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Sample records for zig-zag slab laser

  1. Thermal Lens Measurement in Diode-Pumped Nd:YAG Zig-Zag Slab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoak, M. C.; Kay, R. B.; Coyle, D. B.; Hopf, D.

    1998-01-01

    A major advantage that solid state zig-zag slab lasers have over conventional rod-based designs is that a much weaker thermal lens is produced in the slab when side-pumped with Quasi-CW laser diode arrays, particularly if the pump radiation is kept well away from the Brewster-cut ends. This paper reports on a rather strong thermal lens produced when diode pump radiation is collimated into a narrow portion of the zig-zag slab. The collimation of multi-bar pump packages to increase brightness and improve overlap is a direct consequence of designs which seek to maximize performance and efficiency. Our slab design employed a 8.1 cm x 2.5 mm x 5 mm slab with opposing Brewster end faces. It was pumped through the 2.5 mm direction by seven laser diode array packages, each housing four 6OW diode bars, 1 cm in width. The pump face, anti-reflection (AR) coated at 809 nm, was 6.8 cm in width and the 8.1 cm opposing side, high-reflection (HR) coated at 809 nm, reflected the unabsorbed pump beam for a second pass through the slab.

  2. The slab geometry laser. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Kane, T. J.; Kuhn, K.; Byer, R. L.; Unternahrer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Slab geometry solid-state lasers offer significant performance improvements over conventional rod-geometry lasers. A detailed theoretical description of the thermal, stress, and beam-propagation characteristics of a slab laser is presented. The analysis includes consideration of the effects of the zig-zag optical path, which eliminates thermal and stress focusing and reduces residual birefringence.

  3. Flowing Air-Water Cooled Slab Nd: Glass Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Baida; Cai, Bangwei; Liao, Y.; Xu, Shifa; Xin, Z.

    1989-03-01

    A zig-zag optical path slab geometry Nd: glass laser cooled through flowing air-water is developed by us. Theoretical studies on temperature distribution of slab and rod configurations in the unsteady state clarify the advantages of the slab geometry laser. The slab design and processing are also reported. In our experiments main laser output characteristics, e. g. laser efficiency, polarization, far-field divergence angle as well as resonator misalignment are investigated. The slab phosphate glass laser in combination with a crossed Porro-prism resonator demonstrates a good laser performance.

  4. High energy, high average power solid state green or UV laser

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Norton, Mary; Dane, C. Brent

    2004-03-02

    A system for producing a green or UV output beam for illuminating a large area with relatively high beam fluence. A Nd:glass laser produces a near-infrared output by means of an oscillator that generates a high quality but low power output and then multi-pass through and amplification in a zig-zag slab amplifier and wavefront correction in a phase conjugator at the midway point of the multi-pass amplification. The green or UV output is generated by means of conversion crystals that follow final propagation through the zig-zag slab amplifier.

  5. Soliton Analysis in Complex Molecular Systems: A Zig-Zag Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, P. L.; Savin, A. V.; Zolotaryuk, A. V.

    1997-06-01

    A simple numerical method for seeking solitary wavesolutions of a permanent profile in molecular systems of big complexity is presented. The method is essentially based on the minimization of a finite-dimensional function which is chosen under an appropriate discretization of time derivatives in equations of motion. In the present paper, it is applied to a zig-zag chain backbone of coupled particles, each of which has twodegrees of freedom (longitudinal and transverse). Both topological and nontopological soliton solutions are treated for this chain when it is (i) subjected to a two-dimensional periodic substrate potential or (ii) considered as an isolated object, respectively. In the first case, which may be considered as a zig-zag generalization of the Frenkel-Kontorova chain model, two types of kink solutions with different topological charges, describing vacancies of one or two atoms (I- or II-kinks) and defects with excess one or two atoms in the chain (I- or II-antikinks), have been found. The second case (isolated chain) is a generalization of the well-known Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain model, which takes into account transverse degrees of freedom of the chain molecules. Two types of stable nontopological soliton solutions which describe either (i) a supersonic solitary wave of longitudinal stretching accompanied by transverse slendering or (ii) supersonic pulses of longitudinal compression propagating together with localized transverse thickening (bulge) have been obtained.

  6. One joule per Q-switched pulse diode-pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holder, Lonnie E.; Kennedy, Chandler; Long, Larry; Dube, George

    1992-01-01

    Q-switched 1-J output has been achieved from diode-pumped zig-zag Nd:YAG slabs in an oscillator-amplifier configuration. The oscillator was single transverse and longitudinal model. This laser set records for Q-switched energy per pulse, and for average power from a diode-pumped laser. The laser was constructed in a rugged configuration suitable for routine laboratory use.

  7. The Effect of Acceleration Sprint and Zig-zag Drill Combination to Increase Students’ Speed and Agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bana, O.; Mintarto, E.; Kusnanik, N. W.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the following factors: (1) how far the effect of exercise acceleration sprint on the speed and agility (2) how much influence the zig-zag drill combination to the speed and agility (3) and is there any difference between the effects of exercise acceleration sprint and practice zig-zag drill combination of the speed and agility. This research is quantitative with quasi-experimental approach. The design of this study is matching only design.This study was conducted on 33 male students who take part in extracurricular and divided into 3 groups with 11 students in each group. Group 1 was given training of acceleration sprint, group 2 was given zig-zag training combination drills of conventional and exercises for group 3, for 8 weeks. The data collection was using sprint 30 meter to test the speed and agility t-test to test agility. Data were analyzed using t-test and analysis of variance. The conclusion of the research is (1) there is a significant effect of exercise acceleration sprint for the speed and agility, (2) there is a significant influence combination zig-zag drills, on speed and agility (3) and exercise acceleration sprint have more effect on the speed and agility.

  8. Cubic Zig-Zag Enrichment of the Classical Kirchhoff Kinematics for Laminated and Sandwich Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed anaylsis and examples are presented that show how to enrich the kinematics of classical Kirchhoff plate theory by appending them with a set of continuous piecewise-cubic functions. This analysis is used to obtain functions that contain the effects of laminate heterogeneity and asymmetry on the variations of the inplane displacements and transverse shearing stresses, for use with a {3, 0} plate theory in which these distributions are specified apriori. The functions used for the enrichment are based on the improved zig-zag plate theory presented recently by Tessler, Di Scuva, and Gherlone. With the approach presented herein, the inplane displacements are represented by a set of continuous piecewise-cubic functions, and the transverse shearing stresses and strains are represented by a set of piecewise-quadratic functions that are discontinuous at the ply interfaces.

  9. Two-dimensional thermography image retrieval from zig-zag scanned data with TZ-SCAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Ryohei; Arai, Kohei

    2008-10-01

    TZ-SCAN is a simple and low cost thermal imaging device which consists of a single point radiation thermometer on a tripod with a pan-tilt rotator, a DC motor controller board with a USB interface, and a laptop computer for rotator control, data acquisition, and data processing. TZ-SCAN acquires a series of zig-zag scanned data and stores the data as CSV file. A 2-D thermal distribution image can be retrieved by using the second quefrency peak calculated from TZ-SCAN data. An experiment is conducted to confirm the validity of the thermal retrieval algorithm. The experimental result shows efficient accuracy for 2-D thermal distribution image retrieval.

  10. An Implementation of RC4+ Algorithm and Zig-zag Algorithm in a Super Encryption Scheme for Text Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiman, M. A.; Amalia; Chayanie, N. I.

    2018-03-01

    Cryptography is the art and science of using mathematical methods to preserve message security. There are two types of cryptography, namely classical and modern cryptography. Nowadays, most people would rather use modern cryptography than classical cryptography because it is harder to break than the classical one. One of classical algorithm is the Zig-zag algorithm that uses the transposition technique: the original message is unreadable unless the person has the key to decrypt the message. To improve the security, the Zig-zag Cipher is combined with RC4+ Cipher which is one of the symmetric key algorithms in the form of stream cipher. The two algorithms are combined to make a super-encryption. By combining these two algorithms, the message will be harder to break by a cryptanalyst. The result showed that complexity of the combined algorithm is θ(n2 ), while the complexity of Zig-zag Cipher and RC4+ Cipher are θ(n2 ) and θ(n), respectively.

  11. Zig-zag tape influence in NREL Phase VI wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Iradi, Sugoi; Munduate, Xabier

    2014-06-01

    Two bladed 10 metre diameter wind turbine was tested in the 24.4m × 36.6m NASA-Ames wind tunnel (Phase VI). These experiments have been extensively used for validation purposes for CFD and other engineering tools. The free transition case (S), has been, and is, the most employed one for validation purposes, and consist in a 3° pitch case with a rotational speed of 72rpm upwind configuration with and without yaw misalignment. However, there is another less visited case (M) where identical configuration was tested but with the inclusion of a zig-zag tape. This was called transition fixed sequence. This paper shows the differences between the free and the fix transition cases, that should be more appropriate for comparison with fully turbulent simulations. Steady k-ω SST fully turbulent computations performed with WMB CFD method are compared with the experiments showing, better predictions in the attached flow region when it is compared with the transition fixed experiments. This work wants to prove the utility of M case (transition fixed) and show its differences respect the S case (free transition) for validation purposes.

