC and elsewhere.

  19. Cascading Failures as Continuous Phase-Space Transitions

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Yang; Motter, Adilson E.

    2017-12-14

    In network systems, a local perturbation can amplify as it propagates, potentially leading to a large-scale cascading failure. We derive a continuous model to advance our understanding of cascading failures in power-grid networks. The model accounts for both the failure of transmission lines and the desynchronization of power generators and incorporates the transient dynamics between successive steps of the cascade. In this framework, we show that a cascade event is a phase-space transition from an equilibrium state with high energy to an equilibrium state with lower energy, which can be suitably described in a closed form using a global Hamiltonian-likemore » function. From this function, we show that a perturbed system cannot always reach the equilibrium state predicted by quasi-steady-state cascade models, which would correspond to a reduced number of failures, and may instead undergo a larger cascade. We also show that, in the presence of two or more perturbations, the outcome depends strongly on the order and timing of the individual perturbations. These results offer new insights into the current understanding of cascading dynamics, with potential implications for control interventions.« less

  20. Kohn Anomaly and Phase Stability in Group VB Transition Metals

    SciT

    Landa, Alexander; Soderlind, Per; Naumov, Ivan

    In the periodic table, only a few pure metals exhibit lattice or magnetic instabilities associated with Fermi surface nesting, the classical examples being α-U and Cr. Whereas α-U displays a strong Kohn anomaly in the phonon spectrum that ultimately leads to the formation of charge density waves (CDWs), Cr is known for its nesting-induced spin density waves (SDWs). Recently, it has become clear that a pronounced Kohn anomaly and the corresponding softening in the elastic constants is also the key factor that controls structural transformations and mechanical properties in compressed group VB metals—materials with relatively high superconducting critical temperatures. Thismore » article reviews the current understanding of the structural and mechanical behavior of these metals under pressure with an introduction to the concept of the Kohn anomaly and how it is related to the important concept of Peierls instability. We review both experimental and theoretical results showing different manifestations of the Kohn anomaly in the transverse acoustic phonon mode TA (ξ00) in V, Nb, and Ta. Specifically, in V the anomaly triggers a structural transition to a rhombohedral phase, whereas in Nb and Ta it leads to an anomalous reduction in yield strength.« less

  1. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Benilov, E S; Benilov, M S

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value T(s) depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than T(s), the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with T(s) being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  2. Sebum/Meibum Surface Film Interactions and Phase Transitional Differences.

    PubMed

    Mudgil, Poonam; Borchman, Douglas; Gerlach, Dylan; Yappert, Marta C

    2016-05-01

    Sebum may contribute to the composition of the tear film lipid layer naturally or as a contaminant artifact from collection. The aims of this study were to determine: if sebum changes the rheology of meibum surface films; if the resonance near 5.2 ppm in the 1H-NMR spectra of sebum is due to squalene (SQ); and if sebum or SQ, a major component of sebum, interacts with human meibum. Human meibum was collected from the lid margin with a platinum spatula. Human sebum was collected using lipid absorbent tape. Langmuir trough technology was used to measure the rheology of surface films. Infrared spectroscopy was used to measure lipid conformation and phase transitions. We used 1H-NMR to measure composition and confirm the primary structure of SQ. The NMR resonance near 5.2 ppm in the spectra of human sebum was from SQ which composed 28 mole percent of sebum. Both sebum and SQ lowered the lipid order of meibum. Sebum expanded meibum films at lower concentrations and condensed meibum films at higher concentrations. Sebum caused meibum to be more stable at higher pressures (greater maximum surface pressure). Physiological levels of sebum would be expected to expand or fluidize meibum making it spread better and be more surface active (qualities beneficial for tear film stability). Sebum would also be expected to stabilize the tear film lipid layer, which may allow it to withstand the high shear pressure of a blink.

