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Sample records for zhs6u nickel alloy

  1. High-resistant castable corrosion-resistant nickel alloy for monocrystalline casting by the directional crystallization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, S. B.; Andrienko, A. G.; Gaiduk, S. V.; Kononov, V. V.; Zamkovoi, V. E.

    2008-01-01

    A high-resistant corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy has been developed for monocrystalline casting using the directional crystallization method. Its mechanical properties are close to those of aircraft alloys ZhS6K-VI and ZhS6U-VI with an equiaxial structure and ZhS26-VI with an oriented structure. The technology of producing blades for turboprop engines from the new alloy has been developed and tested.

  2. Effect of hot isostatic pressing on the structure and properties of cast polycrystalline gas-turbine blades made of nickel superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, A. G.

    2012-05-01

    A concept of a two-stage hot isostatic pressing (HIP) cycle is developed for castings made of nickel superalloys in order to minimize plastic deformation and the recrystallization ability of their structure. At the first stage of the cycle, diffusion pore dissolution is predominant due to the motion of vacancies toward grain boundaries in a polycrystal; at the second stage, retained coarse pores are filled during plastic deformation. The effect of uniform compression pressure during HIP and microstructure defects on the vacancy diffusion in nickel superalloys is estimated. A two-stage HIP regime is developed for processing of cast gas-turbine engine blades made of a ZhS6U alloy in order to substantially decrease the shrinkage porosity and to increase the high-temperature characteristics, including the creep and fatigue resistance.

  3. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  4. Thermodynamics of Alloys: Studies of Nickel-Gallium, Nickel-Germanium and Nickel-Rhodium Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    NICKEL ALLOYS, *GALLIUM ALLOYS, *GERMANIUM ALLOYS, * RHODIUM ALLOYS, *PHASE STUDIES, THERMODYNAMICS, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, FREE ENERGY, ENTROPY, HEAT OF FORMATION, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE, UNITED KINGDOM.

  5. Welding and brazing of nickel and nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortland, J. E.; Evans, R. M.; Monroe, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The joining of four types of nickel-base materials is described: (1) high-nickel, nonheat-treatable alloys, (2) solid-solution-hardening nickel-base alloys, (3) precipitation-hardening nickel-base alloys, and (4) dispersion-hardening nickel-base alloys. The high-nickel and solid-solution-hardening alloys are widely used in chemical containers and piping. These materials have excellent resistance to corrosion and oxidation, and retain useful strength at elevated temperatures. The precipitation-hardening alloys have good properties at elevated temperature. They are important in many aerospace applications. Dispersion-hardening nickel also is used for elevated-temperature service.

  6. Study of fluoride corrosion of nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, W. H.; Steindler, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report contains the results of an investigation of the corrosion resistance of nickel and nickel alloys exposed to fluorine, uranium hexafluoride, and volatile fission product fluorides at high temperatures. Survey of the unclassified literature on the subject is included.

  7. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  8. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  9. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  10. Castable nickel aluminide alloys for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.

    1992-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys which include as a component from about 0.5 to about 4 at. % of one or more of the elements selected from the group consisting of molybdenum or niobium to substantially improve the mechanical properties of the alloys in the cast condition.

  11. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  12. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  13. Fiber Laser Weldability of Austenitic Nickel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jonathan

    Recent developments of fiber lasers allow for easier beam delivery facilitating greater applications for laser welding in industry. Welding with high energy density heat sources allows for faster travel speeds, faster cooling rates, and smaller heat affected zones. However, there is a still a lack of knowledge base on how laser welding process parameters affect the weldability of austenitic nickel alloys. In this work, laser welds were made on several austenitic nickel alloys from different alloy families: HAYNESRTM 214RTM alloy, HAYNESRTM 282RTM alloy, HAYNESRTM 230RTM alloy, HAYNESRTM HR-120RTM alloy, HAYNESRTM HR-160 RTM alloy, HAYNESRTM 188 alloy, HAYNESRTM 718 alloy. Welds were made at 25 mm/s at laser powers ranging from 400 to 600 Watts. Solidification cracking was observed in cross-sections of the fusion zone of HR-160RTM alloy and HR-120RTM alloy. Dendritic solidification was found in all alloys, and partitioning within the dendritic structure compared well with Scheil calculations performed using ThermoCalc software. A eutectic liquid rich in carbide forming elements was found at the interdendritic regions in 188, 230RTM, 282 RTM, and 718 alloys and was quantified by processing backscatter electron images of the fusion zone. This interdendritic liquid was found to back fill solidification cracks that formed in the fusion zone during weldability testing. Transverse Varestraint and Sigma-Jig testing were performed to rank the weldability of alloys. During Transvarestraint testing, the ram drop timing was recorded in relation to the laser output, and a type R thermocouple was also placed in the laser path, and the approximate cooling rate of the fusion zone was recorded and used to calculate the solidification cracking temperature range. Rankings of the weldability compared well between Sigma-Jig and Transvarestraint testing, with the exception of 214 alloy and HR-120 alloy, which ranked much better and worse, respectively in Sigma-Jig tests. A possible

  14. ELECTRO-DEPOSITION OF NICKEL ALLOYS FROM THE PYROPHOSPHATE BATH: NICKEL- ZINC AND NICKEL-MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS

    SciT

    Panikkar, S.K.; Char, T.L.R.

    1958-02-01

    Results of studies on the electrodeposition of nickel-zinc and nickel-- molybdenum alloys in a pyrophosphate bath using platinium electrodes are presented. The fects of varying current density and metal contents of the electrolyte on alloy deposit composition, cathode efficiency, and cathode potential are presented in tabular form. (J.R.D.) l2432 A study was made of the effect of homogenization on the mechanical properties of solution-treated and aged aluminum and the quantitative effects of several variables on hardness. The effect of alloying elements on the increase in hardness of aluminum is shown. (J.E.D.)

  15. Fume generation rates for stainless steel, nickel and aluminum alloys

    SciT

    Castner, H.R.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes a study of the effects of pulsed welding current on fume produced during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of stainless steel, nickel, and aluminum alloys. This is an extension of earlier studies of mild steel electrode wire. Reduction of welding fume is important because steady current GMAW of stainless steels and nickel alloys may produce fume that exceeds recommended worker exposure limits for some of the fume constituents. Fume generation from aluminum alloy ER5356 was studied because steady current welding with this alloy produces much higher fume generation rates than ER4043 alloy electrode wire. This work showsmore » that pulsed current can reduce GMAW fume generation rates for Er308L, ER310, and ER312 stainless steel, ERNiCr-3 nickel alloy, and ER5356 aluminum-magnesium alloy electrode wires.« less

  16. Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloys are electrodeposited from a bath comprising a nickel salt, a chromium salt, a phosphorus source such as sodium hypophosphite, a complexing agent for the nickel ions, supporting salts to increase conductivity, and a buffering agent. The process is carried out at about room temperature and requires a current density between about 20 to 40 A/dm.sup.2.

  17. Brush Plating of Nickel-Tungsten Alloy for Engineering Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ASETS Defense ‘12 1 Brush Plating of Nickel-Tungsten Alloy for Engineering Application Zhimin Zhong & Sid Clouser Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Brush Plating of Nickel-Tungsten Alloy for Engineering Application 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...6 Surface morphology Visual appearance, scanning electron and optical microscope images. Smooth, fine grained, micro- cracked surface morphology

  18. Nickel base alloy. [for gas turbine engine stator vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A nickel base superalloy for use at temperatures of 2000 F (1095 C) to 2200 F (1205 C) was developed for use as stator vane material in advanced gas turbine engines. The alloy has a nominal composition in weight percent of 16 tungsten, 7 aluminum, 1 molybdenum, 2 columbium, 0.3 zirconium, 0.2 carbon and the balance nickel.

  19. Method for inhibiting corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    Nickel-containing alloys are protected against corrosion by contacting the alloy with a molten alkali metal having dissolved therein aluminum, silicon or manganese to cause the formation of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic layer. Components can be protected by applying the coating after an apparatus is assembled.

  20. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COBALT AND PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-NICKEL ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-08-25

    >New plutonium-base teroary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuels are described. The alloys consist of 10 to 20 atomic percent cobalt with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 88 atomic percent; or, of from 10 to 25 atomic percent nickel (or mixture of nickel and cobalt) with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 86 atomic percent. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are a lower melting point and a wide range of permissible plutonium dilution.

  1. Nickel aluminide alloy for high temperature structural use

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys including nickel, aluminum, chromium, zirconium and boron wherein the concentration of zirconium is maintained in the range of from about 0.05 to about 0.35 atomic percent to improve the ductility, strength and fabricability of the alloys at 1200.degree. C. Titanium may be added in an amount equal to about 0.2 to about 0.5 atomic percent to improve the mechanical properties of the alloys and the addition of a small amount of carbon further improves hot fabricability.

  2. Tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, James M.; Riley, Robert E.

    1977-03-15

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing said tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy is further described and comprises (a) coating the tungsten particles with a nickel-cobalt alloy, (b) pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, (c) heating said compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400.degree. C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, (d) increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500.degree. C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, (e) cooling to about 1200.degree. C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1/2 hour, and (f) cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere.

  3. Ductile tungsten-nickel alloy and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., William B.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a ductile, high-density tungsten-nickel alloy which possesses a tensile strength in the range of 100,000 to 140,000 psi and a tensile elongation of 3.1 to 16.5 percent in 1 inch at 25.degree.C. This alloy is prepared by the steps of liquid phase sintering a mixture of tungsten-0.5 to 10.0 weight percent nickel, heat treating the alloy at a temperature above the ordering temperature of approximately 970.degree.C. to stabilize the matrix phase, and thereafter rapidly quenching the alloy in a suitable liquid to maintain the matrix phase in a metastable, face-centered cubic, solid- solution of tungsten in nickel.

  4. Corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography cites 118 articles from the international literature concerning corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Articles dealing with corrosion resistance, corrosion tests, intergranular corrosion, oxidation resistance, and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys are included.

  5. Nanophase Nickel-Zirconium Alloys for Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, jay; Valdez, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Nanophase nickel-zirconium alloys have been investigated for use as electrically conductive coatings and catalyst supports in fuel cells. Heretofore, noble metals have been used because they resist corrosion in the harsh, acidic fuel cell interior environments. However, the high cost of noble metals has prompted a search for less-costly substitutes. Nickel-zirconium alloys belong to a class of base metal alloys formed from transition elements of widely different d-electron configurations. These alloys generally exhibit unique physical, chemical, and metallurgical properties that can include corrosion resistance. Inasmuch as corrosion is accelerated by free-energy differences between bulk material and grain boundaries, it was conjectured that amorphous (glassy) and nanophase forms of these alloys could offer the desired corrosion resistance. For experiments to test the conjecture, thin alloy films containing various proportions of nickel and zirconium were deposited by magnetron and radiofrequency co-sputtering of nickel and zirconium. The results of x-ray diffraction studies of the deposited films suggested that the films had a nanophase and nearly amorphous character.

  6. Ductile tungsten-nickel-alloy and method for manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    The tensile elongation of a tungsten-nickel-iron alloy containing essentially 95 weight percent reprocessed tungsten, 3.5 weight percent nickel, and 1.5 weight percent iron is increased from a value of less than about 1 percent up to about 23 percent by the addition of less than 0.5 weight percent of a reactive metal consisting of niobium and zirconium.

  7. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1980-01-01

    A method for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a morphology of the gamma-double prime phase enveloping the gamma-prime phase, the alloy consisting essentially of about 40 to 50% nickel, 7.5 to 14% chromium, 1.5 to 4% niobium, 0.3 to 0.75% silicon, 1 to 3% titanium, 0.1 to 0.5% aluminum, 0.02 to 1% carbon, 0.002 to 0.0015% boron and the remain substantially all iron. To obtain optimal results, the alloy is cold-worked 20 to 60% followed by heating at 1050.degree. C. for 1/2 hour with an air-cool plus heating at 800.degree. C. for 2 hours with a furnace cool to 625.degree. C. The alloy is then held at 625.degree. C. for 12 hours, followed by an air-cool.

  8. The measurement of the stacking fault energy in copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship of hydrogen solubility and the hydrogen embrittlement of high strength, high performance face centered cubic alloys to the stacking fault energy of the alloys was investigated. The stacking fault energy is inversely related to the distance between the two partial dislocations which are formed by the dissociation of a perfect dislocation. The two partial dislocations define a stacking fault in the crystal which offers a region for hydrogen segregation. The distance between the partial dislocations is measured by weak beam, dark field transmission electron microscopy. The stacking fault energy is calculated. Pure copper, pure nickel and copper-nickel single crystals are used to determine the stacking fault energy.

  9. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  10. Exploratory Investigation of Advanced-Temperature Nickel-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, John C.; Waters, William J.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy with properties suitable for aircraft turbine blades as well as for possible space vehicle applications. An entire series of alloys that do not require vacuum melting techniques and that generally provide good stress-rupture and impact properties was evolved. The basic-alloy composition of 79 percent nickel, 8 percent molybdenum, 6 percent chromium, 6 percent aluminum, and 1 percent zirconium was modified by a series of element additions such as carbon, titanium, and boron, with the nickel content adjusted to account for the additives. Stress-rupture, impact, and swage tests were made with all the alloys. The strongest composition (basic alloy plus 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon) displayed 384- and 574-hour stress-rupture lives at 1800 F and 15,000 psi in the as-cast and homogenized conditions, respectively. All the alloys investigated demonstrated good impact resistance. Several could not be broken in a low-capacity Izod impact tester and, on this basis, all compared favorably with several high-strength high-temperature alloys. Swaging cracks were encountered with all the alloys. In several cases, however, these cracks were slight and could be detected only by zyglo examination. Some of these compositions may become amenable to hot working on further development. On the basis of the properties indicated, it appears that several of the alloys evolved, particularly the 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon basic-alloy modification, could be used for advanced- temperature turbine blades, as well as for possible space vehicle applications.

  11. Quantitative Residual Strain Analyses on Strain Hardened Nickel Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Maeguchi, Takaharu; Goto, Toru; Juan, Hou

    Many papers have reported about the effects of strain hardening by cold rolling, grinding, welding, etc. on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of nickel based alloys and austenitic stainless steels for LWR pipings and components. But, the residual strain value due to cold rolling, grinding, welding, etc. is not so quantitatively evaluated.

  12. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  13. Oxidation resistant, thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranow, S.; Klingler, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Modified thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium alloy has been developed that exhibits greatly improved resistance to high-temperature oxidation. Additions of aluminum have been made to change nature of protective oxide scale entirely and to essentially inhibit oxidation at temperatures up to 1260 C.

  14. Hot hardness of nickel-rich nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1976-01-01

    Rockwell A hardness of cast nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys was examined from ambient to 1150 K and compared to cast NiAl and IN-100. Alloy constitution was either gamma, gamma prime + gamma or gamma + beta + alpha + gamma prime. Below 1000 K beta containing NiCrAl alloys have hardnesses comparable to IN-100; above 1000 K they soften faster than IN-100. At 1150 K the hardness of beta-containing NiCrAl alloys decreases with increasing beta-content. The beta-containing NiCrAl alloys were harder than beta-NiAl. The ultimate tensile strengths of the NiCrAl alloys were estimated. The effects of NiCrAl coatings on strength and fatigue life of cooled turbine components were deduced.

  15. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.

    1998-01-01

    Alloys for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1.+-.0.8%)Al--(1.0.+-.0.8%)Mo--(0.7.+-.0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques.

  16. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.

    1998-03-10

    Alloys are disclosed for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1{+-}0.8%)Al--(1.0{+-}0.8%)Mo--(0.7 + 0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques. 4 figs.

  17. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-04-03

    A method is described for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a morphology of the gamma-double prime phase enveloping the gamma-prime, the alloy consisting essentially of about 25 to 45% nickel, 10 to 16% chromium, 1.5 to 3% of an element selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and niobium, about 2% titanium, about 3% aluminum, and the remainder substantially all iron. To obtain optimum results, the alloy is heated to a temperature of 1025 to 1075/sup 0/C for 2 to 5 minutes, cold-worked about 20 to 60%, aged at a temperature of about 775/sup 0/C for 8 hours followed by an air-cool, and then heated to a temperature in the range of 650 to 700/sup 0/C for 2 hours followed by an air-cool.

  18. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy

    DOEpatents

    Merrick, Howard F.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1982-01-01

    A method for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a bimodal distribution of gamma prime phase within a network of dislocations, the alloy consisting essentially of about 25% to 45% nickel, 10% to 16% chromium, 1.5% to 3% of an element selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and niobium, about 2% titanium, about 3% aluminum, and the remainder substantially all iron. To obtain optimum results, the alloy is heated to a temperature of 1025.degree. C. to 1075.degree. C. for 2-5 minutes, cold-worked about 20% to 60%, aged at a temperature of about 775.degree. C. for 8 hours followed by an air-cool, and then heated to a temperature in the range of 650.degree. C. to 700.degree. C. for 2 hours followed by an air-cool.

  19. Recrystallization characteristics of oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotzler, R. K.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopy was employed to study the process of recrystallization in two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) mechanically alloyed nickel-base alloys, MA 754 and MA 6000E. MA 754 contained both fine, uniformly dispersed particles and coarser oxides aligned along the working direction. Hot rolled MA 754 had a grain size of 0.5 microns and high dislocation densities. After partial primary recrystallization, the fine grains transformed to large elongated grains via secondary (or abnormal) grain growth. Extruded and rolled MA 6000E contained equiaxed grains of 0.2 micron diameter. Primary recrystallization occurring during working eliminated virtually all dislocations. Conversion from fine to coarse grains was triggered by gamma prime dissolution; this was also a process of secondary or abnormal grain growth. Comparisons were made to conventional and oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys.

  20. Electrodeposition of Low Stress Nickel Phosphorous Alloys for Precision Component Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell; Ramsey, Brian; Speegle, Chet; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nickel alloys are favored for electroforming precision components. Nickel phosphorous and nickel cobalt phosphorous are studied in this work. A completely new and innovative electrolytic process eliminates the fumes present in electroless processes and is suitable for electroforming nickel phosphorous and nickel cobalt phosphorous alloys to any desirable thickness, using soluble anodes, without stripping of tanks. Solutions show excellent performance for extended throughput. Properties include, cleaner low temperature operation (40 - 45 C), high Faradaic efficiency, low stress, Rockwell C 52 - 54 hardness and as much as 2000 N per square millimeter tensile strength. Performance is compared to nickel and nickel cobalt electroforming.

  1. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum-nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-08-09

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum-nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum-nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum-nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon.

  2. Thermal and mechanical treatments for nickel and some nickel-base alloys: Effects on mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. M.; Beuhring, V. F.

    1972-01-01

    This report deals with heat treating and working nickel and nickel-base alloys, and with the effects of these operations on the mechanical properties of the materials. The subjects covered are annealing, solution treating, stress relieving, stress equalizing, age hardening, hot working, cold working, combinations of working and heat treating (often referred to as thermomechanical treating), and properties of the materials at various temperatures. The equipment and procedures used in working the materials are discussed, along with the common problems that may be encountered and the precautions and corrective measures that are available.

  3. Effect of Ni +-ION bombardment on nickel and binary nickel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roarty, K. B.; Sprague, J. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Smidt, F. A.

    1981-03-01

    Pure nickel and four binary nickel alloys have been subjected to high energy Ni ion bombardment at 675, 625 and 525°C. After irradiation, each specimen was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The pure nickel control was found to swell appreciably (1 to 5%) and the Ni-Al and the Ni-Ti samples were found to swell at all temperatures, but to a lesser degree (0.01 to 0.35%). The Ni-Mo contained a significant density of voids only at 525° C, while swelling was suppressed at all temperatures in the Ni-Si alloy. The dislocation structure progressed from loops to tangles as temperature increased in all materials except the Ni-Ti, in which there was an absence of loops at all temperatures. Dislocation densities decreased as temperature increased in all samples. These results do not correlate well with the relative behavior of the same alloys observed after neutron irradiation at 455°C. The differences between these two sets of data appear to be caused by different mechanisms controlling void nucleation in ion and neutron irradiation of these alloys.

  4. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  5. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  6. Chromium boron surfaced nickel-iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashid, James M. (Inventor); Friedrich, Leonard A. (Inventor); Freling, Melvin (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Chromium boron diffusion coatings on nickel iron alloys uniquely provide them with improvement in high cycle fatigue strength (up to 30%) and erosion resistance (up to 15 times), compared to uncoated alloy. The diffused chromium layer extends in two essential concentration zones to a total depth of about 40.times.10.sup.-6 m, while the succeeding boron layer is limited to 50-90% of the depth of the richest Cr layer nearest the surface. Both coatings are applied using conventional pack diffusion processes.

  7. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  8. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  9. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  10. Nickel-titanium alloys: stress-related temperature transitional range.

    PubMed

    Santoro, M; Beshers, D N

    2000-12-01

    The inducement of mechanical stress within nickel-titanium wires can influence the transitional temperature range of the alloy and therefore the expression of the superelastic properties. An analogous variation of the transitional temperature range may be expected during orthodontic therapy, when the archwires are engaged into the brackets. To investigate this possibility, samples of currently used orthodontic nickel-titanium wires (Sentalloy, GAC; Copper Ni-Ti superelastic at 27 degrees C, 35 degrees C, 40 degrees C, Ormco; Nitinol Heat-Activated, 3M-Unitek) were subjected to temperature cycles ranging between 4 degrees C and 60 degrees C. The wires were mounted in a plexiglass loading device designed to simulate clinical situations of minimum and severe dental crowding. Electrical resistivity was used to monitor the phase transformations. The data were analyzed with paired t tests. The results confirmed the presence of displacements of the transitional temperature ranges toward higher temperatures when stress was induced. Because nickel-titanium wires are most commonly used during the aligning stage in cases of severe dental crowding, particular attention was given to the performance of the orthodontic wires under maximum loading. An alloy with a stress-related transitional temperature range corresponding to the fluctuations of the oral temperature should express superelastic properties more consistently than others. According to our results, Copper Ni-Ti 27 degrees C and Nitinol Heat-Activated wires may be considered suitable alloys for the alignment stage.

  11. Evolution of the Structure and Phase Composition of Deformable Refractory Nickel Alloys for GTE Discs Upon Complication of Their Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabina, E. B.; Filonova, E. V.; Lomberg, B. S.; Morozova, G. I.

    2015-07-01

    Variation of the phase composition and structure of deformable refractory nickel alloys upon complication of their alloying is considered starting with the ÉI437B pioneer domestic alloy with heterophase hardening and ending with alloy VZh175 used as a material for advanced aircraft engines.

  12. Evolution of Nickel-titanium Alloys in Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Ounsi, Hani F; Nassif, Wadih; Grandini, Simone; Salameh, Ziad; Neelakantan, Prasanna; Anil, Sukumaran

    2017-11-01

    To improve clinical use of nickel-titanium (NiTi) endodontic rotary instruments by better understanding the alloys that compose them. A large number of engine-driven NiTi shaping instruments already exists on the market and newer generations are being introduced regularly. While emphasis is being put on design and technique, manufacturers are more discreet about alloy characteristics that dictate instrument behavior. Along with design and technique, alloy characteristics of endodontic instruments is one of the main variables affecting clinical performance. Modification in NiTi alloys is numerous and may yield improvements, but also drawbacks. Martensitic instruments seem to display better cyclic fatigue properties at the expense of surface hardness, prompting the need for surface treatments. On the contrary, such surface treatments may improve cutting efficiency but are detrimental to the gain in cyclic fatigue resistance. Although the design of the instrument is vital, it should in no way cloud the importance of the properties of the alloy and how they influence the clinical behavior of NiTi instruments. Dentists are mostly clinicians rather than engineers. With the advances in instrumentation design and alloys, they have an obligation to deal more intimately with engineering consideration to not only take advantage of their possibilities but also acknowledge their limitations.

  13. Influence of the alloying effect on nickel K-shell fluorescence yield in Ni Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalayci, Y.; Agus, Y.; Ozgur, S.; Efe, N.; Zararsiz, A.; Arikan, P.; Mutlu, R. H.

    2005-02-01

    Alloying effects on the K-shell fluorescence yield ωK of nickel in Ni-Si binary alloy system have been studied by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence. It is found that ωK increases from pure Ni to Ni 2Si and then decreases from Ni 2Si to NiSi. These results are discussed in terms of d-occupation number on the Ni site and it is concluded that electronic configuration as a result of p-d hybridization explain qualitatively the observed variation of ωK in Ni-Si alloys.

  14. Cold resistant nickel-alloy steel

    SciT

    Legostaev, Yu.L.; Karchevskaya, N.I.; Karchevnikov, V.P.

    1988-05-01

    Low-alloy cold-resistant steel 10GNB was developed for the construction of ships and floating drill rigs. The optimal heat-treatment regime for the steel was refinement. Reducing the carbon content improved its weldability and toughness properties. Optical metallography and electron microscopy established that the optimal structure was a tempered martensitic-bainitic mixture with uniformly distributed particles of disperse special niobium carbides NbC. The substructure and the processes of carbide and carbonitride phase segregation were studied by transmission and extraction electron microscopy. In mechanical tests the steel exhibited high resistance to brittle failure. In terms of corrosion resistance the steel corresponds to the requirementsmore » set forth for shipbuilding steels.« less

  15. Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered Copper-Nickel Thin Film and Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    ARL-TR-7783 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered Copper-Nickel Thin Films and Alloys...TR-7783 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered Copper-Nickel Thin Films and Alloys by Eugene...

  16. The solidification velocity of nickel and titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altgilbers, Alex Sho

    2002-09-01

    The solidification velocity of several Ni-Ti, Ni-Sn, Ni-Si, Ti-Al and Ti-Ni alloys were measured as a function of undercooling. From these results, a model for alloy solidification was developed that can be used to predict the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling more accurately. During this investigation a phenomenon was observed in the solidification velocity that is a direct result of the addition of the various alloying elements to nickel and titanium. The additions of the alloying elements resulted in an additional solidification velocity plateau at intermediate undercoolings. Past work has shown a solidification velocity plateau at high undercoolings can be attributed to residual oxygen. It is shown that a logistic growth model is a more accurate model for predicting the solidification of alloys. Additionally, a numerical model is developed from simple description of the effect of solute on the solidification velocity, which utilizes a Boltzmann logistic function to predict the plateaus that occur at intermediate undercoolings.

  17. Process for the electrodeposition of low stress nickel-manganese alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, James John; Goods, Steven Howard; Yang, Nancy Yuan-Chi; Cadden, Charles Henry

    2005-06-07

    A process for electrodepositing a low stress nickel-manganese multilayer alloy on an electrically conductive substrate is provided. The process includes the steps of immersing the substrate in an electrodeposition solution containing a nickel salt and a manganese salt and repeatedly passing an electric current through an immersed surface of the substrate. The electric current is alternately pulsed for predetermined durations between a first electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and a second electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and manganese. A multilayered alloy having adjacent layers of nickel and a nickel-manganese alloy on the immersed surface of the substrate is thereby produced. The resulting multilayered alloy exhibits low internal stress, high strength and ductility, and high strength retention upon exposure to heat.

  18. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barret, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate-coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000, and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni, Ni-50 at.% Cr, and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. From these equations corrosion isopleths were prepared. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  19. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000 and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni; Ni-50 at.% Cr; and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. Corrosion isopleths were prepared from these equations. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  20. Spectrophotometric studies and applications for the determination of Ni2+ in zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xiaoping; Li, Helin; Zhao, Wenzhen; Li, Dejun

    The absorption properties of zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte were studied by visible spectrophotometer. The results show that the relationship between the absorbance of the zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte and Ni2+ concentration in the electrolyte obeys Beer's law at 660 nm. In addition, other components except Ni2+ in the zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte such as zinc chloride, ammonium chloride, potassium chloride and boric acid have no obvious effect on the absorbance of zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte. Based on these properties, a new method is developed to determine Ni2+ concentration in zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte. Comparing with other methods, this method is simple, direct and accurate. Moreover, the whole testing process does not consume any reagent and dilution, and after testing, the electrolyte samples can be reused without any pollution to the environment.

  1. High strength nickel-chromium-iron austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, Robert C.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1980-01-01

    A solid solution strengthened Ni-Cr-Fe alloy capable of retaining its strength at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 42 to 48% nickel, 11 to 13% chromium, 2.6 to 3.4% niobium, 0.2 to 1.2% silicon, 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium, 2.6 to 3.4% molybdenum, 0.1 to 0.3% aluminum, 0.1 to 0.3% titanium, 0.02 to 0.05% carbon, 0.002 to 0.015% boron, up to 0.06 zirconium, and the balance iron. After solution annealing at 1038.degree. C. for one hour, the alloy, when heated to a temperature of 650.degree. C., has a 2% yield strength of 307 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 513 MPa and a rupture strength of as high as 400 MPa after 100 hours.

  2. Tungsten wire-nickel base alloy composite development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Moracz, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Further development and evaluation of refractory wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites is described. Emphasis was placed on evaluating thermal fatigue resistance as a function of matrix alloy composition, fabrication variables and reinforcement level and distribution. Tests for up to 1,000 cycles were performed and the best system identified in this current work was 50v/o W/NiCrAlY. Improved resistance to thermal fatigue damage would be anticipated for specimens fabricated via optimized processing schedules. Other properties investigated included 1,093 C (2,000 F) stress rupture strength, impact resistance and static air oxidation. A composite consisting of 30v/o W-Hf-C alloy fibers in a NiCrAlY alloy matrix was shown to have a 100-hour stress rupture strength at 1,093 C (2,000 F) of 365 MN/square meters (53 ksi) or a specific strength advantage of about 3:1 over typical D.S. eutectics.

  3. Diffusion in thoriated and nonthoriated nickel and nickel-chromium alloys at 1260 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Various solid-solid diffusion couples were assembled from thoriated and nonthoriated nickel-base alloys, welded, and diffusion annealed at 1260 C. Concentration profiles indicated that a thoria dispersion does not affect diffusion in Cr(alloy):Ni and Ni-4.8Al:Ni types of couples unless a fine grain structure is retained by the thoria particles. Metallography revealed the presence of thoria-free bands in the thoriated-Ni side of the diffusion zone. The bands contained grain boundaries and, in some cases, non-Kirkendall porosity. A mechanism based on the operation of vacancy sources is proposed to explain the thoria-free bands. In addition, a particular DS-NiCr:Ni couple had negligible Kirkendall porosity. This behavior was related to the grain structure of the particular lot of DS-NiCr.

  4. The Nature of Surface Oxides on Corrosion-Resistant Nickel Alloy Covered by Alkaline Water

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A nickel alloy with high chrome and molybdenum content was found to form a highly resistive and passive oxide layer. The donor density and mobility of ions in the oxide layer has been determined as a function of the electrical potential when alkaline water layers are on the alloy surface in order to account for the relative inertness of the nickel alloy in corrosive environments. PMID:20672134

  5. Machinability of nickel based alloys using electrical discharge machining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Adam; Gokul, A. K.; Bharani Dharan, M. P.; Jeevakarthikeyan, R. V. S.; Uthayakumar, M.; Thirumalai Kumaran, S.; Duraiselvam, M.

    2018-04-01

    The high temperature materials such as nickel based alloys and austenitic steel are frequently used for manufacturing critical aero engine turbine components. Literature on conventional and unconventional machining of steel materials is abundant over the past three decades. However the machining studies on superalloy is still a challenging task due to its inherent property and quality. Thus this material is difficult to be cut in conventional processes. Study on unconventional machining process for nickel alloys is focused in this proposed research. Inconel718 and Monel 400 are the two different candidate materials used for electrical discharge machining (EDM) process. Investigation is to prepare a blind hole using copper electrode of 6mm diameter. Electrical parameters are varied to produce plasma spark for diffusion process and machining time is made constant to calculate the experimental results of both the material. Influence of process parameters on tool wear mechanism and material removal are considered from the proposed experimental design. While machining the tool has prone to discharge more materials due to production of high energy plasma spark and eddy current effect. The surface morphology of the machined surface were observed with high resolution FE SEM. Fused electrode found to be a spherical structure over the machined surface as clumps. Surface roughness were also measured with surface profile using profilometer. It is confirmed that there is no deviation and precise roundness of drilling is maintained.

  6. Shape memory behavior of single and polycrystalline nickel rich nickel titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Irfan

    NiTi is the most commonly used shape memory alloy (SMA) and has been widely used for bio-medical, electrical and mechanical applications. Nickel rich NiTi shape memory alloys are coming into prominence due to their distinct superelasticity and shape memory properties as compared to near equi-atomic NiTi shape memory alloys. Besides, their lower density and higher work output than steels makes these alloys an excellent candidate for aerospace and automotive industry. Shape memory properties and phase transformation behavior of high Ni-rich Ni54Ti46 (at.%) polycrystals and Ni-rich Ni 51Ti49 (at.%) single-crystals are determined. Their properties are sensitive to heat treatments that affect the phase transformation behavior of these alloys. Phase transformation properties and microstructure were investigated in aged Ni54Ti46 alloys with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to reveal the precipitation characteristics and R-phase formation. It was found that Ni54Ti46 has the ability to exhibit perfect superelasticity under high stress levels (~2 GPa) with 4% total strain after 550°C-3h aging. Stress independent R-phase transformation was found to be responsible for the change in shape memory behavior with stress. The shape memory responses of [001], [011] and [111] oriented Ni 51Ti49 single-crystals alloy were reported under compression to reveal the orientation dependence of their shape memory behavior. It has been found that transformation strain, temperatures and hysteresis, Classius-Clapeyron slopes, critical stress for plastic deformation are highly orientation dependent. The effects of precipitation formation and compressive loading at selected temperatures on the two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) properties of a [111]- oriented Ni51Ti49 shape memory alloy were revealed. Additionally, aligned Ni4Ti3 precipitates were formed in a single crystal of Ni51Ti49 alloy by aging under applied compression stress along the

  7. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Robert M.; Cohen, Isadore

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  8. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  9. Determination of the gaseous hydrogen ductile-brittle transition in copper-nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnston, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    A series of copper-nickel alloys were fabricated, notched tensile specimens machined for each alloy, and the specimens tested in 34.5 MPa hydrogen and in air. A notched tensile ratio was determined for each alloy and the hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) determined for the alloys of 47.7 weight percent nickel to 73.5 weight percent nickel. Stacking fault probability and stacking fault energies were determined for each alloy using the x ray diffraction line shift and line profiles technique. Hydrogen environment embrittlement was determined to be influenced by stacking fault energies; however, the correlation is believed to be indirect and only partially responsible for the HEE behavior of these alloys.

  10. Titanium-Zirconium-Nickel Alloy Inside Marshall's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This Photo, which appeared on the July cover of `Physics Today', is of the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber allowing scientists to record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. Once inside the chamber, a laser heats the sample until it melts. The laser is then turned off and the sample cools, changing from a liquid drop to a solid sphere. In this particular shot, the ESL contains a solid metal sample of titanium-zirconium-nickel alloy. Since 1977, the ESL has been used at MSFC to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds. Materials created as a result of these tests include new optical materials, special metallic glasses, and spacecraft components.

  11. Titanium-Zirconium-Nickel Alloy Inside Marshall's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This is a close-up of a sample of titanium-zirconium-nickel alloy inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber allowing scientists to record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. Once inside the chamber, a laser heats the sample until it melts. The laser is then turned off and the sample cools, changing from a liquid drop to a solid sphere. Since 1977, the ESL has been used at MSFC to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds. Materials created as a result of these tests include new optical materials, special metallic glasses, and spacecraft components.

  12. Electrodeposition of nickel-iridium alloy films from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wangping; Jiang, Jinjin; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Zhizhi; Yuan, Ningyi; Ding, Jianning

    2018-03-01

    Nickel-iridium (Ni-Ir) alloy films were electrodeposited from aqueous solutions on copper substrates under galvanostatic conditions. The effects of bath composition and deposition time on the faradaic efficiency (FE), partial current densities, chemical composition, morphology and crystallographic structure of the films were studied. The results show that the Ni-Ir alloys with Ir content as high as 37 at% and FE as high as 44% were obtained. Increase in concentration of citric acid had little or no effect on the composition of the alloys, but resulted in a significant decrease in FE and partial current densities of Ni and Ir. The FE and the partial current density of Ni slightly decreased with increasing Ir3+ concentration, however, Ir content increased while partial current density of Ir remained stable. The increase of Ni2+ concentration could result in the increase of the FE and the rate of Ni-Ir deposition, and even no cracks formed on the surface. The surface average roughness and root mean square roughness of the film were 6.8 ± 0.3 nm and 5.4 ± 0.3 nm, respectively. The mixture phases contained significant amounts of Ni oxides and a small amount of metallic Ni, Ir and Ir oxides on the surface. After argon ion sputter cleaning, the film was mainly composed of metallic Ni and Ir. The film consisted of the amorphous and nanocrystalline phases. The Ni content in the deposits was higher than that in the electrolyte, the co-deposition of Ni-Ir alloy was a normal deposition.

  13. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high Ti content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of Ti and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of Ti alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is presented.

  14. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60wt%Ni, 40wt%Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high titanium content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of titanium and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of titanium alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is studied.

  15. Iron-Nickel alloy in the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Heinz, Dion L.; Campbell, Andrew J.; Devine, James M.; Mao, Wendy L.; Shen, Guoyin

    2002-05-01

    The phase relations of an Fe10wt%Ni alloy were investigated in a diamond anvil cell up to 86 GPa and 2382 K. Adding nickel into iron stabilizes the fcc phase to higher pressures and lower temperatures compared to pure iron, and a region of two-phase coexistence between fcc and hcp phases is observed. Iron with up to 10 wt% nickel is likely to be in the hcp structure under inner core conditions. The axial ratio (c/a) of hcp-Fe10wt%Ni has a weak pressure dependence, but it increases substantially with increasing temperature. The extrapolated c/a ratio at ~5700 K and ~86 GPa is approximately 1.64, lower than a theoretically predicted value of nearly 1.7 for hcp-Fe at 5700 K and inner-core pressure. A lower c/a ratio should have an effect on the longitudinal anisotropy of the hcp phase, and hence, may influence the interpretation of the seismic wave anisotropy of the inner core.

  16. High strength nickel-base alloy with improved oxidation resistance up to 2200 degrees F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Modifying the chemistry of the NASA TAZ-8 alloy and utilizing vacuum melting techniques provides a high strength, workable nickel base superalloy with improved oxidation resistance for use up to 2200 degrees F.

  17. Refining a complex nickel alloy to remove a sulfur impurity during vacuum induction melting: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. V.; Min, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    The peculiarities of refining a complexly alloyed nickel alloy from a sulfur impurity during melting of the alloy in a vacuum induction furnace are considered. The application of CaO-based slags is shown to allow the sulfur content in a metal to be decreased; however, in this case, the reduction of calcium, its transfer into the melt, and the degradation of the properties of the alloy take place.

  18. Fretting of Nickel-Chromium-Aluminum Alloys at Temperatures to 816 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of four nickel-based alloys containing 10 percent and 20 percent chromium in combination with 2 percent and 5 percent aluminum were fretted in dry air at temperatures to 816 C. At all temperatures, the alloys showed far less fretting wear than did high-purity nickel. This was attributed to the formation of protective oxide films on the alloys, the result of the selective oxidation of the alloy constituents. Increasing the aluminum concentration reduced fretting wear at all temperatures. Increasing the chromium concentration from 10 percent to 20 percent resulted in decreased fretting wear at 23 and 540 C, but increased fretting wear at 650 and 816 C.

  19. Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Fine-Grain Nickel-Based Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Constant-Kmax fatigue crack growth tests were performed on two finegrain nickel-base alloys Inconel 718 (DA) and Ren 95 to determine if these alloys exhibit near-threshold time-dependent crack growth behavior observed for fine-grain aluminum alloys in room-temperature laboratory air. Test results showed that increases in K(sub max) values resulted in increased crack growth rates, but no evidence of time-dependent crack growth was observed for either nickel-base alloy at room temperature.

  20. Copper, Aluminum and Nickel: A New Monocrystalline Orthodontic Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierenga, Mark

    Introduction: This study was designed to evaluate, via tensile and bend testing, the mechanical properties of a newly-developed monocrystalline orthodontic archwire comprised of a blend of copper, aluminum, and nickel (CuAlNi). Methods: The sample was comprised of three shape memory alloys; CuAlNi, copper nickel titanium (CuNiTi), and nickel titanium (NiTi); from various orthodontic manufacturers in both 0.018" round and 0.019" x 0.025" rectangular dimensions. Additional data was gathered for similarly sized stainless steel and beta-titanium archwires as a point of reference for drawing conclusions about the relative properties of the archwires. Measurements of loading and unloading forces were recorded in both tension and deflection testing. Repeated-measure ANOVA (alpha= 0.05) was used to compare loading and unloading forces across wires and one-way ANOVA (alpha= 0.05) was used to compare elastic moduli and hysteresis. To identify significant differences, Tukey post-hoc comparisons were performed. Results: The modulus of elasticity, deflection forces, and hysteresis profiles of CuAlNi were significantly different than the other superelastic wires tested. In all tests, CuAlNi had a statistically significant lower modulus of elasticity compared to the CuNiTi and NiTi wires (P <0.0001). The CuAlNi wire exhibited significantly lower loading and unloading forces than any other wire tested. In round wire tensile tests, loading force at all deflections was significantly lower for CuAlNi than CuNiTi or NiTi (P <0.0001). In tensile testing, the CuAlNi alloy was able to recover from a 7 mm extension (10% elongation) without permanent deformation and with little to no loss in force output. In large-deflection bend tests at 4, 5, and 6 mm deflection, CuAlNi showed the significantly lowest loading forces across the three wire materials (P <0.0001). The NiTi wires showed up to 12 times the amount of energy loss due to hysteresis compared to CuAlNi. CuAlNi showed a hysteresis

  1. Effects of thermomechanical processing on strength and toughness of iron - 12-percent-nickel - reactive metal alloys at -196 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermomechanical processing (TMP) was evaluated as a method of strengthening normally tough iron-12-nickel-reactive metal alloys at cryogenic temperatures. Five iron-12 nickel alloys with reactive metal additions of aluminum, niobium, titanium, vanadium, and aluminum plus niobium were investigated. Primary evaluation was based on the yield strength and fracture toughness of the thermomechanically processed alloys at -196 C.

  2. Fundamental Understanding of the Intrinsic Ductility in Nickel-Base L12 Type Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-12

    COSATI CO0ES I L SUBJE CT TIE RMS (Conue an eo e eee it necessary and identify by blb .un bPe) . ". Eo GROUP SUB. G. Nickel Aluminide , Single...Ni3Al alloys, three series of alloys were formulated and produced as singl’e--crtals. The alloying additions selected include tantalum, tin and titanium ...been completed-for a tantalum and a titanium -containing alloy. Relative .. to the binary alloy, the alloying additions were found to significantly

  3. Multiscale Characterization of Nickel Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Keith

    Shape memory alloys were characterized by a variety of methods to investigate the relationship between microstructural phase transformation, macroscale deformation due to mechanical loading, material geometry, and initial material state. The major portion of the work is application of digital image correlation at several length scales to SMAs under mechanical loading. In addition, the connection between electrical resistance, stress, and strain was studied in NiTi wires. Finally, a new processing method was investigated to develop porous NiTi samples, which can be examined under DIC in future work. The phase transformation temperatures of a Nickel-Titanium based shape memory alloy (SMA) were initially evaluated under stress-free conditions by the differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) technique. Results show that the phase transformation temperature is significantly higher for transition from de-twinned martensite to austenite than from twinned martensite or R phase to austenite. To further examine transformation temperatures as a function of initial state a tensile test apparatus with in-situ electrical resistance (ER) measurements was used to evaluate the transformation properties of SMAs at a variety of stress levels and initial compositions. The results show that stress has a significant influence on the transformation of detwinned martensite, but a small influence on R phase and twinned martensite transformations. Electrical resistance changes linearly with strain during the transformations from both kinds of martensite to austenite. The linearity between ER and strain during the transformation from de-twinned martensite to austenite is not affected by the stress, facilitating application to control algorithms. A revised phase diagram is drawn to express these results. To better understand the nature of the local and global strain fields that accompany phase transformation in shape memory alloys (SMAs), here we use high resolution imaging together with image

  4. Tool life and surface integrity aspects when drilling nickel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, S.; Pervaiz, S.; Vincent, S.; Karthikeyan, R.

    2018-04-01

    Nickel based super alloys manufactured through powder metallurgy (PM) route are required to increase the operational efficiency of gas turbine engines. They are material of choice for high pressure components due to their superior high temperature strength, excellent corrosion, oxidation and creep resistance. This unique combination of mechanical and thermal properties makes them even more difficult-to-machine. In this paper, the hole making process using coated carbide inserts by drilling and plunge milling for a nickel-based powder metallurgy super alloy has been investigated. Tool life and process capability studies were conducted using optimized process parameters using high pressure coolants. The experimental trials were directed towards an assessment of the tendency for surface malformations and detrimental residual stress profiles. Residual stresses in both the radial and circumferential directions have been evaluated as a function of depth from the machined surface using the target strain gauge / center hole drilling method. Circumferential stresses near workpiece surface and at depth of 512 µm in the starting material was primarily circumferential compression which was measured to be average of –404 MPa. However, the radial stresses near workpiece surface was tensile and transformed to be compressive in nature at depth of 512 µm in the starting material (average: -87 Mpa). The magnitude and the depth below the machined surface in both radial and circumferential directions were primarily tensile in nature which increased with hole number due to a rise of temperature at the tool–workpiece interface with increasing tool wear. These profiles are of critical importance for the selection of cutting strategies to ensure avoidance/minimization of tensile residual stresses that can be detrimental to the fatigue performance of the components. These results clearly show a tendency for the circumferential stresses to be more tensile than the radial stresses

  5. Nickel-silver alloy electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and oxidation in an alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Tang, Maureen H; Hahn, Christopher; Klobuchar, Aidan J; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Wellendorff, Jess; Bligaard, Thomas; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2014-09-28

    The development of improved catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in basic electrolytes remains a major technical obstacle to improved fuel cells, water electrolyzers, and other devices for electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Based on the free energy of adsorbed hydrogen intermediates, theory predicts that alloys of nickel and silver are active for these reactions. In this work, we synthesize binary nickel-silver bulk alloys across a range of compositions and show that nickel-silver alloys are indeed more active than pure nickel for hydrogen evolution and, possibly, hydrogen oxidation. To overcome the mutual insolubility of silver and nickel, we employ electron-beam physical vapor codeposition, a low-temperature synthetic route to metastable alloys. This method also produces flat and uniform films that facilitate the measurement of intrinsic catalytic activity with minimal variations in the surface area, ohmic contact, and pore transport. Rotating-disk-electrode measurements demonstrate that the hydrogen evolution activity per geometric area of the most active catalyst in this study, Ni0.75Ag0.25, is approximately twice that of pure nickel and has comparable stability and hydrogen oxidation activity. Our experimental results are supported by density functional theory calculations, which show that bulk alloying of Ni and Ag creates a variety of adsorption sites, some of which have near-optimal hydrogen binding energy.

  6. Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, Jackson H.; Selle, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

  7. Refining a complex nickel alloy to remove a sulfur impurity during vacuum induction melting: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. V.; Min, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    The results of studying the refining of complexly alloyed nickel melts from sulfur during melting in a vacuum induction furnace or with the use of an oxide calcium crucible, metallic calcium added to a melt, or rare-earth metals additions (which form thermodynamically stable refractory compounds with sulfur and, thus, eliminate the harmful effect of sulfur in the alloys) are reported.

  8. Systems and Methods for the Electrodeposition of a Nickel-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogozalek, Nance Jo (Inventor); Wistrand, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrodepositing a nickel-cobalt alloy using a rotating cylinder electrode assembly with a plating surface and an electrical contact. The assembly is placed within a plating bath and rotated while running a plating cycle. Nickel-cobalt alloy deposition is selectively controlled by controlling current density distribution and/or cobalt content in the plating bath while running the plating cycle to deposit an alloy of a desired yield strength onto the plating surface in a single plating cycle. In various embodiments, the rotating cylinder may be used as an insitu monitoring method to assist in obtaining the properties desired.

  9. The development of additive manufacturing technique for nickel-base alloys: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadi-Maad, Ahmad; Basuki, Arif

    2018-04-01

    Nickel-base alloys are an attractive alloy due to its excellent mechanical properties, a high resistance to creep deformation, corrosion, and oxidation. However, it is a hard task to control performance when casting or forging for this material. In recent years, additive manufacturing (AM) process has been implemented to replace the conventional directional solidification process for the production of nickel-base alloys. Due to its potentially lower cost and flexibility manufacturing process, AM is considered as a substitute technique for the existing. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the previous work related to the AM techniques for Ni-base alloys while highlighting current challenges and methods to solving them. The properties of conventionally manufactured Ni-base alloys are also compared with the AM fabricated alloys. The mechanical properties obtained from tension, hardness and fatigue test are included, along with discussions of the effect of post-treatment process. Recommendations for further work are also provided.

  10. Plating Repair Of Nickel-Alloy Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Steve K.; Chagnon, Kevin M.

    1989-01-01

    Procedure for localized electrodeposition of nickel enables repair of small damaged nickel-based pressure vessels. Electrodeposition restores weakened areas of vessel wall to at least their former strength.

  11. Strengthening via deformation twinning in a nickel alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Shaw, Leon L.; Villegas, Juan; Huang, Jian-Yu; ...

    2007-07-01

    In this study, nanograins and nanotwins are produced in specimens using one processing technique to allow direct comparison in their nanohardnesses. It is shown that the hardness of nanotwins can be close to the lower end of the hardness of nanograins. The resistance of nanotwins to dislocation movement is explained based on elastic interactions between the incident 60° dislocation and the product dislocations. The latter includes one Shockley partial at the twin boundary and one 60° dislocation in the twinned region. The analysis indicates that a resolved shear stress of at least 1.24 GPa is required for a 60° dislocationmore » to pass across a twin boundary in the nickel alloy investigated. It is this high level of the required shear stress coupled with a limited number of dislocations that can be present between two adjacent twin boundaries that provides nanotwins with high resistance to dislocation movement. The model proposed is corroborated by the detailed analysis of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.« less

  12. Development and Processing of Nickel Aluminide-Carbide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, Timothy Scott

    1996-01-01

    With the upper temperature limit of the Ni-based superalloys attained, a new class of materials is required. Intermetallics appear as likely candidates because of their attractive physical properties. With a relatively low density, high thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance, high melting point, and simple crystal structure, nickel aluminide (NiAl) appears to be a potential candidate. However, NiAl is limited in structural applications due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor elevated temperature strength. One approach to improving these properties has been through the application of eutectic composites. Researchers have shown that containerless directional solidification of NiAl-based eutectic alloys can provide improvement in both the creep strength and fracture toughness. Although these systems have shown improvements in the mechanical properties, the presence of refractory metals increases the density significantly in some alloys. Lower density systems, such as the carbides, nitrides, and borides, may provide NiAl-based eutectic structure. With little or no information available on these systems, experimental investigation is required. The objective of this research was to locate and develop NiAl-carbide eutectic alloys. Exploratory arc-melts were performed in NiAl-refractory metal-C systems. Refractory metal systems investigated included Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, and Zr. Systems containing carbides with excellent stability (i.e.,HfC, NbC, TaC, TiC, and ZrC) produced large blocky cubic carbides in an NiAl matrix. The carbides appeared to have formed in the liquid state and were randomly distributed throughout the polycrystalline NiAl. The Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and W systems contained NiAl dendrites with a two-phase interdendritic microconstituent present. Of these systems, the NiAl-Mo-C system had the most promising microstructure for in-situ composites. Three processing techniques were used to evaluate the NiAl-Mo-C system

  13. Corrosion Characterization in Nickel Plated 110 ksi Low Alloy Steel and Incoloy 925: An Experimental Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Kiran; Vincent, S.; Barbadikar, Dipika; Kumar, Shresh; Anwar, Rebin; Fernandes, Nevil

    2018-04-01

    Incoloy 925 is an age hardenable Nickel-Iron-Chromium alloy with the addition of Molybdenum, Copper, Titanium and Aluminium used in many applications in oil and gas industry. Nickel alloys are preferred mostly in corrosive environments where there is high concentration of H2S, CO2, chlorides and free Sulphur as sufficient nickel content provides protection against chloride-ion stress-corrosion cracking. But unfortunately, Nickel alloys are very expensive. Plating an alloy steel part with nickel would cost much lesser than a part make of nickel alloy for large quantities. A brief study will be carried out to compare the performance of nickel plated alloy steel with that of an Incoloy 925 part by conducting corrosion tests. Tests will be carried out using different coating thicknesses of Nickel on low alloy steel in 0.1 M NaCl solution and results will be verified. From the test results we can confirm that Nickel plated low alloy steel is found to exhibit fairly good corrosion in comparison with Incoloy 925 and thus can be an excellent candidate to replace Incoloy materials.