  12. Co-assembly of Zn(SPh){sub 2} and organic linkers into helical and zig-zag polymer chains

    SciT

    Liu Yi; Yu Lingmin; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2012-07-15

    Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers, single helicate [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(TPyTA)(EG)]{sub n} (EG=ethylene glycol) (1) and zig-zag structure [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(BPyVB)]{sub n} (2), were synthesized under solvothermal conditions at 150 Degree-Sign C or room temperature by the co-assembly of Zn(SPh){sub 2} and organic linkers such as 2,4,6-tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPyTA) and 1,3-bis(trans-4-pyridylvinyl)benzene (BPyVB). X-ray crystallography study reveals that both polymers 1 and 2 crystallize in space group P2{sub 1}/c of the monoclinic system. The solid-state UV-vis absorption spectra show that 1 and 2 have maxium absorption onsets at 400 nm and 420 nm, respectively. TGA analysis indicates that 1 and 2 are stable up tomore » 110 Degree-Sign C and 210 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers, single helicate [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(TPyTA)(EG)]{sub n} (1) and zig-zag structure [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(BPyVB)]{sub n} (2), were synthesized. Solid-state UV-vis absorptions show that 1 and 2 have maxium absorption onsets at 400 nm and 420 nm, respectively. TGA analysis indicates that 1 and 2 are stable up to 110 Degree-Sign C and 210 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers have been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TPyTA results in helical structures in 1 while BPyVB leads to zig-zag chains in 2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid-state UV-vis absorption spectra and TGA analysis of the title polymers were studied.« less

  13. Communication: electronic band gaps of semiconducting zig-zag carbon nanotubes from many-body perturbation theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Umari, P; Petrenko, O; Taioli, S; De Souza, M M

    2012-05-14

    Electronic band gaps for optically allowed transitions are calculated for a series of semiconducting single-walled zig-zag carbon nanotubes of increasing diameter within the many-body perturbation theory GW method. The dependence of the evaluated gaps with respect to tube diameters is then compared with those found from previous experimental data for optical gaps combined with theoretical estimations of exciton binding energies. We find that our GW gaps confirm the behavior inferred from experiment. The relationship between the electronic gap and the diameter extrapolated from the GW values is also in excellent agreement with a direct measurement recently performed through scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

  14. Reversible conformational transition gives rise to 'zig-zag' temperature dependence of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Levitsky VYu; Melik-Nubarov, N S; Siksnis, V A; Grinberg VYa; Burova, T V; Levashov, A V; Mozhaev, V V

    1994-01-15

    We have obtained unusual 'zig-zag' temperature dependencies of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation (k(in)) of enzymes (alpha-chymotrypsin, covalently modified alpha-chymotrypsin, and ribonuclease) in a plot of log k(in) versus reciprocal temperature (Arrhenius plot). These dependencies are characterized by the presence of both ascending and descending linear portions which have positive and negative values of the effective activation energy (Ea), respectively. A kinetic scheme has been suggested that fits best for a description of these zig-zag dependencies. A key element of this scheme is the temperature-dependent reversible conformational transition of enzyme from the 'low-temperature' native state to a 'high-temperature' denatured form; the latter form is significantly more stable against irreversible thermoinactivation than the native enzyme. A possible explanation for a difference in thermal stabilities is that low-temperature and high-temperature forms are inactivated according to different mechanisms. Existence of the suggested conformational transition was proved by the methods of fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The values of delta H and delta S for this transition, determined from calorimetric experiments, are highly positive; this fact underlies a conclusion that this heat-induced transition is caused by an unfolding of the protein molecule. Surprisingly, in the unfolded high-temperature conformation, alpha-chymotrypsin has a pronounced proteolytic activity, although this activity is much smaller than that of the native enzyme.

  15. Thermal analysis of smart composite laminated angle-ply using higher order shear deformation theory with zig zag function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YagnaSri, P.; Siddiqui, Maimuna; Vijaya Nirmala, M.

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the work is to develop the higher order theory for piezoelectric composite laminated plates with zigzag function and to determine the thermal characteristics of piezoelectric laminated plate with zig zag function for different aspect ratios (a/h), thickness ratios (z/h) and voltage and also to evaluate electric potential function by solving second order differential equation satisfying electric boundary conditions along the thickness direction of piezoelectric layer. The related functions and derivations for equation of motion are obtained using the dynamic version of the principle of virtual work or Hamilton’s principle. The solutions are obtained by using Navier’s stokes method for anti-symmetric angle-ply with specific type of simply supported boundary conditions. Computer programs have been developed for realistic prediction of stresses and deflections for various sides to thickness ratios (a/h) and voltages.

  16. Modulational Instability and Quantum Discrete Breather States of Cold Bosonic Atoms in a Zig-Zag Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xia; Xie, Jiayu; Wu, Tianle; Tang, Bing

    2018-07-01

    A theoretical study on modulational instability and quantum discrete breather states in a system of cold bosonic atoms in zig-zag optical lattices is presented in this work. The time-dependent Hartree approximation is employed to deal with the multiple body problem. By means of a linear stability analysis, we analytically study the modulational instability, and estimate existence conditions of the bright stationary localized solutions for different values of the second-neighbor hopping constant. On the other hand, we get analytical bright stationary localized solutions, and analyze the influence of the second-neighbor hopping on their existence conditions. The predictions of the modulational instability analysis are shown to be reliable. Using these stationary localized single-boson wave functions, the quantum breather states corresponding to the system with different types of nonlinearities are constructed.

  17. Dense zig-zag microstructures in YSZ thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stender, Dieter; Schäuble, Nina; Weidenkaff, Anke; Montagne, Alex; Ghisleni, Rudy; Michler, Johann; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The very brittle oxygen ion conductor yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a typical solid electrolyte for miniaturized thin film fuel cells. In order to decrease the fuel cell operating temperature, the thickness of yttria stabilized zirconia thin films is reduced. Often, these thin membranes suffer from mechanical failure and gas permeability. To improve these mechanical issues, a glancing angle deposition approach is used to grow yttria stabilized zirconia thin films with tilted columnar structures. Changes of the material flux direction during the deposition result in a dense, zigzag-like structure with columnar crystallites. This structure reduces the elastic modulus of these membranes as compared to columnar yttria stabilized zirconia thin films as monitored by nano-indentation which makes them more adaptable to applied stress.

  18. Photo-oxidative doping in π-conjugated zig-zag chain of carbon atoms with sulfur-functional group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro

    2017-12-01

    Photo-oxidative doping processes were studied for the trans-polyacetylene backbone with the -SCH3 side group as a chemically representative of the precisely controlled S-functionalized zig-zag graphene nanoribbon edge. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy indicates that photochemical reaction of S-CH3 with atmospheric O2 forms selectively oxidized products such as -S(O)CH3 and -SO3- bound to the polyacetylene (PA) backbone. Using the correlation between the oxidation states of sulfur and the XANES peak positions, the partial charge distribution of CH3Sδ+-PAδ- has been estimated. Such positively charged sulfur atoms can attract higher electronegative oxygen atoms and expect to enhance the photooxidization capabilities. The formation of the -SO3- side group is evidently responsible for hole doping into the PA backbone. The results can provide some strategy for area-selective and controllable doping processes of atomic-scale molecular systems with the assistance of UV light.

  19. Chromatin conformation in living cells: support for a zig-zag model of the 30 nm chromatin fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Holley, W. R.; Mian, I. S.; Chatterjee, A.

    1998-01-01

    A new method was used to probe the conformation of chromatin in living mammalian cells. The method employs ionizing radiation and is based on the concept that such radiation induces correlated breaks in DNA strands that are in spatial proximity. Human dermal fibroblasts in G0 phase of the cell cycle and Chinese hamster ovary cells in mitosis were irradiated by X-rays or accelerated ions. Following lysis of the cells, DNA fragments induced by correlated breaks were end-labeled and separated according to size on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. A characteristic peak was obtained for a fragment size of 78 bases, which is the size that corresponds to one turn of DNA around the nucleosome. Additional peaks between 175 and 450 bases reflect the relative position of nearest-neighbor nucleosomes. Theoretical calculations that simulate the indirect and direct effect of radiation on DNA demonstrate that the fragment size distributions are closely related to the chromatin structure model used. Comparison of the experimental data with theoretical results support a zig-zag model of the chromatin fiber rather than a simple helical model. Thus, radiation-induced damage analysis can provide information on chromatin structure in the living cell. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  20. Design and Performance of the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Kay, Richard B.; Lindauer, Steven J., II

    2002-01-01

    The Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) laser is a Nd:YAG Q-switched, diode side-pumped, zig-zag slab design producing 10 ns, 15 mJ pulses at 1064 nm. It employs an unstable resonator as well as a graded reflectivity output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile. In order to conserve power, a conductively cooled design is employed and is designed to operate over a range of 25 C without active thermal control. The laser is an oscillator-only design and equipped with an 15X beam expander to limit the output divergence to less than 60 microrad. Thermal lensing compensation in the side-pumped slab was performed with different treatments of the x and y portions of the z-directed beam. Performance data as a function of temperature are given.

  1. The HALNA project: Diode-pumped solid-state laser for inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, T.; Ikegawa, T.; Kawanaka, J.; Miyanaga, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Izawa, Y.; Matsumoto, O.; Yasuhara, R.; Kurita, T.; Sekine, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Kan, H.; Furukawa, H.; Motokoshi, S.; Kanabe, T.

    2006-06-01

    High-enery, rep.-rated, diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) is one of leading candidates for inertial fusion energy driver (IFE) and related laser-driven high-field applications. The project for the development of IFE laser driver in Japan, HALNA (High Average-power Laser for Nuclear Fusion Application) at ILE, Osaka University, aims to demonstrate 100-J pulse energy at 10 Hz rep. rate with 5 times diffraction limited beam quality. In this article, the advanced solid-state laser technologies for one half scale of HALNA (50 J, 10 Hz) are presented including thermally managed slab amplifier of Nd:phosphate glass and zig-zag optical geometry, and uniform, large-area diode-pumping.