  3. Sebum/Meibum Surface Film Interactions and Phase Transitional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Mudgil, Poonam; Borchman, Douglas; Gerlach, Dylan; Yappert, Marta C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Sebum may contribute to the composition of the tear film lipid layer naturally or as a contaminant artifact from collection. The aims of this study were to determine: if sebum changes the rheology of meibum surface films; if the resonance near 5.2 ppm in the 1H-NMR spectra of sebum is due to squalene (SQ); and if sebum or SQ, a major component of sebum, interacts with human meibum. Methods Human meibum was collected from the lid margin with a platinum spatula. Human sebum was collected using lipid absorbent tape. Langmuir trough technology was used to measure the rheology of surface films. Infrared spectroscopy was used to measure lipid conformation and phase transitions. We used 1H-NMR to measure composition and confirm the primary structure of SQ. Results The NMR resonance near 5.2 ppm in the spectra of human sebum was from SQ which composed 28 mole percent of sebum. Both sebum and SQ lowered the lipid order of meibum. Sebum expanded meibum films at lower concentrations and condensed meibum films at higher concentrations. Sebum caused meibum to be more stable at higher pressures (greater maximum surface pressure). Conclusions Physiological levels of sebum would be expected to expand or fluidize meibum making it spread better and be more surface active (qualities beneficial for tear film stability). Sebum would also be expected to stabilize the tear film lipid layer, which may allow it to withstand the high shear pressure of a blink. PMID:27145473

  4. Dark Matter Decay between Phase Transitions at the Weak Scale.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael J; Kopp, Joachim

    2017-08-11

    We propose a new alternative to the weakly interacting massive particle paradigm for dark matter. Rather than being determined by thermal freeze-out, the dark matter abundance in this scenario is set by dark matter decay, which is allowed for a limited amount of time just before the electroweak phase transition. More specifically, we consider fermionic singlet dark matter particles coupled weakly to a scalar mediator S_{3} and to auxiliary dark sector fields, charged under the standard model gauge groups. Dark matter freezes out while still relativistic, so its abundance is initially very large. As the Universe cools down, the scalar mediator develops a vacuum expectation value (VEV), which breaks the symmetry that stabilizes dark matter. This allows dark matter to mix with charged fermions and decay. During this epoch, the dark matter abundance is reduced to give the value observed today. Later, the SM Higgs field also develops a VEV, which feeds back into the S_{3} potential and restores the dark sector symmetry. In a concrete model we show that this "VEV flip-flop" scenario is phenomenologically successful in the most interesting regions of its parameter space. We also comment on detection prospects at the LHC and elsewhere.

  5. Kohn Anomaly and Phase Stability in Group VB Transition Metals

    DOE PAGES

    Landa, Alexander; Soderlind, Per; Naumov, Ivan; ...

    2018-03-26

    In the periodic table, only a few pure metals exhibit lattice or magnetic instabilities associated with Fermi surface nesting, the classical examples being α-U and Cr. Whereas α-U displays a strong Kohn anomaly in the phonon spectrum that ultimately leads to the formation of charge density waves (CDWs), Cr is known for its nesting-induced spin density waves (SDWs). Recently, it has become clear that a pronounced Kohn anomaly and the corresponding softening in the elastic constants is also the key factor that controls structural transformations and mechanical properties in compressed group VB metals—materials with relatively high superconducting critical temperatures. Thismore » article reviews the current understanding of the structural and mechanical behavior of these metals under pressure with an introduction to the concept of the Kohn anomaly and how it is related to the important concept of Peierls instability. We review both experimental and theoretical results showing different manifestations of the Kohn anomaly in the transverse acoustic phonon mode TA (ξ00) in V, Nb, and Ta. Specifically, in V the anomaly triggers a structural transition to a rhombohedral phase, whereas in Nb and Ta it leads to an anomalous reduction in yield strength.« less