  14. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-01-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 degrees C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 degrees C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 degrees C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics.

  15. Sound Velocities of Iron-Nickel and Iron-Nickel-Silicon Alloys at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. A.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Murphy, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismological and cosmochemical studies suggest Earth's core is primarily composed of iron with ~5 to 10 wt% nickel and some light elements [e.g. 1]. To date, the concentration of nickel and the amount and identity of light elements remain poorly constrained due in part to the difficulty of conducting experimental measurements at core conditions. The vibrational properties of a variety iron alloys paired with seismic observations can help better constrain the composition of the core. We directly measured the partial phonon density of states of bcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe0.85Ni0.1Si0.05 at high pressures. The samples were compressed using a panoramic diamond anvil cell. A subset of the experiments were conducted using neon as a pressure transmitting medium. Measurements of high statistical quality were performed with nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) at sector 3-ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source [2, 3, 4]. The unit cell volume of each sample was determined at each compression point with in-situ x-ray diffraction at sector 3-ID-B before and after each NRIXS measurement. The Debye, compressional, and shear sound velocities were determined from the low energy region of the partial phonon density of states paired with the volume measurements. We will present partial phonon density of states and sound velocities for Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe0.85Ni0.1Si0.05 at high-pressure and compare with those of pure iron. References: [1] McDonough, W.F. (2004): Compositional Model for the Earth's Core. Elsevier Ltd., Oxford. [2] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2011.07.001. [3] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Grüneisen parameter of hcp-Fe to 171 GPa, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2011GL049531. [4] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, and W. Sturhahn (2013): Experimental constraints on the

  16. A nickel base alloy, NASA WAZ-16, with potential for gas turbine stator vane application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A nickel-base superalloy based on the nickel-aluminum-tungsten system designated WAZ-16 was developed for high strength in the 1095 C (2000 F) to 1205 C (2200 F) range. Its tensile strength at the latter temperature is approximately 186 MN/m2 (27,000 psi). The combination of properties of the alloy suggest that it has potential as a stator vane material in advanced gas turbine engines.

  17. Regenerability of hydrotalcite-derived nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles for syngas production from biomass tar.

    PubMed

    Li, Dalin; Koike, Mitsuru; Wang, Lei; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Xu, Ya; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2014-02-01

    Nickel-iron/magnesium/aluminum bimetallic catalysts were prepared by the calcination and reduction of nickel-magnesium-iron-aluminum hydrotalcite-like compounds. Characterization suggests that, at iron/nickel≤0.5, both nickel and iron species are homogeneously distributed in the hydrotalcite precursor and incorporated into the Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O periclase after calcination, giving rise to uniform nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles after reduction. Ni-Fe/Mg/Al (Fe/Ni=0.25) exhibits the best catalytic performance for the steam reforming of tar derived from the pyrolysis of biomass. It is suggested that the uniform nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles and the synergy between nickel and iron are responsible for the high catalytic performance. Moreover, the Ni-Fe/Mg/Al catalyst exhibits much better regenerability toward oxidation-reduction treatment for the removal of deposited coke than that of conventional Ni-Fe/α-Al2 O3 . This property can be attributed to the better regeneration of Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles through the formation and reduction of Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Electrodeposition of High Quality Nickel Phosphorous Alloys for Pollution Reduction and Energy Conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell; Ramsey, Brian

    2003-01-01

    NASA and the University of Alabama in Huntsville have developed ecologically friendly, versatile nickel and nickel cobalt phosphorous electroplating processes. Solutions show excellent performance with high efficiency for vastly extended throughput. Properties include, clean, low temperature operation (40 - 60 C), high Faradaic efficiency, low stress and high hardness. A variety of alloy and plating speed options are easily achieved from the same chemistry using soluble anodes for metal replacement with only 25% of the phosphorous additions required for electroless nickel. Thick deposits are easily achieved unattended, for electroforming freestanding shapes without buildup of excess orthophosphate or stripping of equipment.

  19. Electrodeposition of High Quality Nickel Phosphorous Alloys for Pollution Reduction and Energy Conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell; Ramsey, Brian

    2004-01-01

    NASA and the University of Alabama in Huntsville have developed ecologically friendly, versatile nickel and nickel cobalt phosphorous electroplating processes. Solutions show excellent performance with high efficiency for vastly extended throughput. Properties include, clean, low temperature operation (40 - 60 C), high Faradaic efficiency, low stress and high hardness. A variety of alloy and plating speed options are easily achieved from the same chemistry using soluble anodes for metal replacement with only 25% of the phosphorous additions required for electroless nickel. Thick deposits are easily achieved unattended, for electroforming freestanding shapes without buildup of excess orthophosphate or stripping of equipment.

  20. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutina, Yu. N.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Anisimov, A. G.; Shevtsova, L. I.

    2015-10-01

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  1. Iron-nickel-chromium alloy having improved swelling resistance and low neutron absorbence

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1986-01-01

    An iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloy suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding which utilizes the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. The alloy consists essentially of about 33-39.5% nickel, 7.5-16% chromium, 1.5-4% niobium, 0.1-0.7% silicon, 0.01-0.2% zirconium, 1-3% titanium, 0.2-0.6% aluminum, and the remainder essentially all iron. Up to 0.4% manganese and up to 0.010% magnesium can be added to inhibit trace element effects.

  2. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    SciT

    Malyutina, Yu. N., E-mail: iuliiamaliutina@gmail.com; Bataev, A. A., E-mail: bataev@adm.nstu.ru; Shevtsova, L. I., E-mail: edeliya2010@mail.ru

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  3. Vacuum Levels Needed to Simulate Internal Fatigue Crack Growth in Titanium Alloys and Nickel-Base Superalloys Thermaodynamic Conditioners (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0412 VACUUM LEVELS NEEDED TO SIMULATE INTERNAL FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH IN TITANIUM ALLOYS AND NICKEL - BASE SUPERALLOYS...LEVELS NEEDED TO SIMULATE INTERNAL FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH IN TITANIUM ALLOYS AND NICKEL - BASE SUPERALLOYS: THERMAODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS (PREPRINT) 5a...have examined fatigue growth of surface cracks in vacuum to simulate sub-surface growth in Ti- alloys and Ni - base superalloys. Even with the highest

  4. Vacuum Levels Needed to Simulate Internal Fatigue Crack Growth in Titanium Alloys and Nickel-base Superalloys: Thermodynamic Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0250 VACUUM LEVELS NEEDED TO SIMULATE INTERNAL FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH IN TITANIUM ALLOYS AND NICKEL - BASE SUPERALLOYS...TITANIUM ALLOYS AND NICKEL - BASE SUPERALLOYS: THERMODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...surface growth in Ti- alloys and Ni - base superalloys. Even with the highest vacuum level attained using “state-of-the-art” pumps, it is unclear if

  5. Method for determining the hardness of strain hardening articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Steven A.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a rapid nondestructive method for determining the extent of strain hardening in an article of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy. The method comprises saturating the article with a magnetic field from a permanent magnet, measuring the magnetic flux emanating from the article, comparing the measurements of the magnetic flux emanating from the article with measured magnetic fluxes from similarly shaped standards of the alloy with known amounts of strain hardening to determine the hardness.

  6. Properties of experimental copper-aluminium-nickel alloys for dental post-and-core applications.

    PubMed

    Rittapai, Apiwat; Urapepon, Somchai; Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep; Harniratisai, Choltacha

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to develop a copper-aluminium-nickel alloy which has properties comparable to that of dental alloys used for dental post and core applications with the reasonable cost. Sixteen groups of experimental copper alloys with variants of 3, 6, 9, 12 wt% Al and 0, 2, 4, 6 wt% Ni were prepared and casted. Their properties were tested and evaluated. The data of thermal, physical, and mechanical properties were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The alloy toxicity was evaluated according to the ISO standard. The solidus and liquidus points of experimental alloys ranged from 1023℃ to 1113℃ and increased as the nickel content increased. The highest ultimate tensile strength (595.9 ± 14.2 MPa) was shown in the Cu-12Al-4Ni alloy. The tensile strength was increased as the both elements increased. Alloys with 3-6 wt% Al exhibited a small amount of 0.2% proof strength. Accordingly, the Cu-9Al-2Ni and Cu-9Al-4Ni alloys not only demonstrated an appropriate modulus of elasticity (113.9 ± 8.0 and 122.8 ± 11.3 GPa, respectively), but also had a value of 0.2% proof strength (190.8 ± 4.8 and 198.2 ± 3.4 MPa, respectively), which complied with the ISO standard requirement (>180 MPa). Alloys with the highest contents of nickel (6 wt% Ni) revealed a widespread decolourisation zone (5.0-5.9 mm), which correspondingly produced the largest cell response, equating positive control. The copper alloys fused with 9 wt% Al and 2-4 wt% Ni can be considered for a potential use as dental post and core applications.

  7. DC Electric Arc Furnace Application for Production of Nickel-Boron Master Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Murat; Tasyürek, Kerem Can; Bugdayci, Mehmet; Turan, Ahmet; Yücel, Onuralp

    2017-09-01

    In this study, nickel-boron (Ni-B) alloys were produced via a carbothermic reduction starting from boric acid (H3BO3) with high-purity nickel oxide (NiO), charcoal, and wood chips in a direct current arc furnace. In electric arc furnace experiments, different starting mixtures were used, and their effects on the chemical compositions of the final Ni-B alloys were investigated. After the reduction and melting stages, Ni-B alloys were obtained by tapping from the bottom of the furnace. The samples from the designated areas were also taken and analyzed. The chemical composition of the final alloys and selected samples were measured with wet chemical analysis. The Ni-B alloys had a composition of up to 14.82 mass% B. The phase contents of the final alloys and selected samples were measured using x-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD data helped predict possible reactions and reaction mechanisms. The material and energy balance calculations were made via the XRD Rietveld and chemical compositions. Nickel boride phases started to form 600 mm below the surface. The targeted NiB phase was detected at the tapping zone of the crucible (850-900 mm depth). The energy consumption was 1.84-4.29 kWh/kg, and the electrode consumption was 10-12 g/kg of raw material charged.

  8. Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment of a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    Existing Dual Microstructure Heat Treat (DMHT) technology was successfully applied to Alloy 10, a high strength, nickel-base disk alloy, to produce a disk with a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim. Specimens were extracted from the DMHT disk and tested in tension, creep, fatigue, and crack growth using conditions pertinent to disk applications. These data were then compared with data from "traditional" subsolvus and supersolvus heat treatments for Alloy 10. The results showed the DMHT disk to have a high strength, fatigue resistant bore comparable to that of subsolvus Alloy 10. Further, creep resistance of the DMHT rim was comparable to that of supersolvus Alloy 10. Crack growth resistance in the DMHT rim, while better than that for subsolvus, was inferior to that of supersolvus Alloy 10. The slow cool at the end of the DMHT conversion and/or the subsolvus resolution step are thought to be responsible for degrading rim DMHT crack growth resistance.

  9. High gas velocity oxidation and hot corrosion testing of oxide dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) nickel-base alloys were tested in high velocity gases for cyclic oxidation resistance at temperatures to 1200 C and times to 500 hours and for hot corrosion resistance at 900 C for 200 hours. Nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS alloys were found to have superior resistance to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to bare and coated nickel-chromium ODS alloys. The best of the alloys tested had compositions of nickel - 15.5 to 16 weight percent chromium with aluminum weight percents between 4.5 and 5.0. All of the nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS materials experienced small weight losses (less than 16 mg/sq cm).

  10. The determination of the stacking fault energy in copper-nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for determining the stacking fault energies of a series of nickel-copper alloys to gain an insight into the embrittling effect of hydrogen are evaluated. Plans for employing weak beam dark field electron microscopy to determine stacking fault energies are outlined.

  11. Study made of corrosion resistance of stainless steel and nickel alloys in nuclear reactor superheaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Hart, R. K.; Lee, R. H.; Ruther, W. E.; Schlueter, R. R.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments performed under conditions found in nuclear reactor superheaters determine the corrosion rate of stainless steel and nickel alloys used in them. Electropolishing was the primary surface treatment before the corrosion test. Corrosion is determined by weight loss of specimens after defilming.

  12. Joining precipitation-hardened nickel-base alloys by friction welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Solid state deformation welding process, friction welding, has been developed for joining precipitation hardened nickel-base alloys and other gamma prime-strengthened materials which heretofore have been virtually unweldable. Method requires rotation of one of the parts to be welded, but where applicable, it is an ideal process for high volume production jobs.

  13. An electron-microscope study of alpha to gamma transformation in an iron-nickel alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobodyuk, V. A.; Khandros, L. G.; Fedas, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures used to study the alpha to gamma conversion in thin foils of an iron alloy with 32% nickel concentration and initial martensite conversion temperature of -60 C are described. Photomicrographs show deformation twinning as well as changes in samples after they were heated. Reverse conversion is discussed and results are examined.

  14. Electrochemical polishing of thread fastener test specimens of nickel-chromium iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kephart, Alan R.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical polishing device and method for selective anodic dissolution of the surface of test specimens comprised, for example, of nickel-chromium-iron alloys, which provides for uniform dissolution at the localized sites to remove metal through the use of a coiled wire electrode (cathode) placed in the immediate proximity of the working, surface resulting in a polished and uniform grain boundary.

  15. The elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloy in molten salt corrosion by using nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qiantao; Liu, Ke; Gao, Jie; Li, Xiaolin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Nickel-based alloys as candidate materials for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR), need to be used under high temperature in molten salt environment. In order to ensure the safety of the reactor running, it is necessary to study the elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloys in the high temperature molten salts. In this work, the scanning nuclear microprobe at Fudan University was applied to study the elemental move. The Nickel-based alloy samples were corroded by molten salt at different temperatures. The element concentrations in the Nickel-based alloys samples were determined by the scanning nuclear microprobe. Micro-PIXE results showed that the element concentrations changed from the interior to the exterior of the alloy samples after the corrosion.

  16. Wear of carbide inserts with complex surface treatment when milling nickel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Sergey; Swe, Min Htet; Kapitanov, Alexey; Egorov, Sergey

    2018-03-01

    One of the effective ways of strengthening hard alloys is the creating structure layers on their surface with the gradient distribution of physical and mechanical properties between the wear-resistant coating and the base material. The article discusses the influence of the near-surface layer which is modified by low-energy high-current electron-beam alloying and the upper anti-friction layer in a multi-component coating on the wear mechanism of the replaceable multifaceted plates in the dry milling of the difficult to machine nickel alloys.

  17. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures oftungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  18. Resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys to cyclic oxidation at 1100 C and 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-rich alloys in the Ni-Cr-Al system were evaluated for cyclic oxidation resistance in still air at 1,100 and 1,200 C. A first approximation oxidation attack parameter Ka was derived from specific weight change data involving both a scaling growth constant and a spalling constant. An estimating equation was derived with Ka as a function of the Cr and Al content by multiple linear regression and translated into countour ternary diagrams showing regions of minimum attack. An additional factor inferred from the regression analysis was that alloys melted in zirconia crucibles had significantly greater oxidation resistance than comparable alloys melted otherwise.

  19. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures of tungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  20. The strengthening mechanism of a nickel-based alloy after laser shock processing at high temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinghong; Zhou, Liucheng; He, Weifeng; He, Guangyu; Wang, Xuede; Nie, Xiangfan; Wang, Bo; Luo, Sihai; Li, Yuqin

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the strengthening mechanism of laser shock processing (LSP) at high temperatures in the K417 nickel-based alloy. Using a laser-induced shock wave, residual compressive stresses and nanocrystals with a length of 30–200 nm and a thickness of 1 μm are produced on the surface of the nickel-based alloy K417. When the K417 alloy is subjected to heat treatment at 900 °C after LSP, most of the residual compressive stress relaxes while the microhardness retains good thermal stability; the nanocrystalline surface has not obviously grown after the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, which shows a comparatively good thermal stability. There are several reasons for the good thermal stability of the nanocrystalline surface, such as the low value of cold hardening of LSP, extreme high-density defects and the grain boundary pinning of an impure element. The results of the vibration fatigue experiments show that the fatigue strength of K417 alloy is enhanced and improved from 110 to 285 MPa after LSP. After the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, the fatigue strength is 225 MPa; the heat treatment has not significantly reduced the reinforcement effect. The feature of the LSP strengthening mechanism of nickel-based alloy at a high temperature is the co-working effect of the nanocrystalline surface and the residual compressive stress after thermal relaxation. PMID:27877617

  1. Mortality among workers in a nickel refinery and alloy manufacturing plant in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Enterline, P E; Marsh, G M

    1982-06-01

    Workers from a nickel refinery at Huntington, W. Va., which received a nickel matte from smelters in Ontario, Canada, during 1922-47 were studied for excesses in sinonasal and lung cancers. Other workers who were in a nickel alloy production plant operated in conjunction with the refinery but who did not work in the refinery were also studied. Evidence is presented on the existence of a nasal cancer hazard and possibly a lung cancer hazard among workers employed in the nickel refinery. Two of these workers developed a sinonasal cancer. Evidence of a respiratory cancer hazard in other parts of the plant before or after 1947 is weak, and the observed results could be due to chance variations from the mortality experience of the standard reference populations. Among nonrefinery workers hired while the nickel refinery was in operation, 2 employees had a probable sinonasal cancer. The first employee worked in a high-temperature conversion process where nickel carbonate was decomposed to nickel oxide, and the second employee is believed to have done maintenance work in the plant where this process was used. For both cohorts combined there were slight overall excesses in lung, stomach, and prostate cancers with some evidence of a dose-response relationship for these cancers.

  2. The effect of nickel addition on antimicrobial, physical, and mechanical properties of copper-nickel alloy against suspensions of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhayani, Dinni; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection can cause serious illness. Humans can be infected by E. coli via contact with the contaminated food and water. Copper and copper alloys were known for their antimicrobial properties and were applied in several healthcare setting as antimicrobial material. However, the people preference in the appearance of stainless steel and aluminum contribute to the low application of copper and its alloy. In this study, the mechanical, physical, and antibacterial properties of copper and copper-nickel alloy compared with stainless steel 304 were tested. The antibacterial activity of stainless steel, copper, and copper-nickel alloy was evaluated by inoculating 7.5 × 106 - 2.5 × 107 CFU/ml suspensions of E. coli. The bacterial colonies were investigated after 0-4 hour incubation at 37°C. The result showed that on the observation time, copper and copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloys have antibacterial activity while the bacteria in stainless steel remain existed. The appearance (color / shade) of Cu-Ni alloys in some composition is silvery which is stainless steel-like. For the mechanical properties, copper-nickel alloys have lower hardness than stainless steel (SS 304). This research proved that copper-nickel alloys have the ability to reduce the amount of E. col colonies. The copper content may affect the antibacterial activity but not directly linked. Cu-Ni alloys also have the appearance and mechanical properties that quite similar compared to SS304. Therefore, Cu-Ni alloys have the potential to be applied as substitution or complementary material of SS304 in various applications for preventing the bacterial contamination especially E. coli.

  3. Iron-nickel alloys as canister material for radioactive waste disposal in underground repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apps, J. A.

    1982-09-01

    Canisters containing high-level radioactive waste must retain their integrity in an underground waste repository for at least one thousand years after burial (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1981). Since no direct means of verifying canister integrity is plausible over such a long period, indirect methods must be chosen. A persuasive approach is to examine the natural environment and find a suitable material which is thermodynamically compatible with the host rock under the environmental conditions with the host rock under the environmental conditions expected in a waste repository. Several candidates have been proposed, among them being iron-nickel alloys that are known to occur naturally in altered ultramafic rocks. The following review of stability relations among iron-nickel alloys below 3500 C is the initial phase of a more detailed evaluation of these alloys as suitable canister materials.

  4. Effects of neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of nickel-base fastener alloys

    SciT

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture behavior and deformation microstructure of high-strength nickel-base alloy fastener materials, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625. Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition, and Alloy 625 in the direct aged condition were irradiated to a fluence of 2.4x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} at 264 C in the Advanced Test Reactor. Deformation structures at low strains were examined. It was previously shown that Alloy X-750 undergoes hardening, a significant degradation in ductility and an increase in intergranular fracture. In contrast, Alloy 625 had shown softening with a concomitant increase in ductility and transgranularmore » failure after irradiation. The deformation microstructures of the two alloys were also different. Alloy X-750 deformed by a planar slip mechanism with fine microcracks forming at the intersections of slip bands with grain boundaries. Alloy 625 showed much more homogeneous deformation with fine, closely spaced slip bands and an absence of microcracks. The mechanism(s) of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) are discussed.« less

  5. Phase Relations of Iron and Iron-Nickel Alloys up to 3 Mbars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Y.; Hirose, K.; Sata, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Iron is believed to be the major component of the Earth's core because it is the most abundant element that satisfies the observed seismic densities. Based on cosmochemical models and the studies of iron meteorites, it is generally accepted that the Earth's core also contains substantial amounts of nickel. Therefore, the high pressure behaviour of iron-nickel alloys is crucially important for interpreting and constraining geophysical and geochemical models of the Earth's core. The phase relation of iron at relatively low pressure has been well established. α-Fe with bcc structure at ambient condition transforms to γ-Fe at high temperature and to ɛ-Fe with hcp structure at above ~ 10 GPa. In contrast, the phase relation and the crystal structure at high pressure and temperature are still highly controversial. The phase relations of iron-nickel alloys were also studied in an externally-heated diamond-anvil cell (Huang et al. 1988, 1992) and in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (Lin et al. 2002, Mao et al. 2005, Dubrovinsky et al. 2007), but these experiments were limited to the pressure of 225 GPa. Applications of the previous results to the Earth's inner core conditions required significant extrapolations. In this study, we have investigated the phase relations of iron and a number of iron-nickel alloys in a wide range of pressures (>300 GPa), temperatures (>2000 K) and compositions (0-80 wt% Ni) using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell with synchrotron x-ray diffraction. For iron, in-situ x-ray diffraction studies showed a wide range of stability of ɛ-Fe with an hcp structure up to 300 GPa and 2000 K and up to 343 GPa at room temperature. No evidence for the existence of phases other than ɛ-Fe, such as β-Fe with a dhcp structure (suggested by Dubrovinsky et al. 2000) or orthorhombic structure (suggested by Andrault et al. 1997), was observed. For iron-nickel alloys, high pressure and temperature experiments were conducted on Fe-18.4 wt% Ni, Fe-24.9 wt% Ni, Fe

  6. Ignition characteristics of the nickel-based alloy UNS N07718 in pressurized oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, James W.; Billiard, Phillip A.; Hurley, James A.; Mcdermott, Kathleen M.; Vazquez, Isaura

    1989-01-01

    The development of ignition and combustion in pressurized oxygen atmospheres was studied for the nickel based alloy UNS N07718. Ignition of the alloy was achieved by heating the top. It was found that the alloy would autoheat to destruction from temperatures below the solidus temperature. In addition, endothermic events occurred as the alloy was heated, many at reproducible temperatures. Many endothermic events occurred prior to abrupt increases in surface temperature and appeared to accelerate the rate of increase in specimen temperature. It appeared that the source of some endotherms may increase the oxidation rate of the alloy. Ignition parameters are defined and the temperatures at which these parameters occur are given for the oxygen pressure range of 1.72 to 13.8 MPa (250 to 2000 psia).

  7. Elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovic, J. J.; Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Sensitivity of the elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel to grain size and shape was examined in both tension and creep. Elevated temperature strength increased with increasing grain diameter and increasing L/D ratio. Measured activation enthalpies in tension and creep were not the same. In tension, the internal stress was not proportional to the shear modulus. Creep activation enthalpies increased with increasing L/D ratio and increasing grain diameter, to high values compared with that of the self diffusion enthalpy. It has been postulated that two concurrent processes contribute to the elevated temperature deformation of polycrystalline TD-nickel: (1) diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and (2) dislocation motion.

  8. NASA Lewis Nickel Alloy being Poured in the Technical Service Building

    1966-04-21

    A nickel alloy developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center being poured in a shop inside the Technical Services Building. Materials technology is an important element in the successful development of both advanced airbreathing and rocket propulsion systems. An array of dependable materials is needed to build different types of engines for operation in diverse environments. NASA Lewis began investigating the characteristics of different materials shortly after World War II. In 1949 the materials research group was expanded into its own division. The Lewis researchers studied and tested materials in environments that simulated the environment in which they would operate. Lewis created two programs in the early 1960s to create materials for new airbreathing engines. One concentrated on high-temperature alloys and the other on cooling turbine blades. William Klopp, Peter Raffo, Lester Rubenstein, and Walter Witzke developed Tungsten RHC, the highest strength metal at temperatures over 3500⁰ F. The men received an IR-100 Award for their efforts. Similarly a cobalt-tungsten alloy was developed by the Fatigue and Alloys Research Branch. The result was a combination of high temperature strength and magnetic properties that were applicable for generator rotor application. John Freche invented and patented a nickel alloy while searching for high temperature metals for aerospace use. NASA agreed to a three-year deal which granted Union Carbide exclusive use of the new alloy before it became public property.

  9. Bending properties of a new nickel-titanium alloy with a lower percent by weight of nickel.

    PubMed

    Testarelli, Luca; Plotino, Gianluca; Al-Sudani, Dina; Vincenzi, Valentina; Giansiracusa, Alessio; Grande, Nicola M; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bending properties of Hyflex instruments, which exhibit a lower percent in weight of nickel (52 Ni %wt) and compare them with other commercially available nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments. Ten instruments with tip size 25, 0.06 taper of each of the following NiTi rotary instrumentation techniques were selected for the study: Hyflex, EndoSequence, ProFile, Hero, and Flexmasters. All instruments from each group were tested for stiffness by comparing their bending moment when they attained a 45-degree bend. Experimental procedures strictly followed testing methodology described in ISO 3630-1. All data were recorded and subjected to statistical evaluation by using analysis of variance test. Statistical significance was set at P < .05). Statistical analysis of the data revealed that Hyflex files were found to be the most flexible instruments, with a significant difference (P < .05) in comparison with the other instruments. Among the other files, a significant difference has been reported for EndoSequence instruments compared with ProFile, Hero, and FlexMaster (P < .05), whereas no significant differences have been reported among those 3 files (P > .05). Results of the present study have illustrated an increased flexibility of the new NiTi alloy over conventional NiTi alloy, and they highlight the potential of the new manufacturing process. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermodynamic Considerations of Contamination by Alloying Elements of Remelted End-of-Life Nickel- and Cobalt-Based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Cobalt and nickel are high-value commodity metals and are mostly used in the form of highly alloyed materials. The alloying elements used may cause contamination problems during recycling. To ensure maximum resource efficiency, an understanding of the removability of these alloying elements and the controllability of some of the primary alloying elements is essential with respect to the recycling of end-of-life (EoL) nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys by remelting. In this study, the distribution behaviors of approximately 30 elements that are usually present in EoL nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys in the solvent metal (nickel, cobalt, or nickel-cobalt alloy), oxide slag, and gas phases during the remelting were quantitatively evaluated using a thermodynamic approach. The results showed that most of the alloying elements can be removed either in the slag phase or into the gas phase. However, the removal of copper, tin, arsenic, and antimony by remelting is difficult, and they remain as tramp elements during the recycling. On the other hand, the distribution tendencies of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten can be controlled by changing the remelting conditions. To increase the resource efficiency of recycling, preventing contamination by the tramp elements and identifying the alloying compositions of EoL superalloys are significantly essential, which will require the development of efficient prior alloy-sorting systems and advanced separation technologies.

  11. Alloys for hydrogen storage in nickel/hydrogen and nickel/metal hydride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anani, Anaba; Visintin, Arnaldo; Petrov, Konstantin; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Reilly, James J.; Johnson, John R.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Desch, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors in the three laboratories to (1) prepare alloys of the AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) types, using arc-melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques; (2) examine their physico-chemical characteristics (morphology, composition); (3) determine the hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior (pressure-composition isotherms as a function of temperature); and (4) evaluate their performance characteristics as hydride electrodes (charge/discharge, capacity retention, cycle life, high rate capability). The work carried out on representative AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) type modified alloys (by partial substitution or with small additives of other elements) is presented. The purpose of the modification was to optimize the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydriding/dehydriding reactions and enhance the stabilities of the alloys for the desired battery applications. The results of our collaboration, to date, demonstrate that (1) alloys prepared by arc melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques exhibit similar morphology, composition and hydriding/dehydriding characteristics; (2) alloys with the appropriate small amounts of substituent or additive elements: (1) retain the single phase structure, (2) improve the hydriding/dehydriding reactions for the battery applications, and (3) enhance the stability in the battery environment; and (3) the AB(sub 2) type alloys exhibit higher energy densities than the AB(sub 5) type alloys but the state-of-the-art, commercialized batteries are predominantly manufactured using Ab(sub 5) type alloys.

  12. Oxidation of nickel-aluminum and iron-aluminum alloys

    SciT

    Cathcart, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    The high-temperature oxidation behavior of several ordered alloys in the Ni-Al and Fe-Al systems is reviewed with special emphasis on Ni/sub 3/Al and NiAl. Ordering influences oxidation through its effect on the activities of the alloy components and by changing the point defect concentration in an alloy. Three categories of Ni-Al alloys are distinguished based on Al content and oxidation behavior. A characteristic feature of the oxidation of high-aluminum Ni-Al and Fe-Al alloys is the formation of voids in the substrate at the oxidate-metal interface. The mechanism of void formation and its suppression by minor additions of oxygen-active elements ismore » discussed. A brief description of the effect of preoxidation on the reactions of Ni/sub 3/Al-base alloys in SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ environments is also included. 51 references, 14 figures, 1 table.« less

  13. Oxidation of nickel-aluminum and iron-aluminum alloys

    SciT

    Cathcart, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    The high-temperature oxidation behavior of several ordered alloys in the Ni-Al and Fe-Al systems is reviewed with special emphasis on Ni/sub 3/Al and NiAl. Ordering influences oxidation through its effect on the activities of the alloy components and by changing the point defect concentration in an alloy. Three categories of Ni-Al alloys are distinguished based on Al content and oxidation behavior. A characteristic feature of the oxidation of high-aluminum Ni-Al and Fe-Al alloys is the formation of voids in the substrate at the oxide-metal interface. The mechanism of void formation and its suppression by minor additions of oxygen-active elements aremore » discussed. A brief description of the effect of pre-oxidation on the reactions of Ni/sub 3/Al-base alloys in SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ environments is also included.« less

  14. Production of High-Purity Anhydrous Nickel(II) Perrhenate for Tungsten-Based Sintered Heavy Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Leszczyńska-Sejda, Katarzyna; Benke, Grzegorz; Kopyto, Dorota; Majewski, Tomasz; Drzazga, Michał

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for the production of high-purity anhydrous nickel(II) perrhenate. The method comprises sorption of nickel(II) ions from aqueous nickel(II) nitrate solutions, using strongly acidic C160 cation exchange resin, and subsequent elution of sorbed nickel(II) ions using concentrated perrhenic acid solutions. After the neutralization of the resulting rhenium-nickel solutions, hydrated nickel(II) perrhenate is then separated and then dried at 160 °C to obtain the anhydrous form. The resulting compound is reduced in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia in order to produce a Re-Ni alloy powder. This study provides information on the selected properties of the resulting Re-Ni powder. This powder was used as a starting material for the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni heavy alloys. Microstructure examination results and selected properties of the produced sintered heavy alloys were compared to sintered alloys produced using elemental W, Re, and Ni powders. This study showed that the application of anhydrous nickel(II) perrhenate in the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni results in better properties of the sintered alloys compared to those made from elemental powders. PMID:28772808

  15. Effects of alloy chemistry on the electrochemical and hydriding properties of nickel-substituted lanthanum nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, Charles Kincaid

    The primary goal of this work was to verify the hypothesis that alloying LaNi5 with ternary elements that have a large heat of formation with La (and secondarily, with Ni) would slow the kinetics of metal (La) atom diffusion. This would have the effect of stabilizing the Haucke phase crystal structure of LaNi5 during electrochemical and gas-phase hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling, and extending the material's useful lifetime. To test this hypothesis, I prepared a variety of single-phase alloys of composition LaNi5-xMx, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5, M∈ {Al, Si, Ga, Ge, In, Sn}. Each alloy was annealed to insure equilibrium starting conditions. The lifetimes of these alloys were tested by charge-discharge cycling as the anode of an alkaline Ni-MH rechargeable cell. By characterizing the lifetimes of the alloys as an exponential capacity decay, I was able to determine a trend between the capacity decay and the heat of formation of an average 'B' element with La. The alloys were further characterized by obtaining gas-phase isotherms and, in the case of the Gex alloys, the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation and decomposition. X-ray diffraction was used to measure the effect of substitution on the alloy and its hydride phase. By examining the data obtained at Caltech as well as data published in the literature, several trends were noted. There is a fairly linear relationship between the solute's expansion of the LaNi5 unit cell and its radius. The total volume expansion an alloy experienced upon absorption of hydrogen was found to decrease with substituted composition. The discrete lattice expansion of Gex alloys was found to decrease substantially for 0 < x < 0.2, but subsequent substitution had little effect on the volume expansion. The electrode electrochemical kinetice of charge transfer were investigated for each MH alloy. Measurements of the charge transfer exchange current by micropolarization and AC impedance were similar, while those measured by Tafel

  16. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  17. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Osetsky, Y.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; ...

    2014-11-26

    According to modern theory, damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensional glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, are absorbed mainly by grain boundaries and dislocations, creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that the addition of certain alloying elements influences many radiation effects, including swelling; however, the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this study, we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling study of SIA clusters mobility in body-centered cubic Fe–Ni alloys. We have foundmore » that Ni interacts strongly with the periphery of clusters, affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by the number of Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant, even in low-Ni alloys. Thus a 1 nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500 K in the Fe–0.8 at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhances cluster immobilization. Finally, this effect should have quite broad consequences in void swelling, matrix damage accumulation and radiation induced hardening and the results obtained help to better understand and predict the effects of radiation in Fe–Ni ferritic alloys.« less

  18. Metallographic examination of TD-nickel base alloys. [thermal and chemical etching technique evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Petrovic, J. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques are evaluated for chemical, electrochemical, and thermal etching of thoria dispersed (TD) nickel alloys. An electrochemical etch is described which yielded good results only for large grain sizes of TD-nickel. Two types of thermal etches are assessed for TD-nickel: an oxidation etch and vacuum annealing of a polished specimen to produce an etch. It is shown that the first etch was somewhat dependent on sample orientation with respect to the processing direction, the second technique was not sensitive to specimen orientation or grain size, and neither method appear to alter the innate grain structure when the materials were fully annealed prior to etching. An electrochemical etch is described which was used to observe the microstructures in TD-NiCr, and a thermal-oxidation etch is shown to produce better detail of grain boundaries and to have excellent etching behavior over the entire range of grain sizes of the sample.

  19. Precipitation hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy having good swelling resistance and low neutron absorbence

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.; Merrick, Howard F.; Gibson, Robert C.

    1980-01-01

    An iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloy suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding which utilizes the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and characterized in having a morphology of the gamma-double prime phase enveloping the gamma-prime phase and delta phase distributed at or near the grain boundaries. The alloy consists essentially of about 40-50% nickel, 7.5-14% chromium, 1.5-4% niobium, 0.25-0.75% silicon, 1-3% titanium, 0.1-0.5% aluminum, 0.02-0.1% carbon, 0.002-0.015% boron, and the balance iron. Up to 2% manganese and up to 0.01% magnesium may be added to inhibit trace element effects; up to 0.1% zirconium may be added to increase radiation swelling resistance; and up to 3% molybdenum may be added to increase strength.

  20. Thermal Coefficient of Linear Expansion Modified by Dendritic Segregation in Nickel-Iron Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. M.; Maksimova, E. V.

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents investigations of thermal properties of Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-Co casting alloys affected by the heterogeneous distribution of their chemical elements. It is shown that nickel dendritic segregation has a negative effect on properties of studied invars. A mathematical model is proposed to explore the influence of nickel dendritic segregation on the thermal coefficient of linear expansion (TCLE) of the alloy. A computer simulation of TCLE of Fe-Ni-Co superinvars is performed with regard to a heterogeneous distribution of their chemical elements over the whole volume. The ProLigSol computer software application is developed for processing the data array and results of computer simulation.

  1. Intermetallic Nickel-Titanium Alloys for Oil-Lubricated Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Pepper, S. V.; Noebe, R.; Hull, D. R.; Glennon, G.

    2009-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, NITINOL 60 (60NiTi), containing 60 wt% nickel and 40 wt% titanium, is shown to be a promising candidate material for oil-lubricated rolling and sliding contact applications such as bearings and gears. NiTi alloys are well known and normally exploited for their shape memory behavior. When properly processed, however, NITINOL 60 exhibits excellent dimensional stability and useful structural properties. Processed via high temperature, high-pressure powder metallurgy techniques or other means, NITINOL 60 offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. NITINOL 60 is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, less dense than steel, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, nongalling and nonmagnetic. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic encompasses all of these attributes. Further, NITINOL 60 has shown remarkable tribological performance when compared to other aerospace bearing alloys under oil-lubricated conditions. Spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) tests were conducted in vacuum using NITINOL 60 balls loaded between rotating 440C stainless steel disks, lubricated with synthetic hydrocarbon oil. Under conditions considered representative of precision bearings, the performance (life and friction) equaled or exceeded that observed with silicon nitride or titanium carbide coated 440C bearing balls. Based upon this preliminary data, it appears that NITINOL 60, despite its high titanium content, is a promising candidate alloy for advanced mechanical systems requiring superior and intrinsic corrosion resistance, electrical conductivity and nonmagnetic behavior under lubricated contacting conditions.

  2. The applications and research progresses of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy in reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zeng, Yanjun; Tang, Xiaoying

    2010-06-01

    In spite of some good successes and excellent researches of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi-SMA) in reconstructive surgery, there are still serious limitations to the clinical applications of NiTi alloy today. The potential leakage of elements and ions could be toxic to cells, tissues and organs. This review discussed the properties, clinical applications, corrosion performance, biocompatibility, the possible preventive measures to improve corrosion resistance by surface/structure modifications and the long-term challenges of using SMAs.

  3. The Solidification Velocity of Undercooled Nickel and Titanium Alloys with Dilute Solute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Algoso, Paul R.; Altgilbers, A. S.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The study of solidification velocity is important for two reasons. First, understanding the manner in which the degree of undercooling of the liquid and solidification velocity affect the microstructure of the solid is fundamental. Second, there is disagreement between theoretical predictions of the relationship between undercooling and solidification velocity and experimental results. Thus, the objective of this research is to accurately and systematically quantify the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling for dilute nickel-and titanium-based alloys. The alloys chosen for study cover a wide range of equilibrium partition coefficients, and the results are compared to current theory.

  4. Survey of Nickel-Aluminium-Bronze Casting Alloys on Marine Applications,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    and corrosion performance of nickel-aluminium bronze (NAB)/covered by naval specification DGS-8520 and DGS-348 have been investigated. No evidence was...found to suggest that there would be any significant difference in corrosion performance between alloys meeting the two specifications. Early... corrosion problems associated with the weld repair areas of castings have been overcome largely by using improved foundry and welding techniques followed by a

  5. Diffusion welding. [heat treatment of nickel alloys following single step vacuum welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Dispersion-strengthened nickel alloys are sanded on one side and chemically polished. This is followed by a single-step welding process wherein the polished surfaces are forced into intimate contact at 1,400 F for one hour in a vacuum. Diffusion, recrystallization, and grain growth across the original weld interface are obtained during postheating at 2,150 F for two hours in hydrogen.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  7. In situ oxidation studies on /001/ copper-nickel alloy thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Rao, D. B.; Douglass, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies are reported of (001)-oriented single crystalline thin films of Cu-3%Ni, Cu-4.6%Ni, and Cu-50%Ni alloy which were prepared by vapor deposition onto (001) NaCl substrates and subsequently annealed at around 1100 K and oxidized at 725 K at low oxygen partial pressure. At all alloy concentrations, Cu2O and NiO nucleated and grew independently without the formation of mixed oxides. The shape and growth rates of Cu2O nuclei were similar to rates found earlier. For low-nickel alloy concentrations, the NiO nuclei were larger and the number density of NiO was less than that of Cu-50%Ni films for which the shape and growth rates of NiO were identical to those for pure nickel films. Phenomena involving a reduced induction period, surface precipitation, and through-thickness growth are also described. The results are consistent with previously established oxidation mechanisms for pure copper and pure nickel films.

  8. Development and Verification of Sputtered Thin-Film Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) by Cory R Knick and Christopher J Morris Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...Laboratory Development and Verification of Sputtered Thin-Film Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) by Cory R Knick and Christopher

  9. Process for fabricating articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.; Snyder, Jr., William B.

    1976-01-01

    A high density W--Ni--Fe alloy of composition 85-96% by weight W and the remainder Ni and Fe in a wt. ratio of 5:5-8:2 having enhanced mechanical properties is prepared by compacting the mixed powders, sintering the compact in reducing atmosphere to near theoretical density followed by further sintering at a temperature where a liquid phase is present, vacuum annealing, and cold working to achieve high uniform hardness.

  10. Dendritic growth and structure of undercooled nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Shiohara, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objectives of this overall investigation are to: study means for obtaining high undercooling in levitation melted droplets, and study structures produced upon the solidification of these undercooled specimens. Thermal measurements are made of the undercooling, and of the rapid recalescence, to develop an understanding of the solidification mechanism. Comparison of results is made with the modeling studies. Characterization and metallographic work is done to gain an understanding of the relationship between rapid solidification variables and the structures so produced. In ground based work to date, solidification of undercooled Ni-25 wt percent Sn alloy was observed by high-speed cinematography and the results compared with optical temperature measurements. Also in ground based work, high-speed optical temperature measurements were made of the solidification behavior of levitated metal samples within a transparent glass medium. Two undercooled Ni-Sn alloys were examined. Measurements were carried out on samples at undercoolings up to 330 K. Microstructures of samples produced in ground based work were determined by optical metallography and by SEM, and microsegregation by electron microprobe measurements. A series of flight tests were planned to conduct experiments similar to the ground based experiments. The Space Shuttle Columbia carried an alloy undercooled experiment in the STS 61-C mission in January 1986. A sample of Ni-32.5 wt percent Sn eutectic was melted and solidified under microgravity conditions.

  11. The effect of alloying on gamma and gamma prime in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Wallace, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the compositional limits of gamma and gamma prime phases in nickel-base superalloys. Fifty-one nickel-base alloys were melted under vacuum and heat treated for 4 hours at 1190 C followed by 1008 hours at 850 C. The alloys had the following composition ranges: A1 4.0 to 13 atomic percent, Cr 6.5 to 20.5 percent, Ti 0.25 to 4.75 percent, Mo 0.0 to 6.0 percent, and W 0.0 to 4.0 percent. The residues from the ammonium sulfate electrolytic extraction for the two-phase alloys were analyzed chemically and by X-ray diffraction. The results of the investigation were used to assemble a mathematical model of the gamma-gamma prime region of the Ni-Al-Cr-Ti-Mo-W system. A computer program was written to analyze the model of the phase diagram. Some of these results are also presented graphically. The resulting model is capable of satisfactorily predicting the compositions of conjugate gamma-gamma prime phases in the alloys investigated and twelve of fifteen commercial superalloys studied.

  12. Characterization and cytotoxicity of ions released from stainless steel and nickel-titanium orthodontic alloys.

    PubMed

    Eliades, Theodore; Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris; Eliades, George; Makou, Margarita

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the substances released from orthodontic brackets and nickel-titanium wires and to comparatively assess the cytotoxicity of the ions released from these orthodontic alloys. Two full sets of stainless steel brackets of 20 brackets each (weight 2.1 g) and 2 groups of 0.018 x 0.025 Ni-Ti archwires of 10 wires each (weight 2.0 g) were immersed in 0.9% saline solution for a month. The immersion media were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and the ionic content was statistically analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts and gingival fibroblasts were exposed to various concentrations of the 2 immersion media; nickel chloride was used as a positive control for comparison purposes. The cytotoxic or cytostatic activity of the media was investigated with the MTT and the DNA synthesis assays. The results of the cytotoxicity assay were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey test with solution and concentration variants as discriminating variables (alpha=0.05). The results indicated no ionic release for the nickel-titanium alloy aging solution, whereas measurable nickel and traces of chromium were found in the stainless steel bracket-aging medium. Concentrations of the nickel chloride solution greater then 2 mM were found to reduce by more than 50% the viability and DNA synthesis of fibroblasts; however, neither orthodontic materials-derived media had any effect on the survival and DNA synthesis of either cells.

  13. Ab initio simulations of iron-nickel alloys at Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Alexander S.; Vočadlo, Lidunka; Brodholt, John P.

    2012-09-01

    We report ab initio density functional theory calculations on iron-nickel (FeNi) alloys at conditions representative of the Earth's inner core. We test different concentrations of Ni, up to ∼39 wt% using ab initio lattice dynamics, and investigate the thermodynamic and vibrational stability of the three candidate crystal structures (bcc, hcp and fcc). First of all, at inner core pressures, we find that pure Fe transforms from the hcp to the fcc phase at around 6000 K. Secondly, in agreement with low pressure experiments on Fe-Ni alloys, we find the fcc structure is stabilised by the incorporation of Ni under core pressures and temperatures. Our results show that the fcc structure may, therefore, be stable under core conditions depending on the temperature in the inner core and the Ni content. Lastly, we find that within the quasi-harmonic approximation, there is no stability field for FeNi alloys in the bcc structure under core conditions.

  14. [The effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental casting alloys after electrochemical corrosion].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Guang-yan; Zhang, Li-xia; Wang, Jue; Shen, Qing-ping; Su, Jian-sheng

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental alloys after electrochemical corrosion. The surface morphology and surface structure of nickel-chromium dental alloys were examined by stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy before and after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. The surface element component and chemical states of nickel-chromium dental alloys were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrograph after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. More serious corrosion happened on the surface of nickel-chromium alloy in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva than in 0 g/L EGCG. The diameters of corrosion pits were smaller, and the dendrite structure of the alloy surface was not affected in 0 g/L EGCG. While the diameters of corrosion pits were larger, the dendritic interval of the alloy surface began to merge, and the dendrite structure was fuzzy in 1.0 g/L EGCG. In addition, the O, Ni, Cr, Be, C and Mo elements were detected on the surface of nickel-chromium alloys after sputtered for 120 s in 0 g/L EGCG and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva after electrochemical corrosion, and the surface oxides were mainly NiO and Cr(2)O(3). Compared with 0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva, the content of O, NiO and Cr(2)O(3) were lower in 1.0 g/L EGCG. The results of surface morphology and the corrosion products both show that the corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium alloys become worse and the oxide content of corrosion products on the surface reduce in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva.

  15. Effect of Alloy 625 Buffer Layer on Hardfacing of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using Nickel Base Hardfacing Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Dashpot piston, made up of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, is a part of diverse safety rod used for safe shutdown of a nuclear reactor. This component was hardfaced using nickel base AWS ER NiCr-B alloy and extensive cracking was experienced during direct deposition of this alloy on dashpot piston. Cracking reduced considerably and the component was successfully hardfaced by application of Inconel 625 as buffer layer prior to hardface deposition. Hence, a separate study was undertaken to investigate the role of buffer layer in reducing the cracking and on the microstructure of the hardfaced deposit. Results indicate that in the direct deposition of hardfacing alloy on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, both heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed and the deposit layer are hard making the thickness of the hard layer formed equal to combined thickness of both HAZ and deposit. This hard layer is unable to absorb thermal stresses resulting in the cracking of the deposit. By providing a buffer layer of Alloy 625 followed by a post-weld heat treatment, HAZ formed in the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is effectively tempered, and HAZ formed during the subsequent deposition of the hardfacing alloy over the Alloy 625 buffer layer is almost completely confined to Alloy 625, which does not harden. This reduces the cracking susceptibility of the deposit. Further, unlike in the case of direct deposition on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, dilution of the deposit by Ni-base buffer layer does not alter the hardness of the deposit and desired hardness on the deposit surface could be achieved even with lower thickness of the deposit. This gives an option for reducing the recommended thickness of the deposit, which can also reduce the risk of cracking.

  16. In vitro and in vivo corrosion evaluation of nickel-chromium- and copper-aluminum-based alloys.

    PubMed

    Benatti, O F; Miranda, W G; Muench, A

    2000-09-01

    The low resistance to corrosion is the major problem related to the use of copper-aluminum alloys. This in vitro and in vivo study evaluated the corrosion of 2 copper-aluminum alloys (Cu-Al and Cu-Al-Zn) compared with a nickel-chromium alloy. For the in vitro test, specimens were immersed in the following 3 corrosion solutions: artificial saliva, 0.9% sodium chloride, and 1.0% sodium sulfide. For the in vivo test, specimens were embedded in complete dentures, so that one surface was left exposed. The 3 testing sites were (1) close to the oral mucosa (partial self-cleaning site), (2) surface exposed to the oral cavity (self-cleaning site), and (3) specimen bottom surface exposed to the saliva by means of a tunnel-shaped perforation (non-self-cleaning site). Almost no corrosion occurred with the nickel-chromium alloy, for either the in vitro or in vivo test. On the other hand, the 2 copper-aluminum-based alloys exhibited high corrosion in the sulfide solution. These same alloys also underwent high corrosion in non-self-cleaning sites for the in vivo test, although minimal attack was observed in self-cleaning sites. The nickel-chromium alloy presented high resistance to corrosion. Both copper-aluminum alloys showed considerable corrosion in the sulfide solution and clinically in the non-self-cleaning site. However, in self-cleaning sites these 2 alloys did not show substantial corrosion.

  17. High temperature oxidation behavior of gamma-nickel+gamma'-nickel aluminum alloys and coatings modified with platinum and reactive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nan

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000°C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455°C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain beta-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used beta-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt+Hf-modified gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al 2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower temperatures (˜970°C) in the very early stage of oxidation. It

  18. Quantitative in vivo biocompatibility of new ultralow-nickel cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys.