  2. Solid-state laser sources for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Kane, T.; Eggleston, J.; Long, S. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in slab-geometry and conventional rod Nd:YAG solid-state lasers for applications in remote sensing is presented. Developments in slab geometry lasers, which were aimed at improving pulse energy and tuning range, have been based on the use of a Nd:glass substrate with a zig-zag optical path, with selective Raman shifting in gases and harmonic generation in LiNbO3 and KDP to extend the tuning range into the UV and visible regions. The theoretically predicted advantages of the elimination of birefringence and thermal and stress-induced focusing in the slab-geometry laser have been confirmed in measurements on a test-bed Nd:glass system, and a CW lamp pumped Nd:YAG oscillator, which have also demonstrated an order of magnitude improvement in laser performance. A single axial mode Nd:YAG oscillator has also been designed which, operating in a 3-msec quasi-CW mode, has a chirp rate of 30 kHz/microsec and a free-running stability of + or - 20 MHz. With chirp compensation, this stability is adequate for wind velocity measurements by coherent lidar.

  3. Nonimaging concentrators for diode-pumped slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacovara, Philip; Gleckman, Philip L.; Holman, Robert L.; Winston, Roland

    1991-10-01

    Diode-pumped slab lasers require concentrators for high-average power operation. We detail the properties of diode lasers and slab lasers which set the concentration requirements and the concentrator design methodologies that are used, and describe some concentrator designs used in high-average power slab lasers at Lincoln Laboratory.

  4. Circular zig-zag scan video format

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, C.G.; Simmons, C.M.

    1992-06-09

    A circular, ziz-zag scan for use with vidicon tubes is disclosed. A sine wave is generated, rectified and its fourth root extracted. The fourth root, and its inverse, are used to generate horizontal ramp and sync signals. The fourth root is also used to generate a vertical sync signal, and the vertical sync signal, along with the horizontal sync signal, are used to generate the vertical ramp signal. Cathode blanking and preamplifier clamp signals are also obtained from the vertical sync signal. 10 figs.

  5. Circular zig-zag scan video format

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, C. Glen; Simmons, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    A circular, ziz-zag scan for use with vidicon tubes. A sine wave is generated, rectified and its fourth root extracted. The fourth root, and its inverse, are used to generate horizontal ramp and sync signals. The fourth root is also used to generate a vertical sync signal, and the vertical sync signal, along with the horizontal sync signal, are used to generate the vertical ramp signal. Cathode blanking and preamplifier clamp signals are also obtained from the vertical sync signal.

  6. Clean WS2 and MoS2 Nanoribbons Generated by Laser-Induced Unzipping of the Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vasu, Kuraganti; Yamijala, Sharma S R K C; Zak, Alla; Gopalakrishnan, Kothandam; Pati, Swapan K; Rao, C N R

    2015-08-26

    The preparation of 1D WS(2) and MoS(2) flexible nanoribbons by laser-induced unzipping of the nanotubes is reported. The nanoribbons are of high quality, uniform width, and devoid of surface contamination. The zig-zag edges in WS(2) nanoribbons give rise to ferromagnetism at room temperature. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Innovative ceramic slab lasers for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapucci, Antonio; Ciofini, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) are gaining increasing interest for high power industrial application, given the continuous improvement in high power diode laser technology reliability and affordability. These sources open new windows in the parameter space for traditional applications such as cutting , welding, marking and engraving for high reflectance metallic materials. Other interesting applications for this kind of sources include high speed thermal printing, precision drilling, selective soldering and thin film etching. In this paper we examine the most important DPSS laser source types for industrial applications and we describe in details the performances of some slab laser configurations investigated at our facilities. The different architectures' advantages and draw-backs are briefly compared in terms of performances, system complexity and ease of scalability to the multi-kW level.

  8. General analysis of slab lasers using geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Te-yuan; Bass, Michael

    2007-02-01

    A thorough and general geometrical optics analysis of a slab-shaped laser gain medium is presented. The length and thickness ratio is critical if one is to achieve the maximum utilization of absorbed pump power by the laser light in such a medium; e.g., the fill factor inside the slab is to be maximized. We point out that the conditions for a fill factor equal to 1, laser light entering and exiting parallel to the length of the slab, and Brewster angle incidence on the entrance and exit faces cannot all be satisfied at the same time. Deformed slabs are also studied. Deformation along the width direction of the largest surfaces is shown to significantly reduce the fill factor that is possible.

  9. Q-switched slab RF discharge CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kochetkov, Yu V.; Kozlov, A. Yu; Mokrousova, D. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Zemtsov, D. S.

    2017-05-01

    A compact repetitively pulsed cryogenically cooled slab RF discharge CO laser with double path V-type laser resonator equipped with external Q-switching system based on rotating mirror was developed and studied. The laser produced mid-IR (λ ~ 5-7 µm) radiation pulses of ~1 ÷ 2 µs duration (FWHM), peak power up to ~3 kW, and pulse repetition rate up to 130 Hz. Averaged output laser power reached 0.5 W, the laser spectrum consisted of ~80 laser lines with individual peak power up to 80 W.

  10. Face pumping of thin, solid-state slab lasers with laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Faulstich, A; Baker, H J; Hall, D R

    1996-04-15

    A new technique for face pumping of slab lasers uses transfer of light from 10 quasi-cw laser diode bars through a slotted mirror into a rectangular, highly ref lective pump chamber, giving efficient multipass pumping of a thin Nd:glass slab laser. A slope efficiency of 28% and a maximum pulse energy of 65 mJ have been obtained, and gain and loss measurements with thickness t = 0.45-1.04 mm have confirmed the 1/t scaling of gain in thin slabs and the high efficiency of pump light transfer.

  11. Development of thermally controlled HALNA DPSSL for inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Osamu; Yasuhara, Ryo; Kurita, Takashi; Ikegawa, Tadashi; Sekine, Takashi; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Kawanaka, Junji; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Izawa, Yasukazu; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Masahiro; Kan, Hirofumi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Motokoshi, Shinji

    2006-02-01

    We have been developing a high average-power laser system for science and industry applications that can generate an output of 20 J per pulse at 10-Hz operation. Water-cooled Nd:glass zig-zag slab is pumped with 803-nm AlGaAs laser-diode modules. To efficiently extract energy from the laser medium, the laser beam alternately passes through dual zig-zag slab amplifier modules. Twin LD modules equipped on each slab amplifier module pump the laser medium with a peak power density of 2.5 kW/cm2. In high power laser system, thermal load in the laser medium causes serious thermal effects. We arranged cladding glasses on the top and bottom of the laser slab to reduce thermal effects.

  12. The Zig-zag Instability of Streamlined Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Thibault; Coux, Martin; Quere, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2017-11-01

    When a floating bluff body, like a sphere, impacts water with a vertical velocity, its trajectory is straight and the depth of its dive increases with its initial velocity. Even though we observe the same phenomenon at low impact speed for axisymmetric streamlined bodies, the trajectory is found to deviate from the vertical when the velocity overcomes a critical value. This instability results from a competition between the destabilizing torque of the lift and the stabilizing torque of the Archimede's force. Balancing these torques yields a prediction on the critical velocity above which the instability appears. This theoretical value is found to depend on the position of the gravity center of the projectile and predicts with a full agreement the behaviour observed in our different experiments. Project funded by DGA.

  13. Experimental study of a VBG-based Tm : YLF slab laser at different output coupler parameters

    SciT

    Duan, X M; Ding, Y; Dai, T Y

    2015-04-30

    The performance of a Tm : YLF slab laser is studied at different output coupler parameters. Use is made of a 20-mm-long a-cut slab crystal doped with 2.5 at. % thulium ions. With a volume Bragg grating and a Fabry – Perot etalon, the selected output wavelength of this Tm : YLF slab laser is 1908 nm. For the optimised output coupler with a transmission of 20% and a radius of curvature of 300 mm, the output power exceeds 74.1 W and the slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power reaches 48.4%. In addition, the beam quality ofmore » the Tm : YLF slab laser is improved. (lasers)« less

  14. Study on the amplifier experiment of end-pumped long pulse slab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Quanwei; Chen, Xiaoming; Jiang, JianFeng; Pang, Yu; Tong, Lixin; Li, Mi; Hu, Hao; Lv, Wenqiang; Gao, Qingsong; Tang, Chun

    2018-03-01

    The amplifier experiment research of end-pumped long pulse slab laser is developed, the results of out-put energy, optical-optical efficiency and pulse waveform are obtained at different experiment conditions, such as peak pumped power, amplifier power and pumped pulse width. The seed laser is CW fundamental transverse-mode operation fiber laser, the laser medium is composited Nd:YAG slab. Under end-pumped and the 2 passes, the laser obtain 7.65J out-put energy and 43.1% optical-optical efficiency with 45kW peak-pumped power and 386μs pump pulse width. The experimental results provide the basic for the optimization design to high frequency, high energy and high beam-quality slab lasers.

  15. Yb:YAG master oscillator power amplifier for remote wind sensing.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, A K; Saraf, S; Byer, R L

    2007-10-20

    We have demonstrated key advances towards a solid-state laser amplifier at 1.03 microm for global remote wind sensing. We designed end-pumped zig-zag slab amplifiers to achieve high gain. We overcame parasitic oscillation limitations using claddings on the slab's total internal reflection (TIR) and edge surfaces to confine the pump and signal light by TIR and allow leakage of amplified spontaneous emission rays that do not meet the TIR condition. This enables e3, e5, and e8 single-, double-, and quadruple-pass small-signal amplifier gain, respectively. The stored energy density is 15.6 J/cm3, a record for a laser-diode end-pumped Yb:YAG zig-zag slab amplifier.