  6. Probing Electroweak Phase Transition via Enhanced Di-Higgs Production

    DOE PAGES

    Carena, Marcela; Liu, Zhen; Riembau, Marc

    2018-05-24

    We consider a singlet extension of the Standard Model (SM) with a spontaneousmore » $$Z_2$$ breaking and study the gluon-gluon fusion production of the heavy scalar, with subsequent decay into a pair of SM-like Higgs bosons. We find that an on-shell interference effect can notably enhance the resonant di-Higgs production rate up to 40\\%. In addition, consistently taking into account both the on-shell and off-shell interference effects between the heavy scalar and the SM di-Higgs diagrams significantly improves the HL-LHC and HE-LHC reach in this channel. As an example, within an effective field theory analysis in an explicitly $$Z_2$$ breaking scenario, we further discuss the potential to probe the parameter region compatible with a first order electroweak phase transition. Our analysis is applicable for general potentials of the singlet extension of the SM as well as for more general resonance searches.« less

  7. Clustering and Phase Transitions on a Neutral Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Adam; King, Dawn; Maric, Nevena; Bahar, Sonya

    2012-02-01

    The problem of speciation and species aggregation on a neutral landscape, subject to random mutational fluctuations rather than selective drive, has been a focus of research since the seminal work of Kimura on genetic drift. These ideas have received increased attention due to the more recent development of a neutral ecological theory by Hubbell. De Aguiar et al. recently demonstrated, in a computational model, that speciation can occur under neutral conditions; this study bears some comparison with more mathematical studies of clustering on neutral landscapes in the context of branching and annihilating random walks. Here, we show that clustering can occur on a neutral landscape where the dimensions specify the simulated organisms' phenotypes. Unlike the De Aguiar et al. model, we simulate sympatric speciation: the organisms cluster phenotypically, but are not spatially separated. Moreover, we find that clustering occurs not only in the case of assortative mating, but also in the case of asexual fission. Clustering is not observed in a control case where organisms can mate randomly. We find that the population size and the number of clusters undergo phase-transition-like behavior as the maximum mutation size is varied.

  8. Phase transition in lead titanate thin films: a Brillouin study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzel, P.; Dugautier, C.; Moch, P.; LeMarrec, F.; Karkut, M. G.

    2002-12-01

    The elastic properties of both polycrystalline and epitaxial PbTiO3 (PTO) thin films are studied using Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. The epitaxial PTO films were prepared by pulsed laser ablation on (1) a [0 0 1] single crystal of SrTiO3 (STO) doped with Nb and (2) a [0 0 1] STO buffered with a layer of YBa2Cu3O7. The polycrystalline PTO films were prepared by sol-gel on a Si substrate buffered with TiO2 and Pt layers. The data analysis takes into account the ripple and the elasto-optic contributions. The latter significantly affects the measured spectra since it gives rise to a Love mode in the p-s scattering geometry. At room temperature, the spectra of the epitaxially grown samples are interpreted using previously published elastic constants of PTO single crystals. Sol-gel samples exhibit appreciable softening of the effective elastic properties compared to PTO single crystals: this result is explained by taking into account the random orientation of the microscopic PTO grains. For both the polycrystalline and the epitaxial films we have determined that the piezoelectric terms do not contribute to the spectra. The temperature dependence of the spectra shows strong anomalies of the elastic properties near the ferroelectric phase transition. Compared to the bulk, TC is higher in the sol-gel films, while in the epitaxial films the sign of the TC shift depends on the underlying material.

  9. Cascading Failures as Continuous Phase-Space Transitions

    SciT

    Yang, Yang; Motter, Adilson E.

    In network systems, a local perturbation can amplify as it propagates, potentially leading to a large-scale cascading failure. We derive a continuous model to advance our understanding of cascading failures in power-grid networks. The model accounts for both the failure of transmission lines and the desynchronization of power generators and incorporates the transient dynamics between successive steps of the cascade. In this framework, we show that a cascade event is a phase-space transition from an equilibrium state with high energy to an equilibrium state with lower energy, which can be suitably described in a closed form using a global Hamiltonian-likemore » function. From this function, we show that a perturbed system cannot always reach the equilibrium state predicted by quasi-steady-state cascade models, which would correspond to a reduced number of failures, and may instead undergo a larger cascade. We also show that, in the presence of two or more perturbations, the outcome depends strongly on the order and timing of the individual perturbations. These results offer new insights into the current understanding of cascading dynamics, with potential implications for control interventions.« less