    PubMed

    Sonofuchi, Kazuaki; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Chiba, Akihiko; Kawano, Mitsuko; Nakayama, Masafumi; Ogasawara, Kouetsu; Yabe, Yutaka; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Nickel (Ni) eluted from metallic biomaterials is widely accepted as a major cause of allergies and inflammation. To improve the safety of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloy implants, new ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo alloys with and without zirconium (Zr) have been developed, with Ni contents of less than 0.01%. In the present study, we investigated the biocompatibility of these new alloys in vivo by subcutaneously implanting pure Ni, conventional Co-Cr-Mo, ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo, and ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo with Zr wires into the dorsal sides of mice. After 3 and 7 days, tissues around the wire were excised, and inflammation; the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α; and Ni, Co, Cr, and Mo ion release were analyzed using histological analyses, qRT-PCR, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Significantly larger amounts of Ni eluted from pure Ni wires than from the other wires, and the degree of inflammation depended on the amount of eluted Ni. Although no significant differences in inflammatory reactions were identified among new alloys and conventional Co-Cr-Mo alloys in histological and qRT-PCR analyses, ICP-MS analysis revealed that Ni ion elution from ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo alloys with and without Zr was significantly lower than from conventional Co-Cr-Mo alloys. Our study, suggests that the present ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo alloys with and without Zr have greater safety and utility than conventional Co-Cr-Mo alloys. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1505-1513, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The substitution of nickel for cobalt in hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy UDIMET 700 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel was substituted in various proportions for cobalt in a series of five hot-isostatically-pressed powder metallurgy alloys based on the UDIMET 700 composition. These alloys were given 5-step heat treatments appropriate for use in turbine engine disks. The resultant microstructures displayed three distinct sizes of gamma-prime particles in a gamma matrix. The higher cobalt-content alloys contained larger amounts of the finest gamma-prime particles, and had the lowest gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch. While all alloys had approximately the same tensile properties at 25 and 650 gamma C, the rupture lives at 650 and 760 C peaked in the alloys with cobalt contents between 12.7 and 4.3 pct. Minimum creep rates increased as cobalt contents were lowered, suggesting their correlation with the gamma-prime particle size distribution and the gamma-gamma-prime mismatch. It was also found that, on overaging at temperatures higher than suitable for turbine disk use, the high cobalt-content alloys were prone to sigma phase formation.

  20. Hydrogen Induced Intergranular Cracking of Nickel-Base Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    alloys are discussed. Experimental The steel used in the present investigation is a fully bainitic 2 1/4 Cr-lMo pressure vessel steel , ASTM A542 Class 3...Appendix A describes recent experiments performed in order to study the influence of plastic deformation on hydrogen transport in a 214 Cr-lMo steel (8...PLASTIC DEFORMATION ON HYDROGEN TRANSPORT IN 2 1/4 Cr-lMo STEEL M. Kurkela, G.S. Frankel, and R.M. Latanision Department of Materials Science and

  1. Adhesive bonding of super-elastic titanium-nickel alloy castings with a phosphate metal conditioner and an acrylic adhesive.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, H; Tanoue, N; Yanagida, H; Atsuta, M; Koike, M; Yoneyama, T

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the bonding characteristics of super-elastic titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni) alloy castings. Disk specimens were cast from a Ti-Ni alloy (Ti-50.85Ni mol%) using an arc centrifugal casting machine. High-purity titanium and nickel specimens were also prepared as experimental references. The specimens were air-abraded with alumina, and bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond C & B). A metal conditioner containing a phosphate monomer (Cesead II Opaque Primer) was also used for priming the specimens. Post-thermocycling average bond strengths (MPa) of the primed groups were 41.5 for Ti-Ni, 30.4 for Ti and 19.5 for Ni, whereas those of the unprimed groups were 21.6 for Ti, 19.3 for Ti-Ni and 9.3 for Ni. Application of the phosphate conditioner elevated the bond strengths of all alloy/metals (P < 0.05). X-ray fluorescence analysis revealed that nickel was attached to the debonded resin surface of the resin-to-nickel bonded specimen, indicating that corrosion of high-purity nickel occurred at the resin-nickel interface. Durable bonding to super-elastic Ti-Ni alloy castings can be achieved with a combination of a phosphate metal conditioner and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

  2. The Characterization of Thin Film Nickel Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris Odum, Nicole Latrice

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are able to recover their original shape through the appropriate heat or stress exposure after enduring mechanical deformation at a low temperature. Numerous alloy systems have been discovered which produce this unique feature like TiNb, AgCd, NiAl, NiTi, and CuZnAl. Since their discovery, bulk scale SMAs have undergone extensive material property investigations and are employed in real world applications. However, its thin film counterparts have been modestly investigated and applied. Researchers have introduced numerous theoretical microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices; yet, the research community's overall unfamiliarity with the thin film properties has delayed growth in this area. In addition, it has been difficult to outline efficient thin film processing techniques. In this dissertation, NiTi thin film processing and characterization techniques will be outlined and discussed. NiTi thin films---1 mum thick---were produced using sputter deposition techniques. Substrate bound thin films were deposited to analysis the surface using Scanning Electron Microscopy; the film composition was obtained using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy; the phases were identified using X-ray diffraction; and the transformation temperatures acquired using resistivity testing. Microfabrication processing and sputter deposition were employed to develop tensile membranes for membrane deflection experimentation to gain insight on the mechanical properties of the thin films. The incorporation of these findings will aid in the movement of SMA microactuation devices from theory to fruition and greatly benefit industries such as medicinal and aeronautical.

  3. The effect of interface properties on nickel base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, M.; Grossman, T.; Senemeier, M.; Wright, K.

    1995-01-01

    This program was performed to assess the extent to which mechanical behavior models can predict the properties of sapphire fiber/nickel aluminide matrix composites and help guide their development by defining improved combinations of matrix and interface coating. The program consisted of four tasks: 1) selection of the matrices and interface coating constituents using a modeling-based approach; 2) fabrication of the selected materials; 3) testing and evaluation of the materials; and 4) evaluation of the behavior models to develop recommendations. Ni-50Al and Ni-20AI-30Fe (a/o) matrices were selected which gave brittle and ductile behavior, respectively, and an interface coating of PVD YSZ was selected which provided strong bonding to the sapphire fiber. Significant fiber damage and strength loss was observed in the composites which made straightforward comparison of properties with models difficult. Nevertheless, the models selected generally provided property predictions which agreed well with results when fiber degradation was incorporated. The presence of a strong interface bond was felt to be detrimental in the NiAI MMC system where low toughness and low strength were observed.

  4. Nickel titanium alloy: Cytotoxicity evaluation on microorganism culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, V. C.; Soare, S.; Barbalat, A.; Dinu, C. Z.; Moldovan, A.; Stoica, I.; Vassu, T.; Purice, A.; Scarisoareanu, N.; Birjega, R.; Craciun, V.; DeStefano, V. Ferrari; Dinescu, M.

    2006-04-01

    High purity nickel (Ni) and titanium (Ti) targets have been used to form well-defined thin films of nitinol on Ti substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Their chemical composition, crystalline structure and surface properties have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have shown that by varying the deposition parameters such as laser fluence and number of laser pulses, we are able to control the film thickness as well as film's uniformity and roughness. Cytocompatibility tests have been performed through in vitro assays using microorganisms culture cells such as yeasts ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria ( Escherichia coli), in order to determine the thin film's toxic potential at the in vitro cellular level. Microorganism's adhesion on the nitinol surface was observed and the biofilm formation has been analyzed and quantified. Our results have shown no reactivity detected in cell culture exposed to NiTi films in comparison with the negative controls and a low adherence of the microorganisms on the nitinol surface that is an important factor for biofilm prevention. We can, therefore, conclude that NiTi is a good candidate material to be used for implants and medical devices.

  5. A crystallographic model for nickel base single crystal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel-base single-crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components. This objective is achieved by developing a rate-dependent anisotropic constitutive model and implementing it in a nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurgical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. An extension of Schmid's law is combined with the Bodner-Partom equations to model the inelastic tension/compression asymmetry and orientation-dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is used to approximate the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response and strain-rate sensitivity of the single-crystal superalloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are also discussed. The model is implemented in a finite-element code, and the computed and experimental results are compared for several orientations and loading conditions.

  6. Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment of a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2002-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic aircraft will require nickel-base disk alloys that can be used at temperatures in excess of 1300 F. Smaller turbine engines, with higher rotational speeds, also require disk alloys with high strength. To address these challenges, NASA funded a series of disk programs in the 1990's. Under these initiatives, Honeywell and Allison focused their attention on Alloy 10, a high-strength, nickel-base disk alloy developed by Honeywell for application in the small turbine engines used in regional jet aircraft. Since tensile, creep, and fatigue properties are strongly influenced by alloy grain size, the effect of heat treatment on grain size and the attendant properties were studied in detail. It was observed that a fine grain microstructure offered the best tensile and fatigue properties, whereas a coarse grain microstructure offered the best creep resistance at high temperatures. Therefore, a disk with a dual microstructure, consisting of a fine-grained bore and a coarse-grained rim, should have a high potential for optimal performance. Under NASA's Ultra-Safe Propulsion Project and Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, a disk program was initiated at the NASA Glenn Research Center to assess the feasibility of using Alloy 10 to produce a dual-microstructure disk. The objectives of this program were twofold. First, existing dual-microstructure heat treatment (DMHT) technology would be applied and refined as necessary for Alloy 10 to yield the desired grain structure in full-scale forgings appropriate for use in regional gas turbine engines. Second, key mechanical properties from the bore and rim of a DMHT Alloy 10 disk would be measured and compared with conventional heat treatments to assess the benefits of DMHT technology. At Wyman Gordon and Honeywell, an active-cooling DMHT process was used to convert four full-scale Alloy 10 disks to a dual-grain microstructure. The resulting microstructures are illustrated in the

  7. Radiation damage buildup by athermal defect reactions in nickel and concentrated nickel alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, S.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; ...

    2017-04-12

    We develop a new method using binary collision approximation simulating the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling conditions (RBS/C) from molecular dynamics atom coordinates of irradiated cells. The approach allows comparing experimental and simulated RBS/C signals as a function of depth without fitting parameters. The simulated RBS/C spectra of irradiated Ni and concentrated solid solution alloys (CSAs, NiFe and NiCoCr) show a good agreement with the experimental results. The good agreement indicates the damage evolution under damage overlap conditions in Ni and CSAs at room temperature is dominated by defect recombination and migration induced by irradiation rather than activated thermally.

  8. Hydrogen embrittlement: the game changing factor in the applicability of nickel alloys in oilfield technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento Klapper, Helmuth; Klöwer, Jutta; Gosheva, Olesya

    2017-06-01

    Precipitation hardenable (PH) nickel (Ni) alloys are often the most reliable engineering materials for demanding oilfield upstream and subsea applications especially in deep sour wells. Despite their superior corrosion resistance and mechanical properties over a broad range of temperatures, the applicability of PH Ni alloys has been questioned due to their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement (HE), as confirmed in documented failures of components in upstream applications. While extensive work has been done in recent years to develop testing methodologies for benchmarking PH Ni alloys in terms of their HE susceptibility, limited scientific research has been conducted to achieve improved foundational knowledge about the role of microstructural particularities in these alloys on their mechanical behaviour in environments promoting hydrogen uptake. Precipitates such as the γ', γ'' and δ-phase are well known for defining the mechanical and chemical properties of these alloys. To elucidate the effect of precipitates in the microstructure of the oil-patch PH Ni alloy 718 on its HE susceptibility, slow strain rate tests under continuous hydrogen charging were conducted on material after several different age-hardening treatments. By correlating the obtained results with those from the microstructural and fractographic characterization, it was concluded that HE susceptibility of oil-patch alloy 718 is strongly influenced by the amount and size of precipitates such as the γ' and γ'' as well as the δ-phase rather than by the strength level only. In addition, several HE mechanisms including hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and hydrogen-enhanced local plasticity were observed taking place on oil-patch alloy 718, depending upon the characteristics of these phases when present in the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  9. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  10. Growth of Monolayer Graphene on Nanoscale Copper-Nickel Alloy Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Joon Hyong; Gorman, Jason J.; Na, Seung Ryul; Cullinan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Growth of high quality and monolayer graphene on copper thin films on silicon wafers is a promising approach to massive and direct graphene device fabrication in spite of the presence of potential dewetting issues in the copper film during graphene growth. Current work demonstrates roles of a nickel adhesion coupled with the copper film resulting in mitigation of dewetting problem as well as uniform monolayer graphene growth over 97 % coverage on films. The feasibility of monolayer graphene growth on Cu-Ni alloy films as thin as 150 nm in total is also demonstrated. During the graphene growth on Cu-Ni films, the nickel adhesion layer uniformly diffuses into the copper thin film resulting in a Cu-Ni alloy, helping to promote graphene nucleation and large area surface coverage. Furthermore, it was found that the use of extremely thin metal catalyst films also constraint the total amount of carbon that can be absorbed into the film during growth, which helps to eliminate adlayer formation and promote monolayer growth regardless of alloying content, thus improving the monolayer fraction of graphene coverage on the thinner films. These results suggest a path forward for the large scale integration of high quality, monolayer graphene into nanoelectronic and nanomechanical devices. PMID:28669999

  11. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers by catalytic CVD of chlorobenzene over bulk nickel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenzhin, Roman M.; Bauman, Yuri I.; Volodin, Alexander M.; Mishakov, Ilya V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A.

    2018-01-01

    Catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of chlorobenzene over bulk nickel alloy (nichrome) was studied. The bulk Ni-containing samples being exposed to a contact with aggressive reaction medium undergo self-disintegration followed by growth of carbon nanofibers. This process, also known as a metal dusting, requires the simultaneous presence of chlorine and hydrogen sources in the reaction mixture. Molecule of chlorobenzene complies with these requirements. The experiments on CCVD were performed in a flow-through reactor system. The initial stages of nickel disintegration process were investigated in a closed system under Autogenic Pressure at Elevated Temperature (RAPET) conditions. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies and ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied to examine the samples after their interaction with chlorobenzene. Introduction of additional hydrogen into the flow-through system was shown to affect the morphology of grown carbon nanofibers.

  12. Glucose sensing on graphite screen-printed electrode modified by sparking of copper nickel alloys.

    PubMed

    Riman, Daniel; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karantzalis, Alexandros E; Hrbac, Jan; Prodromidis, Mamas I

    2017-04-01

    Electric spark discharge was employed as a green, fast and extremely facile method to modify disposable graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) with copper, nickel and mixed copper/nickel nanoparticles (NPs) in order to be used as nonenzymatic glucose sensors. Direct SPEs-to-metal (copper, nickel or copper/nickel alloys with 25/75, 50/50 and 75/25wt% compositions) sparking at 1.2kV was conducted in the absence of any solutions under ambient conditions. Morphological characterization of the sparked surfaces was performed by scanning electron microscopy, while the chemical composition of the sparked NPs was evaluated with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the various sparked SPEs towards the electro oxidation of glucose in alkaline media and the critical role of hydroxyl ions were evaluated with cyclic voltammetry and kinetic studies. Results indicated a mixed charge transfer- and hyroxyl ion transport-limited process. Best performing sensors fabricated by Cu/Ni 50/50wt% alloy showed linear response over the concentration range 2-400μM glucose and they were successfully applied to the amperometric determination of glucose in blood. The detection limit (S/N 3) and the relative standard deviation of the method were 0.6µM and <6% (n=5, 2µM glucose), respectively. Newly devised sparked Cu/Ni graphite SPEs enable glucose sensing with distinct advantages over existing glucose chemical sensors in terms of cost, fabrication simplicity, disposability, and adaptation of green methods in sensor's development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Auricle reconstruction with a nickel-titanium shape memory alloy as the framework.

    PubMed

    Chi, Fang-Lu; Wang, Shen-Jun; Liu, Hong-Jian

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the biocompatibility and implantability of a nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy in auricle reconstruction. Twelve New Zealand rabbits underwent subcutaneous implantation with a NiTi alloy framework shaped like the human auricle under general anesthesia. The implant was inserted after skin expansion. Implant vascularization was evaluated at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 after implantation by histologic analysis. Immunohistochemical methods were used to examine expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in tissue around the implant. The fibrovascular ingrowth rate of implants was determined by bone scanning using (99m)Tc-PYP. The surface of the NiTi alloy implant was examined microscopically with scanning electron microscopy. The implant harvested showed only partial vascularization at 1 month and completely vascularized at 3 months. The amount of vascular endothelial growth factor-positive cells was markedly increased at 6 months and reached the highest number at 3 months. The fibrovascular ingrowth rate of implant was assessed by (99m)Tc-PYP bone scan using ratios of (99m)Tc-PYP activity in placement regions versus the contralateral normal region. One rabbit had exposure of the NiTi alloy framework as a result of overlying skin flap necrosis. It was rescued with animal skin without the complete removal of the framework. All the other rabbits tolerated the implant well, and there were no complications. The NiTi alloy implant represents an alternative implant for auricular reconstruction.

  14. Effect of nickel on point defects diffusion in Fe – Ni alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Osetsky, Yury N.

    2017-05-05

    Iron-Nickel alloys are perspective alloys as nuclear energy structural materials because of their good radiation damage tolerance and mechanical properties. Understanding of experimentally observed features such as the effect of Ni content to radiation defects evolution is essential for developing predictive models of radiation. Recently an atomic-scale modelling study has revealed one particular mechanism of Ni effect related to the reduced mobility of clusters of interstitial atoms in Fe-Ni alloys. In this paper we present results of the microsecond-scale molecular dynamics study of point defects, i.e. vacancies and self-interstitial atoms, diffusion in Fe-Ni alloys. It is found that the additionmore » of Ni atoms affects diffusion processes: diffusion of vacancies is enhanced in the presence of Ni, whereas diffusion of interstitials is reduced and these effects increase at high Ni concentration and low temperature. As a result, the role of Ni solutes in radiation damage evolution in Fe-Ni alloys is discussed.« less

  15. Nickel-aluminum alloy clusters -- structural and dynamical properties

    SciT

    Jellinek, J.; Krissinel, E.B.

    1997-08-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of mixed Ni{sub n}Al{sub m} alloy clusters mimicked by a many-body potential are studied computationally for all the possible compositions n and m such that n + m = 13. It is shown that the manifold of the usually very large number of the different possible structural forms can be systematized by introducing classes of structures corresponding to the same concentration of the components, geometry and type of the central atom. General definitions of mixing energy and mixing coefficient are introduced, and it is shown that the energy ordering of the structural forms within each classmore » is governed by the mixing coefficient. The peculiarities of the solid-to-liquid-like transition are described as a function of the concentration of the two types of atoms. These peculiarities are correlated with and explained in terms of the energy spectra of the structural forms. Class-dependent features of the dynamics are described and analyzed.« less

  16. Influence of speed on wear and cutting forces in end-milling nickel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrems, M.; Sánchez, H. T.; Kurfess, T.; Bunget, C.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of speed on the flank wear of the cutting tool when a nickel alloy is milled is studied. From the analysis of the measured forces, a dynamic semi-experimental model is developed based on the parallelism between the curve of the thrust forces of the unworn tool and the curves when the flank of the tool is worn. Based on the change in the geometry of the contact in the flank worrn face, a theory of indentation of the tool on the workpiece is formulated in such a way that upon applying equations of contact mechanics, a good approximation of the experimental results is obtained.

  17. Structure of nickel-copper alloys subjected to high-pressure torsion to saturation stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. V.; Stolbovsky, A. V.; Popova, E. N.

    2017-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and microhardness measurements were used to study the structure of Ni-Cu alloys subjected to high-pressure torsion (to saturation state) at room-temperature using five revolutions. It was shown that, when passing from copper to nickel, the submicrocrystalline structure becomes substantially refined, and the microhardness increases by more than 1.5 times. This is related to differences in the melting temperature and stacking fault energy. The simultaneous effect of these two factors leads to the nonlinearity of the composition dependences of the crystallite size and microhardness.

  18. Piercing mandrel strengthening by surfacing with nickel aluminide-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorin, I. V.; Dubtsov, Yu N.; Sokolov, G. N.; Artem'ev, A. A.; Lysak, V. I.; Elsukov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    Electrode composite wire (CW) was used for argon-arc surfacing of a thermal-resisting nickel aluminide-based alloy (Ni-Al-Cr-W-Mo-Ta system) on the butt-end surface of the non-water-cooled piercing mandrel. It was shown that multipassing surfacing forms a defect-free deposited metal based on the γ’-Ni3Al phase of various structural origins. Using high-temperature sclerometry and thermal fatigue testing methods, the metal deposited with CW containing ultrafine particle of 0.3-0.4 % wt. WC carbide features increased resistance to thermal and force effects at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  19. Analysis of thermoelectric properties of high-temperature complex alloys of nickel-base, iron-base and cobalt-base groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties alloys of the nickel-base, iron-base, and cobalt-base groups containing from 1% to 25% 106 chromium were compared and correlated with the following material characteristics: atomic percent of the principle alloy constituent; ratio of concentration of two constituents; alloy physical property (electrical resistivity); alloy phase structure (percent precipitate or percent hardener content); alloy electronic structure (electron concentration). For solid-solution-type alloys the most consistent correlation was obtained with electron concentration, for precipitation-hardenable alloys of the nickel-base superalloy group, the thermoelectric potential correlated with hardener content in the alloy structure. For solid-solution-type alloys, no problems were found with thermoelectric stability to 1000; for precipitation-hardenable alloys, thermoelectric stability was dependent on phase stability. The effects of the compositional range of alloy constituents on temperature measurement uncertainty are discussed.

  20. Vibration Sensor Monitoring of Nickel-Titanium Alloy Turning for Machinability Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Segreto, Tiziana; Caggiano, Alessandra; Karam, Sara; Teti, Roberto

    2017-12-12

    Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) alloys are very difficult-to-machine materials causing notable manufacturing problems due to their unique mechanical properties, including superelasticity, high ductility, and severe strain-hardening. In this framework, the aim of this paper is to assess the machinability of Ni-Ti alloys with reference to turning processes in order to realize a reliable and robust in-process identification of machinability conditions. An on-line sensor monitoring procedure based on the acquisition of vibration signals was implemented during the experimental turning tests. The detected vibration sensorial data were processed through an advanced signal processing method in time-frequency domain based on wavelet packet transform (WPT). The extracted sensorial features were used to construct WPT pattern feature vectors to send as input to suitably configured neural networks (NNs) for cognitive pattern recognition in order to evaluate the correlation between input sensorial information and output machinability conditions.

  1. Transparent nickel selenide alloy counter electrodes for bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells exceeding 10% efficiency.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yanyan; Tang, Qunwei; He, Benlin; Li, Ru; Yu, Liangmin

    2014-11-07

    In the current work, we report a series of bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) that provide power conversion efficiencies of more than 10% from bifacial irradiation. The device comprises an N719-sensitized TiO2 anode, a transparent nickel selenide (Ni-Se) alloy counter electrode (CE), and liquid electrolyte containing I(-)/I3(-) redox couples. Because of the high optical transparency, electron conduction ability, electrocatalytic activity of Ni-Se CEs, as well as dye illumination, electron excitation and power conversion efficiency have been remarkably enhanced. Results indicate that incident light from a transparent CE has a compensation effect to the light from the anode. The impressive efficiency along with simple preparation of the cost-effective Ni-Se alloy CEs highlights the potential application of bifacial illumination technique in robust DSSCs.

  2. Copper-nickel superalloys as inert alloy anodes for aluminum electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhongning; Xu, Junli; Qiu, Zhuxian; Wang, Zhaowen; Gao, Bingliang

    2003-11-01

    The superalloys Cu-Ni-Al, Cu-Ni-Fe, and Cu-Ni-Cr were studied as anodes for aluminum electrolysis. The alloys were tested for corrosion in acidic electrolyte molten salt and for oxidation in both air and oxygen. The results showed that the Cu-Ni-Al anodes possess excellent resistance to oxidation and corrosion, and the oxidation rates of Cu-Ni-Fe and Cu-Ni-Al anodes were slower than those of pure copper or nickel. During electrolysis, the cell voltage of the Cu-Ni-Al anode was affected most by the concentration of alumina in cryolite molten salt. The Cu-Ni-Fe anode exhibited corrosion resistance in electrolyte molten salt. Comparatively, the Cu-Ni-Cr anode showed poor resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The testing found that further study is warranted on the use of Cu-Ni-Al and Cu-Ni-Fe as inert alloy anodes.

  3. Comparison of joining processes for Haynes 230 nickel based super alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williston, David Hugh

    Haynes 230 is a nickel based, solid-solution strengthened alloy that is used for high-temperature applications in the aero-engine and power generation industries. The alloy composition is balanced to avoid precipitation of undesirable topologically closed-packed (TCP) intermetallic phases, such as Sigma, Mu, or Laves-type, that are detrimental to mechanical and corrosion properties. This material is currently being used for the NASA's J2X upper stage rocket nozzle extension. Current fabrication procedures use fusion welding processes to join blanks that are subsequently formed. Cracks have been noted to occur in the fusion welded region during the forming operations. Use of solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding are being proposed to eliminate the fusion weld cracks. Of interest is a modified friction stir welding process called thermal stir welding. Three welding process: Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Thermal Stir Welding (TSWing) are compared in this study.

  4. Vibration Sensor Monitoring of Nickel-Titanium Alloy Turning for Machinability Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Segreto, Tiziana; Karam, Sara; Teti, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) alloys are very difficult-to-machine materials causing notable manufacturing problems due to their unique mechanical properties, including superelasticity, high ductility, and severe strain-hardening. In this framework, the aim of this paper is to assess the machinability of Ni-Ti alloys with reference to turning processes in order to realize a reliable and robust in-process identification of machinability conditions. An on-line sensor monitoring procedure based on the acquisition of vibration signals was implemented during the experimental turning tests. The detected vibration sensorial data were processed through an advanced signal processing method in time-frequency domain based on wavelet packet transform (WPT). The extracted sensorial features were used to construct WPT pattern feature vectors to send as input to suitably configured neural networks (NNs) for cognitive pattern recognition in order to evaluate the correlation between input sensorial information and output machinability conditions. PMID:29231864

  5. Structure-property relationships in thermomechanically treated beryllia dispersed nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grewal, M. S.; Sastri, S. A.; Grant, N. J.

    1975-01-01

    BeO dispersed nickel alloys, produced by powder metallurgy techniques, were studied extensively in stress rupture at 815, 982, and 1093 C (1088, 1255, and 1366 K) and by transmission electron microscopy. The alloys were subjected to a variety of thermomechanical treatments (TMT) to determine the benefits of TMT on properties. It is shown that the use of intermediate annealing treatments after 10 pct reduction steps is highly beneficial on both low and high temperature properties. It is indicated that the high temperature strength is not primarily dependent on the grain aspect ratio or texture but depends strongly on the dislocation density and distribution of dislocations in a stable substructure which is pinned by the fine oxide dispersion.

  6. The effect of primary recoil spectrum on radiation induced segregation in nickel-silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averback, R. S.; Rehn, L. E.; Wagner, W.; Ehrhart, P.

    1983-08-01

    Segregation of silicon to the surface of Ni-12.7 at% Si alloys during 2.0-MeV He and 3.25-MeV Kr irradiations was measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. For equal calculated defect production rates the Kr irradiation was < 3 % as efficient as the He irradiation for promoting segregation in the temperature range, 450 °C-580 °C. It was further observed that Kr preirradiation of specimens dramatically reduced segregation during subsequent He irradiation. A model for cascade annealing in Ni-Si alloys is presented which qualitatively explains the segregation results. The model assumes that small interstitial-atom-clusters form in individual cascades and that these clusters become trapped at silicon solute atoms. The vacancy thereby becomes the more mobile defect. The model should also have relevance for the observation that void swelling in nickel is suppressed by the addition of silicon solute.

  7. The Effect of Solution Heat Treatment on an Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Kantzos, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    Five heat treat options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, LSHR, have been investigated. These included two conventional solution heat treat cycles, subsolvus/oil quench and supersolvus/fan cool, which yield fine grain and coarse grain microstructure disks respectively, as well as three advanced dual microstructure heat treat (DMHT) options. The DMHT options produce disks with a fine grain bore and a coarse grain rim. Based on an overall evaluation of the mechanical property data, it was evident that the three DMHT options achieved a desirable balance of properties in comparison to the conventional solution heat treatments for the LSHR alloy. However, one of the DMHT options, SUB/DMHT, produced the best set of properties, largely based on dwell crack growth data. Further evaluation of the SUB/DMHT option in spin pit experiments on a generic disk shape demonstrated the advantages and reliability of a dual grain structure at the component level.

  8. Metallurgical investigation into ductility dip cracking in nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noecker, Fredrick F., II

    A690 is a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy with excellent resistance to general corrosion, localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. However, the companion filler metal for A690, EN52, has been shown by several researchers to be susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC), which limits its widespread use in joining applications. The Gleeble hot ductility test was used to evaluate the DDC susceptibility of A600 and A690, along with their filler metals, EN82H and EN52, throughout the heating and cooling portions of a simulated weld reheat thermal cycle. Both macroscopic mechanical measures and microscopic measures of DDC were quantified and compared. Water quenching was conducted at select temperatures for subsequent microstructural characterization. Microstructural and microchemical characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques. The greatest resistance to DDC was observed in A600 and A690 during heating, where no DDC cracks formed even when the samples were fractured. Both A690 and EN52 were found to form an intermediate on-cooling dip in ductility and UTS, which corresponded to an increase in ductility dip crack length. The hot ductility and cracking resistance of EN82H remained high throughout the entire thermal cycle. DDC susceptibility in both EN52 and EN82H decreased when the thermal cycle was modified to promote coarsening/precipitation of intergranular carbides prior to straining. AEM analysis did not reveal any sulfur or phosphorous intergranular segregation in EN52 at 1600°F on-heating, on-cooling or after a 60 second hold. The ductility dip cracks were preferentially oriented at a 45° to the tensile axis and were of a wedge type appearance, both of which are characteristic of grain boundary sliding (GBS). Samples with microstructures that consisted of coarsened carbides and/or serrated grain boundaries, which are expected to decrease GBS, were found to be

  9. Simultaneous material flow analysis of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum used in alloy steel by means of input-output analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Ohno, Hajime; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Takeda, Osamu; Miki, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2013-05-07

    Steel is not elemental iron but rather a group of iron-based alloys containing many elements, especially chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Steel recycling is expected to promote efficient resource use. However, open-loop recycling of steel could result in quality loss of nickel and molybdenum and/or material loss of chromium. Knowledge about alloying element substance flow is needed to avoid such losses. Material flow analyses (MFAs) indicate the importance of steel recycling to recovery of alloying elements. Flows of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum are interconnected, but MFAs have paid little attention to the interconnected flow of materials/substances in supply chains. This study combined a waste input-output material flow model and physical unit input-output analysis to perform a simultaneous MFA for nickel, chromium, and molybdenum in the Japanese economy in 2000. Results indicated the importance of recovery of these elements in recycling policies for end-of-life (EoL) vehicles and constructions. Improvement in EoL sorting technologies and implementation of designs for recycling/disassembly at the manufacturing phase are needed. Possible solutions include development of sorting processes for steel scrap and introduction of easier methods for identifying the composition of secondary resources. Recovery of steel scrap with a high alloy content will reduce primary inputs of alloying elements and contribute to more efficient resource use.

  10. Characterization of porous nickel-titanium alloys for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez Tenorio, Rommy

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the electrochemical behaviour of porous NiTi alloys provided by different sources. In order to achieve this goal, a systematic characterization of the physical and chemical properties by different techniques and new approaches were conducted. The martensite-austenite phase transition was determined by the use of the Differential scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The morphological characteristics (porosity and roughness) were measured with the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The surface chemical composition of the samples was identified by the use of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). In the case of porous material the biomechanical compatibility is closely related to the porosity distribution of the sample. To describe appropriately the influence of this parameter on the properties of NiTi, four types of materials provided by different sources were analyzed. The samples were produced by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS) procedure. A heat treatment was applied in order to release internal stress created during forming processes, one series of specimens from each type was submitted to an annealing process during 30 min at 550°C in an air atmosphere. Its influence on the properties of the materials was also evaluated. Our first results showed that despite the fact that all the materials present different pore size, all the samples exhibited an open and interconnected porosity that promotes a good fixation and bone ingrowth within their structure. The thermal analysis showed that the temperature of the inception of the martensite-austenite phase transition occurs at 60°C, which is greater than the body temperature by 20°C. The microscopic analysis for the samples revealed that the heat treatment did not generate any morphological changes. The XPS study indicated that the surface oxidation occurs after the heat treatment. This oxide layer has a different thickness for

  11. Tungsten solution kinetics and amorphization of nickel in mechanically alloyed Ni-W alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aning, A. O.; Wang, Z.; Courtney, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of solution of W, and the subsequent amorphization of Ni, in mechanically alloyed Ni-W alloys has been investigated. As W is a highly abrasive material in the energy intensive devices used for mechanical alloying, we studied the above reactions in different mills. One used hardened steel balls as the grinding media, and the other Al2O3. Abrasion is common to both mills, but Fe wear debris from the hardened steel enters into solution in the Ni rich phases whereas Al2O3 debris is present as small dispersoids. The kinetics of W solution and those of subsequent amorphization do not appear strongly affected by the Fe in solution or the Al2O3 dispersoid. Tungsten dissolves in crystalline Ni in amounts in excess of the equilibrium solubility during alloying. Amorphization of the Ni phase occurs if the W content in this phase exceeds ca. 28 at. pct.

  12. Ignition characteristics of the nickel-based alloy UNS N07001 in pressurized oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Billiard, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of ignition and combustion in pressurized oxygen atmospheres was studied for the nickel-based alloy UNS N07001. Ignition of the alloy was achieved by heating the top surface of a cylindrical specimen with a continuous-wave CO2 laser. Two heating procedures were used. In the first, laser power was adjusted to maintain an approximately linear increase in surface temperature. In the second, laser power was periodically increased until autoheating (self-heating) was established. It was found that the alloy would autoheat to combustion from temperatures below the solidus temperature. In addition, the alloy had a tendency to develop combustion zones (hot spots) at high oxygen pressures when the incremental (step) heating test mode was used. Unique points on the temperature-time curves that describe certain events are defined and the temperatures at which these events occur are given for the oxygen pressure range of 1.72 to 13.8 MPa (250 to 2000 psia).

  13. Stiffness-constant variation in nickel-based alloys: Experiment and theory

    SciT

    Hennion, M.; Hennion, B.

    1979-01-01

    Recent measurements of the spin-wave stiffness constant in several nickel alloys at various concentrations are interpreted within a random-phase approximation, coherent-potential approximation (RPA-CPA) band model which uses the Hartree-Fock approximation to treat the intraatomic correlations. We give a theoretical description of the possible impurity states in the Hartree-Fock approximation. This allows the determination of the Hartree-Fock solutions which can account for the stiffness-constant behavior and the magnetic moment on the impurity for all the investigated alloys. For alloys such as NiCr, NiV, NiMo, and NiRu, the magnetizations of which deviate from the Slater-Pauling curve, our determination does not correspond tomore » previous works and is consequently discussed. The limits of the model appear mainly due to local-environment effects; in the case of NiMn, it is found that a ternary-alloy model with some Mn atoms in the antiferromagnetic state can account for both stiffness-constant and magnetization behaviors.« less

  14. Characterization of Nanocrystalline Nickel-Cobalt Alloys Synthesized by Direct and Pulse Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, M.; Saidi, A.; Ahmadian, M.; Raeissi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Co alloys are electrodeposited by direct (DC) and pulse current (PC) in an electrolyte solution which consisted of nickel sulfate, cobalt sulfate and boric acid. Electrodeposition parameters including current density, electrolyte pH and pulse times in a single electrolyte bath were changed. XRD pattern showed that the structure of the alloys depends on Co content and the synthesis parameter and changed from single phase structure (fcc) to dual phase structure (fcc + hcp). The Co content in the deposited alloys declined from 70 at.% to 50 at.% by increasing in direct current from 70 mA/cm2 to 115 mA/cm2 and also decreased from 75 at.% to 33 at.% with decrease in pH values from 4 to 2. By applying PC the Co content changed from 76 at.% to 41 at.%. Magnetic properties measurements showed the saturation magnetization (Ms) increased with increasing the Co content. There was no significant effect on coercivity values (Hc) with change in Co content and about 40 Oe was obtained for all samples. The grain size of deposited alloys obtained between 24-58 nm and 15-21 nm by applying DC and PC, respectively.

  15. Metallic ions released from stainless steel, nickel-free, and titanium orthodontic alloys: toxicity and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Antonio José; Fernández, Esther; Vicente, Ascensión; Calvo, José L; Ortiz, Clara

    2011-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the amounts of metallic ions that stainless steel, nickel-free, and titanium alloys release to a culture medium, and to evaluate the cellular viability and DNA damage of cultivated human fibroblasts with those mediums. The metals were extracted from 10 samples (each consisting of 4 buccal tubes and 20 brackets) of the 3 orthodontic alloys that were submerged for 30 days in minimum essential medium. Next, the determination of metals was performed by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, cellular viability was assessed by using the tetrazolium reduction assay (MTT assay) (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide), and DNA damage was determined with the Comet assay. The metals measured in all the samples were Ti(47), Cr(52), Mn(55), Co(59), Ni(60), Mo(92), Fe(56), Cu(63), Zn(66), As(75), Se(78), Cd(111), and Pb(208). The cellular viability of the cultured fibroblasts incubated for 7 days with minimum essential medium, with the stainless steel alloy submerged, was close to 0%. Moreover, high concentrations of titanium, chromium, manganese, cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, iron, copper, and zinc were detected. The nickel-free alloy released lower amounts of ions to the medium. The greatest damage in the cellular DNA, measured as the olive moment, was also produced by the stainless steel alloy followed by the nickel-free alloy. Conversely, the titanium alloy had an increased cellular viability and did not damage the cellular DNA, as compared with the control values. The titanium brackets and tubes are the most biocompatible of the 3 alloys studied. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nickel

    The agricultural significance of nickel (Ni) is becoming increasingly apparent; yet, relative few farmers, growers, specialists or researchers know much about its function in crops, nor symptoms of deficiency or toxicity. The body of knowledge is reviewed regarding Ni’s background, uptake, transloc...

  17. Surface characteristics, mechanical properties, and cytocompatibility of oxygen plasma-implanted porous nickel titanium shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Wu, S L; Chu, Paul K; Liu, X M; Chung, C Y; Ho, J P Y; Chu, C L; Tjong, S C; Yeung, K W K; Lu, W W; Cheung, K M C; Luk, K D K

    2006-10-01

    Good surface properties and biocompatibility are crucial to porous NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) used in medical implants, as possible nickel release from porous NiTi may cause deleterious effects in the human body. In this work, oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (O-PIII) was used to reduce the amount of nickel leached from porous NiTi alloys with a porosity of 42% prepared by capsule-free hot isostatic pressing. The mechanical properties, surface properties, and biocompatibility were studied by compression tests, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cell culturing. The O-PIII porous NiTi SMAs have good mechanical properties and excellent superelasticity, and the amount of nickel leached from the O-PIII porous NiTi is much less than that from the untreated samples. XPS results indicate that a nickel-depleted surface layer predominantly composed of TiO(2) is produced by O-PIII and acts as a barrier against out-diffusion of nickel. The cell culturing tests reveal that both the O-PIII and untreated porous NiTi alloys have good biocompatibility. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  18. NICKEL COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Nickel coatings on uranium and various methods of obtaining such coatings are described. Specifically disclosed are such nickel or nickel alloy layers as barriers between uranium and aluminum- silicon, chromium, or copper coatings.

  19. Microstructure, nickel suppression and mechanical characteristics of electropolished and photoelectrocatalytically oxidized biomedical nickel titanium shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Chu, C L; Guo, C; Sheng, X B; Dong, Y S; Lin, P H; Yeung, K W K; Chu, Paul K

    2009-07-01

    A new surface modification protocol encompassing an electropolishing pretreatment (EP) and subsequent photoelectrocatalytic oxidation (PEO) has been developed to improve the surface properties of biomedical nickel titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA). Electropolishing is a good way to improve the resistance to localized breakdown of NiTi SMA whereas PEO offers the synergistic effects of advanced oxidation and electrochemical oxidation. Our results indicate that PEO leads to the formation of a sturdy titania film on the EP NiTi substrate. There is an Ni-free zone near the top surface and a graded interface between the titania layer and NiTi substrate, which bodes well for both biocompatibility and mechanical stability. In addition, Ni ion release from the NiTi substrate is suppressed, as confirmed by the 10-week immersion test. The modulus and hardness of the modified NiTi surface increase with larger indentation depths, finally reaching plateau values of about 69 and 3.1GPa, respectively, which are slightly higher than those of the NiTi substrate but much lower than those of a dense amorphous titania film. In comparison, after undergoing only EP, the mechanical properties of NiTi exhibit an inverse change with depth. The deformation mechanism is proposed and discussed. Our results indicate that surface modification by dual EP and PEO can notably suppress Ni ion release and improve the biocompatibility of NiTi SMA while the surface mechanical properties are not compromised, making the treated materials suitable for hard tissue replacements.

  20. Creep and stress rupture of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion and precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Mervyn, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture behavior of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and gamma-prime precipitation strengthened nickel-base alloy (alloy MA 6000E) was studied at intermediate and elevated temperatures. At 760 C, MA 6000E exhibits the high creep strength characteristic of nickel-base superalloys and at 1093 C the creep strength is superior to other ODS nickel-base alloys. The stress dependence of the creep rate is very sharp at both test temperatures and the apparent creep activation energy measured around 760 C is high, much larger in magnitude than the self-diffusion energy. Stress rupture in this large grain size material is transgranular and crystallographic cracking is observed. The rupture ductility is dependent on creep strain rate, but usually is low. These and accompanying microstructural results are discussed with respect to other ODS alloys and superalloys and the creep behavior is rationalized by invoking a recently-developed resisting stress model of creep in materials strengthened by second phase particles.

  1. Multimodal Nanoscale Characterization of Transformation and Deformation Mechanisms in Several Nickel Titanium Based Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalena, Lee

    . NiTiAu alloys are shown to demonstrate work output at extremely high temperatures - above 400 °C - where the potential benefits may offset material cost. Crystal structures and chemical effects of previously undocumented secondary phases are extensively examined using STEM and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS). These insights are combined with mechanical test data to develop an understanding of the critical microstructure-property relationships involved. In addition to the native corrosion resistance common to all these alloys, a nickel rich NiTi-1Hf alloy is shown to demonstrate extremely high strength and wear resistance, making it an ideal candidate for tribological applications such as bearings used in corrosive environments. Details of the stress-induced martensite phase are revealed in this alloy system using synchrotron radiation and aberration-corrected STEM. Finally, post mortem Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD) and in situ High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) are used to explore the remarkable grain refinement process that occurs in NiTi and related alloys through load-biased thermal cycling. Microstructural changes in the form of defect generation and subgrain development are key mechanistic insights sought to further understand the processes resulting in unrecovered strain accumulation, which lead to detrimental functional fatigue in these alloys.

  2. Intergranular tellurium cracking of nickel-based alloys in molten Li, Be, Th, U/F salt mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexander; Gnidoy, Ivan; Kulakov, Alexander; Uglov, Vadim; Vasiliev, Alexander; Presniakov, Mikhail

    2013-09-01

    In Russia, R&D on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) are concentrated now on fast/intermediate spectrum concepts which were recognized as long term alternative to solid fueled fast reactors due to their attractive features: strong negative feedback coefficients, easy in-service inspection, and simplified fuel cycle. For high-temperature MSR corrosion of the metallic container alloy in primary circuit is the primary concern. Key problem receiving current attention include surface fissures in Ni-based alloys probably arising from fission product tellurium attack. This paper summarizes results of corrosion tests conducted recently to study effect of oxidation state in selected fuel salt on tellurium attack and to develop means of controlling tellurium cracking in the special Ni-based alloys recently developed for molten salt actinide recycler and tranforming (MOSART) system. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys was tested at temperatures up to 750 °C in stressed and unloaded conditions in molten LiF-BeF2 salt mixture fueled by about 20 mol% of ThF4 and 2 mol% of UF4 at different [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratios: 0.7, 4, 20, 100 and 500. Following Ni-based alloys (in mass%): HN80М-VI (Mo—12, Cr—7.6, Nb—1.5), HN80МТY (Mo—13, Cr—6.8, Al—1.1, Ti—0.9), HN80МТW (Mo—9.4, Cr—7.0, Ti—1.7, W—5.5) and ЕМ-721 (W—25.2, Cr—5.7, Ti—0.17) were used for the study in the corrosion facility. If the redox state the fuel salt is characterized by uranium ratio [U(IV)]/[U(III)] < 1 the alloys' specimens get a more negative stationary electrode potential than equilibrium electrode potentials of some uranium intermetallic compounds and alloys with nickel and molybdenum. This leads to spontaneous behavior of alloy formation processes on the specimens' surface and further diffusion of uranium deep into the metallic phase. As consequence of this films of intermetallic compounds and alloys of nickel, molybdenum, tungsten with uranium are formed on the alloys specimens' surface

  3. Active-passive corrosion of iron-chromium-nickel alloys in hot concentrated sulphuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Joseph R.

    1999-11-01

    In the manufacture of sulphuric acid more stringent environmental standards and operation economics have forced the industry to improve product utilization, energy efficiency and reliability. A key to improving both the thermal efficiency and reliability is the use and/or development of more corrosion resistance materials including stainless steels, especially in the parts of the plant that handle the condensed acid. Application of more corrosion resistant material requires a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism involved in concentrated H2SO4-H2O (>90 wt.%) solutions. While corrosion kinetics of carbon steel, the traditional material of construction, are relatively well understood, this is much less true in the case of the cyclic active-passive corrosion of stainless steels. Models proposed to explain the cyclic active-passive corrosion involve a periodic formation of either a protective metal sulphate film or an insoluble sulphur layer. To better understand the reactivity and/or passivity of stainless steel in concentrated H2SO4-H2O solutions a study employing immersion and electrochemical techniques, including rotating electrodes, was conducted in order to clarify the following: (1) The state of stainless steel passivity. (2) The conditions in which passivity is stable. (3) The role played by the major alloying elements in establishing and maintaining the passive state. The study involved evaluating the corrosion behaviour of stainless steels S30403 and S43000 along with iron, chromium and nickel in 93.5 wt.% H2SO4 at temperatures between 25--80°C. Major discoveries of the study include: (1) A content of 17--18 wt.% chromium is sufficient to anodically passivate S43000 as the potential is made more noble. Passivity is not stable and requires anodic polarization. (2) Alloyed nickel plays an active role in improving the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. A content of 8 wt.% nickel is sufficient promote a periodic passivation of the base Fe-(17

  4. Surface and corrosion characteristics of carbon plasma implanted and deposited nickel-titanium alloy

    SciT

    Poon, R.W.Y.; Liu, X.Y.; Chung, C.Y.

    2005-05-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are potentially useful in orthopedic implants on account of their super-elastic and shape memory properties. However, the materials are prone to surface corrosion and the most common problem is out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the substrate into body tissues and fluids. In order to improve the corrosion resistance and related surface properties, we used the technique of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition to deposit an amorphous hydrogenated carbon coating onto NiTi and implant carbon into NiTi. Both the deposited amorphous carbon film and carbon plasma implanted samples exhibit much improved corrosion resistances andmore » surface mechanical properties and possible mechanisms are suggested.« less

  5. Experimental study of isopropanol dehydrogenation over amorphous alloy raney nickel catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Fang; Xu, Min; Li, Xun-Feng; Huai, Xiu-Lan

    2013-12-01

    The dehydrogenation reaction of isopropanol occurring at low temperature is of great industrial importance. It is a key procedure in isopropanol/acetone/hydrogen chemical heat pump system. An experimental investigation was performed to study the behavior of the liquid phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol over amorphous alloy Raney nickel catalysts. Un-promoted and promoted catalysts were used and their performances were compared under various catalyst amounts, acetone content in the reactant and reaction temperature ranging from 348 K to 355 K. It is found that there exists an optimum catalyst concentration which is about 0.34 g in 300 ml isopropanol. The temperature has evident effect on the reaction. The presence of activities of Fe-promoted catalyst decrease slightly compared to the un-promoted catalyst when the temperature are 348 K and 351 K. Besides, the reaction rate decreases almost linearly with the increase of acetone volume fraction in the reactant.

  6. The role of grain size and shape in strengthening of dispersion hardened nickel alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, B. A.; Clauer, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Thermomechanical processing was used to develop various microstructures in Ni, Ni-2ThO2, Ni-20Cr, Ni-20Cr-2ThO2, Ni-20Cr-10W and Ni-20Cr-10W-2ThO2, and the influence of microstructure on room temperature and elevated temperature strength was investigated. The yield strength at 25 C increased with substructure refinement according to the Hall-Petch relation. It was found that substructure refinement was a much more potent means of strengthening at room temperature than was dispersion hardening. At elevated temperature (1093 C), the most important microstructural feature affecting strength of dispersion hardened nickel alloys was the grain aspect ratio, i.e. grain length, L, divided by grain width,l. The yield strength and creep strength increased linearly with increasing L/l.

  7. Corrosion of Nickel-Based Alloys in Ultra-High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2017-03-01

    MgCl2-KCl binary system has been proposed to be used as high temperature reactor coolant. Due to its relatively low melting point, good heat capacity and excellent thermal stability, this system can also be used in high operation temperature concentrating solar power generation system as heat transfer fluid (HTF). The corrosion behaviors of nickel based alloys in MgCl2-KCl molten salt system at 1,000 °C were determined based on long-term isothermal dipping test. After 500 h exposure tests under strictly maintained high purity argon gas atmosphere, the weight loss and corrosion rate analysis were conducted. Among all the tested samples, Ni-201 demonstrated the lowest corrosion rate due to the excellent resistance of Ni to high temperature element dissolution. Detailed surface topography and corrosion mechanisms were also determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS).

  8. Inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide nanocoating for friction reduction of nickel-titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Samorodnitzky-Naveh, Gili R; Redlich, Meir; Rapoport, Lev; Feldman, Yishay; Tenne, Reshef

    2009-12-01

    To fabricate a friction-reducing coating onto different nickel-titanium (NiTi) substrates using inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS(2)) nanoparticles and to estimate in vitro friction reducing extent of the coating. Different NiTi substrates were coated with cobalt and IF-WS(2) nanoparticles film by the electrodeposition procedure. Coating composition analyses was made by scanning-electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffractometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Friction evaluation was carried out using standard tribological tests and an Instron system. Stable and well-adhered cobalt + IF-WS(2) coating of the NiTi substrates was obtained. Friction tests presented up to 66% reduction of the friction coefficient. NiTi alloy is widely used for many medical appliances; hence, this unique friction-reducing coating could be implemented to provide better manipulation and lower piercing rates.

  9. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results obtained in a program to evaluate dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys for use in a metallic radiative thermal protection system operating at surface temperatures to 1477 K for the space shuttle were presented. Vehicle environments having critical effects on the thermal protection system are defined; TD Ni-20Cr characteristics of material used in the current study are compared with previous results; cyclic load, temperature, and pressure effects on sheet material residual strength are investigated; the effects of braze reinforcement in improving the efficiency of spotwelded joints are evaluated; parametric studies of metallic radiative thermal protection systems are reported; and the design, instrumentation, and testing of full scale subsize heat shield panels in two configurations are described. Initial tests of full scale subsize panels included simulated meteoroid impact tests, simulated entry flight aerodynamic heating, programmed differential pressure loads and temperatures simulating mission conditions, and acoustic tests simulating sound levels experienced during boost flight.

  10. Development of phase analysis methods of impurity elements in alloys based on iron and nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, N. A.; Anuchkin, S. N.; Volchenkova, V. A.; Kazenas, E. K.; Penkina, T. N.; Fomina, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Using the method of AES with ICP, new methods have been developed for quantifying the content of various forms of existence of impurity elements: Al-Al2O3; Zr-ZrO2 in alloys based on iron (Fe-Sn) and nickel (Ni-Sn). Open systems were used to dissolve Al and Zr. To translate difficult-to-open aluminum oxides (corundum) and zirconium oxide (baddeleyite) into the solution, accelerated techniques were developed using the microwave system Mars 5. To confirm the completeness of the dissolution of oxides, a classical scheme of alloy fusion with alkali metal salts was used. Optimal analytical parameters for determining the elements: Al and Zr were chosen. The influence of matrix elements (iron and nickel) and methods of its elimination were studied. This made it possible to determine the elements in a wide concentration range from 1 • 10-3 to n% Al and from 1 • 10-4 to n% Zr without preliminary separation of the matrix with good metrological characteristics. The relative standard deviation (Sr) does not exceed 0,2. The separate determination of the contents of aluminum and aluminium oxide in the model melt of Fe-Sn-Al2O3 and zirconium and zirconium oxide in the Ni-Sn-ZrO2 model melt allowed us to estimate the number of nanoparticles participating in the heterophase interaction with tin and retired to the interface in the form of ensembles and the number of nanoparticles present in the melt and affecting the crystallization process and the structure of the metal.

