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Sample records for zig-3 maintains axon

  1. The Microtubule Regulatory Protein Stathmin Is Required to Maintain the Integrity of Axonal Microtubules in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Jason E.; Lytle, Nikki K.; Zuniga, Alfredo; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Axonal transport, a form of long-distance, bi-directional intracellular transport that occurs between the cell body and synaptic terminal, is critical in maintaining the function and viability of neurons. We have identified a requirement for the stathmin (stai) gene in the maintenance of axonal microtubules and regulation of axonal transport in Drosophila . The stai gene encodes a cytosolic phosphoprotein that regulates microtubule dynamics by partitioning tubulin dimers between pools of soluble tubulin and polymerized microtubules, and by directly binding to microtubules and promoting depolymerization. Analysis of stai function in Drosophila , which has a single stai gene, circumvents potential complications with studies performed in vertebrate systems in which mutant phenotypes may be compensated by genetic redundancy of other members of the stai gene family. This has allowed us to identify an essential function for stai in the maintenance of the integrity of axonal microtubules. In addition to the severe disruption in the abundance and architecture of microtubules in the axons of stai mutant Drosophila , we also observe additional neurological phenotypes associated with loss of stai function including a posterior paralysis and tail-flip phenotype in third instar larvae, aberrant accumulation of transported membranous organelles in stai deficient axons, a progressive bang-sensitive response to mechanical stimulation reminiscent of the class of Drosophila mutants used to model human epileptic seizures, and a reduced adult lifespan. Reductions in the levels of Kinesin-1, the primary anterograde motor in axonal transport, enhance these phenotypes. Collectively, our results indicate that stai has an important role in neuronal function, likely through the maintenance of microtubule integrity in the axons of nerves of the peripheral nervous system necessary to support and sustain long-distance axonal transport. PMID:23840848

  2. A role for myelin-associated peroxisomes in maintaining paranodal loops and axonal integrity.

    PubMed

    Kassmann, Celia M; Quintes, Susanne; Rietdorf, Jens; Möbius, Wiebke; Sereda, Michael Werner; Nientiedt, Tobias; Saher, Gesine; Baes, Myriam; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2011-07-21

    Demyelinating diseases of the nervous system cause axon loss but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show by confocal and electron microscopy that in myelin-forming glia peroxisomes are associated with myelin membranes. When peroxisome biogenesis is experimentally perturbed in Pex5 conditional mouse mutants, myelination by Schwann cells appears initially normal. However, in nerves of older mice paranodal loops become physically unstable and develop swellings filled with vesicles and electron-dense material. This novel model of a demyelinating neuropathy demonstrates that peroxisomes serve an important function in the peripheral myelin compartment, required for long-term axonal integrity. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Developmental axon stretch stimulates neuron growth while maintaining normal electrical activity, intracellular calcium flux, and somatic morphology

    PubMed Central

    Loverde, Joseph R.; Pfister, Bryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of nerve fibers intuitively occurs throughout mammalian development, and is synchronized with expansion of the growing body. While most tissue systems enlarge through mitosis and differentiation, elongation of nerve fibers is remarkably unique. The emerging paradigm suggests that axons undergo stretch as contiguous tissues enlarge between the proximal and distal segments of spanning nerve fibers. While stretch is distinct from growth, tension is a known stimulus which regulates the growth of axons. Here, we hypothesized that the axon stretch-growth process may be a natural form of injury, whereby regenerative processes fortify elongating axons in order to prevent disconnection. Harnessing the live imaging capability of our axon stretch-growth bioreactors, we assessed neurons both during and following stretch for biomarkers associated with injury. Utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found no evidence of changes in spontaneous action potential activity or degradation of elicited action potentials during real-time axon stretch at strains of up to 18% applied over 5 min. Unlike traumatic axonal injury, functional calcium imaging of the soma revealed no shifts in free intracellular calcium during axon stretch. Finally, the cross-sectional areas of nuclei and cytoplasms were normal, with no evidence of chromatolysis following week-long stretch-growth limited to the lower of 25% strain or 3 mm total daily stretch. The neuronal growth cascade coupled to stretch was concluded to be independent of the changes in membrane potential, action potential generation, or calcium flux associated with traumatic injury. While axon stretch-growth is likely to share overlap with regenerative processes, we conclude that developmental stretch is a distinct stimulus from traumatic axon injury. PMID:26379492

  4. β3GnT2 Maintains Adenylyl Cyclase-3 Signaling and Axon Guidance Molecule Expression in the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faden, Ashley A.; Knott, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), odorant receptor stimulation generates cAMP signals that function in both odor detection and the regulation of axon guidance molecule expression. The enzyme that synthesizes cAMP, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), is coexpressed in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) with poly-N-acetyllactosamine (PLN) oligosaccharides determined by the glycosyltransferase β3GnT2. The loss of either enzyme results in similar defects in olfactory bulb (OB) innervation and OSN survival, suggesting that glycosylation may be important for AC3 function. We show here that AC3 is extensively modified with N-linked PLN, which is essential for AC3 activity and localization. On Western blots, AC3 from the wild-type OE migrates diffusely as a heavily glycosylated 200 kDa band that interacts with the PLN-binding lectin LEA. AC3 from the β3GnT2−/− OE loses these PLN modifications, migrating instead as a 140 kDa glycoprotein. Furthermore, basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production is reduced 80–90% in the β3GnT2−/− OE. Although AC3 traffics normally to null OSN cilia, it is absent from axon projections that aberrantly target the OB. The cAMP-dependent guidance receptor neuropilin-1 is also lost from β3GnT2−/− OSNs and axons, while semaphorin-3A ligand expression is upregulated. In addition, kirrel2, a mosaically expressed adhesion molecule that functions in axon sorting, is absent from β3GnT2−/− OB projections. These results demonstrate that PLN glycans are essential in OSNs for proper AC3 localization and function. We propose that the loss of cAMP-dependent guidance cues is also a critical factor in the severe axon guidance defects observed in β3GnT2−/− mice. PMID:21525298

  5. The C-terminal domains of NF-H and NF-M subunits maintain axonal neurofilament content by blocking turnover of the stationary neurofilament network.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mala V; Yuan, Aidong; Campbell, Jabbar; Kumar, Asok; Nixon, Ralph A

    2012-01-01

    Newly synthesized neurofilaments or protofilaments are incorporated into a highly stable stationary cytoskeleton network as they are transported along axons. Although the heavily phosphorylated carboxyl-terminal tail domains of the heavy and medium neurofilament (NF) subunits have been proposed to contribute to this process and particularly to stability of this structure, their function is still obscure. Here we show in NF-H/M tail deletion [NF-(H/M)(tailΔ)] mice that the deletion of both of these domains selectively lowers NF levels 3-6 fold along optic axons without altering either rates of subunit synthesis or the rate of slow axonal transport of NF. Pulse labeling studies carried out over 90 days revealed a significantly faster rate of disappearance of NF from the stationary NF network of optic axons in NF-(H/M)(tailΔ) mice. Faster NF disappearance was accompanied by elevated levels of NF-L proteolytic fragments in NF-(H/M)(tailΔ) axons. We conclude that NF-H and NF-M C-terminal domains do not normally regulate NF transport rates as previously proposed, but instead increase the proteolytic resistance of NF, thereby stabilizing the stationary neurofilament cytoskeleton along axons.

  6. The C-Terminal Domains of NF-H and NF-M Subunits Maintain Axonal Neurofilament Content by Blocking Turnover of the Stationary Neurofilament Network

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mala V.; Yuan, Aidong; Campbell, Jabbar; Kumar, Asok; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    Newly synthesized neurofilaments or protofilaments are incorporated into a highly stable stationary cytoskeleton network as they are transported along axons. Although the heavily phosphorylated carboxyl-terminal tail domains of the heavy and medium neurofilament (NF) subunits have been proposed to contribute to this process and particularly to stability of this structure, their function is still obscure. Here we show in NF-H/M tail deletion [NF-(H/M)tailΔ] mice that the deletion of both of these domains selectively lowers NF levels 3–6 fold along optic axons without altering either rates of subunit synthesis or the rate of slow axonal transport of NF. Pulse labeling studies carried out over 90 days revealed a significantly faster rate of disappearance of NF from the stationary NF network of optic axons in NF-(H/M)tailΔ mice. Faster NF disappearance was accompanied by elevated levels of NF-L proteolytic fragments in NF-(H/M)tailΔ axons. We conclude that NF-H and NF-M C-terminal domains do not normally regulate NF transport rates as previously proposed, but instead increase the proteolytic resistance of NF, thereby stabilizing the stationary neurofilament cytoskeleton along axons. PMID:23028520

  7. Axonal transport: cargo-specific mechanisms of motility and regulation.

    PubMed

    Maday, Sandra; Twelvetrees, Alison E; Moughamian, Armen J; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2014-10-22

    Axonal transport is essential for neuronal function, and many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases result from mutations in the axonal transport machinery. Anterograde transport supplies distal axons with newly synthesized proteins and lipids, including synaptic components required to maintain presynaptic activity. Retrograde transport is required to maintain homeostasis by removing aging proteins and organelles from the distal axon for degradation and recycling of components. Retrograde axonal transport also plays a major role in neurotrophic and injury response signaling. This review provides an overview of axonal transport pathways and discusses their role in neuronal function.

  8. Oligodendroglia: metabolic supporters of axons.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Brett M; Lee, Youngjin; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2013-12-01

    Axons are specialized extensions of neurons that are critical for the organization of the nervous system. To maintain function in axons that often extend some distance from the cell body, specialized mechanisms of energy delivery are likely to be necessary. Over the past decade, greater understanding of human demyelinating diseases and the development of animal models have suggested that oligodendroglia are critical for maintaining the function of axons. In this review, we discuss evidence for the vulnerability of neurons to energy deprivation, the importance of oligodendrocytes for axon function and survival, and recent data suggesting that transfer of energy metabolites from oligodendroglia to axons through monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) may be critical for the survival of axons. This pathway has important implications both for the basic biology of the nervous system and for human neurological disease. New insights into the role of oligodendroglial biology provide an exciting opportunity for revisions in nervous system biology, understanding myelin-based disorders, and therapeutics development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mitofusin2 mutations disrupt axonal mitochondrial positioning and promote axon degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Misko, Albert; Sasaki, Yo; Tuck, Elizabeth; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Baloh, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics (fission, fusion and movement) are implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases, from rare genetic disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, to common conditions including Alzheimer’s disease. However, the relationship between altered mitochondrial dynamics and neurodegeneration is incompletely understood. Here we show that disease associated MFN2 proteins suppressed both mitochondrial fusion and transport, and produced classic features of segmental axonal degeneration without cell body death, including neurofilament filled swellings, loss of calcium homeostasis, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species. By contrast, depletion of Opa1 suppressed mitochondrial fusion while sparing transport, and did not induce axonal degeneration. Axon degeneration induced by mutant MFN2 proteins correlated with the disruption of the proper mitochondrial positioning within axons, rather than loss of overall mitochondrial movement, or global mitochondrial dysfunction. We also found that augmenting expression of MFN1 rescued the axonal degeneration caused by MFN2 mutants, suggesting a possible therapeutic strategy for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. These experiments provide evidence that the ability of mitochondria to sense energy requirements and localize properly within axons is key to maintaining axonal integrity, and may be a common pathway by which disruptions in axonal transport contribute to neurodegeneration. PMID:22442078

  10. Regulation of Conduction Time along Axons

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Armin H.

    2013-01-01

    Timely delivery of information is essential for proper function of the nervous system. Precise regulation of nerve conduction velocity is needed for correct exertion of motor skills, sensory integration and cognitive functions. In vertebrates, the rapid transmission of signals along nerve fibers is made possible by the myelination of axons and the resulting saltatory conduction in between nodes of Ranvier. Myelin is a specialization of glia cells and is provided by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. Myelination not only maximizes conduction velocity, but also provides a means to systematically regulate conduction times in the nervous system. Systematic regulation of conduction velocity along axons, and thus systematic regulation of conduction time in between neural areas, is a common occurrence in the nervous system. To date, little is understood about the mechanism that underlies systematic conduction velocity regulation and conduction time synchrony. Node assembly, internode distance (node spacing) and axon diameter - all parameters determining the speed of signal propagation along axons - are controlled by myelinating glia. Therefore, an interaction between glial cells and neurons has been suggested. This review summarizes examples of neural systems in which conduction velocity is regulated by anatomical variations along axons. While functional implications in these systems are not always clear, recent studies in the auditory system of birds and mammals present examples of conduction velocity regulation in systems with high temporal precision and a defined biological function. Together these findings suggest an active process that shapes the interaction between axons and myelinating glia to control conduction velocity along axons. Future studies involving these systems may provide further insight into how specific conduction times in the brain are established and maintained in development. Throughout the text, conduction velocity is used for the

  11. Axonal GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Marty, Alain; Stell, Brandon M

    2008-09-01

    Type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are well established as the main inhibitory receptors in the mature mammalian forebrain. In recent years, evidence has accumulated showing that GABA(A)Rs are prevalent not only in the somatodendritic compartment of CNS neurons, but also in their axonal compartment. Evidence for axonal GABA(A)Rs includes new immunohistochemical and immunogold data: direct recording from single axonal terminals; and effects of local applications of GABA(A)R modulators on action potential generation, on axonal calcium signalling, and on neurotransmitter release. Strikingly, whereas presynaptic GABA(A)Rs have long been considered inhibitory, the new studies in the mammalian brain mostly indicate an excitatory action. Depending on the neuron that is under study, axonal GABA(A)Rs can be activated by ambient GABA, by GABA spillover, or by an autocrine action, to increase either action potential firing and/or transmitter release. In certain neurons, the excitatory effects of axonal GABA(A)Rs persist into adulthood. Altogether, axonal GABA(A)Rs appear as potent neuronal modulators of the mammalian CNS.

  12. Acute nutritional axonal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Johanna; Logigian, Eric L

    2018-01-01

    This study describes clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features of a severe acute axonal polyneuropathy common to patients with acute nutritional deficiency in the setting of alcoholism, bariatric surgery (BS), or anorexia. Retrospective analysis of clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory data of patients with acute axonal neuropathy. Thirteen patients were identified with a severe, painful, sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy that developed over 2-12 weeks with sensory ataxia, areflexia, variable muscle weakness, poor nutritional status, and weight loss, often with prolonged vomiting and normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Vitamin B6 was low in half and thiamine was low in all patients when obtained before supplementation. Patients improved with weight gain and vitamin supplementation, with motor greater than sensory recovery. We suggest that acute or subacute axonal neuropathy in patients with weight loss or vomiting associated with alcohol abuse, BS, or dietary deficiency is one syndrome, caused by micronutrient deficiencies. Muscle Nerve 57: 33-39, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Axons take a dive

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Paredes, Mercedes F; Huang, Eric J; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells (NSCs) and ependymal (E1) cells share the apical surface of the ventricular–subventricular zone (V–SVZ). In a recent article, we show that supraependymal serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from the raphe nuclei in mice form an extensive plexus on the walls of the lateral ventricles where they contact E1 cells and NSCs. Here we further characterize the contacts between 5HT supraependymal axons and E1 cells in mice, and show that suprependymal axons tightly associated to E1 cells are also present in the walls of the human lateral ventricles. These observations raise interesting questions about the function of supraependymal axons in the regulation of E1 cells. PMID:26413556

  14. Axon Regeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hammarlund, Marc; Jin, Yishi

    2014-01-01

    Single axon transection by laser surgery has made C. elegans a new model for axon regeneration. Multiple conserved molecular signaling modules have been discovered through powerful genetic screening. in vivo imaging with single cell and axon resolution has revealed unprecedented cellular dynamics in regenerating axons. Information from C. elegans has greatly expanded our knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of axon regeneration. PMID:24794753

  15. Electrophysiology of Axonal Constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher; Jung, Peter; Brown, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Axons of myelinated neurons are constricted at the nodes of Ranvier, where they are directly exposed to the extracellular space and where the vast majority of the ion channels are located. These constrictions are generated by local regulation of the kinetics of neurofilaments the most important cytoskeletal elements of the axon. In this paper we discuss how this shape affects the electrophysiological function of the neuron. Specifically, although the nodes are short (about 1 μm) in comparison to the distance between nodes (hundreds of μm) they have a substantial influence on the conduction velocity of neurons. We show through computational modeling that nodal constrictions (all other features such as numbers of ion channels left constant) reduce the required fiber diameter for a given target conduction velocity by up to 50% in comparison to an unconstricted axon. We further show that the predicted optimal fiber morphologies closely match reported fiber morphologies. Supported by The National Science Foundation (IOS 1146789)

  16. Death Receptor 6 Promotes Wallerian Degeneration in Peripheral Axons.

    PubMed

    Gamage, Kanchana K; Cheng, Irene; Park, Rachel E; Karim, Mardeen S; Edamura, Kazusa; Hughes, Christopher; Spano, Anthony J; Erisir, Alev; Deppmann, Christopher D

    2017-03-20

    Axon degeneration during development is required to sculpt a functional nervous system and is also a hallmark of pathological insult, such as injury [1, 2]. Despite similar morphological characteristics, very little overlap in molecular mechanisms has been reported between pathological and developmental degeneration [3-5]. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), developmental axon pruning relies on receptor-mediated extrinsic degeneration mechanisms to determine which axons are maintained or degenerated [5-7]. Receptors have not been implicated in Wallerian axon degeneration; instead, axon autonomous, intrinsic mechanisms are thought to be the primary driver for this type of axon disintegration [8-10]. Here we survey the role of neuronally expressed, paralogous tumor necrosis factor receptor super family (TNFRSF) members in Wallerian degeneration. We find that an orphan receptor, death receptor 6 (DR6), is required to drive axon degeneration after axotomy in sympathetic and sensory neurons cultured in microfluidic devices. We sought to validate these in vitro findings in vivo using a transected sciatic nerve model. Consistent with the in vitro findings, DR6 -/- animals displayed preserved axons up to 4 weeks after injury. In contrast to phenotypes observed in Wld s and Sarm1 -/- mice, preserved axons in DR6 -/- animals display profound myelin remodeling. This indicates that deterioration of axons and myelin after axotomy are mechanistically distinct processes. Finally, we find that JNK signaling after injury requires DR6, suggesting a link between this novel extrinsic pathway and the axon autonomous, intrinsic pathways that have become established for Wallerian degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Glia to axon RNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, José Roberto; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José Roberto; Calliari, Aldo; Cal, Karina; Bresque, Mariana; Dipaolo, Andrés; Farias, Joaquina; Mercer, John A

    2014-03-01

    The existence of RNA in axons has been a matter of dispute for decades. Evidence for RNA and ribosomes has now accumulated to a point at which it is difficult to question, much of the disputes turned to the origin of these axonal RNAs. In this review, we focus on studies addressing the origin of axonal RNAs and ribosomes. The neuronal soma as the source of most axonal RNAs has been demonstrated and is indisputable. However, the surrounding glial cells may be a supplemental source of axonal RNAs, a matter scarcely investigated in the literature. Here, we review the few papers that have demonstrated that glial-to-axon RNA transfer is not only feasible, but likely. We describe this process in both invertebrate axons and vertebrate axons. Schwann cell to axon ribosomes transfer was conclusively demonstrated (Court et al. [2008]: J. Neurosci 28:11024-11029; Court et al. [2011]: Glia 59:1529-1539). However, mRNA transfer still remains to be demonstrated in a conclusive way. The intercellular transport of mRNA has interesting implications, particularly with respect to the integration of glial and axonal function. This evolving field is likely to impact our understanding of the cell biology of the axon in both normal and pathological conditions. Most importantly, if the synthesis of proteins in the axon can be controlled by interacting glia, the possibilities for clinical interventions in injury and neurodegeneration are greatly increased. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Physical Biology of Axonal Damage.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Rijk; Kuhl, Ellen

    2018-01-01

    Excessive physical impacts to the head have direct implications on the structural integrity at the axonal level. Increasing evidence suggests that tau, an intrinsically disordered protein that stabilizes axonal microtubules, plays a critical role in the physical biology of axonal injury. However, the precise mechanisms of axonal damage remain incompletely understood. Here we propose a biophysical model of the axon to correlate the dynamic behavior of individual tau proteins under external physical forces to the evolution of axonal damage. To propagate damage across the scales, we adopt a consistent three-step strategy: First, we characterize the axonal response to external stretches and stretch rates for varying tau crosslink bond strengths using a discrete axonal damage model. Then, for each combination of stretch rates and bond strengths, we average the axonal force-stretch response of n = 10 discrete simulations, from which we derive and calibrate a homogenized constitutive model. Finally, we embed this homogenized model into a continuum axonal damage model of [1-d]-type in which d is a scalar damage parameter that is driven by the axonal stretch and stretch rate. We demonstrate that axonal damage emerges naturally from the interplay of physical forces and biological crosslinking. Our study reveals an emergent feature of the crosslink dynamics: With increasing loading rate, the axonal failure stretch increases, but axonal damage evolves earlier in time. For a wide range of physical stretch rates, from 0.1 to 10 /s, and biological bond strengths, from 1 to 100 pN, our model predicts a relatively narrow window of critical damage stretch thresholds, from 1.01 to 1.30, which agrees well with experimental observations. Our biophysical damage model can help explain the development and progression of axonal damage across the scales and will provide useful guidelines to identify critical damage level thresholds in response to excessive physical forces.

  19. Time course of ongoing activity during neuritis and following axonal transport disruption.

    PubMed

    Satkeviciute, Ieva; Goodwin, George; Bove, Geoffrey M; Dilley, Andrew

    2018-05-01

    Local nerve inflammation (neuritis) leads to ongoing activity and axonal mechanical sensitivity (AMS) along intact nociceptor axons and disrupts axonal transport. This phenomenon forms the most feasible cause of radiating pain, such as sciatica. We have previously shown that axonal transport disruption without inflammation or degeneration also leads to AMS but does not cause ongoing activity at the time point when AMS occurs, despite causing cutaneous hypersensitivity. However, there have been no systematic studies of ongoing activity during neuritis or noninflammatory axonal transport disruption. In this study, we present the time course of ongoing activity from primary sensory neurons following neuritis and vinblastine-induced axonal transport disruption. Whereas 24% of C/slow Aδ-fiber neurons had ongoing activity during neuritis, few (<10%) A- and C-fiber neurons showed ongoing activity 1-15 days following vinblastine treatment. In contrast, AMS increased transiently at the vinblastine treatment site, peaking on days 4-5 (28% of C/slow Aδ-fiber neurons) and resolved by day 15. Conduction velocities were slowed in all groups. In summary, the disruption of axonal transport without inflammation does not lead to ongoing activity in sensory neurons, including nociceptors, but does cause a rapid and transient development of AMS. Because it is proposed that AMS underlies mechanically induced radiating pain, and a transient disruption of axonal transport (as previously reported) leads to transient AMS, it follows that processes that disrupt axonal transport, such as neuritis, must persist to maintain AMS and the associated symptoms. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Many patients with radiating pain lack signs of nerve injury on clinical examination but may have neuritis, which disrupts axonal transport. We have shown that axonal transport disruption does not induce ongoing activity in primary sensory neurons but does cause transient axonal mechanical sensitivity. The present data

  20. Axon Transport and Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tourtellotte, Warren G.

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are highly prevalent and are most often associated with chronic disease, side effects from chemotherapy, or toxic-metabolic abnormalities. Neuropathies are less commonly caused by genetic mutations, but studies of the normal function of mutated proteins have identified particular vulnerabilities that often implicate mitochondrial dynamics and axon transport mechanisms. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are a group of phenotypically related diseases caused by monogenic mutations that primarily affect sympathetic and sensory neurons. Here, I review evidence to indicate that many genetic neuropathies are caused by abnormalities in axon transport. Moreover, in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. There may be specific convergence on gene mutations that disrupt nerve growth factor signaling, upon which sympathetic and sensory neurons critically depend. PMID:26724390

  1. Signal propagation along the axon.

    PubMed

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Debanne, Dominique

    2018-03-08

    Axons link distant brain regions and are usually considered as simple transmission cables in which reliable propagation occurs once an action potential has been generated. Safe propagation of action potentials relies on specific ion channel expression at strategic points of the axon such as nodes of Ranvier or axonal branch points. However, while action potentials are generally considered as the quantum of neuronal information, their signaling is not entirely digital. In fact, both their shape and their conduction speed have been shown to be modulated by activity, leading to regulations of synaptic latency and synaptic strength. We report here newly identified mechanisms of (1) safe spike propagation along the axon, (2) compartmentalization of action potential shape in the axon, (3) analog modulation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission and (4) alteration in conduction time after persistent regulation of axon morphology in central neurons. We discuss the contribution of these regulations in information processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Action Potentials Initiate in the Axon Initial Segment and Propagate Through Axon Collaterals Reliably in Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Foust, Amanda; Popovic, Marko; Zecevic, Dejan; McCormick, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Purkinje neurons are the output cells of the cerebellar cortex and generate spikes in two distinct modes, known as simple and complex spikes. Revealing the point of origin of these action potentials, and how they conduct into local axon collaterals, is important for understanding local and distal neuronal processing and communication. By utilizing a recent improvement in voltage sensitive dye imaging technique that provided exceptional spatial and temporal resolution, we were able to resolve the region of spike initiation as well as follow spike propagation into axon collaterals for each action potential initiated on single trials. All fast action potentials, for both simple and complex spikes, whether occurring spontaneously or in response to a somatic current pulse or synaptic input, initiated in the axon initial segment. At discharge frequencies of less than approximately 250 Hz, spikes propagated faithfully through the axon and axon collaterals, in a saltatory manner. Propagation failures were only observed for very high frequencies or for the spikelets associated with complex spikes. These results demonstrate that the axon initial segment is a critical decision point in Purkinje cell processing and that the properties of axon branch points are adjusted to maintain faithful transmission. PMID:20484631

  3. Axonal Membranes and Their Domains: Assembly and Function of the Axon Initial Segment and Node of Ranvier

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Jenkins, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Neurons are highly specialized cells of the nervous system that receive, process and transmit electrical signals critical for normal brain function. Here, we review the intricate organization of axonal membrane domains that facilitate rapid action potential conduction underlying communication between complex neuronal circuits. Two critical excitable domains of vertebrate axons are the axon initial segment (AIS) and the nodes of Ranvier, which are characterized by the high concentrations of voltage-gated ion channels, cell adhesion molecules and specialized cytoskeletal networks. The AIS is located at the proximal region of the axon and serves as the site of action potential initiation, while nodes of Ranvier, gaps between adjacent myelin sheaths, allow rapid propagation of the action potential through saltatory conduction. The AIS and nodes of Ranvier are assembled by ankyrins, spectrins and their associated binding partners through the clustering of membrane proteins and connection to the underlying cytoskeleton network. Although the AIS and nodes of Ranvier share similar protein composition, their mechanisms of assembly are strikingly different. Here we will cover the mechanisms of formation and maintenance of these axonal excitable membrane domains, specifically highlighting the similarities and differences between them. We will also discuss recent advances in super resolution fluorescence imaging which have elucidated the arrangement of the submembranous axonal cytoskeleton revealing a surprising structural organization necessary to maintain axonal organization and function. Finally, human mutations in axonal domain components have been associated with a growing number of neurological disorders including severe cognitive dysfunction, epilepsy, autism, neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Overall, this review highlights the assembly, maintenance and function of axonal excitable domains, particularly the AIS and nodes of Ranvier, and how

  4. An αII Spectrin-Based Cytoskeleton Protects Large-Diameter Myelinated Axons from Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Claire Yu-Mei; Zhang, Chuansheng; Zollinger, Daniel R; Leterrier, Christophe; Rasband, Matthew N

    2017-11-22

    Axons must withstand mechanical forces, including tension, torsion, and compression. Spectrins and actin form a periodic cytoskeleton proposed to protect axons against these forces. However, because spectrins also participate in assembly of axon initial segments (AISs) and nodes of Ranvier, it is difficult to uncouple their roles in maintaining axon integrity from their functions at AIS and nodes. To overcome this problem and to determine the importance of spectrin cytoskeletons for axon integrity, we generated mice with αII spectrin-deficient peripheral sensory neurons. The axons of these neurons are very long and exposed to the mechanical forces associated with limb movement; most lack an AIS, and some are unmyelinated and have no nodes. We analyzed αII spectrin-deficient mice of both sexes and found that, in myelinated axons, αII spectrin forms a periodic cytoskeleton with βIV and βII spectrin at nodes of Ranvier and paranodes, respectively, but that loss of αII spectrin disrupts this organization. Avil-cre;Sptan1 f/f mice have reduced numbers of nodes, disrupted paranodal junctions, and mislocalized Kv1 K + channels. We show that the density of nodal βIV spectrin is constant among axons, but the density of nodal αII spectrin increases with axon diameter. Remarkably, Avil-cre;Sptan1 f/f mice have intact nociception and small-diameter axons, but severe ataxia due to preferential degeneration of large-diameter myelinated axons. Our results suggest that nodal αII spectrin helps resist the mechanical forces experienced by large-diameter axons, and that αII spectrin-dependent cytoskeletons are also required for assembly of nodes of Ranvier. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A periodic axonal cytoskeleton consisting of actin and spectrin has been proposed to help axons resist the mechanical forces to which they are exposed (e.g., compression, torsion, and stretch). However, until now, no vertebrate animal model has tested the requirement of the spectrin cytoskeleton in

  5. In vivo imaging reveals mitophagy independence in the maintenance of axonal mitochondria during normal aging.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu; Wang, Haiqiong; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Qingyao; Zhang, Shuang; Deng, Yuanping; Fang, Yanshan

    2017-10-01

    Mitophagy is thought to be a critical mitochondrial quality control mechanism in neurons and has been extensively studied in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. However, little is known about how mitochondria are maintained in the lengthy neuronal axons in the context of physiological aging. Here, we utilized the unique Drosophila wing nerve model and in vivo imaging to rigorously profile changes in axonal mitochondria during aging. We revealed that mitochondria became fragmented and accumulated in aged axons. However, lack of Pink1 or Parkin did not lead to the accumulation of axonal mitochondria or axonal degeneration. Further, unlike in in vitro cultured neurons, we found that mitophagy rarely occurred in intact axons in vivo, even in aged animals. Furthermore, blocking overall mitophagy by knockdown of the core autophagy genes Atg12 or Atg17 had little effect on the turnover of axonal mitochondria or axonal integrity, suggesting that mitophagy is not required for axonal maintenance; this is regardless of whether the mitophagy is PINK1-Parkin dependent or independent. In contrast, downregulation of mitochondrial fission-fusion genes caused age-dependent axonal degeneration. Moreover, Opa1 expression in the fly head was significantly decreased with age, which may underlie the accumulation of fragmented mitochondria in aged axons. Finally, we showed that adult-onset, neuronal downregulation of the fission-fusion, but not mitophagy genes, dramatically accelerated features of aging. We propose that axonal mitochondria are maintained independently of mitophagy and that mitophagy-independent mechanisms such as fission-fusion may be central to the maintenance of axonal mitochondria and neural integrity during normal aging. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Longitudinal axons are guided by Slit/Robo signals from the floor plate.

    PubMed

    Mastick, Grant S; Farmer, W Todd; Altick, Amy L; Nural, Hikmet Feyza; Dugan, James P; Kidd, Thomas; Charron, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Longitudinal axons grow long distances along precise pathways to connect major CNS regions. However, during embryonic development, it remains largely undefined how the first longitudinal axons choose specific positions and grow along them. Here, we review recent evidence identifying a critical role for Slit/Robo signals to guide pioneer longitudinal axons in the embryonic brain stem. These studies indicate that Slit/Robo signals from the floor plate have dual functions: to repel longitudinal axons away from the ventral midline, and also to maintain straight longitudinal growth. These dual functions likely cooperate with other guidance cues to establish the major longitudinal tracts in the brain.

  7. Sodium Channel β2 Subunits Prevent Action Potential Propagation Failures at Axonal Branch Points.

    PubMed

    Cho, In Ha; Panzera, Lauren C; Chin, Morven; Hoppa, Michael B

    2017-09-27

    Neurotransmitter release depends on voltage-gated Na + channels (Na v s) to propagate an action potential (AP) successfully from the axon hillock to a synaptic terminal. Unmyelinated sections of axon are very diverse structures encompassing branch points and numerous presynaptic terminals with undefined molecular partners of Na + channels. Using optical recordings of Ca 2+ and membrane voltage, we demonstrate here that Na + channel β2 subunits (Na v β2s) are required to prevent AP propagation failures across the axonal arborization of cultured rat hippocampal neurons (mixed male and female). When Na v β2 expression was reduced, we identified two specific phenotypes: (1) membrane excitability and AP-evoked Ca 2+ entry were impaired at synapses and (2) AP propagation was severely compromised with >40% of axonal branches no longer responding to AP-stimulation. We went on to show that a great deal of electrical signaling heterogeneity exists in AP waveforms across the axonal arborization independent of axon morphology. Therefore, Na v β2 is a critical regulator of axonal excitability and synaptic function in unmyelinated axons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels are fulcrums of neurotransmission that convert electrical inputs into chemical outputs in the form of vesicle fusion at synaptic terminals. However, the role of the electrical signal, the presynaptic action potential (AP), in modulating synaptic transmission is less clear. What is the fidelity of a propagating AP waveform in the axon and what molecules shape it throughout the axonal arborization? Our work identifies several new features of AP propagation in unmyelinated axons: (1) branches of a single axonal arborization have variable AP waveforms independent of morphology, (2) Na + channel β2 subunits modulate AP-evoked Ca 2+ -influx, and (3) β2 subunits maintain successful AP propagation across the axonal arbor. These findings are relevant to understanding the flow of excitation in the

  8. Assembly and turnover of neurofilaments in growing axonal neurites.

    PubMed

    Boumil, Edward F; Vohnoutka, Rishel; Lee, Sangmook; Pant, Harish; Shea, Thomas B

    2018-01-26

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are thought to provide stability to the axon. We examined NF dynamics within axonal neurites of NB2a/d1 neuroblastoma by transient transfection with green fluorescent protein-tagged NF-heavy (GFP-H) under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter. Immunofluorescent and biochemical analyses demonstrated that GFP-H expressed early during neurite outgrowth associated with a population of centrally-situated, highly-phosphorylated crosslinked NFs along the length of axonal neurites ('bundled NFs'). By contrast, GFP-H expressed after considerable neurite outgrowth displayed markedly reduced association with bundled NFs and was instead more evenly distributed throughout the axon. This differential localization was maintained for up to 2 weeks in culture. Once considerable neurite outgrowth had progressed, GFP that had previously associated with the NF bundle during early expression was irreversibly depleted by photobleaching. Cessation of expression allowed monitoring of NF turnover. GFP-H associated bundled NFs underwent slower decay than GFP-H associated with surrounding, less-phosphorylated NFs. Notably, GFP associated with bundled NFs underwent similar decay rates within the core and edges of this bundle. These results are consistent with previous demonstration of a resident NF population within axonal neurites, but suggest that this population is more dynamic than previously considered. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Assembly and turnover of neurofilaments in growing axonal neurites

    PubMed Central

    Boumil, Edward F.; Vohnoutka, Rishel; Lee, Sangmook; Pant, Harish

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurofilaments (NFs) are thought to provide stability to the axon. We examined NF dynamics within axonal neurites of NB2a/d1 neuroblastoma by transient transfection with green fluorescent protein-tagged NF-heavy (GFP-H) under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter. Immunofluorescent and biochemical analyses demonstrated that GFP-H expressed early during neurite outgrowth associated with a population of centrally-situated, highly-phosphorylated crosslinked NFs along the length of axonal neurites (‘bundled NFs’). By contrast, GFP-H expressed after considerable neurite outgrowth displayed markedly reduced association with bundled NFs and was instead more evenly distributed throughout the axon. This differential localization was maintained for up to 2 weeks in culture. Once considerable neurite outgrowth had progressed, GFP that had previously associated with the NF bundle during early expression was irreversibly depleted by photobleaching. Cessation of expression allowed monitoring of NF turnover. GFP-H associated bundled NFs underwent slower decay than GFP-H associated with surrounding, less-phosphorylated NFs. Notably, GFP associated with bundled NFs underwent similar decay rates within the core and edges of this bundle. These results are consistent with previous demonstration of a resident NF population within axonal neurites, but suggest that this population is more dynamic than previously considered. PMID:29158321

  10. Pathfinding in a large vertebrate axon tract: isotypic interactions guide retinotectal axons at multiple choice points

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Andrew J.; Law, Mei-Yee; Chien, Chi-Bin

    2008-01-01

    Summary Navigating axons respond to environmental guidance signals, but can also follow axons that have gone before—pioneer axons. Pioneers have been studied extensively in simple systems, but the role of axon-axon interactions remains largely unexplored in large vertebrate axon tracts, where cohorts of identical axons could potentially use isotypic interactions to guide each other through multiple choice points. Furthermore, the relative importance of axon-axon interactions compared to axon-autonomous receptor function has not been assessed. Here we test the role of axon-axon interactions in retinotectal development, by devising a technique to selectively remove or replace early-born retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). We find that early RGCs are both necessary and sufficient for later axons to exit the eye. Furthermore, introducing misrouted axons by transplantation reveals that guidance from eye to tectum relies heavily on interactions between axons, including both pioneer-follower and community effects. We conclude that axon-axon interactions and ligand-receptor signaling have coequal roles, cooperating to ensure the fidelity of axon guidance in developing vertebrate tracts. PMID:18653554

  11. Oligodendrocytes: Myelination and Axonal Support

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Mikael; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers have evolved to enable fast and efficient transduction of electrical signals in the nervous system. To act as an electric insulator, the myelin sheath is formed as a multilamellar membrane structure by the spiral wrapping and subsequent compaction of the oligodendroglial plasma membrane around central nervous system (CNS) axons. Current evidence indicates that the myelin sheath is more than an inert insulating membrane structure. Oligodendrocytes are metabolically active and functionally connected to the subjacent axon via cytoplasmic-rich myelinic channels for movement of macromolecules to and from the internodal periaxonal space under the myelin sheath. This review summarizes our current understanding of how myelin is generated and also the role of oligodendrocytes in supporting the long-term integrity of myelinated axons. PMID:26101081

  12. Optofluidic control of axonal guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Ordonez, Simon; Black, Bryan; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Significant efforts are being made for control on axonal guidance due to its importance in nerve regeneration and in the formation of functional neuronal circuitry in-vitro. These include several physical (topographic modification, optical force, and electric field), chemical (surface functionalization cues) and hybrid (electro-chemical, photochemical etc) methods. Here, we report comparison of the effect of linear flow versus microfluidic flow produced by an opticallydriven micromotor in guiding retinal ganglion axons. A circularly polarized laser tweezers was used to hold, position and spin birefringent calcite particle near growth cone, which in turn resulted in microfluidic flow. The flow rate and resulting shear-force on axons could be controlled by a varying the power of the laser tweezers beam. The calcite particles were placed separately in one chamber and single particle was transported through microfluidic channel to another chamber containing the retina explant. In presence of flow, the turning of axons was found to strongly correlate with the direction of flow. Turning angle as high as 90° was achieved. Optofluidic-manipulation can be applied to other types of mammalian neurons and also can be extended to stimulate mechano-sensing neurons.

  13. Class I PI3-kinase or Akt inhibition do not impair axonal polarization, but slow down axonal elongation.

    PubMed

    Diez, Héctor; Benitez, Ma José; Fernandez, Silvia; Torres-Aleman, Ignacio; Garrido, Juan José; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    PI3K proteins family have multiple and essential functions in most cellular events. This family is composed of class I, class II and class III PI3Ks, which upstream and downstream elements are not completely elucidated. Previous studies using the broad PI3K inhibitor, LY294002 allowed to propose that PI3 kinase>Akt pathway is a key element in the determination of axonal polarity in hippocampal neurons. Recently, new inhibitors with a higher selectivity for class I PI3K have been characterized. In the present study we have examined this widely accepted theory using a new class I PI3K inhibitor (GDC-0941), as well as Akt inhibitors, and PTEN phosphatase constructs to reduce PIP3 levels. Our present data show that both, class I PI3K inhibitor and Akt inhibitor did not alter axon specification in hippocampal neurons, but greatly reduced axon length. However, in the same experiments LY294002 effectively impeded axonal polarization, as previously reported. Our biochemical data show that both, class I PI3K and Akt inhibitors, effectively block downstream elements from Akt to S6K1 activity. Both inhibitors are stable in culture medium along the time period analysed, maintaining the inhibition better than LY294002. Besides, we found evidence that LY294002 directly inhibits mTORC1. However, further analysis using an mTORC1 inhibitor showed no change in neuron polarity. Same result was obtained using a general class III PI3K inhibitor. Interestingly, we found that either, wild-type PTEN, or a phosphatase-dead form of PTEN, disrupted axonal polarization, strongly suggesting that the role of PTEN in axonal polarity can be independent of PIP3. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Diffuse axonal injury by assault.

    PubMed

    Imajo, T; Challener, R C; Roessmann, U

    1987-09-01

    A case of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by assault is reported. The majority of DAI cases documented have been due to traffic accidents and some due to falls from height. DAI is caused by angular or rotational acceleration of the victim's head. The condition is common and is the second most important head injury after subdural hematoma with regard to death. Its clinical picture is characterized by immediate and prolonged coma or demented state. Because of the subtle nature of histological changes in DAI, awareness and intentional search for the lesion is essential. The triad of DAI is as follows: focal lesions (hemorrhages and/or lacerations) in the corpus callosum and brain stem, and microscopic demonstration of axonal damage--retraction balls. The concept of DAI will elucidate and enhance the understanding of many head trauma cases.

  15. Axonal abnormalities in vanishing white matter.

    PubMed

    Klok, Melanie D; Bugiani, Marianna; de Vries, Sharon I; Gerritsen, Wouter; Breur, Marjolein; van der Sluis, Sophie; Heine, Vivi M; Kole, Maarten H P; Baron, Wia; van der Knaap, Marjo S

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to study the occurrence and development of axonal pathology and the influence of astrocytes in vanishing white matter. Axons and myelin were analyzed using electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry on Eif2b4 and Eif2b5 single- and double-mutant mice and patient brain tissue. In addition, astrocyte-forebrain co-culture studies were performed. In the corpus callosum of Eif2b5- mutant mice, myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and G-ratio developed normally up to 4 months. At 7 months, however, axons had become thinner, while in control mice axonal diameters had increased further. Myelin sheath thickness remained close to normal, resulting in an abnormally low G-ratio in Eif2b5- mutant mice. In more severely affected Eif2b4-Eif2b5 double-mutants, similar abnormalities were already present at 4 months, while in milder affected Eif2b4 mutants, few abnormalities were observed at 7 months. Additionally, from 2 months onward an increased percentage of thin, unmyelinated axons and increased axonal density were present in Eif2b5 -mutant mice. Co-cultures showed that Eif2b5 mutant astrocytes induced increased axonal density, also in control forebrain tissue, and that control astrocytes induced normal axonal density, also in mutant forebrain tissue. In vanishing white matter patient brains, axons and myelin sheaths were thinner than normal in moderately and severely affected white matter. In mutant mice and patients, signs of axonal transport defects and cytoskeletal abnormalities were minimal. In vanishing white matter, axons are initially normal and atrophy later. Astrocytes are central in this process. If therapy becomes available, axonal pathology may be prevented with early intervention.

  16. Myelin Loss and Axonal Ion Channel Adaptations Associated with Gray Matter Neuronal Hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Mustafa S.

    2015-01-01

    Myelination and voltage-gated ion channel clustering at the nodes of Ranvier are essential for the rapid saltatory conduction of action potentials. Whether myelination influences the structural organization of the axon initial segment (AIS) and action potential initiation is poorly understood. Using the cuprizone mouse model, we combined electrophysiological recordings with immunofluorescence of the voltage-gated Nav1.6 and Kv7.3 subunits and anchoring proteins to analyze the functional and structural properties of single demyelinated neocortical L5 axons. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that neurons with demyelinated axons were intrinsically more excitable, characterized by increased spontaneous suprathreshold depolarizations as well as antidromically propagating action potentials ectopically generated in distal parts of the axon. Immunofluorescence examination of demyelinated axons showed that βIV-spectrin, Nav1.6, and the Kv7.3 channels in nodes of Ranvier either dissolved or extended into the paranodal domains. In contrast, while the AIS in demyelinated axons started more closely to the soma, ankyrin G, βIV-spectrin, and the ion channel expression were maintained. Structure–function analysis and computational modeling, constrained by the AIS location and realistic dendritic and axonal morphologies, confirmed that a more proximal onset of the AIS slightly reduced the efficacy of action potential generation, suggesting a compensatory role. These results suggest that oligodendroglial myelination is not only important for maximizing conduction velocity, but also for limiting hyperexcitability of pyramidal neurons. PMID:25948275

  17. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  18. Axonal regeneration in zebrafish spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In the present review we discuss two interrelated events—axonal damage and repair—known to occur after spinal cord injury (SCI) in the zebrafish. Adult zebrafish are capable of regenerating axonal tracts and can restore full functionality after SCI. Unlike fish, axon regeneration in the adult mammalian central nervous system is extremely limited. As a consequence of an injury there is very little repair of disengaged axons and therefore functional deficit persists after SCI in adult mammals. In contrast, peripheral nervous system axons readily regenerate following injury and hence allow functional recovery both in mammals and fish. A better mechanistic understanding of these three scenarios could provide a more comprehensive insight into the success or failure of axonal regeneration after SCI. This review summarizes the present understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of axonal regeneration, in both the peripheral nervous system and the central nervous system, and large scale gene expression analysis is used to focus on different events during regeneration. The discovery and identification of genes involved in zebrafish spinal cord regeneration and subsequent functional experimentation will provide more insight into the endogenous mechanism of myelination and remyelination. Furthermore, precise knowledge of the mechanism underlying the extraordinary axonal regeneration process in zebrafish will also allow us to unravel the potential therapeutic strategies to be implemented for enhancing regrowth and remyelination of axons in mammals. PMID:29721326

  19. Axonal regeneration in zebrafish spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2018-03-01

    In the present review we discuss two interrelated events-axonal damage and repair-known to occur after spinal cord injury (SCI) in the zebrafish. Adult zebrafish are capable of regenerating axonal tracts and can restore full functionality after SCI. Unlike fish, axon regeneration in the adult mammalian central nervous system is extremely limited. As a consequence of an injury there is very little repair of disengaged axons and therefore functional deficit persists after SCI in adult mammals. In contrast, peripheral nervous system axons readily regenerate following injury and hence allow functional recovery both in mammals and fish. A better mechanistic understanding of these three scenarios could provide a more comprehensive insight into the success or failure of axonal regeneration after SCI. This review summarizes the present understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of axonal regeneration, in both the peripheral nervous system and the central nervous system, and large scale gene expression analysis is used to focus on different events during regeneration. The discovery and identification of genes involved in zebrafish spinal cord regeneration and subsequent functional experimentation will provide more insight into the endogenous mechanism of myelination and remyelination. Furthermore, precise knowledge of the mechanism underlying the extraordinary axonal regeneration process in zebrafish will also allow us to unravel the potential therapeutic strategies to be implemented for enhancing regrowth and remyelination of axons in mammals.

  20. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels at Nodes of Ranvier Secure Axonal Spike Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Gründemann, Jan; Clark, Beverley A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional connectivity between brain regions relies on long-range signaling by myelinated axons. This is secured by saltatory action potential propagation that depends fundamentally on sodium channel availability at nodes of Ranvier. Although various potassium channel types have been anatomically localized to myelinated axons in the brain, direct evidence for their functional recruitment in maintaining node excitability is scarce. Cerebellar Purkinje cells provide continuous input to their targets in the cerebellar nuclei, reliably transmitting axonal spikes over a wide range of rates, requiring a constantly available pool of nodal sodium channels. We show that the recruitment of calcium-activated potassium channels (IK, KCa3.1) by local, activity-dependent calcium (Ca2+) influx at nodes of Ranvier via a T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ current provides a powerful mechanism that likely opposes depolarizing block at the nodes and is thus pivotal to securing continuous axonal spike propagation in spontaneously firing Purkinje cells. PMID:26344775

  1. Action Potential Dynamics in Fine Axons Probed with an Axonally Targeted Optical Voltage Sensor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yihe; Bayguinov, Peter O; Jackson, Meyer B

    2017-01-01

    The complex and malleable conduction properties of axons determine how action potentials propagate through extensive axonal arbors to reach synaptic terminals. The excitability of axonal membranes plays a major role in neural circuit function, but because most axons are too thin for conventional electrical recording, their properties remain largely unexplored. To overcome this obstacle, we used a genetically encoded hybrid voltage sensor (hVOS) harboring an axonal targeting motif. Expressing this probe in transgenic mice enabled us to monitor voltage changes optically in two populations of axons in hippocampal slices, the large axons of dentate granule cells (mossy fibers) in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region and the much finer axons of hilar mossy cells in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Action potentials propagated with distinct velocities in each type of axon. Repetitive firing broadened action potentials in both populations, but at an intermediate frequency the degree of broadening differed. Repetitive firing also attenuated action potential amplitudes in both mossy cell and granule cell axons. These results indicate that the features of use-dependent action potential broadening, and possible failure, observed previously in large nerve terminals also appear in much finer unmyelinated axons. Subtle differences in the frequency dependences could influence the propagation of activity through different pathways to excite different populations of neurons. The axonally targeted hVOS probe used here opens up the diverse repertoire of neuronal processes to detailed biophysical study.

  2. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  3. The axonal transport of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, William M.; Hollenbeck, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Vigorous transport of cytoplasmic components along axons over substantial distances is crucial for the maintenance of neuron structure and function. The transport of mitochondria, which serves to distribute mitochondrial functions in a dynamic and non-uniform fashion, has attracted special interest in recent years following the discovery of functional connections among microtubules, motor proteins and mitochondria, and their influences on neurodegenerative diseases. Although the motor proteins that drive mitochondrial movement are now well characterized, the mechanisms by which anterograde and retrograde movement are coordinated with one another and with stationary axonal mitochondria are not yet understood. In this Commentary, we review why mitochondria move and how they move, focusing particularly on recent studies of transport regulation, which implicate control of motor activity by specific cell-signaling pathways, regulation of motor access to transport tracks and static microtubule–mitochondrion linkers. A detailed mechanism for modulating anterograde mitochondrial transport has been identified that involves Miro, a mitochondrial Ca2+-binding GTPase, which with associated proteins, can bind and control kinesin-1. Elements of the Miro complex also have important roles in mitochondrial fission–fusion dynamics, highlighting questions about the interdependence of biogenesis, transport, dynamics, maintenance and degradation. PMID:22619228

  4. Differential effects of myostatin deficiency on motor and sensory axons.

    PubMed

    Jones, Maria R; Villalón, Eric; Northcutt, Adam J; Calcutt, Nigel A; Garcia, Michael L

    2017-12-01

    Deletion of myostatin in mice (MSTN -/- ) alters structural properties of peripheral axons. However, properties like axon diameter and myelin thickness were analyzed in mixed nerves, so it is unclear whether loss of myostatin affects motor, sensory, or both types of axons. Using the MSTN -/- mouse model, we analyzed the effects of increasing the number of muscle fibers on axon diameter, myelin thickness, and internode length in motor and sensory axons. Axon diameter and myelin thickness were increased in motor axons of MSTN -/- mice without affecting internode length or axon number. The number of sensory axons was increased without affecting their structural properties. These results suggest that motor and sensory axons establish structural properties by independent mechanisms. Moreover, in motor axons, instructive cues from the neuromuscular junction may play a role in co-regulating axon diameter and myelin thickness, whereas internode length is established independently. Muscle Nerve 56: E100-E107, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of optic axon guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Masaru

    2005-12-01

    Axon guidance is one of the critical processes during vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) development. The optic nerve, which contains the axons of retinal ganglion cells, has been used as a powerful model to elucidate some of the mechanisms underlying axon guidance because it is easily manipulated experimentally, and its function is well understood. Recent molecular biology studies have revealed that numerous guidance molecules control the development of the visual pathway. This review introduces the molecular mechanisms involved in each critical step during optic axon guidance. Axonal projections to the optic disc are thought to depend on adhesion molecules and inhibitory extracellular matrices such as chondroitin sulfate. The formation of the head of the optic nerve and the optic chiasm require ligand-receptor interactions between netrin-1 and the deleted in colorectal cancer receptor, and Slit proteins and Robo receptors, respectively. The gradient distributions of ephrin ligands and Eph receptors are essential for correct ipsilateral projections at the optic chiasm and the topographic mapping of axons in the superior colliculus/optic tectum. The precise gradient is regulated by transcription factors determining the retinal dorso-ventral and nasal-temporal polarities. Moreover, the axon guidance activities by Slit and semaphorin 5A require the existence of heparan sulfate, which binds to numerous guidance molecules. Recent discoveries about the molecular mechanisms underlying optic nerve guidance will facilitate progress in CNS developmental biology and axon-regeneration therapy.

  6. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Axon-Axon Interactions Regulate Topographic Optic Tract Sorting via CYFIP2-Dependent WAVE Complex Function.

    PubMed

    Cioni, Jean-Michel; Wong, Hovy Ho-Wai; Bressan, Dario; Kodama, Lay; Harris, William A; Holt, Christine E

    2018-03-07

    The axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are topographically sorted before they arrive at the optic tectum. This pre-target sorting, typical of axon tracts throughout the brain, is poorly understood. Here, we show that cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting proteins (CYFIPs) fulfill non-redundant functions in RGCs, with CYFIP1 mediating axon growth and CYFIP2 specifically involved in axon sorting. We find that CYFIP2 mediates homotypic and heterotypic contact-triggered fasciculation and repulsion responses between dorsal and ventral axons. CYFIP2 associates with transporting ribonucleoprotein particles in axons and regulates translation. Axon-axon contact stimulates CYFIP2 to move into growth cones where it joins the actin nucleating WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) in the periphery and regulates actin remodeling and filopodial dynamics. CYFIP2's function in axon sorting is mediated by its binding to the WRC but not its translational regulation. Together, these findings uncover CYFIP2 as a key regulatory link between axon-axon interactions, filopodial dynamics, and optic tract sorting. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Helene; Gour, Anjali; Straehle, Jakob; Boergens, Kevin M.; Brecht, Michael; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2017-09-01

    Research on neuronal connectivity in the cerebral cortex has focused on the existence and strength of synapses between neurons, and their location on the cell bodies and dendrites of postsynaptic neurons. The synaptic architecture of individual presynaptic axonal trees, however, remains largely unknown. Here we used dense reconstructions from three-dimensional electron microscopy in rats to study the synaptic organization of local presynaptic axons in layer 2 of the medial entorhinal cortex, the site of grid-like spatial representations. We observe path-length-dependent axonal synapse sorting, such that axons of excitatory neurons sequentially target inhibitory neurons followed by excitatory neurons. Connectivity analysis revealed a cellular feedforward inhibition circuit involving wide, myelinated inhibitory axons and dendritic synapse clustering. Simulations show that this high-precision circuit can control the propagation of synchronized activity in the medial entorhinal cortex, which is known for temporally precise discharges.

  9. The Genetics of Axon Guidance and Axon Regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Andrew D.; Hutter, Harald; Jin, Yishi; Wadsworth, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The correct wiring of neuronal circuits depends on outgrowth and guidance of neuronal processes during development. In the past two decades, great progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of axon outgrowth and guidance. Genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans has played a key role in elucidating conserved pathways regulating axon guidance, including Netrin signaling, the slit Slit/Robo pathway, Wnt signaling, and others. Axon guidance factors were first identified by screens for mutations affecting animal behavior, and by direct visual screens for axon guidance defects. Genetic analysis of these pathways has revealed the complex and combinatorial nature of guidance cues, and has delineated how cues guide growth cones via receptor activity and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Several axon guidance pathways also affect directed migrations of non-neuronal cells in C. elegans, with implications for normal and pathological cell migrations in situations such as tumor metastasis. The small number of neurons and highly stereotyped axonal architecture of the C. elegans nervous system allow analysis of axon guidance at the level of single identified axons, and permit in vivo tests of prevailing models of axon guidance. C. elegans axons also have a robust capacity to undergo regenerative regrowth after precise laser injury (axotomy). Although such axon regrowth shares some similarities with developmental axon outgrowth, screens for regrowth mutants have revealed regeneration-specific pathways and factors that were not identified in developmental screens. Several areas remain poorly understood, including how major axon tracts are formed in the embryo, and the function of axon regeneration in the natural environment. PMID:28114100

  10. Meninges-derived cues control axon guidance.

    PubMed

    Suter, Tracey A C S; DeLoughery, Zachary J; Jaworski, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    The axons of developing neurons travel long distances along stereotyped pathways under the direction of extracellular cues sensed by the axonal growth cone. Guidance cues are either secreted proteins that diffuse freely or bind the extracellular matrix, or membrane-anchored proteins. Different populations of axons express distinct sets of receptors for guidance cues, which results in differential responses to specific ligands. The full repertoire of axon guidance cues and receptors and the identity of the tissues producing these cues remain to be elucidated. The meninges are connective tissue layers enveloping the vertebrate brain and spinal cord that serve to protect the central nervous system (CNS). The meninges also instruct nervous system development by regulating the generation and migration of neural progenitors, but it has not been determined whether they help guide axons to their targets. Here, we investigate a possible role for the meninges in neuronal wiring. Using mouse neural tissue explants, we show that developing spinal cord meninges produce secreted attractive and repulsive cues that can guide multiple types of axons in vitro. We find that motor and sensory neurons, which project axons across the CNS-peripheral nervous system (PNS) boundary, are attracted by meninges. Conversely, axons of both ipsi- and contralaterally projecting dorsal spinal cord interneurons are repelled by meninges. The responses of these axonal populations to the meninges are consistent with their trajectories relative to meninges in vivo, suggesting that meningeal guidance factors contribute to nervous system wiring and control which axons are able to traverse the CNS-PNS boundary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Maintaining evolvability.

    PubMed

    Crow, James F

    2008-12-01

    Although molecular methods, such as QTL mapping, have revealed a number of loci with large effects, it is still likely that the bulk of quantitative variability is due to multiple factors, each with small effect. Typically, these have a large additive component. Conventional wisdom argues that selection, natural or artificial, uses up additive variance and thus depletes its supply. Over time, the variance should be reduced, and at equilibrium be near zero. This is especially expected for fitness and traits highly correlated with it. Yet, populations typically have a great deal of additive variance, and do not seem to run out of genetic variability even after many generations of directional selection. Long-term selection experiments show that populations continue to retain seemingly undiminished additive variance despite large changes in the mean value. I propose that there are several reasons for this. (i) The environment is continually changing so that what was formerly most fit no longer is. (ii) There is an input of genetic variance from mutation, and sometimes from migration. (iii) As intermediate-frequency alleles increase in frequency towards one, producing less variance (as p --> 1, p(1 - p) --> 0), others that were originally near zero become more common and increase the variance. Thus, a roughly constant variance is maintained. (iv) There is always selection for fitness and for characters closely related to it. To the extent that the trait is heritable, later generations inherit a disproportionate number of genes acting additively on the trait, thus increasing genetic variance. For these reasons a selected population retains its ability to evolve. Of course, genes with large effect are also important. Conspicuous examples are the small number of loci that changed teosinte to maize, and major phylogenetic changes in the animal kingdom. The relative importance of these along with duplications, chromosome rearrangements, horizontal transmission and polyploidy

  12. MicroRNA-26a supports mammalian axon regeneration in vivo by suppressing GSK3β expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J-J; Liu, C-M; Zhang, B-Y; Wang, X-W; Zhang, M; Saijilafu; Zhang, S-R; Hall, P; Hu, Y-W; Zhou, F-Q

    2015-08-27

    MicroRNAs are emerging to be important epigenetic factors that control axon regeneration. Here, we report that microRNA-26a (miR-26a) is a physiological regulator of mammalian axon regeneration in vivo. We demonstrated that endogenous miR-26a acted to target specifically glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in adult mouse sensory neurons in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of endogenous miR-26a in sensory neurons impaired axon regeneration in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the regulatory effect of miR-26a was mediated by increased expression of GSK3β because downregulation or pharmacological inhibition of GSK3β fully rescued axon regeneration. Our results also suggested that the miR-26a-GSK3β pathway regulated axon regeneration at the neuronal soma by controlling gene expression. We provided biochemical and functional evidences that the regeneration-associated transcription factor Smad1 acted downstream of miR-26a and GSK3β to control sensory axon regeneration. Our study reveals a novel miR-26a-GSK3β-Smad1 signaling pathway in the regulation of mammalian axon regeneration. Moreover, we provide the first evidence that, in addition to inhibition of GSK3β kinase activity, maintaining a lower protein level of GSK3β in neurons by the microRNA is necessary for efficient axon regeneration.

  13. Mitochondria localize to injured axons to support regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sung Min; Baig, Huma S.; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Axon regeneration is essential to restore the nervous system after axon injury. However, the neuronal cell biology that underlies axon regeneration is incompletely understood. Here we use in vivo single-neuron analysis to investigate the relationship between nerve injury, mitochondrial localization, and axon regeneration. Mitochondria translocate into injured axons, so that average mitochondria density increases after injury. Moreover, single-neuron analysis reveals that axons that fail to increase mitochondria have poor regeneration. Experimental alterations to axonal mitochondrial distribution or mitochondrial respiratory chain function result in corresponding changes to regeneration outcomes. Axonal mitochondria are specifically required for growth cone migration, identifying a key energy challenge for injured neurons. Finally, mitochondrial localization to the axon after injury is regulated in part by dual-leucine zipper kinase-1 (DLK-1), a conserved regulator of axon regeneration. These data identify regulation of axonal mitochondria as a new cell biological mechanism that helps determine the regenerative response of injured neurons. PMID:28009276

  14. Curcumin mitigates axonal injury and neuronal cell apoptosis through the PERK/Nrf2 signaling pathway following diffuse axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tingqin; Zhao, Junjie; Guo, Dan; Pang, Honggang; Zhao, Yonglin; Song, Jinning

    2018-05-23

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) accounts for more than 50% of all traumatic brain injury. In response to the mechanical damage associated with DAI, the abnormal proteins produced in the neurons and axons, namely, β-APP and p-tau, induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Curcumin, a major component extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, has shown potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-infection, and antitumor activity in previous studies. Moreover, curcumin is an activator of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and promotes its nuclear translocation. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of curcumin for the treatment of DAI and investigated the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of curcumin against neural cell death and axonal injury after DAI. Rats subjected to a model of DAI by head rotational acceleration were treated with vehicle or curcumin to evaluate the effect of curcumin on neuronal and axonal injury. We observed that curcumin (20 mg/kg intraperitoneal) administered 1 h after DAI induction alleviated the aggregation of p-tau and β-APP in neurons, reduced ER-stress-related cell apoptosis, and ameliorated neurological deficits. Further investigation showed that the protective effect of curcumin in DAI was mediated by the PERK/Nrf2 pathway. Curcumin promoted PERK phosphorylation, and then Nrf2 dissociated from Keap1 and was translocated to the nucleus, which activated ATF4, an important bZIP transcription factor that maintains intracellular homeostasis, but inhibited the CHOP, a hallmark of ER stress and ER-associated programmed cell death. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that curcumin confers protection against abnormal proteins and neuronal apoptosis after DAI, that the process is mediated by strengthening of the unfolded protein response to overcome ER stress, and that the protective effect of curcumin against DAI is dependent on the activation of Nrf2.

  15. Axonal inclusions in the crab Hemigrapsus nudus.

    PubMed

    Smith, R S

    1978-10-01

    Light microscopic examination of living giant axons from the walking legs of Hemigrapsus nudus revealed intra-axonal inclusions which were usually several tens of micrometers long and about 5 micron wide. The inclusions were filled with small light-scattering particles. The inclusions were shown, by thin section electron microscopy, to be composed largely 68% by volume) of mitochondria. Each inclusion was surrounded by membrane bounded spaces which are presumed to represent a part of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Similar inclusions were not found in the leg axons of a variety of other decapod crustaceans.