  10. Quantum Phase Transitions in Cavity Coupled Dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasisomayajula, Vijay; Russo, Onofrio

    2011-03-01

    We investigate a Quantum Dot System, in which the transconductance, in part, is due to spin coupling, with each dot subjected to a biasing voltage. When this system is housed in a QED cavity, the cavity dot coupling alters the spin coupling of the coupled dots significantly via the Purcell Effect. In this paper we show the extent to which one can control the various coupling parameters: the inter dot coupling, the individual dots coupling with the cavity and the coupled dots coupling with the cavity as a single entity. We show that the dots coupled to each other and to the cavity, the spin transport can be controlled selectively. We derive the conditions for such control explicitly. Further, we discuss the Quantum phase transition effects due to the charge and spin transport through the dots. The electron transport through the dots, electron-electron spin interaction and the electron-photon interaction are treated using the Non-equilibrium Green's Function Formalism. http://publish.aps.org/search/field/author/Trif_Mircea (Trif Mircea), http://publish.aps.org/search/field/author/Golovach_Vitaly_N (Vitaly N. Golovach), and http://publish.aps.org/search/field/author/Loss_Daniel (Daniel Loss), Phys. Rev. B 75, 085307 (2007)

  11. Complex quantum network geometries: Evolution and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph; Wu, Zhihao

    2015-08-01

    Networks are topological and geometric structures used to describe systems as different as the Internet, the brain, or the quantum structure of space-time. Here we define complex quantum network geometries, describing the underlying structure of growing simplicial 2-complexes, i.e., simplicial complexes formed by triangles. These networks are geometric networks with energies of the links that grow according to a nonequilibrium dynamics. The evolution in time of the geometric networks is a classical evolution describing a given path of a path integral defining the evolution of quantum network states. The quantum network states are characterized by quantum occupation numbers that can be mapped, respectively, to the nodes, links, and triangles incident to each link of the network. We call the geometric networks describing the evolution of quantum network states the quantum geometric networks. The quantum geometric networks have many properties common to complex networks, including small-world property, high clustering coefficient, high modularity, and scale-free degree distribution. Moreover, they can be distinguished between the Fermi-Dirac network and the Bose-Einstein network obeying, respectively, the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. We show that these networks can undergo structural phase transitions where the geometrical properties of the networks change drastically. Finally, we comment on the relation between quantum complex network geometries, spin networks, and triangulations.

  12. Complex quantum network geometries: Evolution and phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph; Wu, Zhihao

    2015-08-01

    Networks are topological and geometric structures used to describe systems as different as the Internet, the brain, or the quantum structure of space-time. Here we define complex quantum network geometries, describing the underlying structure of growing simplicial 2-complexes, i.e., simplicial complexes formed by triangles. These networks are geometric networks with energies of the links that grow according to a nonequilibrium dynamics. The evolution in time of the geometric networks is a classical evolution describing a given path of a path integral defining the evolution of quantum network states. The quantum network states are characterized by quantum occupation numbers that can be mapped, respectively, to the nodes, links, and triangles incident to each link of the network. We call the geometric networks describing the evolution of quantum network states the quantum geometric networks. The quantum geometric networks have many properties common to complex networks, including small-world property, high clustering coefficient, high modularity, and scale-free degree distribution. Moreover, they can be distinguished between the Fermi-Dirac network and the Bose-Einstein network obeying, respectively, the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. We show that these networks can undergo structural phase transitions where the geometrical properties of the networks change drastically. Finally, we comment on the relation between quantum complex network geometries, spin networks, and triangulations.