  11. Co-reduction of Copper Smelting Slag and Nickel Laterite to Prepare Fe-Ni-Cu Alloy for Weathering Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Pan, Jian; Zhu, Deqing; Zhang, Feng

    2018-02-01

    In this study, a new technique was proposed for the economical and environmentally friendly recovery of valuable metals from copper smelting slag while simultaneously upgrading nickel laterite through a co-reduction followed by wet magnetic separation process. Copper slag with a high FeO content can decrease the liquidus temperature of the SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO system and facilitate formation of liquid phase in a co-reduction process with nickel laterite, which is beneficial for metallic particle growth. As a result, the recovery of Ni, Cu, and Fe was notably increased. A crude Fe-Ni-Cu alloy with 2.5% Ni, 1.1% Cu, and 87.9% Fe was produced, which can replace part of scrap steel, electrolytic copper, and nickel as the burden in the production of weathering steel by an electric arc furnace. The study further found that an appropriate proportion of copper slag and nickel laterite in the mixture is essential to enhance the reduction, acquire appropriate amounts of the liquid phase, and improve the growth of the metallic alloy grains. As a result, the liberation of alloy particles in the grinding process was effectively promoted and the metal recovery was increased significantly in the subsequent magnetic separation process.

  12. Oxidation and thermal fatigue of coated and uncoated NX-188 nickel-base alloy in a high velocity gas stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Young, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A cast nickel-base superalloy, NX-188, coated and uncoated, was tested in a high-velocity gas stream for resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue by cycling between room temperature and 980, 1040, and 1090 C. Contrary to the behavior of more conventional nickel-base alloys, uncoated NX-188 exhibited the greatest weight loss at the lowest test temperature. In general, on the basis of weight change and metallographic observations a coating consisting of vapor-deposited Fe-Cr-Al-Y over a chromized substrate exhibited the best overall performance in resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue.

  13. Low cycle fatigue life of two nickel-base casting alloys in a hydrogen environment. [for high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of two nickel-base casting alloys, Mar-M-246 (a Martin Company alloy) and 713LC (a low-carbon modification of the alloy 713C developed by International Nickel Company) were tested as candidate materials for the high-pressure fuel and high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles. The samples were subjected to tensile tests and to low cycle fatigue tests in high-pressure hydrogen to study the influence of the hydrogen environment. The Mar-M-246 material was found to have a three times higher cyclic life in hydrogen than the 713LC alloy, and was selected as the nozzle material.

  14. Ex Situ Investigation of Anisotropic Interconnection in Silicon-Titanium-Nickel Alloy Anode Material

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Jong -Soo; Alaboina, Pankaj Kumar; Kang, Chan -Soon; ...

    2017-03-10

    Herein we investigate the nanostructural evolution of Silicon-Titanium-Nickel (Si-Ti-Ni) ternary alloy material synthesized by melt spinning process for advanced lithium-ion battery anode. The synthesized material was found to have nano-Silicon particles dispersed in the Ti 4Ni 4Si 7 (STN) alloy buffering matrix and was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), High resolution- transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopes - energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (STEM-EDS), and electrochemical performance test. The role of STN matrix is to accommodate the volume expansion stresses of the dispersed Si nanoparticles. However, an interesting behavior was observed during cycling. The Si nanoparticles were observed tomore » form interconnection channels growing through the weak STN matrix cracks and evolving to a network isolating the STN matrix into small puddles. In conclusion, this unique nanostructural evolution of Si particles and isolation of the STN matrix failing to offer significant buffering effect to the grown Si network eventually accelerates more volume expansions during cycling due to less mechanical confinement and leads to performance degradation and poor cycle stability.« less

  15. Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Aged Nickel-based Alloy 625 Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Cleiton Carvalho; de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C.; Miná, Emerson Mendonça; Moura, Elineudo P.; Tavares, João Manuel R. S.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the different phases formed during solidification and after thermal aging of the as-welded 625 nickel-based alloy, as well as the influence of microstructural changes on the mechanical properties. The experiments addressed aging temperatures of 650 and 950 °C for 10, 100, and 200 hours. The samples were analyzed by electron microscopy, microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction in order to identify the secondary phases. Mechanical tests such as hardness, microhardness, and Charpy-V impact test were performed. Nondestructive ultrasonic inspection was also conducted to correlate the acquired signals with mechanical and microstructural properties. The results show that the alloy under study experienced microstructural changes when aged at 650 °C. The aging was responsible by the dissolution of the Laves phase formed during the solidification and the appearance of γ″ phase within interdendritic region and fine carbides along the solidification grain boundaries. However, when it was aged at 950 °C, the Laves phase was continuously dissolved and the excess Nb caused the precipitation of the δ-phase (Ni3Nb), which was intensified at 10 hours of aging, with subsequent dissolution for longer periods such as 200 hours. Even when subjected to significant microstructural changes, the mechanical properties, especially toughness, were not sensitive to the dissolution and/or precipitation of the secondary phases.

  16. Mechanical properties of several nickel alloys in hydrogen at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, J. R.; Harris, J. A., Jr.; Vanwanderham, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were performed to determine low cycle fatigue and crack growth rate properties of one iron-base and two forms of one cast nickel-base alloy. The alloys were tested in various forms and/or heat-treat conditions that are proposed for use in a high-pressure hydrogen or a hydrogen-water vapor environment. Some general conclusions can be made comparing the results of tests in a hydrogen environment with those in a hydrogen-water vapor environment. The hydrogen-water vapor environment caused a 50 percent average reduction in fatigue life, indicating extreme degradation when compared with tests conducted in air, for Incoloy 903 at 1033 K (1400 F). Crack growth rates increased significantly for all materials with increasing test temperature. A very significant increase (three orders of magnitude) in crack growth rate occurred for Incoloy 903 tested in the hydrogen-water vapor environment when compared with testing done in hydrogen along at 922 K (1200 F).

  17. Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of the Distribution of Rhenium in Nickel Alloys

    SciT

    Mottura, A.; Warnken, N; Miller, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is used to characterise the distributions of rhenium in a binary Ni-Re alloy and the nickel-based single-crystal CMSX-4 superalloy. A purpose-built algorithm is developed to quantify the size distribution of solute clusters, and applied to the APT datasets to critique the hypothesis that rhenium is prone to the formation of clusters in these systems. No evidence is found to indicate that rhenium forms solute clusters above the level expected from random fluctuations. In CMSX-4, enrichment of Re is detected in the matrix phase close to the matrix/precipitate ({gamma}/{gamma}{prime}) phase boundaries. Phase field modelling indicates that thismore » is due to the migration of the {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} interface during cooling from the temperature of operation. Thus, neither clustering of rhenium nor interface enrichments can be the cause of the enhancement in high temperature mechanical properties conferred by rhenium alloying.« less

  18. Rare-earth metals in nickel aluminide-based alloys: III. Structure and properties of multicomponent Ni3Al-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyleva, O. A.; Povarova, K. B.; Kazanskaya, N. K.; Drozdov, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    The possibility of increasing the life of heterophase cast light Ni3Al-based superalloys at temperatures higher than 0.8 T m of Ni3Al is studied when their directional structure is additionally stabilized by nanoprecipitates, which form upon additional alloying of these alloys by refractory and active metals, and using special methods for preparing and melting of an alloy charge. The effect of the method of introducing the main components and refractory reaction-active and surface-active alloying elements into Ni3Al-based cast superalloys, which are thermally stable natural composite materials of the eutectic type, on the structure-phase state and the life of these alloys is studied. When these alloys are melted, it is necessary to perform a set of measures to form particles of refractory oxide cores covered with the β-NiAl phase and, then, γ'prim-Ni3Al phase precipitates during solidification. The latter phase forms the outer shell of grain nuclei, which provides high thermal stability and hot strength of an intermetallic compound-based alloy. As a result, a modified structure that is stabilized by the nanoprecipitates of nickel and aluminum lanthanides and the nanoprecipitates of phases containing refractory metals is formed. This structure enhances the life of the alloy at 1000 °C by a factor of 1.8-2.5.

  19. Effects of surface finishing conditions on the biocompatibility of a nickel-chromium dental casting alloy.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Emma Louise; Coleman, David C; Moran, Gary P; Fleming, Garry J P

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of surface finishing condition (polished or alumina particle air abraded) on the biocompatibility of direct and indirect exposure to a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) d.Sign®10 dental casting alloy on oral keratinocytes. Biocompatibility was performed by assessing cellular viability and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity and presence of inflammatory cytokine markers. Discs of d.Sign®10 were cast, alumina particle air abraded and half were polished before surface roughness was determined by profilometry. Biocompatibility was assessed by placing the discs directly or indirectly (with immersion solutions) into contact with TR146 monolayers. Metal ion release was determined by ICP-MS. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue dye exclusion, metabolic activity by XTT and cellular toxicity by LDH. Inflammatory cytokine analysis was performed using sandwich ELISAs. The mean polished Ra value was significantly reduced (P<0.001) compared with the alumina particle air abraded discs but metal ion release was significantly increased for the polished discs. Significant reductions in cell density of polished compared with alumina particle air abraded discs was observed following direct or indirect exposure. A significant reduction in metabolic activity, increase in cellular toxicity and an increase in the presence of inflammatory cytokine markers was highlighted for the polished relative to the alumina particle air abraded discs at 24h. Finishing condition of the Ni-Cr dental alloy investigated has important clinical implications. The approach of employing cell density and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity levels and inflammatory marker responses to TR146 epithelial cells combined with ICP-MS afforded the authors an increased insight into the complex processes dental alloys undergo in the oral environment. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    SciT

    Nagle, Denis; Zhang, Dajie

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiationmore » damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.« less

  1. Microstructural study of the nickel-base alloy WAZ-20 using qualitative and quantitative electron optical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.

    1973-01-01

    The NASA nickel-base alloy WAZ-20 was analyzed by advanced metallographic techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize its phases and stability. The as-cast alloy contained primary gamma-prime, a coarse gamma-gamma prime eutectic, a gamma-fine gamma prime matrix, and MC carbides. A specimen aged at 870 C for 1000 hours contained these same constituents and a few widely scattered high W particles. No detrimental phases (such as sigma or mu) were observed. Scanning electron microscope, light metallography, and replica electron microscope methods are compared. The value of quantitative electron microprobe techniques such as spot and area analysis is demonstrated.

  2. Brushing-Induced Surface Roughness of Two Nickel Based Alloys and a Titanium Based Alloy: A Comparative Study - In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, B L Guruprasanna; Nadiger, Ramesh; Shetty, Bharathraj; Gururaj, G; Kumar, K Naveen; Darshan, D D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alloys with high nickel content have been increasingly used in dentistry. Alloys have high corrosion rates when exposed to chemical or physical forces that are common intra orally. Titanium is the most biocompatible materials for crowns, fixed partial dentures and implants in the present use, but paradoxically the self-protective oxide film on the titanium can be affected by excessive use of the most common preventive agents in dentistry. Therefore, this study is undertaken in order to draw attention toward the potential effect of prophylactic brushing in a saline medium. Materials and Methods: Forty-five wax patterns in equal dimensions of 10 mm × 10 mm × 2 mm were cast in titanium (Grade II) and nickel-chromium. Of the 45 wax patterns, 15 wax patterns were used for preparing cast titanium samples and 30 wax patterns were used for preparing cast nickel-chromium samples and polished. These samples were divided into three groups of 15 samples each. They are brushed for 48 h each clinically simulating 2 years of brushing in a saline tooth paste medium. The surface roughnesses of the samples were evaluated using profilometer, scanning electron microscopes and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: The statistical analysis of the Rz and Ra surface roughness values were calculated. Significant difference of surface roughness was present in the titanium samples compared to that of the machine-readable cataloguing and Wirolloy (nickel-chromium) samples after the study. To know the difference in the values of all samples before and after, Student’s paired t-test was carried out. Results showed that there is a significant change in the Rz and Ra values of titanium samples. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that, prophylactic brushing with the fluoridated toothpaste have an effect on the surface roughness of titanium and also to a certain extent, on nickel-chromium. Therefore, careful consideration must

  3. Influence of the rate of filtration of a complexly alloyed nickel melt through a foam-ceramic filter on the sulfur impurity content in the metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. V.; Min, P. G.; Folomeikin, Yu. I.; Vadeev, V. E.

    2015-06-01

    The article discusses the possibility of additional refining of a complexly alloyed nickel melt from a sulfur impurity by decreasing the filtration rate during the passage of the melt through a foam-ceramic filter. The degree of sulfur removal from the melt is shown to depend on its content in the alloy and the melt filtration rate.

  4. Transverse and longitudinal tensile properties at 760 C of several oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anglin, A. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The transverse and longitudinal tensile properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys were determined at 760 C. The alloys with small amounts of gamma prime have strength levels suitable for turbine vane applications, while other highly alloyed, gamma prime strengthened superalloys have strengths typical of turbine blade materials. These alloys were produced by mechanical alloying and extrusion and the turbine blade alloys were also directionally recrystallized. Resultant grain aspect ratios varied from 1:1 to over 20:1. Longitudinal tensile strengths ranged from 285 to 1175 MPa, while longitudinal elongations were in excess of 4 percent for all alloys. Transverse tensile strengths were comparable to longitudinal strengths, but transverse ductility levels were generally less than 2 percent elongation. Tensile and yield strengths increased with increasing strain rate over the range 0.001 to 0.05 per second. Ductility in both orientations was not strain rate sensitive but could be related to grain size and grain aspect ratio.

  5. Statistical analysis and optimization of direct metal laser deposition of 227-F Colmonoy nickel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelastro, A.; Campanelli, S. L.; Casalino, G.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a study on process parameters and building strategy for the deposition of Colmonoy 227-F powder by CO2 laser with a focal spot diameter of 0.3 mm. Colmonoy 227-F is a nickel alloy especially designed for mold manufacturing. The substrate material is a 10 mm thick plate of AISI 304 steel. A commercial CO2 laser welding machine was equipped with a low-cost powder feeding system. In this work, following another one in which laser power, scanning speed and powder flow rate had been studied, the effects of two important process parameters, i.e. hatch spacing and step height, on the properties of the built parts were analysed. The explored ranges of hatch spacing and step height were respectively 150-300 μm and 100-200 μm, whose dimensions were comparable with that of the laser spot. The roughness, adhesion, microstructure, microhardness and density of the manufactured specimens were studied for multi-layer samples, which were made of 30 layers. The statistical significance of the studied process parameters was assessed by the analysis of the variance. The process parameters used allowed to obtain both first layer-to-substrate and layer-to-layer good adhesions. The microstructure was fine and almost defect-free. The microhardness of the deposited material was about 100 HV higher than that of the starting powder. The density as high as 98% of that of the same bulk alloy was more than satisfactory. Finally, simultaneous optimization of density and roughness was performed using the contour plots.

  6. Design of Hydrogen Storage Alloys/Nanoporous Metals Hybrid Electrodes for Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, M M; Yang, C C; Wang, C C; Wen, Z; Zhu, Y F; Zhao, M; Li, J C; Zheng, W T; Lian, J S; Jiang, Q

    2016-06-07

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have demonstrated key technology advantages for applications in new-energy vehicles, which play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the world's dependence on fossil fuels. However, the poor high-rate dischargeability of the negative electrode materials-hydrogen storage alloys (HSAs) limits applications of Ni-MH batteries in high-power fields due to large polarization. Here we design a hybrid electrode by integrating HSAs with a current collector of three-dimensional bicontinuous nanoporous Ni. The electrode shows enhanced high-rate dischargeability with the capacity retention rate reaching 44.6% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g(-1), which is 2.4 times that of bare HSAs (18.8%). Such a unique hybrid architecture not only enhances charge transfer between nanoporous Ni and HSAs, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of hydrogen atoms in HSAs. The developed HSAs/nanoporous metals hybrid structures exhibit great potential to be candidates as electrodes in high-performance Ni-MH batteries towards applications in new-energy vehicles.

  7. Selective rear side ablation of thin nickel-chromium-alloy films using ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, Linda; Ullmann, Frank; Ebert, Robby; Exner, Horst

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, the selective laser structuring from the transparent substrate side plays an increased role in thin film processing. The rear side ablation is a highly effective ablation method for thin film structuring and revels a high structuring quality. Therefore, the rear side ablation of nickel-chromium-alloy thin films on glass substrate was investigated using femtosecond laser irradiation. Single and multiple pulses ablation thresholds as well as the incubation coefficient were determined. By irradiation from the transparent substrate side at low fluences a cracking or a partly delamination of the film could be observed. By increasing the fluence the most part of the film was ablated, however, a very thin film remained at the interface of the glass substrate. This thin remaining layer could be completely ablated by two pulses. A further increase of the pulse number had no influence on the ablation morphology. The ablated film was still intact and an entire disc or fragments could be collected near the ablation area. The fragments showed no morphology change and were still in solid state.

  8. Laser beam micro-milling of nickel alloy: dimensional variations and RSM optimization of laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Alahmari, Abdulrahman M.; Darwish, Saied; Naveed, Madiha

    2016-12-01

    Micro-channels are considered as the integral part of several engineering devices such as micro-channel heat exchangers, micro-coolers, micro-pulsating heat pipes and micro-channels used in gas turbine blades for aerospace applications. In such applications, a fluid flow is required to pass through certain micro-passages such as micro-grooves and micro-channels. The fluid flow characteristics (flow rate, turbulence, pressure drop and fluid dynamics) are mainly established based on the size and accuracy of micro-passages. Variations (oversizing and undersizing) in micro-passage's geometry directly affect the fluid flow characteristics. In this study, the micro-channels of several sizes are fabricated in well-known aerospace nickel alloy (Inconel 718) through laser beam micro-milling. The variations in geometrical characteristics of different-sized micro-channels are studied under the influences of different parameters of Nd:YAG laser. In order to have a minimum variation in the machined geometries of each size of micro-channel, the multi-objective optimization of laser parameters has been carried out utilizing the response surface methodology approach. The objective was set to achieve the targeted top widths and depths of micro-channels with minimum degree of taperness associated with the micro-channel's sidewalls. The optimized sets of laser parameters proposed for each size of micro-channel can be used to fabricate the micro-channels in Inconel 718 with minimum amount of geometrical variations.

  9. Design of Hydrogen Storage Alloys/Nanoporous Metals Hybrid Electrodes for Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Li, M. M.; Yang, C. C.; Wang, C. C.; Wen, Z.; Zhu, Y. F.; Zhao, M.; Li, J. C.; Zheng, W. T.; Lian, J. S.; Jiang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have demonstrated key technology advantages for applications in new-energy vehicles, which play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the world’s dependence on fossil fuels. However, the poor high-rate dischargeability of the negative electrode materials—hydrogen storage alloys (HSAs) limits applications of Ni-MH batteries in high-power fields due to large polarization. Here we design a hybrid electrode by integrating HSAs with a current collector of three-dimensional bicontinuous nanoporous Ni. The electrode shows enhanced high-rate dischargeability with the capacity retention rate reaching 44.6% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g−1, which is 2.4 times that of bare HSAs (18.8%). Such a unique hybrid architecture not only enhances charge transfer between nanoporous Ni and HSAs, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of hydrogen atoms in HSAs. The developed HSAs/nanoporous metals hybrid structures exhibit great potential to be candidates as electrodes in high-performance Ni-MH batteries towards applications in new-energy vehicles. PMID:27270184

  10. Design of Hydrogen Storage Alloys/Nanoporous Metals Hybrid Electrodes for Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. M.; Yang, C. C.; Wang, C. C.; Wen, Z.; Zhu, Y. F.; Zhao, M.; Li, J. C.; Zheng, W. T.; Lian, J. S.; Jiang, Q.

    2016-06-01

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have demonstrated key technology advantages for applications in new-energy vehicles, which play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the world’s dependence on fossil fuels. However, the poor high-rate dischargeability of the negative electrode materials—hydrogen storage alloys (HSAs) limits applications of Ni-MH batteries in high-power fields due to large polarization. Here we design a hybrid electrode by integrating HSAs with a current collector of three-dimensional bicontinuous nanoporous Ni. The electrode shows enhanced high-rate dischargeability with the capacity retention rate reaching 44.6% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g-1, which is 2.4 times that of bare HSAs (18.8%). Such a unique hybrid architecture not only enhances charge transfer between nanoporous Ni and HSAs, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of hydrogen atoms in HSAs. The developed HSAs/nanoporous metals hybrid structures exhibit great potential to be candidates as electrodes in high-performance Ni-MH batteries towards applications in new-energy vehicles.

  11. Development of high temperature nickel-base alloys for jet engine turbine bucket applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quigg, R. J.; Scheirer, S. T.

    1965-01-01

    A program has been initiated to develop a material with superior properties at elevated temperatures for utilization in turbine blade applications. A nickel-base superalloy can provide the necessary high temperature strength by using the maximum capability of the three available strengthening mechanisms - intermetallic gamma prime precipitation (Ni3Al), solid solution strengthening with refractory and precious metals, and stable carbide formations through the addition of strong carbide forming elements. A stress rupture test at 2000 deg F and 15,000 psi was formulated to approximate the desired properties. By adding varying amounts of refractory metals (Mo, W and Ta) it was possible to statistically analyze the effects of each in a basic superalloy composition containing fixed amounts of Co, Cr, C, B, Sr, and Ni at three separate levels of AL and Ta. Metallographic analysis correlated with the mechanical properties of the alloys; those with few strengthening phases were weak and ductile and those with excessive amounts of intermetallic phases present in undesirable morphologies were brittle.

  12. Analysis of the ductility dip cracking in the nickel-base alloy 617mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilers, A.; Nellesen, J.; Zielke, R.; Tillmann, W.

    2017-03-01

    While testing steam leading power plant components made of the nickel-base alloy A617mod at elevated temperatures (700 °C), ductility dip cracking (DDC) was observed in welding seams and their surroundings. In order to clarify the mechanism of crack formation, investigations were carried out on welded specimens made of A617mod. Interrupted tensile tests were performed on tensile specimens taken from the area of the welding seam. To simulate the conditions, the tensile tests were conducted at a temperature of 700 °C and with a low strain rate. Local strain fields at grain boundaries and inside single grains were determined at different deformation states by means of two-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC). Besides the strain fields, local hardnesses (nanoindentation), energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed. Besides information concerning the grain orientation, the EBSD measurement provides information on the coincidence site lattice (CSL) at grain boundaries as well as the Schmid factor of single grains. All results of the analysis methods mentioned above were correlated and compared to each other and related to the crack formation. Among other things, correlations between strain fields and Schmid factors were determined. The investigations show that the following influences affect the crack formation: orientation of the grain boundaries to the direction of the loading, the orientation of the grains to each other (CSL), and grain boundary sliding.

  13. 4-META opaque resin--a new resin strongly adhesive to nickel-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Nagata, K; Takeyama, M; Atsuta, M; Nakabayashi, N; Masuhara, E

    1981-09-01

    1) A new adhesive opaque resin containing a reactive monomer, 4-methacryloxy-ethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), was prepared, and its application to thermosetting acrylic resin veneer crowns was studied. 2) The 4-META opaque resin was applied to a variety of nickel-chromium dental alloy specimens which had undergone different treatment, and endurance tests were conducted to evaluate the durability of adhesion. 3) Stable adhesion against water penetration was achieved with metal surfaces first etched with HCl and then oxidized with HNO3. A bond strength of 250 kg/cm2 was maintained even after immersion in water at 37 degrees C for 30 wk or at 80 degrees C for ten wk. Furthermore, this value did not decrease even after the specimens were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. 4) The 4-META opaque resin studied can eliminate the necessity for retention devices on metal castings. 5) The smooth 4-META opaque resin should have no adverse effects on gingivae.

  14. New Mechanistic Models of Long Term Evolution of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nickel Based Alloys

    SciT

    Kruzic, Jamie J.; Evans, T. Matthew; Greaney, P. Alex

    The report describes the development of a discrete element method (DEM) based modeling approach to quantitatively predict deformation and failure of typical nickel based superalloys. A series of experimental data, including microstructure and mechanical property characterization at 600°C, was collected for a relatively simple, model solid solution Ni-20Cr alloy (Nimonic 75) to determine inputs for the model and provide data for model validation. Nimonic 75 was considered ideal for this study because it is a certified tensile and creep reference material. A series of new DEM modeling approaches were developed to capture the complexity of metal deformation, including cubic elasticmore » anisotropy and plastic deformation both with and without strain hardening. Our model approaches were implemented into a commercially available DEM code, PFC3D, that is commonly used by engineers. It is envisioned that once further developed, this new DEM modeling approach can be adapted to a wide range of engineering applications.« less

  15. Anisotropic constitutive model for nickel base single crystal alloys: Development and finite element implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    A tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel base single crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components is developed. This is achieved by a rate dependent anisotropic constitutive model implemented in a nonlinear three dimensional finite element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurigical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. A non Schmid's law formulation is used to model the tension/compression asymmetry and orientation dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is a good approximation to the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response, and strain rate sensitivity of these alloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are presented. The finite element implementation utilizes an initial strain method and twenty noded isoparametric solid elements. The ability to model piecewise linear load histories is included in the finite element code. The constitutive equations are accurately and economically integrated using a second order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method with a dynamic time incrementing procedure. Computed results from the finite element code are compared with experimental data for tensile, creep and cyclic tests at 760 deg C. The strain rate sensitivity and stress relaxation capabilities of the model are evaluated.

  16. Static and dynamic cyclic oxidation of 12 nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base high-temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Johnston, J. R.; Sanders, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve typical high-temperature nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base alloys were tested by 1 hr cyclic exposures at 1038, 1093, and 1149 C and 0.05 hr exposures at 1093 C. The alloys were tested in both a dynamic burner rig at Mach 0.3 gas flow and in static air furnace for times up to 100 hr. The alloys were evaluated in terms of specific weight loss as a function of time, and X-ray diffraction analysis and metallographic examination of the posttest specimens. A method previously developed was used to estimate specific metal weight loss from the specific weight change of the sample. The alloys were then ranked on this basis. The burner-rig test was more severe than a comparable furnace test and resulted in an increased tendency for oxide spalling due to volatility of Cr in the protective scale and the more drastic cooling due to the air-blast quench of the samples. Increased cycle frequency also increased the tendency to spall for a given test exposure. The behavior of the alloys in both types of tests was related to their composition and their tendency to form scales. The alloys with the best overall behavior formed alpha-Al2O3 aluminate spinels.

  17. The interaction of reaction-bonded silicon carbide and inconel 600 with a nickel-based brazing alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, J. R.; Pugh, M. D.; Drew, R. A. L.

    1989-09-01

    The objective of the present research was to join reaction-bonded silicon carbide (RBSC) to INCONEL 600 (a nickel-based superalloy) for use in advanced heat engine applications using either direct brazing or composite interlayer joining. Direct brazing experiments employed American Welding Society (AWS) BNi-5, a commercial nickel-based brazing alloy, as a filler material; composite interlayers consisted of intimate mixtures of α-SiC and BNi-5 powders. Both methods resulted in the liquid filler metal forming a Ni-Si liquid with the free Si in the RBSC, which, in turn, reacted vigorously with the SiC component of the RBSC to form low melting point constituents in both starting materials and Cr carbides at the metal-ceramic interface. Using solution thermodynamics, it was shown that a Ni-Si liquid of greater than 60 at. pct Ni will decompose a-SiC at the experimental brazing temperature of 1200 ‡C; these calculations are consistent with the experimentally observed composition profiles and reaction morphology within the ceramic. It was concluded that the joining of RBSC to INCONEL 600 using a nickel-based brazing alloy is not feasible due to the inevitability of the filler metal reacting with the ceramic, degrading the high-temperature properties of the base materials.

  18. The effect of injected interstitials on void formation in self-ion irradiated nickel containing concentrated solid solution alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Tai-ni; Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; ...

    2017-02-21

    Pure nickel and three nickel containing single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys (SP-CSAs) have been irradiated using 3 MeV Ni 2+ ions at 500 C to fluences of 1.5 x 10 16 and 5.0 x 10 16 cm 2. We characterized the radiation-induced voids using cross sectional transmission electron microscopy that distributions of voids and dislocation loops were presented as a function of depth. We also observed a various degree of void suppression on the tested samples and a defect clusters migration mechanism was proposed for NiCo. Furthermore, in order to sufficiently understand the defect dynamics in these SP-CSAs, the injectedmore » interstitial effect has been taken into account along with the 1-dimentional (1-D) and 3-dimentional (3-D) interstitial movement mechanisms.« less

  19. Calcium phosphate coating of nickel-titanium shape-memory alloys. Coating procedure and adherence of leukocytes and platelets.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jongsik; Bogdanski, Denise; Köller, Manfred; Esenwein, Stefan A; Müller, Dietmar; Muhr, Gert; Epple, Matthias

    2003-09-01

    Nickel-titanium shape-memory alloys (NiTi-SMA) were coated with calcium phosphate by dipping in oversaturated calcium phosphate solution. The layer thickness (typically 5-20 micrometer) can be varied by choice of the immersion time. The porous nature of the layer of microcrystals makes it mechanically stable enough to withstand both the shape-memory transition upon cooling and heating and also strong bending of the material (superelastic effect). This layer may improve the biocompatibility of NiTi-SMA, particulary for osteosynthetic devices by creating a more physiological surface and by restricting a potential nickel release. The adherence of human leukocytes (peripheral blood mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes) and platelets to the calcium phosphate layer was analyzed in vitro. In comparison to non-coated NiTi-SMA, leukocytes and platelets showed a significantly increased adhesion to the coated NiTi-SMA.

  20. Phase relations of iron and iron nickel alloys up to 300 GPa: Implications for composition and structure of the Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Sata, Nagayoshi; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the phase relations of iron and iron-nickel alloys with 18 to 50 wt.% Ni up to over 300 GPa using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements show the wide stability of hcp-iron up to 301 GPa and 2000 K and 319 GPa and 300 K without phase transition to dhcp, orthorhombic, or bcc phases. On the other hand, the incorporation of nickel has a remarkable effect on expanding the stability field of fcc phase. The geometry of the temperature-composition phase diagram of iron-nickel alloys suggests that the hcp-fcc-liquid triple point is located at 10 to 20 wt.% Ni at the pressure of the inner core boundary. The fcc phase could crystallize depending on the nickel and silicon contents in the Earth's core, both of which are fcc stabilizer.

  1. High-temperature, high-frequency fretting fatigue of a single crystal nickel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlik, John Frederick

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism arising from a combination of wear, corrosion, and fatigue between two nominally clamped surfaces subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high-temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact that could potentially foster crack growth leading to component failure. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). To diagnose the threat that small and relatively undetectable fretting fatigue cracks pose to damage tolerance and the ensuing structural integrity of aerospace components, a strong motivation exists to develop a quantitative mechanics based understanding of fretting crack nucleation in advanced aerospace alloys. In response to this need, the objective of this work is to characterize the fretting behavior exhibited by a polycrystalline/single crystal nickel contact subjected to elevated frequency and temperature. The effort to meet this objective is two fold: (1) to develop a well-characterized experimental fretting rig to investigate fretting behavior of advanced aerospace alloys at high frequency and high temperature, and (2) to develop the associated contact modeling tools for calculating contact stresses given in-situ experimentally measured remote contact loads. By coupling the experimental results and stress analysis, this effort aims to correlate the fretting crack nucleation behavior with the local contact stresses calculated from the devised three dimensional, anisotropic, dissimilar material contact model. The experimental effort is first motivated by a survey of recent fretting issues and

  2. Morphological characterization and in vitro biocompatibility of a porous nickel-titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Prymak, Oleg; Bogdanski, Denise; Köller, Manfred; Esenwein, Stefan A; Muhr, Gert; Beckmann, Felix; Donath, Tilmann; Assad, Michel; Epple, Matthias

    2005-10-01

    Disks consisting of macroporous nickel-titanium alloy (NiTi, Nitinol, Actipore) are used as implants in clinical surgery, e.g. for fixation of spinal dysfunctions. The morphological properties were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by synchrotron radiation-based microtomography (SRmuCT). The composition was studied by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The mechanical properties were studied with temperature-dependent dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA). Studies on the biocompatibility were performed by co-incubation of porous NiTi samples with isolated peripheral blood leukocyte fractions (polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes, PMN; peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes, PBMC) in comparison with control cultures without NiTi samples. The cell adherence to the NiTi surface was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The activation of adherent leukocytes was analyzed by measurement of the released cytokines using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cytokine response of PMN (analyzed by the release of IL-1ra and IL-8) was not significantly different between cell cultures with or without NiTi. There was a significant increase in the release of IL-1ra (p<0.001), IL-6 (p<0.05), and IL-8 (p<0.05) from PBMC in the presence of NiTi samples. In contrast, the release of TNF-alpha by PBMC was not significantly elevated in the presence of NiTi. IL-2 was released from PBMC only in the range of the lower detection limit in all cell cultures. The material, clearly macroporous with an interconnecting porosity, consists of NiTi (martensite; monoclinic, and austenite; cubic) with small impurities of NiTi2 and possibly NiC(x). The material is not superelastic upon manual compression and shows a good biocompatibility.

  3. The effect of thermal processing on microstructure and mechanical properties in a nickel-iron alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ling

    The correlation between processing conditions, resulted microstructure and mechanical properties is of interest in the field of metallurgy for centuries. In this work, we investigated the effect of thermal processing parameters on microstructure, and key mechanical properties to turbine rotor design: tensile yield strength and crack growth resistance, for a nickel-iron based superalloy Inconel 706. The first step of the designing of experiments is to find parameter ranges for thermal processing. Physical metallurgy on superalloys was combined with finite element analysis to estimate variations in thermal histories for a large Alloy 706 forging, and the results were adopted for designing of experiments. Through the systematic study, correlation was found between the processing parameters and the microstructure. Five different types of grain boundaries were identified by optical metallography, fractography, and transmission electron microscopy, and they were found to be associated with eta precipitation at the grain boundaries. Proportions of types of boundaries, eta size, spacing and angle respect to the grain boundary were found to be dependent on processing parameters. Differences in grain interior precipitates were also identified, and correlated with processing conditions. Further, a strong correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties was identified. The grain boundary precipitates affect the time dependent crack propagation resistance, and different types of boundaries have different levels of resistance. Grain interior precipitates were correlated with tensile yield strength. It was also found that there is a strong environmental effect on time dependent crack propagation resistance, and the sensitivity to environmental damage is microstructure dependent. The microstructure with eta decorated on grain boundaries by controlled processing parameters is more resistant to environmental damage through oxygen embrittlement than material without eta

  4. Low cycle fatigue properties of MAR-M-246 Hf in hydrogen. [a cast nickel-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The transverse, low cycle fatigue properties were determined for directionally solidified and single crystal samples of a cast nickel-base alloy proposed for use in space propulsion systems in pure or partial high pressure hydrogen environments at elevated temperatures. The test temperature was 760 C (1400F) and the pressure of the gaseous hydrogen was 34.5 MPa (5000 psig). Low cycle fatique life was established by strain controlled testing using smooth specimens and a servohydraulic closed-loop test machine modified with a high pressure environmental chamber. Results and conclusions are discussed.

  5. Influence of Crucible Materials on High-temperature Properties of Vacuum-melted Nickel-chromium-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    A study of the effect of induction-vacuum-melting procedure on the high-temperature properties of a titanium-and-aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloy revealed that a major variable was the type of ceramic used as a crucible. Reactions between the melt and magnesia or zirconia crucibles apparently increased high-temperature properties by introducing small amounts of boron or zirconium into the melts. Heats melted in alumina crucibles had relatively low rupture life and ductility at 1,600 F and cracked during hot-working as a result of deriving no boron or zirconium from the crucible.

  6. [Study on content of nickel in saliva released from the nickel-chromium and the nickel-chromium-titanium porcelain alloy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Tai-Qiang; Wei, Hong

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the content of nickel (Ni) ion in patients' saliva after wearing the porcelain-fused-to nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) crown or the porcelain-fused-to nickel-chromium-titanium(Ni-Cr-Ti) crown. 50 patients who had one molar or premolar needed repairing were selected and divided into two groups randomly. Patients in one group were fabricated with porcelain-fused-to Ni-Cr crown and the patients in the other group were fabricated with porcelain-fused-to Ni-Cr-Ti crown. Collect the patients' saliva before wearing, 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after wearing. The content of Ni ion in saliva was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The content of Ni ion in both groups increased at the first week, and go back after 6 months. There were no significant differences before wearing, 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after wearing. There were no significant differences between the two groups. Wearing the porcelain-fused-to Ni-Cr crown or the porcelain-fused-to Ni-Cr-Ti crown has no significant influence on the content of Ni ion in saliva.

  7. Effects on the positive electrode of the corrosion of AB{sub 5} alloys in nickel-metal-hydride batteries

    SciT

    Bernard, P.

    1998-02-01

    Effects of corrosion of MmNi{sub 4.3{minus}x}Mn{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.4}Co{sub x} alloys (where Mm = Ce 50%, La 30%, Nd 15%, Pr 5%) are evaluated in nickel-metal-hydride (Ni-MH) cells. Particularly, it is shown how Al released by the corroded alloys pollutes the positive electrode, which endures a loss of charging efficiency, due to the formation of a hydrotalcite-like phase stabilized with Al. Furthermore, since Al is eluted from the hydride electrode and is completely trapped in the positive active material, the titration of this element in the positive electrode is a powerful technique for quantification of the corrosion of AB{sub 5} alloysmore » in Ni-MH cells.« less

  8. Template-Free Synthesis of Nanoporous Nickel and Alloys as Binder-Free Current Collectors of Li Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liqiang; Andela, Paul; De Hosson, Jeff Th M; Pei, Yutao

    2018-05-25

    This paper reports a versatile template-free method based on the hydrogen reduction of metallic salts for the synthesis of nanoporous Ni and alloys. The approach involves thermal decomposition and reduction of metallic precursors followed with metal cluster nucleation and ligament growth. Topological disordered porous architectures of metals with a controllable distribution of pore size and ligament size ranging from tens of nanometers to micrometers are synthesized. The reduction processes are scrutinized through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The formation mechanism of the nanoporous metal is qualitatively explained. The as-prepared nanoporous Ni was tested as binder-free current collectors for nickel oxalate anodes of lithium ion batteries. The nanoporous Ni electrodes deliver enhanced reversible capacities and cyclic performances compared with commercial Ni foam. It is confirmed that this synthesis method has versatility not only because it is suitable for different types of metallic salts precursors but also for various other metals and alloys.

  9. dK/da effects on the SCC growth rates of nickel base alloys in high-temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Wang, Jiamei; Du, Donghai; Andresen, Peter L.; Zhang, Lefu

    2018-05-01

    The effect of dK/da on crack growth behavior of nickel base alloys has been studied by conducting stress corrosion cracking tests under positive and negative dK/da loading conditions on Alloys 690, 600 and X-750 in high temperature water. Results indicate that positive dK/da accelerates the SCC growth rates, and the accelerating effect increases with dK/da and the initial CGR. The FRI model was found to underestimate the dK/da effect by ∼100X, especially for strain hardening materials, and this underscores the need for improved insight and models for crack tip strain rate. The effect of crack tip strain rate and dK/dt in particular can explain the dK/da accelerating effect.

  10. High temperature mechanical properties of a zirconium-modified, precipitation- strengthened nickel, 30 percent copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A precipitation-strengthened Monel-type alloy has been developed through minor alloying additions of zirconium to a base Ni-30Cu alloy. The results of this exploratory study indicate that thermomechanical processing of a solution-treated Ni-30Cu-0.2Zr alloy produced a dispersion of precipitates. The precipitates have been tentatively identified as a Ni5Zr compound. A comparison of the mechanical properties, as determined by testing in air, of the zirconium-modified alloy to those of a Ni-30Cu alloy reveals that the precipitation-strengthened alloy has improved tensile properties to 1200 K and improved stress-rupture properties to 1100 K. The oxidation characteristics of the modified alloy appeared to be equivalent to those of the base Ni-30Cu alloy.

  11. Comparison of the mechanical properties of rotary instruments made of conventional nickel-titanium wire, M-wire, or nickel-titanium alloy in R-phase.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Hélio P; Gambarra-Soares, Thaiane; Elias, Carlos N; Siqueira, José F; Inojosa, Inês F J; Lopes, Weber S P; Vieira, Victor T L

    2013-04-01

    This study compared the mechanical properties of endodontic instruments made of conventional nickel-titanium (NiTi) wire (K(3) and Revo-S SU), M-Wire (ProFile Vortex), or NiTi alloy in R-phase (K(3)XF). The test instruments were subjected to mechanical tests to evaluate resistance to bending (flexibility), cyclic fatigue, and torsional load in clockwise rotation. Data were statistically evaluated by the analysis of variance test and the Student-Newman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons. In the bending resistance test, flexibility decreased in the following order: K(3)XF > Revo-S SU > ProFile Vortex > K(3). The ranking in the fatigue resistance test was the following: K(3)XF > K(3) > ProFile Vortex > Revo-S SU. In the torsional assay, the angular deflection at failure decreased in the following order: K(3)XF > Revo-S SU > K(3) > ProFile Vortex. For the maximum torque values, the ranking was K(3) > K(3)XF > ProFile Vortex > Revo-S SU. The results showed that the K(3)XF instrument, which is made of NiTi alloy in R-phase, had the overall best performance in terms of flexibility, angular deflection at failure, and cyclic fatigue resistance. In addition to the alloy from which the instrument is manufactured, the design and dimensions are important determinants of the mechanical performance of endodontic instruments. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Platinum–nickel nanowire catalysts with composition-tunable alloying and faceting for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciT

    Chang, Fangfang; Yu, Gang; Shan, Shiyao

    2017-01-01

    The ability to tune the alloying properties and faceting characteristics of bimetallic nanocatalysts is essential for designing catalysts with enhanced activity and stability through optimizing strain and ligand effects, which is an important frontier for designing advanced materials as catalysts for fuel cell applications. This report describes composition-controlled alloying and faceting of platinum–nickel nanowires (PtNi NWs) for the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction. The PtNi NWs are synthesized by a surfactant-free method and are shown to display bundled morphologies of nano-tetrahedra or nanowires, featuring an ultrathin and irregular helix morphology with composition-tunable facets. Using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled with atomicmore » pair distribution function analysis, lattice expansion and shrinking are revealed, with the Pt : Ni ratio of ~3 : 2 exhibiting a clear expansion, which coincides with the maximum electrocatalytic activity for the ORR. In comparison with PtNi nanoparticles (NPs), the PtNi NWs display remarkably higher electrocatalytic activity and stability as a result of the composition dependent atomic-scale alloying and faceting, demonstrating a new pathway to the design of alloy nanocatalysts with enhanced activity and durability for fuel cells.« less

  13. Study of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and enzymatic bio-Fenton process-mediated corrosion of copper-nickel alloy.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, U; Hocheng, H

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the corrosion behavior of the copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloy in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans) and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme. In both the cases ferric ions played an important role in weight loss and thereby to carry out the corrosion of the Cu-Ni alloy. A corrosion rate of 0.6 (±0.008), 2.11 (±0.05), 3.69 (±0.26), 0.7 (±0.006) and 0.08 (±0.002) mm/year was obtained in 72 h using 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, A. ferrooxidans culture supernatant, A. ferrooxidans cells, GOx enzyme and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution respectively. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs showed that a variable extent of corrosion was caused by 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, GOx and A. ferrooxidans cells. An arithmetic average surface roughness (Ra) of 174.78 nm was observed for the control work-piece using optical profilometer. The change in Ra was observed with the treatment of the Cu-Ni alloy using various systems. The Ra for 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, GOx and A. ferrooxidans cells was 374.54, 607.32 and 799.48 nm, respectively, after 24 h. These results suggest that A. ferrooxidans cells were responsible for more corrosion of the Cu-Ni alloy than other systems used.

  14. A patient with mandibular deviation and 3 mandibular incisors treated with asymmetrically bent improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wires.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuhei; Kokai, Satoshi; Ono, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Skeletal and dental discrepancies cause asymmetric malocclusions in orthodontic patients. It is difficult to achieve adequate functional occlusion and guidance in patients with congenital absence of a mandibular incisor due to the tooth-size discrepancy. Here, we describe the orthodontic treatment of a 22-year-old woman with an asymmetric Angle Class II malocclusion, mandibular deviation to the left, and 3 mandibular incisors. The anterior teeth and maxillary canines were crowded. We used an improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wire (Tomy International, Tokyo, Japan) to compensate for the asymmetric mandibular arch and an asymmetrically bent archwire to move the maxillary molars distally. A skeletal anchorage system provided traction for intermaxillary elastics, and extractions were not needed. We alleviated the crowding and created an ideal occlusion with proper overjet, overbite, and anterior guidance with Class I canine and molar relationships. This method of treatment with an asymmetrically bent nickel-titanium alloy wire provided proper Class I occlusion and anterior guidance despite the mandibular deviation to the left and 3 mandibular incisors, without the need for extractions. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper in nickel-base alloys with various chemical modifiers*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Suh-Jen Jane; Shiue, Chia-Chann; Chang, Shiow-Ing

    1997-07-01

    The analytical characteristics of copper in nickel-base alloys have been investigated with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Deuterium background correction was employed. The effects of various chemical modifiers on the analysis of copper were investigated. Organic modifiers which included 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino-phenol) (Br-PADAP), ammonium citrate, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-naphthol, 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and Triton X-100 were studied. Inorganic modifiers palladium nitrate, magnesium nitrate, aluminum chloride, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, hydrogen peroxide and potassium nitrate were also applied in this work. In addition, zirconium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide precipitation methods have also been studied. Interference effects were effectively reduced with Br-PADAP modifier. Aqueous standards were used to construct the calibration curves. The detection limit was 1.9 pg. Standard reference materials of nickel-base alloys were used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method. The copper contents determined with the proposed method agreed closely with the certified values of the reference materials. The recoveries were within the range 90-100% with relative standard deviation of less than 10%. Good precision was obtained.

  16. Laser-initiated combustion studies of selected aluminum, copper, iron, and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Clark, A. F.

    1981-01-01

    The results of combustion studies at atmospheric pressure on ten metal alloys are presented. The alloys studied were aluminum alloys 1100, 2219, 6061, and tensile-50; 304, 347 and 21-6-9 stainless steel; inconel 600; beryllium copper and a bronze. It was found that once ignition was achieved all alloys would generally burn to completion. The overall combustion process appears to obey a first order rate process. Preliminary conclusions are presented along with recommendations for future work.

  17. In vitro and in vivo biocompatibility investigation of diamond-like carbon coated nickel-titanium shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Xia, Ya-Yi; Tang, Ji-Cun; Wang, Ri-Ying; Bei, Chao-Yong; Zeng, Yanjum

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the biocompatibility of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi SMA) in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro study was carried out by co-culturing the DLC coated and uncoated NiTi SMA with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), respectively, and the in vivo study was carried out by fixing the rabbits' femoral fracture model by DLC coated and uncoated NiTi SMA embracing fixator for 4 weeks, respectively. The concentration of the cells, alkaline phosphatase (AKP), and nickel ion in culture media were detected, respectively, at the first to fifth day after co-culturing. The inorganic substance, osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in callus surrounding fracture and the Ni(+) in muscles surrounding fracture site, liver and brain were detected 4 weeks postoperatively. The in vitro study showed that the proliferation of MSCs and the expression of AKP in the DLC-coated group were higher than the uncoated group (P < 0.05), while the uncoated group released more Ni(2+) into the culture media than that in the coated group (P < 0.05). The in vivo study revealed that the inorganic substance and AKP, osteocalcin, and TNF expression were significantly higher in the DLC coated NiTi SMA embracing fixator than that in the uncoated group (P < 0.05). Ni(2+) in liver, brain, and muscles surrounding the fracture were significantly lower in the DLC coated groups than that in the uncoated group (P < 0.05). Nickel-titanium shape memory alloy coated by diamond-like carbon appears to have better biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo compared to the uncoated one.

  18. Effect of Vanadium and Sodium Compounds on Accelerated Oxidation of Nickel-Base Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The product of the reaction between V2O5 and the substrates is dependent upon the alloying elements present in the alloy. In the absence of alloying...reaction appears to be a glass . The study is related to corrosion inhibitions in vanadium containing fuels in gas turbines. (Modified author abstract)

  19. Improvement of chemical composition, structure and mechanical properties of heat-resistant chromium-nickel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamova, S.; Trushnikova, A.; Rumyantsev, B.; Butrim, V.; Simonov, V.

    2018-04-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of a multicomponent system of the Cr-Ni alloy (Cr-32Ni-1,5W-0,25V-0,5Ti) with small additions of refractory metals was carried out. The microstructure and phase composition of the base alloy (I) and alloy with additional alloying (II) were studied. The effect of additives on the mechanical properties of the Cr-Ni alloy at 20, 900 and 1080 °C was shown. The microstructure of alloys I and II was studied in the fracture zone of samples after tensile tests at different temperatures. We studied the effect of small additives on the microstructure of alloys and changes in the morphology of the structural components (phases) as a function of temperature and degree of deformation.

  20. The three dimensional distribution of chromium and nickel alloy welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Matsuda, A; Akashi, S; Ogata, M; Takeoka, K; Yoshinaka, M

    1991-08-01

    In the present study, the fumes generated from manual metal arc (MMA) and submerged metal arc (SMA) welding of low temperature service steel, and the chromium and nickel percentages in these fumes, were measured at various horizontal distances and vertical heights from the arc in order to obtain a three dimensional distribution. The MMA welding fume concentrations were significantly higher than the SMA welding fume concentrations. The highest fume concentration on the horizontal was shown in the fumes collected directly above the arc. The fume concentration vertically was highest at 50 cm height and reduced by half at 150 cm height. The fume concentration at 250 cm height was scarcely different from that at 150 cm height. The distribution of the chromium concentration vertically was analogous to the fume concentration, and a statistically significant difference in the chromium percentages was not found at the different heights. The nickel concentrations were not statistically significant within the welding processes, but the nickel percentages in the SMA welding fumes were statistically higher than in the MMA welding fumes. The highest nickel concentration on the horizontal was found in the fumes collected directly above the arc. The highest nickel concentration vertically showed in the fume samples collected at 50 cm height, but the greater the height the larger the nickel percentage in the fumes.

  1. Development of dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium alloy (Ni-Cr-ThO2) sheet for space shuttle vehicles, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingler, L. J.; Weinberger, W. R.; Bailey, P. G.; Baranow, S.

    1972-01-01

    Two dispersion strengthened nickel base alloy systems were developed for use at temperatures up to 1204 C(2200 F); TD nickel chromium (TDNiCr) and TD nickel chromium aluminum (TDNiCrA1). They are considered candidate materials for use on the thermal protection systems of the space shuttle and for long term use in aircraft gas turbine engine applications. Improved manufacturing processes were developed for the fabrication of TDNiCr sheet and foil to specifications. Sheet rolling process studies and extrusion studies were made on two aluminum containing alloys: Ni-16%Cr-3.5%A1-2%ThO2 and Ni-16%Cr-5.0%A12%ThO2. Over 1600 kg.(3500 lb.) of plate, sheet, foil, bar and extrusion products were supplied to NASA Centers for technology studies.