  16. The L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian is necessary for maintenance of sensory axon advance in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Martin, Veronica; Mrkusich, Eli; Steinel, Martin C; Rice, Jason; Merritt, David J; Whitington, Paul M

    2008-04-08

    Cell adhesion molecules have long been implicated in the regulation of axon growth, but the precise cellular roles played by individual cell adhesion molecules and the molecular basis for their action are still not well understood. We have used the sensory system of the Drosophila embryo to shed light on the mechanism by which the L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian regulates axon growth. We have found a highly penetrant sensory axon stalling phenotype in neuroglian mutant embryos. Axons stalled at a variety of positions along their normal trajectory, but most commonly in the periphery some distance along the peripheral nerve. All lateral and dorsal cluster sensory neurons examined, except for the dorsal cluster neuron dbd, showed stalling. Sensory axons were never seen to project along inappropriate pathways in neuroglian mutants and stalled axons showed normal patterns of fasciculation within nerves. The growth cones of stalled axons possessed a simple morphology, similar to their appearance in wild-type embryos when advancing along nerves. Driving expression of the wild-type form of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone rescued the neuroglian mutant phenotype of both pioneering and follower neurons. A partial rescue was achieved by expressing the Neuroglian extracellular domain. Over/mis-expression of Neuroglian in all neurons, oenocytes or trachea had no apparent effect on sensory axon growth. We conclude that Neuroglian is necessary to maintain axon advance along axonal substrates, but is not required for initiation of axon outgrowth, axon fasciculation or recognition of correct growth substrates. Expression of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone is sufficient to promote axon advance and the intracellular region of the molecule is largely dispensable for this function. It is unlikely, therefore, that Nrg acts as a molecular 'clutch' to couple adhesion of F-actin within the growth cone to the extracellular substrate. Rather, we suggest that Neuroglian

  17. The L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian is necessary for maintenance of sensory axon advance in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Veronica; Mrkusich, Eli; Steinel, Martin C; Rice, Jason; Merritt, David J; Whitington, Paul M

    2008-01-01

    Background Cell adhesion molecules have long been implicated in the regulation of axon growth, but the precise cellular roles played by individual cell adhesion molecules and the molecular basis for their action are still not well understood. We have used the sensory system of the Drosophila embryo to shed light on the mechanism by which the L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian regulates axon growth. Results We have found a highly penetrant sensory axon stalling phenotype in neuroglian mutant embryos. Axons stalled at a variety of positions along their normal trajectory, but most commonly in the periphery some distance along the peripheral nerve. All lateral and dorsal cluster sensory neurons examined, except for the dorsal cluster neuron dbd, showed stalling. Sensory axons were never seen to project along inappropriate pathways in neuroglian mutants and stalled axons showed normal patterns of fasciculation within nerves. The growth cones of stalled axons possessed a simple morphology, similar to their appearance in wild-type embryos when advancing along nerves. Driving expression of the wild-type form of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone rescued the neuroglian mutant phenotype of both pioneering and follower neurons. A partial rescue was achieved by expressing the Neuroglian extracellular domain. Over/mis-expression of Neuroglian in all neurons, oenocytes or trachea had no apparent effect on sensory axon growth. Conclusion We conclude that Neuroglian is necessary to maintain axon advance along axonal substrates, but is not required for initiation of axon outgrowth, axon fasciculation or recognition of correct growth substrates. Expression of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone is sufficient to promote axon advance and the intracellular region of the molecule is largely dispensable for this function. It is unlikely, therefore, that Nrg acts as a molecular 'clutch' to couple adhesion of F-actin within the growth cone to the extracellular substrate. Rather, we

  18. Axon tension regulates fasciculation/defasciculation through the control of axon shaft zippering

    PubMed Central

    Šmít, Daniel; Fouquet, Coralie; Pincet, Frédéric; Zapotocky, Martin; Trembleau, Alain

    2017-01-01

    While axon fasciculation plays a key role in the development of neural networks, very little is known about its dynamics and the underlying biophysical mechanisms. In a model system composed of neurons grown ex vivo from explants of embryonic mouse olfactory epithelia, we observed that axons dynamically interact with each other through their shafts, leading to zippering and unzippering behavior that regulates their fasciculation. Taking advantage of this new preparation suitable for studying such interactions, we carried out a detailed biophysical analysis of zippering, occurring either spontaneously or induced by micromanipulations and pharmacological treatments. We show that zippering arises from the competition of axon-axon adhesion and mechanical tension in the axons, and provide the first quantification of the force of axon-axon adhesion. Furthermore, we introduce a biophysical model of the zippering dynamics, and we quantitatively relate the individual zipper properties to global characteristics of the developing axon network. Our study uncovers a new role of mechanical tension in neural development: the regulation of axon fasciculation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19907.001 PMID:28422009

  19. Modeling of axonal endoplasmic reticulum network by spastic paraplegia proteins.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Belgin; Zhao, Lu; Stofanko, Martin; O'Sullivan, Niamh C; Kang, Zi Han; Roost, Annika; Thomas, Matthew R; Zaessinger, Sophie; Blard, Olivier; Patto, Alex L; Sohail, Anood; Baena, Valentina; Terasaki, Mark; O'Kane, Cahir J

    2017-07-25

    Axons contain a smooth tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network that is thought to be continuous with ER throughout the neuron; the mechanisms that form this axonal network are unknown. Mutations affecting reticulon or REEP proteins, with intramembrane hairpin domains that model ER membranes, cause an axon degenerative disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We show that Drosophila axons have a dynamic axonal ER network, which these proteins help to model. Loss of HSP hairpin proteins causes ER sheet expansion, partial loss of ER from distal motor axons, and occasional discontinuities in axonal ER. Ultrastructural analysis reveals an extensive ER network in axons, which shows larger and fewer tubules in larvae that lack reticulon and REEP proteins, consistent with loss of membrane curvature. Therefore HSP hairpin-containing proteins are required for shaping and continuity of axonal ER, thus suggesting roles for ER modeling in axon maintenance and function.

  20. Con-nectin axons and dendrites.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Gerard M J

    2006-07-03

    Unlike adherens junctions, synapses are asymmetric connections, usually between axons and dendrites, that rely on various cell adhesion molecules for structural stability and function. Two cell types of adhesion molecules found at adherens junctions, cadherins and nectins, are thought to mediate homophilic interaction between neighboring cells. In this issue, Togashi et al. (see p. 141) demonstrate that the differential localization of two heterophilic interacting nectins mediates the selective attraction of axons and dendrites in cooperation with cadherins.

  1. Commissural Axons of the Mouse Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E.; Darrow, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorso-ventral (i.e. tonotopic) and rostro-caudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broad-band inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears on a quick time course. PMID:23124982

  2. Evolution of the Mauthner axon cap.

    PubMed

    Bierman, Hilary S; Zottoli, Steven J; Hale, Melina E

    2009-01-01

    Studies of vertebrate brain evolution have focused primarily on patterns of gene expression or changes in size and organization of major brain regions. The Mauthner cell, an important reticulospinal neuron that functions in the startle response of many species, provides an opportunity for evolutionary comparisons at the cellular level. Despite broad interspecific similarities in Mauthner cell morphology, the motor patterns and startle behaviors it initiates vary markedly. Response diversity has been hypothesized to result, in part, from differences in the structure and function of the Mauthner cell-associated axon cap. We used light microscopy techniques to compare axon cap morphology across a wide range of species, including all four extant basal actinopterygian orders, representatives of a variety of teleost lineages and lungfishes, and we combined our data with published descriptions of axon cap structure. The 'composite' axon cap, observed in teleosts, is an organized conglomeration of glia and fibers of inhibitory and excitatory interneurons. Lungfish, amphibian tadpoles and several basal actinopterygian fishes have 'simple' axon caps that appear to lack glia and include few fibers. Several other basal actinopterygian fishes have 'simple-dense' caps that include greater numbers of fibers than simple caps, but lack the additional elements and organization of composite caps. Phylogenetic mapping shows that through evolution there are discrete transitions in axon cap morphology occurring at the base of gnathostomes, within basal actinopterygians, and at the base of the teleost radiation. Comparing axon cap evolution to the evolution of startle behavior and motor pattern provides insight into the relationship between Mauthner cell-associated structures and their functions in behavior. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Variable laterality of corticospinal tract axons that regenerate after spinal cord injury as a result of PTEN deletion or knock-down

    PubMed Central

    Willenberg, Rafer; Zukor, Katherine; Liu, Kai; He, Zhigang; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Corticospinal tract (CST) axons from one hemisphere normally extend and terminate predominantly in the contralateral spinal cord. We previously showed that deleting PTEN in the sensorimotor cortex enables CST axons to regenerate after spinal cord injury and that some regenerating axons extend along the “wrong” side. Here, we characterize the degree of specificity of regrowth in terms of laterality. PTEN was selectively deleted via cortical AAV-Cre injections in neonatal PTEN-floxed mice. As adults, mice received dorsal hemisection injuries at T12 or complete crush injuries at T9. CST axons from one hemisphere were traced by unilateral BDA injections in PTEN-deleted mice with spinal cord injury and in non-injured PTEN-floxed mice that had not received AAV-Cre. In non-injured mice, 97.9 ± 0.7% of BDA-labeled axons in white matter and 88.5 ± 1.0% of BDA-labeled axons in grey matter were contralateral to the cortex of origin. In contrast, laterality of CST axons that extended past a lesion due to PTEN deletion varied across animals. In some cases, regenerated axons extended predominantly on the ipsilateral side, in other cases, axons extended predominantly contralaterally, and in others, axons were similar in numbers on both sides. Similar results were seen in analyses of cases from previous studies using shRNA-mediated PTEN knock-down. These results indicate that CST axons that extend past a lesion due to PTEN deletion or knock-down do not maintain the contralateral rule of the non-injured CST, highlighting one aspect for how resultant circuitry from regenerating axons may differ from that of the uninjured CST. PMID:26878190

  4. The SNARE Protein Syntaxin 3 Confers Specificity for Polarized Axonal Trafficking in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Soo Hoo, Linda; Banna, Chris D.; Radeke, Carolyn M.; Sharma, Nikunj; Albertolle, Mary E.; Low, Seng Hui; Weimbs, Thomas; Vandenberg, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity and precise subcellular protein localization are pivotal to neuronal function. The SNARE machinery underlies intracellular membrane fusion events, but its role in neuronal polarity and selective protein targeting remain unclear. Here we report that syntaxin 3 is involved in orchestrating polarized trafficking in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We show that syntaxin 3 localizes to the axonal plasma membrane, particularly to axonal tips, whereas syntaxin 4 localizes to the somatodendritic plasma membrane. Disruption of a conserved N-terminal targeting motif, which causes mislocalization of syntaxin 3, results in coincident mistargeting of the axonal cargos neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule (NgCAM) and neurexin, but not transferrin receptor, a somatodendritic cargo. Similarly, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous syntaxin 3 leads to partial mistargeting of NgCAM, demonstrating that syntaxin 3 plays an important role in its targeting. Additionally, overexpression of syntaxin 3 results in increased axonal growth. Our findings suggest an important role for syntaxin 3 in maintaining neuronal polarity and in the critical task of selective trafficking of membrane protein to axons. PMID:27662481

  5. The SNARE Protein Syntaxin 3 Confers Specificity for Polarized Axonal Trafficking in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Soo Hoo, Linda; Banna, Chris D; Radeke, Carolyn M; Sharma, Nikunj; Albertolle, Mary E; Low, Seng Hui; Weimbs, Thomas; Vandenberg, Carol A

    Cell polarity and precise subcellular protein localization are pivotal to neuronal function. The SNARE machinery underlies intracellular membrane fusion events, but its role in neuronal polarity and selective protein targeting remain unclear. Here we report that syntaxin 3 is involved in orchestrating polarized trafficking in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We show that syntaxin 3 localizes to the axonal plasma membrane, particularly to axonal tips, whereas syntaxin 4 localizes to the somatodendritic plasma membrane. Disruption of a conserved N-terminal targeting motif, which causes mislocalization of syntaxin 3, results in coincident mistargeting of the axonal cargos neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule (NgCAM) and neurexin, but not transferrin receptor, a somatodendritic cargo. Similarly, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous syntaxin 3 leads to partial mistargeting of NgCAM, demonstrating that syntaxin 3 plays an important role in its targeting. Additionally, overexpression of syntaxin 3 results in increased axonal growth. Our findings suggest an important role for syntaxin 3 in maintaining neuronal polarity and in the critical task of selective trafficking of membrane protein to axons.

  6. Increased mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons: implications for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zambonin, Jessica L.; Zhao, Chao; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Campbell, Graham R.; Engeham, Sarah; Ziabreva, Iryna; Schwarz, Nadine; Lee, Sok Ee; Frischer, Josa M.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial content within axons increases following demyelination in the central nervous system, presumably as a response to the changes in energy needs of axons imposed by redistribution of sodium channels. Myelin sheaths can be restored in demyelinated axons and remyelination in some multiple sclerosis lesions is extensive, while in others it is incomplete or absent. The effects of remyelination on axonal mitochondrial content in multiple sclerosis, particularly whether remyelination completely reverses the mitochondrial changes that follow demyelination, are currently unknown. In this study, we analysed axonal mitochondria within demyelinated, remyelinated and myelinated axons in post-mortem tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis and controls, as well as in experimental models of demyelination and remyelination, in vivo and in vitro. Immunofluorescent labelling of mitochondria (porin, a voltage-dependent anion channel expressed on all mitochondria) and axons (neurofilament), and ultrastructural imaging showed that in both multiple sclerosis and experimental demyelination, mitochondrial content within remyelinated axons was significantly less than in acutely and chronically demyelinated axons but more numerous than in myelinated axons. The greater mitochondrial content within remyelinated, compared with myelinated, axons was due to an increase in density of porin elements whereas increase in size accounted for the change observed in demyelinated axons. The increase in mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons was associated with an increase in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity. In vitro studies showed a significant increase in the number of stationary mitochondria in remyelinated compared with myelinated and demyelinated axons. The number of mobile mitochondria in remyelinated axons did not significantly differ from myelinated axons, although significantly greater than in demyelinated axons. Our neuropathological data and findings in

  7. Increased mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zambonin, Jessica L; Zhao, Chao; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Campbell, Graham R; Engeham, Sarah; Ziabreva, Iryna; Schwarz, Nadine; Lee, Sok Ee; Frischer, Josa M; Turnbull, Doug M; Trapp, Bruce D; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J M; Mahad, Don J

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondrial content within axons increases following demyelination in the central nervous system, presumably as a response to the changes in energy needs of axons imposed by redistribution of sodium channels. Myelin sheaths can be restored in demyelinated axons and remyelination in some multiple sclerosis lesions is extensive, while in others it is incomplete or absent. The effects of remyelination on axonal mitochondrial content in multiple sclerosis, particularly whether remyelination completely reverses the mitochondrial changes that follow demyelination, are currently unknown. In this study, we analysed axonal mitochondria within demyelinated, remyelinated and myelinated axons in post-mortem tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis and controls, as well as in experimental models of demyelination and remyelination, in vivo and in vitro. Immunofluorescent labelling of mitochondria (porin, a voltage-dependent anion channel expressed on all mitochondria) and axons (neurofilament), and ultrastructural imaging showed that in both multiple sclerosis and experimental demyelination, mitochondrial content within remyelinated axons was significantly less than in acutely and chronically demyelinated axons but more numerous than in myelinated axons. The greater mitochondrial content within remyelinated, compared with myelinated, axons was due to an increase in density of porin elements whereas increase in size accounted for the change observed in demyelinated axons. The increase in mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons was associated with an increase in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity. In vitro studies showed a significant increase in the number of stationary mitochondria in remyelinated compared with myelinated and demyelinated axons. The number of mobile mitochondria in remyelinated axons did not significantly differ from myelinated axons, although significantly greater than in demyelinated axons. Our neuropathological data and findings in

  8. Guidance of retinal axons in mammals.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Eloísa; Erskine, Lynda; Morenilla-Palao, Cruz

    2017-11-26

    In order to navigate through the surrounding environment many mammals, including humans, primarily rely on vision. The eye, composed of the choroid, sclera, retinal pigmented epithelium, cornea, lens, iris and retina, is the structure that receives the light and converts it into electrical impulses. The retina contains six major types of neurons involving in receiving and modifying visual information and passing it onto higher visual processing centres in the brain. Visual information is relayed to the brain via the axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a projection known as the optic pathway. The proper formation of this pathway during development is essential for normal vision in the adult individual. Along this pathway there are several points where visual axons face 'choices' in their direction of growth. Understanding how these choices are made has advanced significantly our knowledge of axon guidance mechanisms. Thus, the development of the visual pathway has served as an extremely useful model to reveal general principles of axon pathfinding throughout the nervous system. However, due to its particularities, some cellular and molecular mechanisms are specific for the visual circuit. Here we review both general and specific mechanisms involved in the guidance of mammalian RGC axons when they are traveling from the retina to the brain to establish precise and stereotyped connections that will sustain vision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microfluidic device for unidirectional axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malishev, E.; Pimashkin, A.; Gladkov, A.; Pigareva, Y.; Bukatin, A.; Kazantsev, V.; Mukhina, I.; Dubina, M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the communication and connectivity development of neuron networks, we designed microfluidic devices with several chambers for growing dissociated neuronal cultures from mice fetal hippocampus (E18). The chambers were connected with microchannels providing unidirectional axonal growth between “Source” and “Target” neural sub-networks. Experiments were performed in a hippocampal cultures plated in a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip, aligned with a 60 microelectrode array (MEA). Axonal growth through microchannels was observed with brightfield, phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, and after 7 days in vitro electrical activity was recorded. Visual inspection and spike propagation analysis showed the predominant axonal growth in microchannels in a direction from “Source” to “Target”.

  10. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E.; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G.; Fingert, John H.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ’s performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice.

  11. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G; Fingert, John H; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-05-26

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ's performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice.

  12. Creatine pretreatment protects cortical axons from energy depletion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; Goldberg, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Creatine is a natural nitrogenous guanidino compound involved in bioenergy metabolism. Although creatine has been shown to protect neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) from experimental hypoxia/ischemia, it remains unclear if creatine may also protect CNS axons, and if the potential axonal protection depends on glial cells. To evaluate the direct impact of creatine on CNS axons, cortical axons were cultured in a separate compartment from their somas and proximal neurites using a modified two-compartment culture device. Axons in the axon compartment were subjected to acute energy depletion, an in vitro model of white matter ischemia, by exposure to 6 mM sodium azide for 30 min in the absence of glucose and pyruvate. Energy depletion reduced axonal ATP by 65%, depolarized axonal resting potential, and damaged 75% of axons. Application of creatine (10 mM) to both compartments of the culture at 24 h prior to energy depletion significantly reduced axonal damage by 50%. In line with the role of creatine in the bioenergy metabolism, this application also alleviated the axonal ATP loss and depolarization. Inhibition of axonal depolarization by blocking sodium influx with tetrodotoxin also effectively reduced the axonal damage caused by energy depletion. Further study revealed that the creatine effect was independent of glial cells, as axonal protection was sustained even when creatine was applied only to the axon compartment (free from somas and glial cells) for as little as 2 h. In contrast, application of creatine after energy depletion did not protect axons. The data provide the first evidence that creatine pretreatment may directly protect CNS axons from energy deficiency. PMID:22521466

  13. Axonal regeneration through acellular muscle grafts

    PubMed Central

    HALL, SUSAN

    1997-01-01

    The management of peripheral nerve injury remains a major clinical problem. Progress in this field will almost certainly depend upon manipulating the pathophysiological processes which are triggered by traumatic injuries. One of the most important determinants of functional outcome after the reconstruction of a transected peripheral nerve is the length of the gap between proximal and distal nerve stumps. Long defects (> 2 cm) must be bridged by a suitable conduit in order to support axonal regrowth. This review examines the cellular and acellular elements which facilitate axonal regrowth and the use of acellular muscle grafts in the repair of injuries in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:9034882

  14. Olfactory discrimination largely persists in mice with defects in odorant receptor expression and axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The defining feature of the main olfactory system in mice is that each olfactory sensory neuron expresses only one of more than a thousand different odorant receptor genes. Axons expressing the same odorant receptor converge onto a small number of targets in the olfactory bulb such that each glomerulus is made up of axon terminals expressing just one odorant receptor. It is thought that this precision in axon targeting is required to maintain highly refined odor discrimination. We previously showed that β3GnT2−/− mice have severe developmental and axon guidance defects. The phenotype of these mice is similar to adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) knockout mice largely due to the significant down-regulation of AC3 activity in β3GnT2−/− neurons. Results Microarray analysis reveals that nearly one quarter of all odorant receptor genes are down regulated in β3GnT2−/− mice compared to controls. Analysis of OR expression by quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization demonstrates that the number of neurons expressing some odorant receptors, such as mOR256-17, is increased by nearly 60% whereas for others such as mOR28 the number of neurons is decreased by more than 75% in β3GnT2−/− olfactory epithelia. Analysis of axon trajectories confirms that many axons track to inappropriate targets in β3GnT2−/− mice, and some glomeruli are populated by axons expressing more than one odorant receptor. Results show that mutant mice perform nearly as well as control mice in an odor discrimination task. In addition, in situ hybridization studies indicate that the expression of several activity dependent genes is unaffected in β3GnT2−/− olfactory neurons. Conclusions Results presented here show that many odorant receptors are under-expressed in β3GnT2−/− mice and further demonstrate that additional axon subsets grow into inappropriate targets or minimally innervate glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Odor evoked gene expression is unchanged and β3GnT2

  15. Olfactory discrimination largely persists in mice with defects in odorant receptor expression and axon guidance.

    PubMed

    Knott, Thomas K; Madany, Pasil A; Faden, Ashley A; Xu, Mei; Strotmann, Jörg; Henion, Timothy R; Schwarting, Gerald A

    2012-07-04

    The defining feature of the main olfactory system in mice is that each olfactory sensory neuron expresses only one of more than a thousand different odorant receptor genes. Axons expressing the same odorant receptor converge onto a small number of targets in the olfactory bulb such that each glomerulus is made up of axon terminals expressing just one odorant receptor. It is thought that this precision in axon targeting is required to maintain highly refined odor discrimination. We previously showed that β3GnT2(-/-) mice have severe developmental and axon guidance defects. The phenotype of these mice is similar to adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) knockout mice largely due to the significant down-regulation of AC3 activity in β3GnT2(-/-) neurons. Microarray analysis reveals that nearly one quarter of all odorant receptor genes are down regulated in β3GnT2(-/-) mice compared to controls. Analysis of OR expression by quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization demonstrates that the number of neurons expressing some odorant receptors, such as mOR256-17, is increased by nearly 60% whereas for others such as mOR28 the number of neurons is decreased by more than 75% in β3GnT2(-/-) olfactory epithelia. Analysis of axon trajectories confirms that many axons track to inappropriate targets in β3GnT2(-/-) mice, and some glomeruli are populated by axons expressing more than one odorant receptor. Results show that mutant mice perform nearly as well as control mice in an odor discrimination task. In addition, in situ hybridization studies indicate that the expression of several activity dependent genes is unaffected in β3GnT2(-/-) olfactory neurons. Results presented here show that many odorant receptors are under-expressed in β3GnT2(-/-) mice and further demonstrate that additional axon subsets grow into inappropriate targets or minimally innervate glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Odor evoked gene expression is unchanged and β3GnT2(-/-) mice exhibit a relatively small deficit in

  16. Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribosylation) improves axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Alexandra B; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Sekine, Yuichi; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Miller, David M; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-10-04

    The ability of a neuron to regenerate its axon after injury depends in part on its intrinsic regenerative potential. Here, we identify novel intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration: poly(ADP-ribose) glycohodrolases (PARGs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARGs, which remove poly(ADP-ribose) from proteins, act in injured C. elegans GABA motor neurons to enhance axon regeneration. PARG expression is regulated by DLK signaling, and PARGs mediate DLK function in enhancing axon regeneration. Conversely, PARPs, which add poly(ADP-ribose) to proteins, inhibit axon regeneration of both C. elegans GABA neurons and mammalian cortical neurons. Furthermore, chemical PARP inhibitors improve axon regeneration when administered after injury. Our results indicate that regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) levels is a critical function of the DLK regeneration pathway, that poly-(ADP ribosylation) inhibits axon regeneration across species, and that chemical inhibition of PARPs can elicit axon regeneration.

  17. LONGITUDINAL IMPEDANCE OF THE SQUID GIANT AXON

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kenneth S.; Baker, Richard F.

    1941-01-01

    Longitudinal alternating current impedance measurements have been made on the squid giant axon over the frequency range from 30 cycles per second to 200 kc. per second. Large sea water electrodes were used and the inter-electrode length was immersed in oil. The impedance at high frequency was approximately as predicted theoretically on the basis of the poorly conducting dielectric characteristics of the membrane previously determined. For the large majority of the axons, the impedance reached a maximum at a low frequency and the reactance then vanished at a frequency between 150 and 300 cycles per second. Below this frequency, the reactance was inductive, reaching a maximum and then approaching zero as the frequency was decreased. The inductive reactance is a property of the axon and requires that it contain an inductive structure. The variation of the impedance with interpolar distance indicates that the inductance is in the membrane. The impedance characteristics of the membrane as calculated from the measured longitudinal impedance of the axon may be expressed by an equivalent membrane circuit containing inductance, capacity, and resistance. For a square centimeter of membrane the capacity of 1 µf with dielectric loss is shunted by the series combination of a resistance of 400 ohms and an inductance of one-fifth henry. PMID:19873252

  18. Spatial temperature gradients guide axonal outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Black, Bryan; Vishwakarma, Vivek; Dhakal, Kamal; Bhattarai, Samik; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Jain, Ankur; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2016-01-01

    Formation of neural networks during development and regeneration after injury depends on accuracy of axonal pathfinding, which is primarily believed to be influenced by chemical cues. Recently, there is growing evidence that physical cues can play crucial role in axonal guidance. However, detailed mechanism involved in such guidance cues is lacking. By using weakly-focused near-infrared continuous wave (CW) laser microbeam in the path of an advancing axon, we discovered that the beam acts as a repulsive guidance cue. Here, we report that this highly-effective at-a-distance guidance is the result of a temperature field produced by the near-infrared laser light absorption. Since light absorption by extracellular medium increases when the laser wavelength was red shifted, the threshold laser power for reliable guidance was significantly lower in the near-infrared as compared to the visible spectrum. The spatial temperature gradient caused by the near-infrared laser beam at-a-distance was found to activate temperature-sensitive membrane receptors, resulting in an influx of calcium. The repulsive guidance effect was significantly reduced when extracellular calcium was depleted or in the presence of TRPV1-antagonist. Further, direct heating using micro-heater confirmed that the axonal guidance is caused by shallow temperature-gradient, eliminating the role of any non-photothermal effects. PMID:27460512

  19. Spatial temperature gradients guide axonal outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Bryan; Vishwakarma, Vivek; Dhakal, Kamal; Bhattarai, Samik; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Jain, Ankur; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2016-07-01

    Formation of neural networks during development and regeneration after injury depends on accuracy of axonal pathfinding, which is primarily believed to be influenced by chemical cues. Recently, there is growing evidence that physical cues can play crucial role in axonal guidance. However, detailed mechanism involved in such guidance cues is lacking. By using weakly-focused near-infrared continuous wave (CW) laser microbeam in the path of an advancing axon, we discovered that the beam acts as a repulsive guidance cue. Here, we report that this highly-effective at-a-distance guidance is the result of a temperature field produced by the near-infrared laser light absorption. Since light absorption by extracellular medium increases when the laser wavelength was red shifted, the threshold laser power for reliable guidance was significantly lower in the near-infrared as compared to the visible spectrum. The spatial temperature gradient caused by the near-infrared laser beam at-a-distance was found to activate temperature-sensitive membrane receptors, resulting in an influx of calcium. The repulsive guidance effect was significantly reduced when extracellular calcium was depleted or in the presence of TRPV1-antagonist. Further, direct heating using micro-heater confirmed that the axonal guidance is caused by shallow temperature-gradient, eliminating the role of any non-photothermal effects.

  20. A model of axonal transport drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper a model of targeted drug delivery by means of active (motor-driven) axonal transport is developed. The model is motivated by recent experimental research by Filler et al. (A.G. Filler, G.T. Whiteside, M. Bacon, M. Frederickson, F.A. Howe, M.D. Rabinowitz, A.J. Sokoloff, T.W. Deacon, C. Abell, R. Munglani, J.R. Griffiths, B.A. Bell, A.M.L. Lever, Tri-partite complex for axonal transport drug delivery achieves pharmacological effect, Bmc Neuroscience 11 (2010) 8) that reported synthesis and pharmacological efficiency tests of a tri-partite complex designed for axonal transport drug delivery. The developed model accounts for two populations of pharmaceutical agent complexes (PACs): PACs that are transported retrogradely by dynein motors and PACs that are accumulated in the axon at the Nodes of Ranvier. The transitions between these two populations of PACs are described by first-order reactions. An analytical solution of the coupled system of transient equations describing conservations of these two populations of PACs is obtained by using Laplace transform. Numerical results for various combinations of parameter values are presented and their physical significance is discussed.

  1. Mechanosensitivity in axon growth and guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    In the developing nervous system, axons respond to a diverse array of cues to generate the intricate connection network required for proper function. The growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of a growing axon, integrates information about the local environment and modulates outgrowth and guidance, but little is known about effects of external mechanical cues and internal mechanical forces on growth cone behavior. We have investigated axon outgrowth and force generation on soft elastic substrates for dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (from the peripheral nervous system) and hippocampal neurons (from the central) to see how the mechanics of the microenvironment affect different populations. We find that force generation and stiffness-dependent outgrowth are strongly dependent on cell type. We also observe very different internal dynamics and substrate coupling in the two populations, suggesting that the difference in force generation is due to stronger adhesions and therefore stronger substrate engagement in the peripheral nervous system neurons. We will discuss the biological origins of these differences, and recent analyses of the dynamic aspects of growth cone force generation and the implications for the role of mechanosensitivity in axon guidance. In collaboration with D. Koch, W. Rosoff, and H. M. Geller. Supported by NINDS grant 1R01NS064250-01 (J.S.U.) and the NHLBI Intramural Research Program (H.M.G.).

  2. Modeling molecular mechanisms in the axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rooij, R.; Miller, K. E.; Kuhl, E.

    2017-03-01

    Axons are living systems that display highly dynamic changes in stiffness, viscosity, and internal stress. However, the mechanistic origin of these phenomenological properties remains elusive. Here we establish a computational mechanics model that interprets cellular-level characteristics as emergent properties from molecular-level events. We create an axon model of discrete microtubules, which are connected to neighboring microtubules via discrete crosslinking mechanisms that obey a set of simple rules. We explore two types of mechanisms: passive and active crosslinking. Our passive and active simulations suggest that the stiffness and viscosity of the axon increase linearly with the crosslink density, and that both are highly sensitive to the crosslink detachment and reattachment times. Our model explains how active crosslinking with dynein motors generates internal stresses and actively drives axon elongation. We anticipate that our model will allow us to probe a wide variety of molecular phenomena—both in isolation and in interaction—to explore emergent cellular-level features under physiological and pathological conditions.

  3. Age-Related Changes in Axonal and Mitochondrial Ultrastructure and Function in White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Stahon, Katharine E.; Bastian, Chinthasagar; Griffith, Shelby; Kidd, Grahame J.; Brunet, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    prominent decrease in number, elongated aging mitochondria produce excessive stress markers with reduced ATP production. Because axons maintain function under these conditions, our study suggests that it is important to understand the process of normal brain aging to identify neurodegenerative changes. PMID:27683897

  4. Floor plate chemoattracts crossed axons and chemorepels uncrossed axons in the vertebrate brain.

    PubMed

    Tamada, A; Shirasaki, R; Murakami, F

    1995-05-01

    In the bilaterally symmetrical vertebrate CNS, all developing axons must choose between remaining on the same side of the midline or growing across it. The mechanism underlying this axonal pathfinding is, however, poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that the ventral midline floor plate (FP) chemorepels two types of ipsilaterally projecting axons, one from the alar plate and another from the basal plate in the mesencephalon. We further demonstrate that the FP chemoattracts contralaterally projecting myelencephalic as well as metencephalic axons. The FP at all axial levels displayed both chemoattractive and chemorepellent activities, suggesting that FP chemoattraction and chemorepulsion may be at work throughout the neuraxis. Chemotropic guidance by the FP may therefore play a key role in the establishment of neuronal projection laterality.

  5. Neuronal Dynamics and Axonal Flow, V. The Semisolid State of the Moving Axonal Column

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Paul A.

    1972-01-01

    Evidence assembled since the first comprehensive description of “axonal flow”, by deformation analysis, electron microscopy, cinemicrography, and microrheology, has confirmed that the axon of the mature neuron is (a) a semisolid column; (b) in cellulifugal motion at about 1 μm/min (1 mm per day); (c) continuously reproduced at its perikaryal base; (d) propelled by a microperistaltic pulse wave in its surface; and (e) undergoing internal dissolution at the nerve ending. The axon thus “flows” as a structural entity (“axonal flow”), in contradistinction to fast “intraaxonal transport” of molecules and molecular assemblies along internal routes and by mechanisms that are still unknown. Images PMID:4111049

  6. MAPK signaling promotes axonal degeneration by speeding the turnover of the axonal maintenance factor NMNAT2

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lauren J; Summers, Daniel W; Sasaki, Yo; Brace, EJ; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Injury-induced (Wallerian) axonal degeneration is regulated via the opposing actions of pro-degenerative factors such as SARM1 and a MAPK signal and pro-survival factors, the most important of which is the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT2 that inhibits activation of the SARM1 pathway. Here we investigate the mechanism by which MAPK signaling facilitates axonal degeneration. We show that MAPK signaling promotes the turnover of the axonal survival factor NMNAT2 in cultured mammalian neurons as well as the Drosophila ortholog dNMNAT in motoneurons. The increased levels of NMNAT2 are required for the axonal protection caused by loss of MAPK signaling. Regulation of NMNAT2 by MAPK signaling does not require SARM1, and so cannot be downstream of SARM1. Hence, pro-degenerative MAPK signaling functions upstream of SARM1 by limiting the levels of the essential axonal survival factor NMNAT2 to promote injury-dependent SARM1 activation. These findings are consistent with a linear molecular pathway for the axonal degeneration program. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22540.001 PMID:28095293

  7. Compensatory axon sprouting for very slow axonal die-back in a transgenic model of spinal muscular atrophy type III.

    PubMed

    Udina, Esther; Putman, Charles T; Harris, Luke R; Tyreman, Neil; Cook, Victoria E; Gordon, Tessa

    2017-03-01

    Smn +/- transgenic mouse is a model of the mildest form of spinal muscular atrophy. Although there is a loss of spinal motoneurons in 11-month-old animals, muscular force is maintained. This maintained muscular force is mediated by reinnervation of the denervated fibres by surviving motoneurons. The spinal motoneurons in these animals do not show an increased susceptibility to death after nerve injury and they retain their regenerative capacity. We conclude that the hypothesized immaturity of the neuromuscular system in this model cannot explain the loss of motoneurons by systematic die-back. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive disorder in humans and is the leading genetic cause of infantile death. Patients lack the SMN1 gene with the severity of the disease depending on the number of copies of the highly homologous SMN2 gene. Although motoneuron death in the Smn +/- transgenic mouse model of the mildest form of SMA, SMA type III, has been reported, we have used retrograde tracing of sciatic and femoral motoneurons in the hindlimb with recording of muscle and motor unit isometric forces to count the number of motoneurons with intact neuromuscular connections. Thereby, we investigated whether incomplete maturation of the neuromuscular system induced by survival motoneuron protein (SMN) defects is responsible for die-back of axons relative to survival of motoneurons. First, a reduction of ∼30% of backlabelled motoneurons began relatively late, at 11 months of age, with a significant loss of 19% at 7 months. Motor axon die-back was affirmed by motor unit number estimation. Loss of functional motor units was fully compensated by axonal sprouting to retain normal contractile force in four hindlimb muscles (three fast-twitch and one slow-twitch) innervated by branches of the sciatic nerve. Second, our evaluation of whether axotomy of motoneurons in the adult Smn +/- transgenic mouse increases their susceptibility to cell death demonstrated

  8. Mechanosensing is critical for axon growth in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Eva K.; Sheridan, Graham K.; Svoboda, Hanno; Viana, Matheus; da F. Costa, Luciano; Guck, Jochen; Holt, Christine E.; Franze, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    During nervous system development, neurons extend axons along well-defined pathways. The current understanding of axon pathfinding is based mainly on chemical signalling. However, growing neurons interact not only chemically but also mechanically with their environment. Here we identify mechanical signals as important regulators of axon pathfinding. In vitro, substrate stiffness determined growth patterns of Xenopus retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. In vivo atomic force microscopy revealed striking stiffness gradient patterns in the embryonic brain. RGC axons grew towards the tissue’s softer side, which was reproduced in vitro in the absence of chemical gradients. To test the importance of mechanical signals for axon growth in vivo, we altered brain stiffness, blocked mechanotransduction pharmacologically, and knocked down the mechanosensitive ion channel Piezo1. All treatments resulted in aberrant axonal growth and pathfinding errors, suggesting that local tissue stiffness–read out by mechanosensitive ion channels–is critically involved in instructing neuronal growth in vivo. PMID:27643431

  9. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Events in Axonal Sprouting after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kathirvelu, Balachander; Schweppe, Catherine A; Nie, Esther H

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Yet there is a limited degree of recovery in this disease. One of the mechanisms of recovery is the formation of new connections in the brain and spinal cord after stroke: post-stroke axonal sprouting. Studies indicate that post-stroke axonal sprouting occurs in mice, rats, primates and humans. Inducing post-stroke axonal sprouting in specific connections enhances recovery; blocking axonal sprouting impairs recovery. Behavioral activity patterns after stroke modify the axonal sprouting response. A unique regenerative molecular program mediates this aspect of tissue repair in the CNS. The types of connections that are formed after stroke indicate three patterns of axonal sprouting after stroke: Reactive, Reparative and Unbounded Axonal Sprouting. These differ in mechanism, location, relationship to behavioral recovery and, importantly, in their prospect for therapeutic manipulation to enhance tissue repair. PMID:26874223

  10. Contribution of cytoskeletal elements to the axonal mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microtubules, microfilaments, and neurofilaments are cytoskeletal elements that affect cell morphology, cellular processes, and mechanical structures in neural cells. The objective of the current study was to investigate the contribution of each type of cytoskeletal element to the mechanical properties of axons of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia cells in chick embryos. Results Microtubules, microfilaments, and neurofilaments in axons were disrupted by nocodazole, cytochalasin D, and acrylamide, respectively, or a combination of the three. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was then used to compress the treated axons, and the resulting corresponding force-deformation information was analyzed to estimate the mechanical properties of axons that were partially or fully disrupted. Conclusion We have found that the mechanical stiffness was most reduced in microtubules-disrupted-axons, followed by neurofilaments-disrupted- and microfilaments-disrupted-axons. This suggests that microtubules contribute the most of the mechanical stiffness to axons. PMID:24007256

  11. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  12. Regulation of mitochondria-dynactin interaction and mitochondrial retrograde transport in axons.

    PubMed

    Drerup, Catherine M; Herbert, Amy L; Monk, Kelly R; Nechiporuk, Alex V

    2017-04-17

    Mitochondrial transport in axons is critical for neural circuit health and function. While several proteins have been found that modulate bidirectional mitochondrial motility, factors that regulate unidirectional mitochondrial transport have been harder to identify. In a genetic screen, we found a zebrafish strain in which mitochondria fail to attach to the dynein retrograde motor. This strain carries a loss-of-function mutation in actr10 , a member of the dynein-associated complex dynactin. The abnormal axon morphology and mitochondrial retrograde transport defects observed in actr10 mutants are distinct from dynein and dynactin mutant axonal phenotypes. In addition, Actr10 lacking the dynactin binding domain maintains its ability to bind mitochondria, arguing for a role for Actr10 in dynactin-mitochondria interaction. Finally, genetic interaction studies implicated Drp1 as a partner in Actr10-dependent mitochondrial retrograde transport. Together, this work identifies Actr10 as a factor necessary for dynactin-mitochondria interaction, enhancing our understanding of how mitochondria properly localize in axons.

  13. The "waiting period" of sensory and motor axons in early chick hindlimb: its role in axon pathfinding and neuronal maturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Scott, S A

    2000-07-15

    During embryonic development motor axons in the chick hindlimb grow out slightly before sensory axons and wait in the plexus region at the base of the limb for approximately 24 hr before invading the limb itself (Tosney and Landmesser, 1985a). We have investigated the role of this waiting period by asking, Is the arrest of growth cones in the plexus region a general property of both sensory and motor axons? Why do axons wait? Does eliminating the waiting period affect the further development of motor and sensory neurons? Here we show that sensory axons, like motor axons, pause in the plexus region and that neither sensory nor motor axons require cues from the other population to wait in or exit from the plexus region. By transplanting older or younger donor limbs to host embryos, we show that host axons innervate donor limbs on a schedule consistent with the age of the grafted limbs. Thus, axons wait in the plexus region for maturational changes to occur in the limb rather than in the neurons themselves. Both sensory and motor axons innervate their appropriate peripheral targets when the waiting period is eliminated by grafting older donor limbs. Therefore, axons do not require a prolonged period in the plexus region to sort out and project appropriately. Eliminating the waiting period does, however, accelerate the onset of naturally occurring cell death, but it does not enhance the development of central projections or the biochemical maturation of sensory neurons.

  14. Temporal identity in axonal target layer recognition.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Milan; Hummel, Thomas

    2008-12-11

    The segregation of axon and dendrite projections into distinct synaptic layers is a fundamental principle of nervous system organization and the structural basis for information processing in the brain. Layer-specific recognition molecules that allow projecting neurons to stabilize transient contacts and initiate synaptogenesis have been identified. However, most of the neuronal cell-surface molecules critical for layer organization are expressed broadly in the developing nervous system, raising the question of how these so-called permissive adhesion molecules support synaptic specificity. Here we show that the temporal expression dynamics of the zinc-finger protein sequoia is the major determinant of Drosophila photoreceptor connectivity into distinct synaptic layers. Neighbouring R8 and R7 photoreceptors show consecutive peaks of elevated sequoia expression, which correspond to their sequential target-layer innervation. Loss of sequoia in R7 leads to a projection switch into the R8 recipient layer, whereas a prolonged expression in R8 induces a redirection of their axons into the R7 layer. The sequoia-induced axon targeting is mediated through the ubiquitously expressed Cadherin-N cell adhesion molecule. Our data support a model in which recognition specificity during synaptic layer formation is generated through a temporally restricted axonal competence to respond to broadly expressed adhesion molecules. Because developing neurons innervating the same target area often project in a distinct, birth-order-dependent sequence, temporal identity seems to contain crucial information in generating not only cell type diversity during neuronal division but also connection diversity of projecting neurons.

  15. Axonal flip-flops and oscillators.

    PubMed

    Baker, M D

    2000-11-01

    The strange and unpleasant sensations (paraesthesiae) or asynchronous motor-unit activation (fasciculation) that result from a period of limb ischaemia are examples of ectopic discharge in peripheral nerves. Ectopic activity also results from demyelination and is associated with serious neurological conditions, such as multiple sclerosis. A build-up of extracellular K(+) in the internode and persistent Na(+) currents are now implicated in generating the different forms of activity arising in normal and demyelinated axons.

  16. Ionized calcium concentrations in squid axons

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Values for ionized [Ca] in squid axons were obtained by measuring the light emission from a 0.1-mul drop of aequorin confined to a plastic dialysis tube of 140-mum diameter located axially. Ionized Ca had a mean value of 20 x 10(-9) M as judged by the subsequent introduction of CaEGTA/EGTA buffer (ratio ca. 0.1) into the axoplasm, and light measurement on a second aequorin drop. Ionized Ca in axoplasma was also measured by introducing arsenazo dye into an axon by injection and measuring the Ca complex of such a dye by multichannel spectrophotometry. Values so obtained were ca. 50 x 10(-9) M as calibrated against CaEGTA/EGTA buffer mixtures. Wth a freshly isolated axon in 10 mM Ca seawater, the aequorin glow invariably increased with time; a seawater [Ca] of 2-3 mM allowed a steady state with respect to [Ca]. Replacement of Na+ in seawater with choline led to a large increase in light emission from aequorin. Li seawater partially reversed this change and the reintroduction of Na+ brought light levels back to their initial value. Stimulation at 60/s for 2-5 min produced an increase in aequorin glow about 0.1% of that represented by the known Ca influx, suggesting operationally the presence of substantial Ca buffering. Treatment of an axon with CN produced a very large increase in aequorin glow and in Ca arsenazo formation only if the external seawater contained Ca. PMID:818340

  17. Multifunctional Silk Nerve Guides for Axon Outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupaj, Marie C.

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a critical issue as 2.8% of trauma patients present with this type of injury, estimating a total of 200,000 nerve repair procedures yearly in the United States. While the peripheral nervous system exhibits slow regeneration, at a rate of 0.5 mm -- 9 mm/day following trauma, this regenerative ability is only possible under certain conditions. Clinical repairs have changed slightly in the last 30 years and standard methods of treatment include suturing damaged nerve ends, allografting, and autografting, with the autograft the gold standard of these approaches. Unfortunately, the use of autografts requires a second surgery and there is a shortage of nerves available for grafting. Allografts are a second option however allografts have lower success rates and are accompanied by the need of immunosuppressant drugs. Recently there has been a focus on developing nerve guides as an "off the shelf" approach. Although some natural and synthetic guidance channels have been approved by the FDA, these nerve guides are unfunctionalized and repair only short gaps, less than 3 cm in length. The goal of this project was to identify strategies for functionalizing peripheral nerve conduits for the outgrowth of neuron axons in vitro . To accomplish this, two strategies (bioelectrical and biophysical) were indentified for increasing axon outgrowth and promoting axon guidance. Bioelectrical strategies exploited electrical stimulation for increasing neurite outgrowth. Biophysical strategies tested a range of surface topographies for axon guidance. Novel methods were developed for integrating electrical and biophysical strategies into silk films in 2D. Finally, a functionalized nerve conduit system was developed that integrated all strategies for the purpose of attaching, elongating, and guiding nervous tissue in vitro. Future directions of this work include silk conduit translation into a rat sciatic nerve model in vivo for the purpose of repairing long

  18. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  19. Dystrophic Serotonergic Axons in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Azmitia, Efrain C.; Nixon, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), frontal lobe dementia (FLD) and Diffuse Lewy-Body dementia (DLBD) have diverse neuropathologic features. Here we report that serotonin fibers are dystrophic in the brains of individuals with these three diseases. In neuropathologically normal (control) brains (n=3), serotonin axons immunoreactive (IR) with antibodies against the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) protein were widely distributed in cortex (entorhinal and dorsolateral prefrontal), hippocampus and rostral brainstem. 5-HTT-IR fibers of passage appeared thick, smooth, and un-branched in medial forebrain bundle, medial lemniscus and cortex white matter. The terminal branches were fine, highly branched and varicose in substantia nigra, hippocampus and cortical gray matter. In the diseased brains, however, 5-HTT-IR fibers in the forebrain were reduced in number and were frequently bulbous, splayed, tightly clustered and enlarged. Morphometric analysis revealed significant differences in the size distribution of the 5-HTT-IR profiles in dorsolateral prefrontal area between neurodegenerative diseases and controls. Our observations provide direct morphologic evidence for degeneration of human serotonergic axons in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases despite the limited size (n=3 slices for each region (3) from each brain (4), total slices was n=36) and lack of extensive clinical characterization of the analyzed cohort. This is the first report of dystrophic 5-HTT-IR axons in postmortem human tissue PMID:18502405

  20. The Parkinsonian mimetic, 6-OHDA, impairs axonal transport in dopaminergic axons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is one of the most commonly used toxins for modeling degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in Parkinson's disease. 6-OHDA also causes axonal degeneration, a process that appears to precede the death of DA neurons. To understand the processes involved in 6-OHDA-mediated axonal degeneration, a microdevice designed to isolate axons fluidically from cell bodies was used in conjunction with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled DA neurons. Results showed that 6-OHDA quickly induced mitochondrial transport dysfunction in both DA and non-DA axons. This appeared to be a general effect on transport function since 6-OHDA also disrupted transport of synaptophysin-tagged vesicles. The effects of 6-OHDA on mitochondrial transport were blocked by the addition of the SOD1-mimetic, Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride (MnTBAP), as well as the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) suggesting that free radical species played a role in this process. Temporally, microtubule disruption and autophagy occurred after transport dysfunction yet before DA cell death following 6-OHDA treatment. The results from the study suggest that ROS-mediated transport dysfunction occurs early and plays a significant role in inducing axonal degeneration in response to 6-OHDA treatment. PMID:24885281

  1. Modeling of axonal endoplasmic reticulum network by spastic paraplegia proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yalçın, Belgin; Zhao, Lu; Stofanko, Martin; O'Sullivan, Niamh C; Kang, Zi Han; Roost, Annika; Thomas, Matthew R; Zaessinger, Sophie; Blard, Olivier; Patto, Alex L; Sohail, Anood; Baena, Valentina; Terasaki, Mark; O'Kane, Cahir J

    2017-01-01

    Axons contain a smooth tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network that is thought to be continuous with ER throughout the neuron; the mechanisms that form this axonal network are unknown. Mutations affecting reticulon or REEP proteins, with intramembrane hairpin domains that model ER membranes, cause an axon degenerative disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We show that Drosophila axons have a dynamic axonal ER network, which these proteins help to model. Loss of HSP hairpin proteins causes ER sheet expansion, partial loss of ER from distal motor axons, and occasional discontinuities in axonal ER. Ultrastructural analysis reveals an extensive ER network in axons, which shows larger and fewer tubules in larvae that lack reticulon and REEP proteins, consistent with loss of membrane curvature. Therefore HSP hairpin-containing proteins are required for shaping and continuity of axonal ER, thus suggesting roles for ER modeling in axon maintenance and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23882.001 PMID:28742022

  2. Dependence of regenerated sensory axons on continuous neurotrophin-3 delivery.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shaoping; Nicholson, LaShae; van Niekerk, Erna; Motsch, Melanie; Blesch, Armin

    2012-09-19

    Previous studies have shown that injured dorsal column sensory axons extend across a spinal cord lesion site if axons are guided by a gradient of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) rostral to the lesion. Here we examined whether continuous NT-3 delivery is necessary to sustain regenerated axons in the injured spinal cord. Using tetracycline-regulated (tet-off) lentiviral gene delivery, NT-3 expression was tightly controlled by doxycycline administration. To examine axon growth responses to regulated NT-3 expression, adult rats underwent a C3 dorsal funiculus lesion. The lesion site was filled with bone marrow stromal cells, tet-off-NT-3 virus was injected rostral to the lesion site, and the intrinsic growth capacity of sensory neurons was activated by a conditioning lesion. When NT-3 gene expression was turned on, cholera toxin β-subunit-labeled sensory axons regenerated into and beyond the lesion/graft site. Surprisingly, the number of regenerated axons significantly declined when NT-3 expression was turned off, whereas continued NT-3 expression sustained regenerated axons. Quantification of axon numbers beyond the lesion demonstrated a significant decline of axon growth in animals with transient NT-3 expression, only some axons that had regenerated over longer distance were sustained. Regenerated axons were located in white matter and did not form axodendritic synapses but expressed presynaptic markers when closely associated with NG2-labeled cells. A decline in axon density was also observed within cellular grafts after NT-3 expression was turned off possibly via reduction in L1 and laminin expression in Schwann cells. Thus, multiple mechanisms underlie the inability of transient NT-3 expression to fully sustain regenerated sensory axons.

  3. Axon Regeneration in C. elegans: worming our way to mechanisms of axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Alexandra B.; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-01-01

    How axons repair themselves after injury is a fundamental question in neurobiology. With its conserved genome, relatively simple nervous system, and transparent body, C. elegans has recently emerged as a productive model to uncover the cellular mechanisms that regulate and execute axon regeneration. In this review, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the C. elegans model of regeneration. We explore the technical advances that enable the use of C. elegans for in vivo regeneration studies, review findings in C. elegans that have contributed to our understanding of the regeneration response across species, discuss the potential of C. elegans research to provide insight into mechanisms that function in the injured mammalian nervous system, and present potential future directions of axon regeneration research using C. elegans. PMID:27569538

  4. L1CAM/Neuroglian controls the axon-axon interactions establishing layered and lobular mushroom body architecture.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, Dominique; Enneking, Eva-Maria; Moreno, Eliza; Pielage, Jan

    2015-03-30

    The establishment of neuronal circuits depends on the guidance of axons both along and in between axonal populations of different identity; however, the molecular principles controlling axon-axon interactions in vivo remain largely elusive. We demonstrate that the Drosophila melanogaster L1CAM homologue Neuroglian mediates adhesion between functionally distinct mushroom body axon populations to enforce and control appropriate projections into distinct axonal layers and lobes essential for olfactory learning and memory. We addressed the regulatory mechanisms controlling homophilic Neuroglian-mediated cell adhesion by analyzing targeted mutations of extra- and intracellular Neuroglian domains in combination with cell type-specific rescue assays in vivo. We demonstrate independent and cooperative domain requirements: intercalating growth depends on homophilic adhesion mediated by extracellular Ig domains. For functional cluster formation, intracellular Ankyrin2 association is sufficient on one side of the trans-axonal complex whereas Moesin association is likely required simultaneously in both interacting axonal populations. Together, our results provide novel mechanistic insights into cell adhesion molecule-mediated axon-axon interactions that enable precise assembly of complex neuronal circuits. © 2015 Siegenthaler et al.

  5. ARF6 directs axon transport and traffic of integrins and regulates axon growth in adult DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Eva, Richard; Crisp, Sarah; Marland, Jamie R K; Norman, Jim C; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; ffrench-Constant, Charles; Fawcett, James W

    2012-07-25

    Integrins are involved in axon growth and regeneration. Manipulation of integrins is a route to promoting axon regeneration and understanding regeneration failure in the CNS. Expression of α9 integrin promotes axon regeneration, so we have investigated α9β1 trafficking and transport in axons and at the growth cone. We have previously found that α9 and β1 integrins traffic via Rab11-positive recycling endosomes in peripheral axons and growth cones. However, transport via Rab11 is slow, while rapid transport occurs in vesicles lacking Rab11. We have further studied α9 and β1 integrin transport and traffic in adult rat dorsal root ganglion axons and PC12 cells. Integrins are in ARF6 vesicles during rapid axonal transport and during trafficking in the growth cone. We report that rapid axonal transport of these integrins and their trafficking at the cell surface is regulated by ARF6. ARF6 inactivation by expression of ACAP1 leads to increased recycling of β1 integrins to the neuronal surface and to increased anterograde axonal transport. ARF6 activation by expression of the neuronal guanine nucleotide exchange factors, ARNO or EFA6, increases retrograde integrin transport in axons and increases integrin internalization. ARF6 inactivation increases integrin-mediated outgrowth, while activation decreases it. The coordinated changes in integrin transport and recycling resulting from ARF6 activation or inactivation are the probable mechanism behind this regulation of axon growth. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of integrin traffic and transport in peripheral axons, regulated by the activation state of ARF6, and suggest that ARF6 might be targeted to enhance integrin-dependent axon regeneration after injury.

  6. Can injured adult CNS axons regenerate by recapitulating development?

    PubMed

    Hilton, Brett J; Bradke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons typically fail to regenerate their axons after injury. During development, by contrast, neurons extend axons effectively. A variety of intracellular mechanisms mediate this difference, including changes in gene expression, the ability to form a growth cone, differences in mitochondrial function/axonal transport and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In turn, these intracellular processes are linked to extracellular differences between the developing and adult CNS. During development, the extracellular environment directs axon growth and circuit formation. In adulthood, by contrast, extracellular factors, such as myelin and the extracellular matrix, restrict axon growth. Here, we discuss whether the reactivation of developmental processes can elicit axon regeneration in the injured CNS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Axonal Degeneration Is Mediated by the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Sebastian A.; Martinez, Nicolas W.; Yoo, Soonmoon; Jara, Juan S.; Zamorano, Sebastian; Hetz, Claudio; Twiss, Jeffery L.; Alvarez, Jaime; Court, Felipe A.

    2011-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is an active process that has been associated with neurodegenerative conditions triggered by mechanical, metabolic, infectious, toxic, hereditary and inflammatory stimuli. This degenerative process can cause permanent loss of function, so it represents a focus for neuroprotective strategies. Several signaling pathways are implicated in axonal degeneration, but identification of an integrative mechanism for this self-destructive process has remained elusive. Here, we show that rapid axonal degeneration triggered by distinct mechanical and toxic insults is dependent on the activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Both pharmacological and genetic targeting of cyclophilin D, a functional component of the mPTP, protects severed axons and vincristine-treated neurons from axonal degeneration in ex vivo and in vitro mouse and rat model systems. These effects were observed in axons from both the peripheral and central nervous system. Our results suggest that the mPTP is a key effector of axonal degeneration, upon which several independent signaling pathways converge. Since axonal and synapse degeneration are increasingly considered early pathological events in neurodegeneration, our work identifies a potential target for therapeutic intervention in a wide variety of conditions that lead to loss of axons and subsequent functional impairment. PMID:21248121

  8. Schwann cell glycogen selectively supports myelinated axon function.

    PubMed

    Brown, Angus M; Evans, Richard D; Black, Joel; Ransom, Bruce R

    2012-09-01

    Interruption of energy supply to peripheral axons is a cause of axon loss. We determined whether glycogen was present in mammalian peripheral nerve, and whether it supported axon conduction during aglycemia. We used biochemical assay and electron microscopy to determine the presence of glycogen, and electrophysiology to monitor axon function. Glycogen was present in sciatic nerve, its concentration varying directly with ambient glucose. Electron microscopy detected glycogen granules primarily in myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm, and these diminished after exposure to aglycemia. During aglycemia, conduction failure in large myelinated axons (A fibers) mirrored the time course of glycogen loss. Latency to compound action potential (CAP) failure was directly related to nerve glycogen content at aglycemia onset. Glycogen did not benefit the function of slow-conducting, small-diameter unmyelinated axons (C fibers) during aglycemia. Blocking glycogen breakdown pharmacologically accelerated CAP failure during aglycemia in A fibers, but not in C fibers. Lactate was as effective as glucose in supporting sciatic nerve function, and was continuously released into the extracellular space in the presence of glucose and fell rapidly during aglycemia. Our findings indicated that glycogen is present in peripheral nerve, primarily in myelinating Schwann cells, and exclusively supports large-diameter, myelinated axon conduction during aglycemia. Available evidence suggests that peripheral nerve glycogen breaks down during aglycemia and is passed, probably as lactate, to myelinated axons to support function. Unmyelinated axons are not protected by glycogen and are more vulnerable to dysfunction during periods of hypoglycemia. . Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  9. Neuronal growth cones respond to laser-induced axonal damage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Shi, Linda Z.; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L.; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well known that damage to neurons results in release of substances that inhibit axonal growth, release of chemical signals from damaged axons that attract axon growth cones has not been observed. In this study, a 532 nm 12 ns laser was focused to a diffraction-limited spot to produce site-specific damage to single goldfish axons in vitro. The axons underwent a localized decrease in thickness (‘thinning’) within seconds. Analysis by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy indicated that there was no gross rupture of the cell membrane. Mitochondrial transport along the axonal cytoskeleton immediately stopped at the damage site, but recovered over several minutes. Within seconds of damage nearby growth cones extended filopodia towards the injury and were often observed to contact the damaged site. Turning of the growth cone towards the injured axon also was observed. Repair of the laser-induced damage was evidenced by recovery of the axon thickness as well as restoration of mitochondrial movement. We describe a new process of growth cone response to damaged axons. This has been possible through the interface of optics (laser subcellular surgery), fluorescence and electron microscopy, and a goldfish retinal ganglion cell culture model. PMID:21831892

  10. Schwann Cell Glycogen Selectively Supports Myelinated Axon Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angus M; Evans, Richard D; Black, Joel; Ransom, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Interruption of energy supply to peripheral axons is a cause of axon loss. We determined if glycogen was present in mammalian peripheral nerve, and if it supported axon conduction during aglycemia. Methods We used biochemical assay and electron microscopy to determine the presence of glycogen, and electrophysiology to monitor axon function. Results Glycogen was present in sciatic nerve, its concentration varying directly with ambient [glucose]. Electron microscopy detected glycogen granules primarily in myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm and these diminished after exposure to aglycemia. During aglycemia, conduction failure in large myelinated axons (A fibers) mirrored the time-course of glycogen loss. Latency to CAP failure was directly related to nerve glycogen content at aglycemia onset. Glycogen did not benefit the function of slow-conducting, small diameter unmyelinated axons (C fibers) during aglycemia. Blocking glycogen breakdown pharmacologically accelerated CAP failure during aglycemia in A fibers, but not in C fibers. Lactate was as effective as glucose in supporting sciatic nerve function, and was continuously released into the extracellular space in the presence of glucose and fell rapidly during aglycemia. Interpretation Our findings indicated that glycogen is present in peripheral nerve, primarily in myelinating Schwann cells, and exclusively supports large diameter, myelinated axon conduction during aglycemia. Available evidence suggests that peripheral nerve glycogen breaks down during aglycemia and is passed, probably as lactate, to myelinated axons to support function. Unmyelinated axons are not protected by glycogen and are more vulnerable to dysfunction during periods of hypoglycemia. PMID:23034913

  11. Visualization of Motor Axon Navigation and Quantification of Axon Arborization In Mouse Embryos Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liau, Ee Shan; Yen, Ya-Ping; Chen, Jun-An

    2018-05-11

    Spinal motor neurons (MNs) extend their axons to communicate with their innervating targets, thereby controlling movement and complex tasks in vertebrates. Thus, it is critical to uncover the molecular mechanisms of how motor axons navigate to, arborize, and innervate their peripheral muscle targets during development and degeneration. Although transgenic Hb9::GFP mouse lines have long served to visualize motor axon trajectories during embryonic development, detailed descriptions of the full spectrum of axon terminal arborization remain incomplete due to the pattern complexity and limitations of current optical microscopy. Here, we describe an improved protocol that combines light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and robust image analysis to qualitatively and quantitatively visualize developing motor axons. This system can be easily adopted to cross genetic mutants or MN disease models with Hb9::GFP lines, revealing novel molecular mechanisms that lead to defects in motor axon navigation and arborization.

  12. Therapy development for diffuse axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas H; Hicks, Ramona; Povlishock, John T

    2013-03-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) remains a prominent feature of human traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a major player in its subsequent morbidity. The importance of this widespread axonal damage has been confirmed by multiple approaches including routine postmortem neuropathology as well as advanced imaging, which is now capable of detecting the signatures of traumatically induced axonal injury across a spectrum of traumatically brain-injured persons. Despite the increased interest in DAI and its overall implications for brain-injured patients, many questions remain about this component of TBI and its potential therapeutic targeting. To address these deficiencies and to identify future directions needed to fill critical gaps in our understanding of this component of TBI, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke hosted a workshop in May 2011. This workshop sought to determine what is known regarding the pathogenesis of DAI in animal models of injury as well as in the human clinical setting. The workshop also addressed new tools to aid in the identification of this axonal injury while also identifying more rational therapeutic targets linked to DAI for continued preclinical investigation and, ultimately, clinical translation. This report encapsulates the oral and written components of this workshop addressing key features regarding the pathobiology of DAI, the biomechanics implicated in its initiating pathology, and those experimental animal modeling considerations that bear relevance to the biomechanical features of human TBI. Parallel considerations of alternate forms of DAI detection including, but not limited to, advanced neuroimaging, electrophysiological, biomarker, and neurobehavioral evaluations are included, together with recommendations for how these technologies can be better used and integrated for a more comprehensive appreciation of the pathobiology of DAI and its overall structural and functional implications. Lastly, the document closes

  13. AxonPacking: An Open-Source Software to Simulate Arrangements of Axons in White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Mingasson, Tom; Duval, Tanguy; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS AxonPacking: Open-source software for simulating white matter microstructure.Validation on a theoretical disk packing problem.Reproducible and stable for various densities and diameter distributions.Can be used to study interplay between myelin/fiber density and restricted fraction. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can provide parameters that describe white matter microstructure, such as the fiber volume fraction (FVF), the myelin volume fraction (MVF) or the axon volume fraction (AVF) via the fraction of restricted water (fr). While already being used for clinical application, the complex interplay between these parameters requires thorough validation via simulations. These simulations required a realistic, controlled and adaptable model of the white matter axons with the surrounding myelin sheath. While there already exist useful algorithms to perform this task, none of them combine optimisation of axon packing, presence of myelin sheath and availability as free and open source software. Here, we introduce a novel disk packing algorithm that addresses these issues. The performance of the algorithm is tested in term of reproducibility over 50 runs, resulting density, and stability over iterations. This tool was then used to derive multiple values of FVF and to study the impact of this parameter on fr and MVF in light of the known microstructure based on histology sample. The standard deviation of the axon density over runs was lower than 10−3 and the expected hexagonal packing for monodisperse disks was obtained with a density close to the optimal density (obtained: 0.892, theoretical: 0.907). Using an FVF ranging within [0.58, 0.82] and a mean inter-axon gap ranging within [0.1, 1.1] μm, MVF ranged within [0.32, 0.44] and fr ranged within [0.39, 0.71], which is consistent with the histology. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the open-source software AxonPacking (https://github.com/neuropoly/axonpacking) and can be useful for

  14. Demonstration of ion channel synthesis by isolated squid giant axon provides functional evidence for localized axonal membrane protein translation.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Chhavi; Johnson, Kory R; Tong, Brian A; Miranda, Pablo; Srikumar, Deepa; Basilio, Daniel; Latorre, Ramon; Bezanilla, Francisco; Holmgren, Miguel

    2018-02-02

    Local translation of membrane proteins in neuronal subcellular domains like soma, dendrites and axon termini is well-documented. In this study, we isolated the electrical signaling unit of an axon by dissecting giant axons from mature squids (Dosidicus gigas). Axoplasm extracted from these axons was found to contain ribosomal RNAs, ~8000 messenger RNA species, many encoding the translation machinery, membrane proteins, translocon and signal recognition particle (SRP) subunits, endomembrane-associated proteins, and unprecedented proportions of SRP RNA (~68% identical to human homolog). While these components support endoplasmic reticulum-dependent protein synthesis, functional assessment of a newly synthesized membrane protein in axolemma of an isolated axon is technically challenging. Ion channels are ideal proteins for this purpose because their functional dynamics can be directly evaluated by applying voltage clamp across the axon membrane. We delivered in vitro transcribed RNA encoding native or Drosophila voltage-activated Shaker K V channel into excised squid giant axons. We found that total K + currents increased in both cases; with added inactivation kinetics on those axons injected with RNA encoding the Shaker channel. These results provide unambiguous evidence that isolated axons can exhibit de novo synthesis, assembly and membrane incorporation of fully functional oligomeric membrane proteins.