  13. Probing Electroweak Phase Transition via Enhanced Di-Higgs Production

    SciT

    Carena, Marcela; Liu, Zhen; Riembau, Marc

    2018-01-02

    We consider a singlet extension of the Standard Model (SM) with a spontaneousmore » $$Z_2$$ breaking and study the gluon-gluon fusion production of the heavy scalar, with subsequent decay into a pair of SM-like Higgs bosons. We find that an on-shell interference effect can notably enhance the resonant di-Higgs production rate up to 40\\%. In addition, consistently taking into account both the on-shell and off-shell interference effects between the heavy scalar and the SM di-Higgs diagrams significantly improves the HL-LHC and HE-LHC reach in this channel. As an example, within an effective field theory analysis in an explicitly $$Z_2$$ breaking scenario, we further discuss the potential to probe the parameter region compatible with a first order electroweak phase transition. Our analysis is applicable for general potentials of the singlet extension of the SM as well as for more general resonance searches.« less

  14. Phase transition of Surprise optimization in community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Lang; Hao, Yi; Li, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Shi

    2018-02-01

    Community detection is one of important issues in the research of complex networks. In literatures, many methods have been proposed to detect community structures in the networks, while they also have the scope of application themselves. In this paper, we investigate an important measure for community detection, Surprise (Aldecoa and Marín, Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 1060), by focusing on the critical points in the merging and splitting of communities. We firstly analyze the critical behavior of Surprise and give the phase diagrams in community-partition transition. The results show that the critical number of communities for Surprise has a super-exponential increase with the increase of the link-density difference, while it is close to that of Modularity for small difference between inter- and intra-community link densities. By directly optimizing Surprise, we experimentally test the results on various networks, following a series of comparisons with other classical methods, and further find that the heterogeneity of networks could quicken the splitting of communities. On the whole, the results show that Surprise tends to split communities due to various reasons such as the heterogeneity in link density, degree and community size, and it thus exhibits higher resolution than other methods, e.g., Modularity, in community detection. Finally, we provide several approaches for enhancing Surprise.

  15. Microstructural fingerprints of phase transitions in shock-loaded iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Sui, M. L.; Chen, Y. T.; Lu, Q. H.; Ma, E.; Pei, X. Y.; Li, Q. Z.; Hu, H. B.

    2013-01-01

    The complex structural transformation in crystals under static pressure or shock loading has been a subject of long-standing interest to materials scientists and physicists. The polymorphic transformation is of particular importance for iron (Fe), due to its technological and sociological significance in the development of human civilization, as well as its prominent presence in the earth's core. The martensitic transformation α-->ɛ (bcc-->hcp) in iron under shock-loading, due to its reversible and transient nature, requires non-trivial detective work to uncover its occurrence. Here we reveal refined microstructural fingerprints, needle-like colonies and three sets of {112}<111> twins with a threefold symmetry, with tell-tale features that are indicative of two sequential martensitic transformations in the reversible α-->ɛ phase transition, even though no ɛ is retained in the post-shock samples. The signature orientation relationships are consistent with previously-proposed transformation mechanisms, and the unique microstructural fingerprints enable a quantitative assessment of the volume fraction transformed.

  16. Phase transition and entropy inequality of noncommutative black holes in a new extended phase space

    SciT

    Miao, Yan-Gang; Xu, Zhen-Ming, E-mail: miaoyg@nankai.edu.cn, E-mail: xuzhenm@mail.nankai.edu.cn

    We analyze the thermodynamics of the noncommutative high-dimensional Schwarzschild-Tangherlini AdS black hole with the non-Gaussian smeared matter distribution by regarding a noncommutative parameter as an independent thermodynamic variable named as the noncommutative pressure . In the new extended phase space that includes this noncommutative pressure and its conjugate variable, we reveal that the noncommutative pressure and the original thermodynamic pressure related to the negative cosmological constant make the opposite effects in the phase transition of the noncommutative black hole, i.e. the former dominates the UV regime while the latter does the IR regime, respectively. In addition, by means of themore » reverse isoperimetric inequality, we indicate that only the black hole with the Gaussian smeared matter distribution holds the maximum entropy for a given thermodynamic volume among the noncommutative black holes with various matter distributions.« less

  17. Collective Traffic-like Movement of Ants on a Trail: Dynamical Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Ambarish; John, Alexander; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Schadschneider, Andreas; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2004-11-01

    The traffic-like collective movement of ants on a trail can be described by a stochastic cellular automaton model. We have earlier investigated its unusual flow-density relation by using various mean field approximations and computer simulations. In this paper, we study the model following an alternative approach based on the analogy with the zero range process, which is one of the few known exactly solvable stochastic dynamical models. We show that our theory can quantitatively account for the unusual non-monotonic dependence of the average speed of the ants on their density for finite lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Moreover, we argue that the model exhibits a continuous phase transition at the critial density only in a limiting case. Furthermore, we investigate the phase diagram of the model by replacing the periodic boundary conditions by open boundary conditions.