  2. Development of improved low-strain creep strength in Cabot alloy R-41 sheet. [nickel base sheet alloy for reentry shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of improving the low-strain creep properties of a thin gauge nickel base sheet alloy through modified heat treatment or through development of a preferred crystal-lographic texture was investigated. The basic approach taken to improve the creep strength of the material by heat treatment was to increase grain size by raising the solution treatment temperature for the alloy to the range of 1420 K to 1475 K (2100 F to 2200 F). The key technical issue involved was maintenance of adequate tensile ductility following the solutioning of M6C primary carbides during the higher temperature solution treatment. The approach to improve creep properties by developing a sheet texture involved varying both annealing temperatures and the amount of prior cold work. Results identified a heat treatment for alloy R-14 sheet which yields a substantial creep-life advantage at temperatures above 1090 K (1500 F) when compared with material given the standard heat treatment. At the same time, this treatment provides reasonable tensile ductility over the entire temperature range of interest. The mechanical properties of the material given the new heat treatment are compared with those for material given the standard heat treatment. Attempts to improve creep strength by developing a sheet texture were unsuccessful.

  3. Accelerated Degradation Test and Predictive Failure Analysis of B10 Copper-Nickel Alloy under Marine Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Ye, Tianyuan; Feng, Qiang; Yao, Jinghua; Wei, Mumeng

    2015-09-10

    This paper studies the corrosion behavior of B10 copper-nickel alloy in marine environment. Accelerated degradation test under marine environmental conditions was designed and performed based on the accelerated testing principle and the corrosion degradation mechanism. With the prolongation of marine corrosion time, the thickness of Cu₂O film increased gradually. Its corrosion product was Cu₂(OH)₃Cl, which increased in quantity over time. Cl - was the major factor responsible for the marine corrosion of copper and copper alloy. Through the nonlinear fitting of corrosion rate and corrosion quantity (corrosion weight loss), degradation data of different corrosion cycles, the quantitative effects of two major factors, i.e. , dissolved oxygen (DO) and corrosion medium temperature, on corrosion behavior of copper alloy were analyzed. The corrosion failure prediction models under different ambient conditions were built. One-day corrosion weight loss under oxygenated stirring conditions was equivalent to 1.31-day weight loss under stationary conditions, and the corrosion rate under oxygenated conditions was 1.31 times higher than that under stationary conditions. In addition, corrosion medium temperature had a significant effect on the corrosion of B10 copper sheet.

  4. Three-dimensional hole transport in nickel oxide by alloying with MgO or ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidoust, Nima; Carter, Emily A.

    2015-11-01

    It has been shown previously that the movement of a hole in nickel oxide is confined to two dimensions, along a single ferromagnetic plane. Such confinement may hamper hole transport when NiO is used as a p-type transparent conductor in various solar energy conversion technologies. Here, we use the small polaron model, along with unrestricted Hartree-Fock and complete active space self-consistent field calculations to show that forming substitutional MxNi1-xO alloys with M = Mg or Zn reduces the barrier for movement of a hole away from the ferromagnetic plane to which it is confined. Such reduction occurs for hole transfer alongside one or two M ions that have been substituted for Ni ions. Furthermore, the Mg and Zn ions do not trap holes on O sites in their vicinity, and NiO's transparency is preserved upon forming the alloys. Thus, forming MxNi1-xO alloys with M = Mg or Zn may enhance NiO's potential as a p-type transparent conducting oxide, by disrupting the two-dimensional confinement of holes in pure NiO.

  5. [Utility of nickel-titanium shape memory alloys of vertebral body reduction fixator with assisted distraction bar].

    PubMed

    Man, Yi; Zheng, Yue-huan; Cao, Peng; Chen, Bo; Zheng, Tao; Sun, Chang-hui; Lu, Jiong

    2011-06-07

    To test the nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) shape memory alloys of vertebral body reduction fixator with assisted distraction bar for the treatment of traumatic and osteoporotic vertebral body fracture. A Ni-Ti shape memory alloys of vertebral body reduction fixator with assisted distraction bar was implanted into the compressed fracture specimens through vertebral pedicle with the radiographic monitoring to reduce the collapsed endplate as well as distract the compressed vertebral fracture. Radiographic film and computed tomographic reconstruction technique were employed to evaluate the effects of reduction and distraction. A biomechanic test machine was used to measure the fatigue and the stability of deformation of fixation segments. Relying on the effect of temperature shape memory, such an assembly could basically reduce the collapsed endplate as well as distract the compressed vertebral fracture. And when unsatisfied results of reduction and distraction occurred, its super flexibility could provide additional distraction strength. A Ni-Ti shape memory alloys of vertebral body reduction fixator with assisted distraction bar may provide effective endplate reduction, restore the vertebral height and the immediate biomechanic spinal stability. So the above assembly is indicated for the treatment of traumatic and osteoporotic vertebral body fracture.

  6. Accelerated Degradation Test and Predictive Failure Analysis of B10 Copper-Nickel Alloy under Marine Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Ye, Tianyuan; Feng, Qiang; Yao, Jinghua; Wei, Mumeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the corrosion behavior of B10 copper-nickel alloy in marine environment. Accelerated degradation test under marine environmental conditions was designed and performed based on the accelerated testing principle and the corrosion degradation mechanism. With the prolongation of marine corrosion time, the thickness of Cu2O film increased gradually. Its corrosion product was Cu2(OH)3Cl, which increased in quantity over time. Cl− was the major factor responsible for the marine corrosion of copper and copper alloy. Through the nonlinear fitting of corrosion rate and corrosion quantity (corrosion weight loss), degradation data of different corrosion cycles, the quantitative effects of two major factors, i.e., dissolved oxygen (DO) and corrosion medium temperature, on corrosion behavior of copper alloy were analyzed. The corrosion failure prediction models under different ambient conditions were built. One-day corrosion weight loss under oxygenated stirring conditions was equivalent to 1.31-day weight loss under stationary conditions, and the corrosion rate under oxygenated conditions was 1.31 times higher than that under stationary conditions. In addition, corrosion medium temperature had a significant effect on the corrosion of B10 copper sheet. PMID:28793549

  7. Measurements of sound velocity in iron-nickel alloys by femtosecond laser pulses in a diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, Tatsuya; Ohta, Kenji; Yagi, Takashi; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2018-01-01

    By comparing the seismic wave velocity profile in the Earth with laboratory data of the sound velocity of iron alloys, we can infer the chemical composition of materials in the Earth's core. The sound velocity of pure iron (Fe) has been sufficiently measured using various techniques, while experimental study on the sound velocity of iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloys is limited. Here, we measured longitudinal wave velocities of hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structured Fe up to 29 GPa, Fe-5 wt% Ni, and Fe-15 wt% Ni up to 64 GPa via a combination of the femtosecond pulse laser pump-probe technique and a diamond anvil cell at room temperature condition. We found that the effect of Ni on the sound velocity of an Fe-based alloy is weaker than that determined by previous experimental study. In addition, we obtained the parameters of Birch's law to be V P = 1146(57)ρ - 3638(567) for Fe-5 wt% Ni and V P = 1141(45)ρ- 3808(446) for Fe-15 wt% Ni, respectively, where V P is longitudinal wave velocity (m/s) and ρ is density (g/cm3).

  8. Measurements of sound velocity in iron-nickel alloys by femtosecond laser pulses in a diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, Tatsuya; Ohta, Kenji; Yagi, Takashi; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2018-06-01

    By comparing the seismic wave velocity profile in the Earth with laboratory data of the sound velocity of iron alloys, we can infer the chemical composition of materials in the Earth's core. The sound velocity of pure iron (Fe) has been sufficiently measured using various techniques, while experimental study on the sound velocity of iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloys is limited. Here, we measured longitudinal wave velocities of hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structured Fe up to 29 GPa, Fe-5 wt% Ni, and Fe-15 wt% Ni up to 64 GPa via a combination of the femtosecond pulse laser pump-probe technique and a diamond anvil cell at room temperature condition. We found that the effect of Ni on the sound velocity of an Fe-based alloy is weaker than that determined by previous experimental study. In addition, we obtained the parameters of Birch's law to be V P = 1146(57) ρ - 3638(567) for Fe-5 wt% Ni and V P = 1141(45) ρ- 3808(446) for Fe-15 wt% Ni, respectively, where V P is longitudinal wave velocity (m/s) and ρ is density (g/cm3).

  9. Mechanical and Microstructure Study of Nickel-Based ODS Alloys Processed by Mechano-Chemical Bonding and Ball Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amare, Belachew N.

    Due to the need to increase the efficiency of modern power plants, land-based gas turbines are designed to operate at high temperature creating harsh environments for structural materials. The elevated turbine inlet temperature directly affects the materials at the hottest sections, which includes combustion chamber, blades, and vanes. Therefore, the hottest sections should satisfy a number of material requirements such as high creep strength, ductility at low temperature, high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance. Such requirements are nowadays satisfied by implementing superalloys coated by high temperature thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems to protect from high operating temperature required to obtain an increased efficiency. Oxide dispersive strengthened (ODS) alloys are being considered due to their high temperature creep strength, good oxidation and corrosion resistance for high temperature applications in advanced power plants. These alloys operating at high temperature are subjected to different loading systems such as thermal, mechanical, and thermo-mechanical combined loads at operation. Thus, it is critical to study the high temperature mechanical and microstructure properties of such alloys for their structural integrity. The primary objective of this research work is to investigate the mechanical and microstructure properties of nickel-based ODS alloys produced by combined mechano-chemical bonding (MCB) and ball milling subjected to high temperature oxidation, which are expected to be applied for high temperature turbine coating with micro-channel cooling system. Stiffness response and microstructure evaluation of such alloy systems was studied along with their oxidation mechanism and structural integrity through thermal cyclic exposure. Another objective is to analyze the heat transfer of ODS alloy coatings with micro-channel cooling system using finite element analysis (FEA) to determine their feasibility as a stand-alone structural

  10. Human biomonitoring of chromium and nickel from an experimental exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes of low and high alloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Schettgen, Thomas; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The uptake and elimination of metals from welding fumes is currently not fully understood. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL) it is possible to investigate the impact of welding fumes on human subjects under controlled exposure conditions. In this study, the uptake and elimination of chromium or chromium (VI) respectively as well as nickel was studied in subjects after exposure to the emissions of a manual metal arc welding process using low or high alloyed steel. In this present study 12 healthy male non-smokers, who never worked as welders before, were exposed for 6h to welding fumes of a manual metal arc welding process. In a three-fold crossover study design, subjects were exposed in randomized order to either clean air, emissions from welding low alloyed steel, and emissions from welding high alloyed steel. Particle mass concentration of the exposure aerosol was 2.5mg m(-3). The content of chromium and nickel in the air was determined by analysing air filter samples on a high emission scenario. Urine analysis for chromium and nickel was performed before and after exposure using methods of human biomonitoring. There were significantly elevated chromium levels after exposure to welding fumes from high alloyed steel compared to urinary chromium levels before exposure to high alloyed welding fumes, as well as compared to the other exposure scenarios. The mean values increased from 0.27 µg l(-1) to 18.62 µg l(-1). The results were in good agreement with already existing correlations between external and internal exposure (German exposure equivalent for carcinogenic working materials EKA). The variability of urinary chromium levels was high. For urinary nickel no significant changes could be detected at all. Six-hour exposure to 2.5mg m(-3) high alloyed manual metal arc welding fumes lead to elevated urinary chromium levels far higher (7.11-34.16 µg l(-1)) than the German biological exposure reference value (BAR) of 0.6 µg l(-1) directly after

  11. Dispersion strengthened nickel-yttria sheet alloy produced from comminuted powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, P. F.; Quatinetz, M.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine whether a nickel matrix with yttria as a dispersoid could be produced by a comminution and blending (wet attrition-NASCAB) approach. Concentration of yttria, powder cleaning temperature, screening (sieving) of the powders, and amount of thermomechanical working were major variables. Tensile strength and stress-rupture life at 1093 C were determined. A product containing 4v/o Y2O3, cleaned at 315 or 371 C with screening exhibited 1093 C tensile strength equivalent to NASCAB Ni-4ThO2 and to commercially produced thoriated nickel sheet.

  12. Effect of Water Nutrient Pollution on Long-Term Corrosion of 90:10 Copper Nickel Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Melchers, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their good corrosion resistance, copper and copper alloys such as 90:10 Cu-Ni are used extensively in high-quality marine and industrial piping systems and also in marine, urban, and industrial environments. Their corrosion loss and pitting behaviour tends to follow a bi-modal trend rather than the classic power law. Field data for 90:10 copper nickel immersed in natural seawater are used to explore the effect of water pollution and in particular the availability of critical nutrients for microbiologically induced corrosion. It is shown, qualitatively, that increased dissolved inorganic nitrogen increases corrosion predominantly in the second, long-term, mode of the model. Other, less pronounced, influences are salinity and dissolved oxygen concentration. PMID:28793696

  13. Determination of in vitro lung solubility and intake-to-dose conversion factor for tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Labone, Thomas R; Staack, Gregory C; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Varallo, Thomas P

    2012-09-01

    A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the U.S. Department of Energy Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide was determined to be 9.4 × 10 Sv Bq, which is less than the DCF for tritiated water. Therefore, the radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

  14. Effect of Laser Power on Metallurgical, Mechanical and Tribological Characteristics of Hardfaced Surfaces of Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasekaran, S.; Padmanaban, G.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this present work, nickel based alloy was deposited on 316 LN austenitic stainless steel (ASS) by a laser hardfacing technique to investigate the influence of laser power on macrostructure, microstructure, microhardness, dilution and wear characteristics. The laser power varied from 1.1 to 1.9 kW. The phase constitution, microstructure and microhardness were examined by optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness tester. The wear characteristics of the hardfaced surfaces and substrate were evaluated at room temperature (RT) under dry sliding wear condition (pin-on-disc). The outcome demonstrates that as the laser power increases, dilution increases and hardness of the deposit decreases. This is because excess heat melts more volume of substrate material and increases the dilution; subsequently it decreases the hardness of the deposit. The microstructure of the deposit is characterized by Ni-rich carbide, boride and silicide.

  15. Orthodontic buccal tooth movement by nickel-free titanium-based shape memory and superelastic alloy wire.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Tomizuka, Ryo; Hosoda, Hideki; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Okuno, Osamu; Igarashi, Kaoru; Mitani, Hideo

    2006-11-01

    To examine the mechanical properties and the usefulness of titanium-niobium-aluminum (Ti-Nb-Al) wire in orthodontic tooth movement as compared with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) wire. The load deflection of expansion springs was gauged with an original jig. The gradient of the superelastic region was measured during the unloading process. Expansion springs comprising the two types of alloy wires were applied to upper first molars of rats. The distance between the first molars was measured with micrometer calipers. The force magnitude of the Ti-Nb-Al expansion spring was lower than that of the Ni-Ti expansion spring over the entire deflection range. The initial force magnitude and the gradient in the superelastic region of the Ti-Nb-Al expansion springs were half those of the Ni-Ti expansion springs. Thus, Ti-Nb-Al expansion springs generated lighter and more continuous force. Tooth movement in the Ni-Ti group proceeded in a stepwise fashion. On the other hand, tooth movement in the Ti-Nb-Al group showed relatively smooth and continuous progression. At 17 days after insertion of expansion springs, there were no significant differences between the Ti-Nb-Al and Ni-Ti groups in the amount of tooth movement. These results indicate that Ti-Nb-Al wire has excellent mechanical properties for smooth, continuous tooth movement and suggest that Ti-Nb-Al wire may be used as a practical nickel-free shape memory and superelastic alloy wire for orthodontic treatment as a substitute for Ni-Ti wire.

  16. Comparison of mechanical properties for several electrical spring contact alloys. [Beryllium-nickel alloy 440 (Ni--1. 95 Be--0. 5 Ti); comparison with Neyoro G and Paliney 7

    SciT

    Nordstrom, T.V.

    Purpose was to determine whether beryllium--nickel alloy 440 (Ni-1.95 Be-0.5 Ti) had mechanical properties which made it suitable as a substitute for the presently used precious metal contact alloys Paliney 7 and Neyoro G, in certain electrical contact applications. Possible areas of applicability for the alloy were where extremely low contact resistance was not necessary or in components encountering elevated temperatures above those presently seen in weapons applications. Evaluation of the alloy involved three major experimental areas: (1) measurement of the room temperature microplastic (epsilon approximately 10/sup -6/) and macroplastic (epsilon approximately 10/sup -3/) behavior of alloy 440 in variousmore » age hardening conditions, (2) determination of applied stress effects on stress relaxation or contact force loss, and (3) measurement of elevated temperature mechanical properties and stress relaxation behavior. Similar measurements were also made on Neyoro G and Paliney 7 for comparison. Results show that beryllium-nickel alloy 440 is equal or superior to the presently used Paliney 7 and Neyoro G for normal Sandia requirements. For elevated temperature applications, alloy 440 has clearly superior mechanical properties. 12 fig.« less

  17. Dynamic Strain Aging of Nickel-Base Alloys 800H and 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Tyler E.; Was, Gary S.

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the current investigation is to characterize the dynamic strain aging (DSA) behavior in alloys 800H and 690. Constant extension rate tests were conducted at strain rates in the range of 10-4 s-1 to 10-7 s-1and temperatures between 295 K and 673 K (22 °C and 400 °C), in an argon atmosphere. Maps for the occurrence of serrated flow as a function of strain rate and temperature were built for both alloys. The enthalpy of serrated flow appearance of alloy 800H was found to be 1.07 ± 0.30 eV.

  18. Metallurgical characterization of new palladium-containing cobalt chromium and nickel chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Raghav

    Recently introduced to the market has been an entirely new subclass of casting alloy composition whereby palladium (˜25 wt%) is added to traditional base metal alloys such as CoCr and NiCr. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microstructure and Vickers hardness of two new CoPdCr and one new NiPdCr alloy and compare them to traditional CoCr and NiCr alloys. Methods. The casting alloys investigated were: CoPdCr-A (Noble Crown NF, The Argen Corporation), CoPdCr-I (Callisto CP+, Ivoclar Vivadent), NiPdCr (Noble Crown, Argen), CoCr (Argeloy N.P. Special, Argen), and NiCr (Argeloy N.P. Star, Argen). As-cast cylindrical alloy specimens were mounted in epoxy resin and prepared with standard metallographic procedures, i.e. grinding with successive grades of SiC paper and polishing with alumina suspensions. The alloys were examined with an optical microscope, SEM/EPMA, and XRD to gain insight into their microstructure, composition, and crystal structure. Vickers hardness (VHN) was measured and statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (alpha=0.05). Results. Optical microscopy showed a dendritic microstructure for all alloys. The Pd-containing alloys appear to possess a more complex microstructure. SEM/EPMA showed Cr to be rather uniformly distributed in the matrix with palladium tending to be segregated apart from Mo and Ni or Co. Areas of different composition may explain the poor electrochemical results noted in previous studies. XRD suggested the main phase in the Ni-containing solutions was a face centered cubic Ni solid solution, whereas the CoCr exhibited a hexagonal crystal structure that was altered to face centered cubic when Pd was included in the composition. For Vickers hardness, the Co-containing alloys possessed a greater hardness than the Ni-containing alloys. However, the incorporation of Pd in CoCr and NiCr had only a slight effect on microhardness. Conclusion. Overall, the inclusion of palladium increases the

  19. Several braze filler metals for joining an oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation was made of five braze filler metals for joining an aluminum-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy, TD-NiCrAl. All five braze filler metals evaluated are considered suitable for joining TD-NiCrAl in terms of wettability and flow. Also, the braze alloys appear to be tolerant of slight variations in brazing procedures since joints prepared by three sources using three of the braze filler metals exhibited similar brazing characteristics and essentially equivalent 1100 C stress-rupture properties in a brazed butt-joint configuration. Recommendations are provided for brazing the aluminum-containing ODS alloys.

  20. Elevated temperature mechanical properties and residual tensile properties of two cast superalloys and several nickel-base oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The elevated temperature tensile, stress-rupture and creep properties and residual tensile properties after creep straining have been determined for two cast superalloys and several wrought Ni-16Cr-4Al-yttria oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys. The creep behavior of the ODS alloys is similar to that of previously studied ODS nickel alloys. In general, the longitudinal direction is stronger than the long transverse direction, and creep is at least partially due to a diffusional creep mechanism as dispersoid-free zones were observed after creep-rupture testing. The tensile properties of the nickel-base superalloy B-1900 and cobalt-base superalloy MAR-M509 are not degraded by prior elevated temperature creep straining (at least up to 1 pct) between 1144 and 1366 K. On the other hand, the room temperature tensile properties of ODS nickel-base alloys can be reduced by prior creep strains of 0.5 pct or less between 1144 and 1477 K, with the long transverse direction being more susceptible to degradation than the longitudinal direction.

  1. The crevice corrosion behavior of chromium stainless steel and nickel base alloys in a reverse osmosis plant utilizing seawater

    SciT

    Al-Odwani, A.; Carew, J.; Al-Hashem, A.

    1999-11-01

    The crevice corrosion tests were performed on UNS S31603, UNS S31703, UNS S31726, UNS S31254, UNS N08904, UNS N625, UNS N825 and UNS N276 was investigated in seawater and neutral brine solution using a multiple crevice washer assembly. PTFE multiple-crevice washers were bolted to both sides of the test specimens with PTFE bolts and nuts. The specimens were exposed to seawater flowing at a rate of 100 L/h for periods of 3,000 h and 6,000 h. Duplicate specimens were immersed in a plexiglass cell containing the flowing seawater at a temperature of 30 C. The results showed that all themore » tested coupons were susceptible to some degree of crevice corrosion attack. However, the stainless steels were the most severely affected. The degree of crevice corrosion attack for the nickel base alloys decreased as the percentage of molybdenum content in the alloys increased. Destruction of the passive layer by the concentration of chloride or acidity and reduction of hydrogen ions at the crevices is believed to be the cause of the crevice attack.« less

  2. Template-Free Synthesis of Nanoporous Nickel and Alloys as Binder-Free Current Collectors of Li Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports a versatile template-free method based on the hydrogen reduction of metallic salts for the synthesis of nanoporous Ni and alloys. The approach involves thermal decomposition and reduction of metallic precursors followed with metal cluster nucleation and ligament growth. Topological disordered porous architectures of metals with a controllable distribution of pore size and ligament size ranging from tens of nanometers to micrometers are synthesized. The reduction processes are scrutinized through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The formation mechanism of the nanoporous metal is qualitatively explained. The as-prepared nanoporous Ni was tested as binder-free current collectors for nickel oxalate anodes of lithium ion batteries. The nanoporous Ni electrodes deliver enhanced reversible capacities and cyclic performances compared with commercial Ni foam. It is confirmed that this synthesis method has versatility not only because it is suitable for different types of metallic salts precursors but also for various other metals and alloys. PMID:29911687

  3. Mathematical simulation and optimization of cutting mode in turning of workpieces made of nickel-based heat-resistant alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoljubova, M. N.; Afonasov, A. I.; Kozlov, B. N.; Shavdurov, D. E.

    2018-05-01

    A predictive simulation technique of optimal cutting modes in the turning of workpieces made of nickel-based heat-resistant alloys, different from the well-known ones, is proposed. The impact of various factors on the cutting process with the purpose of determining optimal parameters of machining in concordance with certain effectiveness criteria is analyzed in the paper. A mathematical model of optimization, algorithms and computer programmes, visual graphical forms reflecting dependences of the effectiveness criteria – productivity, net cost, and tool life on parameters of the technological process - have been worked out. A nonlinear model for multidimensional functions, “solution of the equation with multiple unknowns”, “a coordinate descent method” and heuristic algorithms are accepted to solve the problem of optimization of cutting mode parameters. Research shows that in machining of workpieces made from heat-resistant alloy AISI N07263, the highest possible productivity will be achieved with the following parameters: cutting speed v = 22.1 m/min., feed rate s=0.26 mm/rev; tool life T = 18 min.; net cost – 2.45 per hour.

  4. Nickel electroplating on copper pre-activated Al alloy in the electrolyte containing PEG1000 as an additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jie; Wang, Jinwei; Zhang, Dawei

    2018-06-01

    Ni coatings are prepared on Cu-pretreated anodic Al alloy by electroplating technique in environment-friendly electrolytes with PEG1000 as an additive. Some defects like pores, cracks and even uncovered areas are observed for the sample of the Cu-pretreated anodic Al alloy, and these defects seem to be remedied with the following Ni electroplating as observed from their SEM images; while the covering effect of Ni onto the Cu layer is rather limited as judged by their corrosion current data of polarization test. After adding PEG1000 in the Ni electroplating electrolyte, the obtained coating surfaces are seen smoother and thicker; and most of the tiny particles are seen closely packed together with some bigger particles on them. The diffusion of nickel particles into copper layer are confirmed by the line and mapping mode of EDS element analysis for the Ni-Cu composite coating. Their much lower corrosion current density ( I corr) and higher micro-hardness support the fact that the addition of PEG1000 in Ni plating electrolyte has a function of promoting the refinement of Ni particles and the formation of more compacter, thicker and smoother Ni-Cu composite coating.

  5. Corrosion behavior of high-nickel and chromium alloys in natural Baltic seawater

    SciT

    Birn, J.; Janik-Czachor, M.; Wolowik, A.

    Effect of Cl{sup {minus}} ion concentration (O M sodium chloride [NaCl] to 2 M NaCl) and temperature (25 C to 75 C) on stability of the passive state of high-Ni and Cr alloys: NI-1 ({approximately} 16% Mo), CR-2 ({approximately} 6.2% Mo), and NI-3 (3.5% Mo) were investigated in acidic and neutral electrolytes in strictly controlled electrochemical conditions. The anodic behavior of the alloys appeared to depend mostly upon Mo content in the alloy. Thus, the NI-1 was the most stable alloy under the applied experimental conditions. The other alloys were also quite resistant, undergoing pitting only at elevated temperatures, atmore » high anodic potentials, and at a chloride concentration not lower than 1 M. In natural Baltic seawater, these alloys did not exhibit any tendency to pitting, in qualitative agreement with the accelerated electrochemical tests. Complementary microscopic and surface analytical (AES) investigations were carried out to correlate the anodic and corrosion behavior of these materials with their composition and structure, and the composition of the passivating films formed at their surfaces.« less

  6. Dephosphorization of complexly alloyed nickel melts under vacuum induction melting conditions: I. Thermodynamics of dephosphorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtsev, V. T.; Anuchkin, S. N.; Sidorov, V. V.; Rigin, V. E.

    2013-01-01

    A thermodynamic computer simulation of the oxidation potential of a gas-melt-ceramic (80 wt% MgO, 20 wt % Al2O3) system under vacuum induction furnace conditions is used to find that the major contribution to this potential at temperatures ranging from 1673 to 2273 K is made by a nickel melt with additives of nickel protoxide. This provides the possibility of oxidative dephosphorization of the metallic melt. The computation of the saturated vapor pressure of phosphorus compounds with the IIA group elements shows that the data obtained for magnesium, calcium, and barium metaphosphates and europium orthophosphate at 1873 K indicate the principal possibility of melt dephosphorization by the evaporation of these compounds under oxidative conditions.

  7. Creep and Fatigue Interaction in the PWA 1484 Single Crystal Nickel-Base Alloy (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    work by Zhang et al . has shown that during the early part of fatigue cycling dislocations are formed primarily in the γ matrix with the number of...dislocations increasing with the number of applied cycles [11]. Ott and Mughrabi showed that during fatigue of single crystal nickel base superalloys... al . and their research determined that the fatigue behavior of PWA1484 could be well represented by a Walker type fatigue model that also included

  8. A comparative study of the cytotoxicity and corrosion resistance of nickel-titanium and titanium-niobium shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Rebecca E; Ma, Ji; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Munoz-Pinto, Dany; Karaman, Ibrahim; Rubitschek, Felix; Maier, Hans J; Hahn, Mariah S

    2012-07-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloys (SMAs) are commonly used in a range of biomedical applications. However, concerns exist regarding their use in certain biomedical scenarios due to the known toxicity of Ni and conflicting reports of NiTi corrosion resistance, particularly under dynamic loading. Titanium-niobium (TiNb) SMAs have recently been proposed as an alternative to NiTi SMAs due to the biocompatibility of both constituents, the ability of both Ti and Nb to form protective surface oxides, and their superior workability. However, several properties critical to the use of TiNb SMAs in biomedical applications have not been systematically explored in comparison with NiTi SMAs. These properties include cytocompatibility, corrosion resistance, and alterations in alloy surface composition in response to prolonged exposure to physiological solutions. Therefore, the goal of the present work was to comparatively investigate these aspects of NiTi (49.2 at.% Ti) and TiNb (26 at.% Nb) SMAs. The results from the current studies indicate that TiNb SMAs are less cytotoxic than NiTi SMAs, at least under static culture conditions. This increased TiNb cytocompatibility was correlated with reduced ion release as well as with increased corrosion resistance according to potentio-dynamic tests. Measurements of the surface composition of samples exposed to cell culture medium further supported the reduced ion release observed from TiNb relative to NiTi SMAs. Alloy composition depth profiles also suggested the formation of calcium phosphate deposits within the surface oxide layers of medium-exposed NiTi but not of TiNb. Collectively, the present results indicate that TiNb SMAs may be promising alternatives to NiTi for certain biomedical applications. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of alloy composition on cyclic flame hot-corrosion attack of cast nickel-base superalloys at 900 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, Ta, Nb, and W content on the hot corrosion of nickel base alloys were investigated. The alloys were tested in a Mach 0.3 flame with 0.5 ppmw sodium at a temperature of 900 C. One nondestructive and three destructive tests were conducted. The best corrosion resistance was achieved when the Cr content was 12 wt %. However, some lower-Cr-content alloys ( 10 wt%) exhibited reasonable resistance provided that the Al content alloys ( 10 wt %) exhibited reasonable resistance provided that the Al content was 2.5 wt % and the Ti content was Aa wt %. The effect of W, Ta, Mo, and Nb contents on the hot-corrosion resistance varied depending on the Al and Ti contents. Several commercial alloy compositions were also tested and the corrosion attack was measured. Predicted attack was calculated for these alloys from derived regression equations and was in reasonable agreement with that experimentally measured. The regression equations were derived from measurements made on alloys in a one-quarter replicate of a 2(7) statistical design alloy composition experiment. These regression equations represent a simple linear model and are only a very preliminary analysis of the data needed to provide insights into the experimental method.

  10. Investigation of passive films on nickel Alloy 690 in lead-containing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, B.; Lu, B. T.; Luo, J. L.; Lu, Y. C.; Ma, H. Y.

    2008-09-01

    Passive films formed on Alloy UNS N06690 were investigated in simulated crevice chemistries. It was found the role of lead in corrosion processes is strongly dependent on the pH value of the testing solutions. At pH 1.5 the effect of lead is narrowly noticeable; while at pH 12.7, lead has a significant influence on the electrochemical performance of alloy UNS N06690. The lead alters the surface morphologies at both pH and account for higher hydroxide content in the surface film at pH 12.7. The lead incorporation hinders the formation of spinel oxides during the passivation in alkaline solution. Nanoindentation tests indicate a significant lead-induced degradation in the mechanical properties of passive films. The passivation degradation is attributed to detrimental effects of lead via interrupting the dehydration process and hindering the formation of protective layers on the alloy surface.

  11. Improved adherence of sputtered titanium carbide coatings on nickel- and titanium-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Brainard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    Rene 41 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys were radio frequency sputter coated with titanium carbide by several techniques in order to determine the most effective. Coatings were evaluated in pin-on-disk tests. Surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to relate adherence to interfacial chemistry. For Rene 41, good coating adherence was obtained when a small amount of acetylene was added to the sputtering plasma. The acetylene carburized the alloy surface and resulted in better bonding to the TiC coating. For Ti-6Al-4V, the best adherence and wear protection was obtained when a pure titanium interlayer was used between the coating and the alloy. The interlayer is thought to prevent the formation of a brittle, fracture-prone, aluminum oxide layer.

  12. Development of oxidation resistance in thoriated nickel-chromium base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wilcox, B. A.; Jaffee, R. I.; Stringer, J.

    1971-01-01

    A pack process was developed which permits the introduction of nearly six weight percent aluminum into solid solution in the near-surface region of TDNiCr (Ni-20Cr-2ThO2. At this aluminum concentration an adherent alumina scale is produced on the alloy surface upon exposure to an environment of 1330 n/sq m (10 torr) or 101,000 n/sq m (760 torr) air at temperatures of 1093 C (2000 F) and 1204 C (2200 F). Room temperature mechanical properties of the aluminized alloys compare favorably with those of TDNiCr as received. While diffusivities for aluminum are a factor of three higher than those for chromium in TDNiCr or Ni-20Cr, the diffusion rates are similar for either of these elements in the thoriated or unthoriated alloy for a given temperature and grain size.

  13. Development of dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium alloy (Ni-Cr-Th-O2) sheet for space shuttle vehicles, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingler, L. J.; Weinberger, W. R.; Bailey, P. G.; Baranow, S.

    1971-01-01

    A dispersion-strengthened alloy, TD nickel chromium (TDNiCr) is being developed for use on the thermal protection system of the space shuttle at temperatures up to 1204 C(2200 F). Manufacturing processes were developed for the fabrication of sheet and foil to specifications. The addition of aluminum to the basic TDNiCr composition provides outstanding oxidation resistance up to 1260 C(2300 F); aluminum levels of 2 to 4% are considered optimum for space shuttle application.

  14. Carbon-encapsulated nickel-cobalt alloys nanoparticles fabricated via new post-treatment strategy for hydrogen evolution in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hailing; Youliwasi, Nuerguli; Zhao, Lei; Chai, Yongming; Liu, Chenguang

    2018-03-01

    This paper addresses a new post-treatment strategy for the formation of carbon-encapsulated nickel-cobalt alloys nanoparticles, which is easily controlled the performance of target products via changing precursor composition, calcination conditions (e.g., temperature and atmosphere) and post-treatment condition. Glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified by the as-obtained carbon-encapsulated mono- and bi-transition metal nanoparticles exhibit excellent electro-catalytic activity for hydrogen production in alkaline water electrolysis. Especially, Ni0.4Co0.6@N-Cs800-b catalyst prepared at 800 °C under an argon flow exhibited the best electrocatalytic performance towards HER. The high HER activity of the Ni0.4Co0.6@N-Cs800-b modified electrode is related to the appropriate nickel-cobalt metal ratio with high crystallinity, complete and homogeneous carbon layers outside of the nickel-cobalt with high conductivity and the synergistic effect of nickel-cobalt alloys that also accelerate electron transfer process.

  15. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel–chromium based alloys

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel–chromium based alloy (Ni–Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni–Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of <1 month of the restoration duration, among which higher Ni excretions were found in those with either a higher number of teeth replaced by dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of <1, 1 to <3 and 3 to <6 months, especially in those with a higher metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni–Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated. PMID:23579466

  16. Growth Stresses in Thermally Grown Oxides on Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Luke H.; Laux, Britta; He, Ming Y.; Hovis, David; Heuer, Arthur H.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2016-03-01

    Growth stresses that develop in α-Al2O3 scale that form during isothermal oxidation of three Ni-based single crystal alloys have been studied to elucidate their role in coating and substrate degradation at elevated temperatures. Piezospectroscopy measurements at room temperature indicate large room temperature compressive stresses in the oxides formed at 1255 K or 1366 K (982 °C or 1093 °C) on the alloys, ranging from a high of 4.8 GPa for René N4 at 1366 K (1093 °C) to a low of 3.8 GPa for René N5 at 1255 K (982 °C). Finite element modeling of each of these systems to account for differences in coefficients of thermal expansion of the oxide and substrate indicates growth strains in the range from 0.21 to 0.44 pct at the oxidation temperature, which is an order of magnitude higher than the growth strains measured in the oxides on intermetallic coatings that are typically applied to these superalloys. The magnitudes of the growth strains do not scale with the parabolic oxidation rate constants measured for the alloys. Significant spatial inhomogeneities in the growth stresses were observed, due to (i) the presence of dendritic segregation and (ii) large carbides in the material that locally disrupts the structure of the oxide scale. The implications of these observations for failure during cyclic oxidation, fatigue cycling, and alloy design are considered.

  17. Thermal Stabilization and Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystalline Iron-Nickel-Zirconium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotan, Hasan

    Ultrafine grained and nanostructured materials are promising for structural applications because of the high strength compared to coarse grained counterparts. However, their widespread application is limited by an inherently high driving force for thermally induced grain growth, even at low temperatures. Accordingly, the understanding of and control over grain growth in nanoscale materials is of great technological and scientific importance as many physical properties (i.e. mechanical properties) are functions of the average grain size and the grain size distribution within the microstructure. Here, we investigate the microstructural evolution and grain growth in Fe-Ni alloys with Zr addition and differentiate the stabilization mechanisms acting on grain boundaries. Fe-Ni alloys are chosen for stability investigations since they are important for understanding the behavior of many steels and other ferrous alloys. Zirconium is proven to be an effective grain size stabilizer in pure Fe and Fe-base systems. In this study, nanocrystalline alloys were prepared by high energy ball milling. In situ and ex situ experiments were utilized to directly follow grain growth and microstructural evolution as a function of temperature and composition. The information obtained from these experiments enables the real time observation of microstructural evolution and phase transformation and provides a unique view of dynamic reactions as they occur. The knowledge of the thermal stability will exploit the potential high temperature applications and the consolidation conditions (i.e. temperature and pressure) to obtain high dense materials for advanced mechanical tests. Our investigations reveal that the grain growth of Fe-Ni alloys is not affected by Ni content but strongly inhibited by the addition of 1 at% Zr up to about 700 °C. The microstructural stability is lost due to the bcc-to-fcc transformation (occurring at 700°C) by the sudden appearance of abnormally grown fcc grains

  18. Bone modeling and cell-material interface responses induced by nickel-titanium shape memory alloy after periosteal implantation.

    PubMed

    Ryhänen, J; Kallioinen, M; Tuukkanen, J; Lehenkari, P; Junila, J; Niemelä, E; Sandvik, P; Serlo, W

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the new bone formation, modeling and cell-material interface responses induced by nickel-titanium shape memory alloy after periosteal implantation. We used a regional acceleratory phenomenon (RAP) model, in which a periosteal contact stimulus provokes an adaptive modelling response. NiTi has thermal shape memory and superelasticity properties uncommon in other implant alloys. So far, there are insufficient data concerning the biocompatibility of NiTi as a bone implant. NiTi was compared to stainless steel (stst) and Ti-6Al-4V. The test implant was placed in contact with the intact femur periosteum, but it was not fixed inside the bone. Histomorphometry with digital image analysis was used to determine the bone formation and resorption parameters. The ultrastructural features of cell-material adhesion were analysed with scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). A typical peri-implant bone wall modelation was seen due to the normal RAP. The maximum new woven bone formation started earlier (2 weeks) in the Ti-6Al-4V group than in the NiTi (P < 0.01) group, but also decreased earlier, and at 8 weeks the NiTi (P < 0.05) and stst (P < 0.005) groups had greater cortical bone width. At 12 and 26 weeks no statistical differences were seen in the histomorphometric values. The histological response of the soft tissues around the NiTi implant was also clearly non-toxic and non-irritating. Cell adhesion and focal contacts were similar between the materials studied by FESEM. We conclude that NiTi had no negative effect on total new bone formation or normal RAP after periosteal implantation during a 26-week follow-up.

  19. Lubricating Properties of Ceramic-Bonded Calcium Fluoride Coatings on Nickel-Base Alloys from 75 to 1900 deg F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1962-01-01

    The endurance life and the friction coefficient of ceramic-bonded calcium fluoride (CaF2) coatings on nickel-base alloys were determined at temperatures from 75 F to 1900 F. The specimen configuration consisted of a hemispherical rider (3/16-in. rad.) sliding against the flat surface of a rotating disk. Increasing the ambient temperature (up to 1500 F) or the sliding velocity generally reduced the friction coefficient and improved coating life. Base-metal selection was critical above 1500 F. For instance, cast Inconel sliding against coated Inconel X was lubricated effectively to 1500 F, but at 1600 F severe blistering of the coatings occurred. However, good lubrication and adherence were obtained for Rene 41 sliding against coated Rene 41 at temperatures up to 1900 F; no blisters developed, coating wear life was fairly good, and the rider wear rate was significantly lower than for the unlubricated metals. Friction coefficients were 0.12 at 1500 F, 0.15 at 1700 F, and 0.17 at 1800 F and 1900 F. Because of its ready availability, Inconel X appears to be the preferred substrate alloy for applications in which the temperature does not exceed 1500 F. Rene 41 would have to be used in applications involving higher temperatures. Improved coating life was derived by either preoxidizing the substrate metals prior to the coating application or by applying a very thin (less than 0.0002 in.) burnished and sintered overlay to the surface of the coating. Preoxidation did not affect the friction coefficient. The overlay generally resulted in a higher friction coefficient than that obtained without the overlay. The combination of both modifications resulted in longer coating life and in friction coefficients intermediate between those obtained with either modification alone.

  20. Effect of alloy type on the life-time of torsion-preloaded nickel-titanium endodontic instruments.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Hong; Kim, Sung Kyo; Cheung, Gary Shun-Pan; Jeong, Seong Hwa; Bae, Yong Chul; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of torsional preloads on the cyclic fatigue life of nickel-titanium (NiTi) instruments with different history of heat treatments by manufacturers. WaveOne (Primary) made of M-wire, K3XF (#30/0.06) of R-phase, and ProTaper (F2) of conventional NiTi alloy was used. Each file was preloaded at four conditions (nil, 25, 50, and 75% of their mean ultimate torsional strength) before fatigue testing. The torsional preloads 10-, 30-, or 50-times were applied by securing 5 mm of the file tip, rotating it until the preset torque was attained before returning to the origin. Then, the number of cycles to failure (NCF) was evaluated by rotational bending in a simulated canal. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis and two-way ANOVA. Fractured instruments were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM showed that most WaveOne after 75% preloading, regardless of repetitions, showed some longitudinal cracks parallel to the long axis of the file, which were rare for K3XF. Regression analysis revealed that the brand of instrument was the most critical factor. At up to 75% preloading, ProTaper and K3XF did not show any significant decline in NCF. For 30-repetition groups of WaveOne, the 50 and 25% torsion preloaded groups showed a significantly higher NCF than the 0 and 75% groups. Within the limitations of this study, the alloy type of NiTi instrument have a significant effect on the phenomenon that a certain amount of torsional preload may improve the cyclic fatigue resistance of NiTi rotary instruments. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effects of alloying on aging and hardening processes of steel with 20% nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogachev, I. N.; Zvigintsev, N. V.; Maslakova, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of hardness, thermal emf, and electrical resistance were used to study the effects of Co, Mo, Ti and Al contents on aging and hardening processes in Fe 20%Ni steel. It is shown that the effects of these alloying elements differ substantially. Anomalies which arise in the temperature dependence of physical properties due to the presence of cobalt and molybdenum are reduced by the inclusion of titanium and aluminum (and vice versa).

  2. Comparative thermal fatigue resistances of twenty-six nickel and cobalt base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Spera, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal fatigue resistances were determined from fluidized bed tests. Cycles to cracking differed by almost three orders of magnitude for these materials with directional solidification and surface protection of definite benefit. The alloy-coating combination with the highest thermal fatigue resistance was directionally solidified NASA TAZ-8A with an RT-XP coating. It oxidation resistance was excellent, showing almost no weight change after 15 000 fluidized bed cycles.

  3. Characterization of Transformation-Induced Defects in Nickel Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Matthew L.

    Shape memory alloys have remarkable strain recovery properties that make them ideal candidates for many applications that include devices in the automotive, aerospace, medical, and MEMS industries. Although these materials are widely used today, their performance is hindered by poor dimensional stability resulting from cyclic degradation of the martensitic transformation behavior. This functional fatigue results in decreased work output and cyclic accumulation of permanent strain. To date, few studies have taken a fundamental approach to investigating the interaction between plasticity and martensite growth and propagation, which is vitally important to mitigating functional fatigue in future alloy development. The current work focuses on understanding the interplay of these deformation mechanisms in NiTi-based shape memory alloys under a variety of different thermomechanical test conditions. Micron-scale compression testing of NiTi shape memory alloy single crystals is undertaken in an effort to probe the mechanism of austenite dislocation generation. Mechanical testing is paired with post mortem defect analysis via diffraction contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Accompanied by micromechanics-based modeling of local stresses surrounding a martensite plate, these results demonstrate that the previously existing martensite and resulting austenite dislocation substructure are intimately related. A mechanism of transformation-induced dislocation generation is described in detail. A study of pure and load-biased thermal cycling of bulk polycrystalline NiTi is done for comparison of the transformation behavior and resultant defects to the stress-induced case. Post mortem and in situ STEM characterization demonstrate unique defect configurations in this test mode and STEM-based orientation mapping reveals local crystal rotation with increasing thermal cycles. Changes in both martensite and austenite microstructures are explored. The results for

  4. Special Features of the Structure of Single-Crystal Refractory Nickel Alloy Under Directed Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Yu. A.; Echin, A. B.; Surova, V. A.; Kolodyazhnyi, M. Yu.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of the conditions of directed crystallization (the temperature gradient and the crystallization rate) on the dendrite spacing, on the size of the particles of the hardening γ'-phase in the arms and arm spaces of the dendrites, on the volume fraction and size of the pores, on the size of the particles of the eutectic γ/γ'-phase, and on the features of dendritic segregation in a single-crystal castable refractory alloy is studied.

  5. A Study of the Vacancy-Impurity Interaction in Dilute Nickel Alloys by Core Electron Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Danilov, S. E.; Druzhkov, A. P.

    1997-08-01

    It is shown that the angular correlation of annihilation radiation can be used to identify vacancy-impurity complexes in dilute alloys. Annihilation of trapped positrons with core electrons bears information about the chemical environment of a vacancy defect. The method is especially effective for d-matrices doped with sp-impurities since annihilation parameters of positrons with d- and sp-shell electrons differ considerably. The potentialities of the method of core-electron annihilation of positrons are demonstrated taking electron-irradiated dilute Ni-P and Ni-Si alloys as an example. It is shown that the interaction between the vacancies, which migrate at the III stage of annealing, and P atoms in Ni-P causes a considerable change in the annihilation parameters of positrons with core electrons compared to pure Ni. In Ni-Si alloys the annihilation parameters of trapped positrons with core electrons do not differ from those in Ni. This fact is an evidence that Si atoms do not interact with vacancies in Ni.

  6. Corrosion of pre-oxidized nickel alloy X-750 in simulated BWR environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzi, Silvia; Lai, Haiping; Göransson, Kenneth; Thuvander, Mattias; Stiller, Krystyna

    2017-04-01

    Samples of pre-oxidized Alloy X-750 were exposed to a simulated boiling water reactor environment in an autoclave at a temperature of 286 °C and a pressure of 80 bar for four weeks. The effect of alloy iron content on corrosion was investigated by comparing samples with 5 and 8 wt% Fe, respectively. In addition, the effect of two different surface pre-treatments was investigated. The microstructure of the formed oxide scales was studied using mainly electron microscopy. The results showed positive effects of an increased Fe content and of removing the deformed surface layer by pickling. After four weeks of exposure the oxide scale consists of oxides formed in three different ways. The oxide formed during pre-oxidization at 700 °C, mainly consisting of chromia, is partly still present. There is also an outer oxide consisting of NiFe2O4 crystals, reaching a maximum size of 3 μm, which has formed by precipitation of dissolved metal ions. Finally, there is an inner nanocrystalline and porous oxide, with a metallic content reflecting the alloy composition, which has formed by corrosion.

  7. First-principles calculations of the interaction between hydrogen and 3d alloying atom in nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenguan; Qian, Yuan; Zhang, Dongxun; Liu, Wei; Han, Han

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of hydrogen (H) in Ni-based alloy is essential for the prediction of Tritium behavior in Molten Salt Reactor. First-principles calculations were performed to investigate the interaction between H and 3d transition metal (TM) alloying atom in Ni-based alloy. H prefers the octahedral interstitial site to the tetrahedral interstitial site energetically. Most of the 3d TM elements (except Zn) attract H. The attraction to H in the Ni-TM-H system can be mainly attributed to the differences in electronegativity. With the large electronegativity, H and Ni gain electrons from the other TM elements, resulting in the enhanced Ni-H bonds which are the source of the attraction to H in the Ni-TM-H system. The obviously covalent-like Cr-H and Co-H bindings are also beneficial to the attraction to H. On the other hand, the repulsion to H in the Ni-Zn-H system is due to the stable electronic configuration of Zn. We mainly utilize the results calculated in 32-atom supercell which corresponds to the case of a relatively high concentration of hydrogen. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  8. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  9. Tensile and pack compressive tests of some sheets of aluminum alloy, 1025 carbon steel, and chromium-nickel steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atchison, C S; Miller, James A

    1942-01-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain curves, stress-deviation curves, and secant modulus-stress curves are given for longitudinal and transverse specimens of 17S-T, 24S-T, and 24S-RT aluminum-alloy sheet in thicknesses from 0.032 to 0.081 inch, 1025 carbon steel sheet in thicknesses of 0.054 and 0.120 inch, and chromium-nickel steel sheet in thicknesses form 0.020 to 0.0275 inch. Significant differences were found between the tensile and the compressive stress-strain curves, and also the corresponding corollary curves; similarly, differences were found between the curves for the longitudinal and transverse directions. These differences are of particular importance in considering the compressive strength of aircraft structures made of thin sheet. They are explored further for the case of compression by giving tangent modulus-stress curves in longitudinal and transverse compression and dimensionless curves of the ratio of tangent modulus to Young's modulus and of the ratio of reduced modulus for a rectangular section to Young's modulus, both plotted against the ratio of stress to secant yield strength.

  10. The Effect of Stabilization Heat Treatments on the Tensile and Creep Behavior of an Advanced Nickel-Based Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    As part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a study of stabilization heat treatment options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, ME 209, was performed. Using a simple, physically based approach, the effect of stabilization heat treatments on tensile and creep properties was analyzed in this paper. Solutions temperature, solution cooling rate, and stabilization temperature/time were found to have a significant impact on tensile and creep properties. These effects were readily quantified using the following methodology. First, the effect of solution cooling rate was assessed to determine its impact on a given property. The as-cooled property was then modified by using two multiplicative factors which assess the impact of solution temperature and stabilization parameters. Comparison of experimental data with predicted values showed this physically based analysis produced good results that rivaled the statistical analysis employed, which required numerous changes in the form of the regression equation depending on the property and temperature in question. As this physically based analysis uses the data for input, it should be noted that predictions which attempt to extrapolate beyond the bounds of the data must be viewed with skepticism. Future work aimed at expanding the range of the stabilization/aging parameters explored in this study would be highly desirable, especially at the higher solution cooling rates.

  11. A crystal plasticity-based study of the relationship between microstructure and ultra-high-cycle fatigue life in nickel titanium alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Moore, John A.; Frankel, Dana; Prasannavenkatesan, Rajesh; ...

    2016-06-06

    Nickel Titanium (NiTi) alloys are often used in biomedical devices where failure due to mechanical fatigue is common. For other alloy systems, computational models have proven an effective means of determining the relationship between microstructural features and fatigue life. This work will extend the subset of those models which were based on crystal plasticity to examine the relationship between microstructure and fatigue life in NiTi alloys. It will explore the interaction between a spherical inclusion and the material’s free surface along with several NiTi microstructures reconstructed from 3D imaging. This work will determine the distance at which the free surfacemore » interacts with an inclusion and the effect of applied strain of surface-inclusion interaction. The effects of inclusion-inclusion interaction, matrix voiding, and matrix strengthening are explored and ranked with regards to their influence on fatigue life.« less

  12. Studies on hydride-forming alloys as the active material of a metal hydride electrode for a nickel metal hydride cell

    SciT

    Lim, H.S.; Zelter, G.R.; Allison, D.U.