  15. Axon guidance molecules in vascular patterning.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ralf H; Eichmann, Anne

    2010-05-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) form extensive, highly branched and hierarchically organized tubular networks in vertebrates to ensure the proper distribution of molecular and cellular cargo in the vertebrate body. The growth of this vascular system during development, tissue repair or in disease conditions involves the sprouting, migration and proliferation of endothelial cells in a process termed angiogenesis. Surprisingly, specialized ECs, so-called tip cells, which lead and guide endothelial sprouts, share many feature with another guidance structure, the axonal growth cone. Tip cells are motile, invasive and extend numerous filopodial protrusions sensing growth factors, extracellular matrix and other attractive or repulsive cues in their tissue environment. Axonal growth cones and endothelial tip cells also respond to signals belonging to the same molecular families, such as Slits and Roundabouts, Netrins and UNC5 receptors, Semaphorins, Plexins and Neuropilins, and Eph receptors and ephrin ligands. Here we summarize fundamental principles of angiogenic growth, the selection and function of tip cells and the underlying regulation by guidance cues, the Notch pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling.

  16. Clinical progression in Parkinson disease and the neurobiology of axons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiao-Chun; Ulane, Christina M; Burke, Robert E

    2010-06-01

    Despite tremendous growth in recent years in our knowledge of the molecular basis of Parkinson disease (PD) and the molecular pathways of cell injury and death, we remain without therapies that forestall disease progression. Although there are many possible explanations for this lack of success, one is that experimental therapeutics to date have not adequately focused on an important component of the disease process, that of axon degeneration. It remains unknown what neuronal compartment, either the soma or the axon, is involved at disease onset, although some have proposed that it is the axons and their terminals that take the initial brunt of injury. Nevertheless, this concept has not been formally incorporated into many of the current theories of disease pathogenesis, and it has not achieved a wide consensus. More importantly, in view of growing evidence that the molecular mechanisms of axon degeneration are separate and distinct from the canonical pathways of programmed cell death that mediate soma destruction, the possibility of early involvement of axons in PD has not been adequately emphasized as a rationale to explore the neurobiology of axons for novel therapeutic targets. We propose that ongoing degeneration of axons, not cell bodies, is the primary determinant of clinically apparent progression of disease, and that future experimental therapeutics intended to forestall disease progression will benefit from a new focus on the distinct mechanisms of axon degeneration.

  17. Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration after SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    mammalian spinal cord, axon regeneration is frustrated by inhibitors such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) expressed by reactive astrocytes... chondroitin sulfates . Publications, Abstracts and Presentations: Publications: 1. Katerina Vajn, Jeffery A Plunkett, Alexis Tapanes...Jeffery A. Plunkett. Axonal growth of primary zebrafish brainstem neurons across inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. Manuscript in

  18. Functional ionotropic glutamate receptors on peripheral axons and myelin.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Pia Crone; Welch, Nicole Cheryl; Brideau, Craig; Stys, Peter K

    2016-09-01

    Neurotransmitter-dependent signaling is traditionally restricted to axon terminals. However, receptors are present on myelinating glia, suggesting that chemical transmission may also occur along axons. Confocal microscopy and Ca(2+) -imaging using an axonally expressed FRET-based reporter was used to measure Ca(2+) changes and morphological alterations in myelin in response to stimulation of glutamate receptors. Activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors induced a Ca(2+) increase in axon cylinders. However, only the latter caused structural alterations in axons, despite similar Ca(2+) increases. Myelin morphology was significantly altered by NMDA receptor activation, but not by AMPA receptors. Cu(2+) ions influenced the NMDA receptor-dependent response, suggesting that this metal modulates axonal receptors. Glutamate increased ribosomal signal in Schwann cell cytoplasm. Axon cylinders and myelin of peripheral nervous system axons respond to glutamate, with a consequence being an increase in Schwann cell ribosomes. This may have implications for nerve pathology and regeneration. Muscle Nerve 54: 451-459, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribosylation) improves axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Alexandra B; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Sekine, Yuichi; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Miller, David M; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a neuron to regenerate its axon after injury depends in part on its intrinsic regenerative potential. Here, we identify novel intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration: poly(ADP-ribose) glycohodrolases (PARGs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARGs, which remove poly(ADP-ribose) from proteins, act in injured C. elegans GABA motor neurons to enhance axon regeneration. PARG expression is regulated by DLK signaling, and PARGs mediate DLK function in enhancing axon regeneration. Conversely, PARPs, which add poly(ADP-ribose) to proteins, inhibit axon regeneration of both C. elegans GABA neurons and mammalian cortical neurons. Furthermore, chemical PARP inhibitors improve axon regeneration when administered after injury. Our results indicate that regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) levels is a critical function of the DLK regeneration pathway, that poly-(ADP ribosylation) inhibits axon regeneration across species, and that chemical inhibition of PARPs can elicit axon regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12734.001 PMID:27697151

  20. Axon growth regulation by a bistable molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Pranesh; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2018-04-25

    For the brain to function properly, its neurons must make the right connections during neural development. A key aspect of this process is the tight regulation of axon growth as axons navigate towards their targets. Neuronal growth cones at the tips of developing axons switch between growth and paused states during axonal pathfinding, and this switching behaviour determines the heterogeneous axon growth rates observed during brain development. The mechanisms controlling this switching behaviour, however, remain largely unknown. Here, using mathematical modelling, we predict that the molecular interaction network involved in axon growth can exhibit bistability, with one state representing a fast-growing growth cone state and the other a paused growth cone state. Owing to stochastic effects, even in an unchanging environment, model growth cones reversibly switch between growth and paused states. Our model further predicts that environmental signals could regulate axon growth rate by controlling the rates of switching between the two states. Our study presents a new conceptual understanding of growth cone switching behaviour, and suggests that axon guidance may be controlled by both cell-extrinsic factors and cell-intrinsic growth regulatory mechanisms. © 2018 The Author(s).

  1. Disruption of the Axonal Trafficking of Tyrosine Hydroxylase mRNA Impairs Catecholamine Biosynthesis in the Axons of Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gioio, Anthony E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the catecholamine neurotransmitters. In a previous communication, evidence was provided that TH mRNA is trafficked to the axon, where it is locally translated. In addition, a 50-bp sequence element in the 3′untranslated region (3’UTR) of TH mRNA was identified that directs TH mRNA to distal axons (i.e., zip-code). In the present study, the hypothesis was tested that local translation of TH plays an important role in the biosynthesis of the catecholamine neurotransmitters in the axon and/or presynaptic nerve terminal. Toward this end, a targeted deletion of the axonal transport sequence element was developed, using the lentiviral delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and two guide RNA (gRNA) sequences flanking the 50-bp cis-acting regulatory element in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. Deletion of the axonal transport element reduced TH mRNA levels in the distal axons and reduced the axonal protein levels of TH and TH activity as measured by phosphorylation of SER40 in SCG neurons. Moreover, deletion of the zip-code diminished the axonal levels of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE). Conversely, the local translation of exogenous TH mRNA in the distal axon enhanced TH levels and activity, and elevated axonal NE levels. Taken together, these results provide direct evidence to support the hypothesis that TH mRNA trafficking and local synthesis of TH play an important role in the synthesis of catecholamines in the axon and presynaptic terminal. PMID:28630892

  2. Disruption of the Axonal Trafficking of Tyrosine Hydroxylase mRNA Impairs Catecholamine Biosynthesis in the Axons of Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Aschrafi, Armaz; Gioio, Anthony E; Dong, Lijin; Kaplan, Barry B

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the catecholamine neurotransmitters. In a previous communication, evidence was provided that TH mRNA is trafficked to the axon, where it is locally translated. In addition, a 50-bp sequence element in the 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of TH mRNA was identified that directs TH mRNA to distal axons (i.e., zip-code). In the present study, the hypothesis was tested that local translation of TH plays an important role in the biosynthesis of the catecholamine neurotransmitters in the axon and/or presynaptic nerve terminal. Toward this end, a targeted deletion of the axonal transport sequence element was developed, using the lentiviral delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and two guide RNA (gRNA) sequences flanking the 50-bp cis- acting regulatory element in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. Deletion of the axonal transport element reduced TH mRNA levels in the distal axons and reduced the axonal protein levels of TH and TH activity as measured by phosphorylation of SER40 in SCG neurons. Moreover, deletion of the zip-code diminished the axonal levels of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE). Conversely, the local translation of exogenous TH mRNA in the distal axon enhanced TH levels and activity, and elevated axonal NE levels. Taken together, these results provide direct evidence to support the hypothesis that TH mRNA trafficking and local synthesis of TH play an important role in the synthesis of catecholamines in the axon and presynaptic terminal.

  3. Oligodendroglia metabolically support axons and contribute to neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngjin; Morrison, Brett M.; Li, Yun; Lengacher, Sylvain; Farah, Mohamed H.; Hoffman, Paul N.; Liu, Yiting; Tsingalia, Akivaga; Jin, Lin; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Oligodendroglia support axon survival and function through mechanisms independent of myelination and their dysfunction leads to axon degeneration in several diseases. The cause of this degeneration has not been determined, but lack of energy metabolites such as glucose or lactate has been hypothesized. Lactate is transported exclusively by monocarboxylate transporters, and changes to these transporters alter lactate production and utilization. We show the most abundant lactate transporter in the CNS, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), is highly enriched within oligodendroglia and that disruption of this transporter produces axon damage and neuron loss in animal and cell culture models. In addition, this same transporter is reduced in patients with, and mouse models of, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting a role for oligodendroglial MCT1 in pathogenesis. The role of oligodendroglia in axon function and neuron survival has been elusive; this study defines a new fundamental mechanism by which oligodendroglia support neurons and axons. PMID:22801498

  4. Tracking individual action potentials throughout mammalian axonal arbors.

    PubMed

    Radivojevic, Milos; Franke, Felix; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J

    2017-10-09

    Axons are neuronal processes specialized for conduction of action potentials (APs). The timing and temporal precision of APs when they reach each of the synapses are fundamentally important for information processing in the brain. Due to small diameters of axons, direct recording of single AP transmission is challenging. Consequently, most knowledge about axonal conductance derives from modeling studies or indirect measurements. We demonstrate a method to noninvasively and directly record individual APs propagating along millimeter-length axonal arbors in cortical cultures with hundreds of microelectrodes at microsecond temporal resolution. We find that cortical axons conduct single APs with high temporal precision (~100 µs arrival time jitter per mm length) and reliability: in more than 8,000,000 recorded APs, we did not observe any conduction or branch-point failures. Upon high-frequency stimulation at 100 Hz, successive became slower, and their arrival time precision decreased by 20% and 12% for the 100th AP, respectively.

  5. Axonal loss in the multiple sclerosis spinal cord revisited.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Natalia; Carassiti, Daniele; Altmann, Daniel R; Baker, David; Schmierer, Klaus

    2018-05-01

    Preventing chronic disease deterioration is an unmet need in people with multiple sclerosis, where axonal loss is considered a key substrate of disability. Clinically, chronic multiple sclerosis often presents as progressive myelopathy. Spinal cord cross-sectional area (CSA) assessed using MRI predicts increasing disability and has, by inference, been proposed as an indirect index of axonal degeneration. However, the association between CSA and axonal loss, and their correlation with demyelination, have never been systematically investigated using human post mortem tissue. We extensively sampled spinal cords of seven women and six men with multiple sclerosis (mean disease duration= 29 years) and five healthy controls to quantify axonal density and its association with demyelination and CSA. 396 tissue blocks were embedded in paraffin and immuno-stained for myelin basic protein and phosphorylated neurofilaments. Measurements included total CSA, areas of (i) lateral cortico-spinal tracts, (ii) gray matter, (iii) white matter, (iv) demyelination, and the number of axons within the lateral cortico-spinal tracts. Linear mixed models were used to analyze relationships. In multiple sclerosis CSA reduction at cervical, thoracic and lumbar levels ranged between 19 and 24% with white (19-24%) and gray (17-21%) matter atrophy contributing equally across levels. Axonal density in multiple sclerosis was lower by 57-62% across all levels and affected all fibers regardless of diameter. Demyelination affected 24-48% of the gray matter, most extensively at the thoracic level, and 11-13% of the white matter, with no significant differences across levels. Disease duration was associated with reduced axonal density, however not with any area index. Significant association was detected between focal demyelination and decreased axonal density. In conclusion, over nearly 30 years multiple sclerosis reduces axonal density by 60% throughout the spinal cord. Spinal cord cross sectional area

  6. Brain injury tolerance limit based on computation of axonal strain.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and permanent impairment over the last decades. In both the severe and mild TBIs, diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is the most common pathology and leads to axonal degeneration. Computation of axonal strain by using finite element head model in numerical simulation can enlighten the DAI mechanism and help to establish advanced head injury criteria. The main objective of this study is to develop a brain injury criterion based on computation of axonal strain. To achieve the objective a state-of-the-art finite element head model with enhanced brain and skull material laws, was used for numerical computation of real world head trauma. The implementation of new medical imaging data such as, fractional anisotropy and axonal fiber orientation from Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) of 12 healthy patients into the finite element brain model was performed to improve the brain constitutive material law with more efficient heterogeneous anisotropic visco hyper-elastic material law. The brain behavior has been validated in terms of brain deformation against Hardy et al. (2001), Hardy et al. (2007), and in terms of brain pressure against Nahum et al. (1977) and Trosseille et al. (1992) experiments. Verification of model stability has been conducted as well. Further, 109 well-documented TBI cases were simulated and axonal strain computed to derive brain injury tolerance curve. Based on an in-depth statistical analysis of different intra-cerebral parameters (brain axonal strain rate, axonal strain, first principal strain, Von Mises strain, first principal stress, Von Mises stress, CSDM (0.10), CSDM (0.15) and CSDM (0.25)), it was shown that axonal strain was the most appropriate candidate parameter to predict DAI. The proposed brain injury tolerance limit for a 50% risk of DAI has been established at 14.65% of axonal strain. This study provides a key step for a realistic novel injury metric for DAI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Learning to swim, again: Axon regeneration in fish.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jeffrey P; Sagasti, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    Damage to the central nervous system (CNS) of fish can often be repaired to restore function, but in mammals recovery from CNS injuries usually fails due to a lack of axon regeneration. The relatively growth-permissive environment of the fish CNS may reflect both the absence of axon inhibitors found in the mammalian CNS and the presence of pro-regenerative environmental factors. Despite their different capacities for axon regeneration, many of the physiological processes, intrinsic molecular pathways, and cellular behaviors that control an axon's ability to regrow are conserved between fish and mammals. Fish models have thus been useful both for identifying factors differing between mammals and fish that may account for differences in CNS regeneration and for characterizing conserved intrinsic pathways that regulate axon regeneration in all vertebrates. The majority of adult axon regeneration studies have focused on the optic nerve or spinal axons of the teleosts goldfish and zebrafish, which have been productive models for identifying genes associated with axon regeneration, cellular mechanisms of circuit reestablishment, and the basis of functional recovery. Lampreys, which are jawless fish lacking myelin, have provided an opportunity to study regeneration of well defined spinal cord circuits. Newer larval zebrafish models offer numerous genetic tools and the ability to monitor the dynamic behaviors of extrinsic cell types regulating axon regeneration in live animals. Recent advances in imaging and gene editing methods are making fish models yet more powerful for investigating the cellular and molecular underpinnings of axon regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cargo crowding at actin-rich regions along axons causes local traffic jams.

    PubMed

    Sood, Parul; Murthy, Kausalya; Kumar, Vinod; Nonet, Michael L; Menon, Gautam I; Koushika, Sandhya P

    2018-03-01

    Steady axonal cargo flow is central to the functioning of healthy neurons. However, a substantial fraction of cargo in axons remains stationary up to several minutes. We examine the transport of precursors of synaptic vesicles (pre-SVs), endosomes and mitochondria in Caenorhabditis elegans touch receptor neurons, showing that stationary cargo are predominantly present at actin-rich regions along the neuronal process. Stationary vesicles at actin-rich regions increase the propensity of moving vesicles to stall at the same location, resulting in traffic jams arising from physical crowding. Such local traffic jams at actin-rich regions are likely to be a general feature of axonal transport since they also occur in Drosophila neurons. Repeated touch stimulation of C. elegans reduces the density of stationary pre-SVs, indicating that these traffic jams can act as both sources and sinks of vesicles. This suggests that vesicles trapped in actin-rich regions are functional reservoirs that may contribute to maintaining robust cargo flow in the neuron. A video abstract of this article can be found at: Video S1; Video S2. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C; Mennerick, Steven

    2015-08-05

    Neuron-astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (-astrocyte) within the same culture dish. -Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform and arrival time of axonal

  10. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuron–astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (−astrocyte) within the same culture dish. −Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform

  11. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Allan T; Bravo, Jaime J

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation.

  12. Axonal degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease: When signaling abnormalities meet the axonal transport system

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Brady, Scott T.; Lazarov, Orly; Binder, Lester I.; Morfini, Gerardo A.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive, age-dependent degeneration of neurons in the central nervous system. A large body of evidence indicates that neurons affected in AD follow a dying-back pattern of degeneration, where abnormalities in synaptic function and axonal connectivity long precede somatic cell death. Mechanisms underlying dying-back degeneration of neurons in AD remain elusive but several have been proposed, including deficits in fast axonal transport (FAT). Accordingly, genetic evidence linked alterations in FAT to dying-back degeneration of neurons, and FAT defects have been widely documented in various AD models. In light of these findings, we discuss experimental evidence linking several AD-related pathogenic polypeptides to aberrant activation of signaling pathways involved in the phosphoregulation of microtubule-based motor proteins. While each pathway appears to affect FAT in a unique manner, in the context of AD, many of these pathways might work synergistically to compromise the delivery of molecular components critical for the maintenance and function of synapses and axons. Therapeutic approaches aimed at preventing FAT deficits by normalizing the activity of specific protein kinases may help prevent degeneration of vulnerable neurons in AD. PMID:22721767

  13. ROS regulation of axonal mitochondrial transport is mediated by Ca2+ and JNK in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Pin-Chao; Tandarich, Lauren C.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria perform critical functions including aerobic ATP production and calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis, but are also a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. To maintain cellular function and survival in neurons, mitochondria are transported along axons, and accumulate in regions with high demand for their functions. Oxidative stress and abnormal mitochondrial axonal transport are associated with neurodegenerative disorders. However, we know little about the connection between these two. Using the Drosophila third instar larval nervous system as the in vivo model, we found that ROS inhibited mitochondrial axonal transport more specifically, primarily due to reduced flux and velocity, but did not affect transport of other organelles. To understand the mechanisms underlying these effects, we examined Ca2+ levels and the JNK (c-Jun N-terminal Kinase) pathway, which have been shown to regulate mitochondrial transport and general fast axonal transport, respectively. We found that elevated ROS increased Ca2+ levels, and that experimental reduction of Ca2+ to physiological levels rescued ROS-induced defects in mitochondrial transport in primary neuron cell cultures. In addition, in vivo activation of the JNK pathway reduced mitochondrial flux and velocities, while JNK knockdown partially rescued ROS-induced defects in the anterograde direction. We conclude that ROS have the capacity to regulate mitochondrial traffic, and that Ca2+ and JNK signaling play roles in mediating these effects. In addition to transport defects, ROS produces imbalances in mitochondrial fission-fusion and metabolic state, indicating that mitochondrial transport, fission-fusion steady state, and metabolic state are closely interrelated in the response to ROS. PMID:28542430

  14. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion preserves axonal function in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kwai, Natalie; Arnold, Ria; Poynten, Ann M; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Kiernan, Matthew C; Krishnan, Arun V

    2015-02-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common and debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus. Although strict glycaemic control may reduce the risk of developing diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the neurological benefits of different insulin regimens remain relatively unknown. In the present study, 55 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent clinical neurological assessment. Subsequently, 41 non-neuropathic patients, 24 of whom were receiving multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) and 17 receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), underwent nerve excitability testing, a technique that assesses axonal ion channel function and membrane potential in human nerves. Treatment groups were matched for glycaemic control, body mass index, disease duration and gender. Neurophysiological parameters were compared between treatment groups and those taken from age and sex-matched normal controls. Prominent differences in axonal function were noted between MDII-treated and CSII-treated patients. Specifically, MDII patients manifested prominent abnormalities when compared with normal controls in threshold electrotonus (TE) parameters including depolarizing TE(10-20ms), undershoot and hyperpolarizing TE (90-100 ms) (P < 0.05). Additionally, recovery cycle parameters superexcitability and subexcitability were also abnormal (P < 0.05). In contrast, axonal function in CSII-treated patients was within normal limits when compared with age-matched controls. The differences between the groups were noted in cross-sectional analysis and remained at longitudinal follow-up. Axonal function in type 1 diabetes is maintained within normal limits in patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and not with multiple daily insulin injections. This raises the possibility that CSII therapy may have neuroprotective potential in patients with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Miro's N-Terminal GTPase Domain Is Required for Transport of Mitochondria into Axons and Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J.; Wellington, Andrea J.; Sangston, Ryan M.; Gonzalez, Migdalia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state. PMID:25855186

  16. Ergonomics Contribution in Maintainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teymourian, Kiumars; Seneviratne, Dammika; Galar, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe an ergonomics contribution in maintainability. The economical designs, inputs and training helps to increase the maintainability indicators for industrial devices. This analysis can be helpful, among other cases, to compare systems, to achieve a better design regarding maintainability requirements, to improve this maintainability under specific industrial environment and to foresee maintainability problems due to eventual changes in a device operation conditions. With this purpose, this work first introduces the notion of ergonomics and human factors, maintainability and the implementation of assessment of human postures, including some important postures to perform maintenance activities. A simulation approach is used to identify the critical posture of the maintenance personnel and implements the defined postures with minimal loads on the personnel who use the equipment in a practical scenario. The simulation inputs are given to the designers to improve the workplace/equipment in order to high level of maintainability. Finally, the work concludes summarizing the more significant aspects and suggesting future research.

  17. Axonal Transport and Morphology: How Myelination gets Nerves into Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Peter; Zhao, Peng; Monsma, Paula; Brown, Tony

    2011-03-01

    The local caliber of mature axons is largely determined by neurofilament (NF) content. The axoskeleton, mainly consisting of NFs, however, is dynamic. NFs are assembled in the cell body and are transported by molecular motors on microtubule tracks along the axon at a slow rate of fractions of mm per day. We combine live cell fluorescent imaging techniques to access NF transport in myelinated and non-myelinated segments of axons with computational modeling of the active NF flow to show that a), myelination locally slows NF transport rates by regulating duty ratios and b), that the predicted increase in axon caliber agrees well with experiments. This study, for the first time, links NF kinetics directly to axonal morphology, providing a novel conceptual framework for the physical understanding of processes leading to the formation of axonal structures such as the ``Nodes of Ranvier'' as well as abnormal axonal swellings associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). NSF grants # IOS-0818412(PJ) and IOS-0818653 (AB).

  18. Dock and Pak regulate olfactory axon pathfinding in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ang, Lay-Hong; Kim, Jenny; Stepensky, Vitaly; Hing, Huey

    2003-04-01

    The convergence of olfactory axons expressing particular odorant receptor (Or) genes on spatially invariant glomeruli in the brain is one of the most dramatic examples of precise axon targeting in developmental neurobiology. The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which olfactory axons pathfind to their targets are poorly understood. We report here that the SH2/SH3 adapter Dock and the serine/threonine kinase Pak are necessary for the precise guidance of olfactory axons. Using antibody localization, mosaic analyses and cell-type specific rescue, we observed that Dock and Pak are expressed in olfactory axons and function autonomously in olfactory neurons to regulate the precise wiring of the olfactory map. Detailed analyses of the mutant phenotypes in whole mutants and in small multicellular clones indicate that Dock and Pak do not control olfactory neuron (ON) differentiation, but specifically regulate multiple aspects of axon trajectories to guide them to their cognate glomeruli. Structure/function studies show that Dock and Pak form a signaling pathway that mediates the response of olfactory axons to guidance cues in the developing antennal lobe (AL). Our findings therefore identify a central signaling module that is used by ONs to project to their cognate glomeruli.

  19. Calpains mediate axonal cytoskeleton disintegration during Wallerian degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Marek; Ferguson, Toby A.; Schoch, Kathleen M.; Li, Jian; Qian, Yaping; Shofer, Frances S.; Saatman, Kathryn E.; Neumar, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    In both the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS), transected axons undergo Wallerian degeneration. Even though Augustus Waller first described this process after transection of axons in 1850, the molecular mechanisms may be shared, at least in part, by many human diseases. Early pathology includes failure of synaptic transmission, target denervation, and granular disintegration of the axonal cytoskeleton (GDC). The Ca2+-dependent proteases calpains have been implicated in GDC but causality has not been established. To test the hypothesis that calpains play a causal role in axonal and synaptic degeneration in vivo, we studied transgenic mice that express human calpastatin (hCAST), the endogenous calpain inhibitor, in optic and sciatic nerve axons. Five days after optic nerve transection and 48 hours after sciatic nerve transection, robust neurofilament proteolysis observed in wild-type controls was reduced in hCAST transgenic mice. Protection of the axonal cytoskeleton in sciatic nerves of hCAST mice was nearly complete 48 hours post-transection. In addition, hCAST expression preserved the morphological integrity of neuromuscular junctions. However, compound muscle action potential amplitudes after nerve transection were similar in wild-type and hCAST mice. These results, in total, provide direct evidence that calpains are responsible for the morphological degeneration of the axon and synapse during Wallerian degeneration. PMID:23542511

  20. High plasticity of axonal pathology in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Valero-Freitag, Susana; Rodrigues, Eva Ferreira; Merchán-Pérez, Ángel; Rodríguez, J Rodrigo; Dorostkar, Mario M; DeFelipe, Javier; Herms, Jochen

    2017-02-07

    Axonal dystrophies (AxDs) are swollen and tortuous neuronal processes that are associated with extracellular depositions of amyloid β (Aβ) and have been observed to contribute to synaptic alterations occurring in Alzheimer's disease. Understanding the temporal course of this axonal pathology is of high relevance to comprehend the progression of the disease over time. We performed a long-term in vivo study (up to 210 days of two-photon imaging) with two transgenic mouse models (dE9xGFP-M and APP-PS1xGFP-M). Interestingly, AxDs were formed only in a quarter of GFP-expressing axons near Aβ-plaques, which indicates a selective vulnerability. AxDs, especially those reaching larger sizes, had long lifetimes and appeared as highly plastic structures with large variations in size and shape and axonal sprouting over time. In the case of the APP-PS1 mouse only, the formation of new long axonal segments in dystrophic axons (re-growth phenomenon) was observed. Moreover, new AxDs could appear at the same point of the axon where a previous AxD had been located before disappearance (re-formation phenomenon). In addition, we observed that most AxDs were formed and developed during the imaging period, and numerous AxDs had already disappeared by the end of this time. This work is the first in vivo study analyzing quantitatively the high plasticity of the axonal pathology around Aβ plaques. We hypothesized that a therapeutically early prevention of Aβ plaque formation or their growth might halt disease progression and promote functional axon regeneration and the recovery of neural circuits.

  1. Maintaining granular surfaced roads.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-02-01

    Approximately 65% of Iowa's roads are surfaced with aggregates composed of crushed limestone and/or gravel. Rural Iowan's regard these roads as a very important part of their lives. Therefore, the slide-tape presentation, "Maintaining Granular Surfac...

  2. Npn-1 Contributes to Axon-Axon Interactions That Differentially Control Sensory and Motor Innervation of the Limb

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Elisa; Novitch, Bennett G.; Huber, Andrea B.

    2011-01-01

    The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1) in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs. PMID:21364975

  3. Human Periodontal Ligament-Derived Stem Cells Promote Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival and Axon Regeneration After Optic Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Cen, Ling-Ping; Ng, Tsz Kin; Liang, Jia-Jian; Zhuang, Xi; Yao, Xiaowu; Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Chen, Haoyu; Cheung, Herman S; Zhang, Mingzhi; Pang, Chi Pui

    2018-06-01

    Optic neuropathies are the leading cause of irreversible blindness and visual impairment in the developed countries, affecting more than 80 million people worldwide. While most optic neuropathies have no effective treatment, there is intensive research on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) protection and axon regeneration. We previously demonstrated potential of human periodontal ligament-derived stem cells (PDLSCs) for retinal cell replacement. Here, we report the neuroprotective effect of human PDLSCs to ameliorate RGC degeneration and promote axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush (ONC) injury. Human PDLSCs were intravitreally injected into the vitreous chamber of adult Fischer rats after ONC in vivo as well as cocultured with retinal explants in vitro. Human PDLSCs survived in the vitreous chamber and were maintained on the RGC layer even at 3 weeks after ONC. Immunofluorescence analysis of βIII-tubulin and Gap43 showed that the numbers of surviving RGCs and regenerating axons were significantly increased in the rats with human PDLSC transplantation. In vitro coculture experiments confirmed that PDLSCs enhanced RGC survival and neurite regeneration in retinal explants without inducing inflammatory responses. Direct cell-cell interaction and elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor secretion, but not promoting endogenous progenitor cell regeneration, were the RGC protective mechanisms of human PDLSCs. In summary, our results revealed the neuroprotective role of human PDLSCs by strongly promoting RGC survival and axonal regeneration both in vivo and in vitro, indicating a therapeutic potential for RGC protection against optic neuropathies. Stem Cells 2018;36:844-855. © AlphaMed Press 2018.

  4. TRANSVERSE ELECTRIC IMPEDANCE OF THE SQUID GIANT AXON

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Howard J.; Cole, Kenneth S.

    1938-01-01

    The impedance of the excised giant axon from hindmost stellar nerve of Loligo pealii has been measured over the frequency range from 1 to 2500 kilocycles per second. The measurements have been made with the current flow perpendicular to the axis of the axon to permit a relatively simple analysis of the data. It has been found that the axon membrane has a polarization impedance with an average phase angle of 76° and an average capacity of 1.1µf./cm2 at 1 kilocycle. The direct current resistance of the membrane could not be measured, but was greater than 3 ohm cm.2 and the average internal specific resistance was four times that of sea water. There was no detectable change in the membrane impedance when the axon lost excitability, but some time later it decreased to zero. PMID:19873081

  5. Syndecan promotes axon regeneration by stabilizing growth cone migration

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tyson J.; Hammarlund, Marc

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Growth cones facilitate the repair of nervous system damage by providing the driving force for axon regeneration. Using single-neuron laser axotomy and in vivo time-lapse imaging, we show that syndecan, a heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan, is required for growth cone function during axon regeneration in C. elegans. In the absence of syndecan, regenerating growth cones form but are unstable and collapse, decreasing the effective growth rate and impeding regrowth to target cells. We provide evidence that syndecan has two distinct functions during axon regeneration: 1) a canonical function in axon guidance that requires expression outside the nervous system and depends on HS chains, and 2) a novel intrinsic function in growth cone stabilization that is mediated by the syndecan core protein, independently of HS. Thus, syndecan is a novel regulator of a critical choke point in nervous system repair. PMID:25001284

  6. Syndecan promotes axon regeneration by stabilizing growth cone migration.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Tyson J; Hammarlund, Marc

    2014-07-10

    Growth cones facilitate the repair of nervous system damage by providing the driving force for axon regeneration. Using single-neuron laser axotomy and in vivo time-lapse imaging, we show that syndecan, a heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan, is required for growth cone function during axon regeneration in C. elegans. In the absence of syndecan, regenerating growth cones form but are unstable and collapse, decreasing the effective growth rate and impeding regrowth to target cells. We provide evidence that syndecan has two distinct functions during axon regeneration: (1) a canonical function in axon guidance that requires expression outside the nervous system and depends on HS chains and (2) an intrinsic function in growth cone stabilization that is mediated by the syndecan core protein, independently of HS. Thus, syndecan is a regulator of a critical choke point in nervous system repair. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurotrophin Signaling via Long-Distance Axonal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdary, Praveen D.; Che, Dung L.; Cui, Bianxiao

    2012-05-01

    Neurotrophins are a family of target-derived growth factors that support survival, development, and maintenance of innervating neurons. Owing to the unique architecture of neurons, neurotrophins that act locally on the axonal terminals must convey their signals across the entire axon for subsequent regulation of gene transcription in the cell nucleus. This long-distance retrograde signaling, a motor-driven process that can take hours or days, has been a subject of intense interest. In the last decade, live-cell imaging with high sensitivity has significantly increased our capability to track the transport of neurotrophins, their receptors, and subsequent signals in real time. This review summarizes recent research progress in understanding neurotrophin-receptor interactions at the axonal terminal and their transport dynamics along the axon. We emphasize high-resolution studies at the single-molecule level and also discuss recent technical advances in the field.

  8. Dendrosomatic Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons Regulates Axon Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Ya-Xian; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and its signaling components in the neurons of the hippocampus raises a question about what role the Shh signaling pathway may play in these neurons. We show here that activation of the Shh signaling pathway stimulates axon elongation in rat hippocampal neurons. This Shh-induced effect depends on the pathway transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli1. The axon itself does not respond directly to Shh; instead, the Shh signal transduction originates from the somatodendritic region of the neurons and occurs in neurons with and without detectable primary cilia. Upon Shh stimulation, Smo localization to dendrites increases significantly. Shh pathway activation results in increased levels of profilin1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein. Mutations in Pfn1's actin-binding sites or reduction of Pfn1 eliminate the Shh-induced axon elongation. These findings indicate that Shh can regulate axon growth, which may be critical for development of hippocampal neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although numerous signaling mechanisms have been identified that act directly on axons to regulate their outgrowth, it is not known whether signals transduced in dendrites may also affect axon outgrowth. We describe here a transcellular signaling pathway in embryonic hippocampal neurons in which activation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptors in dendrites stimulates axon growth. The pathway involves the dendritic-membrane-associated Shh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli, which induces the expression of the gene encoding the actin-binding protein profilin 1. Our findings suggest scenarios in which stimulation of Shh in dendrites results in accelerated outgrowth of the axon, which therefore reaches its presumptive postsynaptic target cell more quickly. By this mechanism, Shh may play critical roles in the development of hippocampal neuronal circuits. PMID:26658865

  9. Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration after SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    functions. In the mammalian spinal cord, axon regeneration is frustrated by inhibitors such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) expressed by...CG, Becker T (2002) Repellent guidance of regeneration optic axons by chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans in zebrafish. J Neurosci 22(3): 842-853...Shen Y, Tenney AP, Busch SA, Horn KP, Cuascut FX, Liu K, He Z, Silver J, Flanagan JG (2009) PTPσ is a receptor for chondroitin sulfate

  10. Sodium Movements in Perfused Squid Giant Axons

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Eduardo; Canessa-Fischer, Mitzy

    1968-01-01

    Sodium movements in internally perfused giant axons from the squid Dosidicus gigas were studied with varying internal sodium concentrations and with fluoride as the internal anion. It was found that as the internal concentration of sodium was increased from 2 to 200 mM the resting sodium efflux increased from 0.09 to 34.0 pmoles/cm2sec and the average resting sodium influx increased from 42.9 to 64.5 pmoles/cm2sec but this last change was not statistically significant. When perfusing with a mixture of 500 mM K glutamate and 100 mM Na glutamate the resting efflux was 10 ± 3 pmoles/cm2sec and 41 ± 10 pmoles/cm2sec for sodium influx. Increasing the internal sodium concentration also increased both the extra influx and the extra efflux of sodium due to impulse propagation. At any given internal sodium concentration the net extra influx was about 5 pmoles/cm2impulse. This finding supports the notion that the inward current generated in a propagated action potential can be completely accounted for by movements of sodium. PMID:5672003

  11. Evaluation of the Technicon Axon analyser.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Márquez, M; Cortés, M; Mercé, J; Rodriguez, J; González, F

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation of the Technicon Axon analyser was carried out following the guidelines of the 'Sociedad Española de Química Clínica' and the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards.A photometric study revealed acceptable results at both 340 nm and 404 nm. Inaccuracy and imprecision were lower at 404 nm than at 340 nm, although poor dispersion was found at both wavelengths, even at low absorbances. Drift was negligible, the imprecision of the sample pipette delivery system was greater for small sample volumes, the reagent pipette delivery system imprecision was acceptable and the sample diluting system study showed good precision and accuracy.Twelve analytes were studied for evaluation of the analyser under routine working conditions. Satisfactory results were obtained for within-run imprecision, while coefficients of variation for betweenrun imprecision were much greater than expected. Neither specimenrelated nor specimen-independent contamination was found in the carry-over study. For all analytes assayed, when comparing patient sample results with those obtained in a Hitachi 737 analyser, acceptable relative inaccuracy was observed.

  12. Glypican Is a Modulator of Netrin-Mediated Axon Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, Cassandra R.; Perrat, Paola N.; Thackeray, Andrea; Bénard, Claire Y.

    2015-01-01

    Netrin is a key axon guidance cue that orients axon growth during neural circuit formation. However, the mechanisms regulating netrin and its receptors in the extracellular milieu are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that in Caenorhabditis elegans, LON-2/glypican, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, modulates UNC-6/netrin signaling and may do this through interactions with the UNC-40/DCC receptor. We show that developing axons misorient in the absence of LON-2/glypican when the SLT-1/slit guidance pathway is compromised and that LON-2/glypican functions in both the attractive and repulsive UNC-6/netrin pathways. We find that the core LON-2/glypican protein, lacking its heparan sulfate chains, and secreted forms of LON-2/glypican are functional in axon guidance. We also find that LON-2/glypican functions from the epidermal substrate cells to guide axons, and we provide evidence that LON-2/glypican associates with UNC-40/DCC receptor–expressing cells. We propose that LON-2/glypican acts as a modulator of UNC-40/DCC-mediated guidance to fine-tune axonal responses to UNC-6/netrin signals during migration. PMID:26148345

  13. Developmental time windows for axon growth influence neuronal network topology.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sol; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Early brain connectivity development consists of multiple stages: birth of neurons, their migration and the subsequent growth of axons and dendrites. Each stage occurs within a certain period of time depending on types of neurons and cortical layers. Forming synapses between neurons either by growing axons starting at similar times for all neurons (much-overlapped time windows) or at different time points (less-overlapped) may affect the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks. Here, we explore the extreme cases of axon formation during early development, either starting at the same time for all neurons (parallel, i.e., maximally overlapped time windows) or occurring for each neuron separately one neuron after another (serial, i.e., no overlaps in time windows). For both cases, the number of potential and established synapses remained comparable. Topological and spatial properties, however, differed: Neurons that started axon growth early on in serial growth achieved higher out-degrees, higher local efficiency and longer axon lengths while neurons demonstrated more homogeneous connectivity patterns for parallel growth. Second, connection probability decreased more rapidly with distance between neurons for parallel growth than for serial growth. Third, bidirectional connections were more numerous for parallel growth. Finally, we tested our predictions with C. elegans data. Together, this indicates that time windows for axon growth influence the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks opening up the possibility to a posteriori estimate developmental mechanisms based on network properties of a developed network.

  14. Axonal neurofilaments are nonessential elements of toxicant-induced reductions in fast axonal transport: video-enhanced differential interference microscopy in peripheral nervous system axons.

    PubMed

    Stone, J D; Peterson, A P; Eyer, J; Oblak, T G; Sickles, D W

    1999-11-15

    Neurofilament modification and accumulation, occurring in toxicant-induced neuropathies, has been proposed to compromise fast axonal transport and contribute to neurological symptoms or pathology. The current study compares the effects of the neurotoxicants acrylamide (ACR) and 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-HD) on the quantity of fast, bidirectional vesicular traffic within isolated mouse sciatic nerve axons from transgenic mice lacking axonal neurofilaments (Eyer and Peterson, Neuron 12, 1-20, 1994) and nontransgenic littermates possessing neurofilaments. Fast anterograde and retrograde membrane bound organelle (MBO) traffic was quantitated within axons, before and after toxicant exposure, using video-enhanced differential interference contrast (AVEC-DIC) microscopy. Addition of 0.7 mM ACR to the buffer bathing the nerve produced a time-dependent reduction in bidirectional transport with a similar time to onset and magnitude in both transgenic and nontransgenic mice. 2,5-HD (4 mM) exposure reduced bidirectional vesicle traffic by a similar amount in both transgenic and nontransgenic animals. The time to onset of the transport reduction was less and the magnitude of the reduction was greater with 2,5-HD compared to ACR. A single 10-min exposure to ACR or 2,5-HD produced a similar reduction in transport to that produced by prolonged (1 h) exposure. Nonneurotoxic propionamide or 3,4-hexanedione (3,4-HD) produced no changes in bidirectional transport in either transgenic or nontransgenic animals. We conclude that ACR or 2,5-HD produces a rapid, saturable, nonreversible, neurotoxicant-specific reduction in fast bidirectional transport within isolated peripheral nerve axons. These actions are mediated through direct modification of axonal component(s), which are independent of toxicant-induced modifications of, or accumulations of, neurofilaments. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  15. Axonal Transport: How High Microtubule Density Can Compensate for Boundary Effects in Small-Caliber Axons

    PubMed Central

    Wortman, Juliana C.; Shrestha, Uttam M.; Barry, Devin M.; Garcia, Michael L.; Gross, Steven P.; Yu, Clare C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-distance intracellular axonal transport is predominantly microtubule-based, and its impairment is linked to neurodegeneration. In this study, we present theoretical arguments that suggest that near the axon boundaries (walls), the effective viscosity can become large enough to impede cargo transport in small (but not large) caliber axons. Our theoretical analysis suggests that this opposition to motion increases rapidly as the cargo approaches the wall. We find that having parallel microtubules close enough together to enable a cargo to simultaneously engage motors on more than one microtubule dramatically enhances motor activity, and thus minimizes the effects of any opposition to transport. Even if microtubules are randomly placed in axons, we find that the higher density of microtubules found in small-caliber axons increases the probability of having parallel microtubules close enough that they can be used simultaneously by motors on a cargo. The boundary effect is not a factor in transport in large-caliber axons where the microtubule density is lower. PMID:24559984

  16. Axonal Conduction Delays, Brain State, and Corticogeniculate Communication.

    PubMed

    Stoelzel, Carl R; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Swadlow, Harvey A

    2017-06-28

    Thalamocortical conduction times are short, but layer 6 corticothalamic axons display an enormous range of conduction times, some exceeding 40-50 ms. Here, we investigate (1) how axonal conduction times of corticogeniculate (CG) neurons are related to the visual information conveyed to the thalamus, and (2) how alert versus nonalert awake brain states affect visual processing across the spectrum of CG conduction times. In awake female Dutch-Belted rabbits, we found 58% of CG neurons to be visually responsive, and 42% to be unresponsive. All responsive CG neurons had simple, orientation-selective receptive fields, and generated sustained responses to stationary stimuli. CG axonal conduction times were strongly related to modulated firing rates (F1 values) generated by drifting grating stimuli, and their associated interspike interval distributions, suggesting a continuum of visual responsiveness spanning the spectrum of axonal conduction times. CG conduction times were also significantly related to visual response latency, contrast sensitivity (C-50 values), directional selectivity, and optimal stimulus velocity. Increasing alertness did not cause visually unresponsive CG neurons to become responsive and did not change the response linearity (F1/F0 ratios) of visually responsive CG neurons. However, for visually responsive CG neurons, increased alertness nearly doubled the modulated response amplitude to optimal visual stimulation (F1 values), significantly shortened response latency, and dramatically increased response reliability. These effects of alertness were uniform across the broad spectrum of CG axonal conduction times. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Corticothalamic neurons of layer 6 send a dense feedback projection to thalamic nuclei that provide input to sensory neocortex. While sensory information reaches the cortex after brief thalamocortical axonal delays, corticothalamic axons can exhibit conduction delays of <2 ms to 40-50 ms. Here, in the corticogeniculate

  17. Axonal Conduction Delays, Brain State, and Corticogeniculate Communication

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Thalamocortical conduction times are short, but layer 6 corticothalamic axons display an enormous range of conduction times, some exceeding 40–50 ms. Here, we investigate (1) how axonal conduction times of corticogeniculate (CG) neurons are related to the visual information conveyed to the thalamus, and (2) how alert versus nonalert awake brain states affect visual processing across the spectrum of CG conduction times. In awake female Dutch-Belted rabbits, we found 58% of CG neurons to be visually responsive, and 42% to be unresponsive. All responsive CG neurons had simple, orientation-selective receptive fields, and generated sustained responses to stationary stimuli. CG axonal conduction times were strongly related to modulated firing rates (F1 values) generated by drifting grating stimuli, and their associated interspike interval distributions, suggesting a continuum of visual responsiveness spanning the spectrum of axonal conduction times. CG conduction times were also significantly related to visual response latency, contrast sensitivity (C-50 values), directional selectivity, and optimal stimulus velocity. Increasing alertness did not cause visually unresponsive CG neurons to become responsive and did not change the response linearity (F1/F0 ratios) of visually responsive CG neurons. However, for visually responsive CG neurons, increased alertness nearly doubled the modulated response amplitude to optimal visual stimulation (F1 values), significantly shortened response latency, and dramatically increased response reliability. These effects of alertness were uniform across the broad spectrum of CG axonal conduction times. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Corticothalamic neurons of layer 6 send a dense feedback projection to thalamic nuclei that provide input to sensory neocortex. While sensory information reaches the cortex after brief thalamocortical axonal delays, corticothalamic axons can exhibit conduction delays of <2 ms to 40–50 ms. Here, in the

  18. Cooperative Interactions between 480 kDa Ankyrin-G and EB Proteins Assemble the Axon Initial Segment.

    PubMed

    Fréal, Amélie; Fassier, Coralie; Le Bras, Barbara; Bullier, Erika; De Gois, Stéphanie; Hazan, Jamilé; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Couraud, François

    2016-04-20

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is required for generating action potentials and maintaining neuronal polarity. Significant progress has been made in deciphering the basic building blocks composing the AIS, but the underlying mechanisms required for AIS formation remains unclear. The scaffolding protein ankyrin-G is the master-organizer of the AIS. Microtubules and their interactors, particularly end-binding proteins (EBs), have emerged as potential key players in AIS formation. Here, we show that the longest isoform of ankyrin-G (480AnkG) selectively associates with EBs via its specific tail domain and that this interaction is crucial for AIS formation and neuronal polarity in cultured rodent hippocampal neurons. EBs are essential for 480AnkG localization and stabilization at the AIS, whereas 480AnkG is required for the specific accumulation of EBs in the proximal axon. Our findings thus provide a conceptual framework for understanding how the cooperative relationship between 480AnkG and EBs induces the assembly of microtubule-AIS structures in the proximal axon. Neuronal polarity is crucial for the proper function of neurons. The assembly of the axon initial segment (AIS), which is the hallmark of early neuronal polarization, relies on the longest 480 kDa ankyrin-G isoform. The microtubule cytoskeleton and its interacting proteins were suggested to be early key players in the process of AIS formation. In this study, we show that the crosstalk between 480 kDa ankyrin-G and the microtubule plus-end tracking proteins, EBs, at the proximal axon is decisive for AIS assembly and neuronal polarity. Our work thus provides insight into the functional mechanisms used by 480 kDa ankyrin-G to drive the AIS formation and thereby to establish neuronal polarity. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/364421-13$15.00/0.

  19. Cytoplasmic segregation and cytoskeletal organization in the electric catfish giant electromotoneuron with special reference to the axon hillock region.

    PubMed

    Braun, N; Schikorski, T; Zimmermann, H

    1993-02-01

    The cytoplasm of the highly polarized nerve cell is permanently segregated into domains with differing organellar composition. The mechanisms maintaining this segregation are largely unknown. In order to elucidate the potential role of cytoskeletal elements in this process we compared the cytoplasmic segregation within the giant electromotoneuron of the electric catfish (Malapterurus electricus) with the distribution of binding sites for antibodies against elements of the cytoskeleton. Most prominent cytoplasmic segregations include the formation of a subplasmalemmal cortical structure free of Nissl bodies and Golgi cisternae, the separation within the soma of domains containing rough endoplasmic reticulum and filament-rich domains, and the soma-axon transition. The cytoplasmic transition at the axon hillock forms a distinct borderline where Nissl bodies, Golgi cisternae and the bulk of lysosomes abruptly terminate and are excluded from the axoplasm. Synaptic vesicles and mitochondria are free to pass compartmental borders. Tropomyosin, spectrin, and alpha-actinin reveal a rather homogeneous immunofluorescence throughout the neuron. In contrast, neurofilament protein and tubulin display a distinctly increased immunofluorescence in the subplasmalemmal cortical layer, in dendrites as well as in the axon. The increase in immunofluorescence at the axon hillock exactly depicts the small transition zone from the somatic cytoplasm rich in Nissl bodies, Golgi cisternae and lysosomes to the differently structured axoplasm. The picture is similar for beta-tubulin, tyrosinylated and detyrosinylated alpha-tubulin. Detyrosinylated tubulin (glu-tubulin, which is contained in microtubules of increased stability) shows the most prominent enrichment in the axon. The distribution of myosin is comparable to that of neurofilament protein but there is less difference in immunofluorescence between the domains. Our results would be compatible with a role of microtubules together with

  20. The Absence of Sensory Axon Bifurcation Affects Nociception and Termination Fields of Afferents in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Tröster, Philip; Haseleu, Julia; Petersen, Jonas; Drees, Oliver; Schmidtko, Achim; Schwaller, Frederick; Lewin, Gary R.; Ter-Avetisyan, Gohar; Winter, York; Peters, Stefanie; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert; Rathjen, Fritz G.; Schmidt, Hannes

    2018-01-01

    A cGMP signaling cascade composed of C-type natriuretic peptide, the guanylyl cyclase receptor Npr2 and cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI) controls the bifurcation of sensory axons upon entering the spinal cord during embryonic development. However, the impact of axon bifurcation on sensory processing in adulthood remains poorly understood. To investigate the functional consequences of impaired axon bifurcation during adult stages we generated conditional mouse mutants of Npr2 and cGKI (Npr2fl/fl;Wnt1Cre and cGKIKO/fl;Wnt1Cre) that lack sensory axon bifurcation in the absence of additional phenotypes observed in the global knockout mice. Cholera toxin labeling in digits of the hind paw demonstrated an altered shape of sensory neuron termination fields in the spinal cord of conditional Npr2 mouse mutants. Behavioral testing of both sexes indicated that noxious heat sensation and nociception induced by chemical irritants are impaired in the mutants, whereas responses to cold sensation, mechanical stimulation, and motor coordination are not affected. Recordings from C-fiber nociceptors in the hind limb skin showed that Npr2 function was not required to maintain normal heat sensitivity of peripheral nociceptors. Thus, the altered behavioral responses to noxious heat found in Npr2fl/fl;Wnt1Cre mice is not due to an impaired C-fiber function. Overall, these data point to a critical role of axonal bifurcation for the processing of pain induced by heat or chemical stimuli. PMID:29472841

  1. Attenuated traumatic axonal injury and improved functional outcome after traumatic brain injury in mice lacking Sarm1.

    PubMed

    Henninger, Nils; Bouley, James; Sikoglu, Elif M; An, Jiyan; Moore, Constance M; King, Jean A; Bowser, Robert; Freeman, Marc R; Brown, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Axonal degeneration is a critical, early event in many acute and chronic neurological disorders. It has been consistently observed after traumatic brain injury, but whether axon degeneration is a driver of traumatic brain injury remains unclear. Molecular pathways underlying the pathology of traumatic brain injury have not been defined, and there is no efficacious treatment for traumatic brain injury. Here we show that mice lacking the mouse Toll receptor adaptor Sarm1 (sterile α/Armadillo/Toll-Interleukin receptor homology domain protein) gene, a key mediator of Wallerian degeneration, demonstrate multiple improved traumatic brain injury-associated phenotypes after injury in a closed-head mild traumatic brain injury model. Sarm1(-/-) mice developed fewer β-amyloid precursor protein aggregates in axons of the corpus callosum after traumatic brain injury as compared to Sarm1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, mice lacking Sarm1 had reduced plasma concentrations of the phophorylated axonal neurofilament subunit H, indicating that axonal integrity is maintained after traumatic brain injury. Strikingly, whereas wild-type mice exibited a number of behavioural deficits after traumatic brain injury, we observed a strong, early preservation of neurological function in Sarm1(-/-) animals. Finally, using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy we found tissue signatures consistent with substantially preserved neuronal energy metabolism in Sarm1(-/-) mice compared to controls immediately following traumatic brain injury. Our results indicate that the SARM1-mediated prodegenerative pathway promotes pathogenesis in traumatic brain injury and suggest that anti-SARM1 therapeutics are a viable approach for preserving neurological function after traumatic brain injury. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Evidence That Descending Cortical Axons Are Essential for Thalamocortical Axons to Cross the Pallial-Subpallial Boundary in the Embryonic Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yijing; Magnani, Dario; Theil, Thomas; Pratt, Thomas; Price, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Developing thalamocortical axons traverse the subpallium to reach the cortex located in the pallium. We tested the hypothesis that descending corticofugal axons are important for guiding thalamocortical axons across the pallial-subpallial boundary, using conditional mutagenesis to assess the effects of blocking corticofugal axonal development without disrupting thalamus, subpallium or the pallial-subpallial boundary. We found that thalamic axons still traversed the subpallium in topographic order but did not cross the pallial-subpallial boundary. Co-culture experiments indicated that the inability of thalamic axons to cross the boundary was not explained by mutant cortex developing a long-range chemorepulsive action on thalamic axons. On the contrary, cortex from conditional mutants retained its thalamic axonal growth-promoting activity and continued to express Nrg-1, which is responsible for this stimulatory effect. When mutant cortex was replaced with control cortex, corticofugal efferents were restored and thalamic axons from conditional mutants associated with them and crossed the pallial-subpallial boundary. Our study provides the most compelling evidence to date that cortical efferents are required to guide thalamocortical axons across the pallial-subpallial boundary, which is otherwise hostile to thalamic axons. These results support the hypothesis that thalamic axons grow from subpallium to cortex guided by cortical efferents, with stimulation from diffusible cortical growth-promoting factors. PMID:22412988

  3. Intracellular calcium release through IP3R or RyR contributes to secondary axonal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Orem, Ben C; Pelisch, Nicolas; Williams, Joshua; Nally, Jacqueline M; Stirling, David P

    2017-10-01

    Severed CNS axons often retract or dieback away from the injury site and fail to regenerate. The precise mechanisms underlying acute axonal dieback and secondary axonal degeneration remain poorly understood. Here we investigate the role of Ca 2+ store mediated intra-axonal Ca 2+ release in acute axonal dieback and secondary axonal degeneration. To differentiate between primary (directly transected) and "bystander" axonal injury (axons spared by the initial injury but then succumb to secondary degeneration) in real-time we use our previously published highly focal laser-induced spinal cord injury (LiSCI) ex vivo model. Ascending spinal cord dorsal column axons that express YFP were severed using an 800 nm laser pulse while being imaged continuously using two-photon excitation microscopy. We inhibited two major intra-axonal Ca 2+ store channels, ryanodine receptors (RyR) and IP 3 R, with ryanodine or 2-APB, respectively, to individually determine their role in axonal dieback and secondary axonal degeneration. Each antagonist was dissolved in artificial CSF and applied 1h post-injury alone or in combination, and continuously perfused for the remainder of the imaging session. Initially following LiSCI, transected axons retracted equal distances both distal and proximal to the lesion. However, by 4h after injury, the distal axonal segments that are destined for Wallerian degeneration had significantly retracted further than their proximal counterparts. We also found that targeting either RyR or IP 3 R using pharmacological and genetic approaches significantly reduced proximal axonal dieback and "bystander" secondary degeneration of axons compared to vehicle controls at 6h post-injury. Combined treatment effects on secondary axonal degeneration were similar to either drug in isolation. Together, these results suggest that intra-axonal Ca 2+ store mediated Ca 2+ release through RyR or IP 3 R contributes to secondary axonal degeneration following SCI. Copyright © 2017

  4. Acoustic Levitator Maintains Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transducer loading characteristics allow resonance tracked at high temperature. Acoustic-levitation chamber length automatically adjusted to maintain resonance at constant acoustic frequency as temperature changes. Developed for containerless processing of materials at high temperatures, system does not rely on microphones as resonance sensors, since microphones are difficult to fabricate for use at temperatures above 500 degrees C. Instead, system uses acoustic transducer itself as sensor.

  5. Chlorpyrifos-Oxon Disrupts Zebrafish Axonal Growth and Motor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongren; Lauridsen, Holly; Buels, Kalmia; Chi, Lai-Har; La Du, Jane; Bruun, Donald A.; Olson, James R.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    Axonal morphology is a critical determinant of neuronal connectivity, and perturbation of the rate or extent of axonal growth during development has been linked to neurobehavioral deficits in animal models and humans. We previously demonstrated that the organophosphorus pesticide (OP) chlorpyrifos (CPF) inhibits axonal growth in cultured neurons. In this study, we used a zebrafish model to determine whether CPF, its oxon metabolite (CPFO), or the excreted metabolite trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) alter spatiotemporal patterns of axonal growth in vivo. Static waterborne exposure to CPFO, but not CPF or TCPy, at concentrations ≥ 0.03μM from 24- to 72-h post fertilization significantly inhibited acetylcholinesterase, and high-performance liquid chromatography detected significantly more TCPy in zebrafish exposed to 0.1μM CPFO versus 1.0μM CPF. These data suggest that zebrafish lack the metabolic enzymes to activate CPF during these early developmental stages. Consistent with this, CPFO, but not CPF, significantly inhibited axonal growth of sensory neurons, primary motoneurons, and secondary motoneurons at concentrations ≥ 0.1μM. Secondary motoneurons were the most sensitive to axonal growth inhibition by CPFO, which was observed at concentrations that did not cause mortality, gross developmental defects, or aberrant somatic muscle differentiation. CPFO effects on axonal growth correlated with adverse effects on touch-induced swimming behavior, suggesting the functional relevance of these structural changes. These data suggest that altered patterns of neuronal connectivity contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity of CPF and demonstrate the relevance of zebrafish as a model for studying OP developmental neurotoxicity. PMID:21346248

  6. Modelling in vivo action potential propagation along a giant axon.

    PubMed

    George, Stuart; Foster, Jamie M; Richardson, Giles

    2015-01-01

    A partial differential equation model for the three-dimensional current flow in an excitable, unmyelinated axon is considered. Where the axon radius is significantly below a critical value R(crit) (that depends upon intra- and extra-cellular conductivity and ion channel conductance) the resistance of the intracellular space is significantly higher than that of the extracellular space, such that the potential outside the axon is uniformly small whilst the intracellular potential is approximated by the transmembrane potential. In turn, since the current flow is predominantly axial, it can be shown that the transmembrane potential is approximated by a solution to the one-dimensional cable equation. It is noted that the radius of the squid giant axon, investigated by (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e), lies close to R(crit). This motivates us to apply the three-dimensional model to the squid giant axon and compare the results thus found to those obtained using the cable equation. In the context of the in vitro experiments conducted in (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e) we find only a small difference between the wave profiles determined using these two different approaches and little difference between the speeds of action potential propagation predicted. This suggests that the cable equation approximation is accurate in this scenario. However when applied to the it in vivo setting, in which the conductivity of the surrounding tissue is considerably lower than that of the axoplasm, there are marked differences in both wave profile and speed of action potential propagation calculated using the two approaches. In particular, the cable equation significantly over predicts the increase in the velocity of propagation as axon radius increases. The consequences of these results are discussed in terms of the evolutionary costs associated with increasing the speed of action potential propagation by increasing axon radius.

  7. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  8. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons

  9. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties.

    PubMed

    Casale, Amanda E; Foust, Amanda J; Bal, Thierry; McCormick, David A

    2015-11-25

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons contain three main

  10. Highly Effective Photonic Cue for Repulsive Axonal Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Black, Bryan J.; Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo nerve repair requires not only the ability to regenerate damaged axons, but most importantly, the ability to guide developing or regenerating axons along paths that will result in functional connections. Furthermore, basic studies in neuroscience and neuro-electronic interface design require the ability to construct in vitro neural circuitry. Both these applications require the development of a noninvasive, highly effective tool for axonal growth-cone guidance. To date, a myriad of technologies have been introduced based on chemical, electrical, mechanical, and hybrid approaches (such as electro-chemical, optofluidic flow and photo-chemical methods). These methods are either lacking in desired spatial and temporal selectivity or require the introduction of invasive external factors. Within the last fifteen years however, several attractive guidance cues have been developed using purely light based cues to achieve axonal guidance. Here, we report a novel, purely optical repulsive guidance technique that uses low power, near infrared light, and demonstrates the guidance of primary goldfish retinal ganglion cell axons through turns of up to 120 degrees and over distances of ∼90 µm. PMID:24717339

  11. Netrin-1 attracts axons through FAK-dependent mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Simon W; Zhang, Xian; Lynch, Christopher D; Sheetz, Michael P

    2012-08-22

    The mechanism by which extracellular cues influence intracellular biochemical cascades that guide axons is important, yet poorly understood. Because of the mechanical nature of axon extension, we explored whether the physical interactions of growth cones with their guidance cues might be involved. In the context of mouse spinal commissural neuron axon attraction to netrin-1, we found that mechanical attachment of netrin-1 to the substrate was required for axon outgrowth, growth cone expansion, axon attraction and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Crk-associated substrate (CAS). Myosin II activity was necessary for traction forces >30 pN on netrin-1. Interestingly, while these myosin II-dependent forces on netrin-1 substrates or beads were needed to increase the kinase activity and phosphorylation of FAK, they were not necessary for netrin-1 to increase CAS phosphorylation. When FAK kinase activity was inhibited, the growth cone's ability to recruit additional adhesions and to generate forces >60 pN on netrin-1 was disrupted. Together, these findings demonstrate an important role for mechanotransduction during chemoattraction to netrin-1 and that mechanical activation of FAK reinforces interactions with netrin-1 allowing greater forces to be exerted.

  12. Histological Methods for ex vivo Axon Tracing: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Heilingoetter, Cassandra L.; Jensen, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Axon tracers provide crucial insight into the development, connectivity, and function of neural pathways. A tracer can be characterized as a substance that allows for the visualization of a neuronal pathway. Axon tracers have previously been used exclusively with in vivo studies; however, newer methods of axon tracing can be applied to ex vivo studies. Ex vivo studies involve the examination of cells or tissues retrieved from an organism. These post mortem methods of axon tracing offer several advantages, such as reaching inaccessible tissues and avoiding survival surgeries. Methods In order to evaluate the quality of the ex vivo tracing methods, we performed a systematic review of various experimental and comparison studies to discern the optimal method of axon tracing. Results The most prominent methods for ex vivo tracing involve enzymatic techniques or various dyes. It appears that there are a variety of techniques and conditions that tend to give better fluorescent character, clarity, and distance traveled in the neuronal pathway. We found direct comparison studies that looked at variables such as the type of tracer, time required, effect of temperature, and presence of calcium, however, there are other variables that have not been compared directly. Discussion We conclude there are a variety of promising tracing methods available depending on the experimental goals of the researcher, however, more direct comparison studies are needed to affirm the optimal method. PMID:27098542

  13. Highly effective photonic cue for repulsive axonal guidance.

    PubMed

    Black, Bryan J; Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra K

    2014-01-01

    In vivo nerve repair requires not only the ability to regenerate damaged axons, but most importantly, the ability to guide developing or regenerating axons along paths that will result in functional connections. Furthermore, basic studies in neuroscience and neuro-electronic interface design require the ability to construct in vitro neural circuitry. Both these applications require the development of a noninvasive, highly effective tool for axonal growth-cone guidance. To date, a myriad of technologies have been introduced based on chemical, electrical, mechanical, and hybrid approaches (such as electro-chemical, optofluidic flow and photo-chemical methods). These methods are either lacking in desired spatial and temporal selectivity or require the introduction of invasive external factors. Within the last fifteen years however, several attractive guidance cues have been developed using purely light based cues to achieve axonal guidance. Here, we report a novel, purely optical repulsive guidance technique that uses low power, near infrared light, and demonstrates the guidance of primary goldfish retinal ganglion cell axons through turns of up to 120 degrees and over distances of ∼90 µm.