  18. Compressible-Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Phase Transition: Model Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Keiichi

    2017-12-01

    We study the compressible and incompressible two-phase flows separated by a sharp interface with a phase transition and a surface tension. In particular, we consider the problem in R^N , and the Navier-Stokes-Korteweg equations is used in the upper domain and the Navier-Stokes equations is used in the lower domain. We prove the existence of R -bounded solution operator families for a resolvent problem arising from its model problem. According to Göts and Shibata (Asymptot Anal 90(3-4):207-236, 2014), the regularity of ρ _+ is W^1_q in space, but to solve the kinetic equation: u_Γ \\cdot n_t = [[ρ u

  19. Temperature-Controlled High-Speed AFM: Real-Time Observation of Ripple Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirohide; Miyagi, Atsushi; Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-11-01

    With nanometer lateral and Angstrom vertical resolution, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has contributed unique data improving the understanding of lipid bilayers. Lipid bilayers are found in several different temperature-dependent states, termed phases; the main phases are solid and fluid phases. The transition temperature between solid and fluid phases is lipid composition specific. Under certain conditions some lipid bilayers adopt a so-called ripple phase, a structure where solid and fluid phase domains alternate with constant periodicity. Because of its narrow regime of existence and heterogeneity ripple phase and its transition dynamics remain poorly understood. Here, a temperature control device to high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) to observe dynamics of phase transition from ripple phase to fluid phase reversibly in real time is developed and integrated. Based on HS-AFM imaging, the phase transition processes from ripple phase to fluid phase and from ripple phase to metastable ripple phase to fluid phase could be reversibly, phenomenologically, and quantitatively studied. The results here show phase transition hysteresis in fast cooling and heating processes, while both melting and condensation occur at 24.15 °C in quasi-steady state situation. A second metastable ripple phase with larger periodicity is formed at the ripple phase to fluid phase transition when the buffer contains Ca 2+ . The presented temperature-controlled HS-AFM is a new unique experimental system to observe dynamics of temperature-sensitive processes at the nanoscopic level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Simulation of the zero-temperature behavior of a three-dimensional elastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, David; Middleton, A. Alan; Zeng, Chen

    1999-10-01

    We have performed numerical simulation of a three-dimensional elastic medium, with scalar displacements, subject to quenched disorder. In the absence of topological defects this system is equivalent to a (3+1)-dimensional interface subject to a periodic pinning potential. We have applied an efficient combinatorial optimization algorithm to generate exact ground states for this interface representation. Our results indicate that this Bragg glass is characterized by power law divergences in the structure factor S(k)~Ak-3. We have found numerically consistent values of the coefficient A for two lattice discretizations of the medium, supporting universality for A in the isotropic systems considered here. We also examine the response of the ground state to the change in boundary conditions that corresponds to introducing a single dislocation loop encircling the system. The rearrangement of the ground state caused by this change is equivalent to the domain wall of elastic deformations which span the dislocation loop. Our results indicate that these domain walls are highly convoluted, with a fractal dimension df=2.60(5). We also discuss the implications of the domain wall energetics for the stability of the Bragg glass phase. Elastic excitations similar to these domain walls arise when the pinning potential is slightly perturbed. As in other disordered systems, perturbations of relative strength δ introduce a new length scale L*~δ-1/ζ beyond which the perturbed ground state becomes uncorrelated with the reference (unperturbed) ground state. We have performed a scaling analysis of the response of the ground state to the perturbations and obtain ζ=0.385(40). This value is consistent with the scaling relation ζ=df/2-θ, where θ characterizes the scaling of the energy fluctuations of low energy excitations.