    1997-12-01

    Multi-component AB{sub 5} hydrides are attractive replacements for the cadmium electrode in nickel-cadmium batteries. The archetype compound of the AB{sub 5} alloy class is LaNi{sub 5}, but in a typical battery electrode mischmetal is substituted for La and Ni is substituted in part by variety of metals. This paper deals with the effect on cycle life upon the partial substitution of various lanthanides for La and Sn, In, Al, Co, and Mn for Ni. The presence of Ce was shown to enhance cycle life as did Sn in some cases. An electrode of La{sub 0.67}Ce{sub 0.33}B{sub 5} alloy gave overmore » 3,500 cycles (to specific capacity of 200 mAh/g), indicating that it is a very attractive alloy for a practical Ni/MH{sub x} cell.« less

  13. A crystal plasticity-based study of the relationship between microstructure and ultra-high-cycle fatigue life in nickel titanium alloys

    SciT

    Moore, John A.; Frankel, Dana; Prasannavenkatesan, Rajesh

    Nickel Titanium (NiTi) alloys are often used in biomedical devices where failure due to mechanical fatigue is common. For other alloy systems, computational models have proven an effective means of determining the relationship between microstructural features and fatigue life. This work will extend the subset of those models which were based on crystal plasticity to examine the relationship between microstructure and fatigue life in NiTi alloys. It will explore the interaction between a spherical inclusion and the material’s free surface along with several NiTi microstructures reconstructed from 3D imaging. This work will determine the distance at which the free surfacemore » interacts with an inclusion and the effect of applied strain of surface-inclusion interaction. The effects of inclusion-inclusion interaction, matrix voiding, and matrix strengthening are explored and ranked with regards to their influence on fatigue life.« less

  14. Management of long-term and reversible hysteroscopic sterilization: a novel device with nickel-titanium shape memory alloy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Female sterilization is the second most commonly used method of contraception in the United States. Female sterilization can now be performed through laparoscopic, abdominal, or hysteroscopic approaches. The hysteroscopic sterilization may be a safer option than sterilization through laparoscopy or laparotomy because it avoids invading the abdominal cavity and undergoing general anaesthesia. Hysteroscopic sterilization mainly includes chemical agents and mechanical devices. Common issues related to the toxicity of the chemical agents used have raised concerns regarding this kind of contraception. The difficulty of the transcervical insertion of such mechanical devices into the fallopian tubes has increased the high incidence of device displacement or dislodgment. At present, Essure® is the only commercially available hysteroscopic sterilization device being used clinically. The system is irreversible and is not effective immediately. Presentation of the hypothesis Our new hysteroscopic sterility system consists of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a waterproof membrane. The NiTi alloy is covered with two coatings to avoid toxic Ni release and to prevent stimulation of epithelial tissue growth around the oviducts. Because of the shape memory effect of the NiTi alloy, the device works like an umbrella: it stays collapsed at low temperature before placement and opens by the force of shape memory activated by the body temperature after it is inserted hysteroscopically into the interstitial tubal lumen. The rim of the open device will incise into interstitial myometrium during the process of unfolding. Once the device is fixed, it blocks the tube completely. When the patient no longer wishes for sterilization, the device can be closed by perfusing liquid with low temperature into the uterine cavity, followed by prospective hysteroscopic removal. After the device removal, the fallopian tube will revert to its physiological functions. Testing the

  15. Hot corrosion behavior of platinum-modified nickel- and cobalt-based alloys and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deodeshmukh, Vinay Prakash

    High temperature degradation by hot corrosion (650-1000°C) and/or oxidation (>1000°C) can severely reduce the longevity of advanced gas turbine engine components. The protection of high-temperature components against hot corrosion or oxidation is typically conferred by the application of either a diffusion or overlay metallic coating that is able to form a continuous, adherent, and slow-growing oxide scale. There are currently no coatings that provide adequate protection to both hot corrosion and oxidation. Indeed, there is a particular need for such protective coatings because many advanced aero, marine, and industrial gas-turbines operate in both hot corrosion and oxidation regimes in their duty cycle. Recent work at Iowa State University (ISU) has showed that a wide range Pt+Hf-modified gamma'-Ni3Al + gamma-Ni alloy compositions form a very adherent and slow-growing Al 2O3 scale. In fact, the results reported suggest that Pt+Hf-modified gamma' + gamma coatings offer a viable superior alternative to beta-NiAl(Pt)-based coatings. The main thrust of this study was to assess and establish optimum target gamma' + gamma coating compositions for extending the service life of high-temperature gas turbine components exposed to hot corrosion and oxidation conditions. Both high temperature hot-corrosion (HTHC-900°C) and low temperature hot-corrosion (LTHC-705°C) behaviors of the Pt+Hf-modified gamma' + gamma alloys were assessed. The salt used to bring about hot corrosion was Na 2SO4. Quite interestingly, it was found that the HTHC resistance of gamma' + gamma alloys improved with up to about 10 at.% Pt addition, but then decreased significantly with increasing Pt content up to 30 at.% (the maximum level studied); however, under LTHC conditions the resistance of gamma' + gamma alloys improved with increasing Pt content up to 30 at.%. To further improve hot corrosion resistance of Pt+Hf-modified gamma' + gamma alloys, the effects of systematic additions of Cr, Si, and

  16. High temperature corrosion of a nickel base alloy by helium impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouillard, F.; Cabet, C.; Wolski, K.; Terlain, A.; Tabarant, M.; Pijolat, M.; Valdivieso, F.

    2007-05-01

    High temperature corrosion properties of Haynes 230 were investigated in a purposely-designed facility under a typical very high temperature reactor (VHTR) impure helium medium. The study was focused on the surface oxide scale formation and its stability at about 1223 K. The alloy developed a Mn/Cr rich oxide layer on its surface under impure helium at 1173 K. Nevertheless, a deleterious reaction destructing the chromium oxide was evidenced above a critical temperature, TA. Reagents and products of this last reaction were investigated.

  17. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-, iron- and nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. H. M. Esfakur

    The operating temperature of land-based gas turbines and jet engines are ever-increasing to increase the efficiency, decrease the emissions and minimize the cost. Within the engines, complex-shaped parts experience extreme temperature, fatigue and corrosion conditions. Ti-based, Ni-based and Fe-based alloys are commonly used in gas turbines and jet engines depending on the temperatures of different sections. Although those alloys have superior mechanical, high temperature and corrosion properties, severe operating conditions cause fast degradation and failure of the components. Repair of these components could reduce lifecycle costs. Unfortunately, conventional fusion welding is not very attractive, because Ti reacts very easily with oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures, Ni-based superalloys show heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking, and stainless steels show intergranular corrosion and knife-line attack. On the other hand, transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding method has been considered as preferred joining method for those types of alloys. During the initial phase of the current work commercially pure Ti, Fe and Ni were diffusion bonded using commercially available interlayer materials. Commercially pure Ti (Ti-grade 2) has been diffusion bonded using silver and copper interlayers and without any interlayer. With a silver (Ag) interlayer, different intermetallics (AgTi, AgTi2) appeared in the joint centerline microstructure. While with a Cu interlayer eutectic mixtures and Ti-Cu solid solutions appeared in the joint centerline. The maximum tensile strengths achieved were 160 MPa, 502 MPa, and 382 MPa when Ag, Cu and no interlayers were used, respectively. Commercially pure Fe (cp-Fe) was diffusion bonded using Cu (25 m) and Au-12Ge eutectic interlayer (100 microm). Cu diffused predominantly along austenite grain boundaries in all bonding conditions. Residual interlayers appeared at lower bonding temperature and time, however, voids were observed in the joint

  18. Stokes-Einstein relation in liquid iron-nickel alloy up to 300 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Q.-L.; Wang, P.-P.

    2017-05-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were applied to investigate the Stokes-Einstein relation (SER) and the Rosenfeld entropy scaling law (ESL) in liquid Fe0.9Ni0.1 over a sufficiently broad range of temperatures (0.70 < T/Tm < 1.85 Tm is melting temperature) and pressures (from 50 GPa to 300 GPa). Our results suggest that the SER and ESL hold well in the normal liquid region and break down in the supercooled region under high-pressure conditions, and the deviation becomes larger with decreasing temperature. In other words, the SER can be used to calculate the viscosity of liquid Earth's outer core from the self-diffusion coefficients of iron/nickel and the ESL can be used to predict the viscosity and diffusion coefficients of liquid Earth's outer core form its structural properties. In addition, the pressure dependence of effective diameters cannot be ignored in the course of using the SER. Moreover, ESL provides a useful, structure-based probe for the validity of SER, while the ratio of the self-diffusion coefficients of the components cannot be used as a probe for the validity of SER.

  19. Prediction of Fretting Crack Location and Orientation in a Single Crystal Nickel Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlik, J. F.; Farris, T. N.; Haynes, J.; Swanson, G. R.; Ham-Battista, G.

    2005-01-01

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism arising between two nominally clamped surfaces subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high- temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact that could potentially foster crack growth leading to component failure. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). Recently, a high-frequency, high-temperature load frame has been designed for experimentally investigating fretting damage of single crystal nickel materials employed in aircraft and spacecraft turbomachinery. A modeling method for characterizing the fretting stresses of the spherical fretting contact stress behavior in this experiment is developed and described. The calculated fretting stresses for a series of experiments are then correlated to the observed fretting damage. Results show that knowledge of the normal stresses and resolved shear stresses on each crystal plane can aid in predicting crack locations and orientations.

  20. Non-enzymatic glucose sensing on copper-nickel thin film alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pötzelberger, Isabella; Mardare, Andrei Ionut; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2017-09-01

    A simple and cost efficient glucose sensor was constructed using 3D printing having as active material a copper-15 at.% nickel thin film thermally co-evaporated on copper plated circuit boards. The glucose detection in alkaline solution was studied in detail by cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements. The sensor suitability for being used in both quantitative and qualitative glucose detection was demonstrated and calibration of its response to various amounts of glucose revealed two linear regimes with different sensitivities. Glucose levels between 0 and 10 mM are most efficiently quantified as indicated by an amperometric signal increase of 240 μA cm-2 for each 1 mM increase of glucose concentration. The potentiostatic stability of the sensor was evaluated and its complete insensitivity after 7 h was solely attributed to the irreversible transformation of glucose into gluconolactone. A sensor life time of 20 cycles was demonstrated during potentiodynamic cycling when the sensor response remains constant at its maximum level. The magnitude of possible glucose quantification errors were evaluated as interferences induced by additions of ascorbic and uric acids. A worst case scenario of 96 % accuracy of glucose levels quantification was demonstrated using 25 times higher concentrations of interfering substances as compared to the glucose level.

  1. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  2. Solid state welding processes for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Solid-state welding processes were evaluated for joining TD-NiCrAl (Ni-16Cr-4Al-2ThO2) alloy sheet. Both hot-press and resistance spot welding techniques were successfully applied in terms of achieving grain growth across the bond line. Less success was achieved with a resistance seam welding process. In stress-rupture shear and tensile shear tests of lap joints at 1100 C, most failures occurred in the parent material, which indicates that the weld quality was good and that the welds were not a plane of weakness. The overall weld quality was not as good as previously attained with TD-NiCr, probably because the presence of alumina at the faying surfaces and the developmental TD-NiCrAl sheet, which was not of the quality of the TD-NiCr sheet in terms of surface flatness and dimensional control.

  3. Zirconium-nickel crystals—hydrogen accumulators: Dissolution and penetration of hydrogen atoms in alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysina, Z. A.; Zaginaichenko, S. Yu.; Shchur, D. V.; Gabdullin, M. T.; Kamenetskaya, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    The calculation of the free energy, thermodynamic equilibrium equations, and kinetic equations of the intermetallic compound Zr2NiH x has been carried out based on molecular-kinetic concepts. The equilibrium hydrogen concentration depending on the temperature, pressure, and energy parameters has been calculated. The absorption-desorption of hydrogen has been studied, and the possibility of the realization of the hysteresis effect has been revealed. The kinetics of the dissolution and permeability of hydrogen is considered, the time dependence of these values has been found, and conditions for the extremum character of their time dependence have been determined. Relaxation times of the dissolution and permeability of hydrogen into the alloy have been calculated. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data available in the literature.

  4. Effect of nickel-titanium shape memory metal alloy on bone formation.

    PubMed

    Kapanen, A; Ryhänen, J; Danilov, A; Tuukkanen, J

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the biocompatibility of NiTi alloy on bone formation in vivo. For this purpose we used ectopic bone formation assay which goes through all the events of bone formation and calcification. Comparisons were made between Nitinol (NiTi), stainless steel (Stst) and titanium-aluminium (6%)-vanadium (4%) alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), which were implanted for 8 weeks under the fascia of the latissimus dorsi muscle in 3-month-old rats. A light-microscopic examination showed no chronic inflammatory or other pathological findings in the induced ossicle or its capsule. New bone replaced part of the decalcified matrix with mineralized new cartilage and bone. The mineral density was measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). The total bone mineral density (BMD) values were nearly equal between the control and the NiTi samples, the Stst samples and the Ti-6Al-4V samples had lower BMDs. Digital image analysis was used to measure the combined area of new fibrotic tissue and original implanted bone matrix powder around the implants. There were no significant differences between the implanted materials, although Ti-6Al-4V showed the largest matrix powder areas. The same method was used for measurements of proportional cartilage and new bone areas in the ossicles. NiTi showed the largest cartilage area (p < or = 0.05). Between implant groups the new bone area was largest in NiTi. We conclude that NiTi has good biocompatibility, as its effects on ectopic bone formation are similar to those of Stst, and that the ectopic bone formation assay developed here can be used for biocompatibility studies.

  5. Cyclic fatigue resistance of XP-endo Shaper compared with different nickel-titanium alloy instruments.

    PubMed

    Elnaghy, Amr; Elsaka, Shaymaa

    2018-04-01

    The aims of this study were to assess and compare the resistance to cyclic fatigue of XP-endo Shaper (XPS; FKG Dentaire, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) instruments with TRUShape (TRS; Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK, USA), HyFlex CM (HCM; Coltene, Cuyahoga Falls, OH, USA), Vortex Blue (VB; Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties), and iRace (iR; FKG Dentaire) nickel-titanium rotary instruments at body temperature. Size 30, 0.01 taper of XPS, size 30, 0.04 taper of HCM, VB, iR, and size 30, 0.06 taper of TRS instruments were immersed in saline at 37 ± 1 °C during cyclic fatigue testing. The instruments were tested with 60° angle of curvature and a 3-mm radius of curvature. The number of cycles to failure (NCF) was calculated and the length of the fractured segment was measured. Fractographic examination of the fractured surface was performed using a scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis H test and Mann-Whitney U tests. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. XPS had a significantly greater NCF compared with the other instruments (P < 0.001). The topographic appearance of the fracture surfaces of tested instruments revealed ductile fracture of cyclic fatigue failure. XPS instruments exhibited greater cyclic fatigue resistance compared with the other tested instruments. XP-endo Shaper instruments could be used more safely in curved canals due to their higher fatigue resistance.

  6. Dependence of phase configurations, microstructures and magnetic properties of iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloy nanoribbons on deoxidization temperature in hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Jing, Panpan; Liu, Mengting; Pu, Yongping; Cui, Yongfei; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2016-11-23

    Iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloy nanoribbons were reported for the first time by deoxidizing NiFe 2 O 4 nanoribbons, which were synthesized through a handy route of electrospinning followed by air-annealing at 450 °C, in hydrogen (H 2 ) at different temperatures. It was demonstrated that the phase configurations, microstructures and magnetic properties of the as-deoxidized samples closely depended upon the deoxidization temperature. The spinel NiFe 2 O 4 ferrite of the precursor nanoribbons were firstly deoxidized into the body-centered cubic (bcc) Fe-Ni alloy and then transformed into the face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe-Ni alloy of the deoxidized samples with the temperature increasing. When the deoxidization temperature was in the range of 300 ~ 500 °C, although each sample possessed its respective morphology feature, all of them completely reserved the ribbon-like structures. When it was further increased to 600 °C, the nanoribbons were evolved completely into the fcc Fe-Ni alloy nanochains. Additionally, all samples exhibited typical ferromagnetism. The saturation magnetization (M s ) firstly increased, then decreased, and finally increased with increasing the deoxidization temperature, while the coercivity (H c ) decreased monotonously firstly and then basically stayed unchanged. The largest M s (~145.7 emu·g -1 ) and the moderate H c (~132 Oe) were obtained for the Fe-Ni alloy nanoribbons with a mixed configuration of bcc and fcc phases.

  7. Dependence of phase configurations, microstructures and magnetic properties of iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloy nanoribbons on deoxidization temperature in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Panpan; Liu, Mengting; Pu, Yongping; Cui, Yongfei; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2016-11-01

    Iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloy nanoribbons were reported for the first time by deoxidizing NiFe2O4 nanoribbons, which were synthesized through a handy route of electrospinning followed by air-annealing at 450 °C, in hydrogen (H2) at different temperatures. It was demonstrated that the phase configurations, microstructures and magnetic properties of the as-deoxidized samples closely depended upon the deoxidization temperature. The spinel NiFe2O4 ferrite of the precursor nanoribbons were firstly deoxidized into the body-centered cubic (bcc) Fe-Ni alloy and then transformed into the face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe-Ni alloy of the deoxidized samples with the temperature increasing. When the deoxidization temperature was in the range of 300 ~ 500 °C, although each sample possessed its respective morphology feature, all of them completely reserved the ribbon-like structures. When it was further increased to 600 °C, the nanoribbons were evolved completely into the fcc Fe-Ni alloy nanochains. Additionally, all samples exhibited typical ferromagnetism. The saturation magnetization (Ms) firstly increased, then decreased, and finally increased with increasing the deoxidization temperature, while the coercivity (Hc) decreased monotonously firstly and then basically stayed unchanged. The largest Ms (~145.7 emu·g-1) and the moderate Hc (~132 Oe) were obtained for the Fe-Ni alloy nanoribbons with a mixed configuration of bcc and fcc phases.

  8. Effect of ion-implantation on surface characteristics of nickel titanium and titanium molybdenum alloy arch wires.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Manu; Saraswathy, Seema; Sukumaran, Kalathil; Abraham, Kurian Mathew

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the changes in surface roughness and frictional features of 'ion-implanted nickel titanium (NiTi) and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) arch wires' from its conventional types in an in-vitro laboratory set up. 'Ion-implanted NiTi and low friction TMA arch wires' were assessed for surface roughness with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 3 dimensional (3D) optical profilometry. Frictional forces were studied in a universal testing machine. Surface roughness of arch wires were determined as Root Mean Square (RMS) values in nanometers and Frictional Forces (FF) in grams. Mean values of RMS and FF were compared by Student's 't' test and one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). SEM images showed a smooth topography for ion-implanted versions. 3D optical profilometry demonstrated reduction of RMS values by 58.43% for ion-implanted NiTi (795.95 to 330.87 nm) and 48.90% for TMA groups (463.28 to 236.35 nm) from controls. Nonetheless, the corresponding decrease in FF was only 29.18% for NiTi and 22.04% for TMA, suggesting partial correction of surface roughness and disproportionate reduction in frictional forces with ion-implantation. Though the reductions were highly significant at P < 0.001, relations between surface roughness and frictional forces remained non conclusive even after ion-implantation. The study proved that ion-implantation can significantly reduce the surface roughness of NiTi and TMA wires but could not make a similar reduction in frictional forces. This can be attributed to the inherent differences in stiffness and surface reactivity of NiTi and TMA wires when used in combination with stainless steel brackets, which needs further investigations.

  9. Online monitoring of thermo-cycles and its correlation with microstructure in laser cladding of nickel based super alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muvvala, Gopinath; Patra Karmakar, Debapriya; Nath, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding, basically a weld deposition technique, is finding applications in many areas including surface coatings, refurbishment of worn out components and generation of functionally graded components owing to its various advantages over conventional methods like TIG, PTA etc. One of the essential requirements to adopt this technique in industrial manufacturing is to fulfil the increasing demand on product quality which could be controlled through online process monitoring and correlating the signals with the mechanical and metallurgical properties. Rapid thermo-cycle i.e. the fast heating and cooling rates involved in this process affect above properties of the deposited layer to a great extent. Therefore, the current study aims to monitor the thermo-cycles online, understand its variation with process parameters and its effect on different quality aspects of the clad layer, like microstructure, elemental segregations and mechanical properties. The effect of process parameters on clad track geometry is also studied which helps in their judicious selection to deposit a predefined thickness of coating. In this study Inconel 718, a nickel based super alloy is used as a clad material and AISI 304 austenitic steel as a substrate material. The thermo-cycles during the cladding process were recorded using a single spot monochromatic pyrometer. The heating and cooling rates were estimated from the recorded thermo-cycles and its effects on microstructures were characterised using SEM and XRD analyses. Slow thermo-cycles resulted in severe elemental segregations favouring Laves phase formation and increased γ matrix size which is found to be detrimental to the mechanical properties. Slow cooling also resulted in termination of epitaxial growth, forming equiaxed grains near the surface, which is not preferred for single crystal growth. Heat treatment is carried out and the effect of slow cooling and the increased γ matrix size on dissolution of segregated elements in

  10. Dissimilar welding of nickel-based Alloy 690 to SUS 304L with Ti addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. T.; Jeng, S. L.; Yen, C. H.; Kuo, T. Y.

    2004-10-01

    This study investigates the effects of Ti addition on the weldability, microstructure and mechanical properties of a dissimilar weldment of Alloy 690 and SUS 304L. Shielding metal arc welding (SMAW) is employed to butt-weld two plates with three welding layers, where each layer is deposited in a single pass. To investigate the effects of Ti addition, the flux coatings of the electrodes used in the welding process are modified by varying additions of either a Ti-Fe compound or a Ti powder. The results indicate that the microstructure of the fusion zone (FZ) is primarily dendritic. With increasing Ti content, it is noted that the microstructure changes from a columnar dendritic to an equiaxed dendritic, in which the primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS) becomes shorter. Furthermore, it is observed that the amount of Al-Ti oxide phase increases in the inter-dendritic region, while the amount of Nb-rich phase decreases. Moreover, the average hardness of the FZ increases slightly. The results indicate that Ti addition prompts a significant increase in the elongation of the weldment (i.e. 36.5%, Ti: 0.41 wt%), although the tensile strength remains relatively unchanged. However, at an increased Ti content of 0.91 wt%, an obvious reduction in the tensile strength is noted, which can be attributed to a general reduction in the weldability of the joint.

  11. Phase fields of nickel silicides obtained by mechanical alloying in the nanocrystalline state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, M. K.; Pabi, S. K.; Murty, B. S.

    2000-06-01

    Solid state reactions induced by mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental blends of Ni and Si have been studied over the entire composition range of the Ni-Si system. A monotonous increase of the lattice parameter of the Ni rich solid solution, Ni(Si), is observed with refinement of crystallite size. Nanocrystalline phase/phase mixtures of Ni(Si), Ni(Si)+Ni31Si12, Ni31Si12+Ni2Si, Ni2Si+NiSi and NiSi+Si, have been obtained during MA, over the composition ranges of 0-10, 10-28, 28-33, 33-50, and >50 at. % Si, respectively. The results clearly suggest that only congruent melting phases, Ni31Si12, Ni2Si, and NiSi form, while the formation of noncongruent melting phases, Ni3Si, Ni3Si2, and NiSi2, is bypassed in the nanocrystalline state. The phase formation during MA has been discussed based on thermodynamic arguments. The predicted phase fields obtained from effective free energy calculations are quite consistent with those obtained during MA.

  12. Dwell Notch Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of a Powder Metallurgy Nickel Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Yamada, Y.; Ghosn, L. J.; Jayaraman, N.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the processes which govern dwell notch low cycle fatigue (NLCF) behavior of a powder metallurgy (P/M) ME3 disk superalloy. The emphasis was placed on the environmentally driven mechanisms which may embrittle the highly stressed notch surface regions and reduce NLCF life. In conjunction with the environmentally driven notch surface degradation processes, the visco-plastic driven mechanisms which can significantly change the notch root stresses were also considered. Dwell notch low cycle fatigue testing was performed in air and vacuum on a ME3 P/M disk alloy specimens heat treated using either a fast or a slow cooling rate from the solutioning treatment. It was shown that dwells at the minimum stress typically produced a greater life debit than the dwells applied at the maximum stress, especially for the slow cooled heat treatment. Two different environmentally driven failure mechanisms were identified as the root cause of early crack initiation in the min dwell tests. Both of these failure mechanisms produced mostly a transgranular crack initiation failure mode and yet still resulted in low NLCF fatigue lives. The lack of stress relaxation during the min dwell tests produced higher notch root stresses which caused early crack initiation and premature failure when combined with the environmentally driven surface degradation mechanisms. The importance of environmental degradation mechanisms was further highlighted by vacuum dwell NLCF tests which resulted in considerably longer NLCF lives, especially for the min dwell tests.

  13. Grain boundary character, and carbide size and spatial distribution in a ternary nickel alloy

    SciT

    Liu, H.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    A preliminary investigation of the grain boundary character and its relationship to carbide distribution in a Ni-18Cr-18Fe ternary alloy was conducted. The results showed that there was a strong preference for the formation of {Sigma}3 (44.6%) and twin-related {Sigma}9 and {Sigma}27 CSL boundaries. If the coherent {Sigma}3{sub c} twin and the twin-related boundaries are excluded, then the distribution would consist of nearly 80% random (high angle) boundaries and about 20% CSL (with {Sigma} {<=} 49) boundaries. The size and spacing of grain boundary carbides were influenced by grain boundary {Sigma}; the carbides being smaller and more closely spaced on themore » {Sigma}1, {Sigma}9 and {Sigma}27 boundaries, and none could be resolved on the coherent {Sigma}3 twin boundaries. The results could be understood, in part, in terms of the influence of grain boundary energy, but the understanding is incomplete. Further studies are in progress and will be reported.« less

  14. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  15. Structure-Phase Condition and Tribological Properties of Coatings Based on Self-Fluxing Nickel Alloy PG-12N-01 After Laser Surfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoino, O. G.; Feldshtein, E. É.; Kardapolova, M. A.; Lutsko, N. I.

    2017-03-01

    Some parameters of laser surfacing of self-fluxing nickel alloy PG-12N-01 are considered. Different structures containing a low-melting γ-Ni - Ni3B eutectic and a γ-Ni - Cr3C2 eutectic that crystallizes at a higher temperature and forms the strength skeleton of the coating may form depending on the rate of the surfacing. The effect of the rate of the surfacing on the wear resistance of the coating and on the coefficients of dry friction are determined.

  16. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  17. Surface Alloying of SUS 321 Chromium-Nickel Steel by an Electron-Plasma Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu. F.; Teresov, A. D.; Petrikova, E. A.; Krysina, O. V.; Ivanova, O. V.; Shugurov, V. V.; Moskvin, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    The mechanisms of forming nanostructured, nanophase layers are revealed and analyzed in austenitic steel subjected to surface alloying using an electron-plasma process. Nanostructured, nanophase layers up to 30 μm in thickness were formed by melting of the film/substrate system with an electron beam generated by a SOLO facility (Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAS), Tomsk), which ensured crystallization and subsequent quenching at the cooling rates within the range 105-108 K/s. The surface was modified with structural stainless steel specimens (SUS 321 steel). The film/substrate system (film thickness 0.5 μm) was formed by a plasma-assisted vacuum-arc process by evaporating a cathode made from a sintered pseudoalloy of the following composition: Zr - 6 at.% Ti - 6 at.% Cu. The film deposition was performed in a QUINTA facility equipped with a PINK hot-cathode plasma source and DI-100 arc evaporators with accelerated cooling of the process cathode, which allowed reducing the size and fraction of the droplet phase in the deposited film. It is found that melting of the film/substrate system (Zr-Ti-Cu)/(SUS 321 steel) using a high-intensity pulsed electron beam followed by the high-rate crystallization is accompanied by the formation of α-iron cellular crystallization structure and precipitation of Cr2Zr, Cr3C2 and TiC particles on the cell boundaries, which as a whole allowed increasing microhardness by a factor of 1.3, Young's modulus - by a factor of 1.2, wear resistance - by a factor of 2.7, while achieving a three-fold reduction in the friction coefficient.

  18. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  19. Creep and intergranular cracking behavior of nickel-chromium-iron-carbon alloys in 360 C water

    SciT

    Angeliu, T.M.; Paraventi, D.J.; Was, G.S.

    1995-11-01

    Mechanical testing of controlled-purity Ni-x% Cr-9% Fe-y% C alloys at 360 C revealed an environmental enhancement in intergranular (IG) cracking and time-dependent deformation in high-purity (HP) and primary water (PW) over that exhibited in argon. Dimples on the IG facets indicated a creep void nucleation and growth failure mode. IG cracking was located primarily in the interior of the specimen and was not necessarily linked to the environment. Controlled-potential constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments showed increases in IG cracking as the applied potential decreased, suggesting that hydrogen was detrimental to the mechanical properties. It was proposed that the environment,more » through the presence of hydrogen, enhanced IG cracking by enhancing the matrix dislocation mobility. This conclusion was based on observations that dislocation creep controlled IG cracking of controlled-purity Ni-x% Cr-9% Fe-y% C in argon at 360 C. Grain-boundary cavitation (GBC) and sliding (GBS) results showed environmental enhancement of the creep rate primarily resulted from an increase in matrix plastic deformation. However, controlled-potential constant load tensile (CLT) experiments did not indicate a change in the creep rate as the applied potential decreased. While this result did not support hydrogen-assisted creep, the material already may have been saturated with hydrogen at these applied potentials, and thus, no effect was realized. Chromium and carbon decreased IG cracking in HP and PW by increasing the creep resistance. The surface film did not play a significant role in the creep or IG cracking behavior under the conditions investigated.« less

  20. Influence of Chemical Composition on Rupture Properties at 1200 Degrees F. of Forged Chromium-Cobalt-Nickel-Iron Base Alloys in Solution-Treated and Aged Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, E E; Freeman, J W; White, A E

    1951-01-01

    The influence of systematic variations of chemical composition on rupture properties at 1200 degrees F. was determined for 62 modifications of a basic alloy containing 20 percent chromium, 20 percent nickel, 20 percent cobalt, 3 percent molybdenum, 2 percent tungsten, 1 percent columbium, 0.15 percent carbon, 1.7 percent manganese, 0.5 percent silicon, 0.12 percent nitrogen and the balance iron. These modifications included individual variations of each of 10 elements present and simultaneous variations of molybdenum, tungsten, and columbium. Laboratory induction furnace heats were hot-forged to round bar stock, solution-treated at 2200 degrees F., and aged at 1400 degrees F. The melting and fabrication conditions were carefully controlled in order to minimize all variable effects on properties except chemical composition. Information is presented which indicates that melting and hot-working conditions play an important role in high-temperature properties of alloys of the type investigated.

  1. Probing Interfacial Friction and Dissipation in Granular Gold­ Nickel Alloys with a Quartz Crystal Oscillator in an External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, K. M.; Krim, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present here a quartz crystal microbalance study of two-phase gold nickel alloys whose internal granular properties are probed by exposure to a fluctuating external magnetic field. The work is motivated by prior studies demonstrating that granular two-phase materials exhibited lower friction and wear than solid solution alloys with identical compositions. In particular, we report a ``flexing'' effect which appears when an external magnetic field is applied, and is manifested as a decrease in the magnitude of oscillation amplitude that is synchronized with the applied field; the effect is not seen on the complimentary solid solution samples. The effect is consistent with internal interfacial friction between nickel and gold grains, indicating a degree of freedom which may decrease friction even in the absence of an external magnetic field. This is supported through analysis of energy dissipation in the system, using the Butterworth­-Van Dyke equivalent circuit model. Data and interpretation are also presented that rule out alternate explanations such as giant magnetoresistance and/or other resistive phenomenon within the film. Funding provided by NSF DMR0805204. Thanks to L. Pan for sample preparation.

  2. Structural features and properties of the laser-deposited nickel alloy layer on a KhV4F tool steel after heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, V. S.; Dikova, Ts. D.; Stavrev, D. S.

    2017-07-01

    The study and application of the materials that are stable in the temperature range up to 1000°C are necessary to repair forming dies operating in this range. Nickel-based alloys can be used for this purpose. The structural state of a nickel alloy layer deposited onto a KhV4F tool steel and then heat treated is investigated. KhV4F tool steel (RF GOST) samples are subjected to laser deposition using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A nickel-based material (0.02C-73.8Ni-2.5Nb-19.5Cr-1.9Fe-2.8Mn) is employed for laser deposition. After laser deposition, the samples are subjected to heat treatment at 400°C for 5 h, 600°C for 1 h, 800°C for 1 h, and 1000°C for 1 h. The microstructure, the phase composition, and the microhardness of the deposited layer are studied. The structure of the initial deposited layer has relatively large grains (20-40 μm in size). The morphology is characterized by a cellular-dendritic structure in the transition zone. The following two structural constituents with a characteristic dendritic structure are revealed: a supersaturated nickel-based γ solid solution and a chromium-based bcc α solid solution. In the initial state and after heat treatment, the hardness of the deposited material (210-240 HV 0.1) is lower than the hardness of the base material (400-440 HV 0.1). Only after heat treatment at 600°C for 1 h, the hardness increases to 240-250 HV0.1. Structure heredity in the form of a dendritic morphology is observed at temperatures of 400, 600, and 800°C. The following sharp change in the structural state is detected upon heat treatment at 1000°C for 1 h: the dendritic morphology changes into a typical α + γ crystalline structure. The hardness of the base material decreases significantly to 160-180 HV 0.1. The low hardness of the deposited layer implies the use of the layer material in limited volume to repair the forming surfaces of dies and molds for die casting. However, the high ductility of the deposited layer of the nickel

  3. Advanced characterization techniques in understanding the roles of nickel in enhancing strength and toughness of submerged arc welding high strength low alloy steel multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Kin-Ling

    Striving for higher strength along with higher toughness is a constant goal in material properties. Even though nickel is known as an effective alloying element in improving the resistance of a steel to impact fracture, it is not fully understood how nickel enhances toughness. It was the goal of this work to assist and further the understanding of how nickel enhanced toughness and maintained strength in particular for high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel submerged arc welding multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition. Using advanced analytical techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermodynamic modeling software, the effect of nickel was studied with nickel varying from one to five wt. pct. in increments of one wt. pct. in a specific HSLA steel submerged arc welding multiple pass weldment. The test matrix of five different nickel compositions in the as-welded and stress-relieved condition was to meet the targeted mechanical properties with a yield strength greater than or equal to 85 ksi, a ultimate tensile strength greater than or equal to 105 ksi, and a nil ductility temperature less than or equal to -140 degrees F. Mechanical testing demonstrated that nickel content of three wt. pct and greater in the as-welded condition fulfilled the targeted mechanical properties. Therefore, one, three, and five wt. pct. nickel in the as-welded condition was further studied to determine the effect of nickel on primary solidification mode, nickel solute segregation, dendrite thickness, phase transformation temperatures, effective ferrite grain size, dislocation density and strain, grain misorientation distribution, and precipitates. From one to five wt. pct nickel content in the as-welded condition, the primary solidification was shown to change from primary delta-ferrite to primary austenite. The nickel partitioning coefficient increased and dendrite/cellular thickness was

  4. Corrosion behavior of experimental and commercial nickel-base alloys in HCl and HCl containing Fe3+

    SciT

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.

    The effects of ferric ions on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of a series of Ni-based alloys in 20% HCl at 30ºC were investigated. The alloys studied were those prepared by the Albany Research Center (ARC), alloys J5, J12, J13, and those sold commercially, alloys 22, 242, 276, and 2000. Tests included mass loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and linear polarization.

  5. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang

    2016-03-01

    The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between 'cauliflower' like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  6. Comparison of the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of different cements with nickel chromium metal alloy: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Saumya; Balakrishnan, Dhanasekar

    2017-01-01

    Background For success of any indirect metal restoration, a strong bond between cement and the intaglio surface of metal is imperative. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the effect of different surface treatment on the tensile and shear bond strength of different cements with nickel–chromium alloy. Material and Methods 120 premolars were sectioned horizontally parallel to the occlusal surface to expose the dentin. Wax patterns were fabricated for individual tooth followed by casting them in nickel chromium alloy. 60 samples were tested for tensile bond strength, and the remaining 60 for shear bond strength. The samples were divided into three groups (of 20 samples each) as per the following surface treatment: oxidation only, oxidation and sandblasting, or oxidation, sandblasting followed by application of alloy primer. Each group was subdivided into 2 subgroups of 10 samples each, according to the bonding cement i.e RM-GIC and resin cement. Samples were subjected to thermocycling procedure followed by evaluation of bond strength. Results Two-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare the means of tensile and shear bond strength across type of surface treatment and cement, followed by post hoc parametric analysis. For all tests ‘p’ value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Conclusions The surface treatment of oxidation and sandblasting followed by application of alloy primer offered the maximum tensile and shear bond strength for both RM GIC and resin cement. Resin cement exhibited greater tensile and shear bond strength than RM-GIC for all the three surface treatment methods. Key words:Resin cement, resin modified glass ionomer cement, oxidation, sandblasting, alloy primer, tensile bond strength, shear bond strength, universal testing machine. PMID:28828160

  7. A study of life prediction differences for a nickel-base Alloy 690 using a threshold and a non-threshold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. A.; Gao, Xiaosheng; Srivatsan, T. S.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we compare and contrast the crack growth rate of a nickel-base superalloy (Alloy 690) in the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) environment. Over the last few years, a preponderance of test data has been gathered on both Alloy 690 thick plate and Alloy 690 tubing. The original model, essentially based on a small data set for thick plate, compensated for temperature, load ratio and stress-intensity range but did not compensate for the fatigue threshold of the material. As additional test data on both plate and tube product became available the model was gradually revised to account for threshold properties. Both the original and revised models generated acceptable results for data that were above 1 × 10 -11 m/s. However, the test data at the lower growth rates were over-predicted by the non-threshold model. Since the original model did not take the fatigue threshold into account, this model predicted no operating stress below which the material would effectively undergo fatigue crack growth. Because of an over-prediction of the growth rate below 1 × 10 -11 m/s, due to a combination of low stress, small crack size and long rise-time, the model in general leads to an under-prediction of the total available life of the components.

  8. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  9. Lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Dwight, Austin E.

    1979-01-01

    A ternary intermetallic compound capable of reversible sorption of hydrogen having the chemical formula LaNi.sub.5-x Al.sub.x, where x is in the range of about 0.01 to 1.5 and the method of storing hydrogen using the intermetallic compound.

  10. Creep and tensile properties of several oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys at 1365 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The tensile properties at room temperature and at 1365 K and the tensile creep properties at low strain rates at 1365 K were measured for several oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys. The alloys examined included ODS Ni, ODS Ni-20Cr, and ODS Ni-16Cr-Al. Metallography of creep tested, large grain size ODS alloys indicated that creep of these alloys is an inhomogeneous process. All alloys appear to possess a threshold stress for creep. This threshold stress is believed to be associated with diffusional creep in the large grain size ODS alloys and normal dislocation motion in perfect single crystal (without transverse low angle boundaries) ODS alloys. Threshold stresses for large grain size ODS Ni-20Cr and Ni-16Cr-Al type alloys are dependent on the grain aspect ratio. Because of the deleterious effect of prior creep on room temperature mechanical properties of large grain size ODS alloys, it is speculated that the threshold stress may be the design limiting creep strength property.

  11. Thermally oxidized Inconel 600 and 690 nickel-based alloys characterizations by combination of global photoelectrochemistry and local near-field microscopy techniques (STM, STS, AFM, SKPFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechehoud, F.; Benaioun, N. E.; Hakiki, N. E.; Khelil, A.; Simon, L.; Bubendorff, J. L.

    2018-03-01

    Thermally oxidized nickel-based alloys are studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) and photoelectro-chemical techniques as a function of oxidation time at a fixed temperature of 623 K. By photoelectrochemistry measurements we identify the formation of three oxides NiO, Fe2O3, Cr2O3 and determine the corresponding gap values. We use these values as parameter for imaging the surface at high bias voltage by STM allowing the spatial localization and identification of both NiO, Fe2O3 oxide phases using STS measurements. Associated to Kelvin probe measurements we show also that STS allow to distinguished NiO from Cr2O3 and confirm that the Cr2O3 is not visible at the surface and localized at the oxide/steel interface.

  12. Mechanism of competitive grain growth in a curvilinear channel of crystal-sorter during the orientational solidification of nickel-based heat-resistant alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrskiy, V. P.; Pozdnyakov, A. N.; Ershov, M. Yu.; Monastyrskiy, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    Using numerical simulation in the ProCAST program complex, the conditions of the solidification of heat-resistant nickel alloy in curvilinear channels of a ceramic mold have been investigated. It has been shown that, in practically important cases, the vector of the temperature gradient is oriented along the axis of the curvilinear channel. In a spiral crystal selector, a cyclic change in the preferred direction of growth occurs because of the cyclic change in the direction of the vector of the temperature gradient. The fact that the vector of the temperature gradient is almost always directed along the axis of the curvilinear channel makes it possible to govern the orientation of the vector of the temperature gradient in space and, therefore, to obtain a grain with the preferred crystallographic orientation. Based on the results of this investigation, a method of the grain selection with a desired azimuthal orientation is proposed.

  13. Mechanical characteristics of heterogeneous structures obtained by high-temperature brazing of corrosion-resistant steels with rapidly quenched non-boron nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B.; Penyaz, M.; Ivannikov, A.; Sevryukov, O.; Bachurina, D.; Fedotov, I.; Voennov, A.; Abramov, E.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing nickel filler metals for high temperature brazing corrosion resistance steels different classes is perspective. The use of these alloys leads to the formation of a complex heterogeneous structure in the diffusion zone that contains separations of intermediate phases such as silicides and borides. This structure negatively affects the strength characteristics of the joint, especially under dynamic loads and in corrosive environment. The use of non-boron filler metals based on the Ni-Si-Be system is proposed to eliminate this structure in the brazed seam. Widely used austenitic 12Cr18Ni10Ti and ferrite-martensitic 16Cr12MoSiWNiVNb reactor steels were selected for research and brazing was carried out. The mechanical characteristics of brazed joints were determined using uniaxial tensile and impact toughness tests, and fractography was investigated by electron microscopy.

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Nickel Alloy (ASTM A 494 M) Reinforced with Fused SiO2 Chilled Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) for Marine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemanth, Joel, Dr.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the results obtained and the discussions made from a series of corrosion experiments involving Nickel alloy (ASTM A 494 M) reinforced with fused SiO2, size of the particles dispersed varies from 80-120 µm and amount of addition varies from 3 to 12 wt.% in steps of 3 wt.%. The resulting chilled MMCs are solidified under the influence of copper chill of 25 mm thickness to study the effect of corrosion behavior. Corrosion resistance was found to increase significantly with increase in SiO2 content in chilled MMCs. Nevertheless, even with high SiO2 content corrosion attack ie., pitting was found to be most severe during the initial stages of each test but it invariably decreased to a very low value in the later stages, due to the formation of an adherent protective layer on the MMCs developed.

  15. Influence of melting and casting methods and finish line design on the marginal discrepancy of nickel-chromium-titanium alloy crowns.

    PubMed

    Cogolludo, Pablo G; Suarez, María J; Peláez, Jesús; Lozano, José F L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of melting and casting procedures and the cervical finish line design on the marginal fit of nickel-chromium-titanium alloy crowns. Sixty standardized specimens were prepared to receive metal-ceramic crowns and were divided into two groups according to the cervical finish line: chamfer or rounded shoulder. Three melting and casting procedures were analyzed: (1) induction-centrifuge (IC), (2) gas oxygen torch-centrifuge (TC), and (3) induction-vacuum/pressure (IP). The marginal fit was measured with an image analysis system. Significant differences (P =.005) were observed among the groups, with TC showing the lowest discrepancies (45.87 μm). No significant differences were observed between the two finish lines. The accuracy of fit achieved for the groups analyzed may be regarded as within the range of clinical acceptance.

  16. Influence of Thin-Film Adhesives in Pullout Tests Between Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloy and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2018-01-01

    Strips of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) were bonded together using multiple thin film adhesives and their mechanical strengths were evaluated under pullout test configuration. Tensile and lap shear tests were conducted to confirm the deformation of SMAs at room temperature and to evaluate the adhesive strength between the NiTi strips and the PMC. Optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the interfacial bonding after failure. Simple equations on composite tensile elongation were used to fit the experimental data on tensile properties. ABAQUS models were generated to show the effects of enhanced bond strength and the distribution of stress in SMA and PMC. The results revealed that the addition of thin film adhesives increased the average adhesive strength between SMA and PMC while halting the room temperature shape memory effect within the pullout specimen.

  17. Nasomaxillary hypoplasia with a congenitally missing tooth treated with LeFort II osteotomy, autotransplantation, and nickel-titanium alloy wire.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takayoshi; Ikemoto, Shigehiro; Ono, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    In some skeletal Class III adult patients with nasomaxillary hypoplasia, the LeFort I osteotomy provides insufficient correction. This case report describes a 20-year-old woman with a combination of nasomaxillary hypoplasia and a protrusive mandible with a congenitally missing mandibular second premolar. We performed a LeFort II osteotomy for maxillary advancement. Autotransplantation of a tooth was also performed; the donor tooth was used to replace the missing permanent tooth. To increase the chance of success, we applied light continuous force with an improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wire technique before extraction and after transplantation. The patient's profile and malocclusion were corrected, and the autotransplanted tooth functioned well. The postero-occlusal relationships were improved, and ideal overbite and overjet relationships were achieved. The methods used in this case represent a remarkable treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Weldability of high-toughness iron - 12 percent-nickel alloys with reactive metal additions of titanium, aluminum, or niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvetian, J. H.; Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Three exceptionally high toughness Fe-12Ni alloys designed for cryogenic service were welded by using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Evaluation of their weldability included equivalent energy fracture toughness tests, transverse weld tensile tests at -196 and 25 C, and weld crack sensitivity tests. The Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy proved extremely weldable for cryogenic applications, having weld and heat affected zone properties comparable to those of the wrought base alloy. The Fe-12Ni-0.5Al alloy had good weld properties only after the weld joint was heat treated. The Fe-12Ni-0.25Nb alloy was not considered weldable for cryogenic use because of its poor weld joint properties at -196 C and its susceptibility to hot cracking.

  19. A comparison of torque expression between stainless steel, titanium molybdenum alloy, and copper nickel titanium wires in metallic self-ligating brackets.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Amy; Major, Thomas W; Carey, Jason P; Heo, Giseon; Badawi, Hisham; Major, Paul W

    2010-09-01

    The force moment providing rotation of the tooth around the x-axis (buccal-lingual) is referred to as torque expression in orthodontic literature. Many factors affect torque expression, including the wire material characteristics. This investigation aims to provide an experimental study into and comparison of the torque expression between wire types. With a worm-gear-driven torquing apparatus, wire was torqued while a bracket mounted on a six-axis load cell was engaged. Three 0.019 x 0.0195 inch wire (stainless steel, titanium molybdenum alloy [TMA], copper nickel titanium [CuNiTi]), and three 0.022 inch slot bracket combinations (Damon 3MX, In-Ovation-R, SPEED) were compared. At low twist angles (<12 degrees), the differences in torque expression between wires were not statistically significant. At twist angles over 24 degrees, stainless steel wire yielded 1.5 to 2 times the torque expression of TMA and 2.5 to 3 times that of nickel titanium (NiTi). At high angles of torsion (over 40 degrees) with a stiff wire material, loss of linear torque expression sometimes occurred. Stainless steel has the largest torque expression, followed by TMA and then NiTi.

  20. Biocompatibility of nanoactuators: stem cell growth on laser-generated nickel-titanium shape memory alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcikowski, Stephan; Hahn, Anne; Guggenheim, Merlin; Reimers, Kerstin; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    Nanoactuators made from nanoparticulate NiTi shape memory alloy show potential in the mechanical stimulation of bone tissue formation from stem cells. We demonstrate the fabrication of Ni, Ti, and NiTi shape memory alloy nanoparticles and their biocompatibility to human adipose-derived stem cells. The stoichiometry and phase transformation property of the bulk alloy is preserved during attrition by femtosecond laser ablation in liquid, giving access to colloidal nanoactuators. No adverse effect on cell growth and attachment is observed in proliferation assay and environmental electron scanning microscopy, making this material attractive for mechanical stimulation of stem cells.

  1. Grinding as an approach to the production of high-strength, dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, N. W.; Quatinetz, M.; Weeton, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanical process produces dispersion-strengthened metal alloys. Power surface contamination during milling is removed by a cleaning method that involves heating thin shapes or partially-compacted milled powder blends in hydrogen to carefully controlled temperature schedules.

  2. The influence of alloying on the phase formation sequence of ultra-thin nickel silicide films and on the inheritance of texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, F. A.; Solano, E.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Lavoie, C.; Mocuta, C.; Detavernier, C.

    2018-05-01

    The controlled formation of silicide materials is an ongoing challenge to facilitate the electrical contact of Si-based transistors. Due to the ongoing miniaturisation of the transistor, the silicide is trending to ever-thinner thickness's. The corresponding increase in surface-to-volume ratio emphasises the importance of low-energetic interfaces. Intriguingly, the thickness reduction of nickel silicides results in an abrupt change in phase sequence. This paper investigates the sequence of the silicides phases and their preferential orientation with respect to the Si(001) substrate, for both "thin" (i.e., 9 nm) and "ultra-thin" (i.e., 3 nm) Ni films. Furthermore, as the addition of ternary elements is often considered in order to tailor the silicides' properties, additives of Al, Co, and Pt are also included in this study. Our results show that the first silicide formed is epitaxial θ-Ni2Si, regardless of initial thickness or alloyed composition. The transformations towards subsequent silicides are changed through the additive elements, which can be understood through solubility arguments and classical nucleation theory. The crystalline alignment of the formed silicides with the substrate significantly differs through alloying. The observed textures of sequential silicides could be linked through texture inheritance. Our study illustrates the nucleation of a new phase drive to reduce the interfacial energy at the silicide-substrate interface as well as at the interface with the silicide which is being consumed for these sub-10 nm thin films.

  3. The influence of heat treatment on properties of cold rolled alloyed steel and nickel superalloys sheets used in aircraft industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaba, K.; Dul, I.; Puchlerska, S.

    2017-02-01

    Superalloys based on nickel and selected steels are widely used in the aerospace industry, because of their excellent mechanical properties, heat resistance and creep resistance. Metal sheets of these materials are plastically deformed and applied, inter alia, to critical components of aircraft engines. Due to their chemical composition these materials are hardly deformable. There are various methods to improve the formability of these materials, including plastic deformation at an elevated or high temperature, or a suitable heat treatment before forming process. The paper presents results of the metal sheets testing after heat treatment. For the research, sheets of two types of nickel superalloys type Inconel and of three types of steel were chosen. The materials were subjected to multivariate heat treatment at different temperature range and time. After this step, mechanical properties were examined according to the metal sheet rolling direction. The results were compared and the optimal type of pre-trial softening heat treatment for each of the materials was determined.

  4. The Effect of Artificial Aging on The Bond Strength of Heat-activated Acrylic Resin to Surface-treated Nickel-chromium-beryllium Alloy.