  14. Axonal sprouting and laminin appearance after destruction of glial sheaths.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda-Nakagawa, L M; Muller, K J; Nicholls, J G

    1993-01-01

    Laminin, a large extracellular matrix molecule, is associated with axonal outgrowth during development and regeneration of the nervous system in a variety of animals. In the leech central nervous system, laminin immunoreactivity appears after axon injury in advance of the regenerating axons. Although studies of vertebrate nervous system in culture have implicated glial and Schwann cells as possible sources, the cells that deposit laminin at sites crucial for regeneration in the living animal are not known. We have made a direct test to determine whether, in the central nervous system of the leech, cells other than ensheathing glial cells can produce laminin. Ensheathing glial cells of adult leeches were ablated selectively by intracellular injection of a protease. As a result, leech laminin accumulated within 10 days in regions of the central nervous system where it is not normally found, and undamaged, intact axons began to sprout extensively. In normal leeches laminin immunoreactivity is situated only in the basement membrane that surrounds the central nervous system, whereas after ablation of ensheathing glia it appeared in spaces through which neurons grew. Within days of ablation of the glial cell, small mobile phagocytes, or microglia, accumulated in the spaces formerly occupied by the glial cell. Microglia were concentrated at precisely the sites of new laminin appearance and axon sprouting. These results suggest that in the animal, as in culture, leech laminin promotes sprouting and that microglia may be responsible for its appearance. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8506343

  15. Mechanisms of Distal Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, Christopher R.; Höke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of a variety of diseases and treatments, including diabetes, cancer chemotherapy, and infectious causes (HIV, hepatitis C, and Campylobacter jejuni). Despite the fundamental difference between these insults, peripheral neuropathy develops as a combination of just six primary mechanisms: altered metabolism, covalent modification, altered organelle function and reactive oxygen species formation, altered intracellular and inflammatory signaling, slowed axonal transport, and altered ion channel dynamics and expression. All of these pathways converge to lead to axon dysfunction and symptoms of neuropathy. The detailed mechanisms of axon degeneration itself have begun to be elucidated with studies of animal models with altered degeneration kinetics, including the slowed Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) and Sarmknockout animal models. These studies have shown axonal degeneration to occur througha programmed pathway of injury signaling and cytoskeletal degradation. Insights into the common disease insults that converge on the axonal degeneration pathway promise to facilitate the development of therapeutics that may be effective against other mechanisms of neurodegeneration. PMID:25617478

  16. Action potentials reliably invade axonal arbors of rat neocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Charles L.; Denk, Winfried; Tank, David W.; Svoboda, Karel

    2000-01-01

    Neocortical pyramidal neurons have extensive axonal arborizations that make thousands of synapses. Action potentials can invade these arbors and cause calcium influx that is required for neurotransmitter release and excitation of postsynaptic targets. Thus, the regulation of action potential invasion in axonal branches might shape the spread of excitation in cortical neural networks. To measure the reliability and extent of action potential invasion into axonal arbors, we have used two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy to directly image action-potential-mediated calcium influx in single varicosities of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in acute brain slices. Our data show that single action potentials or bursts of action potentials reliably invade axonal arbors over a range of developmental ages (postnatal 10–24 days) and temperatures (24°C-30°C). Hyperpolarizing current steps preceding action potential initiation, protocols that had previously been observed to produce failures of action potential propagation in cultured preparations, were ineffective in modulating the spread of action potentials in acute slices. Our data show that action potentials reliably invade the axonal arbors of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Failures in synaptic transmission must therefore originate downstream of action potential invasion. We also explored the function of modulators that inhibit presynaptic calcium influx. Consistent with previous studies, we find that adenosine reduces action-potential-mediated calcium influx in presynaptic terminals. This reduction was observed in all terminals tested, suggesting that some modulatory systems are expressed homogeneously in most terminals of the same neuron. PMID:10931955

  17. Histological methods for ex vivo axon tracing: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Heilingoetter, Cassandra L; Jensen, Matthew B

    2016-07-01

    Axon tracers provide crucial insight into the development, connectivity, and function of neural pathways. A tracer can be characterized as a substance that allows for the visualization of a neuronal pathway. Axon tracers have previously been used exclusively with in vivo studies; however, newer methods of axon tracing can be applied to ex vivo studies. Ex vivo studies involve the examination of cells or tissues retrieved from an organism. These post mortem methods of axon tracing offer several advantages, such as reaching inaccessible tissues and avoiding survival surgeries. In order to evaluate the quality of the ex vivo tracing methods, we performed a systematic review of various experimental and comparison studies to discern the optimal method of axon tracing. The most prominent methods for ex vivo tracing involve enzymatic techniques or various dyes. It appears that there are a variety of techniques and conditions that tend to give better fluorescent character, clarity, and distance traveled in the neuronal pathway. We found direct comparison studies that looked at variables such as the type of tracer, time required, effect of temperature, and presence of calcium, however, there are other variables that have not been compared directly. We conclude there are a variety of promising tracing methods available depending on the experimental goals of the researcher, however, more direct comparison studies are needed to affirm the optimal method.

  18. Axon Regeneration Genes Identified by RNAi Screening in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Paola; Hammarlund, Marc; Hauth, Linda; Lachnit, Martina; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Axons of the mammalian CNS lose the ability to regenerate soon after development due to both an inhibitory CNS environment and the loss of cell-intrinsic factors necessary for regeneration. The complex molecular events required for robust regeneration of mature neurons are not fully understood, particularly in vivo. To identify genes affecting axon regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, we performed both an RNAi-based screen for defective motor axon regeneration in unc-70/β-spectrin mutants and a candidate gene screen. From these screens, we identified at least 50 conserved genes with growth-promoting or growth-inhibiting functions. Through our analysis of mutants, we shed new light on certain aspects of regeneration, including the role of β-spectrin and membrane dynamics, the antagonistic activity of MAP kinase signaling pathways, and the role of stress in promoting axon regeneration. Many gene candidates had not previously been associated with axon regeneration and implicate new pathways of interest for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24403161

  19. Mechanistic logic underlying the axonal transport of cytosolic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Das, Utpal; Tang, Yong; Roy, Subhojit

    2011-01-01

    Proteins vital to presynaptic function are synthesized in the neuronal perikarya and delivered into synapses via two modes of axonal transport. While membrane-anchoring proteins are conveyed in fast axonal transport via motor-driven vesicles, cytosolic proteins travel in slow axonal transport; via mechanisms that are poorly understood. We found that in cultured axons, populations of cytosolic proteins tagged to photoactivable-GFP (PA-GFP) move with a slow motor-dependent anterograde bias; distinct from vesicular-trafficking or diffusion of untagged PA-GFP. The overall bias is likely generated by an intricate particle-kinetics involving transient assembly and short-range vectorial spurts. In-vivo biochemical studies reveal that cytosolic proteins are organized into higher-order structures within axon-enriched fractions that are largely segregated from vesicles. Data-driven biophysical modeling best predicts a scenario where soluble molecules dynamically assemble into mobile supra-molecular structures. We propose a model where cytosolic proteins are transported by dynamically assembling into multi-protein complexes that are directly/indirectly conveyed by motors. PMID:21555071

  20. Seamless service: maintaining momentum.

    PubMed

    Grinstead, N; Timoney, R

    1994-01-01

    Describes the process used by the Mater Infirmorum Hospital in Belfast in 1992-1994 to achieve high quality care (Seamless Service), motivate staff to deliver and measure performance. Aims of the project include focusing the organization on the customer, improving teamwork and motivation at all levels. After comprehensive data collection from GPs, patients and staff management forums developed a full TQM strategy to gain support and maintain momentum including innovative staff events (every staff member was given the opportunity to attend) where multilevel, multidisciplinary workshops enabled staff to design customer care standards, develop teams and lead customer-driven change.

  1. Localization of mRNA in vertebrate axonal compartments by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sotelo-Silveira, José Roberto; Calliari, Aldo; Kun, Alejandra; Elizondo, Victoria; Canclini, Lucía; Sotelo, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The conclusive demonstration of RNA in vertebrate axons by in situ hybridization (ISH) has been elusive. We review the most important reasons for difficulties, including low concentration of axonal RNAs, localization in specific cortical domains, and the need to isolate axons. We demonstrate the importance of axon micro-dissection to obtain a whole mount perspective of mRNA distribution in the axonal territory. We describe a protocol to perform fluorescent ISH in isolated axons and guidelines for the preservation of structural and molecular integrity of cortical RNA-containing domains (e.g., Periaxoplasmic Ribosomal Plaques, or PARPs) in isolated axoplasm.

  2. Using quantum filters to process images of diffuse axonal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda Osorio, Mateo

    2014-06-01

    Some images corresponding to a diffuse axonal injury (DAI) are processed using several quantum filters such as Hermite Weibull and Morse. Diffuse axonal injury is a particular, common and severe case of traumatic brain injury (TBI). DAI involves global damage on microscopic scale of brain tissue and causes serious neurologic abnormalities. New imaging techniques provide excellent images showing cellular damages related to DAI. Said images can be processed with quantum filters, which accomplish high resolutions of dendritic and axonal structures both in normal and pathological state. Using the Laplacian operators from the new quantum filters, excellent edge detectors for neurofiber resolution are obtained. Image quantum processing of DAI images is made using computer algebra, specifically Maple. Quantum filter plugins construction is proposed as a future research line, which can incorporated to the ImageJ software package, making its use simpler for medical personnel.

  3. Rho and Ras GTPases in Axon Growth, Guidance, and Branching

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Alan; Lalli, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    The establishment of precise neuronal cell morphology provides the foundation for all aspects of neurobiology. During development, axons emerge from cell bodies after an initial polarization stage, elongate, and navigate towards target regions guided by a range of environmental cues. The Rho and Ras families of small GTPases have emerged as critical players at all stages of axonogenesis. Their ability to coordinately direct multiple signal transduction pathways with precise spatial control drives many of the activities that underlie this morphogenetic program: the dynamic assembly, disassembly, and reorganization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, the interaction of the growing axon with other cells and extracellular matrix, the delivery of lipids and proteins to the axon through the exocytic machinery, and the internalization of membrane and proteins at the leading edge of the growth cone through endocytosis. This article highlights the contribution of Rho and Ras GTPases to axonogenesis. PMID:20182621

  4. Imaging axonal transport in the rat visual pathway.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Carla J; Choe, Tiffany E; Lusardi, Theresa A; Burgoyne, Claude F; Wang, Lin; Fortune, Brad

    2013-02-01

    A technique was developed for assaying axonal transport in retinal ganglion cells using 2 µl injections of 1% cholera toxin b-subunit conjugated to AlexaFluor488 (CTB). In vivo retinal and post-mortem brain imaging by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and post-mortem microscopy were performed. The transport of CTB was sensitive to colchicine, which disrupts axonal microtubules. The bulk rates of transport were determined to be approximately 80-90 mm/day (anterograde) and 160 mm/day (retrograde). Results demonstrate that axonal transport of CTB can be monitored in vivo in the rodent anterior visual pathway, is dependent on intact microtubules, and occurs by active transport mechanisms.

  5. Chondroitin-4-sulfation negatively regulates axonal guidance and growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hang; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; McCann, Thomas E.; Unsworth, Edward; Goldsmith, Paul; Yu, Zu-Xi; Tan, Fei; Santiago, Lizzie; Mills, Edward M.; Wang, Yu; Symes, Aviva J.; Geller, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains endow extracellular matrix proteoglycans with diversity and complexity based upon the length, composition, and charge distribution of the polysaccharide chain. Using cultured primary neurons, we show that specific sulfation in the GAG chains of chondroitin sulfate (CS) mediates neuronal guidance cues and axonal growth inhibition. Chondroitin-4-sulfate (CS-A), but not chondroitin-6-sulfate (CS-C), exhibits a strong negative guidance cue to mouse cerebellar granule neurons. Enzymatic and gene-based manipulations of 4-sulfation in the GAG side chains alter their ability to direct growing axons. Furthermore, 4-sulfated CS GAG chains are rapidly and significantly increased in regions that do not support axonal regeneration proximal to spinal cord lesions in mice. Thus, our findings provide the evidence showing that specific sulfation along the carbohydrate backbone carries instructions to regulate neuronal function. PMID:18768934

  6. Aptamer antagonists of myelin-derived inhibitors promote axon growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxuan; Khaing, Zin Z; Li, Na; Hall, Brad; Schmidt, Christine E; Ellington, Andrew D

    2010-03-16

    Myelin of the adult central nervous system (CNS) is one of the major sources of inhibitors of axon regeneration following injury. The three known myelin-derived inhibitors (Nogo, MAG, and OMgp) bind with high affinity to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR) on axons and limit neurite outgrowth. Here we show that RNA aptamers can be generated that bind with high affinity to NgR, compete with myelin-derived inhibitors for binding to NgR, and promote axon elongation of neurons in vitro even in the presence of these inhibitors. Aptamers may have key advantages over protein antagonists, including low immunogenicity and the possibility of ready modification during chemical synthesis for stability, signaling, or immobilization. This first demonstration that aptamers can directly influence neuronal function suggests that aptamers may prove useful for not only healing spinal cord and other neuronal damage, but may be more generally useful as neuromodulators.

  7. Aptamer Antagonists of Myelin-Derived Inhibitors Promote Axon Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxuan; Khaing, Zin Z.; Li, Na; Hall, Brad; Schmidt, Christine E.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Myelin of the adult central nervous system (CNS) is one of the major sources of inhibitors of axon regeneration following injury. The three known myelin-derived inhibitors (Nogo, MAG, and OMgp) bind with high affinity to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR) on axons and limit neurite outgrowth. Here we show that RNA aptamers can be generated that bind with high affinity to NgR, compete with myelin-derived inhibitors for binding to NgR, and promote axon elongation of neurons in vitro even in the presence of these inhibitors. Aptamers may have key advantages over protein antagonists, including low immunogenicity and the possibility of ready modification during chemical synthesis for stability, signaling, or immobilization. This first demonstration that aptamers can directly influence neuronal function suggests that aptamers may prove useful for not only healing spinal cord and other neuronal damage, but may be more generally useful as neuromodulators. PMID:20300533

  8. The nano-architecture of the axonal cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Leterrier, Christophe; Dubey, Pankaj; Roy, Subhojit

    2017-12-01

    The corporeal beauty of the neuronal cytoskeleton has captured the imagination of generations of scientists. One of the easiest cellular structures to visualize by light microscopy, its existence has been known for well over 100 years, yet we have only recently begun to fully appreciate its intricacy and diversity. Recent studies combining new probes with super-resolution microscopy and live imaging have revealed surprising details about the axonal cytoskeleton and, in particular, have discovered previously unknown actin-based structures. Along with traditional electron microscopy, these newer techniques offer a nanoscale view of the axonal cytoskeleton, which is important for our understanding of neuronal form and function, and lay the foundation for future studies. In this Review, we summarize existing concepts in the field and highlight contemporary discoveries that have fundamentally altered our perception of the axonal cytoskeleton.

  9. The axon-protective WLD(S) protein partially rescues mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis after axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Godzik, Katharina; Coleman, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The axon-protective Wallerian degeneration slow (WLD(S)) protein can ameliorate the decline in axonal ATP levels after neurite transection. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this effect is associated with maintenance of mitochondrial respiration and/or glycolysis. We used isolated neurites of superior cervical ganglion (SCG) cultures in the Seahorse XF-24 Metabolic Flux Analyser to determine mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis under different conditions. We observed that both mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis declined significantly during the latent phase of Wallerian degeneration. WLD(S) partially reduced the decline both in glycolysis and in mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that depleting NAD levels in uncut cultures led to changes in mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis similar to those rescued by WLD(S) after cut, suggesting that the maintenance of NAD levels in Wld(S) neurites after axonal injury at least partially underlies the maintenance of ATP levels. However, by using another axon-protective mutation (Sarm1(-/-)), we could demonstrate that rescue of basal ECAR (and hence probably glycolysis) rather than basal OCR (mitochondrial respiration) may be part of the protective phenotype to delay Wallerian degeneration. These findings open new routes to study glycolysis and the connection between NAD and ATP levels in axon degeneration, which may help to eventually develop therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Reflectance Speckle of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Reveals Axonal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiang-Run; Knighton, Robert W.; Zhou, Ye; Zhao, Xiao-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigated the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) reflectance speckle and tested the hypothesis that temporal change of RNFL speckle reveals axonal dynamic activity. Methods. RNFL reflectance speckle of isolated rat retinas was studied with monochromatic illumination. A series of reflectance images was collected every 5 seconds for approximately 15 minutes. Correlation coefficients (CC) of selected areas between a reference and subsequent images were calculated and plotted as a function of the time intervals between images. An exponential function fit to the time course was used to evaluate temporal change of speckle pattern. To relate temporal change of speckle to axonal activity, in vitro living retina perfused at a normal (34°C) and a lower (24°C) temperature, paraformaldehyde-fixed retina, and retina treated with microtubule depolymerization were used. Results. RNFL reflectance was not uniform; rather nerve fiber bundles had a speckled texture that changed with time. In normally perfused retina, the time constant of the CC change was 0.56 ± 0.26 minutes. In retinas treated with lower temperature and microtubule depolymerization, the time constants increased by two to four times, indicating that the speckle pattern changed more slowly. The speckled texture in fixed retina was stationary. Conclusions. Fixation stops axonal activity; treatments with either lower temperature or microtubule depolymerization are known to decrease axonal transport. The results obtained in this study suggest that temporal change of RNFL speckle reveals structural change due to axonal activity. Assessment of RNFL reflectance speckle may offer a new means of evaluating axonal function. PMID:23532525

  11. Retrograde and Wallerian Axonal Degeneration Occur Synchronously after Retinal Ganglion Cell Axotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Akiyasu; Catrinescu, Maria-Magdalena; Belisle, Jonathan M.; Costantino, Santiago; Levin, Leonard A.

    2013-01-01

    Axonal injury and degeneration are pivotal pathological events in diseases of the nervous system. In the past decade, it has been recognized that the process of axonal degeneration is distinct from somal degeneration and that axoprotective strategies may be distinct from those that protect the soma. Preserving the cell body via neuroprotection cannot improve function if the axon is damaged, because the soma is still disconnected from its target. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of axonal degeneration is critical for developing new therapeutic interventions for axonal disease treatment. We combined in vivo imaging with a multilaser confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope and in vivo axotomy with a diode-pumped solid-state laser to assess the time course of Wallerian and retrograde degeneration of unmyelinated retinal ganglion cell axons in living rats for 4 weeks after intraretinal axotomy. Laser injury resulted in reproducible axon loss both distal and proximal to the site of injury. Longitudinal polarization-sensitive imaging of axons demonstrated that Wallerian and retrograde degeneration occurred synchronously. Neurofilament immunostaining of retinal whole-mounts confirmed axonal loss and demonstrated sparing of adjacent axons to the axotomy site. In vivo fluorescent imaging of axonal transport and photobleaching of labeled axons demonstrated that the laser axotomy model did not affect adjacent axon function. These results are consistent with a shared mechanism for Wallerian and retrograde degeneration. PMID:22642911

  12. Reagan: Maintain Antarctic program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan has decided that the United States should maintain an ‘active and influential presence’ in Antarctica to support the nation's interests. Following a review of a study by the Antarctica Policy Group, Reagan issued a memorandum, dated February 5, to the heads of 14 government agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Office of Management and Budget.The U.S. presence in Antarctica ‘shall include the conduct of scientific activities in major disciplines; year-round occupation of the South Pole and two coastal stations; and availability of related necessary logistics support,’ wrote the President. In addition, NSF should continue to budget for the entire U.S. program in Antarctica. Short-term programs by other agencies require the recommendation of the Antarctica Policy Group and should be coordinated within the framework of NSF logistics support.

  13. Axons guided by insulin receptor in Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianbo; Wu, Lingling; Chen, Zun; Kohanski, Ronald A; Pick, Leslie

    2003-04-18

    Insulin receptors are abundant in the central nervous system, but their roles remain elusive. Here we show that the insulin receptor functions in axon guidance. The Drosophila insulin receptor (DInR) is required for photoreceptor-cell (R-cell) axons to find their way from the retina to the brain during development of the visual system. DInR functions as a guidance receptor for the adapter protein Dock/Nck. This function is independent of Chico, the Drosophila insulin receptor substrate (IRS) homolog.

  14. Spontaneous action potentials and neural coding in unmyelinated axons.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Cian; van Rossum, Mark C W

    2015-04-01

    The voltage-gated Na and K channels in neurons are responsible for action potential generation. Because ion channels open and close in a stochastic fashion, spontaneous (ectopic) action potentials can result even in the absence of stimulation. While spontaneous action potentials have been studied in detail in single-compartment models, studies on spatially extended processes have been limited. The simulations and analysis presented here show that spontaneous rate in unmyelinated axon depends nonmonotonically on the length of the axon, that the spontaneous activity has sub-Poisson statistics, and that neural coding can be hampered by the spontaneous spikes by reducing the probability of transmitting the first spike in a train.

  15. Effects of channel blocking on information transmission and energy efficiency in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujiang; Yue, Yuan; Yu, Yuguo; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Lianchun

    2018-04-01

    Action potentials are the information carriers of neural systems. The generation of action potentials involves the cooperative opening and closing of sodium and potassium channels. This process is metabolically expensive because the ions flowing through open channels need to be restored to maintain concentration gradients of these ions. Toxins like tetraethylammonium can block working ion channels, thus affecting the function and energy cost of neurons. In this paper, by computer simulation of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model, we studied the effects of channel blocking with toxins on the information transmission and energy efficiency in squid giant axons. We found that gradually blocking sodium channels will sequentially maximize the information transmission and energy efficiency of the axons, whereas moderate blocking of potassium channels will have little impact on the information transmission and will decrease the energy efficiency. Heavy blocking of potassium channels will cause self-sustained oscillation of membrane potentials. Simultaneously blocking sodium and potassium channels with the same ratio increases both information transmission and energy efficiency. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that information processing capacity and energy efficiency can be maximized by regulating the number of active ion channels, and this indicates a viable avenue for future experimentation.

  16. Axon Initial Segment Cytoskeleton: Architecture, Development, and Role in Neuron Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Svitkina, Tatyana M.

    2016-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is a specialized structure in neurons that resides in between axonal and somatodendritic domains. The localization of the AIS in neurons is ideal for its two major functions: it serves as the site of action potential firing and helps to maintain neuron polarity. It has become increasingly clear that the AIS cytoskeleton is fundamental to AIS functions. In this review, we discuss current understanding of the AIS cytoskeleton with particular interest in its unique architecture and role in maintenance of neuron polarity. The AIS cytoskeleton is divided into two parts, submembrane and cytoplasmic, based on localization, function, and molecular composition. Recent studies using electron and subdiffraction fluorescence microscopy indicate that submembrane cytoskeletal components (ankyrin G, βIV-spectrin, and actin filaments) form a sophisticated network in the AIS that is conceptually similar to the polygonal/triangular network of erythrocytes, with some important differences. Components of the AIS cytoplasmic cytoskeleton (microtubules, actin filaments, and neurofilaments) reside deeper within the AIS shaft and display structural features distinct from other neuronal domains. We discuss how the AIS submembrane and cytoplasmic cytoskeletons contribute to different aspects of AIS polarity function and highlight recent advances in understanding their AIS cytoskeletal assembly and stability. PMID:27493806

  17. Axonal Transport and Neurodegeneration: How Marine Drugs Can Be Used for the Development of Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    White, Joseph A.; Banerjee, Rupkatha; Gunawardena, Shermali

    2016-01-01

    Unlike virtually any other cells in the human body, neurons are tasked with the unique problem of transporting important factors from sites of synthesis at the cell bodies, across enormous distances, along narrow-caliber projections, to distally located nerve terminals in order to maintain cell viability. As a result, axonal transport is a highly regulated process whereby necessary cargoes of all types are packaged and shipped from one end of the neuron to the other. Interruptions in this finely tuned transport have been linked to many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s (AD), Huntington’s disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) suggesting that this pathway is likely perturbed early in disease progression. Therefore, developing therapeutics targeted at modifying transport defects could potentially avert disease progression. In this review, we examine a variety of potential compounds identified from marine aquatic species that affect the axonal transport pathway. These compounds have been shown to function in microtubule (MT) assembly and maintenance, motor protein control, and in the regulation of protein degradation pathways, such as the autophagy-lysosome processes, which are defective in many degenerative diseases. Therefore, marine compounds have great potential in developing effective treatment strategies aimed at early defects which, over time, will restore transport and prevent cell death. PMID:27213408

  18. Negative regulation of glial engulfment activity by Draper terminates glial responses to axon injury

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Mary A.; Hackett, Rachel; Doherty, Johnna; Sheehan, Amy; Speese, Sean D.; Freeman, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal injury elicits potent cellular responses from glia, but molecular pathways modulating glial activation, phagocytic function, and termination of reactive responses remain poorly defined. Here we show that positive or negative regulation of glial reponses to axon injury are molecularly encoded by unique isoforms of the Drosophila engulfment receptor Draper. Draper-I promotes engulfment of axonal debris through an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). In contrast, Draper-II, an alternative splice variant, potently inhibits glial engulfment function. Draper-II suppresses Draper-I signaling through a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-like domain and the tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew (Csw). Intriguingly, loss of Draper-II/Csw signaling prolongs expression of glial engulfment genes after axotomy and reduces the ability of glia to respond to secondary axotomy. Our work highlights a novel role for Draper-II in inhibiting glial responses to neurodegeneration, and indicates a balance of opposing Draper-I/-II signaling events is essential to maintain glial sensitivity to brain injury. PMID:22426252

  19. Enhancement of GABA release through endogenous activation of axonal GABA(A) receptors in juvenile cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Chat, Mireille; Marty, Alain

    2007-11-14

    Recent evidence indicates the presence of presynaptic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) in the axon domain of several classes of central neurons, including cerebellar basket and stellate cells. Here, we investigate the possibility that these receptors could be activated in the absence of electrical or chemical stimulation. We find that low concentrations of GABA increase the frequency of miniature GABAergic synaptic currents. Submaximal concentrations of a GABA(A)R blocker, gabazine, decrease both the miniature current frequency and the probability of evoked GABA release. Zolpidem, an agonist of the benzodiazepine binding site, and NO-711 (1-[2-[[(diphenylmethylene)imino]oxy]ethyl]-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride), a blocker of GABA uptake, both increase the frequency of miniature currents. These effects occur up to postnatal day 14, but not later. Immunohistochemistry indicates the presence of alpha1-containing GABA(A)Rs in interneuron presynaptic terminals with a similar age dependence. We conclude that, under resting conditions, axonal GABA(A)Rs are significantly activated, that this activation results in enhanced GABA release, and that it can be augmented by increasing the affinity of GABA(A)Rs or reducing GABA uptake. Our findings suggest the existence of a positive-feedback mechanism involving presynaptic GABA(A)Rs that maintains a high release rate and a high local GABA concentration in the immature cerebellar network.

  20. A quantitative examination of the role of cargo-exerted forces in axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cassie S.; Lee, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Axonal transport, via molecular motors kinesin and dynein, is a critical process in supplying the necessary constituents to maintain normal neuronal function. In this study, we predict the role of cooperativity by motors of the same polarity across the entire spectrum of physiological axonal transport. That is, we examined how the number of motors, either kinesin or dynein, working together to move a cargo, results in the experimentally determined velocity profiles seen in fast and slow anterograde and retrograde transport. We quantified the physiological forces exerted on a motor by a cargo as a function of cargo size, transport velocity, and transport type. Our results show that the force exerted by our base case neurofilament (DNF=10nm, LNF=1.6μm) is ~1.25pN at 600nm/s; additionally, the force exerted by our base case organelle (DOrg=1μm) at 1,000nm/s is ~5.7pN. Our results indicate that while a single motor can independently carry an average cargo, cooperativity is required to produce the experimental velocity profiles for fast transport. However, no cooperativity is required to produce the slow transport velocity profiles; thus, a single dynein or kinesin can carry the average neurofilament retrogradely or anterogradely, respectively. The potential role cooperativity may play in the hypothesized mechanisms of motoneuron transport diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is discussed. PMID:19150364

  1. Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Neuronal Morphology and AnkyrinG Density at the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Mónica; Dominguez, Ana; Zhang, Wei; del Puerto, Ana; Ciorraga, María; Benitez, María José; Guaza, Carmen; Garrido, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal polarization underlies the ability of neurons to integrate and transmit information. This process begins early in development with axon outgrowth, followed by dendritic growth and subsequent maturation. In between these two steps, the axon initial segment (AIS), a subcellular domain crucial for generating action potentials (APs) and maintaining the morphological and functional polarization, starts to develop. However, the cellular/molecular mechanisms and receptors involved in AIS initial development and maturation are mostly unknown. In this study, we have focused on the role of the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), a highly abundant G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) in the nervous system largely involved in different phases of neuronal development and differentiation. Although CB1R activity modulation has been related to changes in axons or dendrites, its possible role as a modulator of AIS development has not been yet explored. Here we analyzed the potential role of CB1R on neuronal morphology and AIS development using pharmacological and RNA interference approaches in cultured hippocampal neurons. CB1R inhibition, at a very early developmental stage, has no effect on axonal growth, yet CB1R activation can promote it. By contrast, subsequent dendritic growth is impaired by CB1R inhibition, which also reduces ankyrinG density at the AIS. Moreover, our data show a significant correlation between early dendritic growth and ankyrinG density. However, CB1R inhibition in later developmental stages after dendrites are formed only reduces ankyrinG accumulation at the AIS. In conclusion, our data suggest that neuronal CB1R basal activity plays a role in initial development of dendrites and indirectly in AIS proteins accumulation. Based on the lack of CB1R expression at the AIS, we hypothesize that CB1R mediated modulation of dendritic arbor size during early development indirectly determines the accumulation of ankyrinG and AIS development. Further studies

  2. Membrane potential dynamics of axons in cultured hippocampal neurons probed by second-harmonic-generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriya, Mutsuo; Yasui, Masato

    2010-03-01

    The electrical properties of axons critically influence the nature of communication between neurons. However, due to their small size, direct measurement of membrane potential dynamics in intact and complex mammalian axons has been a challenge. Furthermore, quantitative optical measurements of axonal membrane potential dynamics have not been available. To characterize the basic principles of somatic voltage signal propagation in intact axonal arbors, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging is applied to cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. When FM4-64 is applied extracellularly to dissociated neurons, whole axonal arbors are visualized by SHG imaging. Upon action potential generation by somatic current injection, nonattenuating action potentials are recorded in intact axonal arbors. Interestingly, however, both current- and voltage-clamp recordings suggest that nonregenerative subthreshold somatic voltage changes at the soma are poorly conveyed to these axonal sites. These results reveal the nature of membrane potential dynamics of cultured hippocampal neurons, and further show the possibility of SHG imaging in physiological investigations of axons.

  3. Selective rab11 transport and the intrinsic regenerative ability of CNS axons

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Hiroaki; Donegá, Matteo; Lam, Brian YH; Petrova, Veselina; van Erp, Susan; Yeo, Giles SH; Kwok, Jessica CF; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Neurons lose intrinsic axon regenerative ability with maturation, but the mechanism remains unclear. Using an in-vitro laser axotomy model, we show a progressive decline in the ability of cut CNS axons to form a new growth cone and then elongate. Failure of regeneration was associated with increased retraction after axotomy. Transportation into axons becomes selective with maturation; we hypothesized that selective exclusion of molecules needed for growth may contribute to regeneration decline. With neuronal maturity rab11 vesicles (which carry many molecules involved in axon growth) became selectively targeted to the somatodendritic compartment and excluded from axons by predominant retrograde transport However, on overexpression rab11 was mistrafficked into proximal axons, and these axons showed less retraction and enhanced regeneration after axotomy. These results suggest that the decline of intrinsic axon regenerative ability is associated with selective exclusion of key molecules, and that manipulation of transport can enhance regeneration. PMID:28829741

  4. Axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus measured by q-space imaging.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kouhei; Hori, Masaaki; Miyajima, Masakazu; Nakajima, Madoka; Suzuki, Yuriko; Kamagata, Koji; Suzuki, Michimasa; Arai, Hajime; Ohtomo, Kuni; Aoki, Shigeki

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that compression and stretching of the corticospinal tract (CST) potentially cause treatable gait disturbance in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). Measurement of axon diameter with diffusion MRI has recently been used to investigate microstructural alterations in neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated alterations in the axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction of the CST in iNPH by q-space imaging (QSI) analysis. Nineteen patients with iNPH and 10 age-matched controls were recruited. QSI data were obtained with a 3-T system by using a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence with the diffusion gradient applied parallel to the antero-posterior axis. By using a two-component low-q fit model, the root mean square displacements of intra-axonal space ( =  axon diameter) and intra-axonal volume fraction of the CST were calculated at the levels of the internal capsule and body of the lateral ventricle, respectively. Wilcoxon's rank-sum test revealed a significant increase in CST intra-axonal volume fraction at the paraventricular level in patients (p<0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed in the axon diameter. At the level of the internal capsule, neither axon diameter nor intra-axonal volume fraction differed significantly between the two groups. Our results suggest that in patients with iNPH, the CST does not undergo irreversible axonal damage but is rather compressed and/or stretched owing to pressure from the enlarged ventricle. These analyses of axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction yield insights into microstructural alterations of the CST in iNPH.

  5. Maintaining proper dental records.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Wilhemina

    2014-01-01

    Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record.

  6. Computational analysis of axonal transport: a novel assessment of neurotoxicity, neuronal development and functions.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Yoshio; Hida, Tomonobu; Gotoh, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Axonal transport plays a crucial role in neuronal morphogenesis, survival and function. Despite its importance, however, the molecular mechanisms of axonal transport remain mostly unknown because a simple and quantitative assay system for monitoring this cellular process has been lacking. In order to better characterize the mechanisms involved in axonal transport, we formulate a novel computer-assisted monitoring system of axonal transport. Potential uses of this system and implications for future studies will be discussed.

  7. The Extracellular Environment of the CNS: Influence on Plasticity, Sprouting, and Axonal Regeneration after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Lindsey H.

    2018-01-01

    The extracellular environment of the central nervous system (CNS) becomes highly structured and organized as the nervous system matures. The extracellular space of the CNS along with its subdomains plays a crucial role in the function and stability of the CNS. In this review, we have focused on two components of the neuronal extracellular environment, which are important in regulating CNS plasticity including the extracellular matrix (ECM) and myelin. The ECM consists of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and tenascins, which are organized into unique structures called perineuronal nets (PNNs). PNNs associate with the neuronal cell body and proximal dendrites of predominantly parvalbumin-positive interneurons, forming a robust lattice-like structure. These developmentally regulated structures are maintained in the adult CNS and enhance synaptic stability. After injury, however, CSPGs and tenascins contribute to the structure of the inhibitory glial scar, which actively prevents axonal regeneration. Myelin sheaths and mature adult oligodendrocytes, despite their important role in signal conduction in mature CNS axons, contribute to the inhibitory environment existing after injury. As such, unlike the peripheral nervous system, the CNS is unable to revert to a “developmental state” to aid neuronal repair. Modulation of these external factors, however, has been shown to promote growth, regeneration, and functional plasticity after injury. This review will highlight some of the factors that contribute to or prevent plasticity, sprouting, and axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. PMID:29849554

  8. Integration and long distance axonal regeneration in the central nervous system from transplanted primitive neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiagang; Sun, Woong; Cho, Hyo Min; Ouyang, Hong; Li, Wenlin; Lin, Ying; Do, Jiun; Zhang, Liangfang; Ding, Sheng; Liu, Yizhi; Lu, Paul; Zhang, Kang

    2013-01-04

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in devastating motor and sensory deficits secondary to disrupted neuronal circuits and poor regenerative potential. Efforts to promote regeneration through cell extrinsic and intrinsic manipulations have met with limited success. Stem cells represent an as yet unrealized therapy in SCI. Recently, we identified novel culture methods to induce and maintain primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) from human embryonic stem cells. We tested whether transplanted human pNSCs can integrate into the CNS of the developing chick neural tube and injured adult rat spinal cord. Following injection of pNSCs into the developing chick CNS, pNSCs integrated into the dorsal aspects of the neural tube, forming cell clusters that spontaneously differentiated into neurons. Furthermore, following transplantation of pNSCs into the lesioned rat spinal cord, grafted pNSCs survived, differentiated into neurons, and extended long distance axons through the scar tissue at the graft-host interface and into the host spinal cord to form terminal-like structures near host spinal neurons. Together, these findings suggest that pNSCs derived from human embryonic stem cells differentiate into neuronal cell types with the potential to extend axons that associate with circuits of the CNS and, more importantly, provide new insights into CNS integration and axonal regeneration, offering hope for repair in SCI.

  9. Focal release of neurotrophic factors by biodegradable microspheres enhance motor and sensory axonal regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Santos, Daniel; Giudetti, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Navarro, Xavier; Del Valle, Jaume

    2016-04-01

    Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) promote nerve regeneration and neuronal survival after peripheral nerve injury. However, drawbacks related with administration and bioactivity during long periods limit their therapeutic application. In this study, PLGA microspheres (MPs) were used to locally release different NTFs and evaluate whether they accelerate axonal regeneration in comparison with free NTFs or controls. ELISA, SEM, UV/visible light microscopy, organotypic cultures of DRG explants and spinal cord slices were used to characterize MP properties and the bioactivity of the released NTFs. Results of organotypic cultures showed that encapsulated NTFs maintain longer bioactivity and enhance neurite regeneration of both sensory and motor neurons compared with free NTFs. For in vivo assays, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone tube filled with collagen gel or collagen mixed with PBS encapsulated MPs (control groups) and with free or encapsulated NGF, BDNF, GDNF or FGF-2. After 20 days, a retrotracer was applied to the regenerated nerve to quantify motor and sensory axonal regeneration. NTF encapsulation in MPs improved regeneration of both motor and sensory axons, as evidenced by increased numbers of retrolabeled neurons. Hence, our results show that slow release of NTFs with PLGA MP enhance nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Impaired Mitochondrial Dynamics Underlie Axonal Defects in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias.

    PubMed

    Denton, Kyle; Mou, Yongchao; Xu, Chong-Chong; Shah, Dhruvi; Chang, Jaerak; Blackstone, Craig; Li, Xue-Jun

    2018-05-02

    Mechanisms by which long corticospinal axons degenerate in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are largely unknown. Here, we have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with two autosomal recessive forms of HSP, SPG15 and SPG48, which are caused by mutations in the ZFYVE26 and AP5Z1 genes encoding proteins in the same complex, the spastizin and AP5Z1 proteins, respectively. In patient iPSC-derived telencephalic glutamatergic and midbrain dopaminergic neurons, neurite number, length and branching are significantly reduced, recapitulating disease-specific phenotypes. We analyzed mitochondrial morphology and noted a significant reduction in both mitochondrial length and their densities within axons of these HSP neurons. Mitochondrial membrane potential was also decreased, confirming functional mitochondrial defects. Notably, mdivi-1, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial fission GTPase DRP1, rescues mitochondrial morphology defects and suppresses the impairment in neurite outgrowth and late-onset apoptosis in HSP neurons. Furthermore, knockdown of these HSP genes causes similar axonal defects, also mitigated by treatment with mdivi-1. Finally, neurite outgrowth defects in SPG15 and SPG48 cortical neurons can be rescued by knocking down DRP1 directly. Thus, abnormal mitochondrial morphology caused by an imbalance of mitochondrial fission and fusion underlies specific axonal defects and serves as a potential therapeutic target for SPG15 and SPG48.

  11. Systemic inflammation induces axon injury during brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Beatriz; Jukes, John-Paul; Vergara-Irigaray, Nuria; Errea, Oihana; Villoslada, Pablo; Perry, V Hugh; Newman, Tracey A

    2011-12-01

    Axon injury is a key contributor to the progression of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Systemic infections, which frequently precede relapses in MS, have been linked to clinical progression in Alzheimer's disease. There is evidence of a role for the innate immune system in MS lesions, as axonal injury is associated with macrophage activation. We hypothesize that systemic inflammation leads to enhanced axonal damage in MS as a consequence of innate immune system activation. Monophasic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in a cohort of Lewis rats. The animals received a systemic challenge with either an inflammagen (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) or saline as a control, at 1, 3, or 6 weeks into the remission phase of the disease. The clinical outcome, cellular recruitment to lesions, degree of tissue damage, and cytokine profiles were measured. We found that systemic inflammation activates the central nervous system (CNS) innate immune response and results in a switch in the macrophage/microglia phenotype. This switch was accompanied by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression and increased axon injury. This increased injury occurred independently of the re-emergence of overt clinical signs. Our evidence indicates that microglia/macrophages, associated with lesions, respond to circulating cytokines, produced in response to an inflammatory event outside the CNS, by producing immune mediators that lead to tissue damage. This has implications for people with MS, in which prevention and stringent management of systemic infectious diseases may slow disease progression. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  12. ERMs colocalize transiently with L1 during neocortical axon outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Mintz, C David; Dickson, Tracey C; Gripp, Mark L; Salton, Stephen R J; Benson, Deanna L

    2003-09-29

    L1 is a member of the Ig superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) that functions in many aspects of neuronal development including axonal outgrowth and neuronal migration. These functions require coordination between L1 and the actin cytoskeleton. Because CAMs and the cytoskeleton do not bind directly, membrane-cytoskeletal linkers (MCLs) such as ankyrin are thought to be crucial to their interactions, but data from a knockout mouse suggest that ankyrin is not necessary for the earliest events attributed to L1 function. Recent findings in hippocampal cell culture show that members of the ERM family of proteins (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) can also serve as MCLs between L1 and actin in neurons. Here, we demonstrate that ERM proteins are expressed in extending neuronal processes in the intermediate zone of the developing cortex, a region that is densely packed with migrating neurons and growing axons. ERMs and L1 are codistributed extensively over a transient time course that coincides with rapid axon growth and cortical expansion. This codistribution is strong at embryonic day 17 and 19 but diminishes by postnatal day 0, at which time ankyrin-L1 codistribution increases dramatically. These findings suggest that in the developing neocortex, ERMs are the predominant MCL for L1 during migration and axon extension, neither of which requires ankyrin function. Furthermore, these data suggest that there is a developmentally regulated switch in MCL function in the developing brain. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Chronic severe axonal polyneuropathy associated with hyperthyroidism and multivitamin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Kazuma; Umehara, Fujio; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Kumazawa, Aya; Ueno, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is often associated with various neuromuscular disorders, most commonly proximal myopathy. Peripheral nerve involvement in hyperthyroidism is very uncommon and has rarely been reported. We describe a 29-year-old woman with untreated hyperthyroidism who presented with chronic severe axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy. Peripheral nerve involvement developed together with other symptoms of hyperthyroidism 2 years before presentation. She also had anorexia nervosa for the past 6 months, resulting in multivitamin deficiency. Electrophysiological and pathological findings as well as clinical manifestations confirmed the diagnosis of severe axonal polyneuropathy. Anorexia nervosa has been considered a manifestation of untreated hyperthyroidism. We considered hyperthyroidism to be an important causal factor in the polyneuropathy in our patient, although peripheral nerve involvement in hyperthyroidism is rare. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of chronic severe axonal polyneuropathy ascribed to both hyperthyroidism and multivitamin deficiency. Our findings strongly suggest that not only multivitamin deficiency, but also hyperthyroidism can cause axonal polyneuropathy, thus expanding the clinical spectrum of hyperthyroidism.

  14. Waves, rings, and trails: The scenic landscape of axonal actin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this article is to provide the reader a snapshot of recent studies on axonal actin—largely emerging from superresolution and live-imaging experiments—and place this new information in context with earlier studies. PMID:26754647

  15. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  16. Optic nerve head axonal transport in rabbits with hereditary glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Bunt-Milam, A H; Dennis, M B; Bensinger, R E

    1987-04-01

    Rabbits with hereditary glaucoma develop ocular changes that resemble human congenital glaucoma and buphthalmia. The inheritance is autosomal recessive (bu). Previous research was performed primarily on albino bu/bu rabbits that were unhealthy and bred poorly. We have bred pigmented bu/bu rabbits to determine if this would improve hardiness and provide a better model for the disease in humans. First-generation offspring from matings of bu/bu albino with bu/bu pigmented rabbits were all affected, indicating that the bu gene is found at the same locus in both strains. The pigmented bu/bu offspring had a high degree of mortality, as reported previously for albino bu/bu rabbits. Newborn bu/bu rabbits initially had normal intraocular pressure (IOP; 15-23 mmHg); after 1- to 3 months, the IOP increased to 26-48 mmHg. The eyes became buphthalmic and the IOP returned to normal or sub-normal levels after 6-10 months. Since the lamina cribrosa is absent or poorly formed in the rabbit optic nerve head (ONH), this model was used to test the role of mechanical factors in the etiology of ONH pathology caused by increased IOP. Orthograde axonal transport was evaluated in both eyes from eight normal and 24 bu/bu rabbits of different ages, using intravitreal injections of [3H]leucine to mark orthograde axonal transport, followed by light- and electron-microscopic radioautography of the ONHs and superior colliculi. Normal rabbits of all ages showed no blockage of axonal transport in the ONH. All optic axons from young bu/bu rabbits with normal IOP and most axons from older buphthalmic rabbits that previously had elevated IOP were normal morphologically. Small zones of transport blockage occurred in bu/bu eyes while IOP was elevated; most affected axons lay immediately adjacent to ONH connective tissue beams that radiate outward from the central retinal vessels to the optic-nerve sheath. Thus, the rabbit, which lacks a true lamina cribrosa, does not show marked blockage of axonal

  17. Dystrophic Serotonin Axons in Postmortem Brains from Young Autism Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azmitia, Efrain C.; Singh, Jorawer S.; Hou, Xiao P.; Wiegel, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Autism causes neuropathological changes in varied anatomical loci. A coherent neural mechanism to explain the spectrum of autistic symptomatology has not been proposed because most anatomical researchers focus on point-to-point functional neural systems (e.g. auditory, social networks) rather than considering global chemical neural systems. Serotonergic neurons have a global innervation pattern. Their cell bodies are found in the midbrain but they project their axons throughout the neural axis beginning in the fetal brain. This global system is implicated in autism by animal models and by biochemical, imaging, pharmacological, and genetics studies. However, no anatomical studies of the 5-HT innervation of autistic donors have been reported. Our review presents immunocytochemical evidence of an increase in 5-HT axons in post-mortem brain tissue from autism donors aged 2.8 to 29 years relative to controls. This increase is observed in the principle ascending fiber bundles of the medial and lateral forebrain bundles, and in the innervation density of the amygdala and the piriform, superior temporal, and parahippocampal cortices. In autistic donors eight years of age and up, several types of dystrophic 5-HT axons were seen in the termination fields. One class of these dystrophic axons, the thick heavily stained axons, was not seen in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide morphological evidence for the involvement of serotonin neurons in the early etiology of autism, and suggest a diet therapy may be effective to blunt serotonin’s trophic actions during early brain development in children. PMID:21901837

  18. Dystrophic serotonin axons in postmortem brains from young autism patients.

    PubMed

    Azmitia, Efrain C; Singh, Jorawer S; Hou, Xiao P; Wegiel, Jerzy

    2011-10-01

    Autism causes neuropathological changes in varied anatomical loci. A coherent neural mechanism to explain the spectrum of autistic symptomatology has not been proposed because most anatomical researchers focus on point-to-point functional neural systems (e.g., auditory and social networks) rather than considering global chemical neural systems. Serotonergic neurons have a global innervation pattern. Disorders Research Program, AS073234, Program Project (JW). Their cell bodies are found in the midbrain but they project their axons throughout the neural axis beginning in the fetal brain. This global system is implicated in autism by animal models and by biochemical, imaging, pharmacological, and genetics studies. However, no anatomical studies of the 5-HT innervation of autistic donors have been reported. Our review presents immunocytochemical evidence of an increase in 5-HT axons in postmortem brain tissue from autism donors aged 2.8-29 years relative to controls. This increase is observed in the principle ascending fiber bundles of the medial and lateral forebrain bundles, and in the innervation density of the amygdala and the piriform, superior temporal, and parahippocampal cortices. In autistic donors 8 years of age and up, several types of dystrophic 5-HT axons were seen in the termination fields. One class of these dystrophic axons, the thick heavily stained axons, was not seen in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide morphological evidence for the involvement of serotonin neurons in the early etiology of autism, and suggest new therapies may be effective to blunt serotonin's trophic actions during early brain development in children. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Exclusion of Integrins from CNS Axons Is Regulated by Arf6 Activation and the AIS

    PubMed Central

    Franssen, Elske H. P.; Zhao, Rong-Rong; Koseki, Hiroaki; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are adhesion and survival molecules involved in axon growth during CNS development, as well as axon regeneration after injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Adult CNS axons do not regenerate after injury, partly due to a low intrinsic growth capacity. We have previously studied the role of integrins in axon growth in PNS axons; in the present study, we investigate whether integrin mechanisms involved in PNS regeneration may be altered or lacking from mature CNS axons by studying maturing CNS neurons in vitro. In rat cortical neurons, we find that integrins are present in axons during initial growth but later become restricted to the somato-dendritic domain. We investigated how this occurs and whether it can be altered to enhance axonal growth potential. We find a developmental change in integrin trafficking; transport becomes predominantly retrograde throughout axons, but not dendrites, as neurons mature. The directionality of transport is controlled through the activation state of ARF6, with developmental upregulation of the ARF6 GEF ARNO enhancing retrograde transport. Lowering ARF6 activity in mature neurons restores anterograde integrin flow, allows transport into axons, and increases axon growth. In addition, we found that the axon initial segment is partly responsible for exclusion of integrins and removal of this structure allows integrins into axons. Changing posttranslational modifications of tubulin with taxol also allows integrins into the proximal axon. The experiments suggest that the developmental loss of regenerative ability in CNS axons is due to exclusion of growth-related molecules due to changes in trafficking. PMID:26019348

  20. Drosophila melanogaster Hedgehog cooperates with Frazzled to guide axons through a non-canonical signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ricolo, Delia; Butí, Elisenda; Araújo, Sofia J

    2015-08-01

    We report that the morphogen Hedgehog (Hh) is an axonal chemoattractant in the midline of Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Hh is present in the ventral nerve cord during axonal guidance and overexpression of hh in the midline causes ectopic midline crossing of FasII-positive axonal tracts. In addition, we show that Hh influences axonal guidance via a non-canonical signalling pathway dependent on Ptc. Our results reveal that the Hh pathway cooperates with the Netrin/Frazzled pathway to guide axons through the midline in invertebrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron microscopic examination of the myelinated axons of corpus callosum in perfused young and old rats.

    PubMed

    Sargon, Mustafa F; Denk, C Cem; Celik, H Hamdi; Surucu, H Selcuk; Aldur, M Mustafa

    2007-07-01

    In this study, the myelinated axons of parts of the corpus callosums of young and old rats were examined under the electron microscope and a grading system was performed for quantitating the ultrastructural pathological changes of these axons. Except the old splenium group, the only ultrastructural pathological change, observed in the myelinated axons was the separation in myelin configuration. In addition to this finding, in the old splenium group, in some of the myelinated axons, an interruption was observed in the myelin configuration. Additionally, these ultrastructural pathological findings were present in the larger sized myelinated axons of the corpus callosum.

  2. Changes in microtubule stability and density in myelin-deficient shiverer mouse CNS axons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, L. L.; Witt, A. S.; Payne, H. R.; Shine, H. D.; Brady, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    Altered axon-Schwann cell interactions in PNS myelin-deficient Trembler mice result in changed axonal transport rates, neurofilament and microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation, neurofilament density, and microtubule stability. To determine whether PNS and CNS myelination have equivalent effects on axons, neurofilaments, and microtubules in CNS, myelin-deficient shiverer axons were examined. The genetic defect in shiverer is a deletion in the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene, an essential component of CNS myelin. As a result, shiverer mice have little or no compact CNS myelin. Slow axonal transport rates in shiverer CNS axons were significantly increased, in contrast to the slowing in demyelinated PNS nerves. Even more striking were substantial changes in the composition and properties of microtubules in shiverer CNS axons. The density of axonal microtubules is increased, reflecting increased expression of tubulin in shiverer, and the stability of microtubules is drastically reduced in shiverer axons. Shiverer transgenic mice with two copies of a wild-type myelin basic protein transgene have an intermediate level of compact myelin, making it possible to determine whether the actual level of compact myelin is an important regulator of axonal microtubules. Both increased microtubule density and reduced microtubule stability were still observed in transgenic mouse nerves, indicating that signals beyond synaptogenesis and the mere presence of compact myelin are required for normal regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton.

  3. The corpus callosum in primates: processing speed of axons and the evolution of hemispheric asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kimberley A.; Stimpson, Cheryl D.; Smaers, Jeroen B.; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Jacobs, Bob; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2015-01-01

    Interhemispheric communication may be constrained as brain size increases because of transmission delays in action potentials over the length of axons. Although one might expect larger brains to have progressively thicker axons to compensate, spatial packing is a limiting factor. Axon size distributions within the primate corpus callosum (CC) may provide insights into how these demands affect conduction velocity. We used electron microscopy to explore phylogenetic variation in myelinated axon density and diameter of the CC from 14 different anthropoid primate species, including humans. The majority of axons were less than 1 µm in diameter across all species, indicating that conduction velocity for most interhemispheric communication is relatively constant regardless of brain size. The largest axons within the upper 95th percentile scaled with a progressively higher exponent than the median axons towards the posterior region of the CC. While brain mass among the primates in our analysis varied by 97-fold, estimates of the fastest cross-brain conduction times, as conveyed by axons at the 95th percentile, varied within a relatively narrow range between 3 and 9 ms across species, whereas cross-brain conduction times for the median axon diameters differed more substantially between 11 and 38 ms. Nonetheless, for both size classes of axons, an increase in diameter does not entirely compensate for the delay in interhemispheric transmission time that accompanies larger brain size. Such biophysical constraints on the processing speed of axons conveyed by the CC may play an important role in the evolution of hemispheric asymmetry. PMID:26511047

  4. Maximizing functional axon repair in the injured central nervous system: Lessons from neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Andrew; Bueno, Mardja; Hua, Luyang; Fournier, Alyson E

    2018-01-01

    The failure of damaged axons to regrow underlies disability in central nervous system injury and disease. Therapies that stimulate axon repair will be critical to restore function. Extensive axon regeneration can be induced by manipulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressors; however, it has been difficult to translate this into functional recovery in models of spinal cord injury. The current challenge is to maximize the functional integration of regenerating axons to recover motor and sensory behaviors. Insights into axonal growth and wiring during nervous system development are helping guide new approaches to boost regeneration and functional connectivity after injury in the mature nervous system. Here we discuss our current understanding of axonal behavior after injury and prospects for the development of drugs to optimize axon regeneration and functional recovery after CNS injury. Developmental Dynamics 247:18-23, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pharmacogenetic stimulation of neuronal activity increases myelination in an axon-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Mitew, Stanislaw; Gobius, Ilan; Fenlon, Laura R; McDougall, Stuart J; Hawkes, David; Xing, Yao Lulu; Bujalka, Helena; Gundlach, Andrew L; Richards, Linda J; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Merson, Tobias D; Emery, Ben

    2018-01-22

    Mounting evidence suggests that neuronal activity influences myelination, potentially allowing for experience-driven modulation of neural circuitry. The degree to which neuronal activity is capable of regulating myelination at the individual axon level is unclear. Here we demonstrate that stimulation of somatosensory axons in the mouse brain increases proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) within the underlying white matter. Stimulated axons display an increased probability of being myelinated compared to neighboring non-stimulated axons, in addition to being ensheathed with thicker myelin. Conversely, attenuating neuronal firing reduces axonal myelination in a selective activity-dependent manner. Our findings reveal that the process of selecting axons for myelination is strongly influenced by the relative activity of individual axons within a population. These observed cellular changes are consistent with the emerging concept that adaptive myelination is a key mechanism for the fine-tuning of neuronal circuitry in the mammalian CNS.

  6. Regulation of neuronal axon specification by glia-neuron gap junctions in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingfeng; Zhang, Albert; Jin, Yishi; Yan, Dong

    2016-10-21

    Axon specification is a critical step in neuronal development, and the function of glial cells in this process is not fully understood. Here, we show that C. elegans GLR glial cells regulate axon specification of their nearby GABAergic RME neurons through GLR-RME gap junctions. Disruption of GLR-RME gap junctions causes misaccumulation of axonal markers in non-axonal neurites of RME neurons and converts microtubules in those neurites to form an axon-like assembly. We further uncover that GLR-RME gap junctions regulate RME axon specification through activation of the CDK-5 pathway in a calcium-dependent manner, involving a calpain clp-4 . Therefore, our study reveals the function of glia-neuron gap junctions in neuronal axon specification and shows that calcium originated from glial cells can regulate neuronal intracellular pathways through gap junctions.

  7. Squid Giant Axon Contains Neurofilament Protein mRNA but does not Synthesize Neurofilament Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gainer, Harold; House, Shirley; Kim, Dong Sun; Chin, Hemin; Pant, Harish C

    2017-04-01

    When isolated squid giant axons are incubated in radioactive amino acids, abundant newly synthesized proteins are found in the axoplasm. These proteins are translated in the adaxonal Schwann cells and subsequently transferred into the giant axon. The question as to whether any de novo protein synthesis occurs in the giant axon itself is difficult to resolve because the small contribution of the proteins possibly synthesized intra-axonally is not easily distinguished from the large amounts of the proteins being supplied from the Schwann cells. In this paper, we reexamine this issue by studying the synthesis of endogenous neurofilament (NF) proteins in the axon. Our laboratory previously showed that NF mRNA and protein are present in the squid giant axon, but not in the surrounding adaxonal glia. Therefore, if the isolated squid axon could be shown to contain newly synthesized NF protein de novo, it could not arise from the adaxonal glia. The results of experiments in this paper show that abundant 3H-labeled NF protein is synthesized in the squid giant fiber lobe containing the giant axon's neuronal cell bodies, but despite the presence of NF mRNA in the giant axon no labeled NF protein is detected in the giant axon. This lends support to the glia-axon protein transfer hypothesis which posits that the squid giant axon obtains newly synthesized protein by Schwann cell transfer and not through intra-axonal protein synthesis, and further suggests that the NF mRNA in the axon is in a translationally repressed state.

  8. Rotational dynamics of cargos at pauses during axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Jeftinija, Ksenija; Jeftinija, Srdija; Fang, Ning

    2012-01-01

    Direct visualization of axonal transport in live neurons is essential for our understanding of the neuronal functions and the working mechanisms of microtubule-based motor proteins. Here we use the high-speed single particle orientation and rotational tracking technique to directly visualize the rotational dynamics of cargos in both active directional transport and pausing stages of axonal transport, with a temporal resolution of 2 ms. Both long and short pauses are imaged, and the correlations between the pause duration, the rotational behaviour of the cargo at the pause, and the moving direction after the pause are established. Furthermore, the rotational dynamics leading to switching tracks are visualized in detail. These first-time observations of cargo's rotational dynamics provide new insights on how kinesin and dynein motors take the cargo through the alternating stages of active directional transport and pause.

  9. MEMBRANE AND PROTOPLASM RESISTANCE IN THE SQUID GIANT AXON

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kenneth S.; Hodgkin, Alan L.

    1939-01-01

    The direct current longitudinal resistance of the squid giant axon was measured as a function of the electrode separation. Large sea water electrodes were used and the inter-electrode length was immersed in oil. The slope of the resistance vs. separation curve is large for a small electrode separation, but becomes smaller and finally constant as the separation is increased. An analysis of the resistance vs. length curves gives the following results. The nerve membrane has a resistance of about 1000 ohm cm.2 The protoplasm has a specific resistance of about 1.4 times that of sea water. The resistance of the connective tissue sheath outside the fiber corresponds to a layer of sea water about 20µ in thickness. The characteristic length for the axon is about 2.3 mm. in oil and 6.0 mm. in sea water. PMID:19873126

  10. Dendrite and Axon Specific Geometrical Transformation in Neurite Development

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Vasily I.; Semyanov, Alexey V.; Kazantsev, Victor B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model of neurite growth to explain the differences in dendrite and axon specific neurite development. The model implements basic molecular kinetics, e.g., building protein synthesis and transport to the growth cone, and includes explicit dependence of the building kinetics on the geometry of the neurite. The basic assumption was that the radius of the neurite decreases with length. We found that the neurite dynamics crucially depended on the relationship between the rate of active transport and the rate of morphological changes. If these rates were in the balance, then the neurite displayed axon specific development with a constant elongation speed. For dendrite specific growth, the maximal length was rapidly saturated by degradation of building protein structures or limited by proximal part expansion reaching the characteristic cell size. PMID:26858635

  11. Severe Acute Axonal Neuropathy Induced by Ciprofloxacin: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Cyprian

    2018-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones increase the risk of peripheral neuropathy. The present work aims to report a case of fluoroquinolone-related severe axonal neuropathy. The subject of this study was a 62-year-old man who exhibited generalized sensory disturbances 4 days after treatment by ciprofloxacin prescribed for urinary infection. Electrodiagnostic studies revealed severe motor-sensory axonal neuropathy with widespread fibrillation potentials in support of generalized motor polyradiculopathy. There was no evidence of conduction blocks or albuminocytologic dissociation in favor of an autoimmune inflammatory reaction. The only pathological biomarker was the reduction of serum folate. According to this case, we suggest that folate level could be routinely measured and supplementation should be performed in patients with fluoroquinolone-induced neuropathy.

  12. Estimating neuronal connectivity from axonal and dendritic density fields

    PubMed Central

    van Pelt, Jaap; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2013-01-01

    Neurons innervate space by extending axonal and dendritic arborizations. When axons and dendrites come in close proximity of each other, synapses between neurons can be formed. Neurons vary greatly in their morphologies and synaptic connections with other neurons. The size and shape of the arborizations determine the way neurons innervate space. A neuron may therefore be characterized by the spatial distribution of its axonal and dendritic “mass.” A population mean “mass” density field of a particular neuron type can be obtained by averaging over the individual variations in neuron geometries. Connectivity in terms of candidate synaptic contacts between neurons can be determined directly on the basis of their arborizations but also indirectly on the basis of their density fields. To decide when a candidate synapse can be formed, we previously developed a criterion defining that axonal and dendritic line pieces should cross in 3D and have an orthogonal distance less than a threshold value. In this paper, we developed new methodology for applying this criterion to density fields. We show that estimates of the number of contacts between neuron pairs calculated from their density fields are fully consistent with the number of contacts calculated from the actual arborizations. However, the estimation of the connection probability and the expected number of contacts per connection cannot be calculated directly from density fields, because density fields do not carry anymore the correlative structure in the spatial distribution of synaptic contacts. Alternatively, these two connectivity measures can be estimated from the expected number of contacts by using empirical mapping functions. The neurons used for the validation studies were generated by our neuron simulator NETMORPH. An example is given of the estimation of average connectivity and Euclidean pre- and postsynaptic distance distributions in a network of neurons represented by their population mean density

  13. ELECTRIC IMPEDANCE OF THE SQUID GIANT AXON DURING ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kenneth S.; Curtis, Howard J.