  16. Kilohertz Pulse Repetition Frequency Slab Ti:sapphire Lasers with High Average Power (10 W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, William J.; Coutts, David W.; Webb, Colin E.

    1999-11-01

    High-average-power broadband 780-nm slab Ti:sapphire lasers, pumped by a kilohertz pulse repetition frequency copper vapor laser (CVL), were demonstrated. These lasers are designed for damage-free power scaling when pumped by CVL s configured for maximum output power (of order 100 W) but with poor beam quality ( M 2 300 ). A simple Brewster-angled slab laser side pumped by a CVL produced 10-W average power (1.25-mJ pulses at 8 kHz) with 4.2-ns FWHM pulse duration at an absolute efficiency of 15% (68-W pump power). Thermal lensing in the Brewster slab laser resulted in multitransverse mode output, and pump absorption was limited to 72% by the maximum doping level for commercially available Ti:sapphire (0.25%). A slab laser with a multiply folded zigzag path was therefore designed and implemented that produced high-beam-quality (TEM 00 -mode) output when operated with cryogenic cooling and provided a longer absorption path for the pump. Excessive scattering of the Ti:sapphire beam at the crystal surfaces limited the efficiency of operation for the zigzag laser, but fluorescence diagnostic techniques, gain measurement, and modeling suggest that efficient power extraction ( 15 W TEM 00 , 23% efficiency) from this laser would be possible for crystals with an optical quality surface polish.

  17. Spectral singularities, threshold gain, and output intensity for a slab laser with mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Keremcan; Mostafazadeh, Ali; Sarısaman, Mustafa

    2018-05-01

    We explore the consequences of the emergence of linear and nonlinear spectral singularities in TE modes of a homogeneous slab of active optical material that is placed between two mirrors. We use the results together with two basic postulates regarding the behavior of laser light emission to derive explicit expressions for the laser threshold condition and output intensity for these modes of the slab and discuss their physical implications. In particular, we reveal the details of the dependence of the threshold gain and output intensity on the position and properties of the mirrors and on the real part of the refractive index of the gain material.

  18. 250-W RF-excited slab CO2 lasers using gold catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyun, V. V.; Samorodov, V. G.; Shishkanov, E. F.

    2003-11-01

    The investigations and constructions of compact RF-excitation CO2 lasers with slab discharge channel geometry and unstable-waveguide resonators are described. The output average power scale up to 260 W from electrode area of 198 cm2 have been obtained in sealed-off mode because use a catalyst effect in discharge volume.

  19. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications.

  20. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1997-11-18

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications. 5 figs.

  1. Dispersion of TE modes in slab waveguides with reference to double heterostructure semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buus, J.

    1980-06-01

    The group index for TE modes in an asymmetrical slab waveguide is investigated, and a simple analytical expression is derived. It is shown that the product of the phase and group indices is related to the power fraction in each of the three layers of the waveguide. The results are of interest in the analysis of double heterostructure semiconductor lasers. Theoretical and experimental results for lasers emitting at 1.55 microns are compared.

  2. Adaptive slab laser beam quality improvement using a weighted least-squares reconstruction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanqiu; Dong, LiZhi; Chen, XiaoJun; Tan, Yi; Liu, Wenjin; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Ping; Xu, Bing; Ye, YuTang

    2016-04-10

    Adaptive optics is an important technology for improving beam quality in solid-state slab lasers. However, there are uncorrectable aberrations in partial areas of the beam. In the criterion of the conventional least-squares reconstruction method, it makes the zones with small aberrations nonsensitive and hinders this zone from being further corrected. In this paper, a weighted least-squares reconstruction method is proposed to improve the relative sensitivity of zones with small aberrations and to further improve beam quality. Relatively small weights are applied to the zones with large residual aberrations. Comparisons of results show that peak intensity in the far field improved from 1242 analog digital units (ADU) to 2248 ADU, and beam quality β improved from 2.5 to 2.0. This indicates the weighted least-squares method has better performance than the least-squares reconstruction method when there are large zonal uncorrectable aberrations in the slab laser system.

  3. Low-cost Engineering of Laser Rods and Slabs with Liquid Phase Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We investigated the use of a liquid phase epitaxial ( LPE ) coating to improve the performance of a rod or slab laser. A...single crystal erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) rod coated with undoped YAG, and an uncoated sample were procured, then compared on the...the whispering gallery modes, which otherwise would deplete the gain in ~50% of the rod volume. We also investigated LPE growth on a ceramic sample

  4. Efficient Q-switched Tm:YAG ceramic slab laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuaiyi; Wang, Mingjian; Xu, Lin; Wang, Yan; Tang, Yulong; Cheng, Xiaojin; Chen, Weibiao; Xu, Jianqiu; Jiang, Benxue; Pan, Yubai

    2011-01-17

    Characteristics of Tm:YAG ceramic for high efficient 2-μm lasers are analyzed. Efficient diode end-pumped continuous-wave and Q-switched Tm:YAG ceramic lasers are demonstrated. At the absorbed pump power of 53.2W, the maximum continuous wave (cw) output power of 17.2 W around 2016 nm was obtained with the output transmission of 5%. The optical conversion efficiency is 32.3%, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 36.5%. For Q-switched operation, the shortest width of 69 ns was achieved with the pulse repetition frequency of 500 Hz and single pulse energy of 20.4 mJ, which indicates excellent energy storage capability of the Tm:YAG ceramic.

  5. High energy efficient solid state laser sources. [slab geometry laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Slab glass performance studies demonstate 18 J of output at 2 Hz with 2.3% wall plug efficiency. The goal is to achieve 10 J per pulse at 10 Hz and 3% wall plug efficiency during the next annual period. The slab concept was extended to Nd:YAG and to Nd:GGG. To date over 80 W of CW output power at 2% efficiency was generated in slab Nd:YAG. A multiplexed slab Nd:YAG pre-amplifier was invented and a Nd:YAG oscillator was demonstrated with 100kHz linewidth for eventual use in wind velocity measurements.

  6. A homogeneous cooling scheme investigation for high power slab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianguo; Lin, Weiran; Fan, Zhongwei; Chen, Yanzhong; Ge, Wenqi; Yu, Jin; Liu, Hao; Mo, Zeqiang; Fan, Lianwen; Jia, Dan

    2017-10-01

    The forced convective heat transfer with the advantages of reliability and durability is widely used in cooling the laser gain medium. However, a flow direction induced temperature gradient always appears. In this paper, a novel cooling configuration based on longitudinal forced convective heat transfer is presented. In comparison with two different types of configurations, it shows a more efficient heat transfer and more homogeneous temperature distribution. The investigation of the flow rate reveals that the higher flow rate the better cooling performance. Furthermore, the simulation results with 20 L/min flow rate shows an adequate temperature level and temperature homogeneity which keeps a lower hydrostatic pressure in the flow path.

  7. Automatic low-order aberration compensator for solid-state slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin; Dong, Lizhi; Lai, Boheng; Yang, Ping; Kong, Qingfeng; Yang, Kangjian; Liu, Yong; Tang, Guomao; Xu, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Slab geometry is a promising architecture for power scaling of solid-state lasers. By propagating the laser beams along zigzag path in the gain medium, the thermal effects can be well compensated. However, in the non-zigzag direction, the thermal effects are not compensated. Among the overall aberrations in the slab lasers, the major contributors are two low-order aberrations: astigmatism and defocus, which can range up to over 100 microns (peak to valley), leading to detracted beam quality. Another problem with slab lasers is that the output beams are generally in a rectangular aperture with high aspect ratio (normally 1:10), where square beams are favorable for many applications. In order to solve these problems, we propose an automatic low-order aberration compensation system. This system is composed of three lenses fixed on a motorized rail, one is a spherical lens and the others are cylindrical lenses. Astigmatism and defocus can be compensated by merely adjusting the distances between the lenses. Two wave-front sensors are employed in this compensation system, one is used for detecting the initial parameters of the beams, and the other one is used for detecting the remaining aberrations after correction. The adjustments of the three lenses are directly calculated based on beam parameters using ray tracing method. The initial size of the beam is 3.2mm by 26mm, and peak to valley(PV) value of the wave-front is 33.07λ(λ=1064nm). After correction, the dimension becomes 40mm by 40mm, and peak to valley (PV) value of the wave-front is less than 2 microns.

  8. Investigation on efficiency declines due to spectral overlap between LDAs pump and laser medium in high power double face pumped slab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ye; Chen, Yanzhong; Liao, Lifen; Guo, Guangyan; He, Jianguo; Fan, Zhongwei

    2018-03-01

    In high power diode lasers, the input cooling water temperature would affect both output power and output spectrum. In double face pumped slab laser, the spectrum of two laser diode arrays (LDAs) must be optimized for efficiency reason. The spectrum mismatch of two LDAs would result in energy storing decline. In this work, thermal induced efficiency decline due to spectral overlap between high power LDAs and laser medium was investigated. A numerical model was developed to describe the energy storing variation with changing LDAs cooling water temperature and configuration (series/parallel connected). A confirmatory experiment was conducted using a double face pumped slab module. The experiment results show good agreements with simulations.