    PubMed

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Zinelis, Spiros; Al Taweel, Sara M; Nagy, William W

    2016-01-01

    The debonding load of heat-activated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin material to a nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloy conditioned by three different surface treatments and utilizing two different commercial bonding systems was investigated. Denture resin (Lucitone-199) was bonded to Ni-Cr-Be alloy specimens treated with Metal Primer II, the Rocatec system with opaquer and the Rocatec system without opaquer. Denture base resin specimens bonded to non-treated sandblasted Ni-Cr-Be alloy were used as controls. Twenty samples for each treatment condition (80 specimens) were tested. The 80 specimens were divided into two categories, thermocycled and non-thermocycled, containing four groups of ten specimens each. The non-thermocycled specimens were tested after 48 hours' storage in room temperature water. The thermocycled specimens were tested after 2,000 cycles in 4°C and 55°C water baths. The debonding load was calculated in Newtons (N), and collected data were subjected by non parametric test Kruskal-Wallis One Way Analysis of Variance on Ranks and Dunn's post hoc test at the α = 0.05. The Metal Primer II and Rocatec system without opaquer groups produced significantly higher bond strengths (119.9 and 67.6 N), respectively, than did the sandblasted and Rocatec system with opaquer groups, where the bond strengths were 2.6 N and 0 N, respectively. The Metal Primer II was significantly different from all other groups (P<0.05). The bond strengths of all groups were significantly decreased (P<0.05) after thermocycling. Although thermocycling had a detrimental effect on the debonding load of all surface treatments tested, the Metal Primer II system provided higher values among all bonding systems tested, before and after thermocycling.

  5. Formation of Gradient Structures in the Zone of Joining a Deformable Nickel Alloy and a Single-Crystal Intermetallic Alloy during Thermodiffusion Pressure Welding and Subsequent Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarova, K. B.; Valitov, V. A.; Drozdov, A. A.; Bazyleva, O. A.; Galieva, E. V.; Arginbaeva, E. G.

    2018-01-01

    The possibility of formation of a high-quality solid-phase joint of an Ni3Al-based single-crystal intermetallic VKNA-25 blade alloy with a high-temperature deformable EP975 disk alloy by pressure welding is studied to create high-performance one-piece blisk unit for the next-generation aviation gas turbine engines and to decrease the unit mass. The influence of the conditions of thermodiffusion pressure welding under the hightemperature superplasticity of the disk alloy and the influence of heat treatment of welded joints on the gradient structures in the welded joint zone and the structure at the periphery of the welded samples are investigated.

  6. Comparative analysis of the fit of 3-unit implant-supported frameworks cast in nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys and commercially pure titanium after casting, laser welding, and simulated porcelain firings.

    PubMed

    Tiossi, Rodrigo; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the vertical misfit of 3-unit implant-supported nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy and commercially pure titanium (cpTi) frameworks after casting as 1 piece, after sectioning and laser welding, and after simulated porcelain firings. The results on the tightened side showed no statistically significant differences. On the opposite side, statistically significant differences were found for Co-Cr alloy (118.64 microm [SD: 91.48] to 39.90 microm [SD: 27.13]) and cpTi (118.56 microm [51.35] to 27.87 microm [12.71]) when comparing 1-piece to laser-welded frameworks. With both sides tightened, only Co-Cr alloy showed statistically significant differences after laser welding. Ni-Cr alloy showed the lowest misfit values, though the differences were not statistically significantly different. Simulated porcelain firings revealed no significant differences.

  7. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  8. Nickel extraction from nickel matte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subagja, R.

    2018-01-01

    In present work, the results of research activities to make nickel metal from nickel matte are presented. The research activities were covering a) nickel matte characterization using Inductively Couple plasma (ICP), Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), b) nickel matte dissolution process to dissolve nickel from nickel matte into the spent electrolyte solutions that contains hydrochloric acid, c) purification of nickel chloride leach solution by copper cementation process to remove copper using nickel matte, selective precipitation process to remove iron, solvent extraction using Tri normal octyl amine to separate cobalt from nickel chloride solutions and d) Nickel electro winning process to precipitate nickel into the cathode surface from purified nickel chloride solution by using direct current. The research activities created 99, 72 % pure nickel metal as the final product of the process.

  9. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  10. Development of high-emittance scales on thoriated nickel-chromium-aluminum-base alloys. [produced by high temperature oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, I. G.; Wilcox, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    The surface regions of a DSNiCrAl alloy have been doped, by a pack diffusion process, with small amounts of Mn, Fe, or Co, and the effect of these dopants on the total normal emissivity of the scales produced by subsequent high temperature oxidation has been measured. While all three elements lead to a modest increase in emissivity, (up to 23% greater than the undoped alloy) only the change caused by manganese is thermally stable. However, this increased emissivity is within 85 percent of that of TDNiCr oxidized to form a chromia scale. The maganese-doped alloy is some 50 percent weaker than undoped DSNiCrAl after the doping treatment, and approximately 30 percent weaker after oxidation.

  11. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking and selective internal oxidation of nickel-chromium-iron alloys in hydrogenated steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, Brent M.

    2005-07-01

    Selective internal oxidation (SIO) is a mechanism of grain boundary embrittlement through the formation of intergranular oxides of Cr2O3. SIO is proposed as a mechanism to explain intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Ni-base alloys in pressurized water reactor environments. The purpose of this work is to investigate SIO through a series of experiments using controlled-purity alloys in a controlled, low-pressure steam environment in which the oxygen potential is varied. Five alloys; Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, LCr (Ni-5Cr-9Fe), CD85 (Ni-16Cr-9Fe) and HCr (Ni-30Cr-9Fe), were used in corrosion coupon exposure tests and constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests at 550°C and 400°C in an environment consisting of a controlled mixture of hydrogen, water vapor and argon. The hydrogen-to-water vapor partial pressure ratio (PPR) was varied between 0.001 and 0.9 to control the oxygen partial pressure. The Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr and LCr alloys formed a uniform Ni(OH)2 film at PPR values less than 0.09 while CD85 and HCr formed Cr2O 3 oxide films over the entire PPR range. Corrosion coupon results also show the formation of highly localized oxide particles at grain boundaries. Focused ion beam analysis revealed that intergranular oxides were observed at significant depths (>150 nm) down grain boundaries and the oxide morphology depended on the alloy composition and PPR value. Diffusion of oxygen along the grain boundary accounted for the growth of intergranular oxides. CERT test results showed that intergranular cracking was caused by creep-induced microvoid coalescence only at 550°C and did not depend on PPR. At 400°C, the cracking behavior depended on the PPR and resulted in a mixture of creep-induced microvoid coalescence and brittle intergranular failure. The cracked boundary fraction was higher at a PPR value where a Ni(OH)2 surface film formed. Alloy composition influenced cracking and the cracked boundary fraction decreased as the alloy chromium content increased. The

  12. Application of powder metallurgy to an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy, NASA-TRW 6-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ashbrook, R. L.; Waters, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Bar stock of the NASA-TRW 6-A alloy was made by prealloyed powder techniques and its properties evaluated over a range of temperatures. Room temperature ultimate tensile strength was 1894 MN/sq m (274 500 psi). The as-extruded powder product showed substantial improvements in strength over the cast alloy up to 649 C (1200 F) and superplasticity at 1093 C (2000 F). Both conventional and autoclave heat treatments were applied to the extruded powder product. The conventional heat treatment was effective in increasing rupture life at 649 and 704 C (1200 and 1300 F); the autoclave heat treatment, at 760 and 816 C (1400 and 1500 F).

  13. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers from melamine over nickel alloy in a closed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenzhin, Roman M.; Bauman, Yuri I.; Volodin, Alexander M.; Mishakov, Ilya V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach to the synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers in a closed system at elevated pressure with the use of bulk Ni-Cr alloy as a catalyst precursor was proposed. Melamine was chosen as a substrate containing both carbon and nitrogen. Method of ferromagnetic resonance was applied for diagnostics of dispersed Ni particles appearance. The process of corrosion of a bulk alloy followed by formation of dispersed Ni particles catalyzing the growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers was found to take place at temperatures above 560 °C. The final content of nitrogen in obtained carbon nanofibers was about 10 at.%.

  14. Electroformed Nickel-Graphite Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong-Skiba, Pei

    2005-01-01

    Future x-ray astronomy will demand larger optics than Chandra, currently in orbit. Ways must be devised to produce cheaper and lighter x-ray mirrors to save the cost of manufacturing and launching this future telescope. One technique, being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center and elsewhere, is electroformed nickel replication technique, wherein mirror shells are electroformed (using pure nickel or a nickel alloy) onto super-polished and figured aluminum mandrels and are subsequently released by cooling. This technique can produce relatively inexpensive mirrors, but is hampered by the high density of nickel (8.9 g / cm3). An alternative is to develop a composite, with lower mass density and compatible mechanical properties to the nickel cobalt alloy, as the mirror shell material.

  15. A probabilistic-based approach to monitoring tool wear state and assessing its effect on workpiece quality in nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan Niaki, Farbod

    The objective of this research is first to investigate the applicability and advantage of statistical state estimation methods for predicting tool wear in machining nickel-based superalloys over deterministic methods, and second to study the effects of cutting tool wear on the quality of the part. Nickel-based superalloys are among those classes of materials that are known as hard-to-machine alloys. These materials exhibit a unique combination of maintaining their strength at high temperature and have high resistance to corrosion and creep. These unique characteristics make them an ideal candidate for harsh environments like combustion chambers of gas turbines. However, the same characteristics that make nickel-based alloys suitable for aggressive conditions introduce difficulties when machining them. High strength and low thermal conductivity accelerate the cutting tool wear and increase the possibility of the in-process tool breakage. A blunt tool nominally deteriorates the surface integrity and damages quality of the machined part by inducing high tensile residual stresses, generating micro-cracks, altering the microstructure or leaving a poor roughness profile behind. As a consequence in this case, the expensive superalloy would have to be scrapped. The current dominant solution for industry is to sacrifice the productivity rate by replacing the tool in the early stages of its life or to choose conservative cutting conditions in order to lower the wear rate and preserve workpiece quality. Thus, monitoring the state of the cutting tool and estimating its effects on part quality is a critical task for increasing productivity and profitability in machining superalloys. This work aims to first introduce a probabilistic-based framework for estimating tool wear in milling and turning of superalloys and second to study the detrimental effects of functional state of the cutting tool in terms of wear and wear rate on part quality. In the milling operation, the

  16. Molybdenum carbide supported nickel-molybdenum alloys for synthesis gas production via partial oxidation of surrogate biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shreya; Marin-Flores, Oscar G.; Norton, M. Grant; Ha, Su

    2015-10-01

    In this study, NiMo alloys supported on Mo2C are synthesized by wet impregnation for partial oxidation of methyl oleate, a surrogate biodiesel, to produce syngas. When compared to single phase Mo2C, the H2 yield increases from 70% up to >95% at the carbon conversion of ∼100% for NiMo alloy nanoparticles that are dispersed over the Mo2C surface. Supported NiMo alloy samples are prepared at two different calcination temperatures in order to determine its effect on particle dispersion, crystalline phase and catalytic properties. The reforming test data indicate that catalyst prepared at lower calcination temperature shows better nanoparticle dispersion over the Mo2C surface, which leads to higher initial performance when compared to catalysts synthesized at higher calcination temperature. Activity tests using the supported NiMo alloy on Mo2C that are calcined at the lower temperature of 400 °C shows 100% carbon conversion with 90% H2 yield without deactivation due to coking over 24 h time-on-stream.

  17. Zirconium alloys with small amounts of iron and copper or nickel show improved corrosion resistance in superheated steam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Youngdahl, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Heat treating various compositions of zirconium alloys improve their corrosion resistance to superheated steam at temperatures higher than 500 degrees C. This increases their potential as fuel cladding for superheated-steam nuclear-fueled reactors as well as in autoclaves operating at modest pressures.

  18. Nickel-Based Superalloy Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Chen, PoShou

    2008-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy that resists embrittlement by hydrogen more strongly than does nickel alloy 718 has been developed. Nickel alloy 718 is the most widely used superalloy. It has excellent strength and resistance to corrosion as well as acceptably high ductility, and is recognized as the best alloy for many high-temperature applications. However, nickel alloy 718 is susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and to delayed failure and reduced tensile properties in gaseous hydrogen. The greater resistance of the present nickel-based superalloy to adverse effects of hydrogen makes this alloy a superior alternative to nickel alloy 718 for applications that involve production, transfer, and storage of hydrogen, thereby potentially contributing to the commercial viability of hydrogen as a clean-burning fuel. The table shows the composition of the present improved nickel-based superalloy in comparison with that of nickel alloy 718. This composition was chosen to obtain high resistance to embrittlement by hydrogen while maintaining high strength and exceptional resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The most novel property of this alloy is that it resists embrittlement by hydrogen while retaining tensile strength greater than 175 kpsi (greater than 1.2 GPa). This alloy exhibits a tensile elongation of more than 20 percent in hydrogen at a pressure of 5 kpsi (approximately equal to 34 MPa) without loss of ductility. This amount of elongation corresponds to 50 percent more ductility than that exhibited by nickel alloy 718 under the same test conditions.

  19. Peculiar features of boron distribution in high temperature fracture area of rapidly quenched heat-resistant nickel alloy

    SciT

    Shulga, A. V., E-mail: avshulga@mephi.ru

    This article comprises the results of comprehensive study of the structure and distribution in the high temperature fracture area of rapidly quenched heat-resistant superalloy of grade EP741NP after tensile tests. The structure and boron distribution in the fracture area are studied in detail by means of direct track autoradiography in combination with metallography of macro- and microstructure. A rather extensive region of microcracks generation and intensive boron redistribution is detected in the high temperature fracture area of rapidly quenched nickel superalloy of grade EP741NP. A significant decrease in boron content in the fracture area and formation of elliptically arranged boridemore » precipitates are revealed. The mechanism of intense boron migration and stability violation of the structural and phase state in the fracture area of rapidly quenched heat-resistant nickel superalloy of grade EP741NP is proposed on the basis of accounting for deformation occurring in the fracture area and analysis of the stressed state near a crack.« less

  20. Asymmetrical distalization of maxillary molars with zygomatic anchorage, improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wires, and open-coil springs.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takayoshi; Yoon, Hyung Sik; Ono, Takashi

    2013-10-01

    In nongrowing patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion, premolar extraction or maxillary distalization can be used as camouflage treatment. Zygomatic anchorage enables distalization in uncooperative or noncompliant patients. We describe 1 such procedure in a 24-year-old woman. We used novel improved superelastic nickel-titanium archwires combined with nickel-titanium open-coil springs to provide a constant and continuous low force to the dentition. We were able to successfully eliminate the protrusive profile and correct the Class II molar relationship using this system of zygomatic anchorage. The posterior occlusal relationships were improved to achieve Class I canine and molar relationships on both sides, and ideal overbite and overjet relationships were established. Facial esthetics was improved with decreased protrusion of the upper and lower lips. The method used here is a promising alternative to traditional distalization techniques and might offer an effective and simple means of distalizing maxillary molars in uncooperative patients. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Alloying-assisted phonon engineering of layered BiInSe3@nickel foam for efficient solar-enabled water evaporation.

    PubMed

    Yao, J D; Zheng, Z Q; Yang, G W

    2017-11-02

    The fresh water crisis has emerged as one of the most urgent bottlenecks hindering the rapid development of modern industry and society. Solar energy-driven water evaporation represents a potential green and sustainable solution to address this issue. Herein, for the first time, centimeter-scale BiInSe 3 -coated nickel foam (BiInSe 3 @NF) as an efficient solar-enabled evaporator was successfully achieved and exploited for solar energy-driven water evaporation. Benefitting from multiple scattering-induced light trapping of the rough substrate, strong light-matter interaction and intermediate band (IB)-induced efficient phonon emission of BiInSe 3 , the BiInSe 3 @NF device achieved a high evaporation rate of 0.83 kg m -2 h -1 under 1 sun irradiation, which is 2.5 times that of pure water. These figures-of-merit are superior to recently reported state-of-the-art photothermal conversion materials, such as black titania, plasmonic assembly and carbon black. In addition, superior stability over a period of 60 days was demonstrated. In summary, the current contribution depicts a facile scenario for design, production and application of an economical and efficient solar-enabled BiInSe 3 @NF evaporator. More importantly, the phonon engineering strategy based on alloying induced IB states can be readily applied to other analogous van der Waals materials and a series of superior vdWM alloys toward photothermal applications can be expected in the near future.

  2. A comparative evaluation of bond strength of feldspathic porcelain to nickel-chromium alloy, when subjected to various surface treatments: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kavan A.; Mathur, Somil; Upadhyay, Snehal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The purpose was to evaluate the effect of various surface treatments and sandblasting with different particle size on the bond strength of feldspathic porcelain with predominantly base metal alloys, using a universal testing machine. Materials and Methods: Totally, 40 specimen of nickel-chromium alloy were prepared in an induction casting machine. The groups divided were as follows: Group I-sandblasted with 50 μ Al2O3, Group II-sandblasted with 110 μ Al2O3, Group III-sandblasted with 250 μ Al2O3 and Group IV-sandblasted with 250 μ Al2O3, followed by oxidation and again sandblasted with 250 μ Al2O3. The dimensions of each specimen were adjusted so as to maintain the thickness of ceramic at 1 mm. The specimen were loaded on the assembly of the universal testing machine, and a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min was used to apply a compressive force at the junction of metal and feldspathic porcelain. The force application continued until adhesive fracture occurred, and the readings of the load applied to that particular specimen were recorded. Results: The means for shear bond strength for Group I, II, III and IV were found to be (226.92 ± 1.67), (233.16 ± 3.85), (337.81 ± 16.97) and (237.08 ± 4.33), respectively. Means of shear bond strength among the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance test. Comparison between individual groups were made with Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference post-hoc test. Conclusion: Different particle size and surface treatment have an important role on the bond strength of ceramic-metal interface. Greater particle size demonstrated higher bond strength. PMID:26929487

  3. The role of grain boundary chemistry and structure in the environmentally-assisted intergranular cracking of nickel-base alloys

    SciT

    Was, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests in constant extension rate tensile (CERT) and constant load tensile (CLT) tests were conducted on Ni-xCr- 9Fe-yC in Ar, water, and a LiOH-boric acid solution. Cr and C improve the resistance of Ni-base alloys to IG cracking in both Ar and water at 360C. Since creep plays a role in IG cracking, one possible explanation for the role of the environment involves its effect on the creep. Experiments were conducted on the role of C in the deformation behavior and failure mode of Ni-16Cr-9Fe. Constant load experiments were conducted on Ni-16Cr-9Fe to determine if the CLTmore » test is more aggressive than CERT. The electron backscattering technique in a SEM is being developed in order to extend the IG cracking studies to grain sizes typical of commercial alloys, 20-30 microns.« less

  4. The roles of auxeticity and volume fraction on γ‧ precipitate microstructures in nickel-base alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardell, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    New correlations are found between the elastic constants and late-stage precipitate microstructures in Ni-Al, Ni-Ga, Ni-Ge and Ni-Si alloys. The auxetic behaviour of Poisson's ratio, ν, measured parallel to [0 0 1] or ? in response to [1 1 0] loading, favours the amalgamation of Ni3Al and Ni3Ga precipitates into non-equilibrium shapes along cube directions when δν = (νγ‧ - νγ)/νγ‧ > 0, the superscripts referring to the γ‧ (Ni3X) and γ (Ni-X) phases, respectively. When δν < 0 amalgamation of Ni3Ge and Ni3Si precipitates does not occur and the particles retain cuboidal shapes. When δν > 0 amalgamation of Ni3Al and Ni3Ga occurs readily, primarily producing laths of both phases. The γ‧ volume fraction, f, is also shown to play a role in the late-stage microstructures of Ni-Al alloys, with an increasing tendency to form Ni3Al laths, rather than plates, as f increases. The shapes of elastically soft γ precipitates in inverse Ni-Al and Ni-Ge alloys are different; Ni-Al precipitates are lath shaped, but Ni-Ge precipitates are plate shaped. The Ni-Ge plate shape, in a non-auxetic Ni3Ge matrix (Ni3Ge being the sole non-auxetic Ni3X phase of the four studied), is the only example of persistent plates in any of the Ni-base alloys investigated to date. The combination of an elastically soft precipitate (Ni-Ge) in a non-auxetic matrix suggests a connection between auxeticity and shape.

  5. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  6. Characterization of corrosion products of AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloys for nickel-metal hydride batteries

    SciT

    Maurel, F.; Knosp, B.; Backhaus-Ricoult, M.

    2000-01-01

    To better understand the decrease in storage capacity of AB{sub 5}-type alloys in rechargeable Ni/MH batteries undergoing repeated charge/discharge cycles, the corrosion of a MnNi{sub 3.55}Co{sub 0.75}Mn{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3} alloy in aqueous KOH electrolyte was studied. The crystal structure, chemical composition, and distribution of corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Hollow and filed needles of a mixed rare earth hydroxide Mn(OH){sub 3} were found to cover a continuous nanocrystalline corrosion scale composed of metal (Ni, Co) solid solution, oxide (Ni,Co)O solid solution and rare earth hydroxide, and a Mn-depleted alloy subscale. Corrosionmore » kinetics were measured for three different temperatures. Growth kinetics of the continuous corrosion scale and of the Mm(OH){sub 3} needles obeyed linear and parabolic rate laws, respectively. Models for the corrosion mechanism were developed on the basis of diffusional transport of Mn and OH through the hydroxide needles and subsequent diffusion along grain boundaries through the nanocrystalline scale.« less

  7. Controlling the formation and stability of ultra-thin nickel silicides - An alloying strategy for preventing agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, F. A.; van Stiphout, K.; Nanakoudis, A.; Bals, S.; Vantomme, A.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Lavoie, C.; Detavernier, C.

    2018-02-01

    The electrical contact of the source and drain regions in state-of-the-art CMOS transistors is nowadays facilitated through NiSi, which is often alloyed with Pt in order to avoid morphological agglomeration of the silicide film. However, the solid-state reaction between as-deposited Ni and the Si substrate exhibits a peculiar change for as-deposited Ni films thinner than a critical thickness of tc = 5 nm. Whereas thicker films form polycrystalline NiSi upon annealing above 450 ° C , thinner films form epitaxial NiSi2 films that exhibit a high resistance toward agglomeration. For industrial applications, it is therefore of utmost importance to assess the critical thickness with high certainty and find novel methodologies to either increase or decrease its value, depending on the aimed silicide formation. This paper investigates Ni films between 0 and 15 nm initial thickness by use of "thickness gradients," which provide semi-continuous information on silicide formation and stability as a function of as-deposited layer thickness. The alloying of these Ni layers with 10% Al, Co, Ge, Pd, or Pt renders a significant change in the phase sequence as a function of thickness and dependent on the alloying element. The addition of these ternary impurities therefore changes the critical thickness tc. The results are discussed in the framework of classical nucleation theory.

  8. Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 718 Powders onto AISI 4140 Alloy Steel Substrates: Interface Bond and Fracture Failure Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoyeol; Cong, Weilong; Zhang, Hong-Chao; Liu, Zhichao

    2017-03-25

    As a prospective candidate material for surface coating and repair applications, nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN718) was deposited on American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 4140 alloy steel substrate by laser engineered net shaping (LENS) to investigate the compatibility between two dissimilar materials with a focus on interface bonding and fracture behavior of the hybrid specimens. The results show that the interface between the two dissimilar materials exhibits good metallurgical bonding. Through the tensile test, all the fractures occurred in the as-deposited IN718 section rather than the interface or the substrate, implying that the as-deposited interlayer bond strength is weaker than the interfacial bond strength. From the fractography using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS), three major factors affecting the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part are (i) metallurgical defects such as incompletely melted powder particles, lack-of-fusion porosity, and micropores; (ii) elemental segregation and Laves phase, and (iii) oxide formation. The fracture failure mechanism is a combination of all these factors which are detrimental to the mechanical properties and structural integrity by causing premature fracture failure of the as-deposited IN718.

  9. Friction and wear of oxide-ceramic sliding against IN-718 nickel base alloy at 25 to 800 C in atmospheric air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    The friction and wear of oxide-ceramics sliding against the nickel base alloy IN-718 at 25 to 800 C were measured. The oxide materials tested were mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2); lithium aluminum silicate (LiAlSi(x)O(y)); polycrystalline monolithic alpha alumina (alpha-Al2O3); single crystal alpha-Al2O3 (sapphire); zirconia (ZrO2); and silicon carbide (SiC) whisker-reinforced Al2O3 composites. At 25 C the mullite and zirconia had the lowest friction and the polycrystalline monolithic alumina had the lowest wear. At 800 C the Al2O3-8 vol/percent SiC whisker composite had the lowest friction and the Al2O3-25 vol/percent SiC composite had the lowest wear. The friction of the Al2O3-SiC whisker composites increased with increased whisker content while the wear decreased. In general, the wear-resistance of the ceramics improve with their hardness.

  10. Durability of De-Alloyed Platinum-Nickel Cathode Catalyst in Low Platinum Loading Membrane-Electrode Assemblies Subjected to Accelerated Stress Tests

    SciT

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Peng, J. -K.

    Here, the durability of de-alloyed platinum-nickel catalysts supported on high-surface area carbon (d-PtNi/C) in optimized electrodes and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) under an accelerated stress test (AST) protocol is investigated with the objective of developing a quantitative understanding of the degradation mechanisms and their relationship to the electrode structure, pre-conditioning, and operating conditions. It is found that the cell degradation can be mitigated by controlling the voltage cycle, acid washing the MEA to remove Ni contaminants that enter the electrode and membrane during fabrication, and monitoring the operating conditions. For example, the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss is <25% aftermore » 30,000 triangle cycles with 0.925 V upper potential limit if the MEA is acid washed and extensive diagnostics are avoided. The parameters that exacerbate the cell degradation also accelerate the rate at which Ni leaches out from the catalyst. A mechanistic model is presented for the degradation in performance of d-PtNi/C electrodes. The model correlates a) the degradation in ORR mass and specific activities with ECSA and Ni losses, b) the decrease in limiting current density ( iL), which is inversely proportional to the O 2 mass transport resistance, with the degradation in catalyst roughness factor, and c) the increase in mass transfer overpotentials with the reduced current density, i/iL .« less

  11. Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 718 Powders onto AISI 4140 Alloy Steel Substrates: Interface Bond and Fracture Failure Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoyeol; Cong, Weilong; Zhang, Hong-Chao; Liu, Zhichao

    2017-01-01

    As a prospective candidate material for surface coating and repair applications, nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN718) was deposited on American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 4140 alloy steel substrate by laser engineered net shaping (LENS) to investigate the compatibility between two dissimilar materials with a focus on interface bonding and fracture behavior of the hybrid specimens. The results show that the interface between the two dissimilar materials exhibits good metallurgical bonding. Through the tensile test, all the fractures occurred in the as-deposited IN718 section rather than the interface or the substrate, implying that the as-deposited interlayer bond strength is weaker than the interfacial bond strength. From the fractography using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS), three major factors affecting the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part are (i) metallurgical defects such as incompletely melted powder particles, lack-of-fusion porosity, and micropores; (ii) elemental segregation and Laves phase, and (iii) oxide formation. The fracture failure mechanism is a combination of all these factors which are detrimental to the mechanical properties and structural integrity by causing premature fracture failure of the as-deposited IN718. PMID:28772702

  12. The Effects of Fiber Orientation and Adhesives on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite with Embedded Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan C.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Kannan, Manigandan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) sections were embedded within carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (CFRPPMC) laminates and their tensile properties were evaluated with simultaneous monitoring of modal acoustic emissions. The test specimens were fabricated in three different layup configurations and two different thin film adhesives were applied to bond the SMA with the PMC. A trio of acoustic sensors were attached to the specimens during tensile testing to monitor the modal acoustic emission (AE) as the materials experienced mechanical failure. The values of ultimate tensile strengths, strains, and moduli were obtained. Cumulative AE energy of events and specimen failure location were determined. In conjunction, optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the break areas of the specimens. The analysis of AE data revealed failure locations within the specimens which were validated from the microscopic images. The placement of 90 deg plies in the outer ply gave the strongest acoustic signals during break as well as the cleanest break of the samples tested. Overlapping 0 deg ply layers surrounding the SMA was found to be the best scenario to prevent failure of the specimen itself.

  13. In vitro biocompatibility assessment of a nickel-titanium alloy using electron microscopy in situ end-labeling (EM-ISEL).

    PubMed

    Assad, M; Yahia, L H; Rivard, C H; Lemieux, N

    1998-07-01

    Shape memory nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys are potential candidates for biomedical applications. However, their equiatomic composition (50 wt% Ni) is controversial, and concerns have been raised about their biocompatibility level because of the carcinogenicity potential. The relative in vitro genotoxicity of NiTi therefore was evaluated and compared to commercially pure titanium (cpTi), 316L stainless steel (SS 316L), and positive and negative controls. To do so, human peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured in semiphysiological medium that previously had been exposed to the biomaterials. The electron microscopy in situ end-labeling (EM-ISEL) assay then was performed in order to provide quantification of in vitro chromatin DNA single-stranded breaks (SSBs). Chromosomes and nuclei were harvested and exposed to exonuclease III, which amplifies DNA lesions at 3' ends of breaks. After random priming, incorporation of biotin-dUTP was labeled by immunogold binding, which then was detected using electron microscopy. Cellular chromatin exposed to the positive control demonstrated a significantly stronger immunogold labeling than when it was exposed to NiTi, cpTi, SS 316L extracts, or the untreated control. Moreover, gold particle counts, whether in the presence of NiTi, cpTi, or the negative control medium, were not statistically different. NiTi genocompatibility therefore presents promising prescreening results towards its biocompatibility approval.

  14. Experimental Identification and Simulation of Time and/or Rate Dependent Reversible and Irreversible Deformation Regions for both a Titanium and Nickel Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Sellers, Cory

    2013-01-01

    In this paper time and/or rate dependent deformation regions are experimentally mapped out as a function of temperature. It is clearly demonstrated that the concept of a threshold stress (a stress that delineate reversible and irreversible behavior) is valid and necessary at elevated temperatures and corresponds to the classical yield stress at lower temperatures. Also the infinitely slow modulus, (Es) i.e. the elastic modulus of the material if it was loaded at an infinitely slow strain rate, and the "dynamic modulus", modulus, Ed, which represents the modulus of the material if it is loaded at an infinitely fast rate are used to delineate rate dependent from rate independent regions. As demonstrated at elevated temperatures there is a significant difference between the two modulus values, thus indicating both significant time-dependence and rate dependence. In the case of the nickel-based super alloy, ME3, this behavior is also shown to be grain size specific. Consequently, at higher temperatures viscoelastic behavior exist below k (i.e., the threshold stress) and at stresses above k the behavior is viscoplastic. Finally a multi-mechanism, stress partitioned viscoelastic model, capable of being consistently coupled to a viscoplastic model is characterized over the full temperature range investigated for Ti-6-4 and ME3.

  15. Durability of De-Alloyed Platinum-Nickel Cathode Catalyst in Low Platinum Loading Membrane-Electrode Assemblies Subjected to Accelerated Stress Tests

    DOE PAGES

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Peng, J. -K.; ...

    2018-04-25

    Here, the durability of de-alloyed platinum-nickel catalysts supported on high-surface area carbon (d-PtNi/C) in optimized electrodes and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) under an accelerated stress test (AST) protocol is investigated with the objective of developing a quantitative understanding of the degradation mechanisms and their relationship to the electrode structure, pre-conditioning, and operating conditions. It is found that the cell degradation can be mitigated by controlling the voltage cycle, acid washing the MEA to remove Ni contaminants that enter the electrode and membrane during fabrication, and monitoring the operating conditions. For example, the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss is <25% aftermore » 30,000 triangle cycles with 0.925 V upper potential limit if the MEA is acid washed and extensive diagnostics are avoided. The parameters that exacerbate the cell degradation also accelerate the rate at which Ni leaches out from the catalyst. A mechanistic model is presented for the degradation in performance of d-PtNi/C electrodes. The model correlates a) the degradation in ORR mass and specific activities with ECSA and Ni losses, b) the decrease in limiting current density ( iL), which is inversely proportional to the O 2 mass transport resistance, with the degradation in catalyst roughness factor, and c) the increase in mass transfer overpotentials with the reduced current density, i/iL .« less

  16. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  17. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  18. Multifilament Superconducting Wire Based on NbTi Alloy in a Combined Copper/Copper-Nickel Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, G. P.; Shikov, A. K.; Potanina, L. V.; Gubkin, I. N.; Scherbakova, O. V.; Salunin, N. I.; Korpusov, V. U.; Novikov, S. I.; Novikov, M. S.

    2004-06-01

    Model fine filament superconducting 0.65 mm wire based on NbTi alloy, intended for operating in fields having sweep rate from 1 up to 4 T/s, has been developed and manufactured by Bochvar Institute (VNIINM). The wire was fabricated by a single stacking method. Each filament was surrounded by a matrix of commercial MN-5 alloy (Cu-5wt.%Ni). The effects of heat treatment regimes, and twist pitches within the range of 3.5 - 8 mm on Jc of the strand were investigated at fields of 2-8 T. The critical current density is more than 2700 A/mm2 at 5 T, 4.2 K. The magnetization of wire has been measured by a vibrating magnetometer at field amplitude up to ± 3 T. Hysteresis losses and effective diameter were calculated. Total and coupling losses have been determined by Fitz method on strand magnetization at fields, varying in trapezoidal mode. It was shown that the wire of this type is of potential application for the use in the magnets of the GSI-type accelerator to be constructed in Germany.

  19. The effect of alloying nickel with iron on the supersonic ballistic stage of high energy displacement cascades

    SciT

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    Previous experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the production of extended defect structures by collision cascades is inhibited in equiatomic NiFe, in comparison to pure Ni. It is also known that the production of such extend defect structures results from the formation of subcascades by high-energy recoils and their subsequent interaction. A detailed analysis of the ballistics of 40 keV cascades in Ni and NiFe is performed to identify the formation of such subcascades and to assess their spatial distribution. It is found that subcascades in Ni and NiFe are created with nearly identical energies and distributed similarly in space.more » This suggests that the differences in production of extended defect structures is not related to processes taking place in the ballistic phase of the collision cascade. Lastly, these results can be generalized to other, more chemically complex, concentrated alloys where the elements have similar atomic numbers, such as many high-entropy alloys.« less

  20. The effect of alloying nickel with iron on the supersonic ballistic stage of high energy displacement cascades

    DOE PAGES

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-23

    Previous experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the production of extended defect structures by collision cascades is inhibited in equiatomic NiFe, in comparison to pure Ni. It is also known that the production of such extend defect structures results from the formation of subcascades by high-energy recoils and their subsequent interaction. A detailed analysis of the ballistics of 40 keV cascades in Ni and NiFe is performed to identify the formation of such subcascades and to assess their spatial distribution. It is found that subcascades in Ni and NiFe are created with nearly identical energies and distributed similarly in space.more » This suggests that the differences in production of extended defect structures is not related to processes taking place in the ballistic phase of the collision cascade. Lastly, these results can be generalized to other, more chemically complex, concentrated alloys where the elements have similar atomic numbers, such as many high-entropy alloys.« less

  1. Nickel recovery from electronic waste II electrodeposition of Ni and Ni-Fe alloys from diluted sulfate solutions.

    PubMed

    Robotin, B; Ispas, A; Coman, V; Bund, A; Ilea, P

    2013-11-01

    This study focuses on the electrodeposition of Ni and Ni-Fe alloys from synthetic solutions similar to those obtained by the dissolution of electron gun (an electrical component of cathode ray tubes) waste. The influence of various parameters (pH, electrolyte composition, Ni(2+)/Fe(2+) ratio, current density) on the electrodeposition process was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRFA) were used to provide information about the obtained deposits' thickness, morphology, and elemental composition. By controlling the experimental parameters, the composition of the Ni-Fe alloys can be tailored towards specific applications. Complementarily, the differences in the nucleation mechanisms for Ni, Fe and Ni-Fe deposition from sulfate solutions have been evaluated and discussed using cyclic voltammetry and potential step chronoamperometry. The obtained results suggest a progressive nucleation mechanism for Ni, while for Fe and Ni-Fe, the obtained data points are best fitted to an instantaneous nucleation model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dephosphorization of complexly alloyed nickel melts under vacuum induction melting conditions: II. Experimental results and their interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtsev, V. T.; Anuchkin, S. N.; Sidorov, V. V.; Rigin, V. E.

    2013-05-01

    The activities of the components of BaO-BaF2-BaCl2-NiO and CaO-CaF2-CaCl2-NiO slags systems, which were considered as a phase having a collective electron system, are calculated, and it is shown that the barium, calcium, and oxygen activities at 1600°C are maximal in the BaO- and CaO-based systems depending on the main oxide content. The dephosphorization of three types of nickel-based melts by slags of 14 compositions in crucibles made of Al2O3, MgO, and MgO-Al2O3 (80-20 wt %) is experimentally studied, and the degree of dephosphorization is shown to depend on the phosphorus content in a metal, the slag composition, and the crucible material (degree of dephosphorization is maximal in Al2O3 crucibles). The forming slag is assimilated by Al2O3 and MgO-Al2O3 ceramics with a porosity of about 30%. If 4-10 wt % NiO are present in a slag, the wettability of the Al2O3 ceramic is significantly higher than that of the MgO-based ceramic.

  3. Zinc-oxide nanocoating for improvement of the antibacterial and frictional behavior of nickel-titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Kachoei, Mojgan; Nourian, Azin; Divband, Baharak; Kachoei, Zahra; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2016-10-01

    To fabricate a friction-reducing and antibacterial coating with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles on nickel-titanium (NiTi) wire. NiTi orthodontic wires were coated with ZnO nanoparticles using the chemical deposition method. Characteristics of the coating as well as the physical, mechanical and antibacterial properties of the wires were investigated. A stable and well-adhered ZnO coating on the NiTi wires was obtained. The hardness and elastic modulus of the ZnO nanocoating were 2.3 ± 0.2 and 61.0 ± 3.6 GPa, respectively. The coated wires presented up to 21% reduction in the frictional forces and antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans. ZnO nanocoating significantly improved the surface quality of NiTi wires. The modulus of elasticity, unloading forces and austenite finish temperature were not significantly different after coating. This unique coating could be implemented into practice for safer and faster treatment to the benefit of both patient and clinician.

  4. A multiple linear regression analysis of hot corrosion attack on a series of nickel base turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine an equation for estimating hot corrosion attack for a series of Ni base cast turbine alloys. The U transform (i.e., 1/sin (% A/100) to the 1/2) was shown to give the best estimate of the dependent variable, y. A complete second degree equation is described for the centered" weight chemistries for the elements Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, W, Cb, Ta, and Co. In addition linear terms for the minor elements C, B, and Zr were added for a basic 47 term equation. The best reduced equation was determined by the stepwise selection method with essentially 13 terms. The Cr term was found to be the most important accounting for 60 percent of the explained variability hot corrosion attack.

  5. Assessment of Fatigue Resistance of Aluminide Layers on MAR 247 Nickel Super Alloy with Full-Field Optical Strain Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, D.; Brynk, T.; Pakieła, Z.

    2017-08-01

    This work presents the results of fatigue tests of MAR 247 alloy flat specimens with aluminides layers of 20 or 40 µm thickness obtained in CVD process. Fatigue test was conducted at amplitude equal to half of maximum load and ranging between 300 and 650 MPa (stress asymmetry ratio R = 0, frequency f = 20 Hz). Additionally, 4 of the tests, characterized by the highest amplitude, were accompanied with non-contact strain field measurements by means of electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital image correlation. Results of these measurements allowed to localize the areas of deformation concentration identified as the damage points of the surface layer or advanced crack presence in core material. Identification and observation of the development of deformation in localization areas allowed to assess fatigue-related phenomena in both layer and substrate materials.

  6. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  7. Metallurgical characterization of M-Wire nickel-titanium shape memory alloy used for endodontic rotary instruments during low-cycle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jia; Gao, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Rotary instruments made of a new nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy (M-Wire) have shown improved cyclic fatigue resistance and mechanical properties compared with those made of conventional superelastic NiTi wires. The objective of this study was to characterize microstructural changes of M-Wire throughout the cyclic fatigue process under controlled strain amplitude. The average fatigue life was calculated from 30 M-Wire samples that were subjected to a strain-controlled (≈ 4%) rotating bend fatigue test at room temperature and rotational speed of 300 rpm. Microstructural evolution of M-Wire has been investigated by different metallurgical characterization techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry, Vickers microhardness, and transmission electron microscopy at 4 different stages (as-received state, 30%, 60%, and 90% of average fatigue life). During rotating bend fatigue test, no statistically significant difference (P > .05) was found on austenite finish temperatures between as-received M-Wire and fatigued samples. However, significant differences (P < .05) were observed on Vickers microhardness for samples with 60% and 90% fatigue life compared with as-received and 30% fatigue life. Coincidentally, substantial growth of martensite grains and martensite twins was observed in microstructure under transmission electron microscopy after 60% fatigue life. The results of the present study suggested that endodontic instruments manufactured with M-Wire are expected to have higher strength and wear resistance than similar instruments made of conventional superelastic NiTi wires because of its unique nano-crystalline martensitic microstructure. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Porous TiO₂ surface formed on nickel-titanium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation: a prospective polymer-free reservoir for drug eluting stent applications.

    PubMed

    Huan, Zhiguang; Fratila-Apachitei, Lidy E; Apachitei, Iulian; Duszczyk, Jurek

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a porous oxide layer was formed on the surface of nickel-titanium alloy (NiTi) by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) with the aim to produce a polymer-free drug carrier for drug eluting stent (DES) applications. The oxidation was performed galvanostatically in concentrated phosphoric acid electrolyte at low temperature. It was found that the response of NiTi substrate during the PEO process was different from that of bulk Ti, since the presence of large amount of Ni delayed the initial formation of a compact oxide layer that is essential for the PEO to take place. Under optimized PEO conditions, the resultant surface showed porosity, pore density and oxide layer thickness of 14.11%, 2.40 × 10⁵ pores/mm² and 0.8 μm, respectively. It was additionally noted that surface roughness after PEO did not significantly increase as compared with that of original NiTi substrate and the EDS analyses revealed a decrease in Ni/Ti ratio on the surface after PEO. The cross-section morphology showed no discontinuity between the PEO layer and the NiTi substrate. Furthermore, wettability and surface free energy of the NiTi substrate increased significantly after PEO treatment. The PEO process could be successfully translated to NiTi stent configuration proving for the first time its feasibility for such a medical device and offering potential for development of alternative, polymer-free drug carriers for NiTi DES. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    SciT

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional andmore » phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress

  10. Investigation on the Microstructure and Ductility-Dip Cracking Susceptibility of the Butt Weld Welded with ENiCrFe-7 Nickel-Base Alloy-Covered Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; Wang, Huang; He, Guo

    2015-03-01

    The weld metal of the ENiCrFe-7 nickel-based alloy-covered electrodes was investigated in terms of the microstructure, the grain boundary precipitation, and the ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility. Besides the dendritic gamma-Ni(Cr,Fe) phase, several types of precipitates dispersed on the austenitic matrix were observed, which were determined to be the Nb-rich MC-type carbides with "Chinese script" morphology and size of approximately 3 to 10 µm, the Mn-rich MO-type oxides with size of approximately 1 to 2 µm, and the spherical Al/Ti-rich oxides with size of less than 1 µm. The discontinuous Cr-rich M23C6-type carbides predominantly precipitate on the grain boundaries, which tend to coarsen during reheating but begin to dissolve above approximately 1273 K (1000 °C). The threshold strain for DDC at each temperature tested shows a certain degree of correlation with the grain boundary carbides. The DDC susceptibility increases sharply as the carbides coarsen in the temperature range of 973 K to 1223 K (700 °C to 950 °C). The growth and dissolution of the carbides during the welding heat cycles deteriorate the grain boundaries and increase the DDC susceptibility. The weld metal exhibits the minimum threshold strain of approximately 2.0 pct at 1323 K (1050 °C) and the DTR less than 873 K (600 °C), suggesting that the ENiCrFe-7—covered electrode has less DDC susceptibility than the ERNiCrFe-7 bare electrode but is comparable with the ERNiCrFe-7A.

  11. Nickel cobalt phosphorous low stress electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An electrolytic plating process is provided for electrodepositing a nickel or nickel cobalt alloy which contains at least about 2% to 25% by atomic volume of phosphorous. The process solutions contains nickel and optionally cobalt sulfate, hypophosphorous acid or a salt thereof, boric acid or a salt thereof, a monodentate organic acid or a salt thereof, and a multidentate organic acid or a salt thereof. The pH of the plating bath is from about 3.0 to about 4.5. An electroplating process is also provided which includes electroplating from the bath a nickel or nickel cobalt phosphorous alloy. This process can achieve a deposit with high microyield of at least about 84 kg/mm.sup.2 (120 ksi) and a density lower than pure nickel of about 8.0 gm/cc. This process can be used to plate a deposit of essentially zero stress at plating temperatures from ambient to 70.degree. C.

  12. [Contact dermatitis caused by nickel].

    PubMed

    Romaguera, C; Grimalt, F; Vilaplana, J; Mascaro, J M

    1987-01-01

    This paper attempts to explain the initial onset in which the population are sensitized to nickel at an early age, above all in females. A study has been made on 200 controls who tolerated metals and on 964 patents who did not tolerate them. The study comprised of patch tests with 8 distinct washers, made of a variety of metals and alloys all containing nickel, and with nickel sulphate to 1% in petrolatum and cobalt salts to 1% in petrolatum. The results, professional and atopic relationship and other considerations are commented.

  13. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  14. The Effect of Heat Treatment on Residual Stress and Machining Distortions in Advanced Nickel Base Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an extension of NASA's AST and IDPAT Programs which sought to predict the effect of stabilization heat treatments on residual stress and subsequent machining distortions in the advanced disk alloy, ME-209. Simple "pancake" forgings of ME-209 were produced and given four heat treats: 2075F(SUBSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/NO AGE; 2075F/OIL QUENCH/1400F@8HR;2075F/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/l400F@8HR; and 2160F(SUPERSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/ 1400F@8HR. The forgings were then measured to obtain surface profiles in the heat treated condition. A simple machining plan consisting of face cuts from the top surface followed by measurements of the surface profile opposite the cut were made. This data provided warpage maps which were compared with analytical results. The analysis followed the IDPAT methodology and utilized a 2-D axisymmetric, viscoplastic FEA code. The analytical results accurately tracked the experimental data for each of the four heat treatments. The 1550F stabilization heat treatment was found to significantly reduce residual stresses and subsequent machining distortions for fine grain (subsolvus) ME209, while coarse grain (supersolvus) ME209 would require additional time or higher stabilization temperatures to attain the same degree of stress relief.

  15. The Effect of Alloying on Topologically Close Packed Phase Instability in Advanced Nickel-Based Superalloy Rene N6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Arenas, David; Keller, Dennis; Vasudevan, Vijay

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to describe topologically close packed (TCP) phase instability as a function of composition in the advanced Ni-base superalloy Rene N6. TCP phases are detrimental to overall high-temperature performance of Ni-base superalloys because of their brittle nature and because they deplete the Ni-rich matrix of potent solid solution strengthening elements. Thirty-four variations of polycrystalline Rene N6 determined from a design-of-experiments approach were cast and homogenized at 1315"C for 80 hours followed by exposure at 10930C for 400 hours to promote TCP formation. The alloys had the following composition ranges in atomic percent: Co 10.61 to 16.73%, Mo 0.32 to 1.34%, W 1.85 to 2.52%, Re 1.80 to 2.1 1 %, Ta 2.36 to 3.02%, Al 11.90 to 14.75%, and Cr 3.57 to 6.23%. Physical and chemical characteristics of all n-ticrostructures obtained were described using various analytical techniques. From these observations, a mathematical description of TCP occurrence (omega and P phase) was generated for polycrystalline Rene N6.

  16. Oxidation in oxygen at 900 deg and 1000 deg C of four nickel-base cast superalloys: NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, alloy 713C, and IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The oxidation at 900 and 1,000 C of four nickel-base superalloys in 1 atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen was investigated. Thermogravimetric rate data were obtained for periods to 100 hours. The morphology and composition of the oxide scales formed after 100 hours were studied by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA). Alloys B-1900 and VIA were found to be primarily alumina formers, though probably 25 percent of their surface was covered by CR2O3-containing oxides at 900 C. Alloys 713C and IN-738 were primarily chromia formers, though the surface of 713C at 1,000 C was covered with NiO, and the surface of IN-738 at both temperatures was covered with a thin layer of TiO2.

  17. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  18. Separating the Influence of Environment from Stress Relaxation Effects on Dwell Fatigue Crack Growth in a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Both environmental embrittlement and crack tip visco-plastic stress relaxation play a significant role in determining the dwell fatigue crack growth (DFCG) resistance of nickel-based disk superalloys. In the current study performed on the Low Solvus High Refractory (LSHR) disk alloy, the influence of these two mechanisms were separated so that the effects of each could be quantified and modeled. Seven different microstructural variations of LSHR were produced by controlling the cooling rate and the subsequent aging and thermal exposure heat treatments. Through cyclic fatigue crack growth testing performed both in air and vacuum, it was established that four out of the seven LSHR heat treatments evaluated, possessed similar intrinsic environmental resistance to cyclic crack growth. For these four heat treatments, it was further shown that the large differences in dwell crack growth behavior which still persisted, were related to their measured stress relaxation behavior. The apparent differences in their dwell crack growth resistance were attributed to the inability of the standard linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) stress intensity parameter to account for visco-plastic behavior. Crack tip stress relaxation controls the magnitude of the remaining local tensile stresses which are directly related to the measured dwell crack growth rates. It was hypothesized that the environmentally weakened grain boundary crack tip regions fail during the dwells when their strength is exceeded by the remaining local crack tip tensile stresses. It was shown that the classical creep crack growth mechanisms such as grain boundary sliding did not contribute to crack growth, but the local visco-plastic behavior still plays a very significant role by determining the crack tip tensile stress field which controls the dwell crack growth behavior. To account for the influence of the visco-plastic behavior on the crack tip stress field, an empirical modification to the LEFM stress

  19. Grain boundary selective oxidation and intergranular stress corrosion crack growth of high-purity nickel binary alloys in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    DOE PAGES

    Bruemmer, S. M.; Olszta, M. J.; Toloczko, M. B.; ...

    2017-11-26

    The effects of alloying elements in Ni-5at%X binary alloys on intergranular (IG) corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been assessed in 300–360 °C hydrogenated water at the Ni/NiO stability line. Alloys with Cr or Al additions exhibited grain boundary oxidation and IGSCC, while localized degradation was not observed for pure Ni, Ni-Cu or Ni-Fe alloys. Environment-enhanced crack growth was determined by comparing the response in water and N 2 gas. Lastly, results demonstrate that selective grain boundary oxidation of Cr and Al promoted IGSCC of these Ni alloys in hydrogenated water.

  20. Grain boundary selective oxidation and intergranular stress corrosion crack growth of high-purity nickel binary alloys in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    SciT

    Bruemmer, S. M.; Olszta, M. J.; Toloczko, M. B.

    The effects of alloying elements in Ni-5at%X binary alloys on intergranular (IG) corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been assessed in 300–360 °C hydrogenated water at the Ni/NiO stability line. Alloys with Cr or Al additions exhibited grain boundary oxidation and IGSCC, while localized degradation was not observed for pure Ni, Ni-Cu or Ni-Fe alloys. Environment-enhanced crack growth was determined by comparing the response in water and N 2 gas. Lastly, results demonstrate that selective grain boundary oxidation of Cr and Al promoted IGSCC of these Ni alloys in hydrogenated water.

  1. Grain boundary selective oxidation and intergranular stress corrosion crack growth of high-purity nickel binary alloys in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    SciT

    Bruemmer, S. M.; Olszta, M. J.; Toloczko, M. B.

    The effects of alloying elements in Ni-5at%X binary alloys on intergranular (IG) corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been assessed in 300-360°C hydrogenated water at the Ni/NiO stability line. Alloys with Cr or Al additions exhibited grain boundary oxidation and IGSCC, while localized degradation was not observed for pure Ni, Ni-Cu or Ni-Fe alloys. Environment-enhanced crack growth was determined by comparing the response in water and N2 gas. Results demonstrate that selective grain boundary oxidation of Cr and Al promoted IGSCC of these Ni alloys in hydrogenated water.