    1939-01-01

    Alternating current impedance measurements have been made over a wide frequency range on the giant axon from the stellar nerve of the squid, Loligo pealii, during the passage of a nerve impulse. The transverse impedance was measured between narrow electrodes on either side of the axon with a Wheatstone bridge having an amplifier and cathode ray oscillograph for detector. When the bridge was balanced, the resting axon gave a narrow line on the oscillograph screen as a sweep circuit moved the spot across. As an impulse passed between impedance electrodes after the axon had been stimulated at one end, the oscillograph line first broadened into a band, indicating a bridge unbalance, and then narrowed down to balance during recovery. From measurements made during the passage of the impulse and appropriate analysis, it was found that the membrane phase angle was unchanged, the membrane capacity decreased about 2 per cent, while the membrane conductance fell from a resting value of 1000 ohm cm.2 to an average of 25 ohm cm.2 The onset of the resistance change occurs somewhat after the start of the monophasic action potential, but coincides quite closely with the point of inflection on the rising phase, where the membrane current reverses in direction, corresponding to a decrease in the membrane electromotive force. This E.M.F. and the conductance are closely associated properties of the membrane, and their sudden changes constitute, or are due to, the activity which is responsible for the all-or-none law and the initiation and propagation of the nerve impulse. These results correspond to those previously found for Nitella and lead us to expect similar phenomena in other nerve fibers. PMID:19873125

  14. Intracellular calcium buffering capacity in isolated squid axons

    PubMed Central

    Brinley, FJ; Tiffert, T; Scarpa, A; Mullins, LJ

    1977-01-01

    Changes in ionized calcium were studied in axons isolated from living squid by measuring absorbance of the Ca binding dye Arsenazo III using multiwavelength differential absorption spectroscopy. Absorption changes measured in situ were calibrated in vitro with media of ionic composition similar to axoplasm containing CaEGTA buffers. Calcium loads of 50-2,500 μmol/kg axoplasm were induced by microinjection, by stimulation in 112 mM Ca seawater, or by soaking in choline saline with 1-10 mM Ca. Over this range of calcium loading of intact axoplasm, the ionized calcium in the axoplasm rose about 0.6 nM/μM load. Similar loading in axons preteated with carbonyl cyanide 4- trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) to inhibit the mitochondrial proton gradient increased ionized calcium by 5-7 percent of the imposed load, i.e. 93-95 percent of the calcium load was buffered by a process insensitive to FCCP. This FCCP- insensitive buffer system was not saturated by the largest calcium loads imposed, indicating a capacity of at least several millimolar. Treatment of previously loaded axons with FCCP or apyrase plus cyanide produced rises in ionized calcium which could be correlated with the extent of the load. Analysis of results indicated that, whereas only 6 percent of the endogenous calcium in fresh axons is stored in the FCCP-sensitive (presumably mitochondrial) buffer system, about 30 percent of an imposed exogenous load in the range of 50-2,500 μM is taken up by this system. PMID:894260

  15. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Axonal Response to Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Outcomes 6 Conclusions 6 References 6-29 Appendices Introduction During the first year we pursued studies of Magnetic Resonance q-space imaging...QSI) of the spinal cord and myelin imaging. The QSI studies extended our previous work establishing our ability to define the distribution of axon...Conventional MR imaging of the central nervous systems studies water protons exclusively. Although other compounds, such a lipid and proteins, have

  16. Polyethylene glycol restores axonal conduction after corpus callosum transection.

    PubMed

    Bamba, Ravinder; Riley, D Colton; Boyer, Richard B; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P

    2017-05-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been shown to restore axonal continuity after peripheral nerve transection in animal models. We hypothesized that PEG can also restore axonal continuity in the central nervous system. In this current experiment, coronal sectioning of the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats was performed after animal sacrifice. 3Brain high-resolution microelectrode arrays (MEA) were used to measure mean firing rate (MFR) and peak amplitude across the corpus callosum of the ex-vivo brain slices. The corpus callosum was subsequently transected and repeated measurements were performed. The cut ends of the corpus callosum were still apposite at this time. A PEG solution was applied to the injury site and repeated measurements were performed. MEA measurements showed that PEG was capable of restoring electrophysiology signaling after transection of central nerves. Before injury, the average MFRs at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum were 0.76, 0.66, and 0.65 spikes/second, respectively, and the average peak amplitudes were 69.79, 58.68, and 49.60 μV, respectively. After injury, the average MFRs were 0.71, 0.14, and 0.25 spikes/second, respectively and peak amplitudes were 52.11, 8.98, and 16.09 μV, respectively. After application of PEG, there were spikes in MFR and peak amplitude at the injury site and contralaterally. The average MFRs were 0.75, 0.55, and 0.47 spikes/second at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum, respectively and peak amplitudes were 59.44, 45.33, 40.02 μV, respectively. There were statistically differences in the average MFRs and peak amplitudes between the midline and non-midline corpus callosum groups ( P < 0.01, P < 0.05). These findings suggest that PEG restores axonal conduction between severed central nerves, potentially representing axonal fusion.

  17. Polyethylene glycol restores axonal conduction after corpus callosum transection

    PubMed Central

    Bamba, Ravinder; Riley, D. Colton; Boyer, Richard B.; Pollins, Alonda C.; Shack, R. Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2017-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been shown to restore axonal continuity after peripheral nerve transection in animal models. We hypothesized that PEG can also restore axonal continuity in the central nervous system. In this current experiment, coronal sectioning of the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats was performed after animal sacrifice. 3Brain high-resolution microelectrode arrays (MEA) were used to measure mean firing rate (MFR) and peak amplitude across the corpus callosum of the ex-vivo brain slices. The corpus callosum was subsequently transected and repeated measurements were performed. The cut ends of the corpus callosum were still apposite at this time. A PEG solution was applied to the injury site and repeated measurements were performed. MEA measurements showed that PEG was capable of restoring electrophysiology signaling after transection of central nerves. Before injury, the average MFRs at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum were 0.76, 0.66, and 0.65 spikes/second, respectively, and the average peak amplitudes were 69.79, 58.68, and 49.60 μV, respectively. After injury, the average MFRs were 0.71, 0.14, and 0.25 spikes/second, respectively and peak amplitudes were 52.11, 8.98, and 16.09 μV, respectively. After application of PEG, there were spikes in MFR and peak amplitude at the injury site and contralaterally. The average MFRs were 0.75, 0.55, and 0.47 spikes/second at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum, respectively and peak amplitudes were 59.44, 45.33, 40.02 μV, respectively. There were statistically differences in the average MFRs and peak amplitudes between the midline and non-midline corpus callosum groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). These findings suggest that PEG restores axonal conduction between severed central nerves, potentially representing axonal fusion. PMID:28616031

  18. Internalization and Axonal Transport of the HIV Glycoprotein gp120

    PubMed Central

    Berth, Sarah; Caicedo, Hector Hugo; Sarma, Tulika; Morfini, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    The HIV glycoprotein gp120, a neurotoxic HIV glycoprotein that is overproduced and shed by HIV-infected macrophages, is associated with neurological complications of HIV such as distal sensory polyneuropathy, but interactions of gp120 in the peripheral nervous system remain to be characterized. Here, we demonstrate internalization of extracellular gp120 in a manner partially independent of binding to its coreceptor CXCR4 by F11 neuroblastoma cells and cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Immunocytochemical and pharmacological experiments indicate that gp120 does not undergo trafficking through the endolysosomal pathway. Instead, gp120 is mainly internalized through lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent manner, with a minor fraction being internalized by fluid phase pinocytosis. Experiments using compartmentalized microfluidic chambers further indicate that, after internalization, endocytosed gp120 selectively undergoes retrograde but not anterograde axonal transport from axons to neuronal cell bodies. Collectively, these studies illuminate mechanisms of gp120 internalization and axonal transport in peripheral nervous system neurons, providing a novel framework for mechanisms for gp120 neurotoxicity. PMID:25636314

  19. EEG functional connectivity, axon delays and white matter disease.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Paul L; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Fields, R Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Both structural and functional brain connectivities are closely linked to white matter disease. We discuss several such links of potential interest to neurologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and non-clinical neuroscientists. Treatment of brains as genuine complex systems suggests major emphasis on the multi-scale nature of brain connectivity and dynamic behavior. Cross-scale interactions of local, regional, and global networks are apparently responsible for much of EEG's oscillatory behaviors. Finite axon propagation speed, often assumed to be infinite in local network models, is central to our conceptual framework. Myelin controls axon speed, and the synchrony of impulse traffic between distant cortical regions appears to be critical for optimal mental performance and learning. Several experiments suggest that axon conduction speed is plastic, thereby altering the regional and global white matter connections that facilitate binding of remote local networks. Combined EEG and high resolution EEG can provide distinct multi-scale estimates of functional connectivity in both healthy and diseased brains with measures like frequency and phase spectra, covariance, and coherence. White matter disease may profoundly disrupt normal EEG coherence patterns, but currently these kinds of studies are rare in scientific labs and essentially missing from clinical environments. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  20. Vesicular glutamate release from central axons contributes to myelin damage.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Sean; Hansen, Daniel Bloch; Vella, Jasmine; Bond, Peter; Harper, Glenn; Zammit, Christian; Valentino, Mario; Fern, Robert

    2018-03-12

    The axon myelin sheath is prone to injury associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor activation but the source of glutamate in this context is unknown. Myelin damage results in permanent action potential loss and severe functional deficit in the white matter of the CNS, for example in ischemic stroke. Here, we show that in rats and mice, ischemic conditions trigger activation of myelinic NMDA receptors incorporating GluN2C/D subunits following release of axonal vesicular glutamate into the peri-axonal space under the myelin sheath. Glial sources of glutamate such as reverse transport did not contribute significantly to this phenomenon. We demonstrate selective myelin uptake and retention of a GluN2C/D NMDA receptor negative allosteric modulator that shields myelin from ischemic injury. The findings potentially support a rational approach toward a low-impact prophylactic therapy to protect patients at risk of stroke and other forms of excitotoxic injury.

  1. Ionic Current Measurements in the Squid Giant Axon Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kenneth S.; Moore, John W.

    1960-01-01

    The concepts, experiments, and interpretations of ionic current measurements after a step change of the squid axon membrane potential require the potential to be constant for the duration and the membrane area measured. An experimental approach to this ideal has been developed. Electrometer, operational, and control amplifiers produce the step potential between internal micropipette and external potential electrodes within 40 microseconds and a few millivolts. With an internal current electrode effective resistance of 2 ohm cm.2, the membrane potential and current may be constant within a few millivolts and 10 per cent out to near the electrode ends. The maximum membrane current patterns of the best axons are several times larger but of the type described by Cole and analyzed by Hodgkin and Huxley when the change of potential is adequately controlled. The occasional obvious distortions are attributed to the marginal adequacy of potential control to be expected from the characteristics of the current electrodes and the axon. Improvements are expected only to increase stability and accuracy. No reason has been found either to question the qualitative characteristics of the early measurements or to so discredit the analyses made of them. PMID:13694548

  2. KINETICS OF ION MOVEMENT IN THE SQUID GIANT AXON

    PubMed Central

    Shanes, Abraham M.; Berman, Morris D.

    1955-01-01

    The loss of Na22, K42, and Cl36 from single giant axons of the squid, Loligo pealii, following exposure to an artificial sea water containing these radioisotopes, occurs in two stages, an initial rapid one followed by an exponential decline. The time constants of the latter stage for the 3 ion species are, respectively, 290, 200, and 175 minutes. The outflux of sodium is depressed while that of potassium is accelerated in the absence of oxygen; the emergence of potassium is slowed by cocaine, while that of sodium is unaffected. One cm. ends of the axons take up about twice as much radiosodium as the central segment; this difference in activity is largely preserved during exposure to inactive solution. Such marked differences are not observed with radiopotassium. From the experimental data estimates are given of the influxes and outfluxes of the individual ions. The kinetics of outflux suggests a cortical layer of measureable thickness which contains the ions in different proportions from those in the medium and which governs the rate of emergence of these ions from the axon as though it contained very few but large (relative to ion dimensions) pores. PMID:13271727

  3. Revisiting chemoaffinity theory: Chemotactic implementation of topographic axonal projection

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Neural circuits are wired by chemotactic migration of growth cones guided by extracellular guidance cue gradients. How growth cone chemotaxis builds the macroscopic structure of the neural circuit is a fundamental question in neuroscience. I addressed this issue in the case of the ordered axonal projections called topographic maps in the retinotectal system. In the retina and tectum, the erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular (Eph) receptors and their ligands, the ephrins, are expressed in gradients. According to Sperry’s chemoaffinity theory, gradients in both the source and target areas enable projecting axons to recognize their proper terminals, but how axons chemotactically decode their destinations is largely unknown. To identify the chemotactic mechanism of topographic mapping, I developed a mathematical model of intracellular signaling in the growth cone that focuses on the growth cone’s unique chemotactic property of being attracted or repelled by the same guidance cues in different biological situations. The model presented mechanism by which the retinal growth cone reaches the correct terminal zone in the tectum through alternating chemotactic response between attraction and repulsion around a preferred concentration. The model also provided a unified understanding of the contrasting relationships between receptor expression levels and preferred ligand concentrations in EphA/ephrinA- and EphB/ephrinB-encoded topographic mappings. Thus, this study redefines the chemoaffinity theory in chemotactic terms. PMID:28792499

  4. Variability and Reliabiltiy in Axon Growth Cone Navigation Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnelo, Marta; Ricoult, Sébastien G.; Juncker, David; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Faisal, Aldo A.

    2015-03-01

    The nervous system's wiring is a result of axon growth cones navigating through specific molecular environments during development. In order to reach their target, growth cones need to make decisions under uncertainty as they are faced with stochastic sensory information and probabilistic movements. The overall system therefore exhibits features of whole organisms (perception, decision making, action) in the subset of a single cell. We aim to characterise growth cone navigation in defined nano-dot guidance cue environments, by using the tools of computational neuroscience to conduct ``molecular psychophysics.'' We start with a generative model of growth cone behaviour and we 1. characterise sensory and internal sources of noise contributing to behavioural variables, by combining knowledge of the underlying stochastic dynamics in cue sensing and the growth of the cytoskeleton. This enables us to 2. produce bottom-up lower limit estimates of behavioural response reliability and visualise it as probability distributions over axon growth trajectories. Given this information we can match our in silico model's ``psychometric'' decision curves with empirical data. Finally we use a Monte-Carlo approach to predict response distributions of axon trajectories from our model.

  5. Explaining intermediate filament accumulation in giant axonal neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Opal, Puneet; Goldman, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN)1 is a rare autosomal recessive neurological disorder caused by mutations in the GAN gene that encodes gigaxonin, a member of the BTB/Kelch family of E3 ligase adaptor proteins.1 This disease is characterized by the aggregation of Intermediate Filaments (IF)—cytoskeletal elements that play important roles in cell physiology including the regulation of cell shape, motility, mechanics and intra-cellular signaling. Although a range of cell types are affected in GAN, neurons display the most severe pathology, with neuronal intermediate filament accumulation and aggregation; this in turn causes axonal swellings or “giant axons.” A mechanistic understanding of GAN IF pathology has eluded researchers for many years. In a recent study1 we demonstrate that the normal function of gigaxonin is to regulate the degradation of IF proteins via the proteasome. Our findings present the first direct link between GAN mutations and IF pathology; moreover, given the importance of IF aggregations in a wide range of disease conditions, our findings could have wider ramifications. PMID:25003002

  6. Rapid signalling in distinct dopaminergic axons during locomotion and reward.

    PubMed

    Howe, M W; Dombeck, D A

    2016-07-28

    Dopaminergic projection axons from the midbrain to the striatum are crucial for motor control, as their degeneration in Parkinson disease results in profound movement deficits. Paradoxically, most recording methods report rapid phasic dopamine signalling (~100-ms bursts) in response to unpredicted rewards, with little evidence for movement-related signalling. The leading model posits that phasic signalling in striatum-targeting dopamine neurons drives reward-based learning, whereas slow variations in firing (tens of seconds to minutes) in these same neurons bias animals towards or away from movement. However, current methods have provided little evidence to support or refute this model. Here, using new optical recording methods, we report the discovery of rapid phasic signalling in striatum-targeting dopaminergic axons that is associated with, and capable of triggering, locomotion in mice. Axons expressing these signals were largely distinct from those that responded to unexpected rewards. These results suggest that dopaminergic neuromodulation can differentially impact motor control and reward learning with sub-second precision, and indicate that both precise signal timing and neuronal subtype are important parameters to consider in the treatment of dopamine-related disorders.

  7. Inner membrane fusion mediates spatial distribution of axonal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yiyi; Lee, Hao-Chih; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Suhan, Joseph; Qiu, Minhua; Ba, Qinle; Yang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria form a dynamic interconnected network to respond to changing needs at different subcellular locations. A fundamental yet unanswered question regarding this network is whether, and if so how, local fusion and fission of individual mitochondria affect their global distribution. To address this question, we developed high-resolution computational image analysis techniques to examine the relations between mitochondrial fusion/fission and spatial distribution within the axon of Drosophila larval neurons. We found that stationary and moving mitochondria underwent fusion and fission regularly but followed different spatial distribution patterns and exhibited different morphology. Disruption of inner membrane fusion by knockdown of dOpa1, Drosophila Optic Atrophy 1, not only increased the spatial density of stationary and moving mitochondria but also changed their spatial distributions and morphology differentially. Knockdown of dOpa1 also impaired axonal transport of mitochondria. But the changed spatial distributions of mitochondria resulted primarily from disruption of inner membrane fusion because knockdown of Milton, a mitochondrial kinesin-1 adapter, caused similar transport velocity impairment but different spatial distributions. Together, our data reveals that stationary mitochondria within the axon interconnect with moving mitochondria through fusion and fission and that local inner membrane fusion between individual mitochondria mediates their global distribution. PMID:26742817

  8. Traction force and tension fluctuations in growing axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Polackwich, Jamie; Koch, Daniel; McAllister, Ryan; Geller, Herbert

    Actively generated mechanical forces play a central role in axon growth and guidance during nervous system development. We describe the dynamics of traction stresses from growth cones of actively advancing axons from postnatal rat DRG neurons. By tracking the movement of the growth cone and analyzing the traction stresses in a co-moving reference frame, we show that there is a clear and consistent average stress field underlying the complex spatial stresses present at any one time. The average stress field has strong maxima on the sides of the growth cone, directed inward toward the growth cone neck. This pattern represents a Contractile stress contained within the growth cone, and a net force that is balanced by the axon tension. In addition, using high time-resolution measurements, we show that the stress field is composed of fluctuating local stress peaks, with a population of peaks whose lifetime distribution follows an exponential decay, and a small number of very long-lived peaks. We also find that the tension appears to vary randomly over short time scales, roughly consistent with the lifetime of the stress peaks, suggesting that the tension fluctuations originate from stochastic adhesion dynamics.

  9. Axonal Control of the Adult Neural Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D.; Tecott, Laurence H.; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSC) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain’s neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C. PMID:24561083

  10. Dendritic and Axonal Wiring Optimization of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    The way in which a neuronal tree expands plays an important role in its functional and computational characteristics. We aimed to study the existence of an optimal neuronal design for different types of cortical GABAergic neurons. To do this, we hypothesized that both the axonal and dendritic trees of individual neurons optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. We took the branching points of real three-dimensional neuronal reconstructions of the axonal and dendritic trees of different types of cortical interneurons and searched for the minimal wiring arborization structure that respects the branching points. We compared the minimal wiring arborization with real axonal and dendritic trees. We tested this optimization problem using a new approach based on graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques. We concluded that neuronal wiring is near-optimal in most of the tested neurons, although the wiring length of dendritic trees is generally nearer to the optimum. Therefore, wiring economy is related to the way in which neuronal arborizations grow irrespective of the marked differences in the morphology of the examined interneurons.

  11. Bilateral spinal anterior horn lesions in acute motor axonal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Daisuke; Fujii, Katsunori; Misawa, Sonoko; Shiohama, Tadashi; Fukuhara, Tomoyuki; Fujita, Mayuko; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Shimojo, Naoki

    2018-05-28

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is an acute immune-mediated peripheral polyneuropathy. Neuroimaging findings from patients with this syndrome have revealed gadolinium enhancement in the cauda equina and in the anterior and posterior nerve roots, but intra-spinal lesions have never been described. Herein, we report, for the first time, bilateral spinal anterior horn lesions in a patient with an acute motor axonal neuropathy form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The patient was a previously healthy 13-year-old Japanese girl, who exhibited acute-onset flaccid tetraplegia and loss of tendon reflexes. Nerve conduction studies revealed motor axonal damage, leading to the diagnosis of acute motor axonal neuropathy. Notably, spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral anterior horn lesions on T2-weighted imaging at the Th11-12 levels, as well as gadolinium enhancement of the cauda equina and anterior and posterior nerve roots. The anterior horn lesions were most prominent on day 18, and their signal intensity declined thereafter. Although intravenous treatment with immunoglobulins was immediately administered, the motor function was not completely regained. We propose that anterior spinal lesions might be responsible for the prolonged neurological disability of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome, possibly produced by retrograde progression from the affected anterior nerve roots to the intramedullary roots, and the anterior horn motor neurons. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Adhesive micro-line periodicity determines guidance of axonal outgrowth†

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Fothergill, Thomas; Lumbard, Derek C.; Dent, Erik W.; Williams, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive micro-lines of various sub-cellular geometries were created using a non-traditional micro stamping technique. This technique employed the use of commercially available diffraction gratings as the molds for the micro stamps, a method which is quick and inexpensive, and which could easily be adopted as a patterning tool in a variety of research efforts. The atypical saw-tooth profile of the micro stamps enabled a unique degree of control and flexibility over patterned line and gap widths. Cortical neurons cultured on patterned poly-lysine micro-lines on PDMS exhibit a startling transition in axonal guidance: From the expected parallel guidance to an unexpected perpendicular guidance that becomes dominant as patterned lines and gaps become sufficiently narrow. This transition is most obvious when the lines are narrow relative to gaps, while the periodicity of the pattern is reduced. Axons growing perpendicular to micro-lines exhibited ‘vinculated’ growth, a unique morphological phenotype consisting of periodic orthogonal extensions along the axon. PMID:23250489

  13. Axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome: concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Satoshi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2013-12-01

    Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) is a pure motor axonal subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) that was identified in the late 1990s. In Asia and Central and South America, it is the major subtype of GBS, seen in 30-65% of patients. AMAN progresses more rapidly and has an earlier peak than demyelinating GBS; tendon reflexes are relatively preserved or even exaggerated, and autonomic dysfunction is rare. One of the main causes is molecular mimicry of human gangliosides by Campylobacter jejuni lipo-oligosaccharides. In addition to axonal degeneration, electrophysiology shows rapidly reversible nerve conduction blockade or slowing, presumably due to pathological changes at the nodes or paranodes. Autoantibodies that bind to GM1 or GD1a gangliosides at the nodes of Ranvier activate complement and disrupt sodium-channel clusters and axoglial junctions, which leads to nerve conduction failure and muscle weakness. Improved understanding of the disease mechanism and pathophysiology might lead to new treatment options and improve the outlook for patients with AMAN. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo axonal transport deficits in a mouse model of fronto-temporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Tabassum; Ali, Yousuf O.; Venkitaramani, Deepa V.; Jang, Ming-Kuei; Lu, Hui-Chen; Pautler, Robia G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Axonal transport is vital for neurons and deficits in this process have been previously reported in a few mouse models of Alzheimer's disease prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles. However, it remains to be determined whether axonal transport is defective prior to the onset of neurodegeneration. The rTg4510 mouse, a fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17) tauopathy model, over-express tau-P301L mutation found in familial forms of FTDP-17, in the forebrain driven by the calcium–calmodulin kinase II promoter. This mouse model exhibits tau pathology, neurodegeneration in the forebrain, and associated behavioral deficits beginning at 4–5 months of age. Animal model rTg4510 transgenic mice were used in these studies. Mice were given 2 μL of MnCl2 in each nostril 1 h prior to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Following MnCl2 nasal lavage, mice were imaged using Manganese enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MEMRI) Protocol with TE = 8.5 ms, TR = 504 ms, FOV = 3.0 cm, matrix size = 128 × 128 × 128, number of cycles = 15 with each cycle taking approximately 2 min, 9 s, and 24 ms using Paravision software (BrukerBioSpin, Billerica, MA). During imaging, body temperature was maintained at 37.0 °C using an animal heating system (SA Instruments, Stony Brook, NY). Data analysis Resulting images were analyzed using Paravision software. Regions of interest (ROI) within the olfactory neuronal layer (ONL) and the water phantom consisting of one pixel (ONL) and 9 pixels (water) were selected and copied across each of the 15 cycles. Signal intensities (SI) of ONL and water phantom ROIs were measured. SI values obtained for ONL were then normalized the water phantom SI values. The correlation between normalized signal intensity in the ONL and time were assessed using Prism (GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA). Results Using the MEMRI technique on 1.5, 3, 5, and 10-month old rTg4510 mice and littermate controls, we found

  15. In vivo axonal transport deficits in a mouse model of fronto-temporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Majid, Tabassum; Ali, Yousuf O; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Jang, Ming-Kuei; Lu, Hui-Chen; Pautler, Robia G

    2014-01-01

    Axonal transport is vital for neurons and deficits in this process have been previously reported in a few mouse models of Alzheimer's disease prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles. However, it remains to be determined whether axonal transport is defective prior to the onset of neurodegeneration. The rTg4510 mouse, a fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17) tauopathy model, over-express tau-P301L mutation found in familial forms of FTDP-17, in the forebrain driven by the calcium-calmodulin kinase II promoter. This mouse model exhibits tau pathology, neurodegeneration in the forebrain, and associated behavioral deficits beginning at 4-5 months of age. rTg4510 transgenic mice were used in these studies. Mice were given 2 μL of MnCl2 in each nostril 1 h prior to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Following MnCl2 nasal lavage, mice were imaged using Manganese enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MEMRI) Protocol with TE = 8.5 ms, TR = 504 ms, FOV = 3.0 cm, matrix size = 128 × 128 × 128, number of cycles = 15 with each cycle taking approximately 2 min, 9 s, and 24 ms using Paravision software (BrukerBioSpin, Billerica, MA). During imaging, body temperature was maintained at 37.0 °C using an animal heating system (SA Instruments, Stony Brook, NY). Resulting images were analyzed using Paravision software. Regions of interest (ROI) within the olfactory neuronal layer (ONL) and the water phantom consisting of one pixel (ONL) and 9 pixels (water) were selected and copied across each of the 15 cycles. Signal intensities (SI) of ONL and water phantom ROIs were measured. SI values obtained for ONL were then normalized the water phantom SI values. The correlation between normalized signal intensity in the ONL and time were assessed using Prism (GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA). Using the MEMRI technique on 1.5, 3, 5, and 10-month old rTg4510 mice and littermate controls, we found significant axonal transport deficits present in

  16. Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides Reduce Neurofilament Synthesis and Inhibit Axon Regeneration in Lamprey Reticulospinal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guixin; Jin, Li-qing; Hu, Jianli; Rodemer, William; Selzer, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The sea lamprey has been used as a model for the study of axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. Previous studies have suggested that, unlike developing axons in mammal, the tips of regenerating axons in lamprey spinal cord are simple in shape, packed with neurofilaments (NFs), and contain very little F-actin. Thus it has been proposed that regeneration of axons in the central nervous system of mature vertebrates is not based on the canonical actin-dependent pulling mechanism of growth cones, but involves an internal protrusive force, perhaps generated by the transport or assembly of NFs in the distal axon. In order to assess this hypothesis, expression of NFs was manipulated by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO). A standard, company-supplied MO was used as control. Axon retraction and regeneration were assessed at 2, 4 and 9 weeks after MOs were applied to a spinal cord transection (TX) site. Antisense MO inhibited NF180 expression compared to control MO. The effect of inhibiting NF expression on axon retraction and regeneration was studied by measuring the distance of axon tips from the TX site at 2 and 4 weeks post-TX, and counting the number of reticulospinal neurons (RNs) retrogradely labeled by fluorescently-tagged dextran injected caudal to the injury at 9 weeks post-TX. There was no statistically significant effect of MO on axon retraction at 2 weeks post-TX. However, at both 4 and 9 weeks post-TX, inhibition of NF expression inhibited axon regeneration.

  17. Axonal ensheathment and septate junction formation in the peripheral nervous system of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swati; Pillai, Anilkumar M; Paik, Raehum; Li, Jingjun; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2006-03-22

    Axonal insulation is critical for efficient action potential propagation and normal functioning of the nervous system. In Drosophila, the underlying basis of nerve ensheathment is the axonal insulation by glial cells and the establishment of septate junctions (SJs) between glial cell membranes. However, the details of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying axonal insulation and SJ formation are still obscure. Here, we report the characterization of axonal insulation in the Drosophila peripheral nervous system (PNS). Targeted expression of tau-green fluorescent protein in the glial cells and ultrastructural analysis of the peripheral nerves allowed us to visualize the glial ensheathment of axons. We show that individual or a group of axons are ensheathed by inner glial processes, which in turn are ensheathed by the outer perineurial glial cells. SJs are formed between the inner and outer glial membranes. We also show that Neurexin IV, Contactin, and Neuroglian are coexpressed in the peripheral glial membranes and that these proteins exist as a complex in the Drosophila nervous system. Mutations in neurexin IV, contactin, and neuroglian result in the disruption of blood-nerve barrier function in the PNS, and ultrastructural analyses of the mutant embryonic peripheral nerves show loss of glial SJs. Interestingly, the murine homologs of Neurexin IV, Contactin, and Neuroglian are expressed at the paranodal SJs and play a key role in axon-glial interactions of myelinated axons. Together, our data suggest that the molecular machinery underlying axonal insulation and axon-glial interactions may be conserved across species.

  18. Axon Response to Guidance Cues Is Stimulated by Acetylcholine in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Ren, Xing-Cong; Quinn, Christopher C.; Wadsworth, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Gradients of acetylcholine can stimulate growth cone turning when applied to neurons grown in culture, and it has been suggested that acetylcholine could act as a guidance cue. However, the role acetylcholine plays in directing axon migrations in vivo is not clear. Here, we show that acetylcholine positively regulates signaling pathways that mediate axon responses to guidance cues in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations that disrupt acetylcholine synthesis, transportation, and secretion affect circumferential axon guidance of the AVM neuron and in these mutants exogenously supplied acetylcholine improves AVM circumferential axon guidance. These effects are not observed for the circumferential guidance of the DD and VD motor neuron axons, which are neighbors of the AVM axon. Circumferential guidance is directed by the UNC-6 (netrin) and SLT-1 (slit) extracellular cues, and exogenously supplied acetylcholine can improve AVM axon guidance in mutants when either UNC-6– or SLT-1–induced signaling is disrupted, but not when both signaling pathways are perturbed. Not in any of the mutants does exogenously supplied acetylcholine improve DD and VD axon guidance. The ability of acetylcholine to enhance AVM axon guidance only in the presence of either UNC-6 or SLT-1 indicates that acetylcholine potentiates UNC-6 and SLT-1 guidance activity, rather than acting itself as a guidance cue. Together, our results show that for specific neurons acetylcholine plays an important role in vivo as a modulator of axon responses to guidance cues. PMID:21868605

  19. Premyelinated central axons express neurotoxic NMDA receptors: relevance to early developing white-matter injury

    PubMed Central

    Huria, Tahani; Beeraka, Narasimha Murthy; Al-Ghamdi, Badrah; Fern, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic-type injury to developing white matter is associated with the significant clinical condition cerebral palsy and with the cognitive deficits associated with premature birth. Premyelinated axons are the major cellular component of fetal white matter and loss of axon function underlies the disability, but the cellular mechanisms producing ischemic injury to premyelinated axons have not previously been described. Injury was found to require longer periods of modelled ischemia than at latter developmental points. Ischemia produced initial hyperexcitability in axons followed by loss of function after Na+ and Ca2+ influx. N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) type glutamate receptor (GluR) agonists potentiated axon injury while antagonists were protective. The NMDA GluR obligatory Nr1 subunit colocalized with markers of small premyelinated axons and expression was found at focal regions of axon injury. Ischemic injury of glial cells present in early developing white matter was NMDA GluR independent. Axons in human postconception week 18 to 23 white matter had a uniform prediameter expansion phenotype and postembedded immuno-gold labelling showed Nr1 subunit expression on the membrane of these axons, demonstrating a shared key neuropathologic feature with the rodent model. Premyelinated central axons therefore express high levels of functional NMDA GluRs that confer sensitivity to ischemic injury. PMID:25515212

  20. Pharmacologically inhibiting kinesin-5 activity with monastrol promotes axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Klaw, Michelle C.; Lemay, Michel A.; Baas, Peter W.; Tom, Veronica J.

    2014-01-01

    While it is well established that the axons of adult neurons have a lower capacity for regrowth, some regeneration of certain CNS populations after spinal cord injury (SCI) is possible if their axons are provided with a permissive substrate, such as an injured peripheral nerve. While some axons readily regenerate into a peripheral nerve graft (PNG), these axons almost always stall at the distal interface and fail to re-innervate spinal cord tissue. Treatment of the glial scar at the distal graft interface with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) can improve regeneration, but most regenerated axons need further stimulation to extend beyond the interface. Previous studies demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting kinesin-5, a motor protein best known for its essential role in mitosis but also expressed in neurons, with the pharmacological agent monastrol increases axon growth on inhibitory substrates in vitro. We sought to determine if monastrol treatment after a SCI improves functional axon regeneration. Animals received complete thoracic level 7 (T7) transections and PNGs and were treated intrathecally with ChABC and either monastrol or DMSO vehicle. We found that combining ChABC with monastrol significantly enhanced axon regeneration. However, there were no further improvements in function or enhanced c-Fos induction upon stimulation of spinal cord rostral to the transection. This indicates that monastrol improves ChABC-mediated axon regeneration but that further treatments are needed to enhance the integration of these regrown axons. PMID:25447935

  1. Spinally projecting preproglucagon axons preferentially innervate sympathetic preganglionic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn-Smith, I.J.; Marina, N.; Manton, R.N.; Reimann, F.; Gribble, F.M.; Trapp, S.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and medullary reticular formation, produce GLP-1. In transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), these brainstem PPG neurons project to many central autonomic regions where GLP-1 receptors are expressed. The spinal cord also contains GLP-1 receptor mRNA but the distribution of spinal PPG axons is unknown. Here, we used two-color immunoperoxidase labeling to examine PPG innervation of spinal segments T1–S4 in YFP-PPG mice. Immunoreactivity for YFP identified spinal PPG axons and perikarya. We classified spinal neurons receiving PPG input by immunoreactivity for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and/or Fluorogold (FG) retrogradely transported from the peritoneal cavity. FG microinjected at T9 defined cell bodies that supplied spinal PPG innervation. The deep dorsal horn of lower lumbar cord contained YFP-immunoreactive neurons. Non-varicose, YFP-immunoreactive axons were prominent in the lateral funiculus, ventral white commissure and around the ventral median fissure. In T1–L2, varicose, YFP-containing axons closely apposed many ChAT-immunoreactive sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) in the intermediolateral cell column (IML) and dorsal lamina X. In the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, about 10% of ChAT-immunoreactive preganglionic neurons received YFP appositions, as did occasional ChAT-positive motor neurons throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the ventral horn. YFP appositions also occurred on NOS-immunoreactive spinal interneurons and on spinal YFP-immunoreactive neurons. Injecting FG at T9 retrogradely labeled many YFP-PPG cell bodies in the medulla but none of the spinal YFP-immunoreactive neurons. These results show that brainstem PPG neurons

  2. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at differentmore » developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose

  3. Axonal Spheroid Accumulation In the Brainstem and Spinal Cord of A Young Angus Cow with Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Hanshaw, D M; Finnie, J W; Manavis, J; Kessell, A E

    2015-08-01

    An 18-month-old Angus cow presented with rapidly developing ataxia and subsequently died. The finding of large numbers of axonal spheroids in brainstem nuclei and spinal cord grey matter, bilaterally symmetrical in distribution, was consistent with a histopathological diagnosis of neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD). Most of the axonal swellings were immunopositive to amyloid precursor protein, suggesting that interruption to axonal flow was important in their genesis. The topographical distribution of axonal spheroids in the brain and spinal cord in this bovine case closely resembled that found in the ovine neurodegenerative disorder termed NAD, in which axonal swellings are the major pathological feature. This appears to be the first reported case of this type of NAD in cattle. The aetiology of the spheroidal aggregations in this case was not determined. There was no evidence from the case history or neuropathology to indicate whether the axonal spheroids in this case involved an acquired or heritable aetiology. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  4. Neuronal intrinsic regenerative capacity: The impact of microtubule organization and axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Blanca; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2018-05-08

    In the adult vertebrate central nervous system, axons generally fail to regenerate. In contrast, peripheral nervous system axons are able to form a growth cone and regenerate upon lesion. Among the multiple intrinsic mechanisms leading to the formation of a new growth cone and to successful axon regrowth, cytoskeleton organization and dynamics is central. Here we discuss how multiple pathways that define the regenerative capacity converge into the regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton and transport. We further explore the use of dorsal root ganglion neurons as a model to study the neuronal regenerative ability. Finally, we address some of the unanswered questions in the field, including the mechanisms by which axonal transport might be modulated by injury, and the relationship between microtubule organization, dynamics, and axonal transport. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Role of calpains in the injury-induced dysfunction and degeneration of the mammalian axon.

    PubMed

    Ma, Marek

    2013-12-01

    Axonal injury and degeneration, whether primary or secondary, contribute to the morbidity and mortality seen in many acquired and inherited central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders, such as traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, cerebral ischemia, neurodegenerative diseases, and peripheral neuropathies. The calpain family of proteases has been mechanistically linked to the dysfunction and degeneration of axons. While the direct mechanisms by which transection, mechanical strain, ischemia, or complement activation trigger intra-axonal calpain activity are likely different, the downstream effects of unregulated calpain activity may be similar in seemingly disparate diseases. In this review, a brief examination of axonal structure is followed by a focused overview of the calpain family. Finally, the mechanisms by which calpains may disrupt the axonal cytoskeleton, transport, and specialized domains (axon initial segment, nodes, and terminals) are discussed. © 2013.

  6. F-spondin Is Essential for Maintaining Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Gabriela L.; Su, Jianmin; Monavarfeshani, Aboozar; Fox, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master pacemaker that drives circadian behaviors. SCN neurons have intrinsic, self-sustained rhythmicity that is governed by transcription-translation feedback loops. Intrinsic rhythms within the SCN do not match the day-night cycle and are therefore entrained by light-derived cues. Such cues are transmitted to the SCN by a class of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). In the present study, we sought to identify how axons from ipRGCs target the SCN. While none of the potential targeting cues identified appeared necessary for retinohypothalamic innervation, we unexpectedly identified a novel role for the extracellular matrix protein F-spondin in circadian behavior. In the absence of F-spondin, mice lost their ability to maintain typical intrinsic rhythmicity. Moreover, F-spondin loss results in the displacement of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons, a class of neurons that are essential for maintaining rhythmicity among SCN neurons. Thus, this study highlights a novel role for F-spondin in maintaining circadian rhythms. PMID:29472844

  7. Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0524 TITLE:Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey D...29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0524...MCT1 in injured oligodendroglia of multiple sclerosis patients contributes to axon neurodegeneration and that increasing MCT1 will be protective in the

  8. Acutely damaged axons are remyelinated in multiple sclerosis and experimental models of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Verena; van der Meer, Franziska; Wrzos, Claudia; Scheidt, Uta; Bahn, Erik; Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang; Junker, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Remyelination is in the center of new therapies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis to resolve and improve disease symptoms and protect axons from further damage. Although remyelination is considered beneficial in the long term, it is not known, whether this is also the case early in lesion formation. Additionally, the precise timing of acute axonal damage and remyelination has not been assessed so far. To shed light onto the interrelation between axons and the myelin sheath during de- and remyelination, we employed cuprizone- and focal lysolecithin-induced demyelination and performed time course experiments assessing the evolution of early and late stage remyelination and axonal damage. We observed damaged axons with signs of remyelination after cuprizone diet cessation and lysolecithin injection. Similar observations were made in early multiple sclerosis lesions. To assess the correlation of remyelination and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis lesions, we took advantage of a cohort of patients with early and late stage remyelinated lesions and assessed the number of APP- and SMI32- positive damaged axons and the density of SMI31-positive and silver impregnated preserved axons. Early de- and remyelinating lesions did not differ with respect to axonal density and axonal damage, but we observed a lower axonal density in late stage demyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions than in remyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions. Our findings suggest that remyelination may not only be protective over a long period of time, but may play an important role in the immediate axonal recuperation after a demyelinating insult. © 2017 The Authors GLIA Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMN). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30µM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato, exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. PMID:25668718

  10. A study of axonal degeneration in the optic nerves of aging mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Philpott, D. E.; Miquel, J.

    1978-01-01

    The optic nerves of C57BL/6J mice ranging from 3 to 30 months were examined by electron microscopy. At all ages investigated, optic nerve axons contained enlarged mitochondria with abnormal cristae. With increasing age, a large number of necrotic axons were observed and were in the process of being phagocytized. The abnormal mitochondria may represent preliminary changes that eventually lead to necrosis of the axon.

  11. Akt1-Inhibitor of DNA binding2 is essential for growth cone formation and axon growth and promotes central nervous system axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyo Rim; Kwon, Il-Sun; Hwang, Inwoo; Jin, Eun-Ju; Shin, Joo-Ho; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M; Swanson, Raymond; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of axon growth during development are beneficial to the search for neuron-intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration. Here, we discovered that, in the developing neuron from rat, Akt signaling regulates axon growth and growth cone formation through phosphorylation of serine 14 (S14) on Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2). This enhances Id2 protein stability by means of escape from proteasomal degradation, and steers its localization to the growth cone, where Id2 interacts with radixin that is critical for growth cone formation. Knockdown of Id2, or abrogation of Id2 phosphorylation at S14, greatly impairs axon growth and the architecture of growth cone. Intriguingly, reinstatement of Akt/Id2 signaling after injury in mouse hippocampal slices redeemed growth promoting ability, leading to obvious axon regeneration. Our results suggest that Akt/Id2 signaling is a key module for growth cone formation and axon growth, and its augmentation plays a potential role in CNS axonal regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20799.001 PMID:27938661

  12. Gene replacement in mice reveals that the heavily phosphorylated tail of neurofilament heavy subunit does not affect axonal caliber or the transit of cargoes in slow axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mala V.; Garcia, Michael L.; Miyazaki, Yukio; Gotow, Takahiro; Yuan, Aidong; Mattina, Salvatore; Ward, Chris M.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nixon, Ralph A.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2002-01-01

    The COOH-terminal tail of mammalian neurofilament heavy subunit (NF-H), the largest neurofilament subunit, contains 44-51 lysine–serine–proline repeats that are nearly stoichiometrically phosphorylated after assembly into neurofilaments in axons. Phosphorylation of these repeats has been implicated in promotion of radial growth of axons, control of nearest neighbor distances between neurofilaments or from neurofilaments to other structural components in axons, and as a determinant of slow axonal transport. These roles have now been tested through analysis of mice in which the NF-H gene was replaced by one deleted in the NF-H tail. Loss of the NF-H tail and all of its phosphorylation sites does not affect the number of neurofilaments, alter the ratios of the three neurofilament subunits, or affect the number of microtubules in axons. Additionally, it does not reduce interfilament spacing of most neurofilaments, the speed of action potential propagation, or mature cross-sectional areas of large motor or sensory axons, although its absence slows the speed of acquisition of normal diameters. Most surprisingly, at least in optic nerve axons, loss of the NF-H tail does not affect the rate of transport of neurofilament subunits. PMID:12186852

  13. Differential effects of Rho GTPases on axonal and dendritic development in hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Ahnert-Hilger, G; Höltje, M; Grosse, G; Pickert, G; Mucke, C; Nixdorf-Bergweiler, B; Boquet, P; Hofmann, F; Just, I

    2004-07-01

    Formation of neurites and their differentiation into axons and dendrites requires precisely controlled changes in the cytoskeleton. While small GTPases of the Rho family appear to be involved in this regulation, it is still unclear how Rho function affects axonal and dendritic growth during development. Using hippocampal neurones at defined states of differentiation, we have dissected the function of RhoA in axonal and dendritic growth. Expression of a dominant negative RhoA variant inhibited axonal growth, whereas dendritic growth was promoted. The opposite phenotype was observed when a constitutively active RhoA variant was expressed. Inactivation of Rho by C3-catalysed ADP-ribosylation using C3 isoforms (Clostridium limosum, C3(lim) or Staphylococcus aureus, C3(stau2)), diminished axonal branching. By contrast, extracellularly applied nanomolar concentrations of C3 from C. botulinum (C3(bot)) or enzymatically dead C3(bot) significantly increased axon growth and axon branching. Taken together, axonal development requires activation of RhoA, whereas dendritic development benefits from its inactivation. However, extracellular application of enzymatically active or dead C3(bot) exclusively promotes axonal growth and branching suggesting a novel neurotrophic function of C3 that is independent from its enzymatic activity.

  14. A morphological study of diffuse axonal injury in a rat model by lateral head rotation trauma.

    PubMed

    Xiaoshengi, He; Guitao, Yang; Xiang, Zhang; Zhou, Fei

    2010-03-01

    Morphology in diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by lateral head rotation was investigated. SD rats were divided into injury (n=9) and sham (n=3) groups. A device was used to produce lateral rotational acceleration of the rats' heads. At different survival times three rats were killed for light and electron microscopic examination of the brain tissue. Sagittal sections were made from medulla oblongata and immunolabelled for NF68. At post-traumatic 30 min, NF68 immunolabelling showed a small number ofswollen and irregular axons. Ultrastructurally slightly-separated myelin lamellae and disorderly arranged neurofilaments occurred. At 2 and 24 h axonal damage became more severe. Increases in immunolabelled axonal swellings, disconnected axons and axonal retraction bulbs appeared. EM provided evidence of myelin separation, peri-axonal spaces, blank areas in axoplasm, loss of microtubules, peripheral accumulation of mitochondria and clumped neurofilaments for DAI. A tendency was noted for greater labelling with NF68 as axonal damage increased. The disorderly arrangement of NFs occurred at early stage of post-traumatic axonal changes.

  15. Calcium overloading in traumatic axonal injury by lateral head rotation: a morphological evidence in rat model.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Sheng; Xiang, Zhang; Zhou, Fei; Fu, Luo-An; Shuang, Wang

    2004-05-01

    The study investigated morphologically axonal calcium overloading and its relationship with axonal structural changes. Twelve SD rats were divided into an injury and a sham group. The rat model of traumatic axonal injury (TAI) by lateral head rotation was produced. The oxalate-pyroantimonate technique for calcium localization was used to process the rat's medulla oblongata tissues with thin sections observed electron-microscopically for axonal structure and calcium precipitates on it. The axonal damage in medulla oblongata appeared at 2 h post-injury, gradually became diffuse and severe, and continued to exist at 24 hours. At 2 hours, calcium precipitates were deposited on separated lamellae and axolemma, but were rarely distributed in the axoplasm. At 6 hours, calcium precipitates occurred on separated lamellae and axolemma in much higher density, but on axoplasm in extremely small amounts. Some axons, though lacking structural changes of the myelin sheath, sequestered plenty of calcium deposits on their swollen mitochondria. At 24 hours, damaged axons presented with much more severe lamellae separation and calcium deposits. Axonal calcium overloading developed in rat TAI model using lateral head rotation. This was significantly related to structural damage in the axons. These findings suggest the feasibility of using calcium antagonists in cope the management of human DAI in its very early stage.

  16. Drebrin Coordinates the Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeleton During the Initiation of Axon Collateral Branches

    PubMed Central

    Ketschek, Andrea; Spillane, Mirela; Dun, Xin-Peng; Hardy, Holly; Chilton, John; Gallo, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Drebrin is a cytoskeleton-associated protein which can interact with both actin filaments and the tips of microtubules. Its roles have been studied mostly in dendrites, and the functions of drebrin in axons are less well understood. In this work we analyzed the role of drebrin, through shRNA-mediated depletion and over-expression, in the collateral branching of chicken embryonic sensory axons. We report that drebrin promotes the formation of axonal filopodia and collateral branches in vivo and in vitro. Live imaging of cytoskeletal dynamics revealed that drebrin promotes the formation of filopodia from precursor structures termed axonal actin patches. Endogenous drebrin localizes to actin patches and depletion studies indicate that drebrin contributes to the development of patches. In filopodia, endogenous drebrin localizes to the proximal portion of the filopodium. Drebrin was found to promote the stability of axonal filopodia and the entry of microtubule plus tips into axonal filopodia. The effects of drebrin on the stabilization of filopodia are independent of its effects on promoting microtubule targeting to filopodia. Inhibition of myosin II induces a redistribution of endogenous drebrin distally into filopodia, and further increases branching in drebrin overexpressing neurons. Finally, a 30 minute treatment with the branch inducing signal nerve growth factor increases the levels of axonal drebrin. The current study determines the specific roles of drebrin in the regulation of the axonal cytoskeleton, and provides evidence that drebrin contributes to the coordination of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton during the initial stages of axon branching. PMID:26731339

  17. The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Axon Guidance in Mossy Fiber Sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2018-01-01

    The question of whether mossy fiber sprouting is epileptogenic has not been resolved; both sprouting-induced recurrent excitatory and inhibitory circuit hypotheses have been experimentally (but not fully) supported. Therefore, whether mossy fiber sprouting is a potential therapeutic target for epilepsy remains under debate. Moreover, the axon guidance mechanisms of mossy fiber sprouting have attracted the interest of neuroscientists. Sprouting of mossy fibers exhibits several uncommon axonal growth features in the basically non-plastic adult brain. For example, robust branching of axonal collaterals arises from pre-existing primary mossy fiber axons. Understanding the branching mechanisms in adulthood may contribute to axonal regeneration therapies in neuroregenerative medicine in which robust axonal re-growth is essential. Additionally, because granule cells are produced throughout life in the neurogenic dentate gyrus, it is interesting to examine whether the mossy fibers of newly generated granule cells follow the pre-existing trajectories of sprouted mossy fibers in the epileptic brain. Understanding these axon guidance mechanisms may contribute to neuron transplantation therapies, for which the incorporation of transplanted neurons into pre-existing neural circuits is essential. Thus, clarifying the axon guidance mechanisms of mossy fiber sprouting could lead to an understanding of central nervous system (CNS) network reorganization and plasticity. Here, we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms of axon guidance in mossy fiber sprouting by discussing mainly in vitro studies. PMID:29896153

  18. Ectopic vesicular glutamate release at the optic nerve head and axon loss in mouse experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Christine T; Sretavan, David W

    2012-11-07

    Although clinical and experimental observations indicate that the optic nerve head (ONH) is a major site of axon degeneration in glaucoma, the mechanisms by which local retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons are injured and damage spreads among axons remain poorly defined. Using a laser-induced ocular hypertension (LIOH) mouse model of glaucoma, we found that within 48 h of intraocular pressure elevation, RGC axon segments within the ONH exhibited ectopic accumulation and colocalization of multiple components of the glutamatergic presynaptic machinery including the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT2, several synaptic vesicle marker proteins, glutamate, the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex and active zone cytomatrix components, as well as ultrastructurally identified, synaptophysin-containing vesicles. Ectopic vesicle exocytosis and glutamate release were detected in acute preparations of the LIOH ONH. Immunolocalization and analysis using the ionotropic receptor channel-permeant cation agmatine indicated that ONH axon segments and glia expressed glutamate receptors, and these receptors were more active after LIOH compared with controls. Pharmacological antagonism of glutamate receptors and neuronal activity resulted in increased RGC axon sparing in vivo. Furthermore, in vivo RGC-specific genetic disruption of the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT2 or the obligatory NMDA receptor subunit NR1 promoted axon survival in experimental glaucoma. As the inhibition of ectopic glutamate vesicular release or glutamate receptivity can independently modify the severity of RGC axon loss, synaptic release mechanisms may provide useful therapeutic entry points into glaucomatous axon degeneration.

  19. NMNAT1 inhibits axon degeneration via blockade of SARM1-mediated NAD+ depletion

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yo; Nakagawa, Takashi; Mao, Xianrong; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1 leads to preservation of injured axons. While increased NAD+ or decreased NMN levels are thought to be critical to this process, the mechanism(s) of this axon protection remain obscure. Using steady-state and flux analysis of NAD+ metabolites in healthy and injured mouse dorsal root ganglion axons, we find that rather than altering NAD+ synthesis, NMNAT1 instead blocks the injury-induced, SARM1-dependent NAD+ consumption that is central to axon degeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19749.001 PMID:27735788

  20. S6 Kinase Inhibits Intrinsic Axon Regeneration Capacity via AMP Kinase in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Thomas; Wu, Zilu; Chisholm, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of axons to regrow after injury is determined by the complex interplay of intrinsic growth programs and external cues. In Caenorhabditis elegans mechanosensory neuron, axons exhibit robust regenerative regrowth following laser axotomy. By surveying conserved metabolic signaling pathways, we have identified the ribosomal S6 kinase RSKS-1 as a new cell-autonomous inhibitor of axon regeneration. RSKS-1 is not required for axonal development but inhibits axon regrowth after injury in multiple neuron types. Loss of function in rsks-1 results in more rapid growth cone formation after injury and accelerates subsequent axon extension. The enhanced regrowth of rsks-1 mutants is partly dependent on the DLK-1 MAPK cascade. An essential output of RSKS-1 in axon regrowth is the metabolic sensor AMP kinase, AAK-2. We further show that the antidiabetic drug phenformin, which activates AMP kinase, can promote axon regrowth. Our data reveal a new function for an S6 kinase acting through an AMP kinase in regenerative growth of injured axons. PMID:24431434

  1. GSK3 controls axon growth via CLASP-mediated regulation of growth cone microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Eun-Mi; Saijilafu; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kim, Seong-Jin; Xu, Wen-Lin; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Suppression of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) activity in neurons yields pleiotropic outcomes, causing both axon growth promotion and inhibition. Previous studies have suggested that specific GSK3 substrates, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), support axon growth by regulating the stability of axonal microtubules (MTs), but the substrate(s) and mechanisms conveying axon growth inhibition remain elusive. Here we show that CLIP (cytoplasmic linker protein)-associated protein (CLASP), originally identified as a MT plus end-binding protein, displays both plus end-binding and lattice-binding activities in nerve growth cones, and reveal that the two MT-binding activities regulate axon growth in an opposing manner: The lattice-binding activity mediates axon growth inhibition induced by suppression of GSK3 activity via preventing MT protrusion into the growth cone periphery, whereas the plus end-binding property supports axon extension via stabilizing the growing ends of axonal MTs. We propose a model in which CLASP transduces GSK3 activity levels to differentially control axon growth by coordinating the stability and configuration of growth cone MTs. PMID:21937714

  2. Limits to the capacity of transplants of olfactory glia to promote axonal regrowth in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gudiño-Cabrera, G; Pastor, A M; de la Cruz, R R; Delgado-García, J M; Nieto-Sampedro, M

    2000-02-28

    Olfactory bulb ensheathing cell (OBEC) transplants promoted axonal regeneration in the spinal cord dorsal root entry zone and in the corticospinal tract. However, OBECs failed to promote abducens internuclear neuron axon regeneration when transplanted at the site of nerve fibre transection. In experiments performed in both cats and rats, OBECs survived for up to 2 months, lining themselves up along the portion of the regrowing axons proximal to the interneuron cell body. However, OBECs migrated preferentially towards abducens somata, in the direction opposite to the oculomotor nucleus target. OBECs seem to promote nerve fibre regeneration only where preferred direction of glial migration coincides with the direction of axonal growth towards its target.

  3. Biomarker evidence of axonal injury in neuroasymptomatic HIV-1 patients.

    PubMed

    Jessen Krut, Jan; Mellberg, Tomas; Price, Richard W; Hagberg, Lars; Fuchs, Dietmar; Rosengren, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Gisslén, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 infected patients is reported to be high. Whether this is a result of active HIV-related neurodegeneration is unclear. We examined axonal injury in HIV-1 patients by measuring the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL) in CSF with a novel, sensitive method. With a cross-sectional design, CSF concentrations of neurofilament protein light (NFL) (marker of neuronal injury), neopterin (intrathecal immunoactivation) and CSF/Plasma albumin ratio (blood-brain barrier integrity) were analyzed on CSF from 252 HIV-infected patients, subdivided into untreated neuroasymptomatics (n = 200), HIV-associated dementia (HAD) (n = 14) and on combinations antiretroviral treatment (cART) (n = 85), and healthy controls (n = 204). 46 HIV-infected patients were included in both treated and untreated groups, but sampled at different timepoints. Furthermore, 78 neuroasymptomatic patients were analyzed before and after treatment initiation. While HAD patients had the highest NFL concentrations, elevated CSF NFL was also found in 33% of untreated neuroasymptomatic patients, mainly in those with blood CD4+ cell counts below 250 cells/μL. CSF NFL concentrations in the untreated neuroasymptomatics and treated groups were equivalent to controls 18.5 and 3.9 years older, respectively. Neopterin correlated with NFL levels in untreated groups while the albumin ratio correlated with NFL in both untreated and treated groups. Increased CSF NFL indicates ongoing axonal injury in many neuroasymptomatic patients. Treatment decreases NFL, but treated patients retain higher levels than controls, indicating either continued virus-related injury or an aging-like effect of HIV infection. NFL correlates with neopterin and albumin ratio, suggesting an association between axonal injury, neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability. NFL appears to be a sensitive biomarker of subclinical and clinical brain injury in HIV and warrants further

  4. Biomarker Evidence of Axonal Injury in Neuroasymptomatic HIV-1 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Price, Richard W.; Hagberg, Lars; Fuchs, Dietmar; Rosengren, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Gisslén, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 infected patients is reported to be high. Whether this is a result of active HIV-related neurodegeneration is unclear. We examined axonal injury in HIV-1 patients by measuring the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL) in CSF with a novel, sensitive method. Methods With a cross-sectional design, CSF concentrations of neurofilament protein light (NFL) (marker of neuronal injury), neopterin (intrathecal immunoactivation) and CSF/Plasma albumin ratio (blood-brain barrier integrity) were analyzed on CSF from 252 HIV-infected patients, subdivided into untreated neuroasymptomatics (n = 200), HIV-associated dementia (HAD) (n = 14) and on combinations antiretroviral treatment (cART) (n = 85), and healthy controls (n = 204). 46 HIV-infected patients were included in both treated and untreated groups, but sampled at different timepoints. Furthermore, 78 neuroasymptomatic patients were analyzed before and after treatment initiation. Results While HAD patients had the highest NFL concentrations, elevated CSF NFL was also found in 33% of untreated neuroasymptomatic patients, mainly in those with blood CD4+ cell counts below 250 cells/μL. CSF NFL concentrations in the untreated neuroasymptomatics and treated groups were equivalent to controls 18.5 and 3.9 years older, respectively. Neopterin correlated with NFL levels in untreated groups while the albumin ratio correlated with NFL in both untreated and treated groups. Conclusions Increased CSF NFL indicates ongoing axonal injury in many neuroasymptomatic patients. Treatment decreases NFL, but treated patients retain higher levels than controls, indicating either continued virus-related injury or an aging-like effect of HIV infection. NFL correlates with neopterin and albumin ratio, suggesting an association between axonal injury, neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability. NFL appears to be a sensitive biomarker of subclinical and

  5. Excitability properties of motor axons in adults with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Cliff S.; Zhou, Ping; Marciniak, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a permanent disorder caused by a lesion to the developing brain that significantly impairs motor function. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying motor impairment are not well understood. Specifically, few have addressed whether motoneuron or peripheral axon properties are altered in CP, even though disruption of descending inputs to the spinal cord may cause them to change. In the present study, we have compared nerve excitability properties in seven adults with CP and fourteen healthy controls using threshold tracking techniques by stimulating the median nerve at the wrist and recording the compound muscle action potential over the abductor pollicis brevis. The excitability properties in the CP subjects were found to be abnormal. Early and late depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus was significantly larger (i.e., fanning out), and resting current–threshold (I/V) slope was smaller, in CP compared to control. In addition resting threshold and rheobase tended to be larger in CP. According to a modeling analysis of the data, an increase in leakage current under or through the myelin sheath, i.e., the Barrett–Barrett conductance, combined with a slight hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential, best explained the group differences in excitability properties. There was a trend for those with greater impairment in gross motor function to have more abnormal axon properties. The findings indicate plasticity of motor axon properties far removed from the site of the lesion. We suspect that this plasticity is caused by disruption of descending inputs to the motoneurons at an early age around the time of their injury. PMID:26089791

  6. Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Motor Neuronal Death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Yuta; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Watanabe, Keisuke; Amino, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Wide-spread fasciculations are a characteristic feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting motor axonal hyperexcitability. Previous excitability studies have shown increased nodal persistent sodium conductances and decreased potassium currents in motor axons of ALS patients, both of the changes inducing hyperexcitability. Altered axonal excitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, but the relationship of the extent of motor neuronal death and abnormal excitability has not been fully elucidated. We performed multiple nerve excitability measurements in the median nerve at the wrist of 140 ALS patients and analyzed the relationship of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude (index of motor neuronal loss) and excitability indices, such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, recovery cycle and current-threshold relationships. Compared to age-matched normal controls (n = 44), ALS patients (n = 140) had longer strength-duration time constant (SDTC: a measure of nodal persistent sodium current; p < 0.05), greater threshold changes in depolarizing threshold electrotonus (p < 0.05) and depolarizing current threshold relationship (i.e. less accommodation; (p < 0.05), greater superexcitability (a measure of fast potassium current; p < 0.05) and reduced late subexcitability (a measure of slow potassium current; p < 0.05), suggesting increased persistent sodium currents and decreased potassium currents. The reduced potassium currents were found even in the patient subgroups with normal CMAP (> 5mV). Regression analyses showed that SDTC (R = -0.22) and depolarizing threshold electrotonus (R = -0.22) increased with CMAP decline. These findings suggest that motor nerve hyperexcitability occurs in the early stage of the disease, and precedes motor neuronal loss in ALS. Modulation of altered ion channel function could be a treatment option for ALS. PMID:27383069

  7. Pathophysiologic insights into motor axonal function in Kennedy disease.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2007-11-06

    Kennedy disease (KD), or spinobulbomuscular atrophy, is a slowly progressive inherited neurodegenerative disorder, marked by prominent fasciculations that typically precede the development of other symptoms. Although the genetic basis of KD relates to triplet (CAG) repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene on the X chromosome, the mechanisms underlying the clinical presentation in KD have yet to be established. Consequently, the present study applied axonal excitability techniques to investigate the pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with KD. Peripheral nerve excitability studies were undertaken in 7 patients with KD with compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) recorded from the right abductor pollicis brevis. Strength-duration time constant (KD 0.54 +/- 0.03 msec; controls, 0.41 +/- 0.02 msec, p < 0.01) and the hyperpolarizing current/threshold gradient (KD 0.42 +/- 0.01; controls, 0.37 +/- 0.01, p < 0.05) were significantly increased in KD. Strength-duration time constant correlated with the CMAP amplitude (R = 0.68) and the fasciculation frequency (R = 0.62). Threshold electrotonus revealed greater changes in response to subthreshold depolarizing (KD TEd [90 to 100 msec], 50.75 +/- 1.98%; controls TEd [90 to 100 msec], 45.67 +/- 0.67%, p < 0.01) and hyperpolarizing (KD TEh [90 to 100 msec], 128.5 +/- 6.9%; controls TEh [90 to 100 msec], 120.5 +/- 2.4%) conditioning pulses. Measurements of refractoriness, superexcitability, and late subexcitability changed appropriately for axonal hyperpolarization, perhaps reflecting the effects of increased ectopic activity. In total, the increase in the strength-duration time constant may be the primary event, occurring early in course of the disease, contributing to the development of axonal hyperexcitability in Kennedy disease, and thereby to the generation of fasciculations, a characteristic hallmark of the disease.

  8. Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy in a Child With Atypical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Seung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) is a variant of Guillain–Barre syndrome. It has been reported to have no sensory symptoms and is diagnosed by typical electrophysiological findings of low-amplitude or unobtainable compound muscle action potentials with normal sensory nerve action potentials. However, the authors experienced atypical case of general electrophysiological findings of AMAN with pain and paresthesia and presented it. This case implies that clinician should be on the alert to atypical sensory symptoms from the classical presentation of AMAN even if the patient is diagnosed with AMAN electrophysiologically and should consider proper treatment options based on clinical presentations. PMID:25621680

  9. Sim1 is required for the migration and axonal projections of V3 interneurons in the developing mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Blacklaws, Jake; Deska-Gauthier, Dylan; Jones, Christopher T; Petracca, Yanina L; Liu, Mingwei; Zhang, Han; Fawcett, James P; Glover, Joel C; Lanuza, Guillermo M; Zhang, Ying

    2015-09-01

    V3 spinal interneurons (INs) are a group of excitatory INs that play a crucial role in producing balanced and stable gaits in vertebrate animals. In the developing mouse spinal cord, V3 INs arise from the most ventral progenitor domain and form anatomically distinctive subpopulations in adult spinal cords. They are marked by the expression of transcription factor Sim1 postmitotically, but the function of Sim1 in V3 development remains unknown. Here, we used Sim1(Cre) ;tdTomato mice to trace the fate of V3 INs in a Sim1 mutant versus control genetic background during development. In Sim1 mutants, V3 INs are produced normally and maintain a similar position and organization as in wild types before E12.5. Further temporal analysis revealed that the V3 INs in the mutants failed to migrate properly to form V3 subgroups along the dorsoventral axis of the spinal cord. At birth, in the Sim1 mutant the number of V3 INs in the ventral subgroup was normal, but they were significantly reduced in the dorsal subgroup with a concomitant increase in the intermediate subgroup. Retrograde labeling at lumbar level revealed that loss of Sim1 led to a reduction in extension of contralateral axon projections both at E14.5 and P0 without affecting ipsilateral axon projections. These results demonstrate that Sim1 is essential for proper migration and the guidance of commissural axons of the spinal V3 INs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Sigma-1 receptor regulates Tau phosphorylation and axon extension by shaping p35 turnover via myristic acid

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A.; Pokrass, Michael J.; Klauer, Neal R.; Nohara, Hiroshi; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) per relative concentrations of its activators p35 and p25 is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. P35 has a short t½ and undergoes rapid proteasomal degradation in its membrane-bound myristoylated form. P35 is converted by calpain to p25, which, along with an extended t½, promotes aberrant activation of cdk5 and causes abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, thus leading to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is implicated in neuronal survival. However, the specific role of the Sig-1R in neurodegeneration is unclear. Here we found that Sig-1Rs regulate proper tau phosphorylation and axon extension by promoting p35 turnover through the receptor’s interaction with myristic acid. In Sig-1R–KO neurons, a greater accumulation of p35 is seen, which results from neither elevated transcription of p35 nor disrupted calpain activity, but rather to the slower degradation of p35. In contrast, Sig-1R overexpression causes a decrease of p35. Sig-1R–KO neurons exhibit shorter axons with lower densities. Myristic acid is found here to bind Sig-1R as an agonist that causes the dissociation of Sig-1R from its cognate partner binding immunoglobulin protein. Remarkably, treatment of Sig-1R–KO neurons with exogenous myristic acid mitigates p35 accumulation, diminishes tau phosphorylation, and restores axon elongation. Our results define the involvement of Sig-1Rs in neurodegeneration and provide a mechanistic explanation that Sig-1Rs help maintain proper tau phosphorylation by potentially carrying and providing myristic acid to p35 for enhanced p35 degradation to circumvent the formation of overreactive cdk5/p25. PMID:25964330

  11. Sigma-1 receptor regulates Tau phosphorylation and axon extension by shaping p35 turnover via myristic acid.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Pokrass, Michael J; Klauer, Neal R; Nohara, Hiroshi; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-05-26

    Dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) per relative concentrations of its activators p35 and p25 is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. P35 has a short t½ and undergoes rapid proteasomal degradation in its membrane-bound myristoylated form. P35 is converted by calpain to p25, which, along with an extended t½, promotes aberrant activation of cdk5 and causes abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, thus leading to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is implicated in neuronal survival. However, the specific role of the Sig-1R in neurodegeneration is unclear. Here we found that Sig-1Rs regulate proper tau phosphorylation and axon extension by promoting p35 turnover through the receptor's interaction with myristic acid. In Sig-1R-KO neurons, a greater accumulation of p35 is seen, which results from neither elevated transcription of p35 nor disrupted calpain activity, but rather to the slower degradation of p35. In contrast, Sig-1R overexpression causes a decrease of p35. Sig-1R-KO neurons exhibit shorter axons with lower densities. Myristic acid is found here to bind Sig-1R as an agonist that causes the dissociation of Sig-1R from its cognate partner binding immunoglobulin protein. Remarkably, treatment of Sig-1R-KO neurons with exogenous myristic acid mitigates p35 accumulation, diminishes tau phosphorylation, and restores axon elongation. Our results define the involvement of Sig-1Rs in neurodegeneration and provide a mechanistic explanation that Sig-1Rs help maintain proper tau phosphorylation by potentially carrying and providing myristic acid to p35 for enhanced p35 degradation to circumvent the formation of overreactive cdk5/p25.