  9. Laser beat wave excitation of terahertz radiation in a plasma slab

    SciT

    Chauhan, Santosh; Parashar, Jetendra, E-mail: j.p.parashar@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generation by nonlinear mixing of lasers, obliquely incident on a plasma slab is investigated. Two cases are considered: (i) electron density profile is parabolic but density peak is below the critical density corresponding to the beat frequency, (ii) plasma boundaries are sharp and density is uniform. In both cases, nonlinearity arises through the ponderomotive force that gives rise to electron drift at the beat frequency. In the case of inhomogeneous plasma, non zero curl of the nonlinear current density gives rise to electromagnetic THz generation. In case of uniform plasma, the sharp density variation at the plasmamore » boundaries leads to radiation generation. In a slab width of less than a terahertz wavelength, plasma density one fourth of terahertz critical density, laser intensities ∼10{sup 17 }W/cm{sup 2} at 1 μm, one obtains the THz intensity ∼1 GW/cm{sup 2} at 3 THz radiation frequency.« less

  10. Relativistic magnetic reconnection driven by a moderately intense laser interacting with a micro-plasma-slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei; Pukhov, Alexander; Fülöp, Tünde

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR) in the relativistic regime is generally thought to be responsible for powering rapid bursts of non-thermal radiation in astrophysical events. It is therefore of significant importance to study how the field energy is transferred to the plasma to power the observed emission. However, due to the difficulty in making direct measurements in astrophysical systems or achieving relativistic MR in laboratory environments, the particle acceleration is usually studied using fully kinetic PIC simulations. Here we present a numerical study of a readily available (TW-mJ-class) laser interacting with a micro-scale plasma slab. The simulations show when the electron beams excited on both sides of the slab approach the end of the plasma structure, ultrafast relativistic MR occurs. As the field topology changes, the explosive release of magnetic energy results in emission of relativistic electron jets with cut-off energy 12 MeV. The proposed novel scenario can be straightforwardly implemented in experiments, and might significantly improve the understanding of fundamental questions such as field dissipation and particle acceleration in relativistic MR. This work is supported by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation and the European Research Council (ERC-2014-CoG Grant 64712).

  11. Wavefront improvement in an end-pumped high-power Nd:YAG zigzag slab laser.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Sung; Cha, Yong-Ho; Lim, Gwon; Kim, Yonghee; Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Cha, Byung Heon; Lee, Hyeon Cheor; Kim, Sangin; Koh, Kwang Uoong; Kim, Hyun Tae

    2017-08-07

    Techniques for wavefront improvement in an end-pumped Nd:YAG zigzag slab laser amplifier were proposed and demonstrated experimentally. First, a study on the contact materials was conducted to improve the heat transfer between the slab and cooling blocks and to increase the cooling uniformity. Among many attempts, only the use of silicon oil showed an improvement in the wavefront. Thus, the appropriate silicone oil was applied to the amplifier as a contact material. In addition, the wavefront compensation method using a glass rod array was also applied to the amplifier. A very low wavefront distortion was obtained through the use of a silicone-oil contact and glass rod array. The variance of the optical path difference for the entire beam height was 3.87 μm at a pump power of 10.6 kW, and that for the 80% section was 1.69 μm. The output power from the oscillator was 3.88 kW, which means the maximum output extracted from the amplifier at a pump power of 10.6 kW.

  12. Automatic low-order aberration correction based on geometrical optics for slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Dong, Lizhi; Lai, Boheng; Yang, Ping; Liu, Yong; Kong, Qingfeng; Yang, Kangjian; Tang, Guomao; Xu, Bing

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, we present a method based on geometry optics to simultaneously correct low-order aberrations and reshape the beams of slab lasers. A coaxial optical system with three lenses is adapted. The positions of the three lenses are directly calculated based on the beam parameters detected by wavefront sensors. The initial sizes of the input beams are 1.8  mm×11  mm, and peak-to-valley (PV) values of the wavefront range up to several tens of microns. After automatic correction, the dimensions may reach nearly 22  mm×22  mm as expected, and PV values of the wavefront are less than 2 μm. The effectiveness and precision of this method are verified with experiments.

  13. The Relaxation of Vicinal (001) with ZigZag [110] Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Micah; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh; González-Cabrera, Diego Luis; Einstein, Theodore L.

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents a kinetic Monte Carlo study of the relaxation dynamics of [110] steps on a vicinal (001) simple cubic surface. This system is interesting because [110] steps have different elementary excitation energetics and favor step diffusion more than close-packed [100] steps. In this talk we show how this leads to relaxation dynamics showing greater fluctuations on a shorter time scale for [110] steps as well as 2-bond breaking processes being rate determining in contrast to 3-bond breaking processes for [100] steps. The existence of a steady state is shown via the convergence of terrace width distributions at times much longer than the relaxation time. In this time regime excellent fits to the modified generalized Wigner distribution (as well as to the Berry-Robnik model when steps can overlap) were obtained. Also, step-position correlation function data show diffusion-limited increase for small distances along the step as well as greater average step displacement for zigzag steps compared to straight steps for somewhat longer distances along the step. Work supported by NSF-MRSEC Grant DMR 05-20471 as well as a DOE-CMCSN Grant.

  14. Flapping, wobbling, and zig-zagging: Tomographic PIV measurements of Antarctic sea butterfly ``flying'' underwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, D.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2015-11-01

    A portable tomographic PIV technique was used to study the fluid dynamics and kinematics of sea butterflies in Antarctica. Antarctic pteropods (or sea butterflies), which are currently threatened by ocean acidification, swim in seawater with a pair of gelatinous parapodia (or ``wings'') via a unique propulsion mechanism. Both power and recovery strokes propel the organism (1.5 - 5 mm in size) upward in a sawtooth-like trajectory with average speed of 14 - 30 mm/s and pitch the shell forwards-and-backwards at 1.9 - 3 Hz. The pitching motion effectively positions the parapodia such that they stroke downward during both the power and recovery strokes. Reynolds numbers defined for flapping, translating, and pitching (i.e. Ref, ReU, and ReΩ) characterize the motion of the pteropod. For Ref <50, the shell does not pitch and the pteropod swims abnormally. We present a detailed comparison of the volumetric fluid velocity fields induced by pteropods swimming upwards with Ref = 80 and 180. The pteropod at the lower Ref creates an attached shear flow along the parapodia and pushes fluid in a method analogous to a paddle. In contrast, at higher Ref, the flow along the parapodia separates and generates complex vortex structures.

  15. Application of silicon zig-zag wall arrays for anodes of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. V.; Rumyantsev, A. M.; Levitskii, V. S.; Beregulin, E. V.; Zhdanov, V. V.; Terukov, E. I.; Astrova, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic tests of anodes based on zigzag wall arrays fabricated by the electrochemical etching and post-anodization treatment of silicon have been performed. Compared with anodes based on nanowires and planar thin films, these structures have several advantages. An ex situ analysis of the morphology and structural transformations in a material subjected to cyclic lithiation was conducted by electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The effect of geometrical parameters and a cycling mode on the degradation rate was studied. It is shown that a significant rise in the cycle life of the anode can be obtained by the restriction of the inserted amount of lithium. The anode, subjected to galvanostatic cycling at a rate C/2.8 at a limited charge capacity of 1000 mA · h g-1, demonstrates no degradation after 1200 cycles.

  16. Comparative study of high power Tm:YLF and Tm:LLF slab lasers in continuous wave regime.

    PubMed

    Berrou, Antoine; Collett, Oliver J P; Morris, Daniel; Esser, M J Daniel

    2018-04-16

    We report on Tm:YLF and Tm:LLF slab lasers (1.5 x 11 x 20 mm 3 ) end pumped from one end with a high-brightness 792 nm laser diode stack. These two lasers are compared under identical pump conditions in continuous-wave regime. A stronger negative thermal lens in Tm:LLF than in Tm:YLF is highlighted, making it more difficult to operate the Tm:LLF laser under stable lasing conditions. In a configuration where the high reflectivity cavity mirror has a radius of curvature of r = 150 mm, the Tm:YLF (Tm:LLF) laser produces a maximum output power of 150 W (143 W) for 428 W of incident pump power (respectively). For a second cavity configuration where the high reflectivity cavity mirror has a radius of curvature of r = 500 mm, the Tm:YLF laser produces a maximum output power of 164 W for 412 W of incident pump power and a 57% slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power. The emitted wavelength of these two lasers are measured as a function of the output coupler reflectivity and it shows that Tm:LLF laser emits at a longer wavelength than Tm:YLF.

  17. Efficient, high power, Q-switched Nd:YLF slab laser end-pumped by diode stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hengli; Li, Daijun; Shi, Peng; Diart, Rober; Shell, Alexander; Haas, Claus R.; Du, Keming

    2005-06-01

    A high power diode stack end-pumped electro-optically Q-switched Nd:YLF slab laser with a stable and off-axis negative-branch confocal unstable hybrid resonator was demonstrated. By using a cylindrical lens in the stable direction the thermal lens effect was compensated. Pulse energy of 25 mJ was obtained with a pulse width of 22.4 ns at repetition rates of 500 Hz and a conversion efficiency of 22%. The stability was better than 0.8% and the beam propagation M2 factor was about 1.2.

  18. Automatic low-order aberrations compensator for a conduction-cooled end-pumped solid-state zigzag slab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin; Dong, Lizhi; Lai, Boheng; Yang, Ping; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Xun; Liu, Yong; Tang, Guomao; Xu, Bing

    2017-11-01

    In order to solve the problem of large low-order aberrations with solid-state zigzag slab lasers, an automatic compensator has been developed in this paper. In this compensator, three lenses are mounted on a motorized rail, whose positions can be obtained using ray tracing method based on the beam parameters detected by a wave-front sensor. The initial peak to valley (PV) values of the wave-front range up to several tens of microns. Both simulated and experimental results show that the PV values of the wave-front can be reduced to around 1 . 6 μm with the proposed automatic compensator.