  2. Considerations on the performance and fabrication of candidate materials for the Yucca Mountain repository waste packages highly corrosion resistant nickel-base and titanium-base alloys

    SciT

    Dalder, E; Goldberg, A

    1995-11-30

    Among the metallurgical factors that affect the performance of a material in a given environment are alloy composition, alloy segregation, depletion of alloying elements, non-uniform microstructures, precipitation leading to an increase in susceptibility to corrosion as well as decreases in ductility, residual plastic deformation, and residual stresses. Precipitation often occurs preferentially at grain boundaries, causing depletion of critical elements in regions adjacent to these boundaries. Continuous grain-boundary precipitates can lead to drops in ductility and toughness. The presence of non-metallic inclusions, if excessive and/or segregated, can also cause embrittlement. Segregation of alloying elements can result in localized galvanic action. Depletionmore » of alloying elements as well as segregation can result in reductions in the concentrations of critical elements below those necessary to resist localized corrosion. Segregation and alloy depletion can also facilitate precipitation that could lead to embrittlement.« less

  3. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  4. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  5. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  6. Nickel Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nickel allergy is a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis — an itchy rash that appears where your skin ... need to avoid contact. Symptoms An allergic reaction (contact dermatitis) usually begins within hours to days after exposure ...

  7. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  8. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  9. Nickel silicide formation in silicon implanted nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Z.; Williams, J. S.; Pogany, A. P.; Sood, D. K.; Collins, G. A.

    1995-04-01

    Nickel silicide formation during the annealing of very high dose (≥4.5×1017 ions/cm2) Si implanted Ni has been investigated, using ion beam analytical techniques, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. An initial amorphous Si-Ni alloy, formed as a result of high dose ion implantation, first crystallized to Ni2Si upon annealing in the temperature region of 200-300 °C. This was followed by the formation of Ni5Si2 in the temperature region of 300-400 °C and then by Ni3Si at 400-600 °C. The Ni3Si layer was found to have an epitaxial relationship with the substrate Ni, which was determined as Ni3Si<100>∥Ni<100> and Ni3Si<110>∥Ni<110> for Ni(100) samples. The minimum channeling yield in the 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectra of this epitaxial layer improved with higher annealing temperatures up to 600 °C, and reached a best value measured at about 8%. However, the epitaxial Ni3Si dissolved after long time annealing at 600 °C or annealing at higher temperatures to liberate soluble Si into the Ni substrate. The epitaxy is attributed to the excellent lattice match between the Ni3Si and the Ni. The annealing behavior follows the predictions of the Ni-Si phase diagram for this nickel-rich binary system.

  10. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and electrochemistry of the iron and nickel base alloys in caustic environments. Progress report, 1 March 1977--28 February 1978

    SciT

    Staehle, R.W.; Agrawal, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    The straining electrode technique was used to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of AISI 304 stainless steel in 20N NaOH solution, and of Inconel 600 Alloy and Incoloy 800 Alloy in boiling 17.5N NaOH solution. The crack propagation rate estimated from the straining experiments correlated well with the previous constant load experiments. It was found that the straining electrode technique is a useful method for estimating, through short term experiments, parameters like crack propagation rate, crack morphology, and repassivation rate, as a function of the electrode potential. The role of alloying elements on the crack propagation rate inmore » the above alloys are also discussed.« less

  11. Dynamic oxidation behavior at 1000 and 1100 C of four nickel-base cast alloys, NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    The superalloys NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X were tested cyclically and isothermally for resistance to oxidation in high velocity gas streams for 100 hours at specimen temperatures of 1000 C and 1100 C. Alloys VIA and B-1900, which were the most oxidation resistant, displayed slight and very similar weight changes and metal losses. Alloy 713C also sustained only slight metal losses, but it exhibited some tendency to spall. Alloy 738X was found to be the most susceptible to cyclic oxidation; this resulted in heavy spalling, which in turn caused high weight losses and high metal losses. Oxidation test results are related to the amounts of chromium aluminum, and the refractory metals in the alloys investigated.

  12. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation at 1000 and 1100 deg C of four nickel-base alloys: NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Santoro, G. J.; Lowell, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation resistance of four cast Ni-base gamma + gamma prime alloys, NASA-TRW Via, B-1900, 713C, and 738X, was determined in still air at 1000 and 1100 C. The oxidation process was evaluated by specific sample weight change with time, sample thickness change, X-ray diffraction of the scales, and sample metallography. The behavior is discussed in terms of the Cr, Al, and refractory metal contents of the alloys.

  13. In-Situ Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Nickel-Base 718 Alloy Under Various CO2 Partial Pressures at 150 and 205 °C in NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yubi; Zhao, Yongtao; Tang, An; Yang, Wenjie; Li, Enzuo

    2018-07-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behavior of nickel-base alloy 718 was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization techniques at various partial pressures of CO2 (P_{{{CO}2 }}s) in a 25 wt% NaCl solution at 150 and 205 °C. The passive films composed of FeCO3 exhibit good corrosion resistance with a feature of Warburg impedance, Tafel plots show a complete passivation and the anodic reactions was dominated by a diffusion process at low P_{{{CO}2 }}s (1.8-9.8 MPa) at 150 °C. While numerous dented corrosion areas appeared on the sample surface for the P_{{{CO}2 }} of 11.6 MPa at 205 °C, the Tafel plot with three anodic peaks and the Nyquist diagram with an atrophied impedance arc were present. This dented corrosion attribute to the synergistic effects of stress, temperature, P_{{{CO}2 }} and Cl-, the temperature and stress could play crucial roles on the corrosion of the alloy 718.

  14. In-Situ Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Nickel-Base 718 Alloy Under Various CO2 Partial Pressures at 150 and 205 °C in NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yubi; Zhao, Yongtao; Tang, An; Yang, Wenjie; Li, Enzuo

    2018-03-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behavior of nickel-base alloy 718 was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization techniques at various partial pressures of CO2 (P_{{{CO}2 }} s) in a 25 wt% NaCl solution at 150 and 205 °C. The passive films composed of FeCO3 exhibit good corrosion resistance with a feature of Warburg impedance, Tafel plots show a complete passivation and the anodic reactions was dominated by a diffusion process at low P_{{{CO}2 }} s (1.8-9.8 MPa) at 150 °C. While numerous dented corrosion areas appeared on the sample surface for the P_{{{CO}2 }} of 11.6 MPa at 205 °C, the Tafel plot with three anodic peaks and the Nyquist diagram with an atrophied impedance arc were present. This dented corrosion attribute to the synergistic effects of stress, temperature, P_{{{CO}2 }} and Cl-, the temperature and stress could play crucial roles on the corrosion of the alloy 718.

  15. Use of the CSA to Calculate Phase Diagrams and Coherent Inter-Phase Boundary Energies of Multi-Component Nickel-Based Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-02

    desirable performance such as their mechanical properties and oxidation-resistance. In this report, we obtain a thermodynamic description of Ni-AI...quaternary system for nickel-based superalloys since the addition of Re improves the mechanical properties of Ni-based superalloys [93Qui], (ii) extensive...well as in solidified samples. 7. Mechanical property Analysis A Micromet II and Macromet II units from Buehler Co. are capable of micro-hardness

  16. Properties and durability of the passive films on a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy and an iron-based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharkya, Pallavi

    Alloy 22, a Ni-Cr-Mo-W alloy, and SAM1651, an Fe-Cr-Mo-B-Y-C bulk metallic glass are highly corrosion-resistant alloys. The high corrosion resistance of these alloys is due to the formation of tenacious oxide films on their surfaces. This study examines the reformation behavior of the passive films as a function of the corrosion resistance of the alloys and the corrosivity of the environment. The main tasks of this study were (i) to determine the chemical durability of passive films on these highly corrosion-resistant alloys in aggressive environments, (ii) to investigate the durability after mechanically damaging the passive films either locally or over the entire surface area and to study the reformation kinetics, (iii) to compare the durability of the passive films of the aforementioned highly corrosion resistant alloys with an alloy of intermediate corrosion resistance, AL6XN, and an alloy of less corrosion resistance, 316L SS, (iv) to examine the evolution of the electronic properties of the passive films on alloy 22 and SAM1651 under different environmental conditions such as concentrated chloride solution, acidic solution, temperature, potential and oxyanions, and (v) to develop an understanding of the relationship between the passive films' composition, electronic and electrochemical properties and the performance. A combination of techniques was utilized to meet the above mentioned objectives. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) was used to determine the electrochemical parameters such as freely corroding, breakdown and repassivation potentials. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the electronic properties such as impedance, thickness and capacitance of the passive films. Mott-Schottky (M-S) analysis was used to determine the type and the density of the defects in the passive films. The mechanical durability and reformation kinetics of the passive films was investigated using a scratch-repassivation method. The quality

  17. Plasma Spray for Difficult-To-Braze Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, A.

    1982-01-01

    Nickel plating on surfaces makes brazing easier for some alloys. Sometimes nickel plating may not be feasible because of manufacturing sequence, size of hardware, or lack of suitable source for nickel plating. Alternative surface preparation in such cases is to grit-blast surface lightly and then plasma-spray 1 1/2 to 2 mils of fine nickel powder or braze-alloy material directly on surface. Powder is sprayed from plasma gun, using argon as carrier gas to prevent oxidation of nickel or braze alloy.

  18. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  19. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation behavior of two nickel-aluminum alloys (Ni3AL and NiAl) with additions of chromium, silicon, and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Santoro, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    The alloys Ni3Al and NiAl with and without 1 and 3 atomic percent chromium, silicon, and titanium replacing the aluminum were cyclically oxidized at 1200 C for times to 200 hours, and the results were compared with those obtained with the alloy B-1900 subjected to the same oxidation process. The evaluation was based on metal recession, specific weight change, metallography, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al was improved by Si, unaffected by Ti, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of NiAl was slightly improved by Ti, unaffected by Si, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al with 1 atomic percent Si was nearly equal to that of NiAl. Alloy B-1900 exhibited oxidation resistance comparable to that of Ni3Al + Cr compositions.

  20. Electroless nickel plating on stainless steels and aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Procedures for applying an adherent electroless nickel plating on 303 SE, 304, and 17-7 PH stainless steels, and 7075 aluminum alloy was developed. When heat treated, the electroless nickel plating provides a hard surface coating on a high strength, corrosion resistant substrate.

  1. X-Ray Photoelectron Study of the Oxides Formed on Nickel Metal and Nickel-Chromium 20% Alloy Surfaces Under Reducing and Oxidizing Potentials in Basic, Neutral and Acidic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Brad P.; Keech, Peter G.; McIntyre, N. Stewart

    The corrosion products produced on polycrystalline Ni metal and Ni-Cr (20%) (NiCr) alloy surfaces exposed to aqueous environments chosen to emulate possible solution conditions in the steam generator (SG) tubing of pressurized water reactors (PWR) were studied using XPS. Additional measurements modelling the distribution of oxidized Ni and Cr species on select alloy specimens were carried out using ToF SIMS. Exposure of Ni metal and NiCr alloy samples to mildly oxidizing potentials in basic solutions resulted in the preferential growth of a β-Ni(OH)2 phase; driven by the dissolution of metallic Ni at both 25°C and 150°C. The presence of β-Ni(OH)2, Cr(OH)3 and small amounts of a Cr6+-containing oxide on NiCr specimens oxidized under mildly oxidizing conditions at 150°C in neutral solutions suggested that the dissolution of both metallic Ni and Cr followed by the back deposition of the corresponding corrosion products was responsible for oxide growth under these conditions. In acidic media oxide nucleation at 150°C under mildly oxidizing potentials was determined to occur via the dissolution of both Ni and Cr species on NiCr specimens as well. The increased stability of Ni2+ in acidic solution led to a limited precipitation of β-Ni(OH)2 resulting in the formation of very thin oxides containing higher levels of Cr(OH)3. Reactions on metallic Ni and NiCr surfaces under highly oxidizing potentials resulted in an increase in the NiO content of these films compared to similar exposures carried out at milder oxidation conditions attributed to accelerated dehydration of the β-Ni(OH)2 phase. In addition, an increase in the Cr(OH)3 contribution on the alloy surface oxidized at a more oxidative potential suggested a more rapid dissolution of Cr under these conditions; overall, uneven films were formed from these conditions. The composition of the corrosion product formed after an exposure to a highly oxidizing potential was found to be unchanged following a subsequent

  2. Nickel subsulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel subsulfide ; CASRN 12035 - 72 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  3. Nickel carbonyl

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel carbonyl ; CASRN 13463 - 39 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  4. The influence of chromium on structure and mechanical properties of B2 nickel aluminide alloys. Ph.D. Thesis - Florida Univ., 1991 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, James Dean

    1992-01-01

    Major obstacles to the use of NiAl-based alloys and composites are low ductility and toughness. These shortcomings result in part from a lack of sufficient slip systems to accommodate plastic deformation of polycrystalline material (von Mises Criterion). It has been reported that minor additions of chromium to polycrystalline NiAl cause the predominant slip system to shift from the usual. If true, then a major step toward increasing ductility in this compound may be realized. The purpose of the present study was to verify this phenomenon, characterize it with respect to chromium level and Ni to Al ratio, and correlate any change in slip system with microstructure and mechanical properties. Compression and tensile specimens were prepared from alloys containing 0 to 5 percent chromium and 45 to 55 percent aluminum. Following about one percent strain, transmission electron microscopy foils were produced and the slip systems determined using the g x b = 0 invisibility criterion. Contrary to previous results, chromium was found to have no effect on the preferred slip system of any of the alloys studied. Possible reasons for the inconsistency of the current results with previous work are considered. Composition-structure-property relationships are discerned for the alloys, and good correlation are demonstrated in terms of conventional strengthening models for metallic systems.

  5. Spongy Raney nickel hydrogen electrodes for alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, Tahei; Nakabayashi, Ichiro

    1989-11-01

    Spongy Raney nickel catalysts for use as hydrogen electrodes of fuel cells were prepared by a new method. In this method molten aluminum was sprayed on both sides of a spongy plate of nickel as substrate with an acetylene-oxygen flame gun. Then, the spongy nickel electrodes were activated by alloying at a given temperature of from 550 to 750 C, and leaching the aluminum from the alloy in alkaline solution. This type of catalyst showed good thermal and electrical conductivity and also mechanical strength by itself. Its polarization resistance was very low, and the characteristics of the electrodes improved with increase in the temperature of heat-treatment for alloying. The finding that activity depended on the alloying temperature was consistent with observations by scanning electron microscope on the surface textures of catalysts alloyed at different temperatures.

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of nickel and nickel-base alloy surface alterations in simulated hot corrosion conditions with emphasis on eventual application to turbine blade corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateescu, G. D.; Smith, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the high temperature oxidation and Na2SO4 induced hot corrosion of some nickel base superalloys was accomplished by using ESCA to determine the surface composition of the oxidized or corroded samples. Oxidation was carried out at 900 or 1000 C in slowly flowing O2 for samples of B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C, and IN-738. Oxidation times ranged from 0.5 to 100 hr. Hot corrosion of B-1900 was induced applying a coating of Na2SO4 to peroxidized samples, the heating to 900 C in slowly flowing O2. For oxidized samples, the predominant type of scale formed by each superalloy was determined, and a marked surface enrichment of Ti was found in each case. For corroded samples, the transfer of significant amounts of material from the oxide layer to the surface of the salt layer was observed to occur long before the onset of accelerating weight-gain. Changes in surface composition were observed to coincide with the beginning of accelerating corrosion, the most striking of which was a tenfold decrease in the sulfur to sodium ration and an increase in the Cr(VI) ratio.

  7. Nonsurgical treatment of an adult with a skeletal Class II gummy smile using zygomatic temporary anchorage devices and improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wires.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yuji; Ono, Takashi

    2017-11-01

    Patients with a severe gummy smile and a skeletal Class II profile are difficult to treat. This case report describes an effective treatment alternative for improving a gummy smile in a patient with a severe Class II molar relationship, severe crowding, and lip protrusion using zygomatic anchorage devices and improved superelastic nickel-titanium wires. A 36-year-old woman had an excessive overjet and a deep overbite with a bilateral Angle Class II molar relationship. The cephalometric analysis demonstrated a Class II skeletal relationship (ANB, 9.5°), retroclination of the mandible (FMA, 38.4°), and severe labial inclination of the mandibular incisors (IMPA, 101.9°). The main treatment objectives included normalizing the overjet and overbite, improving the gummy smile, and establishing a satisfactory occlusion. During treatment with fixed appliances, intrusion of the total maxillary dentition using skeletal anchorage and elimination of the bimaxillary protrusion were achieved. Improvement of the lateral profile and gummy smile enhanced facial esthetics. Intrusion and distalization of the maxillary dentition with skeletal anchorage and improved superelastic nickel-titanium wires provided a satisfactory dental occlusion, esthetic improvement, and adequate function. This approach should be considered as an alternative treatment option to orthognathic surgery for adults with high-angle skeletal Class II malocclusion and a gummy smile. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Study on Formation and Thermal Stability of Nano-sized Oxide Clusters in Mechanically Alloyed Nickel Aluminum for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Deog

    The intermetallic compound, B2 NiAl, is a promising material for high temperature structural applications such as in aviation jet engines or gas turbines, provided that its high temperature mechanical properties can be improved. Although extensive efforts over the last several decades have been devoted toward enhancing ductility through alloying design and reducing impurities, as well as improving high temperature creep strength through precipitation and dispersion strengthening, these efforts have relied on traditional approaches, a combination of large grain size to limit diffusional creep and precipitation/dispersion (50 ˜ 100 nm size) strengthening to limit dislocation creep, for high temperature strengthening. While traditional approaches have shown a good improvement from a relatively high temperature strengthening point of view, the size and number density of dispersoids were not able to provide sufficient strength in the high temperature creep regime. Furthermore, details of the interaction mechanism between dislocations and dispersoids are not yet well understood. This study focuses on designing and developing advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) NiAl intermetallics with improved high temperature creep strength by incorporating a high number density (˜1024 m-3) of very thermally stable Y-Ti-O nano-clusters, akin to those recently observed to improve creep strength and radiation resistance in nano-structured ferritic alloys. Advanced ODS NiAl alloys have been produced by mechanical alloying of pre-alloyed Ni-50at%Al with Y2O3 and Ti elemental powders. The milled powders were subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering, with the objective of producing very high number densities of nano-sized Y-Ti-O precipitates, along with fine grain size. Advanced experimental characterization techniques, combined with microhardness strength measurement, were used to investigate the material microstructure and strength following processing and to evaluate

  9. Raman and and x-ray diffraction study of iron and iron-nickel alloys at varying P-T conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A.; Struzhkin, V.; Gregoryanz, E.; Maddury, S.; Huang, E.; Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H.

    2002-05-01

    High-pressure properties of iron and iron-rich alloys are crucial for understanding of the Earth interior, because iron is the major constitute element of the Earth core. Using recently developed [1,2] Raman spectroscopy technique for shear elastic modulus determination, we studied iron-rich alloys of Ni (0 to 20 % Ni) up to 150 GPa, and also at varying temperatures (78-400 K). We find substantial decrease of the Raman hcp-phonon frequency compared to the pure iron, and also considerable anharmonic temperature effects. In contrast, low-temperature x-ray diffraction measurements indicate a usual temperature variation of the lattice constants. Possible implications to the Earth core composition and properties are discussed. [1] A. P. Jephcoat, H. Olijnyk, K. Refson, Eos 80, F929 (1999). [2] S. Merkel et al., Science 288, 1626 (2000).

  10. Feasibility study of tungsten as a diffusion barrier between nickel-chromium-aluminum and Gamma/Gamma prime - Delta eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.; Zellars, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coating systems proposed for potential use on eutectic alloy components in high-temperature gas turbine engines were studied with emphasis on deterioration of such systems by diffusion. A 1-mil thick W sheet was placed between eutectic alloys and a NiCrAl layer. Layered test specimens were aged at 1100 C for as long as long as 500 hours. Without the W barrier, the delta phase of the eutectic deteriorated by diffusion of Nb into the NiCrAl. Insertion of the W barrier stopped the diffusion of Nb from delta. Chromium diffusion from the NiCrAl into the gamma/gamma prime phase of the eutectic was greatly reduced by the barrier. However, the barrier thickness decreased with time; and W diffused into both the NiCrAl and the eutectic. When the delta platelets were alined parallel to the NiCrAl layer, rather than perpendicular, diffusion into the eutectic was reduced.

  11. The role of grain boundary chemistry and structure in the environmentally-assisted intergranular cracking of nickel-base alloys. Progress report, August 1, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciT

    Was, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests in constant extension rate tensile (CERT) and constant load tensile (CLT) tests were conducted on Ni-xCr- 9Fe-yC in Ar, water, and a LiOH-boric acid solution. Cr and C improve the resistance of Ni-base alloys to IG cracking in both Ar and water at 360C. Since creep plays a role in IG cracking, one possible explanation for the role of the environment involves its effect on the creep. Experiments were conducted on the role of C in the deformation behavior and failure mode of Ni-16Cr-9Fe. Constant load experiments were conducted on Ni-16Cr-9Fe to determine if the CLTmore » test is more aggressive than CERT. The electron backscattering technique in a SEM is being developed in order to extend the IG cracking studies to grain sizes typical of commercial alloys, 20-30 microns.« less

  12. Large Scale Evaluation fo Nickel Aluminide Rolls

    SciT

    None

    2005-09-01

    This completed project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem Steel (now Mittal Steel) to demonstrate the effectiveness of using nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated, energy-efficient, commercial annealing furnace system.

  13. Identification of a new pseudo-binary hydroxide during calendar corrosion of (La, Mg)2Ni7-type hydrogen storage alloys for Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Chen, H.; Joiret, S.; Bourgon, J.; Latroche, M.

    2014-11-01

    To improve the performances of Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries, an important step is the understanding of the corrosion processes that take place in the electrode material. In particular, the present study focuses for the first time on the model (La, Mg)2Ni7 system. The calendar corrosion in 8.7 M KOH medium was investigated from 6 h to 16 weeks immersion. By a unique combination of structural and elemental characterisations, the corrosion products are evidenced in those systems. In particular, we demonstrate that Ni and Mg combine in a pseudo-binary hydroxide Mg1-xNix(OH)2 whereas La corrodes into nanoporous La(OH)3 needles with inner hollow nanochannels.

  14. Oxidation kinetics of some Ni-Cr alloys.

    PubMed

    Baran, G

    1983-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of four Ni-Cr alloys and a high-purity nickel standard was determined under isothermal conditions in an air atmosphere. In addition, weight gains of the alloys were measured during a simulated pre-oxidation treatment. The alloys' behavior suggests that mechanisms of oxidation vary with temperature and alloy composition.

  15. Effect of minor reactive metal additions on fracture toughness of iron: 12-percent nickel alloy at-196 deg and 25 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.; Stephens, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The slow bend precracked Charpy fracture toughness and tensile behavior of arc-melted and hot-rolled Fe-12Ni alloys containing up to 4 atomic percent reactive metal additions were determined at -196 C and 25 C after water quenching from three annealing temperatures. The fracture toughness of Fe-12Ni at -196 C was improved by small amounts of Al, Ce, Hf, La, Nb, Ta, Ti, V, Y, and Zr, but not by Si. Cryogenic toughness was improved up to 7.5 times that of binary Fe-12Ni and varied with the reactive metal, its concentration, and the annealing temperature.

  16. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  17. Anthropogenic nickel cycle: insights into use, trade, and recycling.

    PubMed

    Reck, Barbara K; Müller, Daniel B; Rostkowski, Katherine; Graedel, T E

    2008-05-01

    The anthropogenic nickel cycle for the year 2000 was analyzed using a material flow analysis at multiple levels: 52 countries, territories, or country groups, eight regions, and the planet. Special attention was given to the trade in nickel-containing products at different stages of the cycle. A new circular diagram highlights process connections, the role and potential of recycling, and the relevance of trade at different life stages. The following results were achieved. (1) The nickel cycle is dominated by six countries or territories: USA, China and Hong Kong, Japan, Germany, Taiwan, and South Korea; only China also mines some of its nickel used. (2) Nickel is mostly used in alloyed form in stainless steels (68%). (3) More scrap is used for the production of stainless steels (42%) than for other first uses (11%). (4) Industrial machinery is the largest end use category for nickel (25%), followed by buildings and infrastructure (21%) and transportation (20%). (5) 57% of discarded nickel is recycled within the nickel and stainless steel industries, and 14% is lost to other metal markets where nickel is an unwanted constituent of carbon steel and copper alloy scrap.

  18. Effect of Porosity Content of Arc-Sprayed Alloy 625 Skins on the Flexural Behavior of Nickel Foam Core Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati, S.; Pershin, L.; Coyle, T. W.; Mostaghimi, J.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic foam core sandwich structures have been of particular interest for engineering applications in recent decades because of their unique mechanical and physical properties. Thermal spraying techniques have been recently introduced as a novel low-cost method for production of these structures with complex shapes. One of the potential applications of the metallic foam core sandwich structures prepared by thermal spray techniques is as heat shield devices. Open porosity in the microstructure of the coating may allow the cooling efficiency of the heat shield to be improved through the film cooling phenomenon. A modified twin wire-arc spraying process was employed to deposit high temperature resistant alloy 625 coatings with a high percentage of the open porosity. The effect of skin porosity on the mechanical properties (flexural rigidity) of the sandwich structures was studied using a four-point bending test. It was concluded from the four-point bending test results that increase in the porosity content of the coatings leads to decrease in the flexural rigidity of the sandwich panels. The ductility of the porous and conventional arc-sprayed alloy 625 coatings was improved after heat treatment at 1100 °C for 3 h.

  19. Raman study of the shear elastic modulus of iron and iron-nickel alloys at varying P-T conditions: implication for the iron core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A.; Struzhkin, V.

    2003-04-01

    The knowledge of high-pressure properties of iron and iron-rich alloys are crucial for understanding of the Earth interior, because iron is the major constitute element of the Earth core. Raman spectroscopy has been used recently [1,2] for the shear elastic modulus C44 determination in Fe at compression levels approaching the core boundary. We studied iron-rich alloys of Ni (0 to 20 % Ni) up to 150 GPa, and also at varying temperatures (78-400 K). We find substantial decrease of the Raman hcp-phonon frequency compared to the pure iron, and also considerable anharmonic temperature effects. We argue that the strong anharmonicity of the E2g mode the vicinity of α to ɛ transition can be one of the reasons of the discrepancy between theoretical [3,4] and experimental Raman frequencies and the shear elastic modulus C44. Theoretical calculations do not take into the account the anharmonic effects explicitly, so that the calculated Raman frequency is higher than the experimental one, which is strongly renormalized as a consequence of a Fermi damping. The E2g mode becomes less anharmonic at high pressures (>80 GPa), and theory and experiment are indeed in a much better agreement. [1] S. Merkel et al., Science 288, 1626 (2000). [2] H. Olijnyk, A.P. Jephcoat, K. Refson, Europhys. Lett. 53, 504 (2001). [3] G. Steinle-Neumann, L. Stixrude, and R.E. Cohen, Phys. Rev. B 60, 791 (1999). [4] L. Vocadlo, personal communication.

  20. Hot corrosion of the B2 nickel aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The hot corrosion behavior of the B2 nickel aluminides was studied to determine the inherent hot corrosion resistance of the beta nickel aluminides and to develop a mechanism for the hot corrosion of the beta nickel aluminides. The effects of the prior processing of the material, small additions of zirconium, stoichiometry of the materials, and preoxidation of the samples were also examined. Additions of 2, 5, and 15 w/o chromium were used to determine the effect of chromium on the hot corrosion of the beta nickel aluminides and the minimum amount of chromium necessary for good hot corrosion resistance. The results indicate that the beta nickel aluminides have inferior inherent hot corrosion resistance despite their excellent oxidation resistance. Prior processing and zirconium additions had no discernible effect on the hot corrosion resistance of the alloys. Preoxidation extended the incubation period of the alloys only a few hours and was not considered to be an effective means of stopping hot corrosion. Stoichiometry was a major factor in determining the hot corrosion resistance of the alloys with the higher aluminum alloys having a definitely superior hot corrosion resistance. The addition of chromium to the alloys stopped the hot corrosion attack in the alloys tested. From a variety of experimental results, a complex hot corrosion mechanism was proposed. During the early stages of the hot corrosion of these alloys the corrosion is dominated by a local sulphidation/oxidation form of attack. During the intermediate stages of the hot corrosion, the aluminum depletion at the surface leads to a change in the oxidation mechanism from a protective external alumina layer to a mixed nickel-aluminum spinel and nickel oxide that can occur both externally and internally. The material undergoes extensive cracking during the later portions of the hot corrosion.

  1. Chemical waves in the O2 + H2 reaction on a Rh(111) surface alloyed with nickel. I. Photoelectron emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolinsky, Tim; von Boehn, Bernhard; Imbihl, Ronald

    2018-04-01

    Chemical waves that arise in the H2 + O2 reaction on a bimetallic Rh(111)/Ni surface have been studied in the 10-6 and 10-5 mbar range at T = 773 K with photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Nickel coverages of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0 monolayers were investigated. Coadsorbed with some oxygen, Ni starts to penetrate the Rh bulk region substantially only beyond 900 K. In the 10-5 mbar range, chemical waves are characterized by three distinct gray levels in PEEM. This number reduces to only two levels in the 10-6 mbar range. In situ LEED showed the periodic appearance of a (n × 1) (n = 8, 10) pattern during chemical waves which was assigned to a 2D-Ni oxide. With in situ AES, one observes that the bright phase in PEEM correlates with a high Ni coverage and the dark phase with a low Ni coverage.

  2. High-temperature fabricable nickel-iron aluminides

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.

    1988-02-02

    Nickel-iron aluminides are described that are based on Ni.sub.3 Al, and have significant iron content, to which additions of hafnium, boron, carbon and cerium are made resulting in Ni.sub.3 Al base alloys that can be fabricated at higher temperatures than similar alloys previously developed. Further addition of molybdenum improves oxidation and cracking resistance. These alloys possess the advantages of ductility, hot fabricability, strength, and oxidation resistance.

  3. Low temperature nickel titanium iron shape memory alloys: Actuator engineering and investigation of deformation mechanisms using in situ neutron diffraction at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vinu B.

    Shape memory alloys are incorporated as actuator elements due to their inherent ability to sense a change in temperature and actuate against external loads by undergoing a shape change as a result of a temperature-induced phase transformation. The cubic so-called austenite to the trigonal so-called R-phase transformation in NiTiFe shape memory alloys offers a practical temperature range for actuator operation at low temperatures, as it exhibits a narrow temperature-hysteresis with a desirable fatigue response. Overall, this work is an investigation of selected science and engineering aspects of low temperature NiTiFe shape memory alloys. The scientific study was performed using in situ neutron diffraction measurements at the newly developed low temperature loading capability on the Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory and encompasses three aspects of the behavior of Ni46.8Ti50Fe3.2 at 92 K (the lowest steady state temperature attainable with the capability). First, in order to study deformation mechanisms in the R-phase in NiTiFe, measurements were performed at a constant temperature of 92 K under external loading. Second, with the objective of examining NiTiFe in one-time, high-stroke, actuator applications (such as in safety valves), a NiTiFe sample was strained to approximately 5% (the R-phase was transformed to B19' phase in the process) at 92 K and subsequently heated to full strain recovery under a load. Third, with the objective of examining NiTiFe in cyclic, low-stroke, actuator applications (such as in cryogenic thermal switches), a NiTiFe sample was strained to 1% at 92 K and subsequently heated to full strain recovery under load. Neutron diffraction spectra were recorded at selected time and stress intervals during these experiments. The spectra were subsequently used to obtain quantitative information related to the phase-specific strain, texture and phase fraction evolution using the

  4. Adverse effects of nickel in transosseous wires and surgical implants: literature review.

    PubMed

    Nwashindi, A; Dim, E M

    2014-01-01

    Transosseous wires used in the management of fractures are stainless steel alloys which contain nickel 14.5%, chromium 17.6%, iron 62.5% and molybdenum 2.8%. Gradual disintegration of the transosseous wires release nickel into the blood leading to increase nickel concentration in the blood. Nickel has been found to have some adverse systemic effects on the body. The aim of this paper is to discuss the sources of Nickel in the body as well as the systemic adverse effects of Nickel as a degradation product of stainless steel surgical implants. A study of pertinent literature on nickel as a content of stainless steel alloy used in implant surgery was done, taking note also of other sources of nickel in the body, the toxicokinetics of nickel and the related adverse effects of this metal and its compound in humans. As outcome,the sources of human exposure to nickel,distribution and metabolism of nickel in the body, host responseto stainless steel wires and the adverse effects of nickel in the body are presented. It may be necessary to discourage the use of wires or implants containing nickel in the management of fractures.The need for removal of these implants after they have served their purposes is emphasized.

  5. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Sidney

    1989-01-01

    It was long known that many strong metals can become weakened and brittle as the result of the accumulation of hydrogen within the metal. When the metal is stretched, it does not show normal ductile properties, but fractures prematurely. This problem can occur as the result of a hydrogen evolution reaction such as corrosion or electroplating, or due to hydrogen in the environment at the metal surface. High strength alloys such as steels are especially susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Nickel-hydrogen cells commonly use Inconel 718 alloy for the pressure container, and this also is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Metals differ in their susceptibility to embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells is analyzed and the reasons why it may or may not occur are discussed. Although Inconel 718 can display hydrogen embrittlement, experience has not identified any problem with nickel-hydrogen cells. No hydrogen embrittlement problem is expected with the 718 alloy pressure container used in nickel-hydrogen cells.

  6. Gravitational effects on weld pool shape and microstructural evolution during gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding on 304 stainless steel, nickel, and aluminum-4 wt.% copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Namhyun

    The objective of the present work was to investigate effects of gravitational (acceleration) level and orientation on Ni 200 alloy (99.5% Ni purity), 304 stainless steel, and Al-4 wt.% Cu alloy during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser beam welding (LBW). Main characterization was focused on the weld pool shape, microstructure, and solute distribution as a function of gravitational level and orientation. The welds were divided into two classes, i.e., 'stable' and 'unstable' welds, in view of the variation of weld pool shape as a function of gravitational level and orientation. In general, higher arc current and translational GTAW produced more significant effects of gravitational orientation on the weld pool shape than the case of lower arc current and spot welding. Cross-sectional area (CSA) was a secondary factor in determining the stability of weld pool shape. For the 'stable' weld of 304 stainless steel GTAW, the II-U weld showed less convexity in the pool bottom and more depression of the free surface, therefore producing deeper penetration (10--20%) than the case of II-D weld. The II-D weld of 304 stainless steel showed 31% deeper penetration, 28% narrower width, and more hemispherical shape of the weld pool than the case of II-U weld. For GTAW on 304 stainless steel, gravitational level variation from low gravity (LG ≈ 1.2 go) to high gravity (HG ≈ 1.8 go) caused 10% increase in width and 10% decrease in depth while maintaining the overall weld pool volume. Furthermore, LBW on 304 stainless steels showed mostly constant shape of weld pool as a function of gravitational orientation. GTAW on Ni showed similar trends of weld pool shape compared with GTAW on 304 stainless steel, i.e., the weld pool became unstable by showing more penetration in the II-D weld for slower arc translational velocity (V a) and larger weld pool size. However, the Ni weld pool shape had greater stability of the weld pool shape with respect to the gravitational orientation

  7. Study of the Effect of Molten Copper Chloride Immersion Test on Alloys with High Nickel Content with and without Surface Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siantar, Edwin

    The demand for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier has increased greatly. The Cu-Cl cycle is a promising thermochemical cycle that is currently being developed to be the large-scale method of hydrogen production. The lifetime of materials for the pipes transporting molten CuCl is an important parameter for an economic design of a commercial thermochemical Cu-Cl hydrogen plant. This research is an examination of candidate materials following an immersion test in molten CuCl at 500 °C for 100 h. Two alloys, Ni based super-alloy (Inconel 625) and super austenitic stainless steel (AL6XN) were selected as the base metal. There were two types of coating applied to improve the corrosion resistance of the base metals during molten CuCl exposure. A metallic of Diamalloy 4006 and two ceramic of yttria stabilized zirconia and alumina coatings were applied to the base metal using thermal spray methods. An immersion apparatus was designed and constructed to perform an immersion test that has a condition similar to those in a hydrogen plant. After the immersion test, the materials were evaluated using an electrochemical method in combination with ex-situ surface analysis. The surface condition including elemental composition, film structure and resistivity of the materials were examined and compared. The majority of the coatings were damaged and fell off. Cracks were found in the original coated specimens indicating the sample geometry may have affected the integrity of the sprayed coating. When the coating cracked, it provided a pathway for the molten CuCl to go under the coating and react with the surface underneath the coating. Copper deposits and iron chloride that were found on the sample surfaces suggest that there were corrosion reactions that involved the metal dissolution and reduction of copper during immersion test. The results also suggest that Inconel 625 performed better than stainless steel AL6XN. Both Diamalloy 4006 and YSZ (ZrO2 18TiO2 10Y2O3) coatings seemed to

  8. The intermetallic formation and growth kinetics at the interface of near eutectic tin-silver-copper solder alloys and gold/nickel metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Mao

    The formation of a one micron thick layer of an intermetallic compound between a solder alloy and a metallic substrate generally constitutes a good solder joint in an electronic device. However, if the compound grows too thick, and/or if multiple intermetallic compounds form, poor solder joint reliability may result. Thus significant interest has been focused on intermetallic compound phase selection and growth kinetics at such solder/metal interfaces. The present study focuses on one such specific problem, the formation and growth of intermetallic compounds at near eutectic Sn-Ag-Cu solder alloy/Ni interfaces. Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder was reflowed on Au/Ni substrates, resulting in the initial formation and growth of (CuNi)6Sn 5 at Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu /Ni interfaces. (NiCu)3Sn4 formed between the (CuNi)6Sn5 and the Ni substrate when the concentration of Cu in the liquid SnAgCu solder decreased to a critical value which depended upon temperature: 0.37, 0.31 and 0.3(wt.%) at reflow temperatures of 260°C, 245°C and 230°C respectively. The growth rate of (CuNi)6Sn5 was found to be consistent with extrapolations of a diffusion limited growth model formulated for lower temperature, solid state diffusion couples. The long range diffusion of Cu did not limit growth rates. The spalling of (CuNiAu)6Sn5 from (NiCu)3 Sn4 surfaces during reflow was also examined. When the Cu concentration in the solder decreased to approximately 0.28wt.%, the (Cu,Ni,Au) 6Sn5 was observed to spall. Compressive stress in (CuNiAu) 6Sn5 and weak adhesion between (CuNiAu)6Sn 5 and (NiCu)3Sn4 was found to cause this effect.

  9. Chemical waves in the O2 + H2 reaction on a Rh(111) surface alloyed with nickel. II. Photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolinsky, Tim; Homann, Mathias; von Boehn, Bernhard; Gregoratti, Luca; Amati, Matteo; Al-Hada, Mohamed; Sezen, Hikmet; Imbihl, Ronald

    2018-04-01

    Chemical waves in the H2 + O2 reaction on a Rh(111) surface alloyed with Ni [ΘNi < 1.5 monolayers (ML)] have been investigated in the 10-7 and 10-6 mbar range at T = 773 K using scanning photoelectron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as in situ methods. The local intensity variations of the O 1s and the Ni 2p signal display an anticorrelated behavior. The coincidence of a high oxygen signal with a low Ni 2p intensity, which seemingly contradicts the chemical attraction between O and Ni, has been explained with a phase separation of the oxygen covered Rh(111)/Ni surface into a 3D-Ni oxide and into a Ni poor metallic phase. Macroscopic NiO islands (≈1 μm size) formed under reaction conditions have been identified as 2D-Ni oxide. Titration experiments of the oxygen covered Rh(111)/Ni surface with H2 demonstrated that the reactivity of oxygen is decreased by an order of magnitude through the addition of 0.6 ML Ni. An excitation mechanism is proposed in which the periodic formation and reduction of NiO modulate the catalytic activity.

  10. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation in tin-bismuth alloys due to nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, R. J.; Davis, C. G.; Johns, P. M.; ...

    2015-06-26

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. In this study, most of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To improve the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical modelmore » for the purpose of predicting heat affected zone size in substrate materials. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and alloys from the Sn-Bi binary system. To accomplish this, phenomenological models for predicting the variation of physical properties (i.e., thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity) with temperature and composition in the Sn-Bi system were utilized using literature data.« less

  11. Infiltration sintering properties of Ni-4B-4Si(wt.%) alloy powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Zhang, X. C.; Wang, F. L.; Zou, J. T.

    2018-01-01

    The Ni-4B-4Si(wt.%) alloy powders were infiltrated into the nickel skeletons, the effects of sintering temperatures (1050-1150 °C) and skeletons (loose and compact nickel powders) on the microstructures and hardness of the sintered alloys were investigated. The Ni-B-Si alloy sintered at 1100 °C consisted of γ-Ni and Ni3B, and Si mainly solid soluted in the γ-Ni. The loose nickel powders favored to the infiltration of Ni-B-Si liquid alloy into the nickel skeletons, the sintered alloys exhibited dense microstructures and good interfacial bonding with Ni substrates. The interfacial hardness was equal to that of the sintered alloys and Ni substrates. Loose nickel powders ensured the density and interfacial bonding of the sintered alloys, the infiltration sintering process can be simplified and easily applied to practice.

  12. Choosing An Alloy For Automotive Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes study of chemical compositions and microstructures of alloys for automotive Stirling engines. Engines offer advantages of high efficiency, low pollution, low noise, and ability to use variety of fuels. Twenty alloys evaluated for resistance to corrosion permeation by hydrogen, and high temperature. Iron-based alloys considered primary candidates because of low cost. Nickel-based alloys second choice in case suitable iron-based alloy could not be found. Cobalt-based alloy included for comparison but not candidate, because it is expensive strategic material.

  13. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  14. NICKEL PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

    1959-05-12

    A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

  15. Li-alloy electrode for Li-alloy/metal sulfide cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A method of making a negative electrode, the electrode made thereby and a secondary electrochemical cell using the electrode. Lithium, silicon and nickel is alloyed in a prescribed proportion forming an electroactive material, to provide an improved electrode and cell.

  16. High weldability nickel-base superalloy

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, Robert C.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1980-01-01

    This is a nickel-base superalloy with excellent weldability and high strength. Its composition consists essentially of, by weight percent, 10-20 iron, 57-63 nickel, 7-18 chromium, 4-6 molybdenum, 1-2 niobium, 0.2-0.8 silicon, 0.01-0.05 zirconium, 1.0-2.5 titanium, 1.0-2.5 aluminum, 0.02-0.06 carbon, and 0.002-0.015 boron. The weldability and strength of this alloy give it a variety of applications. The long-time structural stability of this alloy together with its low swelling under nuclear radiation conditions, make it especially suitable for use as a duct material and controlling element cladding for sodium-cooled nuclear reactors.

  17. The Effect of Nickel on Iron Isotope Fractionation and Implications for the Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. M.; Shahar, A.; Elardo, S. M.; Liu, J.; Xiao, Y.; Mao, W. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's core is thought to be composed mainly of an iron-rich iron nickel (FeNi) alloy. Therefore, determining the behavior of these alloys at core conditions is crucial for interpreting and constraining geophysical and geochemical models. Understanding the effect of nickel on iron isotope fractionation can shed light on planetary core formation. We collected a series of phonon excitation spectra using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) on 57Fe-enriched FeNi alloys with varying (Fe0.9Ni0.1, Fe0.8Ni0.2, Fe0.7Ni0.3) nickel content in a diamond anvil cell at pressures up to 50 GPa. All three alloys studied exhibited differences from pure Fe, indicating that increasing nickel content could have an effect on iron isotope fractionation which would have implications for planetary core formation and provide constraints the bulk composition for terrestrial planets.

  18. Chromium modified nickel-iron aluminide useful in sulfur bearing environments

    SciT

    Cathcart, J.V.; Liu, C.T.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes an improved nickel-iron aluminide containing chromium and molybdenum additions to improve resistance to sulfur attack. The corrosive effects of sulfur are discussed and the chemical composition of corrosion resistant alloys is illustrated.

  19. Distribution of nickel after modified nitinol stent implantation in animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepeleva, E.; Sergeevichev, D.; Lotkov, A.; Kashin, O.; Korobeynikov, A.; Kozyr, K.; Baystrukov, V.; Zubarev, D.; Kretov, E.; Pokushalov, E.

    2017-09-01

    Intravascular stenting of arteries in atherosclerotic lesions is one of the most frequently performed procedures in cardiovascular surgery today. Most stents are made of various stainless-steel alloys and other metals (such as nitinol). Nitinol is a biocompatible, superplastic and corrosion resistant material with an important feature of shape memory. However, the composition of this alloy includes nickel, which shows toxicity to the kidneys, liver, lungs, heart and other organs when it accumulates in the organism. In this research we investigated the nickel content in serum, urine and hair of the laboratory animals after implantation of nitinol stents treated with plasma ionic surface modification by silicon.

  20. Bonding titanium to Rene 41 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pair of intermediate materials joined by electron beam welding method welds titanium to Rene 41 alloy. Bond is necessary for combining into one structure high strength-to-density ratio titanium fan blades and temperature resistant nickel-base alloy turbine-buckets in VTOL aircraft lift-fan rotor.

  1. ALLOY FOR FUEL OF NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Bloomster, C.H.; Katayama, Y.B.

    1963-04-23

    This patent deals with an aluminum alloy suitable as nuclear fuel and consisting mainly of from 1 to 10 wt% of plutonium, from 2 to 3.5 wt% of nickel, the balance being aluminum. The alloy may also contain from 0.9 to 1.1 wt% of silicon and up to 0.7% of iron. (AEC)

  2. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  6. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  7. Transformation temperatures of martensite in beta phase nickel aluminide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Resistivity and thermal arrest measurements determined that the compositional dependence of Ms (martensite state) temperatures for NiAl martensite was linear between 60 and 69 atomic percent nickel, with Ms = 124 Ni - 7410 K. Resistivity and surface relief experiments indicated the presence of thermoelastic martensite for selected alloys. Some aspects of the transformation were studied by hot stage microscopy and related to the behavior observed for alloys exhibiting the shape-memory effect.

  8. Duct and cladding alloy

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  9. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  10. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  11. Oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Rouge, Carl J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites comprises an MCrAlX material. M is a metal selected from nickel, cobalt, and iron. X is an active element selected from Y, Yb, Zr, and Hf.

  12. Ni-Co alloy plaque for cathode of Ni-Cd battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, J. J.

    1986-03-01

    The present invention relates generally to Ni-Cd batteries, and, in particular, relates to the plaque material attached to the cathode. Because of the wide use of nickel-cadmium batteries, the corrosion rates of nickel and nickel-cobalt alloys are of interest to nickel-cadmium battery electrochemical theory and its technology. The plaque material of the cathode consists of a Ni-Co alloy in solid solution wherein the cobalt is by weight percent one to ten percent of the alloy. Conventional methods of applying the plaque material to the nickel core may be used. It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved cathode for a nickel-cadmium battery wherein the nickel corrosion is substantially lessened in the plaque material. One process of making the plaque uses a nickel powder slurry that is applied to a nickel-plated steel core. This is then sintered at a high temperature which results in a very porous structure and an welding of the nickel grains to the core. This plaque is then soaked in appropriate salts to make either a positive or a negative plate; nickel salts make a positive plate and a cadmium salts a negative plate, for example. After impregnation, the plaque is placed in an electrolyte and an electric current is passed therethrough to convert the salts to their final form. In the nickel-cadmium cell, nickel hydroxide is the active material in the positive plate.

  13. Aluminide coatings for nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, H. C.; Sieraski, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The metalliding process was used to aluminide IN-100 and TD NiCr. Aluminum was deposited over a broad range of deposition rates, with two types of coating structures resulting. Chromium, silicon, titanium and yttrium were also individually deposited simutaneously with aluminum on IN-100. None of these had a marked effect on the oxidation resistance of the aluminide coating. Porosity-free aluminide coatings with good oxidation resistance were formed on TD NiCr providing the aluminum concentration did not exceed 8 percent, the limit of solubility in the gamma phase.

  14. Evaluation of cyclic flexural fatigue of M-wire nickel-titanium rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadlaq, Solaiman M S; Aljarbou, Fahad A; AlThumairy, Riyadh I

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate cyclic flexural fatigue resistance of GT series X rotary files made from the newly developed M-wire nickel-titanium alloy compared with GT and Profile nickel-titanium files made from a conventional nickel-titanium alloy. Fifteen files, size 30/0.04, of each type were used to evaluate the cyclic flexural fatigue resistance. A simple device was specifically constructed to measure the time each file type required to fail under cyclic flexural fatigue testing. The results of this experiment indicated that the GT series X files had superior cyclic flexural fatigue resistance than the other 2 file types made from a conventional nickel-titanium alloy (P = .004). On the other hand, the difference between the Profile and the GT files was not statistically significant. The findings of this study suggest that size 30/0.04 nickel-titanium rotary files made from the newly developed M-wire alloy have better cyclic flexural fatigue resistance than files of similar design and size made from the conventional nickel-titanium alloy. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Microstructure and Aging of Powder-Metallurgy Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of thermal responses and aging behaviors of three new aluminum alloys. Alloys produced from rapidly solidified powders and contain 3.20 to 5.15 percent copper, 0.24 to 1.73 percent magnesium, 0.08 to 0.92 percent iron, and smaller amounts of manganese, nickel, titanium, silicon, and zinc. Peak hardness achieved at lower aging temperatures than with standard ingot-metallurgy alloys. Alloys of interest for automobile, aircraft, and aerospace applications.

  16. The continuing battle against defects in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the six decades since the identification of age hardenable nickel-base superalloys their compositions and microstructures have changed markedly. Current alloys are tailored for specific applications. Thus their microstructures are defined for that application. This paper briefly reviews the evolution of superalloy microstructures and comments on the appearance and implications of microstructural defects in high performance superalloys. It is seen that new alloys and proceses have generated new types of defects. Thus as the industry continues to develop new alloys and processes it must remain vigilant toward the identification and control of new types of defects.

  17. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  18. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  19. Exploring the Molecular Mechanisms of Nickel-Induced Genotoxicity and Carcinogenicity: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Keyuna S.; Buchner, Virginia; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel, a naturally occurring element that exists in various mineral forms, is mainly found in soil and sediment, and its mobilization is influenced by the physicochemical properties of the soil. Industrial sources of nickel include metallurgical processes such as electroplating, alloy production, stainless steel, and nickel-cadmium batteries. Nickel industries, oil- and coal-burning power plants, and trash incinerators have been implicated in its release into the environment. In humans, nickel toxicity is influenced by the route of exposure, dose, and solubility of the nickel compound. Lung inhalation is the major route of exposure for nickel-induced toxicity. Nickel may also be ingested or absorbed through the skin. The primary target organs are the kidneys and lungs. Other organs such as the liver, spleen, heart and testes may also be affected to a lesser extent. Although the most common health effect is an allergic reaction, research has also demonstrated that nickel is carcinogenic to humans. The focus of the present review is on recent research concerning the molecular mechanisms of nickel-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. We first present a background on the occurrence of nickel in the environment, human exposure, and human health effects. PMID:21905451

  20. Nickel Curie Point Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiaverina, Chris; Lisensky, George

    2014-01-01

    Ferromagnetic materials such as nickel, iron, or cobalt lose the electron alignment that makes them attracted to a magnet when sufficient thermal energy is added. The temperature at which this change occurs is called the "Curie temperature," or "Curie point." Nickel has a Curie point of 627 K, so a candle flame is a sufficient…