  12. Relationship of acute axonal damage, Wallerian degeneration, and clinical disability in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailender; Dallenga, Tobias; Winkler, Anne; Roemer, Shanu; Maruschak, Brigitte; Siebert, Heike; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2017-03-17

    Axonal damage and loss substantially contribute to the incremental accumulation of clinical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis. Here, we assessed the amount of Wallerian degeneration in brain tissue of multiple sclerosis patients in relation to demyelinating lesion activity and asked whether a transient blockade of Wallerian degeneration decreases axonal loss and clinical disability in a mouse model of inflammatory demyelination. Wallerian degeneration and acute axonal damage were determined immunohistochemically in the periplaque white matter of multiple sclerosis patients with early actively demyelinating lesions, chronic active lesions, and inactive lesions. Furthermore, we studied the effects of Wallerian degeneration blockage on clinical severity, inflammatory pathology, acute axonal damage, and long-term axonal loss in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis using Wallerian degeneration slow (Wld S ) mutant mice. The highest numbers of axons undergoing Wallerian degeneration were found in the perilesional white matter of multiple sclerosis patients early in the disease course and with actively demyelinating lesions. Furthermore, Wallerian degeneration was more abundant in patients harboring chronic active as compared to chronic inactive lesions. No co-localization of neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptor, a bona fide immunohistochemical marker of Wallerian degeneration, with amyloid precursor protein, frequently used as an indicator of acute axonal transport disturbance, was observed in human and mouse tissue, indicating distinct axon-degenerative processes. Experimentally, a delay of Wallerian degeneration, as observed in Wld S mice, did not result in a reduction of clinical disability or acute axonal damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, further supporting that acute axonal damage as reflected by axonal transport disturbances does not share common molecular mechanisms with Wallerian degeneration. Furthermore, delaying Wallerian degeneration

  13. Neuron-to-neuron transmission of α-synuclein fibrils through axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Freundt, Eric C.; Maynard, Nate; Clancy, Eileen K.; Roy, Shyamali; Bousset, Luc; Sourigues, Yannick; Covert, Markus; Melki, Ronald; Kirkegaard, Karla; Brahic, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Objective The lesions of Parkinson's disease spread through the brain in a characteristic pattern that corresponds to axonal projections. Previous observations suggest that misfolded α-synuclein could behave as a prion, moving from neuron to neuron and causing endogenous α-synuclein to misfold. Here, we characterized and quantified the axonal transport of α-synuclein fibrils and showed that fibrils could be transferred from axons to second-order neurons following anterograde transport. Methods We grew primary cortical mouse neurons in microfluidic devices to separate soma from axonal projections in fluidically isolated microenvironments. We used live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence to characterize the transport of fluorescent α-synuclein fibrils and their transfer to second-order neurons. Results Fibrillar α-synuclein was internalized by primary neurons and transported in axons with kinetics consistent with slow component-b of axonal transport (fast axonal transport with saltatory movement). Fibrillar α-synuclein was readily observed in the cell bodies of second-order neurons following anterograde axonal transport. Axon-to-soma transfer appeared not to require synaptic contacts. Interpretation These results support the hypothesis that the progression of Parkinson's disease can be caused by neuron-to-neuron spread of α-synuclein aggregates and that the anatomical pattern of progression of lesions between axonally connected areas results from the axonal transport of such aggregates. That the transfer did not appear to be transsynaptic gives hope that α-synuclein fibrils could be intercepted by drugs during the extra-cellular phase of their journey. PMID:23109146

  14. Innervation of the Uvea by Galanin and Somatostatin Immunoreactive Axons in Macaques and Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Sally I.; Kaufman, Paul L.; De Jean, Baptiste J.; Byers, John M.; Marshak, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has not been localized previously in the primate uvea, and the neuropeptide somatostatin has not been localized in the uvea of any mammal. Here, the distribution of galanin-like and somatostatin-like immunoreactive axons in the iris, ciliary body and choroid of macaques and baboons using double and triple immunofluorescence labeling techniques and confocal microscopy was reported. In the ciliary body, galanin-like immunoreactive axons innervated blood vessels and the ciliary processes, particularly at their bases. In the iris, the majority of these axons was associated with the loose connective tissue in the stroma. Somatostatin-like immunoreactive axons were found in many of the same areas of the uvea supplied by cholinergic nerves. In the ciliary body, there were labelled axons within the ciliary processes and ciliary muscle. They were also found alongside blood vessels in the ciliary stroma. In the iris, somatostatin-like immunoreactive axons were abundant in the sphincter muscle and less so in the dilator muscle. A unilateral sympathectomy had no effect on the distribution of somatostatin-like or galanin-like immunoreactive axons, and these axons did not contain the sympathetic marker tyrosine hydroxylase. They did not contain the parasympathetic marker choline acetyltransferase, either. The galanin-like immunoreactive axons contained other neuropeptides found in sensory nerves, including calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P and cholecystokinin. Somatostatin-like immunoreactive axons did not contain any of these sensory neuropeptides or galanin-like immunoreactivity, and they were neither labelled with an antibody to 200 kDa neurofilament protein, nor did they bind isolectin-IB4. Nevertheless, they are likely to be of sensory origin because somatostatin-like immunoreactive perikarya have previously been localized in the trigeminal ganglion of primates. Taken together, these findings indicate galanin and somatostatin are present

  15. BrainPhys® increases neurofilament levels in CNS cultures, and facilitates investigation of axonal damage after a mechanical stretch-injury in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Travis C; Kotermanski, Shawn E; Jackson, Edwin K; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2018-02-01

    Neurobasal®/B27 is a gold standard culture media used to study primary neurons in vitro. An alternative media (BrainPhys®/SM1) was recently developed which robustly enhances neuronal activity vs. Neurobasal® or DMEM. To the best of our knowledge BrainPhys® has not been explored in the setting of neuronal injury. Here we characterized the utility of BrainPhys® in a model of in vitro mechanical-stretch injury. Primary rat cortical neurons were maintained in classic Neurobasal®, or sequentially maintained in Neurocult® followed by BrainPhys® (hereafter simply referred to as "BrainPhys® maintained neurons"). The levels of axonal markers and proteins involved in neurotransmission were compared on day in vitro 10 (DIV10). BrainPhys® maintained neurons had higher levels of GluN2B, GluR1, Neurofilament light/heavy chain (NF-L & NF-H), and protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A) vs. neurons in Neurobasal®. Mechanical stretch-injury (50ms/54% biaxial stretch) to BrainPhys® maintained neurons modestly (albeit significantly) increased 24h lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels but markedly decreased axonal NF-L levels post-injury vs. uninjured controls or neurons given a milder 38% stretch-injury. Furthermore, two 54% stretch-injuries (in tandem) exacerbated 24h LDH release, increased α-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), and decreased Tau levels. Also, BrainPhys® maintained cultures had decreased markers of cell damage 24h after a single 54% stretch-injury vs. neurons in Neurobasal®. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that lentivirus mediated overexpression of the pro-death protein RBM5 exacerbates neuronal and/or axonal injury in primary CNS cultures. RBM5 overexpression vs. empty-vector controls increased 24h LDH release, and SBDP levels, after a single 54% stretch-injury but did not affect NF-L levels or Tau. BrainPhys® is a promising new reagent which facilities the investigation of molecular targets involved in axonal and/or neuronal injury in vitro. Copyright © 2017

  16. Amyloid pathology and axonal injury after brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Gregory; Ramlackhansingh, Anil F.; Edison, Paul; Hellyer, Peter; Cole, James; Veronese, Mattia; Leech, Rob; Greenwood, Richard J.; Turkheimer, Federico E.; Gentleman, Steve M.; Heckemann, Rolf A.; Matthews, Paul M.; Brooks, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To image β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque burden in long-term survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI), test whether traumatic axonal injury and Aβ are correlated, and compare the spatial distribution of Aβ to Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Patients 11 months to 17 years after moderate–severe TBI underwent 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB)-PET, structural and diffusion MRI, and neuropsychological examination. Healthy aged controls and patients with AD underwent PET and structural MRI. Binding potential (BPND) images of 11C-PiB, which index Aβ plaque density, were computed using an automatic reference region extraction procedure. Voxelwise and regional differences in BPND were assessed. In TBI, a measure of white matter integrity, fractional anisotropy, was estimated and correlated with 11C-PiB BPND. Results: Twenty-eight participants (9 with TBI, 9 controls, 10 with AD) were assessed. Increased 11C-PiB BPND was found in TBI vs controls in the posterior cingulate cortex and cerebellum. Binding in the posterior cingulate cortex increased with decreasing fractional anisotropy of associated white matter tracts and increased with time since injury. Compared to AD, binding after TBI was lower in neocortical regions but increased in the cerebellum. Conclusions: Increased Aβ burden was observed in TBI. The distribution overlaps with, but is distinct from, that of AD. This suggests a mechanistic link between TBI and the development of neuropathologic features of dementia, which may relate to axonal damage produced by the injury. PMID:26843562

  17. MEMBRANE POTENTIAL OF THE SQUID GIANT AXON DURING CURRENT FLOW

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kenneth S.; Curtis, Howard J.

    1941-01-01

    The squid giant axon was placed in a shallow narrow trough and current was sent in at two electrodes in opposite sides of the trough and out at a third electrode several centimeters away. The potential difference across the membrane was measured between an inside fine capillary electrode with its tip in the axoplasm between the pair of polarizing electrodes, and an outside capillary electrode with its tip flush with the surface of one polarizing electrode. The initial transient was roughly exponential at the anode make and damped oscillatory at the sub-threshold cathode make with the action potential arising from the first maximum when threshold was reached. The constant change of membrane potential, after the initial transient, was measured as a function of the total polarizing current and from these data the membrane potential is obtained as a function of the membrane current density. The absolute value of the resting membrane resistance approached at low polarizing currents is about 23 ohm cm.2. This low value is considered to be a result of the puncture of the axon. The membrane was found to be an excellent rectifier with a ratio of about one hundred between the high resistance at the anode and the low resistance at the cathode for the current range investigated. On the assumption that the membrane conductance is a measure of its ion permeability, these experiments show an increase of ion permeability under a cathode and a decrease under an anode. PMID:19873234

  18. Overexpression of mutant HSP27 causes axonal neuropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinho; Jung, Sung-Chul; Joo, Jaesoon; Choi, Yu-Ri; Moon, Hyo Won; Kwak, Geon; Yeo, Ha Kyung; Lee, Ji-Su; Ahn, Hye-Jee; Jung, Namhee; Hwang, Sunhee; Rheey, Jingeun; Woo, So-Youn; Kim, Ji Yon; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2015-06-19

    Mutations in heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSP27 or HSPB1) cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 F (CMT2F) according to unknown factors. Mutant HSP27 proteins affect axonal transport by reducing acetylated tubulin. We generated a transgenic mouse model overexpressing HSP27-S135F mutant protein driven by Cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early promoter. The mouse phenotype was similar to dHMN patients in that they exhibit motor neuropathy. To determine the phenotypic aberration of transgenic mice, behavior test, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electrophysiological study, and pathology were performed. Rotarod test showed that founder mice exhibited lowered motor performance. MRI also revealed marked fatty infiltration in the anterior and posterior compartments at calf level. Electrophysiologically, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) but not motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) was reduced in the transgenic mice. Toluidine staining with semi-thin section of sciatic nerve showed the ratio of large myelinated axon fiber was reduced, which might cause reduced locomotion in the transgenic mice. Electron microscopy also revealed abundant aberrant myelination. Immunohistochemically, neuronal dysfunctions included elevated level of phosphorylated neurofilament and reduced level of acetylated tubulin in the sural nerve of transgenic mice. There was no additional phenotype besides motor neuronal defects. Overexpression of HSP27-S135F protein causes peripheral neuropathy. The mouse model can be applied to future development of therapeutic strategies for dHMN or CMT2F.

  19. Amyloid pathology and axonal injury after brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gregory; Ramlackhansingh, Anil F; Edison, Paul; Hellyer, Peter; Cole, James; Veronese, Mattia; Leech, Rob; Greenwood, Richard J; Turkheimer, Federico E; Gentleman, Steve M; Heckemann, Rolf A; Matthews, Paul M; Brooks, David J; Sharp, David J

    2016-03-01

    To image β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque burden in long-term survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI), test whether traumatic axonal injury and Aβ are correlated, and compare the spatial distribution of Aβ to Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients 11 months to 17 years after moderate-severe TBI underwent (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PiB)-PET, structural and diffusion MRI, and neuropsychological examination. Healthy aged controls and patients with AD underwent PET and structural MRI. Binding potential (BPND) images of (11)C-PiB, which index Aβ plaque density, were computed using an automatic reference region extraction procedure. Voxelwise and regional differences in BPND were assessed. In TBI, a measure of white matter integrity, fractional anisotropy, was estimated and correlated with (11)C-PiB BPND. Twenty-eight participants (9 with TBI, 9 controls, 10 with AD) were assessed. Increased (11)C-PiB BPND was found in TBI vs controls in the posterior cingulate cortex and cerebellum. Binding in the posterior cingulate cortex increased with decreasing fractional anisotropy of associated white matter tracts and increased with time since injury. Compared to AD, binding after TBI was lower in neocortical regions but increased in the cerebellum. Increased Aβ burden was observed in TBI. The distribution overlaps with, but is distinct from, that of AD. This suggests a mechanistic link between TBI and the development of neuropathologic features of dementia, which may relate to axonal damage produced by the injury. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Axonal transports of tripeptidyl peptidase II in rat sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Maki; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Kato, Takeshi; Hojo, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Axonal transport of tripeptidyl peptidase II, a putative cholecystokinin inactivating serine peptidase, was examined in the proximal, middle, and distal segments of rat sciatic nerves using a double ligation technique. Enzyme activity significantly increased not only in the proximal segment but also in the distal segment 12-72h after ligation, and the maximal enzyme activity was found in the proximal and distal segments at 72h. Western blot analysis of tripeptidyl peptidase II showed that its immunoreactivities in the proximal and distal segments were 3.1- and 1.7-fold higher than that in the middle segment. The immunohistochemical analysis of the segments also showed an increase in immunoreactive tripeptidyl peptidase II level in the proximal and distal segments in comparison with that in the middle segment, indicating that tripeptidyl peptidase II is transported by anterograde and retrograde axonal flow. The results suggest that tripeptidyl peptidase II may be involved in the metabolism of neuropeptides in nerve terminals or synaptic clefts.

  1. Profiling biomarkers of traumatic axonal injury: From mouse to man.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, Susruta; Makwana, Milan; Ahmed, Aminul Islam; Zaben, Malik

    2018-05-18

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) poses a major public health problem on a global scale. Its burden results from high mortality and significant morbidity in survivors. This stems, in part, from an ongoing inadequacy in diagnostic and prognostic indicators despite significant technological advances. Traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is a key driver of the ongoing pathological process following TBI, causing chronic neurological deficits and disability. The science underpinning biomarkers of TAI has been a subject of many reviews in recent literature. However, in this review we provide a comprehensive account of biomarkers from animal models to clinical studies, bridging the gap between experimental science and clinical medicine. We have discussed pathogenesis, temporal kinetics, relationships to neuro-imaging, and, most importantly, clinical applicability in order to provide a holistic perspective of how this could improve TBI diagnosis and predict clinical outcome in a real-life setting. We conclude that early and reliable identification of axonal injury post-TBI with the help of body fluid biomarkers could enhance current care of TBI patients by (i) increasing speed and accuracy of diagnosis, (ii) providing invaluable prognostic information, (iii) allow efficient allocation of rehabilitation services, and (iv) provide potential therapeutic targets. The optimal model for assessing TAI is likely to involve multiple components, including several blood biomarkers and neuro-imaging modalities, at different time points. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Nociceptive DRG neurons express muscle lim protein upon axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Levin, Evgeny; Andreadaki, Anastasia; Gobrecht, Philipp; Bosse, Frank; Fischer, Dietmar

    2017-04-04

    Muscle lim protein (MLP) has long been regarded as a cytosolic and nuclear muscular protein. Here, we show that MLP is also expressed in a subpopulation of adult rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in response to axonal injury, while the protein was not detectable in naïve cells. Detailed immunohistochemical analysis of L4/L5 DRG revealed ~3% of MLP-positive neurons 2 days after complete sciatic nerve crush and maximum ~10% after 4-14 days. Similarly, in mixed cultures from cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral DRG ~6% of neurons were MLP-positive after 2 days and maximal 17% after 3 days. In both, histological sections and cell cultures, the protein was detected in the cytosol and axons of small diameter cells, while the nucleus remained devoid. Moreover, the vast majority could not be assigned to any of the well characterized canonical DRG subpopulations at 7 days after nerve injury. However, further analysis in cell culture revealed that the largest population of MLP expressing cells originated from non-peptidergic IB4-positive nociceptive neurons, which lose their ability to bind the lectin upon axotomy. Thus, MLP is mostly expressed in a subset of axotomized nociceptive neurons and can be used as a novel marker for this population of cells.

  3. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Biankin, Andrew V.; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David K.; Wilson, Peter J.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K.; Cowley, Mark J.; Gardiner, Brooke B.; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J. Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R. Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L.; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D.; Colvin, Emily K.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphrey, Emily S.; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T.; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Lovell, Jessica A.; Daly, Roger J.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M.; Fisher, William E.; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Hodges, Sally E.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R.; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J.; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E.; Yung, Christina K.; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Mann, Karen M.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Adams, David J.; Largaespada, David A.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Rust, Alistair G.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuveson, David A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Wheeler, David A.; Pearson, John V.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:23103869

  4. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  5. Dscam2 mediates axonal tiling in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Millard, S. Sean; Flanagan, John J.; Pappu, Kartik S.; Wu, Wei; Zipursky, S. Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Sensory processing centres in both the vertebrate and the invertebrate brain are often organized into reiterated columns, thus facilitating an internal topographic representation of the external world. Cells within each column are arranged in a stereotyped fashion and form precise patterns of synaptic connections within discrete layers. These connections are largely confined to a single column, thereby preserving the spatial information from the periphery. Other neurons integrate this information by connecting to multiple columns. Restricting axons to columns is conceptually similar to tiling. Axons and dendrites of neighbouring neurons of the same class use tiling to form complete, yet non-overlapping, receptive fields1-3. It is thought that, at the molecular level, cell-surface proteins mediate tiling through contact-dependent repulsive interactions1,2,4,5, but proteins serving this function have not yet been identified. Here we show that the immunoglobulin superfamily member Dscam2 restricts the connections formed by L1 lamina neurons to columns in the Drosophila visual system. Our data support a model in which Dscam2 homophilic interactions mediate repulsion between neurites of L1 cells in neighbouring columns. We propose that Dscam2 is a tiling receptor for L1 neurons. PMID:17554308

  6. Control of extracellular dopamine at dendrite and axon terminals

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Christopher P.; Gantz, Stephanie C.; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Williams, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons release dopamine from both axons and dendrites. The mechanism underlying release at these different sites has been proposed to differ. This study used electrochemical and electrophysiological methods to compare the time course and calcium-dependence of somatodendritc dopamine release in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to that of axonal dopamine release in the dorsal striatum. The amount of dopamine released in the striatum was ~20 fold greater than in cell body regions of the VTA or SNc. However the calcium dependence and time to peak of the dopamine transients were similar. These results illustrate an unexpected overall similarity in the mechanisms of dopamine release in the striatum and cell body regions. To examine how diffusion regulates the time course of dopamine following release, dextran was added to the extracellular solution to slow diffusion. In the VTA, dextran slowed the rate of rise and fall of the extracellular dopamine transient as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) yet did not alter the kinetics of the dopamine dependent inhibitory post-synaptic current (IPSC). Dextran failed to significantly alter the time course of the rise and fall of the dopamine transient in the striatum suggesting a more influential role for reuptake in the striatum. The conclusion is that the time course of dopamine within the extracellular space of the VTA is dependent on both diffusion and reuptake, whereas the activation of D2-receptors on dopamine neurons is primarily limited by reuptake. PMID:20484639

  7. Immunosuppressive therapy reduces axonal damage in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Markus; Malmeström, Clas; Gunnarsson, Martin; Zetterberg, Henrik; Sundström, Peter; Lycke, Jan; Svenningsson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    In progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS), disease-modifying therapies have not been shown to reduce disability progression. The impact from immunosuppressive therapy in PMS was explored by analyzing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of axonal damage (neurofilament light protein, NFL), astrogliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP), and B-cell regulation (CXCL13). CSF was obtained from 35 patients with PMS before and after 12-24 months of mitoxantrone (n=30) or rituximab (n=5) treatment, and from 14 age-matched healthy control subjects. The levels of NFL, GFAP, and CXCL13 were determined by immunoassays. The mean NFL level decreased by 51% (1781 ng/l, SD 2018 vs. 874 ng/l, SD 694, p=0.007), the mean CXCL13 reduction was 55% (9.71 pg/ml, SD 16.08, vs. 4.37 pg/ml, SD 1.94, p=0.008), while GFAP levels remained unaffected. Subgroup analysis showed that the NFL reduction was confined to previously untreated patients (n=20) and patients with Gd-enhancing lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (n=12) prior to study baseline. Our data imply that 12-24 months of immunosuppressive therapy reduces axonal damage in PMS, particularly in patients with ongoing disease activity. Determination of NFL levels in CSF is a potential surrogate marker for treatment efficacy and as endpoint in phase II trials of MS.

  8. Rapid signaling in distinct dopaminergic axons during locomotion and reward

    PubMed Central

    Howe, MW; Dombeck, DA

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dopaminergic projections from the midbrain to striatum are critical for motor control, as their degeneration in Parkinson’s disease results in profound movement deficits. Paradoxically, most recording methods report rapid phasic dopamine signaling (~100ms bursts) to unpredicted rewards, with little evidence for movement-related signaling. The leading model posits that phasic signaling in striatum targeting dopamine neurons drive reward-based learning, while slow variations in firing (tens of seconds to minutes) in these same neurons bias animals towards or away from movement. However, despite widespread acceptance of this model, current methods have provided little evidence to support or refute it. Here, using new optical recording methods, we report the discovery of rapid phasic signaling in striatum-targeting dopaminergic axons that was associated with, and capable of triggering, locomotion in mice. Axons expressing these signals were largely distinct from those signaling during unexpected rewards. These results suggest that dopaminergic neuromodulation can differentially impact motor control and reward learning with sub-second precision and suggest that both precise signal timing and neuronal subtype are important parameters to consider in the treatment of dopamine-related disorders. PMID:27398617

  9. An ex vivo laser-induced spinal cord injury model to assess mechanisms of axonal degeneration in real-time.

    PubMed

    Okada, Starlyn L M; Stivers, Nicole S; Stys, Peter K; Stirling, David P

    2014-11-25

    Injured CNS axons fail to regenerate and often retract away from the injury site. Axons spared from the initial injury may later undergo secondary axonal degeneration. Lack of growth cone formation, regeneration, and loss of additional myelinated axonal projections within the spinal cord greatly limits neurological recovery following injury. To assess how central myelinated axons of the spinal cord respond to injury, we developed an ex vivo living spinal cord model utilizing transgenic mice that express yellow fluorescent protein in axons and a focal and highly reproducible laser-induced spinal cord injury to document the fate of axons and myelin (lipophilic fluorescent dye Nile Red) over time using two-photon excitation time-lapse microscopy. Dynamic processes such as acute axonal injury, axonal retraction, and myelin degeneration are best studied in real-time. However, the non-focal nature of contusion-based injuries and movement artifacts encountered during in vivo spinal cord imaging make differentiating primary and secondary axonal injury responses using high resolution microscopy challenging. The ex vivo spinal cord model described here mimics several aspects of clinically relevant contusion/compression-induced axonal pathologies including axonal swelling, spheroid formation, axonal transection, and peri-axonal swelling providing a useful model to study these dynamic processes in real-time. Major advantages of this model are excellent spatiotemporal resolution that allows differentiation between the primary insult that directly injures axons and secondary injury mechanisms; controlled infusion of reagents directly to the perfusate bathing the cord; precise alterations of the environmental milieu (e.g., calcium, sodium ions, known contributors to axonal injury, but near impossible to manipulate in vivo); and murine models also offer an advantage as they provide an opportunity to visualize and manipulate genetically identified cell populations and subcellular

  10. Bicyclic-Capped Histone Deacetylase 6 Inhibitors with Improved Activity in a Model of Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sida; Benoy, Veronick; Bergman, Joel A; Kalin, Jay H; Frojuello, Mariana; Vistoli, Giulio; Haeck, Wanda; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-02-17

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a disorder of the peripheral nervous system where progressive degeneration of motor and sensory nerves leads to motor problems and sensory loss and for which no pharmacological treatment is available. Recently, it has been shown in a model for the axonal form of CMT that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) can serve as a target for the development of a pharmacological therapy. Therefore, we aimed at developing new selective and activity-specific HDAC6 inhibitors with improved biochemical properties. By utilizing a bicyclic cap as the structural scaffold from which to build upon, we developed several analogues that showed improved potency compared to tubastatin A while maintaining excellent selectivity compared to HDAC1. Further screening in N2a cells examining both the acetylation of α-tubulin and histones narrowed down the library of compounds to three potent and selective HDAC6 inhibitors. In mutant HSPB1-expressing DRG neurons, serving as an in vitro model for CMT2, these inhibitors were able to restore the mitochondrial axonal transport deficits. Combining structure-based development of HDAC6 inhibitors, screening in N2a cells and in a neuronal model for CMT2F, and preliminary ADMET and pharmacokinetic profiles, resulted in the selection of compound 23d that possesses improved biochemical, functional, and druglike properties compared to tubastatin A.

  11. Shank3 is localized in axons and presynaptic specializations of developing hippocampal neurons and involved in the modulation of NMDA receptor levels at axon terminals.

    PubMed

    Halbedl, Sonja; Schoen, Michael; Feiler, Marisa S; Boeckers, Tobias M; Schmeisser, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Autism-related Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3 are major postsynaptic scaffold proteins of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. A few studies, however, have already indicated that within a neuron, the presence of Shank family members is not limited to the postsynaptic density. By separating axons from dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons in microfluidic chambers, we show that RNA of all three Shank family members is present within axons. Immunostaining confirms these findings as all three Shanks are indeed found within separated axons and further co-localize with well-known proteins of the presynaptic specialization in axon terminals. Therefore, Shank proteins might not only serve as postsynaptic scaffold proteins, but also play a crucial role during axonal outgrowth and presynaptic development and function. This is supported by our findings that shRNA-mediated knockdown of Shank3 results in up-regulation of the NMDA receptor subunit GluN1 in axon terminals. Taken together, our findings will have major implications for the future analysis of neuronal Shank biology in both health and disease. Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3 are major postsynaptic scaffold proteins of excitatory glutamatergic synapses strongly related to several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, a few studies have already implicated a functional role of the Shanks beyond the postsynaptic density (PSD). We here show that all three Shanks are localized in both axons and pre-synaptic specializiations of developing hippocampal neurons in culture. We further provide evidence that Shank3 is involved in the modulation of NMDA receptor levels at axon terminals. Taken together, our study will open up novel avenues for the future analysis of neuronal Shank biology in both health and disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Integration of Shallow Gradients of Shh and Netrin-1 Guides Commissural Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Tyler F. W.; Qasaimeh, Mohammad A.; Juncker, David; Yam, Patricia T.; Charron, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    During nervous system development, gradients of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Netrin-1 attract growth cones of commissural axons toward the floor plate of the embryonic spinal cord. Mice defective for either Shh or Netrin-1 signaling have commissural axon guidance defects, suggesting that both Shh and Netrin-1 are required for correct axon guidance. However, how Shh and Netrin-1 collaborate to guide axons is not known. We first quantified the steepness of the Shh gradient in the spinal cord and found that it is mostly very shallow. We then developed an in vitro microfluidic guidance assay to simulate these shallow gradients. We found that axons of dissociated commissural neurons respond to steep but not shallow gradients of Shh or Netrin-1. However, when we presented axons with combined Shh and Netrin-1 gradients, they had heightened sensitivity to the guidance cues, turning in response to shallower gradients that were unable to guide axons when only one cue was present. Furthermore, these shallow gradients polarized growth cone Src-family kinase (SFK) activity only when Shh and Netrin-1 were combined, indicating that SFKs can integrate the two guidance cues. Together, our results indicate that Shh and Netrin-1 synergize to enable growth cones to sense shallow gradients in regions of the spinal cord where the steepness of a single guidance cue is insufficient to guide axons, and we identify a novel type of synergy that occurs when the steepness (and not the concentration) of a guidance cue is limiting. PMID:25826604

  13. CD8+ T Cells Cause Disability and Axon Loss in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schmalstieg, William F.; Sauer, Brian M.; Wang, Huan; German, Christopher L.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Rodriguez, Moses; Howe, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells directly mediate motor disability and axon injury in the demyelinated central nervous system. We have previously observed that genetic deletion of the CD8+ T cell effector molecule perforin leads to preservation of motor function and preservation of spinal axons in chronically demyelinated mice. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine if CD8+ T cells are necessary and sufficient to directly injure demyelinated axons, we adoptively transferred purified perforin-competent CD8+ spinal cord-infiltrating T cells into profoundly demyelinated but functionally preserved perforin-deficient host mice. Transfer of CD8+ spinal cord-infiltrating T cells rapidly and irreversibly impaired motor function, disrupted spinal cord motor conduction, and reduced the number of medium- and large-caliber spinal axons. Likewise, immunodepletion of CD8+ T cells from chronically demyelinated wildtype mice preserved motor function and limited axon loss without altering other disease parameters. Conclusions/Significance In multiple sclerosis patients, CD8+ T cells outnumber CD4+ T cells in active lesions and the number of CD8+ T cells correlates with the extent of ongoing axon injury and functional disability. Our findings suggest that CD8+ T cells may directly injure demyelinated axons and are therefore a viable therapeutic target to protect axons and motor function in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:20814579

  14. Spastin, atlastin, and ER relocalization are involved in axon but not dendrite regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kavitha; Stone, Michelle C.; Weiner, Alexis T.; Gheres, Kyle W.; Zhou, Chaoming; Deitcher, David L.; Levitan, Edwin S.; Rolls, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in >50 genes, including spastin and atlastin, lead to hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We previously demonstrated that reduction of spastin leads to a deficit in axon regeneration in a Drosophila model. Axon regeneration was similarly impaired in neurons when HSP proteins atlastin, seipin, and spichthyin were reduced. Impaired regeneration was dependent on genetic background and was observed when partial reduction of HSP proteins was combined with expression of dominant-negative microtubule regulators, suggesting that HSP proteins work with microtubules to promote regeneration. Microtubule rearrangements triggered by axon injury were, however, normal in all genotypes. We examined other markers to identify additional changes associated with regeneration. Whereas mitochondria, endosomes, and ribosomes did not exhibit dramatic repatterning during regeneration, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was frequently concentrated near the tip of the growing axon. In atlastin RNAi and spastin mutant animals, ER accumulation near single growing axon tips was impaired. ER tip concentration was observed only during axon regeneration and not during dendrite regeneration. In addition, dendrite regeneration was unaffected by reduction of spastin or atlastin. We propose that the HSP proteins spastin and atlastin promote axon regeneration by coordinating concentration of the ER and microtubules at the growing axon tip. PMID:27605706

  15. Modeling of the axon membrane skeleton structure and implications for its mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Tzingounis, Anastasios V.

    2017-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that, unlike the soma and dendrites, the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under tension. Currently, the structure-function relationship of the axonal structure is unclear. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that the stiffness of the axon plasma membrane is significantly higher than the stiffnesses of dendrites and somata. To examine whether the structure of the axon plasma membrane determines its overall stiffness, we introduced a coarse-grain molecular dynamics model of the axon membrane skeleton that reproduces the structure identified by super-resolution microscopy. Our proposed computational model accurately simulates the median value of the Young’s modulus of the axon plasma membrane determined by atomic force microscopy. It also predicts that because the spectrin filaments are under entropic tension, the thermal random motion of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), which are bound to ankyrin particles, a critical axonal protein, is reduced compared to the thermal motion when spectrin filaments are held at equilibrium. Lastly, our model predicts that because spectrin filaments are under tension, any axonal injuries that lacerate spectrin filaments will likely lead to a permanent disruption of the membrane skeleton due to the inability of spectrin filaments to spontaneously form their initial under-tension configuration. PMID:28241082

  16. The Dyslexia-susceptibility Protein KIAA0319 Inhibits Axon Growth Through Smad2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Franquinho, Filipa; Nogueira-Rodrigues, Joana; Duarte, Joana M.; Esteves, Sofia S.; Carter-Su, Christin; Monaco, Anthony P.; Molnár, Zoltán; Velayos-Baeza, Antonio; Brites, Pedro; Sousa, Mónica M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract KIAA0319 is a transmembrane protein associated with dyslexia with a presumed role in neuronal migration. Here we show that KIAA0319 expression is not restricted to the brain but also occurs in sensory and spinal cord neurons, increasing from early postnatal stages to adulthood and being downregulated by injury. This suggested that KIAA0319 participates in functions unrelated to neuronal migration. Supporting this hypothesis, overexpression of KIAA0319 repressed axon growth in hippocampal and dorsal root ganglia neurons; the intracellular domain of KIAA0319 was sufficient to elicit this effect. A similar inhibitory effect was observed in vivo as axon regeneration was impaired after transduction of sensory neurons with KIAA0319. Conversely, the deletion of Kiaa0319 in neurons increased neurite outgrowth in vitro and improved axon regeneration in vivo. At the mechanistic level, KIAA0319 engaged the JAK2-SH2B1 pathway to activate Smad2, which played a central role in KIAA0319-mediated repression of axon growth. In summary, we establish KIAA0319 as a novel player in axon growth and regeneration with the ability to repress the intrinsic growth potential of axons. This study describes a novel regulatory mechanism operating during peripheral nervous system and central nervous system axon growth, and offers novel targets for the development of effective therapies to promote axon regeneration. PMID:28334068

  17. Functional compatibility between Purkinje cell axon branches and their target neurons in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilai; Chen, Na; Ge, Rongjing; Qian, Hao; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2017-09-22

    A neuron sprouts an axon, and its branches to innervate many target neurons that are divergent in their functions. In order to efficiently regulate the diversified cells, the axon branches should differentiate functionally to be compatible with their target neurons, i.e., a function compatibility between presynaptic and postsynaptic partners. We have examined this hypothesis by using electrophysiological method in the cerebellum, in which the main axon of Purkinje cell projected to deep nucleus cells and the recurrent axons innervated the adjacent Purkinje cells. The fidelity of spike propagation is superior in the recurrent branches than the main axon. The capabilities of encoding spikes and processing GABAergic inputs are advanced in Purkinje cells versus deep nucleus cells. The functional differences among Purkinje's axonal branches and their postsynaptic neurons are preset by the variable dynamics of their voltage-gated sodium channels. In addition, activity strengths between presynaptic and postsynaptic partners are proportionally correlated, i.e., active axonal branches innervate active target neurons, or vice versa. The physiological impact of the functional compatibility is to make the neurons in their circuits to be activated appropriately. In conclusion, each cerebellar Purkinje cell sprouts the differentiated axon branches to be compatible with the diversified target cells in their functions, in order to construct the homeostatic and efficient units for their coordinated activity in neural circuits.

  18. Functional compatibility between Purkinje cell axon branches and their target neurons in the cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hao; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2017-01-01

    A neuron sprouts an axon, and its branches to innervate many target neurons that are divergent in their functions. In order to efficiently regulate the diversified cells, the axon branches should differentiate functionally to be compatible with their target neurons, i.e., a function compatibility between presynaptic and postsynaptic partners. We have examined this hypothesis by using electrophysiological method in the cerebellum, in which the main axon of Purkinje cell projected to deep nucleus cells and the recurrent axons innervated the adjacent Purkinje cells. The fidelity of spike propagation is superior in the recurrent branches than the main axon. The capabilities of encoding spikes and processing GABAergic inputs are advanced in Purkinje cells versus deep nucleus cells. The functional differences among Purkinje's axonal branches and their postsynaptic neurons are preset by the variable dynamics of their voltage-gated sodium channels. In addition, activity strengths between presynaptic and postsynaptic partners are proportionally correlated, i.e., active axonal branches innervate active target neurons, or vice versa. The physiological impact of the functional compatibility is to make the neurons in their circuits to be activated appropriately. In conclusion, each cerebellar Purkinje cell sprouts the differentiated axon branches to be compatible with the diversified target cells in their functions, in order to construct the homeostatic and efficient units for their coordinated activity in neural circuits. PMID:29069799

  19. Integration of shallow gradients of Shh and Netrin-1 guides commissural axons.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Tyler F W; Qasaimeh, Mohammad A; Juncker, David; Yam, Patricia T; Charron, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    During nervous system development, gradients of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Netrin-1 attract growth cones of commissural axons toward the floor plate of the embryonic spinal cord. Mice defective for either Shh or Netrin-1 signaling have commissural axon guidance defects, suggesting that both Shh and Netrin-1 are required for correct axon guidance. However, how Shh and Netrin-1 collaborate to guide axons is not known. We first quantified the steepness of the Shh gradient in the spinal cord and found that it is mostly very shallow. We then developed an in vitro microfluidic guidance assay to simulate these shallow gradients. We found that axons of dissociated commissural neurons respond to steep but not shallow gradients of Shh or Netrin-1. However, when we presented axons with combined Shh and Netrin-1 gradients, they had heightened sensitivity to the guidance cues, turning in response to shallower gradients that were unable to guide axons when only one cue was present. Furthermore, these shallow gradients polarized growth cone Src-family kinase (SFK) activity only when Shh and Netrin-1 were combined, indicating that SFKs can integrate the two guidance cues. Together, our results indicate that Shh and Netrin-1 synergize to enable growth cones to sense shallow gradients in regions of the spinal cord where the steepness of a single guidance cue is insufficient to guide axons, and we identify a novel type of synergy that occurs when the steepness (and not the concentration) of a guidance cue is limiting.

  20. Gene Manipulation Strategies to Identify Molecular Regulators of Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Vinicius T.; Costa, Marcos R.

    2017-01-01

    Limited axon regeneration in the injured adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) usually results in irreversible functional deficits. Both the presence of extrinsic inhibitory molecules at the injury site and the intrinsically low capacity of adult neurons to grow axons are responsible for the diminished capacity of regeneration in the adult CNS. Conversely, in the embryonic CNS, neurons show a high regenerative capacity, mostly due to the expression of genes that positively control axon growth and downregulation of genes that inhibit axon growth. A better understanding of the role of these key genes controlling pro-regenerative mechanisms is pivotal to develop strategies to promote robust axon regeneration following adult CNS injury. Genetic manipulation techniques have been widely used to investigate the role of specific genes or a combination of different genes in axon regrowth. This review summarizes a myriad of studies that used genetic manipulations to promote axon growth in the injured CNS. We also review the roles of some of these genes during CNS development and suggest possible approaches to identify new candidate genes. Finally, we critically address the main advantages and pitfalls of gene-manipulation techniques, and discuss new strategies to promote robust axon regeneration in the mature CNS. PMID:28824380

  1. Modeling of the axon membrane skeleton structure and implications for its mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihao; Abiraman, Krithika; Li, He; Pierce, David M; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Lykotrafitis, George

    2017-02-01

    Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that, unlike the soma and dendrites, the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under tension. Currently, the structure-function relationship of the axonal structure is unclear. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that the stiffness of the axon plasma membrane is significantly higher than the stiffnesses of dendrites and somata. To examine whether the structure of the axon plasma membrane determines its overall stiffness, we introduced a coarse-grain molecular dynamics model of the axon membrane skeleton that reproduces the structure identified by super-resolution microscopy. Our proposed computational model accurately simulates the median value of the Young's modulus of the axon plasma membrane determined by atomic force microscopy. It also predicts that because the spectrin filaments are under entropic tension, the thermal random motion of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), which are bound to ankyrin particles, a critical axonal protein, is reduced compared to the thermal motion when spectrin filaments are held at equilibrium. Lastly, our model predicts that because spectrin filaments are under tension, any axonal injuries that lacerate spectrin filaments will likely lead to a permanent disruption of the membrane skeleton due to the inability of spectrin filaments to spontaneously form their initial under-tension configuration.

  2. Selective control of small versus large diameter axons using infrared laser light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothet, Emilie H.; Shaw, Kendrick M.; Horn, Charles C.; Lu, Hui; Wang, Yves T.; Jansen, E. Duco; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    Sensory information is conveyed to the central nervous system via small diameter unmyelinated fibers. In general, smaller diameter axons have slower conduction velocities. Selective control of such fibers could create new clinical treatments for chronic pain, nausea in response to chemo-therapeutic agents, or hypertension. Electrical stimulation can control axonal activity, but induced axonal current is proportional to cross-sectional area, so that large diameter fibers are affected first. Physiologically, however, synaptic inputs generally affect small diameter fibers before large diameter fibers (the size principle). A more physiological modality that first affected small diameter fibers could have fewer side effects (e.g., not recruiting motor axons). A novel mathematical analysis of the cable equation demonstrates that the minimum length along the axon for inducing block scales with the square root of axon diameter. This implies that the minimum length along an axon for inhibition will scale as the square root of axon diameter, so that lower radiant exposures of infrared light will selectively affect small diameter, slower conducting fibers before those of large diameter. This prediction was tested in identified neurons from the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Radiant exposure to block a neuron with a slower conduction velocity (B43) was consistently lower than that needed to block a faster conduction velocity neuron (B3). Furthermore, in the vagus nerve of the musk shrew, lower radiant exposure blocked slow conducting fibers before blocking faster conducting fibers. Infrared light can selectively control smaller diameter fibers, suggesting many novel clinical treatments.

  3. SRF phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase-3 promotes axon growth in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong L; Sathyamurthy, Aruna; Oldenborg, Anna; Tank, Dharmesh; Ramanan, Narendrakumar

    2014-03-12

    The growth of axons is an intricately regulated process involving intracellular signaling cascades and gene transcription. We had previously shown that the stimulus-dependent transcription factor, serum response factor (SRF), plays a critical role in regulating axon growth in the mammalian brain. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying SRF-dependent axon growth remains unknown. Here we report that SRF is phosphorylated and activated by GSK-3 to promote axon outgrowth in mouse hippocampal neurons. GSK-3 binds to and directly phosphorylates SRF on a highly conserved serine residue. This serine phosphorylation is necessary for SRF activity and for its interaction with MKL-family cofactors, MKL1 and MKL2, but not with TCF-family cofactor, ELK-1. Axonal growth deficits caused by GSK-3 inhibition could be rescued by expression of a constitutively active SRF. The SRF target gene and actin-binding protein, vinculin, is sufficient to overcome the axonal growth deficits of SRF-deficient and GSK-3-inhibited neurons. Furthermore, short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of vinculin also attenuated axonal growth. Thus, our findings reveal a novel phosphorylation and activation of SRF by GSK-3 that is critical for SRF-dependent axon growth in mammalian central neurons.

  4. In vivo imaging and quantitative analysis of changes in axon length using transgenic zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Lantz, Susan; Paule, Merle G

    2011-01-01

    We describe an imaging procedure to measure axon length in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated fluorescent image acquisition was performed with the ImageXpress Micro high content screening reader and further analysis of axon lengths was performed on archived images using AcuityXpress software. We utilized the Neurite Outgrowth Application module with a customized protocol (journal) to measure the axons. Since higher doses of ethanol (2-2.5%, v/v) have been shown to deform motor neurons and axons during development, here we used ethanol to treat transgenic [hb9:GFP (green fluorescent protein)] zebrafish embryos at 28 hpf (hours post-fertilization). These embryos express GFP in the motor neurons and their axons. Embryos after ethanol treatment were arrayed in 384-well plates for automated fluorescent image acquisition in vivo. Average axon lengths of high dose ethanol-treated embryos were significantly lower than the control. Another experiment showed that there was no significant difference in the axon lengths between the embryos grown for 24h at 22°C and 28.5°C. These test experiments demonstrate that using axon development as an end-point, compound screening can be performed in a time-efficient manner. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Axonal transport rate decreased at the onset of optic neuritis in EAE mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsen-Hsuan; Kim, Joong Hee; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Chiang, Chia-Wen; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Cross, Anne H.; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis is frequently the first symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating neurodegenerative disease. Impaired axonal transport has been considered as an early event of neurodegenerative diseases. However, few studies have assessed the integrity of axonal transport in MS or its animal models. We hypothesize that axonal transport impairment occurs at the onset of optic neuritis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. In this study, we employed manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to assess axonal transport in optic nerves in EAE mice at the onset of optic neuritis. Axonal transport was assessed as (a) optic nerve Mn2+ accumulation rate (in % signal change/hour) by measuring the rate of increased total optic nerve signal enhancement, and (b) Mn2+ transport rate (in mm/hour) by measuring the rate of change in optic nerve length enhanced by Mn2+. Compared to sham-treated healthy mice, Mn2+ accumulation rate was significantly decreased by 19% and 38% for EAE mice with moderate and severe optic neuritis, respectively. The axonal transport rate of Mn2+ was significantly decreased by 43% and 65% for EAE mice with moderate and severe optic neuritis, respectively. The degree of axonal transport deficit correlated with the extent of impaired visual function and diminished microtubule-associated tubulins, as well as the severity of inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury at the onset of optic neuritis. PMID:24936685

  6. In silico modeling of axonal reconnection within a discrete fiber tract after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Woolfe, Franco; Waxman, Stephen G; Hains, Bryan C

    2007-02-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), descending axons that carry motor commands from the brain to the spinal cord are injured or transected, producing chronic motor dysfunction and paralysis. Reconnection of these axons is a major prerequisite for restoration of function after SCI. Thus far, only modest gains in motor function have been achieved experimentally or in the clinic after SCI, identifying the practical limitations of current treatment approaches. In this paper, we use an ordinary differential equation (ODE) to simulate the relative and synergistic contributions of several experimentally-established biological factors related to inhibition or promotion of axonal repair and restoration of function after SCI. The factors were mathematically modeled by the ODE. The results of our simulation show that in a model system, many factors influenced the achievability of axonal reconnection. Certain factors more strongly affected axonal reconnection in isolation, and some factors interacted in a synergistic fashion to produce further improvements in axonal reconnection. Our data suggest that mathematical modeling may be useful in evaluating the complex interactions of discrete therapeutic factors not possible in experimental preparations, and highlight the benefit of a combinatorial therapeutic approach focused on promoting axonal sprouting, attraction of cut ends, and removal of growth inhibition for achieving axonal reconnection. Predictions of this simulation may be of utility in guiding future experiments aimed at restoring function after SCI.

  7. ESCRT-II controls retinal axon growth by regulating DCC receptor levels and local protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Konopacki, Filip A.; Dwivedy, Asha; Bellon, Anaïs; Blower, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis and local protein synthesis (LPS) act coordinately to mediate the chemotropic responses of axons, but the link between these two processes is poorly understood. The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is a key regulator of cargo sorting in the endocytic pathway, and here we have investigated the role of ESCRT-II, a critical ESCRT component, in Xenopus retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. We show that ESCRT-II is present in RGC axonal growth cones (GCs) where it co-localizes with endocytic vesicle GTPases and, unexpectedly, with the Netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC). ESCRT-II knockdown (KD) decreases endocytosis and, strikingly, reduces DCC in GCs and leads to axon growth and guidance defects. ESCRT-II-depleted axons fail to turn in response to a Netrin-1 gradient in vitro and many axons fail to exit the eye in vivo. These defects, similar to Netrin-1/DCC loss-of-function phenotypes, can be rescued in whole (in vitro) or in part (in vivo) by expressing DCC. In addition, ESCRT-II KD impairs LPS in GCs and live imaging reveals that ESCRT-II transports mRNAs in axons. Collectively, our results show that the ESCRT-II-mediated endocytic pathway regulates both DCC and LPS in the axonal compartment and suggest that ESCRT-II aids gradient sensing in GCs by coupling endocytosis to LPS. PMID:27248654

  8. 3D axon growth by exogenous electrical stimulus and soluble factors.

    PubMed

    Tang-Schomer, Min D

    2018-01-01

    Axon growth and alignment are fundamental processes during nervous system development and neural regeneration after injury. The present study investigates the effects of exogenous stimulus of electrical signals and soluble factors on axon 3D growth, using a silk protein material-based 3D brain tissue model. Electrical stimulus was delivered via embedded gold wires positioned at the interface of the scaffold region and the center matrix gel-filled region, spanning the axon growth area. This setup delivered applied electrical field directly to growing axons, and the effects were compared to micro-needle assisted local delivery of soluble factors of extracellular (ECM) components and neurotrophins. Dissociated rat cortical neurons were exposed to an alternating field of 80 mV/mm at 0.5 Hz to 2 kHz or soluble factors for up to 4 days, and evaluated by of β III-tubulin immunostaining, confocal imaging and 3D neurite tracing. 0.5-20 Hz were found to promote axon growth, with 2 Hz producing the biggest effect of ∼30% axon length increase compared to control cultures. Delivery of ECM components of laminin and fibronectin resulted significantly greater axon initial length increases compared to neurotrophic factors, such as BDNF, GDNF, NGF and NT3 (all at 1 μM). Though axon lengths under 2 Hz stimulation and LN or FN exposure were statistically similar, significant AC-induced axon alignment was found under all frequencies tested. The effects included perpendicular orientation of axons trespassing an electrode, large populations of aligned axon tracts in parallel to the field direction with a few perpendicularly aligned along the middle point of the EF. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that an electrode in AC field could act as an alternating cathode that attracts the growing tip of the axon. These results demonstrate the use of alternating electric field stimulation to direct axon 3D length growth and orientation. Our study provides basis

  9. Heterogeneity of the Axon Initial Segment in Interneurons and Pyramidal Cells of Rodent Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Höfflin, Felix; Jack, Alexander; Riedel, Christian; Mack-Bucher, Julia; Roos, Johannes; Corcelli, Corinna; Schultz, Christian; Wahle, Petra; Engelhardt, Maren

    2017-01-01

    The microdomain that orchestrates action potential initiation in neurons is the axon initial segment (AIS). It has long been considered to be a rather homogeneous domain at the very proximal axon hillock with relatively stable length, particularly in cortical pyramidal cells. However, studies in other brain regions paint a different picture. In hippocampal CA1, up to 50% of axons emerge from basal dendrites. Further, in about 30% of thick-tufted layer V pyramidal neurons in rat somatosensory cortex, axons have a dendritic origin. Consequently, the AIS is separated from the soma. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that cellular excitability is a function of AIS length/position and somatodendritic morphology, undermining a potentially significant impact of AIS heterogeneity for neuronal function. We therefore investigated neocortical axon morphology and AIS composition, hypothesizing that the initial observation of seemingly homogeneous AIS is inadequate and needs to take into account neuronal cell types. Here, we biolistically transfected cortical neurons in organotypic cultures to visualize the entire neuron and classify cell types in combination with immunolabeling against AIS markers. Using confocal microscopy and morphometric analysis, we investigated axon origin, AIS position, length, diameter as well as distance to the soma. We find a substantial AIS heterogeneity in visual cortical neurons, classified into three groups: (I) axons with somatic origin with proximal AIS at the axon hillock; (II) axons with somatic origin with distal AIS, with a discernible gap between the AIS and the soma; and (III) axons with dendritic origin (axon-carrying dendrite cell, AcD cell) and an AIS either starting directly at the axon origin or more distal to that point. Pyramidal cells have significantly longer AIS than interneurons. Interneurons with vertical columnar axonal projections have significantly more distal AIS locations than all other cells with their

  10. Golgi bypass for local delivery of axonal proteins, fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    González, Carolina; Cornejo, Víctor Hugo; Couve, Andrés

    2018-04-06

    Although translation of cytosolic proteins is well described in axons, much less is known about the synthesis, processing and trafficking of transmembrane and secreted proteins. A canonical rough endoplasmic reticulum or a stacked Golgi apparatus has not been detected in axons, generating doubts about the functionality of a local route. However, axons contain mRNAs for membrane and secreted proteins, translation factors, ribosomal components, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and post-endoplasmic reticulum elements that may contribute to local biosynthesis and plasma membrane delivery. Here we consider the evidence supporting a local secretory system in axons. We discuss exocytic elements and examples of autonomous axonal trafficking that impact development and maintenance. We also examine whether unconventional post-endoplasmic reticulum pathways may replace the canonical Golgi apparatus. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Lost in the jungle: new hurdles for optic nerve axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pernet, Vincent; Schwab, Martin E

    2014-07-01

    The poor regenerative capacity of injured central nervous system (CNS) axons leads to permanent neurological deficits after brain, spinal cord, or optic nerve lesions. In the optic nerve, recent studies showed that stimulation of the cytokine or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways potently enhances sprouting and regeneration of injured retinal ganglion cell axons in adult mice, but does not allow the majority of axons to reach their main cerebral targets. New analyses have revealed axon navigation defects in the optic nerve and at the optic chiasm under conditions of strong growth stimulation. We propose that a balanced growth stimulatory treatment will have to be combined with guidance factors and suppression of local growth inhibitory factors to obtain the full regeneration of long CNS axonal tracts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial mRNAs: A Powerful Force in Axonal Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Gale, Jenna R; Aschrafi, Armaz; Gioio, Anthony E; Kaplan, Barry B

    2018-04-01

    Axons, their growth cones, and synaptic nerve terminals are neuronal subcompartments that have high energetic needs. As such, they are enriched in mitochondria, which supply the ATP necessary to meet these demands. To date, a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs has been identified in distal axons and growth cones. Accumulating evidence suggests that the local translation of these mRNAs is required for mitochondrial maintenance and axonal viability. Here, we review evidence that suggests a critical role for axonal translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs in axonal growth and development. Additionally, we explore the role that site-specific translation at the mitochondria itself may play in this process. Finally, we briefly review the clinical implications of dysregulation of local translation of mitochondrial-related mRNAs in neurodevelopmental disorders.

  13. BmRobo2/3 is required for axon guidance in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Tong; Yu, Qi; Zhou, Qi-Sheng; Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Zhao-Yang; Cui, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2016-02-15

    Axon guidance is critical for proper wiring of the nervous system. During the neural development, the axon guidance molecules play a key role and direct axons to choose the correct way to reach the target. Robo, as the receptor of axon guidance molecule Slit, is evolutionarily conserved from planarians to humans. However, the function of Robo in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, remained unknown. In this study, we cloned robo2/3 from B. mori (Bmrobo2/3), a homologue of robo2/3 in Tribolium castaneum. Moreover, BmRobo2/3 was localized in the neuropil, and RNAi-mediated knockdown of Bmrobo2/3 resulted in the longitudinal connectives forming closer to the midline. These data demonstrate that BmRobo2/3 is required for axon guidance in the silkworm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Netrin-4 regulates thalamocortical axon branching in an activity-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Hayano, Yasufumi; Sasaki, Kensuke; Ohmura, Nami; Takemoto, Makoto; Maeda, Yurie; Yamashita, Toshihide; Hata, Yoshio; Kitada, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko

    2014-10-21

    Axon branching is remodeled by sensory-evoked and spontaneous neuronal activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the netrin family member netrin-4 (NTN4) contributes to activity-dependent thalamocortical (TC) axon branching. In the postnatal developmental stages of rodents, ntn4 expression was abundant in and around the TC recipient layers of sensory cortices. Neuronal activity dramatically altered the ntn4 expression level in the cortex in vitro and in vivo. TC axon branching was promoted by exogenous NTN4 and suppressed by depletion of the endogenous protein. Moreover, unc-5 homolog B (Unc5B), which strongly bound to NTN4, was expressed in the sensory thalamus, and knockdown of Unc5B in thalamic cells markedly reduced TC axon branching. These results suggest that NTN4 acts as a positive regulator for TC axon branching through activity-dependent expression.

  15. The Mammalian-Specific Protein Armcx1 Regulates Mitochondrial Transport during Axon Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cartoni, Romain; Norsworthy, Michael W; Bei, Fengfeng; Wang, Chen; Li, Siwei; Zhang, Yiling; Gabel, Christopher V; Schwarz, Thomas L; He, Zhigang

    2016-12-21

    Mitochondrial transport is crucial for neuronal and axonal physiology. However, whether and how it impacts neuronal injury responses, such as neuronal survival and axon regeneration, remain largely unknown. In an established mouse model with robust axon regeneration, we show that Armcx1, a mammalian-specific gene encoding a mitochondria-localized protein, is upregulated after axotomy in this high regeneration condition. Armcx1 overexpression enhances mitochondrial transport in adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Importantly, Armcx1 also promotes both neuronal survival and axon regeneration after injury, and these effects depend on its mitochondrial localization. Furthermore, Armcx1 knockdown undermines both neuronal survival and axon regeneration in the high regenerative capacity model, further supporting a key role of Armcx1 in regulating neuronal injury responses in the adult central nervous system (CNS). Our findings suggest that Armcx1 controls mitochondrial transport during neuronal repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sodium efflux from voltage clamped squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Landowne, D

    1977-01-01

    1. The efflux of radioactive sodium was measured from squid axons during simultaneous voltage clamp experiments such that it was possible to determine the efflux of sodium associated with a measured voltage clamp current. 2. The extra efflux of sodium associated with voltage clamp pulses increased linearly with the magnitude of the depolarization above 40 mV. A 100 mV pulse of sufficient duration to produce all of the sodium current increased the rate constant of efflux by about 10(-6). 3. Application of 100 nM tetrodotoxin eliminated the sodium current and the extra efflux of radioactive sodium. 4. Cooling the axon increased the extra efflux/voltage clamp pulse slightly with a Q10 of 1/1-1. On the same axons cooling increased the integral of the sodium current with a Q10 of 1/1-4. 5. Replacing external sodium with Tris, dextrose or Mg-mannitol reduced the extra efflux of sodium by about 50%. The inward sodium current was replaced with an outward current as expected. 6. Replacing external sodium with lithium also reduced the extra efflux by about 50% but the currents seen in lithium were slightly larger than those in sodium. 7. The effect of replacing external sodium was not voltage dependent. Cooling reduced the effect so that there was less reduction of efflux on switching to Tris ASW in the cold than in the warm. 8. The extra efflux of sodium into sodium-free ASW is approximately the same as the integral of the sodium current. Adding external sodium produces a deviation from the independence principle such that there is more exchange of sodium than predicted. Such a deviation from prediction was noted by Hodgkin & Huxley (1952c). 9. Using the equations of Hodgkin & Huxley (1952c) modified to include the deviation from independence reported in this paper and its temperature dependence, one can predict the temperature dependence of the sodium efflux associated with action potentials and obtain much better agreement than is possibly without these phenomena. 10

  17. Mutations in COA7 cause spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Okunushi, Ryuta; Hara, Taichi; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Yuan, Junhui; Yoshimura, Akiko; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Ando, Masahiro; Hiramatsu, Yu; Ishihara, Satoshi; Tanabe, Hajime; Okamoto, Yuji; Matsuura, Eiji; Ueda, Takehiro; Toda, Tatsushi; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Yamada, Kenichiro; Koide, Takashi; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Jun; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Jun; Doi, Koichiro; Morishita, Shinichi; Sato, Ken; Nakagawa, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Shoji; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2018-06-01

    Several genes related to mitochondrial functions have been identified as causative genes of neuropathy or ataxia. Cytochrome c oxidase assembly factor 7 (COA7) may have a role in assembling mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes that function in oxidative phosphorylation. Here we identified four unrelated patients with recessive mutations in COA7 among a Japanese case series of 1396 patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) or other inherited peripheral neuropathies, including complex forms of CMT. We also found that all four patients had characteristic neurological features of peripheral neuropathy and ataxia with cerebellar atrophy, and some patients showed leukoencephalopathy or spinal cord atrophy on MRI scans. Validated mutations were located at highly conserved residues among different species and segregated with the disease in each family. Nerve conduction studies showed axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. Sural nerve biopsies showed chronic axonal degeneration with a marked loss of large and medium myelinated fibres. An immunohistochemical assay with an anti-COA7 antibody in the sural nerve from the control patient showed the positive expression of COA7 in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells. We also observed mildly elevated serum creatine kinase levels in all patients and the presence of a few ragged-red fibres and some cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibres in a muscle biopsy obtained from one patient, which was suggestive of subclinical mitochondrial myopathy. Mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme assay in skin fibroblasts from the three patients showed a definitive decrease in complex I or complex IV. Immunocytochemical analysis of subcellular localization in HeLa cells indicated that mutant COA7 proteins as well as wild-type COA7 were localized in mitochondria, which suggests that mutant COA7 does not affect the mitochondrial recruitment and may affect the stability or localization of COA7 interaction partners in the mitochondria. In addition

  18. Axonal localization and mitochondrial association of precursor microRNA 338

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Jose Norberto S.; Kar, Amar N.; Kowalak, Jeffrey A.; Gale, Jenna R.; Aschrafi, Armaz; Chen, Cai-Yun; Gioio, Anthony E.; Kaplan, Barry B.