  19. DiPOLE: a 10 J, 10 Hz cryogenic gas cooled multi-slab nanosecond Yb:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Ertel, Klaus; Mason, Paul D; Phillips, P Jonathan; De Vido, Mariastefania; Smith, Jodie M; Butcher, Thomas J; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Greenhalgh, R Justin S; Collier, John L

    2015-07-27

    The Diode Pumped Optical Laser for Experiments (DiPOLE) project at the Central Laser Facility aims to develop a scalable, efficient high pulse energy diode pumped laser amplifier system based on cryogenic gas cooled, multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG technology. We present recent results obtained from a scaled down prototype laser system designed for operation at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate. At 140 K, the system generated 10.8 J of energy in a 10 ns pulse at 1029.5 nm when pumped by 48 J of diode energy at 940 nm, corresponding to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 22.5%. To our knowledge, this represents the highest pulse energy obtained from a cryo cooled Yb laser to date and the highest efficiency achieved by a multi-Joule diode pumped solid state laser system. Additionally, we demonstrated shot-to-shot energy stability of 0.85% rms for the system operated at 7 J, 10 Hz during several runs lasting up to 6 hours, with more than 50 hours in total. We also demonstrated pulse shaping capability and report on beam, wavefront and focal spot quality.

  20. Recording of interference fringe structure by femtosecond laser pulses in samples of silver-containing porous glass and thick slabs of dichromated gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Olga V.; Dement'ev, Dmitry A.; Chekalin, Sergey V.; Kompanets, V. O.; Matveets, Yu. A.; Serov, Oleg B.; Smolovich, Anatoly M.

    2002-05-01

    The recording geometry and recording media for the method of achromatic wavefront reconstruction are discussed. The femtosecond recording on the thick slabs of dichromated gelatin and the samples of silver-containing porous glass was obtained. The applications of the method to ultrafast laser spectroscopy and to phase conjugation were suggested.

  1. High energy 523 nm ND:YLF pulsed slab laser with novel pump beam waveguide design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qi; Zhu, Xiaolei; Ma, Jian; Lu, Tingting; Ma, Xiuhua; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-11-01

    A laser diode pumped Nd:YLF master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) green laser system with high pulse energy and high stable output is demonstrated. At a repetition rate of 50 Hz, 840 mJ pulse energy, 9.1 ns pulse width of 1047 nm infrared laser emitting is obtained from the MOPA system. The corresponding peak power is 93 MW. Extra-cavity frequency doubling with a LiB3O5 crystal, pulse energy of 520 mJ at 523 nm wavelength is achieved. The frequency conversion efficiency reaches up to 62%. The output pulse energy instability of the laser system is less than 0.6% for one hour.

  2. Diode-pumped large-aperture Nd:YAG slab amplifier for high energy nanosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guangyan; Chen, Yanzhong; He, Jianguo; Lang, Ye; Lin, Weiran; Tang, Xiongxin; Zhang, Hongbo; Kang, Zhijun; Fan, Zhongwei

    2017-10-01

    A high gain, low thermal-induced wavefront distortion, laser diode-pumped Nd: YAG slab amplifier is demonstrated with its active media dimensions of 7 mm ×35 mm ×138.2 mm. Under the 200 Hz, 1440 W pulse pumping condition while no seed light to amplify, the thermal induced wavefront aberration of a He-Ne probe passing through the gain meUdium is 0.165 λ@633 nm (RMS). The amplifier shows stable aberration character with two major low-order terms, defocus and 0° astigmatism. The fluorescence distribution, stored energy, and small-signal gain of the amplifier are measured and have a good agreement with the calculated results. In the amplifier, the fluorescence is uniformly distributed and the maximum stored energy of 3.2 J can be achieved with a plane-concave cavity at 200 Hz pump repetition frequency. For a repetition frequency of 200 Hz, 25 μJ injection polarized seed-light and 1440 W pump power, the small signal gain reaches 9.45. The amplifier has been successfully employed in a 200 Hz, 5 J, MOPA system with 1.7 times diffraction limited output.

  3. Pre-processing of data coming from a laser-EMAT system for non-destructive testing of steel slabs.

    PubMed

    Sgarbi, Mirko; Colla, Valentina; Cateni, Sivia; Higson, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Non destructive test systems are increasingly applied in the industrial context for their strong potentialities in improving and standardizing quality control. Especially in the intermediate manufacturing stages, early detection of defects on semi-finished products allow their direction towards later production processes according to their quality, with consequent considerable savings in time, energy, materials and work. However, the raw data coming from non destructive test systems are not always immediately suitable for sophisticated defect detection algorithms, due to noise and disturbances which are unavoidable, especially in harsh operating conditions, such as the ones which are typical of the steelmaking cycle. The paper describes some pre-processing operations which are required in order to exploit the data coming from a non destructive test system. Such a system is based on the joint exploitation of Laser and Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducer technologies and is applied to the detection of surface and sub-surface cracks in cold and hot steel slabs. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimization Study of Hydrogen Gas Adsorption on Zig-zag Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Artificial Neural Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasruddin; Lestari, M.; Supriyadi; Sholahudin

    2018-03-01

    The use of hydrogen gas in fuel cell technology has a huge opportunity to be applied in upcoming vehicle technology. One of the most important problems in fuel cell technology is the hydrogen storage. The adsorption of hydrogen in carbon-based materials attracts a lot of attention because of its reliability. This study investigated the adsorption of hydrogen gas in Single-walled Carbon Nano Tubes (SWCNT) with chilarity of (0, 12), (0, 15), and (0, 18) to find the optimum chilarity. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) can be used to predict the hydrogen storage capacity at different pressure and temperature conditions appropriately, using simulated series of data. The Artificial Neural Network is modeled as a predictor of the hydrogen adsorption capacity which provides solutions to some deficiencies in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a previous study, ANN configurations have been developed for 77k, 233k, and 298k temperatures in hydrogen gas storage. To prepare this prediction, ANN is modeled to find out the configurations that exist in the set of training and validation of specified data selection, the distance between data, and the number of neurons that produce the smallest error. This configuration is needed to make an accurate artificial neural network. The configuration of neural network was then applied to this research. The neural network analysis results show that the best configuration of artificial neural network in hydrogen storage is at 233K temperature i.e. on SWCNT with chilarity of (0.12).

  5. The zig-zag walk with scattering and absorption on the real half line and in a lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    The Darwin-Hamilton equations, describing one-dimensional transport with scattering and absorption, are expanded into a recursion. The solution involves ballot numbers. The recurrence probability as function of scattering order is given by Catalan numbers. To reproduce this analytical result in a lattice model, a novel relation between Narayana and Catalan numbers is derived.

  6. Influence of thermal deformation in cavity mirrors on beam propagation characteristics of high-power slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Xiao, Longsheng; Wang, Wei; Wu, Chao; Tang, Xiahui

    2018-01-01

    Owing to their good diffusion cooling and low sensitivity to misalignment, slab-shape negative-branch unstable-waveguide resonators are widely used for high-power lasers in industry. As the output beam of the resonator is astigmatic, an external beam shaping system is required. However, the transverse dimension of the cavity mirrors in the resonator is large. For a long-time operation, the heating of cavity mirrors can be non-uniform. This results in micro-deformation and a change in the radius of curvature of the cavity mirrors, and leads to an output beam of an offset optical axis of the resonator. It was found that a change in the radius of curvature of 0.1% (1 mm) caused by thermal deformation generates a transverse displacement of 1.65 mm at the spatial filter of the external beam shaping system, and an output power loss of more than 80%. This can potentially burn out the spatial filter. In order to analyze the effect of the offset optical axis of the beam on the external optical path, we analyzed the transverse displacement and rotational misalignments of the spatial filter. For instance, if the transverse displacement was 0.3 mm, the loss in the output power was 9.6% and a sidelobe appeared in the unstable direction. If the angle of rotation was 5°, the loss in the output power was 2%, and the poles were in the direction of the waveguide. Based on these results, by adjusting the bending mirror, the deviation angle of the output beam of the resonator cavity was corrected, in order to obtain maximum output power and optimal beam quality. Finally, the propagation characteristics of the corrected output beam were analyzed.

  7. Enhancement of the beam quality of non-uniform output slab laser amplifier with a 39-actuator rectangular piezoelectric deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Ning, Yu; Lei, Xiang; Xu, Bing; Li, Xinyang; Dong, Lizhi; Yan, Hu; Liu, Wenjing; Jiang, Wenhan; Liu, Lei; Wang, Chao; Liang, Xingbo; Tang, Xiaojun

    2010-03-29

    We present a slab laser amplifier beam cleanup experimental system based on a 39-actuator rectangular piezoelectric deformable mirror. Rather than use a wave-front sensor to measure distortions in the wave-front and then apply a conjugation wave-front for compensating them, the system uses a Stochastic Parallel Gradient Descent algorithm to maximize the power contained within a far-field designated bucket. Experimental results demonstrate that at the output power of 335W, more than 30% energy concentrates in the 1x diffraction-limited area while the beam quality is enhanced greatly.

  8. Efficient Dual Head Nd:YAG 100mJ Oscillator for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald B.; Stysley, Paul R.; Kay, Richard b.; Poulios, Demetrios

    2007-01-01

    A diode pumped, Nd:YAG laser producing 100 mJ Q-switched pulses and employing a dual-pump head scheme in an unstable resonator configuration is described. Each head contains a side pumped zig-zag slab and four 6-bar QCW 808 nm diodes arrays which are de-rated 23%. Denoting 'z' as the lasing axis, the pump directions were along the x-axis in one head and the y-axis in the other, producing a circularized thermal lens, more typical in laser rod-based cavities. The dual head design's effective thermal lens is now corrected with a proper HR mirror curvature selection. This laser has demonstrated over 100 mJ output with high optical efficiency (24%), good TEM(sub 00) beam quality, and high pointing stability.