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) selectively localize to subcompartments of the neuron, such as dendrites, axons and presynaptic terminals, where they regulate the local protein synthesis of their putative target genes. In addition to mature miRNAs, precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) have also been shown to localize to somatodendritic and axonal compartments. miRNA-338 (miR-338) regulates the local expression of several nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs within axons of sympathetic neurons. Previous work has shown that precursor miR-338 (pre-miR-338) introduced into the axon can be locally processed into mature miR-338, where it can regulate local ATP synthesis. However, the mechanisms underlying the localization of pre-miRNAs to the axonal compartment remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the axonal localization of pre-miR-338. Using proteomic and biochemical approaches, we provide evidence for the localization of pre-miR-338 to distal neuronal compartments and identify several constituents of the pre-miR-338 ribonucleoprotein complex. Furthermore, we found that pre-miR-338 is associated with the mitochondria in axons of superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. The maintenance of mitochondrial function within axons requires the precise spatio-temporal synthesis of nuclear-encoded mRNAs, some of which are regulated by miR-338. Therefore, the association of pre-miR-338 with axonal mitochondria could serve as a reservoir of mature, biologically active miRNAs, which could coordinate the intra-axonal expression of multiple nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs. PMID:27229124

  19. N-acetyl-aspartate levels correlate with intra-axonal compartment parameters from diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Elan J; Kirov, Ivan I; Gonen, Oded; Novikov, Dmitry S; Davitz, Matthew S; Lui, Yvonne W; Grossman, Robert I; Inglese, Matilde; Fieremans, Els

    2015-09-01

    Diffusion MRI combined with biophysical modeling allows for the description of a white matter (WM) fiber bundle in terms of compartment specific white matter tract integrity (WMTI) metrics, which include intra-axonal diffusivity (Daxon), extra-axonal axial diffusivity (De||), extra-axonal radial diffusivity (De┴), axonal water fraction (AWF), and tortuosity (α) of extra-axonal space. Here we derive these parameters from diffusion kurtosis imaging to examine their relationship to concentrations of global WM N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), choline (Cho) and myo-Inositol (mI), as measured with proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), in a cohort of 25 patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). We found statistically significant (p<0.05) positive correlations between NAA and Daxon, AWF, α, and fractional anisotropy; negative correlations between NAA and De,┴ and the overall radial diffusivity (D┴). These correlations were supported by similar findings in regional analysis of the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Furthermore, a positive correlation in global WM was noted between Daxon and Cr, as well as a positive correlation between De|| and Cho, and a positive trend between De|| and mI. The specific correlations between NAA, an endogenous probe of the neuronal intracellular space, and WMTI metrics related to the intra-axonal space, combined with the specific correlations of De|| with mI and Cho, both predominantly present extra-axonally, corroborate the overarching assumption of many advanced modeling approaches that diffusion imaging can disentangle between the intra- and extra-axonal compartments in WM fiber bundles. Our findings are also generally consistent with what is known about the pathophysiology of MTBI, which appears to involve both intra-axonal injury (as reflected by a positive trend between NAA and Daxon) as well as axonal shrinkage, demyelination, degeneration, and/or loss (as reflected by correlations between NAA and De

  20. Sonic Hedgehog Guides Axons via Zipcode Binding Protein 1-Mediated Local Translation.

    PubMed

    Lepelletier, Léa; Langlois, Sébastien D; Kent, Christopher B; Welshhans, Kristy; Morin, Steves; Bassell, Gary J; Yam, Patricia T; Charron, Frédéric

    2017-02-15

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) attracts spinal cord commissural axons toward the floorplate. How Shh elicits changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that drive growth cone turning is unknown. We find that the turning of rat commissural axons up a Shh gradient requires protein synthesis. In particular, Shh stimulation increases β-actin protein at the growth cone even when the cell bodies have been removed. Therefore, Shh induces the local translation of β-actin at the growth cone. We hypothesized that this requires zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1), an mRNA-binding protein that transports β-actin mRNA and releases it for local translation upon phosphorylation. We found that Shh stimulation increases phospho-ZBP1 levels in the growth cone. Disruption of ZBP1 phosphorylation in vitro abolished the turning of commissural axons toward a Shh gradient. Disruption of ZBP1 function in vivo in mouse and chick resulted in commissural axon guidance errors. Therefore, ZBP1 is required for Shh to guide commissural axons. This identifies ZBP1 as a new mediator of noncanonical Shh signaling in axon guidance. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sonic hedgehog (Shh) guides axons via a noncanonical signaling pathway that is distinct from the canonical Hedgehog signaling pathway that specifies cell fate and morphogenesis. Axon guidance is driven by changes in the growth cone in response to gradients of guidance molecules. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of how Shh orchestrates changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that are required for growth cone turning. Here, we show that the guidance of axons by Shh requires protein synthesis. Zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1) is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates the local translation of proteins, including actin, in the growth cone. We demonstrate that ZBP1 is required for Shh-mediated axon guidance, identifying a new member of the noncanonical Shh signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/371685-11$15.00/0.

  1. Interleukin (IL)-8 immunoreactivity of injured axons and surrounding oligodendrocytes in traumatic head injury.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 has been suggested to be a positive regulator of myelination in the central nervous system, in addition to its principal role as a chemokine for neutrophils. Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) is an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, although AβPP immunoreactivity can also indicate axonal injury due to hypoxic causes. In this study, we examined IL-8 and AβPP immunoreactivity in sections of corpus callosum obtained from deceased patients with blunt head injury and from equivalent control tissue. AβPP immunoreactivity was detected in injured axons, such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons, in 24 of 44 head injury cases. These AβPP immunoreactive cases had survived for more than 3h. The AβPP immunostaining pattern can be classified into two types: traumatic (Pattern 1) and non-traumatic (Pattern 2) axonal injuries, which we described previously [Hayashi et al. Int. J. Legal Med. 129 (2015) 1085-1090]. Three of 44 control cases also showed AβPP immunoreactive injured axons as Pattern 2. In contrast, IL-8 immunoreactivity was detected in 7 AβPP immunoreactive and in 2 non-AβPP immunoreactive head injury cases, but was not detected in any of the 44 control cases, including the 3 AβPP immunoreactive control cases. The IL-8 immunoreactive cases had survived from 3 to 24 days, whereas those cases who survived less than 3 days (n=29) and who survived 90 days (n=1) were not IL-8 immunoreactive. Moreover, IL-8 was detected as Pattern 1 axons only. In addition, double immunofluorescence analysis showed that IL-8 is expressed by oligodendrocytes surrounding injured axons. In conclusion, our results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of IL-8 may be useful as a complementary diagnostic marker of traumatic axonal injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling Axonal Defects in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia with Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Kyle R.; Xu, Chongchong; Shah, Harsh; Li, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cortical motor neurons, also known as upper motor neurons, are large projection neurons whose axons convey signals to lower motor neurons to control the muscle movements. Degeneration of cortical motor neuron axons is implicated in several debilitating disorders, including hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Since the discovery of the first HSP gene, SPAST that encodes spastin, over 70 distinct genetic loci associated with HSP have been identified. How the mutations of these functionally diverse genes result in axonal degeneration and why certain axons are affected in HSP remains largely unknown. The development of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has provided researchers an excellent resource to generate patient-specific human neurons to model human neuropathologic processes including axonal defects. METHODS In this article, we will frst review the pathology and pathways affected in the common forms of HSP subtypes by searching the PubMed database. We will then summurize the findings and insights gained from studies using iPSC-based models, and discuss the challenges and future directions. RESULTS HSPs, a heterogeneous group of genetic neurodegenerative disorders, are characterized by lower extremity weakness and spasticity that result from retrograde axonal degeneration of cortical motor neurons. Recently, iPSCs have been generated from several common forms of HSP including SPG4, SPG3A, and SPG11 patients. Neurons derived from HSP iPSCs exhibit disease-relevant axonal defects, such as impaired neurite outgrowth, increased axonal swellings, and reduced axonal transport. CONCLUSION These patient-derived neurons offer unique tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms and explore the treatments for rescuing axonal defects in HSP, as well as other diseases involving axonopathy. PMID:27956894

  3. Modelling the Effects of Electrical Coupling between Unmyelinated Axons of Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Gap junctions between fine unmyelinated axons can electrically couple groups of brain neurons to synchronise firing and contribute to rhythmic activity. To explore the distribution and significance of electrical coupling, we modelled a well analysed, small population of brainstem neurons which drive swimming in young frog tadpoles. A passive network of 30 multicompartmental neurons with unmyelinated axons was used to infer that: axon-axon gap junctions close to the soma gave the best match to experimentally measured coupling coefficients; axon diameter had a strong influence on coupling; most neurons were coupled indirectly via the axons of other neurons. When active channels were added, gap junctions could make action potential propagation along the thin axons unreliable. Increased sodium and decreased potassium channel densities in the initial axon segment improved action potential propagation. Modelling suggested that the single spike firing to step current injection observed in whole-cell recordings is not a cellular property but a dynamic consequence of shunting resulting from electrical coupling. Without electrical coupling, firing of the population during depolarising current was unsynchronised; with coupling, the population showed synchronous recruitment and rhythmic firing. When activated instead by increasing levels of modelled sensory pathway input, the population without electrical coupling was recruited incrementally to unpatterned activity. However, when coupled, the population was recruited all-or-none at threshold into a rhythmic swimming pattern: the tadpole “decided” to swim. Modelling emphasises uncertainties about fine unmyelinated axon physiology but, when informed by biological data, makes general predictions about gap junctions: locations close to the soma; relatively small numbers; many indirect connections between neurons; cause of action potential propagation failure in fine axons; misleading alteration of intrinsic firing

  4. Delineating neurotrophin-3 dependent signaling pathways underlying sympathetic axon growth along intermediate targets.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Austin B; Suo, Dong; Park, Juyeon; Deppmann, Christopher D

    2017-07-01

    Postganglionic sympathetic neurons detect vascular derived neurotrophin 3 (NT3) via the axonally expressed receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, to promote chemo-attraction along intermediate targets. Once axons arrive to their final target, a structurally related neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor (NGF), also acts through TrkA to promote final target innervation. Does TrkA signal differently at these different locales? We previously found that Coronin-1 is upregulated in sympathetic neurons upon exposure to NGF, thereby endowing the NGF-TrkA complex with new signaling capabilities (i.e. calcium signaling), which dampens axon growth and branching. Based on the notion that axons do not express functional levels of Coronin-1 prior to final target innervation, we developed an in vitro model for axon growth and branching along intermediate targets using Coro1a -/- neurons grown in NT3. We found that, similar to NGF-TrkA, NT3-TrkA is capable of inducing MAPK and PI3K in the presence or absence of Coronin-1. However, unlike NGF, NT3 does not induce calcium release from intracellular stores. Using a combination of pharmacology, knockout neurons and in vitro functional assays, we suggest that the NT3-TrkA complex uses Ras/MAPK and/or PI3K-AKT signaling to induce axon growth and inhibit axon branching along intermediate targets. However, in the presence of Coronin-1, these signaling pathways lose their ability to impact NT3 dependent axon growth or branching. This is consistent with a role for Coronin-1 as a molecular switch for axon behavior and suggests that Coronin-1 suppresses NT3 dependent axon behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Maintaining Sustainability for Green Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The promise of sustainably designed school facilities is that they will operate more efficiently and last longer than buildings constructed in more traditional ways. But that promise comes with a big if. The payoff is delivered only if the facility managers operate and maintain the buildings in ways that adhere to sustainable strategies called for…

  6. [Maintaining patients' autonomy at home].

    PubMed

    Niang, Bénédicte; Coudre, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    To maintain the flow of hospital discharges, the patient's return home with support from a home nursing service is important. If any difficulties are identified, there are various programmes or good practices which can be put into place. The future law on adapting society to ageing also comprises a scheme combining home assistance and nursing care.

  7. Rearrangement of potassium ions and Kv1.1/Kv1.2 potassium channels in regenerating axons following end-to-end neurorrhaphy: ionic images from TOF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chiung-Hui; Chang, Hung-Ming; Wu, Tsung-Huan; Chen, Li-You; Yang, Yin-Shuo; Tseng, To-Jung; Liao, Wen-Chieh

    2017-10-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 that cluster at juxtaparanodal (JXP) regions are essential in the regulation of nerve excitability and play a critical role in axonal conduction. When demyelination occurs, Kv1.1/Kv1.2 activity increases, suppressing the membrane potential nearly to the equilibrium potential of K + , which results in an axonal conduction blockade. The recovery of K + -dependent communication signals and proper clustering of Kv1.1/Kv1.2 channels at JXP regions may directly reflect nerve regeneration following peripheral nerve injury. However, little is known about potassium channel expression and its relationship with the dynamic potassium ion distribution at the node of Ranvier during the regenerative process of peripheral nerve injury (PNI). In the present study, end-to-end neurorrhaphy (EEN) was performed using an in vivo model of PNI. The distribution of K + at regenerating axons following EEN was detected by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry. The specific localization and expression of Kv1.1/Kv1.2 channels were examined by confocal microscopy and western blotting. Our data showed that the re-establishment of K + distribution and intensity was correlated with the functional recovery of compound muscle action potential morphology in EEN rats. Furthermore, the re-clustering of Kv1.1/1.2 channels 1 and 3 months after EEN at the nodal region of the regenerating nerve corresponded to changes in the K + distribution. This study provided direct evidence of K + distribution in regenerating axons for the first time. We proposed that the Kv1.1/Kv1.2 channels re-clustered at the JXP regions of regenerating axons are essential for modulating the proper patterns of K + distribution in axons for maintaining membrane potential stability after EEN.

  8. Extrinsic and intrinsic regulation of axon regeneration at a crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Andrew; Ong Tone, Stephan; Fournier, Alyson E.

    2015-01-01

    Repair of the injured spinal cord is a major challenge in medicine. The limited intrinsic regenerative response mounted by adult central nervous system (CNS) neurons is further hampered by astrogliosis, myelin debris and scar tissue that characterize the damaged CNS. Improved axon regeneration and recovery can be elicited by targeting extrinsic factors as well as by boosting neuron-intrinsic growth regulators. Our knowledge of the molecular basis of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators of regeneration has expanded rapidly, resulting in promising new targets to promote repair. Intriguingly certain neuron-intrinsic growth regulators are emerging as promising targets to both stimulate growth and relieve extrinsic inhibition of regeneration. This crossroads between the intrinsic and extrinsic aspects of spinal cord injury is a promising target for effective therapies for this unmet need. PMID:26136657

  9. Extrinsic and intrinsic regulation of axon regeneration at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Andrew; Ong Tone, Stephan; Fournier, Alyson E

    2015-01-01

    Repair of the injured spinal cord is a major challenge in medicine. The limited intrinsic regenerative response mounted by adult central nervous system (CNS) neurons is further hampered by astrogliosis, myelin debris and scar tissue that characterize the damaged CNS. Improved axon regeneration and recovery can be elicited by targeting extrinsic factors as well as by boosting neuron-intrinsic growth regulators. Our knowledge of the molecular basis of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators of regeneration has expanded rapidly, resulting in promising new targets to promote repair. Intriguingly certain neuron-intrinsic growth regulators are emerging as promising targets to both stimulate growth and relieve extrinsic inhibition of regeneration. This crossroads between the intrinsic and extrinsic aspects of spinal cord injury is a promising target for effective therapies for this unmet need.

  10. Liquid Junction and Membrane Potentials of the Squid Giant Axon

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kenneth S.; Moore, John W.

    1960-01-01

    The potential differences across the squid giant axon membrane, as measured with a series of microcapillary electrodes filled with concentrations of KCl from 0.03 to 3.0 M or sea water, are consistent with a constant membrane potential and the liquid junction potentials calculated by the Henderson equation. The best value for the mobility of an organic univalent ion, such as isethionate, leads to a probably low, but not impossible, axoplasm specific resistance of 1.2 times sea water and to a liquid junction correction of 4 mv. for microelectrodes filled with 3 M KCl. The errors caused by the assumptions of proportional mixing, unity activity coefficients, and a negligible internal fixed charge cannot be estimated but the results suggest that the cumulative effect of them may not be serious. PMID:13811119

  11. TRANSVERSE IMPEDANCE OF THE SQUID GIANT AXON DURING CURRENT FLOW

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kenneth S.; Baker, Richard F.

    1941-01-01

    The change in the transverse impedance of the squid giant axon caused by direct current flow has been measured at frequencies from 1 kc. per second to 500 kc. per second. The impedance change is equivalent to an increase of membrane conductance at the cathode to a maximum value approximately the same as that obtained during activity and a decrease at the anode to a minimum not far from zero. There is no evidence of appreciable membrane capacity change in either case. It then follows that the membrane has the electrical characteristics of a rectifier. Interpreting the membrane conductance as a measure of ion permeability, this permeability is increased at the cathode and decreased at the anode. PMID:19873233

  12. Axonal conduction block as a novel mechanism of prepulse inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A. H.; Megalou, E. V.; Wang, J.; Frost, W.N.

    2012-01-01

    In prepulse inhibition (PPI), the startle response to a strong, unexpected stimulus is diminished if shortly preceded by the onset of a different stimulus. Because deficits in this inhibitory gating process are a hallmark feature of schizophrenia and certain other psychiatric disorders, the mechanisms underlying PPI are of significant interest. We previously used the invertebrate model system Tritonia diomedea to identify the first cellular mechanism for PPI–presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release from the afferent neurons (S-cells) mediating the startle response. Here we report the involvement of a second, more powerful PPI mechanism in Tritonia: prepulse-elicited conduction block of action potentials traveling in the startle pathway caused by identified inhibitory interneurons activated by the prepulse. This example of axo-axonic conduction block–neurons in one pathway inhibiting the propagation of action potentials in another–represents a novel and potent mechanism of sensory gating in prepulse inhibition. PMID:23115164

  13. Neural signal registration and analysis of axons grown in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigareva, Y.; Malishev, E.; Gladkov, A.; Kolpakov, V.; Bukatin, A.; Mukhina, I.; Kazantsev, V.; Pimashkin, A.

    2016-08-01

    Registration of neuronal bioelectrical signals remains one of the main physical tools to study fundamental mechanisms of signal processing in the brain. Neurons generate spiking patterns which propagate through complex map of neural network connectivity. Extracellular recording of isolated axons grown in microchannels provides amplification of the signal for detailed study of spike propagation. In this study we used neuronal hippocampal cultures grown in microfluidic devices combined with microelectrode arrays to investigate a changes of electrical activity during neural network development. We found that after 5 days in vitro after culture plating the spiking activity appears first in microchannels and on the next 2-3 days appears on the electrodes of overall neural network. We conclude that such approach provides a convenient method to study neural signal processing and functional structure development on a single cell and network level of the neuronal culture.

  14. Comparing axonal excitability in past polio to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Christina; Ng, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Poliomyelitis causes selective destruction of anterior horn cells and usually has a stable disease course post-infection. We assessed the excitability characteristics in patients with a stable course after past poliomyelitis and compared them with changes described in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The excitability characteristics of motor and sensory nerves were studied in 10 subjects with stable past poliomyelitis. Motor rheobase was increased, but there were no significant changes in strength-duration properties or depolarizing threshold electrotonus, as have been seen in previous studies of ALS. There is minimal change in axonal excitability properties in patients with stable past poliomyelitis. The results may signify sufficient compensation in the stable state of the disease. Increased subexcitability in 1 subject with demonstrable hyperexcitability may represent compensation for increased ectopic activity rather than a different process in surviving motor neurons. Muscle Nerve 50: 602-604, 2014. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Multichannel activity propagation across an engineered axon network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. Isaac; Wolf, John A.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Although substantial progress has been made in mapping the connections of the brain, less is known about how this organization translates into brain function. In particular, the massive interconnectivity of the brain has made it difficult to specifically examine data transmission between two nodes of the connectome, a central component of the ‘neural code.’ Here, we investigated the propagation of multiple streams of asynchronous neuronal activity across an isolated in vitro ‘connectome unit.’ Approach. We used the novel technique of axon stretch growth to create a model of a long-range cortico-cortical network, a modular system consisting of paired nodes of cortical neurons connected by axon tracts. Using optical stimulation and multi-electrode array recording techniques, we explored how input patterns are represented by cortical networks, how these representations shift as they are transmitted between cortical nodes and perturbed by external conditions, and how well the downstream node distinguishes different patterns. Main results. Stimulus representations included direct, synaptic, and multiplexed responses that grew in complexity as the distance between the stimulation source and recorded neuron increased. These representations collapsed into patterns with lower information content at higher stimulation frequencies. With internodal activity propagation, a hierarchy of network pathways, including latent circuits, was revealed using glutamatergic blockade. As stimulus channels were added, divergent, non-linear effects were observed in local versus distant network layers. Pairwise difference analysis of neuronal responses suggested that neuronal ensembles generally outperformed individual cells in discriminating input patterns. Significance. Our data illuminate the complexity of spiking activity propagation in cortical networks in vitro, which is characterized by the transformation of an input into myriad outputs over several network layers

  16. Ketorolac Administration Attenuates Retinal Ganglion Cell Death After Axonal Injury.

    PubMed

    Nadal-Nicolás, Francisco M; Rodriguez-Villagra, Esther; Bravo-Osuna, Irene; Sobrado-Calvo, Paloma; Molina-Martínez, Irene; Villegas-Pérez, Maria Paz; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Herrero-Vanrell, Rocío

    2016-03-01

    To assess the neuroprotective effects of ketorolac administration, in solution or delivered from biodegradable microspheres, on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Retinas were treated intravitreally with a single injection of tromethamine ketorolac solution and/or with ketorolac-loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Ketorolac treatments were administered either 1 week before optic nerve crush (pre-ONC) or right after the ONC (simultaneous). In all cases, animals were euthanized 7 days after the ONC. As control, nonloaded microspheres or vehicle (balanced salt solution, BSS) were administered in parallel groups. All retinas were dissected as flat mounts; RGCs were immunodetected with brain-specific homeobox/POU domain protein 3A (Brn3a), and their number was automatically quantified. The percentage of Brn3a+RGCs was 36% to 41% in all control groups (ONC with or without BSS or nonloaded microparticles). Ketorolac solution administered pre-ONC resulted in 63% survival of RGCs, while simultaneous administration promoted a 53% survival. Ketorolac-loaded microspheres were not as efficient as ketorolac solution (43% and 42% of RGC survival pre-ONC or simultaneous, respectively). The combination of ketorolac solution and ketorolac-loaded microspheres did not have an additive effect (54% and 55% survival pre-ONC and simultaneous delivery, respectively). Treatment with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac delays RGC death triggered by a traumatic axonal insult. Pretreatment seems to elicit a better output than simultaneous administration of ketorolac solution. This may be taken into account when performing procedures resulting in RGC axonal injury.

  17. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation. PMID:27022619

  18. Live Imaging of Calcium Dynamics during Axon Degeneration Reveals Two Functionally Distinct Phases of Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuya; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of axon degeneration caused by trauma and disease, but its specific spatial and temporal dynamics in injured axons remain unclear. To clarify the function of calcium in axon degeneration, we observed calcium dynamics in single injured neurons in live zebrafish larvae and tested the temporal requirement for calcium in zebrafish neurons and cultured mouse DRG neurons. Using laser axotomy to induce Wallerian degeneration (WD) in zebrafish peripheral sensory axons, we monitored calcium dynamics from injury to fragmentation, revealing two stereotyped phases of axonal calcium influx. First, axotomy triggered a transient local calcium wave originating at the injury site. This initial calcium wave only disrupted mitochondria near the injury site and was not altered by expression of the protective WD slow (WldS) protein. Inducing multiple waves with additional axotomies did not change the kinetics of degeneration. In contrast, a second phase of calcium influx occurring minutes before fragmentation spread as a wave throughout the axon, entered mitochondria, and was abolished by WldS expression. In live zebrafish, chelating calcium after the first wave, but before the second wave, delayed the progress of fragmentation. In cultured DRG neurons, chelating calcium early in the process of WD did not alter degeneration, but chelating calcium late in WD delayed fragmentation. We propose that a terminal calcium wave is a key instructive component of the axon degeneration program. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Axon degeneration resulting from trauma or neurodegenerative disease can cause devastating deficits in neural function. Understanding the molecular and cellular events that execute axon degeneration is essential for developing treatments to address these conditions. Calcium is known to contribute to axon degeneration, but its temporal requirements in this process have been unclear. Live calcium imaging in severed zebrafish neurons and temporally controlled

  19. Biochemical properties of Na+/K(+)-ATPase in axonal growth cone particles isolated from fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1994-08-01

    Axonal growth cones (AGC) isolated from fetal rat brain have an important specific activity of N+/K(+)-ATPase. Kinetic assays of the enzyme in AGC showed that Km values for ATP or K+ are similar to those reported for the adult brain enzyme. For Na+ the affinity (Km) was lower. Vmax for the three substrates was several times lower in AGC as compared to the adult value. We also observed two apparent inhibition constants of Na+/K(+)-ATPase by ouabain, one of low affinity, possibly corresponding to the alpha 1 isoform and another of high affinity which is different to that described for the alpha 2 isoform of the enzyme. These results support an important role for the sodium pump in the maintainance of volume and cationic balance in neuronal differentiating structures. The functional differences observed also suggest that the enzymatic complex of Na+/K(+)-ATPase in AGC is in a transitional state towards the adult configuration.

  20. The Adam family metalloprotease Kuzbanian regulates the cleavage of the roundabout receptor to control axon repulsion at the midline

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Hope A.; Labrador, Juan-Pablo; Chance, Rebecca K.; Bashaw, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    Slits and their Roundabout (Robo) receptors mediate repulsive axon guidance at the Drosophila ventral midline and in the vertebrate spinal cord. Slit is cleaved to produce fragments with distinct signaling properties. In a screen for genes involved in Slit-Robo repulsion, we have identified the Adam family metalloprotease Kuzbanian (Kuz). Kuz does not regulate midline repulsion through cleavage of Slit, nor is Slit cleavage essential for repulsion. Instead, Kuz acts in neurons to regulate repulsion and Kuz can cleave the Robo extracellular domain in Drosophila cells. Genetic rescue experiments using an uncleavable form of Robo show that this receptor does not maintain normal repellent activity. Finally, Kuz activity is required for Robo to recruit its downstream signaling partner, Son of sevenless (Sos). These observations support the model that Kuz-directed cleavage is important for Robo receptor activation. PMID:20570941

  1. Hindsight regulates photoreceptor axon targeting through transcriptional control of jitterbug/Filamin and multiple genes involved in axon guidance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Carlos; Molina-Fernandez, Claudia; Maureira, Miguel; Candia, Noemi; López, Estefanía; Hassan, Bassem; Aerts, Stein; Cánovas, José; Olguín, Patricio; Sierralta, Jimena

    2015-09-01

    During axon targeting, a stereotyped pattern of connectivity is achieved by the integration of intrinsic genetic programs and the response to extrinsic long and short-range directional cues. How this coordination occurs is the subject of intense study. Transcription factors play a central role due to their ability to regulate the expression of multiple genes required to sense and respond to these cues during development. Here we show that the transcription factor HNT regulates layer-specific photoreceptor axon targeting in Drosophila through transcriptional control of jbug/Filamin and multiple genes involved in axon guidance and cytoskeleton organization.Using a microarray analysis we identified 235 genes whose expression levels were changed by HNT overexpression in the eye primordia. We analyzed nine candidate genes involved in cytoskeleton regulation and axon guidance, six of which displayed significantly altered gene expression levels in hnt mutant retinas. Functional analysis confirmed the role of OTK/PTK7 in photoreceptor axon targeting and uncovered Tiggrin, an integrin ligand, and Jbug/Filamin, a conserved actin- binding protein, as new factors that participate of photoreceptor axon targeting. Moreover, we provided in silico and molecular evidence that supports jbug/Filamin as a direct transcriptional target of HNT and that HNT acts partially through Jbug/Filamin in vivo to regulate axon guidance. Our work broadens the understanding of how HNT regulates the coordinated expression of a group of genes to achieve the correct connectivity pattern in the Drosophila visual system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 1018-1032, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dynamics of terminal arbor formation and target approach of retinotectal axons in living zebrafish embryos: a time-lapse study of single axons.

    PubMed

    Kaethner, R J; Stuermer, C A

    1992-08-01

    In a variety of species, developing retinal axons branch initially more widely in their visual target centers and only gradually restrict their terminal arbors to smaller and defined territories. Retinotectal axons in fish, however, appeared to grow in a directed manner and to arborize only at their retinotopic target sites. To visualize the dynamics of retinal axon growth and arbor formation in fish, time-lapse recordings were made of individual retinal ganglion cell axons in the tectum in live zebrafish embryos. Axons were labeled with the fluorescent carbocyanine dyes Dil or DiO inserted as crystals into defined regions of the retina, viewed with 40x and 100x objectives with an SIT camera, and recorded, with exposure times of 200 msec at 30 or 60 sec intervals, over time periods of up to 13 hr. (1) Growth cones advanced rapidly, but the advance was punctuated by periods of rest. During the rest periods, the growth cones broadened and developed filopodia, but during extension they were more streamlined. (2) Growth cones traveled unerringly into the direction of their retinotopic targets without branching en route. At their target and only there, the axons began to form terminal arborizations, a process that involved the emission and retraction of numerous short side branches. The area that was permanently occupied or touched by transient branches of the terminal arbor--"the exploration field"--was small and almost circular and covered not more than 5.3% of the entire tectal surface area, but represented up to six times the size of the arbor at any one time. These findings are consistent with the idea that retinal axons are guided to their retinotopic target sites by sets of positional markers, with a graded distribution over the axes of the tectum.

  3. Disturbance maintains alternative biome states.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Hirota, Marina; Oliveira, Rafael S; Pausas, Juli G

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the distribution of biomes remains a challenge. Although tropical biome distribution has traditionally been explained by climate and soil, contrasting vegetation types often occur as mosaics with sharp boundaries under very similar environmental conditions. While evidence suggests that these biomes are alternative states, empirical broad-scale support to this hypothesis is still lacking. Using community-level field data and a novel resource-niche overlap approach, we show that, for a wide range of environmental conditions, fire feedbacks maintain savannas and forests as alternative biome states in both the Neotropics and the Afrotropics. In addition, wooded grasslands and savannas occurred as alternative grassy states in the Afrotropics, depending on the relative importance of fire and herbivory feedbacks. These results are consistent with landscape scale evidence and suggest that disturbance is a general factor driving and maintaining alternative biome states and vegetation mosaics in the tropics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  4. Maintaining protein composition in cilia.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Louise A; Elmaghloob, Yasmin; Ismail, Shehab

    2017-12-20

    The primary cilium is a sensory organelle that is vital in regulating several signalling pathways. Unlike most organelles cilia are open to the rest of the cell, not enclosed by membranes. The distinct protein composition is crucial to the function of cilia and many signalling proteins and receptors are specifically concentrated within distinct compartments. To maintain this composition, a mechanism is required to deliver proteins to the cilium whilst another must counter the entropic tendency of proteins to distribute throughout the cell. The combination of the two mechanisms should result in the concentration of ciliary proteins to the cilium. In this review we will look at different cellular mechanisms that play a role in maintaining the distinct composition of cilia, including regulation of ciliary access and trafficking of ciliary proteins to, from and within the cilium.

  5. Using Incentives to Improve Maintainability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    felt that if these tasks were successfully accomplished, system acquisition would be streamlined and ~ost savings would result. One of the...reducing the it [ Ref. 12]. labor hours and spares required to These savings generally accrue system and are difficul~ to the acquisition. As one...maintainability were not considered. The savings that result will be generated by the reduction in man-hours spent in the maintenance of tbe equipment, the

  6. Indonesian drilling maintains steady pace

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Offshore drilling activity in Indonesia increased nominally the first quarter of 1985 to an average 29 rigs. Barring any further problems with oil prices and markets, operators are expected to maintain essentially the current general level of appraisal/development work for the rest of this year. There are still a number of prospective regions to be explored in Southeast Asia. Regional developments are described for the South China Sea area, the Java Sea, South Sumatra, Kalimantan, Irian Jaya and the Malacca Strait.

  7. GDF10 Is a Signal for Axonal Sprouting and Functional Recovery after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, S; Nie, EH; Yin, Y; Benowitz, LI; Tung, S; Vinters, HV; Bahjat, FR; Stenzel-Poore, MP; Kawaguchi, R; Coppola, G; Carmichael, ST

    2016-01-01

    Stroke produces a limited process of neural repair. Axonal sprouting in cortex adjacent to the infarct is part of this recovery process, but the signal that initiates axonal sprouting is not known. Growth and Differentiation Factor 10 (GDF10) is induced in peri-infarct neurons in mouse, non-human primate and human. GDF10 promotes axonal outgrowth in vitro in mouse, rat and human neurons through TGFβRI/II signaling. Using pharmacogenetic gain and loss of function studies, GDF10 produces axonal sprouting and enhanced functional recovery after stroke; knocking down GDF10 blocks axonal sprouting and reduces recovery. RNA-seq from peri-infarct cortical neurons indicates that GDF10 downregulates PTEN and upregulates PI3 kinase signaling and induces specific axonal guidance molecules. Unsupervised genome-wide association analysis of the GDF10 transcriptome shows that it is not related to neurodevelopment but may partially overlap with other CNS injury patterns. GDF10 is a stroke-induced signal for axonal sprouting and functional recovery. PMID:26502261

  8. A Communication Theoretical Modeling of Axonal Propagation in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Hamideh; Akan, Ozgur B

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the fundamentals of communication among neurons, known as neuro-spike communication, leads to reach bio-inspired nanoscale communication paradigms. In this paper, we focus on a part of neuro-spike communication, known as axonal transmission, and propose a realistic model for it. The shape of the spike during axonal transmission varies according to previously applied stimulations to the neuron, and these variations affect the amount of information communicated between neurons. Hence, to reach an accurate model for neuro-spike communication, the memory of axon and its effect on the axonal transmission should be considered, which are not studied in the existing literature. In this paper, we extract the important factors on the memory of axon and define memory states based on these factors. We also describe the transition among these states and the properties of axonal transmission in each of them. Finally, we demonstrate that the proposed model can follow changes in the axonal functionality properly by simulating the proposed model and reporting the root mean square error between simulation results and experimental data.

  9. Misdirection of Regenerating Axons and Functional Recovery Following Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Shirley K.; Hinkle, Marcus L.; Nicolini, Jennifer; Rambo, Lindsay N.; Rexwinkle, April M.; Rose, Sam J.; Sabatier, Manning J.; Backus, Deborah; English, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    Poor functional recovery found after peripheral nerve injury has been attributed to the misdirection of regenerating axons to reinnervate functionally inappropriate muscles. We applied brief electrical stimulation (ES) to the common fibular (CF) but not the tibial (Tib) nerve just prior to transection and repair of the entire rat sciatic nerve, to attempt to influence the misdirection of its regenerating axons. The specificity with which regenerating axons reinnervated appropriate targets was evaluated physiologically using compound muscle action potentials (M responses) evoked from stimulation of the two nerve branches above the injury site. Functional recovery was assayed using the timing of electromyography (EMG) activity recorded from the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (Sol) muscles during treadmill locomotion and kinematic analysis of hindlimb locomotor movements. Selective ES of the CF nerve resulted in restored M-responses at earlier times than in unstimulated controls in both TA and Sol muscles. Stimulated CF axons reinnervated inappropriate targets to a greater extent than unstimulated Tib axons. During locomotion, functional antagonist muscles, TA and Sol, were coactivated both in stimulated rats and in unstimulated but injured rats. Hindlimb kinematics in stimulated rats were comparable to untreated rats, but significantly different from intact controls. Selective ES promotes enhanced axon regeneration but does so with decreased fidelity of muscle reinnervation. Functional recovery is neither improved nor degraded, suggesting that compensatory changes in the outputs of the spinal circuits driving locomotion may occur irrespective of the extent of misdirection of regenerating axons in the periphery. PMID:21120925

  10. Kinesin Mutations Cause Motor Neuron Disease Phenotypes by Disrupting Fast Axonal Transport in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, D. D.; Saxton, W. M.

    1996-01-01

    Previous work has shown that mutation of the gene that encodes the microtubule motor subunit kinesin heavy chain (Khc) in Drosophila inhibits neuronal sodium channel activity, action potentials and neurotransmitter secretion. These physiological defects cause progressive distal paralysis in larvae. To identify the cellular defects that cause these phenotypes, larval nerves were studied by light and electron microscopy. The axons of Khc mutants develop dramatic focal swellings along their lengths. The swellings are packed with fast axonal transport cargoes including vesicles, synaptic membrane proteins, mitochondria and prelysosomal organelles, but not with slow axonal transport cargoes such as cytoskeletal elements. Khc mutations also impair the development of larval motor axon terminals, causing dystrophic morphology and marked reductions in synaptic bouton numbers. These observations suggest that as the concentration of maternally provided wild-type KHC decreases, axonal organelles transported by kinesin periodically stall. This causes organelle jams that disrupt retrograde as well as anterograde fast axonal transport, leading to defective action potentials, dystrophic terminals, reduced transmitter secretion and progressive distal paralysis. These phenotypes parallel the pathologies of some vertebrate motor neuron diseases, including some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and suggest that impaired fast axonal transport is a key element in those diseases. PMID:8913751

  11. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  12. Impaired JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport promotes amyloid plaque pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gowrishankar, Swetha; Wu, Yumei

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes robustly accumulate within axonal swellings at Alzheimer’s disease (AD) amyloid plaques. However, the underlying mechanisms and disease relevance of such lysosome accumulations are not well understood. Motivated by these problems, we identified JNK-interacting protein 3 (JIP3) as an important regulator of axonal lysosome transport and maturation. JIP3 knockout mouse neuron primary cultures accumulate lysosomes within focal axonal swellings that resemble the dystrophic axons at amyloid plaques. These swellings contain high levels of amyloid precursor protein processing enzymes (BACE1 and presenilin 2) and are accompanied by elevated Aβ peptide levels. The in vivo importance of the JIP3-dependent regulation of axonal lysosomes was revealed by the worsening of the amyloid plaque pathology arising from JIP3 haploinsufficiency in a mouse model of AD. These results establish the critical role of JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport in regulating amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing and support a model wherein Aβ production is amplified by plaque-induced axonal lysosome transport defects. PMID:28784610

  13. Glia initiate brain assembly through non-canonical Chimaerin/Furin axon guidance in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rapti, Georgia; Li, Chang; Shan, Alan; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2017-01-01

    Brain assembly is hypothesized to begin when pioneer axons extend over non-neuronal cells, forming tracts guiding follower axons. Yet pioneer-neuron identities, their guidance substrates, and their interactions, are not well understood. Here, using time-lapse embryonic imaging, genetics, protein-interaction, and functional studies, we uncover the early events of C. elegans brain assembly. We demonstrate that C. elegans glia are key for assembly initiation, guiding pioneer and follower axons using distinct signals. Pioneer sublateral neurons, with unique growth properties, anatomy, and innervation, cooperate with glia to mediate follower-axon guidance. We further identify a CHIN-1/Chimaerin-KPC-1/Furin double mutant that severely disrupts assembly. CHIN-1/Chimaerin and KPC-1/Furin function non-canonically in glia and pioneer neurons for guidance-cue trafficking. We exploit this bottleneck to define roles for glial Netrin and Semaphorin in pioneer- and follower-axon guidance, respectively, and for glial and pioneer-neuron Flamingo/CELSR in follower-axon navigation. Altogether, our studies reveal previously-unknown glial roles in pioneer-axon guidance, suggesting conserved brain-assembly principles. PMID:28846083

  14. Modeling the mechanics of axonal fiber tracts using the embedded finite element method.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Harsha T; Kraft, Reuben H

    2017-05-01

    A subject-specific human head finite element model with embedded axonal fiber tractography obtained from diffusion tensor imaging was developed. The axonal fiber tractography finite element model was coupled with the volumetric elements in the head model using the embedded element method. This technique enables the calculation of axonal strains and real-time tracking of the mechanical response of the axonal fiber tracts. The coupled model was then verified using pressure and relative displacement-based (between skull and brain) experimental studies and was employed to analyze a head impact, demonstrating the applicability of this method in studying axonal injury. Following this, a comparison study of different injury criteria was performed. This model was used to determine the influence of impact direction on the extent of the axonal injury. The results suggested that the lateral impact loading is more dangerous compared to loading in the sagittal plane, a finding in agreement with previous studies. Through this analysis, we demonstrated the viability of the embedded element method as an alternative numerical approach for studying axonal injury in patient-specific human head models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Jab1 regulates Schwann cell proliferation and axonal sorting through p27

    PubMed Central

    Porrello, Emanuela; Rivellini, Cristina; Dina, Giorgia; Triolo, Daniela; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Ungaro, Daniela; Panattoni, Martina; Feltri, Maria Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Pardi, Ruggero; Quattrini, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Axonal sorting is a crucial event in nerve formation and requires proper Schwann cell proliferation, differentiation, and contact with axons. Any defect in axonal sorting results in dysmyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Evidence from mouse models shows that axonal sorting is regulated by laminin211– and, possibly, neuregulin 1 (Nrg1)–derived signals. However, how these signals are integrated in Schwann cells is largely unknown. We now report that the nuclear Jun activation domain–binding protein 1 (Jab1) may transduce laminin211 signals to regulate Schwann cell number and differentiation during axonal sorting. Mice with inactivation of Jab1 in Schwann cells develop a dysmyelinating neuropathy with axonal sorting defects. Loss of Jab1 increases p27 levels in Schwann cells, which causes defective cell cycle progression and aberrant differentiation. Genetic down-regulation of p27 levels in Jab1-null mice restores Schwann cell number, differentiation, and axonal sorting and rescues the dysmyelinating neuropathy. Thus, Jab1 constitutes a regulatory molecule that integrates laminin211 signals in Schwann cells to govern cell cycle, cell number, and differentiation. Finally, Jab1 may constitute a key molecule in the pathogenesis of dysmyelinating neuropathies. PMID:24344238

  16. Sequential Axon-derived Signals Couple Target Survival and Layer Specificity in the Drosophila Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Pecot, Matthew Y.; Chen, Yi; Akin, Orkun; Chen, Zhenqing; Tsui, C.Y. Kimberly; Zipursky, S. Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural circuit formation relies on interactions between axons and cells within the target field. While it is well established that target-derived signals act on axons to regulate circuit assembly, the extent to which axon-derived signals control circuit formation is not known. In the Drosophila visual system, anterograde signals numerically match R1–R6 photoreceptors with their targets by controlling target proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Here we demonstrate that additional axon-derived signals selectively couple target survival with layer-specificity. We show that Jelly belly (Jeb) produced by R1–R6 axons interacts with its receptor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk), on budding dendrites to control survival of L3 neurons, one of three postsynaptic targets. L3 axons then produce Netrin, which regulates the layer-specific targeting of another neuron within the same circuit. We propose that a cascade of axon-derived signals, regulating diverse cellular processes, provides a strategy for coordinating circuit assembly across different regions of the nervous system. PMID:24742459

  17. The Drosophila HEM-2/NAP1 homolog KETTE controls axonal pathfinding and cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Hummel, T; Leifker, K; Klämbt, C

    2000-04-01

    In Drosophila, the correct formation of the segmental commissures depends on neuron-glial interactions at the midline. The VUM midline neurons extend axons along which glial cells migrate in between anterior and posterior commissures. Here, we show that the gene kette is required for the normal projection of the VUM axons and subsequently disrupts glial migration. Axonal projection defects are also found for many other moto- and interneurons. In addition, kette affects the cell morphology of mesodermal and epidermal derivatives, which show an abnormal actin cytoskeleton. The KETTE protein is homologous to the transmembrane protein HEM-2/NAP1 evolutionary conserved from worms to vertebrates. In vitro analysis has shown a specific interaction of the vertebrate HEM-2/NAP1 with the SH2-SH3 adapter protein NCK and the small GTPase RAC1, which both have been implicated in regulating cytoskeleton organization and axonal growth. Hypomorphic kette mutations lead to axonal defects similar to mutations in the Drosophila NCK homolog dreadlocks. Furthermore, we show that kette and dock mutants genetically interact. NCK is thought to interact with the small G proteins RAC1 and CDC42, which play a role in axonal growth. In line with these observations, a kette phenocopy can be obtained following directed expression of mutant DCDC42 or DRAC1 in the CNS midline. In addition, the kette mutant phenotype can be partially rescued by expression of an activated DRAC1 transgene. Our data suggest an important role of the HEM-2 protein in cytoskeletal organization during axonal pathfinding.

  18. Characterization of axon formation in the embryonic stem cell-derived motoneuron.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hung-Chuan; Wu, Ya-Ting; Shen, Shih-Cheng; Wang, Chi-Chung; Tsai, Ming-Shiun; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chen, Ching-Wen; Liu, Ching-San; Su, Hong-Lin

    2011-01-01

    The developing neural cell must form a highly organized architecture to properly receive and transmit nerve signals. Neural formation from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a novel system for studying axonogenesis, which are orchestrated by polarity-regulating molecules. Here the ES-derived motoneurons, identified by HB9 promoter-driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression, showed characteristics of motoneuron-specific gene expression. In the majority of motoneurons, one of the bilateral neurites developed into an axon that featured with axonal markers, including Tau1, vesicle acetylcholine transporter, and synaptophysin. Interestingly, one third of the motoneurons developed bi-axonal processes but no multiple axonal GFP cell was found. The neuronal polarity-regulating proteins, including the phosphorylated AKT and ERK, were compartmentalized into both of the bilateral axonal tips. Importantly, this aberrant axon morphology was still present after the engraftment of GFP(+) neurons into the spinal cord, suggesting that even a mature neural environment fails to provide a proper niche to guide normal axon formation. These findings underscore the necessity for evaluating the morphogenesis and functionality of neurons before the clinical trials using ES or somatic stem cells.

  19. The Influence of Glutamate on Axonal Compound Action Potential In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Abouelela, Ahmed; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background  Our previous experiments demonstrated modulation of the amplitude of the axonal compound action potential (CAP) by electrical stimulation. To verify assumption that glutamate released from axons could be involved in this phenomenon, the modification of the axonal CAP induced by glutamate was investigated. Objectives  The major objective of this research is to verify the hypothesis that axonal activity would trigger the release of glutamate, which in turn would interact with specific axonal receptors modifying the amplitude of the action potential. Methods  Segments of the sciatic nerve were exposed to exogenous glutamate in vitro, and CAP was recorded before and after glutamate application. In some experiments, the release of radioactive glutamate analog from the sciatic nerve exposed to exogenous glutamate was also evaluated. Results  The glutamate-induced increase in CAP was blocked by different glutamate receptor antagonists. The effect of glutamate was not observed in Ca-free medium, and was blocked by antagonists of calcium channels. Exogenous glutamate, applied to the segments of sciatic nerve, induced the release of radioactive glutamate analog, demonstrating glutamate-induced glutamate release. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that axolemma contains components necessary for glutamatergic neurotransmission. Conclusion  The proteins of the axonal membrane can under the influence of electrical stimulation or exogenous glutamate change membrane permeability and ionic conductance, leading to a change in the amplitude of CAP. We suggest that increased axonal activity leads to the release of glutamate that results in changes in the amplitude of CAPs.

  20. Calpain-mediated cleavage of collapsin response mediator protein-2 drives acute axonal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Michel, Uwe; Lenz, Christof; Friedel, Caroline C.; Köster, Sarah; d’Hedouville, Zara; Tönges, Lars; Urlaub, Henning; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul; Koch, Jan C.

    2016-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a key initiating event in many neurological diseases. Focal lesions to axons result in a rapid disintegration of the perilesional axon by acute axonal degeneration (AAD) within several hours. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of AAD are only incompletely understood. Here, we studied AAD in vivo through live-imaging of the rat optic nerve and in vitro in primary rat cortical neurons in microfluidic chambers. We found that calpain is activated early during AAD of the optic nerve and that calpain inhibition completely inhibits axonal fragmentation on the proximal side of the crush while it attenuates AAD on the distal side. A screening of calpain targets revealed that collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) is a main downstream target of calpain activation in AAD. CRMP2-overexpression delayed bulb formation and rescued impairment of axonal mitochondrial transport after axotomy in vitro. In vivo, CRMP2-overexpression effectively protected the proximal axon from fragmentation within 6 hours after crush. Finally, a proteomic analysis of the optic nerve was performed at 6 hours after crush, which identified further proteins regulated during AAD, including several interactors of CRMP2. These findings reveal CRMP2 as an important mediator of AAD and define it as a putative therapeutic target. PMID:27845394

  1. Rab5 and Rab4 Regulate Axon Elongation in the Xenopus Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Konopacki, Filip A.; Zivraj, Krishna H.; Holt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    The elongation rate of axons is tightly regulated during development. Recycling of the plasma membrane is known to regulate axon extension; however, the specific molecules involved in recycling within the growth cone have not been fully characterized. Here, we investigated whether the small GTPases Rab4 and Rab5 involved in short-loop recycling regulate the extension of Xenopus retinal axons. We report that, in growth cones, Rab5 and Rab4 proteins localize to endosomes, which accumulate markers that are constitutively recycled. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching experiments showed that Rab5 and Rab4 are recruited to endosomes in the growth cone, suggesting that they control recycling locally. Dynamic image analysis revealed that Rab4-positive carriers can bud off from Rab5 endosomes and move to the periphery of the growth cone, suggesting that both Rab5 and Rab4 contribute to recycling within the growth cone. Inhibition of Rab4 function with dominant-negative Rab4 or Rab4 morpholino and constitutive activation of Rab5 decreases the elongation of retinal axons in vitro and in vivo, but, unexpectedly, does not disrupt axon pathfinding. Thus, Rab5- and Rab4-mediated control of endosome trafficking appears to be crucial for axon growth. Collectively, our results suggest that recycling from Rab5-positive endosomes via Rab4 occurs within the growth cone and thereby supports axon elongation. PMID:24403139

  2. Impaired retrograde transport of axonal autophagosomes contributes to autophagic stress in Alzheimer’s disease neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tammineni, Prasad; Ye, Xuan; Feng, Tuancheng; Aikal, Daniyal; Cai, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Neurons face unique challenges of transporting nascent autophagic vacuoles (AVs) from distal axons toward the soma, where mature lysosomes are mainly located. Autophagy defects have been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the mechanisms underlying altered autophagy remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that defective retrograde transport contributes to autophagic stress in AD axons. Amphisomes predominantly accumulate at axonal terminals of mutant hAPP mice and AD patient brains. Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers associate with AVs in AD axons and interact with dynein motors. This interaction impairs dynein recruitment to amphisomes through competitive interruption of dynein-Snapin motor-adaptor coupling, thus immobilizing them in distal axons. Consistently, deletion of Snapin in mice causes AD-like axonal autophagic stress, whereas overexpressing Snapin in hAPP neurons reduces autophagic accumulation at presynaptic terminals by enhancing AV retrograde transport. Altogether, our study provides new mechanistic insight into AD-associated autophagic stress, thus establishing a foundation for ameliorating axonal pathology in AD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21776.001 PMID:28085665

  3. Target-Derived Neurotrophins Coordinate Transcription and Transport of Bclw to Prevent Axonal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cosker, Katharina E.; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Fenstermacher, Sara J.

    2013-01-01

    Establishment of neuronal circuitry depends on both formation and refinement of neural connections. During this process, target-derived neurotrophins regulate both transcription and translation to enable selective axon survival or elimination. However, it is not known whether retrograde signaling pathways that control transcription are coordinated with neurotrophin-regulated actions that transpire in the axon. Here we report that target-derived neurotrophins coordinate transcription of the antiapoptotic gene bclw with transport of bclw mRNA to the axon, and thereby prevent axonal degeneration in rat and mouse sensory neurons. We show that neurotrophin stimulation of nerve terminals elicits new bclw transcripts that are immediately transported to the axons and translated into protein. Bclw interacts with Bax and suppresses the caspase6 apoptotic cascade that fosters axonal degeneration. The scope of bclw regulation at the levels of transcription, transport, and translation provides a mechanism whereby sustained neurotrophin stimulation can be integrated over time, so that axonal survival is restricted to neurons connected within a stable circuit. PMID:23516285

  4. Age may contribute to the increased frequency of axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Wilken, Miguel; Vázquez, Gabriel; Farez, Mauricio F

    2017-12-01

    The frequency of axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) varies among countries. Previous studies supporting the high frequency of axonal GBS in South America have been carried out with pediatric populations. We seek to determine the frequency of axonal GBS in both children and adults in South America. This is a retrospective cohort analysis of patients who were diagnosed with GBS between January 2006 and December 2013 in a neurological center in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Adults and children with a diagnosis of GBS were included and classified by applying Ho and colleagues' criteria 1 for axonal GBS. The study included 105 patients with GBS. Among 58 adults, only 5 individuals were classified as axonal GBS compared with 16 of 47 children. The frequency of axonal GBS was significantly higher in children than in adults (34% vs. 8.6%, P = 0.0001). As shown in a cohort of South American patients, age may impact the frequency of axonal GBS. Muscle Nerve 56: 1311-1313, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Schwann cell transplantation improves reticulospinal axon growth and forelimb strength after severe cervical spinal cord contusion.

    PubMed

    Schaal, S M; Kitay, B M; Cho, K S; Lo, T P; Barakat, D J; Marcillo, A E; Sanchez, A R; Andrade, C M; Pearse, D D

    2007-01-01

    Schwann cell (SC) implantation alone has been shown to promote the growth of propriospinal and sensory axons, but not long-tract descending axons, after thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). In the current study, we examined if an axotomy close to the cell body of origin (so as to enhance the intrinsic growth response) could permit supraspinal axons to grow onto SC grafts. Adult female Fischer rats received a severe (C5) cervical contusion (1.1 mm displacement, 3 KDyn). At 1 week postinjury, 2 million SCs ex vivo transduced with lentiviral vector encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were implanted within media into the injury epicenter; injury-only animals served as controls. Animals were tested weekly using the BBB score for 7 weeks postimplantation and received at end point tests for upper body strength: self-supported forelimb hanging, forearm grip force, and the incline plane. Following behavioral assessment, animals were anterogradely traced bilaterally from the reticular formation using BDA-Texas Red. Stereological quantification revealed a twofold increase in the numbers of preserved NeuN+ neurons rostral and caudal to the injury/graft site in SC implanted animals, corroborating previous reports of their neuroprotective efficacy. Examination of labeled reticulospinal axon growth revealed that while rarely an axon was present within the lesion site of injury-only controls, numerous reticulospinal axons had penetrated the SC implant/lesion milieu. This has not been observed following implantation of SCs alone into the injured thoracic spinal cord. Significant behavioral improvements over injury-only controls in upper limb strength, including an enhanced grip strength (a 296% increase) and an increased self-supported forelimb hanging, accompanied SC-mediated neuroprotection and reticulospinal axon growth. The current study further supports the neuroprotective efficacy of SC implants after SCI and demonstrates that SCs alone are capable of supporting

  6. Niaspan increases axonal remodeling after stroke in type 1 diabetes rats✩

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tao; Chopp, Michael; Ye, Xinchun; Liu, Zhongwu; Zacharek, Alex; Cui, Yisheng; Roberts, Cynthia; Buller, Ben; Chen, Jieli

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective We investigated axonal plasticity in the bilateral motor cortices and the long term therapeutic effect of Niaspan on axonal remodeling after stroke in type-1 diabetic (T1DM) rats. Experimental approaches T1DM was induced in young adult male Wistar rats via injection of streptozotocin. T1DM rats were subjected to 2 h transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) and were treated with 40 mg/kg Niaspan or saline starting 24 h after MCAo and daily for 28 days. Anterograde tracing using biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) injected into the contralateral motor cortex was performed to assess axonal sprouting in the ipsilateral motor cortex area. Functional outcome, SMI-31 (a pan-axonal microfilament marker), Bielschowsky silver and synaptophysin expression were measured. In vitro studies using primary cortical neuron (PCN) cultures and in vivo BDA injection into the brain to anterogradely label axons and terminals were employed. Results Niaspan treatment of stroke in T1DM–MCAo rats significantly improved functional outcome after stroke and increased SMI-31, Bielschowsky silver and synaptophysin expression in the ischemic brain compared to saline treated T1DM–MCAo rats (p<0.05). Using BDA to anterograde label axons and terminals, Niaspan treatment significantly increased axonal density in ipsilateral motor cortex in T1DM–MCAo rats (p<0.05, n=7/group). Niacin treatment of PCN significantly increased Ang1 expression under high glucose condition. Niacin and Ang1 significantly increased neurite outgrowth, and anti-Ang1 antibody marginally attenuated Niacin induced neurite outgrowth (p=0.06, n=6/group) in cultured PCN under high glucose condition. Conclusion Niaspan treatment increased ischemic brain Ang1 expression and promoted axonal remodeling in the ischemic brain as well as improved functional outcome after stroke. Ang1 may partially contribute to Niaspan-induced axonal remodeling after stroke in T1DM-rats. PMID:22266016

  7. Molecular Analysis of Sensory Axon Branching Unraveled a cGMP-Dependent Signaling Cascade.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, Alexandre; Ter-Avetisyan, Gohar; Schmidt, Hannes; Rathjen, Fritz G

    2018-04-24

    Axonal branching is a key process in the establishment of circuit connectivity within the nervous system. Molecular-genetic studies have shown that a specific form of axonal branching—the bifurcation of sensory neurons at the transition zone between the peripheral and the central nervous system—is regulated by a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent signaling cascade which is composed of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), the receptor guanylyl cyclase Npr2, and cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iα (cGKIα). In the absence of any one of these components, neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and cranial sensory ganglia no longer bifurcate, and instead turn in either an ascending or a descending direction. In contrast, collateral axonal branch formation which represents a second type of axonal branch formation is not affected by inactivation of CNP, Npr2, or cGKI. Whereas axon bifurcation was lost in mouse mutants deficient for components of CNP-induced cGMP formation; the absence of the cGMP-degrading enzyme phosphodiesterase 2A had no effect on axon bifurcation. Adult mice that lack sensory axon bifurcation due to the conditional inactivation of Npr2-mediated cGMP signaling in DRG neurons demonstrated an altered shape of sensory axon terminal fields in the spinal cord, indicating that elaborate compensatory mechanisms reorganize neuronal circuits in the absence of bifurcation. On a functional level, these mice showed impaired heat sensation and nociception induced by chemical irritants, whereas responses to cold sensation, mechanical stimulation, and motor coordination are normal. These data point to a critical role of axon bifurcation for the processing of acute pain perception.

  8. Drebrin coordinates the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton during the initiation of axon collateral branches.

    PubMed

    Ketschek, Andrea; Spillane, Mirela; Dun, Xin-Peng; Hardy, Holly; Chilton, John; Gallo, Gianluca

    2016-10-01

    Drebrin is a cytoskeleton-associated protein which can interact with both actin filaments and the tips of microtubules. Its roles have been studied mostly in dendrites, and the functions of drebrin in axons are less well understood. In this study, we analyzed the role of drebrin, through shRNA-mediated depletion and overexpression, in the collateral branching of chicken embryonic sensory axons. We report that drebrin promotes the formation of axonal filopodia and collateral branches in vivo and in vitro. Live imaging of cytoskeletal dynamics revealed that drebrin promotes the formation of filopodia from precursor structures termed axonal actin patches. Endogenous drebrin localizes to actin patches and depletion studies indicate that drebrin contributes to the development of patches. In filopodia, endogenous drebrin localizes to the proximal portion of the filopodium. Drebrin was found to promote the stability of axonal filopodia and the entry of microtubule plus tips into axonal filopodia. The effects of drebrin on the stabilization of filopodia are independent of its effects on promoting microtubule targeting to filopodia. Inhibition of myosin II induces a redistribution of endogenous drebrin distally into filopodia, and further increases branching in drebrin overexpressing neurons. Finally, a 30 min treatment with the branch-inducing signal nerve growth factor increases the levels of axonal drebrin. This study determines the specific roles of drebrin in the regulation of the axonal cytoskeleton, and provides evidence that drebrin contributes to the coordination of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton during the initial stages of axon branching. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 1092-1110, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The influence of predegenerated nerve grafts on axonal regeneration from prelesioned peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N A; Neumann, M M; de Souky, M A; So, K F; Bedi, K S

    1996-10-01

    Recent in vitro work has indicated that predegenerated segments of peripheral nerve are more capable of supporting neurite growth from adult neurons than fresh segments of nerve, whereas previous in vivo studies which investigated whether predegenerated nerve segments used as grafts are capable of enhancing axonal regeneration produced conflicting results. We have reinvestigated this question by using predegenerated nerve grafts in combination with conditioning lesions of the host nerve to determine the optimal conditions for obtaining the maximal degree of regeneration of myelinated axons. The sciatic nerve of adult Dark Agouti rats were sectioned at midthigh level, and the distal portion was allowed to predegenerate for 0, 6 or 12 d in situ. 10-15 mm lengths of these distal nerve segments were then syngenically grafted onto the central stumps of sciatic nerves which had themselves received a conditioning lesion 0, 6, and 12 d previously, making a total of 9 different donor-host combinations. The grafts were assessed histologically 3 or 8 wk after grafting. Axonal regeneration in the 9 different donor-host combinations was determined by counting the numbers of myelinated axons in transverse sections through the grafts. All grafts examined contained regenerating myelinated axons. The rats given a 3 wk postgrafting survival period had an average of between 1400 and 5300 such axons. The rats given an 8 wk postgrafting survival period had between about 13,000 and 25,000 regenerating myelinated axons. Analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for both the Donor and Host conditions as well as Weeks (i.e. survival period after grafting). These results indicate that both a conditioning lesion of the host neurons and the degree of predegeneration of peripheral nerve segments to be used as grafts are of importance in influencing the degree of axonal regeneration. Of these 2 factors the conditioning lesion of the host appears to have the greater effect on the

  10. Morphological characterization of rat entorhinal neurons in vivo: soma-dendritic structure and axonal domains.

    PubMed

    Lingenhöhl, K; Finch, D M

    1991-01-01

    We used in vivo intracellular labeling with horseradish peroxidase in order to study the soma-dendritic morphology and axonal projections of rat entorhinal neurons. The cells responded to hippocampal stimulation with inhibitory postsynaptic potentials, and thus likely received direct or indirect hippocampal input. All cells (n = 24) showed extensive dendritic domains that extended in some cases for more than 1 mm. The dendrites of layer II neurons were largely restricted to layers I and II or layers I-III, while the dendrites of deeper cells could extend through all cortical layers. Computed 3D rotations showed that the basilar dendrites of deep pyramids extended roughly parallel to the cortical layering, and that they were mostly confined to the layer containing the soma and layers immediately adjacent. Total dendritic lengths averaged 9.8 mm +/- 3.8 (SD), and ranged from 5 mm to more than 18 mm. Axonal processes could be visualized in 21 cells. Most of these showed axonal branching within the entorhinal cortex, sometimes extensive. Efferent axonal domains were reconstructed in detail in 3 layer II stellate cells. All 3 projected axons across the subicular complex to the dentate gyrus. One of these cells showed an extensive net-like axonal domain that also projected to several other structures, including the hippocampus proper, subicular complex, and the amygdalo-piriform transition area. The axons of layer III and IV cells projected to the angular bundle, where they continued in a rostral direction. In contrast to the layer II, III and IV cells, no efferent axonal branches leaving the entorhinal cortex could be visualized in 5 layer V neurons. The data indicate that entorhinal neurons can integrate input from a considerable volume of entorhinal cortex by virtue of their extensive dendritic domains, and provide a further basis for specifying the layers in which cells receive synaptic input. The extensive axonal branching pattern seen in most of the cells would

  11. Axonal/Glial Upregulation of EphB/ephrin-B Signaling in Mouse Experimental Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tony; Sretavan, David

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To use a laser-induced ocular hypertension (LIOH) mouse model to examine the optic nerve head (ONH) expression of EphB/ephrin-B, previously shown to be upregulated in glaucomatous DBA/2J mice. To relate ephrin-B reverse signaling with states of axonal response to disease. Methods. LIOH was induced unilaterally in CD-1 mice by laser photocoagulation of limbal and episcleral veins. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured with a tonometer. EphB/ephrin-B mRNA expression was assessed by in situ hybridization on eyecup cryosections and real-time PCR. Cell specific markers were used to identify the cellular origin of EphB/ephrin-B expression. Activation of ephrin-B signaling was investigated with a phosphospecific antibody on cryosections and retinal whole-mounts. Results. Upregulation of EphB/ephrin-B expression occurred early within a day of IOP elevation. A transient increase of phosphorylation-dependent ephrin-B (pEB) reverse signaling was observed in ONH axons, microglia, and some astrocytes. Morphologically unaffected retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons differed from axons with reactive aberrant trajectories by exhibiting increased pEB activation, whereas pEB levels in morphologically affected axons were comparable to those of controls. Conclusions. An Eph-ephrin signaling network is activated at the ONH after LIOH in CD-1 mice, either before or coincident with the initial morphologic signs of RGC axon damage reported previously. Of note, ephrin-B reverse signaling was transiently upregulated in RGC axons at the ONH early in their response to IOP elevation but was downregulated in axons that had been damaged by glaucomatous injury and exhibited aberrant trajectories. Ephrin-B reverse signaling may mark RGC axons for damage or confer a protective advantage against injury. PMID:19815726

  12. Netrin1 establishes multiple boundaries for axon growth in the developing spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Supraja G; Butler, Samantha J

    2017-10-01

    The canonical model for netrin1 function proposed that it acted as a long-range chemotropic axon guidance cue. In the developing spinal cord, floor-plate (FP)-derived netrin1 was thought to act as a diffusible attractant to draw commissural axons to the ventral midline. However, our recent studies have shown that netrin1 is dispensable in the FP for axon guidance. We have rather found that netrin1 acts locally: netrin1 is produced by neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the ventricular zone (VZ), and deposited on the pial surface as a haptotactic adhesive substrate that guides Dcc + axon growth. Here, we further demonstrate that this netrin1 pial-substrate has an early role orienting pioneering spinal axons, directing them to extend ventrally. However, as development proceeds, commissural axons choose to grow around a boundary of netrin1 expressing cells in VZ, instead of continuing to extend alongside the netrin1 pial-substrate in the ventral spinal cord. This observation suggests netrin1 may supply a more complex activity than pure adhesion, with netrin1-expressing cells also supplying a growth boundary for axons. Supporting this possibility, we have observed that additional domains of netrin1 expression arise adjacent to the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) in E12.5 mice that are also required to sculpt axonal growth. Together, our studies suggest that netrin1 provides "hederal" boundaries: a local growth substrate that promotes axon extension, while also preventing local innervation of netrin1-expressing domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Optic nerve axons and acquired alterations in the appearance of the optic disc.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtschafter, J D

    1983-01-01

    The pathophysiologic events in optic nerve axons have recently been recognized as crucial to an understanding of clinically significant acquired alterations in the ophthalmoscopic appearance of the optic disc. Stasis and related abnormalities of axonal transport appear to explain most aspects of optic nerve head swelling, including optic disc drusen and retinal cottonwool spots. Loss of axoplasm and axonal death can be invoked to interpret optic disc pallor, thinning and narrowing of rim tissue, changes in the size and outline of the optic cup, laminar dots, atrophy of the retinal nerve fiber layer, and acquired demyelination and myelination of the retinal nerve fiber layer. It is speculated that the axons may also play a role in the mechanical support of the lamina cribrosa in resisting the pressure gradient across the pars scleralis of the optic nerve head. Axons and their associated glial cells may be involved in those cases where "reversibility" of cupping of the optic disc has been reported. The structure, physiology, and experimental pathologic findings of the optic nerve head have been reviewed. Many aspects concerning the final anatomic appearance of the optic nerve head have been explained. However, many questions remain concerning the intermediate mechanisms by which increased intracranial pressure retards the various components of axonal transport in papilledema and by which increased IOP causes axonal loss in glaucoma. Investigation of the molecular biology of axonal constituents and their responses to abnormalities in their physical and chemical milieu could extend our understanding of the events that result from mechanical compression and local ischemia. Moreover, we have identified a need to further explore the role of axons in the pathophysiology of optic disc cupping. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:6203209

  14. Trafficking of cholesterol from cell bodies to distal axons in Niemann Pick C1-deficient neurons.

    PubMed

    Karten, Barbara; Vance, Dennis E; Campenot, Robert B; Vance, Jean E

    2003-02-07

    Niemann Pick type C (NPC) disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In cells lacking functional NPC1 protein, endocytosed cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes/lysosomes. We utilized primary neuronal cultures in which cell bodies and distal axons reside in separate compartments to investigate the requirement of NPC1 protein for transport of cholesterol from cell bodies to distal axons. We have recently observed that in NPC1-deficient neurons compared with wild-type neurons, cholesterol accumulates in cell bodies but is reduced in distal axons (Karten, B., Vance, D. E., Campenot, R. B., and Vance, J. E. (2002) J. Neurochem. 83, 1154-1163). We now show that NPC1 protein is expressed in both cell bodies and distal axons. In NPC1-deficient neurons, cholesterol delivered to cell bodies from low density lipoproteins (LDLs), high density lipoproteins, or cyclodextrin complexes was transported into axons in normal amounts, whereas transport of endogenously synthesized cholesterol was impaired. Inhibition of cholesterol synthesis with pravastatin in wild-type and NPC1-deficient neurons reduced axonal growth. However, LDLs restored a normal rate of growth to wild-type but not NPC1-deficient neurons treated with pravastatin. Thus, although LDL cholesterol is transported into axons of NPC1-deficient neurons, this source of cholesterol does not sustain normal axonal growth. Over the lifespan of NPC1-deficient neurons, these defects in cholesterol transport might be responsible for the observed altered distribution of cholesterol between cell bodies and axons and, consequently, might contribute to the neurological dysfunction in NPC disease.

  15. Age related optic nerve axonal loss in adult Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Cepurna, William O; Kayton, Robert J; Johnson, Elaine C; Morrison, John C

    2005-06-01

    The effect of age on the number and morphology of optic nerve axons in adult Brown Norway rats (5-31 months old) (n=29) was examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By manually counting every axon in areas representing 60% of the optic nerve cross-section, we found a significant negative correlation between age and axon count (R(2)=0.18, P<0.05). However, when the oldest animals were omitted, the relationship was no longer statistically significant. Simultaneously, the proportion of spontaneously degenerating axons increased at an exponential rate (R(2)=0.79, P<0.05), with significantly more degeneration in the 31-month group than in 5-month-old animals (ANOVA, P<0.05). This study demonstrates, using quantitative TEM methods, that optic nerve axonal numbers are relatively constant throughout the majority of the adult life of the Brown Norway rat, an increasingly popular strain for glaucoma research. Total axonal loss with aging is substantially less than that reported for other strains. The reduction in axonal numbers and the rate of axonal degeneration do not appear significantly altered until the last few months of life, failing to support some studies that have concluded that optic nerve axon loss in adult rats is linear. However, they do agree with other studies in the rat, and a similar study performed in non-human primate eyes, that concluded that aging changes in the optic nerve and retina follow a complex pattern. Therefore, the impact of animal age must be considered when modeling the course and pathophysiology of experimental glaucomatous optic nerve damage in rats.

  16. Current Opportunities for Clinical Monitoring of Axonal Pathology in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P.; Abu Hamdeh, Sami; Marklund, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multidimensional and highly complex disease commonly resulting in widespread injury to axons, due to rapid inertial acceleration/deceleration forces transmitted to the brain during impact. Axonal injury leads to brain network dysfunction, significantly contributing to cognitive and functional impairments frequently observed in TBI survivors. Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a clinical entity suggested by impaired level of consciousness and coma on clinical examination and characterized by widespread injury to the hemispheric white matter tracts, the corpus callosum and the brain stem. The clinical course of DAI is commonly unpredictable and it remains a challenging entity with limited therapeutic options, to date. Although axonal integrity may be disrupted at impact, the majority of axonal pathology evolves over time, resulting from delayed activation of complex intracellular biochemical cascades. Activation of these secondary biochemical pathways may lead to axonal transection, named secondary axotomy, and be responsible for the clinical decline of DAI patients. Advances in the neurocritical care of TBI patients have been achieved by refinements in multimodality monitoring for prevention and early detection of secondary injury factors, which can be applied also to DAI. There is an emerging role for biomarkers in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and interstitial fluid using microdialysis in the evaluation of axonal injury in TBI. These biomarker studies have assessed various axonal and neuroglial markers as well as inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, modern neuroimaging can detect subtle or overt DAI/white matter changes in diffuse TBI patients across all injury severities using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, and positron emission tomography. Importantly, serial neuroimaging studies provide evidence for evolving axonal injury. Since axonal injury may be a key risk factor for

  17. Stimulation-induced Ca(2+) influx at nodes of Ranvier in mouse peripheral motor axons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongsheng; David, Gavriel

    2016-01-01

    In peripheral myelinated axons of mammalian spinal motor neurons, Ca(2+) influx was thought to occur only in pathological conditions such as ischaemia. Using Ca(2+) imaging in mouse large motor axons, we find that physiological stimulation with trains of action potentials transiently elevates axoplasmic [C(2+)] around nodes of Ranvier. These stimulation-induced [Ca(2+)] elevations require Ca(2+) influx, and are partially reduced by blocking T-type Ca(2+) channels (e.g. mibefradil) and by blocking the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), suggesting an important contribution of Ca(2+) influx via reverse-mode NCX activity. Acute disruption of paranodal myelin dramatically increases stimulation-induced [Ca(2+)] elevations around nodes by allowing activation of sub-myelin L-type (nimodipine-sensitive) Ca(2+) channels. The Ca(2+) that enters myelinated motor axons during normal activity is likely to contribute to several signalling pathways; the larger Ca(2+) influx that occurs following demyelination may contribute to the axonal degeneration that occurs in peripheral demyelinating diseases. Activity-dependent Ca(2+) signalling is well established for somata and terminals of mammalian spinal motor neurons, but not for their axons. Imaging of an intra-axonally injected fluorescent [Ca(2+)] indicator revealed that during repetitive action potential stimulation, [Ca(2+)] elevations localized to nodal regions occurred in mouse motor axons from ventral roots, phrenic nerve and intramuscular branches. These [Ca(2+)] elevations (∼ 0.1 μm with stimulation at 50 Hz, 10 s) were blocked by removal of Ca(2+) from the extracellular solution. Effects of pharmacological blockers indicated contributions from both T-type Ca(2+) channels and reverse mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange (NCX). Acute disruption of paranodal myelin (by stretch or lysophosphatidylcholine) increased the stimulation-induced [Ca(2+)] elevations, which now included a prominent contribution from L-type Ca(2+) channels. These

  18. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  19. How to maintain chain drives

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.L.

    1992-06-18

    Properly selected and maintained chain drives can be expected to give thousands of hours of reliable service. Selection is usually done just once. This paper reports on good maintenance which must be done regularly to keep the drive operating. An effective maintenance program for roller chain should include correct type and adequate amounts of lubrication, replacement of worn chains and sprockets, and elimination of drive interferences. It is important to set u a lubrication and inspection/correction schedule to ensure that all required maintenance is carried out.

  20. Staradmin -- Starlink User Database Maintainer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Adrian

    The subject of this SSN is a utility called STARADMIN. This utility allows the system administrator to build and maintain a Starlink User Database (UDB). The principal source of information for each user is a text file, named after their username. The content of each file is a list consisting of one keyword followed by the relevant user data per line. These user database files reside in a single directory. The STARADMIN program is used to manipulate these user data files and automatically generate user summary lists.

  1. AUTONOMIC AXONS IN THE HUMAN ENDOCRINE PANCREAS SHOW UNIQUE INNERVATION PATTERNS

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Abdulreda, Midhat H.; Formoso, Alexander L.; Gans, Itai; Ricordi, Camillo; Berggren, Per-Olof; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The autonomic nervous system regulates hormone secretion from the endocrine pancreas, the islets of Langerhans, and thus impacts glucose metabolism. The parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves innervate the pancreatic islet, but the precise innervation patterns are not known, particularly in human islets. Here we demonstrate that the innervation of human islets is different from that of mouse islets and that it does not conform to existing models of autonomic control of islet function. By visualizing axons in three dimensions and quantifying axonal densities and contacts within pancreatic islets, we found that, in contrast to mouse endocrine cells, human endocrine cells are sparsely contacted by autonomic axons. Few parasympathetic cholinergic axons penetrate the human islet and the invading sympathetic fibers preferentially innervate smooth muscle cells of blood vessels located within the islet. Thus, rather than modulating endocrine cell function directly, sympathetic nerves may regulate hormone secretion in human islets by controlling local blood flow or by acting on islet regions located downstream. PMID:21723503

  2. BORC/kinesin-1 ensemble drives polarized transport of lysosomes into the axon

    PubMed Central

    Farías, Ginny G.; Guardia, Carlos M.; De Pace, Raffaella; Britt, Dylan J.; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of lysosomes to move within the cytoplasm is important for many cellular functions. This ability is particularly critical in neurons, which comprise vast, highly differentiated domains such as the axon and dendrites. The mechanisms that control lysosome movement in these domains, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that an ensemble of BORC, Arl8, SKIP, and kinesin-1, previously shown to mediate centrifugal transport of lysosomes in nonneuronal cells, specifically drives lysosome transport into the axon, and not the dendrites, in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This transport is essential for maintenance of axonal growth-cone dynamics and autophagosome turnover. Our findings illustrate how a general mechanism for lysosome dispersal in nonneuronal cells is adapted to drive polarized transport in neurons, and emphasize the importance of this mechanism for critical axonal processes. PMID:28320970

  3. BORC/kinesin-1 ensemble drives polarized transport of lysosomes into the axon.

    PubMed

    Farías, Ginny G; Guardia, Carlos M; De Pace, Raffaella; Britt, Dylan J; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2017-04-04

    The ability of lysosomes to move within the cytoplasm is important for many cellular functions. This ability is particularly critical in neurons, which comprise vast, highly differentiated domains such as the axon and dendrites. The mechanisms that control lysosome movement in these domains, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that an ensemble of BORC, Arl8, SKIP, and kinesin-1, previously shown to mediate centrifugal transport of lysosomes in nonneuronal cells, specifically drives lysosome transport into the axon, and not the dendrites, in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This transport is essential for maintenance of axonal growth-cone dynamics and autophagosome turnover. Our findings illustrate how a general mechanism for lysosome dispersal in nonneuronal cells is adapted to drive polarized transport in neurons, and emphasize the importance of this mechanism for critical axonal processes.

  4. Node of Ranvier length as a potential regulator of myelinated axon conduction speed.

    PubMed

    Arancibia-Cárcamo, I Lorena; Ford, Marc C; Cossell, Lee; Ishida, Kinji; Tohyama, Koujiro; Attwell, David

    2017-01-28

    Myelination speeds conduction of the nerve impulse, enhancing cognitive power. Changes of white matter structure contribute to learning, and are often assumed to reflect an altered number of myelin wraps. We now show that, in rat optic nerve and cerebral cortical axons, the node of Ranvier length varies over a 4.4-fold and 8.7-fold range respectively and that variation of the node length is much less along axons than between axons. Modelling predicts that these node length differences will alter conduction speed by ~20%, similar to the changes produced by altering the number of myelin wraps or the internode length. For a given change of conduction speed, the membrane area change needed at the node is >270-fold less than that needed in the myelin sheath. Thus, axon-specific adjustment of node of Ranvier length is potentially an energy-efficient and rapid mechanism for tuning the arrival time of information in the CNS.

  5. Optimization of interneuron function by direct coupling of cell migration and axonal targeting.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lynette; Pakan, Janelle M P; Selten, Martijn M; Marques-Smith, André; Llorca, Alfredo; Bae, Sung Eun; Rochefort, Nathalie L; Marín, Oscar

    2018-06-18

    Neural circuit assembly relies on the precise synchronization of developmental processes, such as cell migration and axon targeting, but the cell-autonomous mechanisms coordinating these events remain largely unknown. Here we found that different classes of interneurons use distinct routes of migration to reach the embryonic cerebral cortex. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons that migrate through the marginal zone develop into Martinotti cells, one of the most distinctive classes of cortical interneurons. For these cells, migration through the marginal zone is linked to the development of their characteristic layer 1 axonal arborization. Altering the normal migratory route of Martinotti cells by conditional deletion of Mafb-a gene that is preferentially expressed by these cells-cell-autonomously disrupts axonal development and impairs the function of these cells in vivo. Our results suggest that migration and axon targeting programs are coupled to optimize the assembly of inhibitory circuits in the cerebral cortex.

  6. Axon regeneration can facilitate or suppress hindlimb function after olfactory ensheathing glia transplantation.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Aya; Jindrich, Devin L; Muñoz-Quiles, Cintia; Zhong, Hui; van den Brand, Rubia; Pham, Daniel L; Ziegler, Matthias D; Ramón-Cueto, Almudena; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Phelps, Patricia E

    2011-03-16

    Reports based primarily on anatomical evidence suggest that olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) transplantation promotes axon regeneration across a complete spinal cord transection in adult rats. Based on functional, electrophysiological, and anatomical assessments, we found that OEG promoted axon regeneration across a complete spinal cord transection and that this regeneration altered motor responses over time. At 7 months after transection, 70% of OEG-treated rats showed motor-evoked potentials in hindlimb muscles after transcranial electric stimulation. Furthermore, a complete spinal cord retransection performed 8 months after injury demonstrated that this axon regeneration suppressed locomotor performance and decreased the hypersensitive hindlimb withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation. OEG transplantation alone promoted reorganization of lumbosacral locomotor networks and, when combined with long-term training, enhanced some stepping measures. These novel findings demonstrate that OEG promote regeneration of mature axons across a complete transection and reorganization of spinal circuitry, both of which contribute to sensorimotor function.

  7. Axon Regeneration Can Facilitate or Suppress Hindlimb Function after Olfactory Ensheathing Glia Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takeoka, Aya; Jindrich, Devin L.; Muñoz-Quiles, Cintia; Zhong, Hui; van den Brand, Rubia; Pham, Daniel L.; Ziegler, Matthias D.; Ramón-Cueto, Almudena; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2011-01-01

    Reports based primarily on anatomical evidence suggest that olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) transplantation promotes axon regeneration across a complete spinal cord transection in adult rats. Based on functional, electrophysiological, and anatomical assessments, we found that OEG promoted axon regeneration across a complete spinal cord transection and that this regeneration altered motor responses over time. At 7 months after transection, 70% of OEG-treated rats showed motor-evoked potentials in hindlimb muscles after transcranial electric stimulation. Furthermore, a complete spinal cord retransection performed 8 months after injury demonstrated that this axon regeneration suppressed locomotor performance and decreased the hypersensitive hindlimb withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation. OEG transplantation alone promoted reorganization of lumbosacral locomotor networks and, when combined with long-term training, enhanced some stepping measures. These novel findings demonstrate that OEG promote regeneration of mature axons across a complete transection and reorganization of spinal circuitry, both of which contribute to sensorimotor function. PMID:21411671

  8. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Axonal Regeneration After Spinal Cord Injury*

    PubMed Central

    van Niekerk, Erna A.; Tuszynski, Mark H.; Lu, Paul; Dulin, Jennifer N.

    2016-01-01

    Following axotomy, a complex temporal and spatial coordination of molecular events enables regeneration of the peripheral nerve. In contrast, multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to the general failure of axonal regeneration in the central nervous system. In this review, we examine the current understanding of differences in protein expression and post-translational modifications, activation of signaling networks, and environmental cues that may underlie the divergent regenerative capacity of central and peripheral axons. We also highlight key experimental strategies to enhance axonal regeneration via modulation of intraneuronal signaling networks and the extracellular milieu. Finally, we explore potential applications of proteomics to fill gaps in the current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying regeneration, and to provide insight into the development of more effective approaches to promote axonal regeneration following injury to the nervous system. PMID:26695766

  9. Long-Distance Axonal Growth from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Paul; Woodruff, Grace; Wang, Yaozhi; Graham, Lori; Hunt, Matt; Wu, Di; Boehle, Eileen; Ahmad, Ruhel; Poplawski, Gunnar; Brock, John; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a healthy 86 year-old male were differentiated into neural stem cells and grafted into adult immunodeficient rats after spinal cord injury. Three months after C5 lateral hemisections, iPSCs survived and differentiated into neurons and glia, and extended tens of thousands of axons from the lesion site over virtually the entire length of the rat central nervous system. These iPSC-derived axons extended through adult white matter of the injured spinal cord, frequently penetrating gray matter and forming synapses with rat neurons. In turn, host supraspinal motor axons penetrated human iPSC grafts and formed synapses. These findings indicate that intrinsic neuronal mechanisms readily overcome the inhibitory milieu of the adult injured spinal cord to extend many axons over very long distances; these capabilities persist even in neurons reprogrammed from very aged human cells. PMID:25123310

  10. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Axonal Regeneration After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    van Niekerk, Erna A; Tuszynski, Mark H; Lu, Paul; Dulin, Jennifer N

    2016-02-01

    Following axotomy, a complex temporal and spatial coordination of molecular events enables regeneration of the peripheral nerve. In contrast, multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to the general failure of axonal regeneration in the central nervous system. In this review, we examine the current understanding of differences in protein expression and post-translational modifications, activation of signaling networks, and environmental cues that may underlie the divergent regenerative capacity of central and peripheral axons. We also highlight key experimental strategies to enhance axonal regeneration via modulation of intraneuronal signaling networks and the extracellular milieu. Finally, we explore potential applications of proteomics to fill gaps in the current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying regeneration, and to provide insight into the development of more effective approaches to promote axonal regeneration following injury to the nervous system. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Accelerated remyelination during inflammatory demyelination prevents axonal loss and improves functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Mei, Feng; Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Shen, Yun-An A; Rankin, Kelsey A; Stebbins, Karin J; Lorrain, Daniel S; Pekarek, Kara; A Sagan, Sharon; Xiao, Lan; Teuscher, Cory; von Büdingen, H-Christian; Wess, Jürgen; Lawrence, J Josh; Green, Ari J; Fancy, Stephen Pj; Zamvil, Scott S; Chan, Jonah R

    2016-09-27

    Demyelination in MS disrupts nerve signals and contributes to axon degeneration. While remyelination promises to restore lost function, it remains unclear whether remyelination will prevent axonal loss. Inflammatory demyelination is accompanied by significant neuronal loss in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model and evidence for remyelination in this model is complicated by ongoing inflammation, degeneration and possible remyelination. Demonstrating the functional significance of remyelination necessitates selectively altering the timing of remyelination relative to inflammation and degeneration. We demonstrate accelerated remyelination after EAE induction by direct lineage analysis and hypothesize that newly formed myelin remains stable at the height of inflammation due in part to the absence of MOG expression in immature myelin. Oligodendroglial-specific genetic ablation of the M1 muscarinic receptor, a potent negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, results in accelerated remyelination, preventing axonal loss and improving functional recovery. Together our findings demonstrate that accelerated remyelination supports axonal integrity and neuronal function after inflammatory demyelination.

  12. Initiation and blocking of the action potential in an axon in weak ultrasonic or microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of the redistribution of the transmembrane ion channels in an axon caused by longitudinal acoustic vibrations of the membrane. These oscillations can be excited by an external source of ultrasound and weak microwave radiation interacting with the charges sitting on the surface of the lipid membrane. It is shown, using the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the axon, that the density redistribution of transmembrane sodium channels may reduce the threshold of the action potential, up to its spontaneous initiation. At the significant redistribution of sodium channels in the membrane, the rarefaction zones of the transmembrane channel density are formed, blocking the propagation of the action potential. Blocking the action potential propagation along the axon is shown to cause anesthesia in the example case of a squid axon. Various approaches to experimental observation of the effects considered in this paper are discussed.

  13. Dynein mediates retrograde neurofilament transport within axons and anterograde delivery of NFs from perikarya into axons: regulation by multiple phosphorylation events.

    PubMed

    Motil, Jennifer; Chan, Walter K-H; Dubey, Maya; Chaudhury, Pulkit; Pimenta, Aurea; Chylinski, Teresa M; Ortiz, Daniela T; Shea, Thomas B

    2006-05-01

    We examined the respective roles of dynein and kinesin in axonal transport of neurofilaments (NFs). Differentiated NB2a/d1 cells were transfected with green fluorescent protein-NF-M (GFP-M) and dynein function was inhibited by co-transfection with a construct expressing myc-tagged dynamitin, or by intracellular delivery of purified dynamitin and two antibodies against dynein's cargo domain. Monitoring of the bulk distribution of GFP signal within axonal neurites, recovery of GFP signal within photobleached regions, and real-time monitoring of individual NFs/punctate structures each revealed that pertubation of dynein function inhibited retrograde transport and accelerated anterograde, confirming that dynein mediated retrograde axonal transport, while intracellular delivery of two anti-kinesin antibodies selectively inhibited NF anterograde transport. In addition, dynamitin overexpression inhibited the initial translocation of newly-expressed NFs out of perikarya and into neurites, indicating that dynein participated in the initial anterograde delivery of NFs into neurites. Delivery of NFs to the axon hillock inner plasma membrane surface, and their subsequent translocation into neurites, was also prevented by vinblastine-mediated inhibition of microtubule assembly. These data collectively suggest that some NFs enter axons as cargo of microtubues that are themselves undergoing transport into axons via dynein-mediated interactions with the actin cortex and/or larger microtubules. C-terminal NF phosphorylation regulates motor association, since anti-dynein selectively coprecipitated extensively phosphorylated NFs, while anti-kinesin selectively coprecipitated less phosphorylated NFs. In addition, however, the MAP kinase inhibitor PD98059 also inhibited transport of a constitutively-phosphorylated NF construct, indicating that one or more additional, non-NF phosphorylation events also regulated NF association with dynein or kinesin. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. c-Jun activation in Schwann cells protects against loss of sensory axons in inherited neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hantke, Janina; Carty, Lucy; Wagstaff, Laura J.; Turmaine, Mark; Wilton, Daniel K.; Quintes, Susanne; Koltzenburg, Martin; Baas, Frank; Mirsky, Rhona

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is the most frequent inherited peripheral neuropathy. It is generally due to heterozygous inheritance of a partial chromosomal duplication resulting in over-expression of PMP22. A key feature of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is secondary death of axons. Prevention of axonal loss is therefore an important target of clinical intervention. We have previously identified a signalling mechanism that promotes axon survival and prevents neuron death in mechanically injured peripheral nerves. This work suggested that Schwann cells respond to injury by activating/enhancing trophic support for axons through a mechanism that depends on upregulation of the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells, resulting in the sparing of axons that would otherwise die. As c-Jun orchestrates Schwann cell support for distressed neurons after mechanical injury, we have now asked: do Schwann cells also activate a c-Jun dependent neuron-supportive programme in inherited demyelinating disease? We tested this by using the C3 mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A. In line with our previous findings in humans with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A, we found that Schwann cell c-Jun was elevated in (uninjured) nerves of C3 mice. We determined the impact of this c-Jun activation by comparing C3 mice with double mutant mice, namely C3 mice in which c-Jun had been conditionally inactivated in Schwann cells (C3/Schwann cell-c-Jun−/− mice), using sensory-motor tests and electrophysiological measurements, and by counting axons in proximal and distal nerves. The results indicate that c-Jun elevation in the Schwann cells of C3 nerves serves to prevent loss of myelinated sensory axons, particularly in distal nerves, improve behavioural symptoms, and preserve F-wave persistence. This suggests that Schwann cells have two contrasting functions in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A: on the one hand they are the genetic source of

  15. Axonal Elongation into Peripheral Nervous System ``Bridges'' after Central Nervous System Injury in Adult Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Samuel; Aguayo, Albert J.

    1981-11-01

    The origin, termination, and length of axonal growth after focal central nervous system injury was examined in adult rats by means of a new experimental model. When peripheral nerve segments were used as ``bridges'' between the medulla and spinal cord, axons from neurons at both these levels grew approximately 30 millimeters. The regenerative potential of these central neurons seems to be expressed when the central nervous system glial environment is changed to that of the peripheral nervous system.

  16. Asymmetric axonal edge guidance: a new paradigm for building oriented neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Renault, Renaud; Durand, Jean-Baptiste; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Villard, Catherine

    2016-06-21

    We present a novel kind of directional axon guides for brain-on-a-chip applications. Contrarily to previous works, the directionality in our design is created by rerouting axons growing in the unwanted direction back to their original compartment while leaving the other growth direction unaffected. This design yields state-of-the-art levels of directionality without the disadvantages of previously reported technologies.

  17. Scar modulation in subacute and chronic CNS lesions: Effects on axonal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stichel, Christine C.; Lausberg, Friederike; Hermanns, Susanne; Müller, Hans Werner

    1999-01-01

    After injury of the adult mammalian CNS axonal regeneration across or around the lesion scar is negligible. Previously, we have shown that the lesion-induced basal membrane (BM) within the lesion center participates in a growth barrier for axon regeneration and that its reduction by means of pharmacological or immunochemical treatment is a prerequisite and sufficient condition for regrowing axons to cross the lesion site. The present study was designed to further investigate this observation by analyzing the effect of a delayed treatment on the regeneration of both subacutely and chronically lesioned axons.Adult rats underwent unilateral transection of the postcommissural fornix. At one to five days after transection one group of animals received a local injection of 2, 2'-dipyridyl (DPY), an inhibitor of collagen triple helix formation and synthesis. Another group received a second transection within the former lesion site followed by an immediate DPY-injection at five days or 4 weeks after transection. Six weeks after the last surgery BM deposition and axonal regeneration were analysed using immunocytochemical methods.A local injection of DPY clearly reduced the lesion-induced BM deposition when applied within the first 3 days after transection. Under these conditions regrowing axons still crossed the former impermeable lesion site and regenerated within their normal pathway up to their former target, the mammillary body. However, in late subacute (5 d) and chronic stages (4 w) the double transection+injection paradigm failed to reduce BM deposition and, in consequence, also to induce axonal regeneration.These results demonstrate the potential of the collagen IV-reducing strategy to promote axonal regeneration across the lesion scar not only in acute but also in early subacute traumatic injuries.

  18. Molecular determinants of Cytochrome C oxidase IV mRNA axonal trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Amar N.; Vargas, Jose Norberto S.; Chen, Cai-Yun; Kowalak, Jeffrey A; Gioio, Anthony E.; Kaplan, Barry B.

    2017-01-01

    In previous studies, we identified a putative 38-nucleotide stem-loop structure (zipcode) in the 3′ untranslated region of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) mRNA that was necessary and sufficient for the axonal localization of the message in primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. However, little is known about the proteins that interact with the COXIV-zipcode and regulate the axonal trafficking and local translation of the COXIV message. To identify proteins involved in the axonal transport of the COXIV mRNA, we used the biotinylated 38-nucleotide COXIV RNA zipcode as bait in the affinity purification of COXIV zipcode binding proteins. Gel-shift assays of the biotinylated COXIV zipcode indicated that the putative stem-loop structure functions as a nucleation site for the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Mass spectrometric analysis of the COXIV zipcode ribonucleoprotein complex led to the identification of a large number RNA binding proteins, including fused in sarcoma/translated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS), and Y-box protein 1 (YB-1). Validation experiments, using western analyses, confirmed the presence of the candidate proteins in the COXIV zipcode affinity purified complexes obtained from SCG axons. Immunohistochemical studies show that FUS, and YB-1 are present in SCG axons. Importantly, RNA immunoprecipitation studies show that FUS, and YB-1 interact with endogenous axonal COXIV transcripts. siRNA-mediated downregulation of the candidate proteins FUS and YB-1 expression in the cell-bodies diminishes the levels of COXIV mRNA in the axon, suggesting functional roles for these proteins in the axonal trafficking of COXIV mRNA. PMID:28161363

  19. Regional Retinal Ganglion Cell Axon Loss in a Murine Glaucoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Julie A.; Kimball, Elizabeth C.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Nguyen, Cathy; Pease, Mary E.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Jefferys, Joan L.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine if retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon loss in experimental mouse glaucoma is uniform in the optic nerve. Methods Experimental glaucoma was induced for 6 weeks with a microbead injection model in CD1 (n = 78) and C57BL/6 (B6, n = 68) mice. From epoxy-embedded sections of optic nerve 1 to 2 mm posterior to the globe, total nerve area and regional axon density (axons/1600 μm2) were measured in superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal zones. Results Control eyes of CD1 mice have higher axon density and more total RGCs than control B6 mice eyes. There were no significant differences in control regional axon density in all mice or by strain (all P > 0.2, mixed model). Exposure to elevated IOP caused loss of RGC in both strains. In CD1 mice, axon density declined without significant loss of nerve area, while B6 mice had less density loss, but greater decrease in nerve area. Axon density loss in glaucoma eyes was not significantly greater in any region in either mouse strain (both P > 0.2, mixed model). In moderately damaged CD1 glaucoma eyes, and CD1 eyes with the greatest IOP elevation exposure, density loss differed by region (P = 0.05, P = 0.03, mixed model) with the greatest loss in the temporal and superior regions, while in severely injured B6 nerves superior loss was greater than inferior loss (P = 0.01, mixed model, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusions There was selectively greater loss of superior and temporal optic nerve axons of RGCs in mouse glaucoma at certain stages of damage. Differences in nerve area change suggest non-RGC responses differ between mouse strains. PMID:28549091

  20. Normal axonal ion channel function in large peripheral nerve fibers following chronic ciguatera sensitization.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2008-03-01

    Although the acute clinical effects of ciguatera poisoning, due to ingestion of ciguatoxin, are mediated by activation of transient Na+ channels, the mechanisms underlying ciguatera sensitization remain undefined. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the median motor and sensory nerves in two patients with ciguatera sensitization. Excitability parameters were all within normal limits, thereby arguing against dysfunction of axonal membrane ion channels in large-diameter fibers in ciguatera sensitization.

  1. Axon-Sorting Multifunctional Nerve Guides: Accelerating Restoration of Nerve Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    factor (singly & in selected combinations) in the organotypic model system for preferential sensory or motor axon extension. Use confocal microscopy to...track axon extension of labeled sensory or motor neurons from spinal cord slices (motor) or dorsal root ganglia ( DRG ) (sensory). 20 Thy1-YFP mice...RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS: • Established a system of color-coded mixed nerve tracking using GFP and RFP expressing motor and sensory neurons (Figure 1

  2. Exosomes Derived from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Axonal Growth of Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chopp, Michael; Liu, Xian Shuang; Katakowski, Mark; Wang, Xinli; Tian, Xinchu; Wu, David; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of brain injury with exosomes derived from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) enhances neurite growth. However, the direct effect of exosomes on axonal growth and molecular mechanisms underlying exosome-enhanced neurite growth are not known. Using primary cortical neurons cultured in a microfluidic device, we found that MSC-exosomes promoted axonal growth, whereas attenuation of argonaut 2 protein, one of the primary microRNA (miRNA) machinery proteins, in MSC-exosomes abolished their effect on axonal growth. Both neuronal cell bodies and axons internalized MSC-exosomes, which was blocked by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) that cleave proteins of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex. Moreover, tailored MSC-exosomes carrying elevated miR-17-92 cluster further enhanced axonal growth compared to native MSC-exosomes. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that the tailored MSC-exosomes increased levels of individual members of this cluster and activated the PTEN/mTOR signaling pathway in recipient neurons, respectively. Together, our data demonstrate that native MSC-exosomes promote axonal growth while the tailored MSC-exosomes can further boost this effect and that tailored exosomes can deliver their selective cargo miRNAs into and activate their target signals in recipient neurons. Neuronal internalization of MSC-exosomes is mediated by the SNARE complex. This study reveals molecular mechanisms that contribute to MSC-exosome-promoted axonal growth, which provides a potential therapeutic strategy to enhance axonal growth.

  3. HIV Glycoprotein Gp120 Impairs Fast Axonal Transport by Activating Tak1 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Berth, Sarah H.; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole; Wang, Bin; Kim, Hajwa; Song, Yuyu; Sapar, Maria; Morfini, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neuropathies are the most common neurological complication of HIV. Of these, distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP) is directly caused by HIV infection and characterized by length-dependent axonal degeneration of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Mechanisms for axonal degeneration in DSP remain unclear, but recent experiments revealed that the HIV glycoprotein gp120 is internalized and localized within axons of DRG neurons. Based on these findings, we investigated whether intra-axonal gp120 might impair fast axonal transport (FAT), a cellular process critical for appropriate maintenance of the axonal compartment. Significantly, we found that gp120 severely impaired both anterograde and retrograde FAT. Providing a mechanistic basis for these effects, pharmacological experiments revealed an involvement of various phosphotransferases in this toxic effect, including members of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways (Tak-1, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)), inhibitor of kappa-B-kinase 2 (IKK2), and PP1. Biochemical experiments and axonal outgrowth assays in cell lines and primary cultures extended these findings. Impairments in neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons by gp120 were rescued using a Tak-1 inhibitor, implicating a Tak-1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in gp120 neurotoxicity. Taken together, these observations indicate that kinase-based impairments in FAT represent a novel mechanism underlying gp120 neurotoxicity consistent with the dying-back degeneration seen in DSP. Targeting gp120-based impairments in FAT with specific kinase inhibitors might provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent axonal degeneration in DSP. PMID:27872270

  4. Spastin, atlastin, and ER relocalization are involved in axon but not dendrite regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kavitha; Stone, Michelle C; Weiner, Alexis T; Gheres, Kyle W; Zhou, Chaoming; Deitcher, David L; Levitan, Edwin S; Rolls, Melissa M

    2016-11-01

    Mutations in >50 genes, including spastin and atlastin, lead to hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We previously demonstrated that reduction of spastin leads to a deficit in axon regeneration in a Drosophila model. Axon regeneration was similarly impaired in neurons when HSP proteins atlastin, seipin, and spichthyin were reduced. Impaired regeneration was dependent on genetic background and was observed when partial reduction of HSP proteins was combined with expression of dominant-negative microtubule regulators, suggesting that HSP proteins work with microtubules to promote regeneration. Microtubule rearrangements triggered by axon injury were, however, normal in all genotypes. We examined other markers to identify additional changes associated with regeneration. Whereas mitochondria, endosomes, and ribosomes did not exhibit dramatic repatterning during regeneration, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was frequently concentrated near the tip of the growing axon. In atlastin RNAi and spastin mutant animals, ER accumulation near single growing axon tips was impaired. ER tip concentration was observed only during axon regeneration and not during dendrite regeneration. In addition, dendrite regeneration was unaffected by reduction of spastin or atlastin. We propose that the HSP proteins spastin and atlastin promote axon regeneration by coordinating concentration of the ER and microtubules at the growing axon tip. © 2016 Rao et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Maintaining consistency in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    In systems designed as assemblies of independently developed components, concurrent access to data or data structures normally arises within individual programs, and is controlled using mutual exclusion constructs, such as semaphores and monitors. Where data is persistent and/or sets of operation are related to one another, transactions or linearizability may be more appropriate. Systems that incorporate cooperative styles of distributed execution often replicate or distribute data within groups of components. In these cases, group oriented consistency properties must be maintained, and tools based on the virtual synchrony execution model greatly simplify the task confronting an application developer. All three styles of distributed computing are likely to be seen in future systems - often, within the same application. This leads us to propose an integrated approach that permits applications that use virtual synchrony with concurrent objects that respect a linearizability constraint, and vice versa. Transactional subsystems are treated as a special case of linearizability.

  6. Bridging Physics and Biology Using Resistance and Axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Joshua M.

    2014-11-01

    When teaching physics, it is often difficult to get biology-oriented students to see the relevance of physics.1 A complaint often heard is that biology students are required to take physics for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) as part of a "weeding out" process, but that they don't feel like they need physics for biology. Despite this impression held by students, there have been calls for better physics education for future physicians and life scientists.2,3 Research is being performed to improve physics classes and labs by linking topics in biology and physics.4,5 Described here is a laboratory experiment covering the topics of resistance of materials and circuits/Kirchhoff's laws in a biology context with their direct application to neurons, axons, and electrical impulse transmission within animals. This experiment will also demonstrate the mechanism believed to cause multiple sclerosis. The apparatus was designed with low-cost and readily available materials in mind.

  7. Axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia: there is a HINT.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Kristien; Chamova, Teodora; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena

    2017-04-01

    Recessive mutations in the gene encoding the histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1) were recently shown to cause a motor-predominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. About 80% of the patients exhibit neuromyotonia, a striking clinical and electrophysiological hallmark that can help to distinguish this disease and to guide diagnostic screening. HINT1 neuropathy has worldwide distribution and is particularly prevalent in populations inhabiting central and south-eastern Europe. With 12 different mutations identified in more than 60 families, it ranks among the most common subtypes of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. This article provides an overview of the present knowledge on HINT1 neuropathy with the aim to increase awareness and spur interest among clinicians and researchers in the field. We propose diagnostic guidelines to recognize and differentiate this entity and suggest treatment strategies to manage common symptoms. As a recent player in the field of hereditary neuropathies, the role of HINT1 in peripheral nerves is unknown and the underlying disease mechanisms are unexplored. We provide a comprehensive overview of the structural and functional characteristics of the HINT1 protein that may guide further studies into the molecular aetiology and treatment strategies of this peculiar Charcot-Marie-Tooth subtype. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  8. Sodium movements in perfused squid giant axons. Passive fluxes.

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Canessa-Fischer, M

    1968-08-01

    Sodium movements in internally perfused giant axons from the squid Dosidicus gigas were studied with varying internal sodium concentrations and with fluoride as the internal anion. It was found that as the internal concentration of sodium was increased from 2 to 200 mM the resting sodium efflux increased from 0.09 to 34.0 pmoles/cm(2)sec and the average resting sodium influx increased from 42.9 to 64.5 pmoles/cm(2)sec but this last change was not statistically significant. When perfusing with a mixture of 500 mM K glutamate and 100 mM Na glutamate the resting efflux was 10 +/- 3 pmoles/cm(2)sec and 41 +/- 10 pmoles/cm(2)sec for sodium influx. Increasing the internal sodium concentration also increased both the extra influx and the extra efflux of sodium due to impulse propagation. At any given internal sodium concentration the net extra influx was about 5 pmoles/cm(2)impulse. This finding supports the notion that the inward current generated in a propagated action potential can be completely accounted for by movements of sodium.

  9. Effect of Detergent on Electrical Properties of Squid Axon Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Uichiro; Adelman, William J.

    1964-01-01

    The effects of detergents on squid giant axon action and resting potentials as well as membrane conductances in the voltage clamp have been studied. Anionic detergents (sodium lauryl sulfate, 0.1 to 1.0 mM; dimethyl benzene sulfonate, 1 to 20 mM, pH 7.6) cause a temporary increase and a later decrease of action potential height and the value of the resting potential. Cationic detergent (cetyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, 6 x 10-5 M or more, pH 7.6) generally brings about immediate and irreversible decreases in the action and resting potentials. Non-ionic detergent (tween 80, 0.1 M, pH 7.6) causes a slight reversible reduction of action potential height without affecting the value of the resting potential. Both anionic and cationic detergents generally decrease the sodium and potassium conductances irreversibly. The effect of non-ionic detergent is to decrease the sodium conductance reversibly, leaving the potassium conductance almost unchanged. PMID:14158665

  10. Oxidative Stress Induces Disruption of the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kareem C.; Sword, Brooke A.; Dupree, Jeffrey L.

    2017-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS), the domain responsible for action potential initiation and maintenance of neuronal polarity, is targeted for disruption in a variety of central nervous system pathological insults. Previous work in our laboratory implicates oxidative stress as a potential mediator of structural AIS alterations in two separate mouse models of central nervous system inflammation, as these effects were attenuated following reactive oxygen species scavenging and NADPH oxidase-2 ablation. While these studies suggest a role for oxidative stress in modulation of the AIS, the direct effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) on the stability of this domain remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that oxidative stress, as induced through treatment with 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a spontaneous ROS/RNS generator, drives a reversible loss of AIS protein clustering in primary cortical neurons in vitro. Pharmacological inhibition of both voltage-dependent and intracellular calcium (Ca2+) channels suggests that this mechanism of AIS disruption involves Ca2+ entry specifically through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and its release from IP3-gated intracellular stores. Furthermore, ROS/RNS-induced AIS disruption is dependent upon activation of calpain, a Ca2+-activated protease previously shown to drive AIS modulation. Overall, we demonstrate for the first time that oxidative stress, as induced through exogenously applied ROS/RNS, is capable of driving structural alterations in the AIS complex. PMID:29228786

  11. Structural study of Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D; Yi, Hong; Erickson-Davis, Cordelia; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G; Faust, Phyllis L

    2009-02-06

    Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common neurological diseases. A basic understanding of its neuropathology is now emerging. Aside from Purkinje cell loss, a prominent finding is an abundance of torpedoes (rounded swellings of Purkinje cell axons). Such swellings often result from the mis-accumulation of cell constituents. Identifying the basic nature of these accumulations is an important step in understanding the underlying disease process. Torpedoes, only recently identified in ET, have not yet been characterized ultrastructurally. Light and electron microscopy were used to characterize the structural constituents of torpedoes in ET. Formalin-fixed cerebellar cortical tissue from four prospectively collected ET brains was sectioned and immunostained with a monoclonal phosphorylated neurofilament antibody (SMI-31, Covance, Emeryville, CA). Using additional sections from three ET brains, torpedoes were assessed using electron microscopy. Immunoreactivity for phosphorylated neurofilament protein revealed clear labeling of torpedoes in each case. Torpedoes were strongly immunoreactive; in many instances, two or more torpedoes were noted in close proximity to one another. On electron microscopy, torpedoes were packed with randomly arranged 10-12nm neurofilaments. Mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum were abundant as well, particularly at the periphery of the torpedo. We demonstrated that the torpedoes in ET represent the mis-accumulation of disorganized neurofilaments and other organelles. It is not known where in the pathogenic cascade these accumulations occur (i.e., whether these accumulations are the primary event or a secondary/downstream event) and this deserves further study.

  12. Does progesterone improve outcome in diffuse axonal injury?

    PubMed

    Soltani, Zahra; Shahrokhi, Nader; Karamouzian, Saeed; Khaksari, Mohammad; Mofid, Behshad; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Reihani, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of progesterone have been demonstrated in the animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the results of clinical studies are conflicting. Considering the heterogenic nature of TBI, the effect of progesterone in patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) was investigated in a clinical trial. In this study, 48 patients with DAI and Glasgow Coma Scale of 3-12, admitted within 4 hours after injury, were randomly assigned to the progesterone or control group. The dose of progesterone administration was 1 mg kg -1 per 12 hours for 5 days. The effect of progesterone was investigated using extended-Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E), functional independence measure (FIM) scores and also mortality within the follow-up period. The progesterone group exhibited higher GOS-E and FIM scores in comparison to the control group at 6 months post-injury (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). Mortality was also found in the control group (p < 0.05). The adverse events attributed to the progesterone administration were not found throughout the study. Findings of this study suggest that progesterone may be neuroprotective in patients with DAI. However, large clinical trials are needed to assess progesterone as a promising drug in DAI.

  13. Microtechnologies for studying the role of mechanics in axon growth and guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Devrim; Blasiak, Agata; Lee, Gil U.

    2015-01-01

    The guidance of axons to their proper targets is not only a crucial event in neurodevelopment, but also a potential therapeutic target for neural repair. Axon guidance is mediated by various chemo- and haptotactic cues, as well as the mechanical interactions between the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Axonal growth cones, dynamic ends of growing axons, convert external stimuli to biochemical signals, which, in turn, are translated into behavior, e.g., turning or retraction, via cytoskeleton–matrix linkages. Despite the inherent mechanical nature of the problem, the role of mechanics in axon guidance is poorly understood. Recent years has witnessed the application of a range of microtechnologies in neurobiology, from microfluidic circuits to single molecule force spectroscopy. In this mini-review, we describe microtechnologies geared towards dissecting the mechanical aspects of axon guidance, divided into three categories: controlling the growth cone microenvironment, stimulating growth cones with externally applied forces, and measuring forces exerted by the growth cones. A particular emphasis is given to those studies that combine multiple techniques, as dictated by the complexity of the problem. PMID:26283918

  14. Microtechnologies for studying the role of mechanics in axon growth and guidance.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Devrim; Blasiak, Agata; Lee, Gil U

    2015-01-01

    The guidance of axons to their proper targets is not only a crucial event in neurodevelopment, but also a potential therapeutic target for neural repair. Axon guidance is mediated by various chemo- and haptotactic cues, as well as the mechanical interactions between the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Axonal growth cones, dynamic ends of growing axons, convert external stimuli to biochemical signals, which, in turn, are translated into behavior, e.g., turning or retraction, via cytoskeleton-matrix linkages. Despite the inherent mechanical nature of the problem, the role of mechanics in axon guidance is poorly understood. Recent years has witnessed the application of a range of microtechnologies in neurobiology, from microfluidic circuits to single molecule force spectroscopy. In this mini-review, we describe microtechnologies geared towards dissecting the mechanical aspects of axon guidance, divided into three categories: controlling the growth cone microenvironment, stimulating growth cones with externally applied forces, and measuring forces exerted by the growth cones. A particular emphasis is given to those studies that combine multiple techniques, as dictated by the complexity of the problem.

  15. Wnt3 and Gata4 regulate axon regeneration in adult mouse DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Duan, Run-Shan; Liu, Pei-Pei; Xi, Feng; Wang, Wei-Hua; Tang, Gang-Bin; Wang, Rui-Ying; Saijilafu; Liu, Chang-Mei

    2018-05-05

    Neurons in the adult central nervous system (CNS) have a poor intrinsic axon growth potential after injury, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Wingless-related mouse mammary tumor virus integration site (WNT) family members regulate neural stem cell proliferation, axon tract and forebrain development in the nervous system. Here we report that Wnt3 is an important modulator of axon regeneration. Downregulation or overexpression of Wnt3 in adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons enhances or inhibits their axon regeneration ability respectively in vitro and in vivo. Especially, we show that Wnt3 modulates axon regeneration by repressing mRNA translation of the important transcription factor Gata4 via binding to the three prime untranslated region (3'UTR). Downregulation of Gata4 could restore the phenotype exhibited by Wnt3 downregulation in DRG neurons. Taken together, these data indicate that Wnt3 is a key intrinsic regulator of axon growth ability of the nervous system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fractional cable equation for general geometry: A model of axons with swellings and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Erick J.; Romero, Juan M.; Yépez-Martínez, Huitzilin

    2017-09-01

    Different experimental studies have reported anomalous diffusion in brain tissues and notably this anomalous diffusion is expressed through fractional derivatives. Axons are important to understand neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Indeed, abnormal accumulation of proteins and organelles in axons is a hallmark of these diseases. The diffusion in the axons can become anomalous as a result of this abnormality. In this case the voltage propagation in axons is affected. Another hallmark of different neurodegenerative diseases is given by discrete swellings along the axon. In order to model the voltage propagation in axons with anomalous diffusion and swellings, in this paper we propose a fractional cable equation for a general geometry. This generalized equation depends on fractional parameters and geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. For a cable with a constant radius we show that the voltage decreases when the fractional effect increases. In cables with swellings we find that when the fractional effect or the swelling radius increases, the voltage decreases. Similar behavior is obtained when the number of swellings and the fractional effect increase. Moreover, we find that when the radius swelling (or the number of swellings) and the fractional effect increase at the same time, the voltage dramatically decreases.

  17. Axonal degeneration and regeneration in sensory roots in a genital herpes model.

    PubMed

    Soffer, D; Martin, J R

    1989-01-01

    In a mouse model of genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, roots of the lower spinal cord were examined 5 days to 6 months after inoculation. Using immunoperoxidase methods on paraffin sections, viral antigen was found in sensory ganglia, their proximal roots and distal nerves on days 5 and 6 after infection. In Epon sections, most mice had focal sensory root abnormalities in lower thoracic, lumbar or sacral levels. At days 7 and 10, lesions showed chiefly nerve fiber degeneration, particularly of large myelinated fibers. At 2 weeks, lesions contained relatively large bundles of small unmyelinated fibers with immature axon-Schwann cell relationships. From 3 to 6 weeks, lesions again contained many more small unmyelinated fibers than normal but, in increasing proportions, axons in bundles were isolated from their neighbors by Schwann cell cytoplasm, and Schwann cells having 1:1 relationships with axons showed mesaxon or thin myelin sheath formation. At later times, the proportion of small unmyelinated axons decreased in parallel with increased numbers of small myelinated axons. By 6 months, affected roots showed a relative reduction in large myelinated fibers, increased proportions of small myelinated fibers and Schwann cell nuclei. Numbers of unmyelinated fibers were reduced relative to 3- to 6-week lesions. Axonal degeneration and regeneration appears to be the chief pathological change in sensory roots in this model. If regenerated fibers arise from latently infected neurons, then establishment of latency is not a relatively silent event, but is associated with major long-lasting, morphologically detectable effects.

  18. Quantitative muscle ultrasound is useful for evaluating secondary axonal degeneration in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hokkoku, Keiichi; Matsukura, Kiyoshi; Uchida, Yudai; Kuwabara, Midori; Furukawa, Yuichi; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Hatanaka, Yuki; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2017-10-01

    In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), exclusion of secondary axonal degeneration is challenging with conventional methods such as nerve conduction study (NCS), needle electromyography, and nerve biopsy. Increased echo intensity (EI) and decreased muscle thickness (MT) identified on muscle ultrasound (MUS) examination represent muscle denervation due to axonal degeneration in neurogenic disorders, suggesting MUS as a new tool to detect secondary axonal degeneration in patients with CIDP. EI and MT of abductor pollicis brevis, abductor digiti minimi, and first dorsal interosseous muscles were measured in 16 CIDP patients. Raw values were converted into z -scores using data from 60 normal controls (NCs). Six of 45 muscles showed abnormally high EI and low MT, suggesting denervation following secondary axonal degeneration. These six muscles belonged to two patients with long disease history, unresponsiveness to treatment, and long interval from onset to initial therapy. There were no significant differences in EI and MT ( p  = .23 and .67, respectively) between the CIDP and NC groups, although NCS results revealed obvious demyelinating abnormalities in all CIDP patients, suggesting the fact that muscle structures will be preserved, and EI and MT will not change unless secondary axonal degeneration occurs in CIDP. MUS is a promising tool for evaluating secondary axonal degeneration in patients with CIDP.

  19. Early development of the circumferential axonal pathway in mouse and chick spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Holley, J A

    1982-03-10

    The early development of the circumferential axonal pathway in the brachial and lumbar spinal cord of mouse and chick embryos was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular processes which comprise this pathway grow in the transverse plane and along the lateral margin of the marginal zone (i.e., circumferentially oriented), as typified by the early embryonic commissural axons. The first formative event observed was in the ventrolateral margin of the primitive spinal cord ventricular zone. Cellular processes were found near the external limiting membrane that appeared to grow a variable distance either dorsally or ventrally. Later in development, presumptive motor column neurons migrated into the ventrolateral region, distal to these early circumferentially oriented processes. Concurrently, other circumferentially oriented perikarya and processes appeared along the dorsolateral margin. Due to their aligned sites of origin and parallel growth, the circumferential processes formed a more or less continuous line or pathway, which in about 10% of the scanned specimens could be followed along the entire lateral margin of the embryonic spinal cord. Several specimens later in development had two sets of aligned circumferential processes in the ventral region. Large numbers of circumferential axons were then found to follow the preformed pathway by fasciculation, after the primitive motor column had become established. Since the earliest circumferential processes appeared to differentiate into axons and were found nearly 24 hours prior to growth of most circumferential axons, their role in guidance as pioneering axons was suggested.

  20. GABA Signaling Promotes Synapse Elimination and Axon Pruning in Developing Cortical Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Fu, Yu; Knott, Graham; Lu, Jiangteng; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that GABA acts beyond inhibitory synaptic transmission and regulates the development of inhibitory synapses in the vertebrate brain, but the underlying cellular mechanism is not well understood. We have combined live imaging of cortical GABAergic axons across time scales from minutes to days with single-cell genetic manipulation of GABA release to examine its role in distinct steps of inhibitory synapse formation in the mouse neocortex. We have shown previously, by genetic knockdown of GABA synthesis in developing interneurons, that GABA signaling promotes the maturation of inhibitory synapses and axons. Here we found that a complete blockade of GABA release in basket interneurons resulted in an opposite effect, a cell-autonomous increase in axon and bouton density with apparently normal synapse structures. These results not only demonstrate that GABA is unnecessary for synapse formation per se but also uncover a novel facet of GABA in regulating synapse elimination and axon pruning. Live imaging revealed that developing GABAergic axons form a large number of transient boutons, but only a subset was stabilized. Release blockade led to significantly increased bouton stability and filopodia density, increased axon branch extension, and decreased branch retraction. Our results suggest that a major component of GABA function in synapse development is transmission-mediated elimination of subsets of nascent contacts. Therefore, GABA may regulate activity-dependent inhibitory synapse formation by coordinately eliminating certain nascent contacts while promoting the maturation of other nascent synapses. PMID:22219294

  1. Fractional cable equation for general geometry: A model of axons with swellings and anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Erick J; Romero, Juan M; Yépez-Martínez, Huitzilin

    2017-09-01

    Different experimental studies have reported anomalous diffusion in brain tissues and notably this anomalous diffusion is expressed through fractional derivatives. Axons are important to understand neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Indeed, abnormal accumulation of proteins and organelles in axons is a hallmark of these diseases. The diffusion in the axons can become anomalous as a result of this abnormality. In this case the voltage propagation in axons is affected. Another hallmark of different neurodegenerative diseases is given by discrete swellings along the axon. In order to model the voltage propagation in axons with anomalous diffusion and swellings, in this paper we propose a fractional cable equation for a general geometry. This generalized equation depends on fractional parameters and geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. For a cable with a constant radius we show that the voltage decreases when the fractional effect increases. In cables with swellings we find that when the fractional effect or the swelling radius increases, the voltage decreases. Similar behavior is obtained when the number of swellings and the fractional effect increase. Moreover, we find that when the radius swelling (or the number of swellings) and the fractional effect increase at the same time, the voltage dramatically decreases.

  2. DISCO Interacting Protein 2 regulates axonal bifurcation and guidance of Drosophila mushroom body neurons.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Yohei; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Sugie, Atsushi; Hiroi, Makoto; Tabata, Tetsuya

    2017-01-15

    Axonal branching is one of the key processes within the enormous complexity of the nervous system to enable a single neuron to send information to multiple targets. However, the molecular mechanisms that control branch formation are poorly understood. In particular, previous studies have rarely addressed the mechanisms underlying axonal bifurcation, in which axons form new branches via splitting of the growth cone. We demonstrate that DISCO Interacting Protein 2 (DIP2) is required for precise axonal bifurcation in Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons by suppressing ectopic bifurcation and regulating the guidance of sister axons. We also found that DIP2 localize to the plasma membrane. Domain function analysis revealed that the AMP-synthetase domains of DIP2 are essential for its function, which may involve exerting a catalytic activity that modifies fatty acids. Genetic analysis and subsequent biochemical analysis suggested that DIP2 is involved in the fatty acid metabolization of acyl-CoA. Taken together, our results reveal a function of DIP2 in the developing nervous system and provide a potential functional relationship between fatty acid metabolism and axon morphogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Drosophila growth cones: a genetically tractable platform for the analysis of axonal growth dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Soriano, Natalia; Gonçalves-Pimentel, Catarina; Beaven, Robin; Haessler, Ulrike; Ofner-Ziegenfuss, Lisa; Ballestrem, Christoph; Prokop, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The formation of neuronal networks, during development and regeneration, requires outgrowth of axons along reproducible paths toward their appropriate postsynaptic target cells. Axonal extension occurs at growth cones (GCs) at the tips of axons. GC advance and navigation requires the activity of their cytoskeletal networks, comprising filamentous actin (F-actin) in lamellipodia and filopodia as well as dynamic microtubules (MTs) emanating from bundles of the axonal core. The molecular mechanisms governing these two cytoskeletal networks, their cross-talk, and their response to extracellular signaling cues are only partially understood, hindering our conceptual understanding of how regulated changes in GC behavior are controlled. Here, we introduce Drosophila GCs as a suitable model to address these mechanisms. Morphological and cytoskeletal readouts of Drosophila GCs are similar to those of other models, including mammals, as demonstrated here for MT and F-actin dynamics, axonal growth rates, filopodial structure and motility, organizational principles of MT networks, and subcellular marker localization. Therefore, we expect fundamental insights gained in Drosophila to be translatable into vertebrate biology. The advantage of the Drosophila model over others is its enormous amenability to combinatorial genetics as a powerful strategy to address the complexity of regulatory networks governing axonal growth. Thus, using pharmacological and genetic manipulations, we demonstrate a role of the actin cytoskeleton in a specific form of MT organization (loop formation), known to regulate GC pausing behavior. We demonstrate these events to be mediated by the actin-MT linking factor Short stop, thus identifying an essential molecular player in this context.

  4. Fast vesicle transport is required for the slow axonal transport of synapsin.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Scott, David; Das, Utpal; Gitler, Daniel; Ganguly, Archan; Roy, Subhojit

    2013-09-25

    Although it is known that cytosolic/soluble proteins synthesized in cell bodies are transported at much lower overall velocities than vesicles in fast axonal transport, the fundamental basis for this slow movement is unknown. Recently, we found that cytosolic proteins in axons of mouse cultured neurons are conveyed in a manner that superficially resembles diffusion, but with a slow anterograde bias that is energy- and motor-dependent (Scott et al., 2011). Here we show that slow axonal transport of synapsin, a prototypical member of this rate class, is dependent upon fast vesicle transport. Despite the distinct overall dynamics of slow and fast transport, experimentally induced and intrinsic variations in vesicle transport have analogous effects on slow transport of synapsin as well. Dynamic cotransport of vesicles and synapsin particles is also seen in axons, consistent with a model where higher-order assemblies of synapsin are conveyed by transient and probabilistic associations with vesicles moving in fast axonal transport. We posit that such dynamic associations generate the slow overall anterogradely biased flow of the population ("dynamic-recruitment model"). Our studies uncover the underlying kinetic basis for a classic cytosolic/soluble protein moving in slow axonal transport and reveal previously unknown links between slow and fast transport, offering a clearer conceptual picture of this curious phenomenon.

  5. Selective control of cortical axonal spikes by a slowly inactivating K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yousheng; Yu, Yuguo; Yang, Jing; McCormick, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Neurons are flexible electrophysiological entities in which the distribution and properties of ionic channels control their behaviors. Through simultaneous somatic and axonal whole-cell recording of layer 5 pyramidal cells, we demonstrate a remarkable differential expression of slowly inactivating K+ currents. Depolarizing the axon, but not the soma, rapidly activated a low-threshold, slowly inactivating, outward current that was potently blocked by low doses of 4-aminopyridine, α-dendrotoxin, and rTityustoxin-Kα. Block of this slowly inactivating current caused a large increase in spike duration in the axon but only a small increase in the soma and could result in distal axons generating repetitive discharge in response to local current injection. Importantly, this current was also responsible for slow changes in the axonal spike duration that are observed after somatic membrane potential change. These data indicate that low-threshold, slowly inactivating K+ currents, containing Kv1.2 α subunits, play a key role in the flexible properties of intracortical axons and may contribute significantly to intracortical processing. PMID:17581873

  6. Upslope treadmill exercise enhances motor axon regeneration but not functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cannoy, Jill; Crowley, Sam; Jarratt, Allen; Werts, Kelly LeFevere; Osborne, Krista; Park, Sohee

    2016-01-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury, moderate daily exercise conducted on a level treadmill results in enhanced axon regeneration and modest improvements in functional recovery. If the exercise is conducted on an upwardly inclined treadmill, even more motor axons regenerate successfully and reinnervate muscle targets. Whether this increased motor axon regeneration also results in greater improvement in functional recovery from sciatic nerve injury was studied. Axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation were studied in Lewis rats over an 11 wk postinjury period using stimulus evoked electromyographic (EMG) responses in the soleus muscle of awake animals. Motor axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation were enhanced in slope-trained rats. Direct muscle (M) responses reappeared faster in slope-trained animals than in other groups and ultimately were larger than untreated animals. The amplitude of monosynaptic H reflexes recorded from slope-trained rats remained significantly smaller than all other groups of animals for the duration of the study. The restoration of the amplitude and pattern of locomotor EMG activity in soleus and tibialis anterior and of hindblimb kinematics was studied during treadmill walking on different slopes. Slope-trained rats did not recover the ability to modulate the intensity of locomotor EMG activity with slope. Patterned EMG activity in flexor and extensor muscles was not noted in slope-trained rats. Neither hindblimb length nor limb orientation during level, upslope, or downslope walking was restored in slope-trained rats. Slope training enhanced motor axon regeneration but did not improve functional recovery following sciatic nerve transection and repair. PMID:27466130

  7. Conduction velocity is regulated by sodium channel inactivation in unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges

    PubMed Central

    De Col, Roberto; Messlinger, Karl; Carr, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    Axonal conduction velocity varies according to the level of preceding impulse activity. In unmyelinated axons this typically results in a slowing of conduction velocity and a parallel increase in threshold. It is currently held that Na+–K+-ATPase-dependent axonal hyperpolarization is responsible for this slowing but this has long been equivocal. We therefore examined conduction velocity changes during repetitive activation of single unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges. In direct contradiction to the currently accepted postulate, Na+–K+-ATPase blockade actually enhanced activity-induced conduction velocity slowing, while the degree of velocity slowing was curtailed in the presence of lidocaine (10–300 μm) and carbamazepine (30–500 μm) but not tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10–80 nm). This suggests that a change in the number of available sodium channels is the most prominent factor responsible for activity-induced changes in conduction velocity in unmyelinated axons. At moderate stimulus frequencies, axonal conduction velocity is determined by an interaction between residual sodium channel inactivation following each impulse and the retrieval of channels from inactivation by a concomitant Na+–K+-ATPase-mediated hyperpolarization. Since the process is primarily dependent upon sodium channel availability, tracking conduction velocity provides a means of accessing relative changes in the excitability of nociceptive neurons. PMID:18096592

  8. Conduction velocity is regulated by sodium channel inactivation in unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges.

    PubMed

    De Col, Roberto; Messlinger, Karl; Carr, Richard W

    2008-02-15

    Axonal conduction velocity varies according to the level of preceding impulse activity. In unmyelinated axons this typically results in a slowing of conduction velocity and a parallel increase in threshold. It is currently held that Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-dependent axonal hyperpolarization is responsible for this slowing but this has long been equivocal. We therefore examined conduction velocity changes during repetitive activation of single unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges. In direct contradiction to the currently accepted postulate, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blockade actually enhanced activity-induced conduction velocity slowing, while the degree of velocity slowing was curtailed in the presence of lidocaine (10-300 microm) and carbamazepine (30-500 microm) but not tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-80 nm). This suggests that a change in the number of available sodium channels is the most prominent factor responsible for activity-induced changes in conduction velocity in unmyelinated axons. At moderate stimulus frequencies, axonal conduction velocity is determined by an interaction between residual sodium channel inactivation following each impulse and the retrieval of channels from inactivation by a concomitant Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-mediated hyperpolarization. Since the process is primarily dependent upon sodium channel availability, tracking conduction velocity provides a means of accessing relative changes in the excitability of nociceptive neurons.

  9. Activity-dependent modulation of the axonal conduction of action potentials along rat hippocampal mossy fibers.

    PubMed

    Chida, Kuniaki; Kaneko, Kenya; Fujii, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The axonal conduction of action potentials in the nervous system is generally considered to be a stable signal for the relaying of information, and its dysfunction is involved in impairment of cognitive function. Recent evidence suggests that the conduction properties and excitability of axons are more variable than traditionally thought. To investigate possible changes in the conduction of action potentials along axons in the central nervous system, we recorded action potentials from granule cells that were evoked and conducted antidromically along unmyelinated mossy fibers in the rat hippocampus. To evaluate changes in axons by eliminating any involvement of changes in the somata, two latency values were obtained by stimulating at two different positions and the latency difference between the action potentials was measured. A conditioning electrical stimulus of 20 pulses at 1 Hz increas