  9. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  10. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  11. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1985-03-12

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  12. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, F.R.; DeZubay, E.A.; Murray, A.P.; Vidt, E.J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations are disclosed particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant. 14 figs.

  13. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  14. Creating a palliative and end-of-life program in a cure-oriented pediatric setting: the zig-zag method.

    PubMed

    Harper, Joann; Hinds, Pamela S; Baker, Justin N; Hicks, Judy; Spunt, Sheri L; Razzouk, Bassem I

    2007-01-01

    Children living with and dying of advanced-stage cancer suffer physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Relief of their suffering requires comprehensive, compassionate palliative and end-of-life (EoL) care.However, an EoL care program might appear inconsistent with the mission of a pediatric oncology research center committed to seeking cures. Here the authors describe the methods used to achieve full institutional commitment to their EoL care program and those used to build the program's philosophical, research, and educational foundations after they received approval. The authors convened 10 focus groups to solicit staff perceptions of the hospital's current palliative and EoL care. They also completed baseline medical record reviews of 145 patient records to identify key EoL characteristics. The authors then crafted a vision statement and a strategic plan, implemented new research protocols,and established publication and funding trajectories. They conclude that establishing a state-of-the-art palliative and EoL program in a cure-oriented pediatric setting is achievable via consensus building and recruitment of diverse institutional resources.

  15. Zig-Zagging in Geometrical Reasoning in Technological Collaborative Environments: A Mathematical Working Space-Framed Study Concerning Cognition and Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gómez-Chacón, Inés Ma.; Romero Albaladejo, Isabel Ma.; del Mar García López, Ma.

    2016-01-01

    This study highlights the importance of cognition-affect interaction pathways in the construction of mathematical knowledge. Scientific output demands further research on the conceptual structure underlying such interaction aimed at coping with the high complexity of its interpretation. The paper discusses the effectiveness of using a dynamic…

  16. Early Earth slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Van Hunen, J.

    2016-12-01

    At present day, the Earth's mantle exhibits a combination of stagnant and penetrating slabs within the transition zone, indicating a intermittent convection mode between layered and whole-mantle convection. Isoviscous thermal convection calculations show that in a hotter Earth, the natural mode of convection was dominated by double-layered convection, which may imply that slabs were more prone to stagnate in the transition zone. Today, slab penetration is to a large extent controlled by trench mobility for a plausible range of lower mantle viscosity and Clapeyron slope of the mantle phase transitions. Trench mobility is, in turn, governed by slab strength and density and upper plate forcing. In this study, we systematically investigate the slab-transition zone internation in the Early Earth, using 2D self-consistent numerical subduction models. Early Earth's higher mantle temperature facilitates decoupling between the plates and the underlying asthenosphere, and may result in slab sinking almost without trench retreat. Such behaviour together with a low resistance of a weak lower mantle may allow slabs to penetrate. The ability of slab to sink into the lower mantle throughout Earth's history may have important implications for Earth's evolution: it would provide efficient mass and heat flux through the transition zone therefore provide an efficient way to cool and mix the Earth's mantle.

  17. Slab replacement maturity guidelines.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the use of maturity method to determine early age strength of concrete in slab : replacement application. Specific objectives were (1) to evaluate effects of various factors on the compressive : maturity-strength relationship ...

  18. Alternate approach slab reinforcement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-01

    The upper mat of reinforcing steel, in exposed concrete bridge approach slabs, is prone to corrosion damage. Chlorides applied to the highways : for winter maintenance can penetrate this concrete layer. Eventually chlorides reach the steel and begin ...

  19. All solid-state diode pumped Nd:YAG MOPA with stimulated Brillouin phase conjugate mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offerhaus, H. L.; Godfried, H. P.; Witteman, W. J.

    1996-02-01

    At the Nederlands Centrum voor Laser Research (NCLR) a 1 kHz diode-pumped Nd:YAG Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) chain with a Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) Phase Conjugate mirror is designed and operated. A small Brewster angle Nd:YAG slab (2 by 2 by 20 mm) is side pumped with 200 μs diode pulses in a stable oscillator. The oscillator is Q-switched and injection seeded with a commercial diode pumped single frequency CW Nd:YAG laser. The output consists of single-transverse, single-longitudinal mode 25 ns FWHM-pulses at 1064 nm. The oscillator slab is imaged on a square aperture that transmits between 3 and 2 mJ (at 100 and 400 Hz, resp.) The aperture is subsequently imaged four times in the amplifier. The amplifier is a 3 by 6 by 60 mm Brewster angle zig-zag slab, pumped by an 80-bar diode stack with pulses up to 250 μs. After the second pass the light is focused in two consecutive cells containing Freon-113 for wave-front reversal in an oscillator/amplifier-setup with a reflectivity of 60%. The light then passes through the amplifier twice more to produce 20 W (at 400 Hz) of output with near diffraction limited beam quality. To increase the output to 50 W at 1 kHz thermal lensing in the oscillator will be reduced.

  20. Laser Journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-12-01

    The major results of an experimental study of a slab Nd:YAG laser are reported in the article; the laser was successfully developed by the authors. The major findings include the following: (1) a method for cooling the blended flowing air and water, as well the related experimental parameters; (2) by using a crossed lens cavity, the authors further improved the anomalous capability within the compensation cavity of the slab laser, as well as higher insensitivity of the system to maladjustment; and (3) a processing technique and major points of slab YAG laser medium.

  1. Slab Leaf Bowls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suitor, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    In science class, fourth graders investigate the structure of plants and leaves from trees and how the process of photosynthesis turns sunlight into sugar proteins. In this article, the author fuses art and science for a creative and successful clay slab project in her elementary art classroom. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  2. Subducted Slab Dynamics: Toward Understanding the Causes of Slab Stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. D.; Frost, D. J.; Rubie, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    The evolution and dynamics of subducted slabs are controlled by a number of factors, including rheology and composition. The correlation of the transformations from olivine to wadslayite and ringwoodite to perovskite plus magnesiowüstite with the seismic velocity discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depth, along with the density changes have been extensively investigated in terms of their impact on slab dynamics. Owing to the relatively smaller changes in density extending over a broader depth range, the impact of the pyroxene-garnet system has received less attention. Recent experimental work has found that the majorite component in garnet--a product of the transition from pyroxene into garnet--is one of the slowest-diffusing components in Earth's mantle. At the relatively low temperatures of the slab, this slow diffusion inhibits the dissolution of pyroxene into garnet, so that the slab remains buoyant relative to the ambient mantle and stagnates. We present dynamic subduction calculations that illustrate the effect of the non-equilibrium pyroxene to garnet transition on slab dynamics. If the transition between equilibrium and non-equilibrium behavior is below 1000 K, we find no impact on slab dynamics. If the transition occurs at 1200 K, it is enough to cause the slab to thicken and stagnate in the transition zone for an extended period of time. Our analysis suggests that cold slabs should be more likely to stagnate in the transition zone and we will compare a global compilation of slab geometries with slab thermal structure to evaluate.

  3. Multiple stationary solutions of an irradiated slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. D.; Feltham, D. L.

    2005-04-01

    A mathematical model describing the heat budget of an irradiated medium is introduced. The one-dimensional form of the equations and boundary conditions are presented and analysed. Heat transport at one face of the slab occurs by absorption (and reflection) of an incoming beam of short-wave radiation with a fraction of this radiation penetrating into the body of the slab, a diffusive heat flux in the slab and a prescribed incoming heat flux term. The other face of the slab is immersed in its own melt and is considered to be a free surface. Here, temperature continuity is prescribed and evolution of the surface is determined by a Stefan condition. These boundary conditions are flexible enough to describe a range of situations such as a laser shining on an opaque medium, or the natural environment of polar sea ice or lake ice. A two-stream radiation model is used which replaces the simple Beer's law of radiation attenuation frequently used for semi-infinite domains. The stationary solutions of the governing equations are sought and it is found that there exists two possible stationary solutions for a given set of boundary conditions and a range of parameter choices. It is found that the existence of two stationary solutions is a direct result of the model of radiation absorption, due to its effect on the albedo of the medium. A linear stability analysis and numerical calculations indicate that where two stationary solutions exist, the solution corresponding to a larger thickness is always stable and the solution corresponding to a smaller thickness is unstable. Numerical simulations reveal that when there are two solutions, if the slab is thinner than the smaller stationary thickness it will melt completely, whereas if the slab is thicker than the smaller stationary thickness it will evolve toward the larger stationary thickness. These results indicate that other mechanisms (e.g. wave-induced agglomeration of crystals) are necessary to grow a slab from zero initial

  4. Comparison of surface abrasion produced on the enamel surface by a standard dentifrice using three different toothbrush bristle designs: A profilometric in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumari, Minal; Acharya, Shashidhar; Prasad, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to assess, in vitro, the effect on surface abrasivity of enamel surface caused by three different types (flat trim, zig-zag, bi-level) of toothbrush bristle design. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four freshly extracted, sound, human incisor teeth were collected for this study. The enamel slab was prepared, which were mounted, on separate acrylic bases followed by subjected to profilometric analysis. The surface roughness was measured using the profilometer. The specimen were divided into three groups, each group containing eight mounted specimens, wherein, Group 1 specimens were brushed with flat trim toothbrush; Group 2 brushed with zig-zag and Group 3 with bi-level bristle design. A commercially available dentifrice was used throughout the study. A single specimen was brushed for 2 times daily for 2 min period for 1 week using a customized brushing apparatus. The pre- and post-roughness value change were analyzed and recorded. Statistical test: Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Result: The results showed that surface abrasion was produced on each specimen, in all the three groups, which were subjected to brushing cycle. However, the bi-level bristle design (350% increase in roughness, P = 0.021) and zig-zag bristle design (160% increase in roughness, P = 0.050) showed significantly higher surface abrasion when compared with flat trim bristle design toothbrush. Conclusion: Flat trim toothbrush bristle produces least surface abrasion and is relatively safe for use. PMID:25125852

  5. A prototype of an electric-discharge gas flow oxygen-iodine laser: I. Modeling of the processes of singlet oxygen generation in a transverse cryogenic slab RF discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, N. P.; Ionin, A. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Yuryshev, N. N.

    2017-03-01

    The existing kinetic model describing self-sustained and electroionization discharges in mixtures enriched with singlet oxygen has been modified to calculate the characteristics of a flow RF discharge in molecular oxygen and its mixtures with helium. The simulations were performed in the gas plug-flow approximation, i.e., the evolution of the plasma components during their motion along the channel was represented as their evolution in time. The calculations were carried out for the O2: He = 1: 0, 1: 1, 1: 2, and 1: 3 mixtures at an oxygen partial pressure of 7.5 Torr. It is shown that, under these conditions, volumetric gas heating in a discharge in pure molecular oxygen prevails over gas cooling via heat conduction even at an electrode temperature as low as 100 K. When molecular oxygen is diluted with helium, the behavior of the gas temperature changes substantially: heat removal begins to prevail over volumetric gas heating, and the gas temperature at the outlet of the discharge zone drops to 220-230 K at room gas temperature at the inlet, which is very important in the context of achieving the generation threshold in an electric-discharge oxygen-iodine laser based on a slab cryogenic RF discharge.

  6. A prototype of an electric-discharge gas flow oxygen−iodine laser: I. Modeling of the processes of singlet oxygen generation in a transverse cryogenic slab RF discharge

    SciT

    Vagin, N. P.; Ionin, A. A., E-mail: aion@sci.lebedev.ru; Kochetov, I. V.

    The existing kinetic model describing self-sustained and electroionization discharges in mixtures enriched with singlet oxygen has been modified to calculate the characteristics of a flow RF discharge in molecular oxygen and its mixtures with helium. The simulations were performed in the gas plug-flow approximation, i.e., the evolution of the plasma components during their motion along the channel was represented as their evolution in time. The calculations were carried out for the O{sub 2}: He = 1: 0, 1: 1, 1: 2, and 1: 3 mixtures at an oxygen partial pressure of 7.5 Torr. It is shown that, under these conditions,more » volumetric gas heating in a discharge in pure molecular oxygen prevails over gas cooling via heat conduction even at an electrode temperature as low as ~100 K. When molecular oxygen is diluted with helium, the behavior of the gas temperature changes substantially: heat removal begins to prevail over volumetric gas heating, and the gas temperature at the outlet of the discharge zone drops to ~220–230 K at room gas temperature at the inlet, which is very important in the context of achieving the generation threshold in an electric-discharge oxygen−iodine laser based on a slab cryogenic RF discharge.« less

  7. Long-life slab replacement concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-01

    This research was initiated following reports of high incidence of cracking on FDOT concrete pavement replacement : slab projects. Field slabs were instrumented for data acquisition from high-early-strength concrete pavement : replacement slabs place...

  8. Deceased Slabs Drive Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, H. J.; Hannah, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    The application of Re-Os isotope geochemistry to dating single oils is a nascent field [1,2]. Challenges include dissection of oils into asphaltene-maltene (ASPH-MALT) components in a way that preserves meaningful chronologic and source information. Significantly, oil-water mixing rapidly transfers Os to the oil, while Re exchange is sluggish [3]. The Os initial ratio of the oil is shifted in the direction of Os carried in the aqueous fluid, whereas the Re-Os isotopic age is preserved. We show that this phenomenon is operative in natural systems. Further, we show that deserpentinization of old oceanic slabs [4], may be linked to expulsion of Os-enriched waters into overlying sedimentary sections - a process that may be of fundamental importance for oil generation. This conclusion does not diminish the role of traditional organic-rich shales as source rocks for the hydrocarbon, but shows that external fluids are essential to petroleum generation. Moreover, the external fluids may be an important driver for expulsion and migration of oils. We have taken apart several petroleum systems from source rock, to residual oil, to tar mat development, to in situ live oil, through to produced oil. In many cases, a fluid with low 187Os/188Os - unlike that of normal basinal brines - provides a critical component to the oil-water mixture. Funding - CHRONOS project supported by Norwegian petroleum industry (Eni-Norge, Lundin, Aker BP) Acknowledgement - Christine Fichler [4], who first queried us on old slabs and oil, and stimulated ideas. [1] Georgiev, S.V., Stein, H.J., Hannah, J.L., Galimberti, R., Nali, M., Yang, G., and Zimmerman, A. (2016) Re-Os dating of maltenes and asphaltenes within single samples of crude oil: Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 179: 53-75. [doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2016.01.016] [2] DiMarzio, J., Georgiev, S.V., Stein, H.J., and Hannah, J.L. (in press) Residency of rhenium and osmium in a heavy crude oil: Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. [3] Hurtig, N.C., Georgiev, S

  9. Slab replacement maturity guidelines : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-04-01

    Concrete sets in hours at moderate temperatures, : but the bonds that make concrete strong continue : to mature over days to years. However, for : replacement concrete slabs on highways, it is : crucial that concrete develop enough strength : within ...

  10. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  11. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  12. The dynamics of double slab subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A. F.; Royden, L. H.; Becker, T. W.

    2017-04-01

    We use numerical models to investigate the dynamics of two interacting slabs with parallel trenches. Cases considered are: a single slab reference, outward dipping slabs (out-dip), inward dipping slabs (in-dip) and slabs dipping in the same direction (same-dip). Where trenches converge over time (same-dip and out-dip systems), large positive dynamic pressures in the asthenosphere are generated beneath the middle plate and large trench-normal extensional forces are transmitted through the middle plate. This results in slabs that dip away from the middle plate at depth, independent of trench geometry. The single slab, the front slab in the same-dip case and both out-dip slabs undergo trench retreat and exhibit stable subduction. However, slabs within the other double subduction systems tend to completely overturn at the base of the upper mantle, and exhibit either trench advance (rear slab in same-dip), or near-stationary trenches (in-dip). For all slabs, the net slab-normal dynamic pressure at 330 km depth is nearly equal to the slab-normal force induced by slab buoyancy. For double subduction, the net outward force on the slabs due to dynamic pressure from the asthenosphere is effectively counterbalanced by the net extensional force transmitted through the middle plate. Thus, dynamic pressure at depth, interplate coupling and lithospheric stresses are closely linked and their effects cannot be isolated. Our results provide insights into both the temporal evolution of double slab systems on Earth and, more generally, how the various components of subduction systems, from mantle flow/pressure to interplate coupling, are dynamically linked.

  13. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-04

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction.

  14. Follow up of injected polyurethane slab jacking.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-08-01

    GLENN JACKSON BRIDGE FOLLOW-UP REPORT The elevation monitoring in the report entitled Injected Polyurethane Slab Jacking (Soltesz 2000) is continued in this current report. The elevations of the concrete slabs are being monitored to see if polyuretha...

  15. Long-life slab replacement concrete : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    Concrete slab replacement projects in Florida have demonstrated a high incidence of : replacement slab cracking. Causes of cracking have not been reliably determined. University of South Florida researchers : sought to identify the factors or : param...

  16. Injected polyurethane slab jacking : interim report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-09-01

    Conventional methods for raising in-place concrete slabs to align roadway sections or to counteract subsidence requires pressure-injecting grout under the slab. As other transportation organizations have had success with the URETEK Method, which util...

  17. Injected polyurethane slab jacking : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-06-01

    Conventional methods for raising in-place concrete slabs to align roadway sections or to counteract subsidence requires pressure-injecting grout under the slab. As other transportation organizations have had success with the URETEK Method, which util...

  18. Dimensional stability of concrete slabs on grade.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    Drying shrinkage is one of the major causes of cracking in concrete slabs on grade. The moisture : difference between the top and bottom surface of the slabs causes a dimensional or shrinkage gradient : to develop through the depth of the slabs...

  19. Spread prestressed concrete slab beam bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    TxDOT uses prestressed slab beam bridges for short-span bridges ranging from approximately 3050 ft in : length. These bridges have precast, pretensioned slab beams placed immediately adjacent to one another : with a cast-in-place slab made composi...

  20. Research on the liquid coolant applied in the high repetition rate slab amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingyan; Li, Yangshuai; Zhang, Panzheng; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yanli; Feng, Tao; Zhou, Qiong; Liu, Qiang; Li, Haiyuan; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Shenlei; Ma, Weixin; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2018-03-01

    High repetition rate slab amplifier (HRRSA) is extraordinarily indispensable for the future fusion power plant, ultra-short laser, laser weapon, and so on. Thermal controlling is the decisive factor for the repetition rate and the output energy of the slab amplifier. For larger clear aperture HRRSA, flash-lamp pumped slab amplifier based on neodymium phosphate glass (Nd:glass) is chosen with the liquid cooling. The liquid coolant circulates across the Nd:glass and takes off the thermal induced in the pumping process. A novel liquid coolant (Series A) whose refractive index is the same with Nd:glass is proposed to alleviate the wavefront distortion induced by thermal. The chemical stability of the liquid coolant under high energy flash-lamp irradiation with 200 shots and under the irradiation of a 1053nm laser with 19 hours and 37 hours are experimented. The results show that the chemical stability of the liquid coolant is stable under irradiation.

  1. Preface: Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig R.; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to publish this special issue of the journal Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors entitled "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics". This issue is an outgrowth of the international symposium "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics", which was held on February 25-27, 2009, in Kyoto, Japan. This symposium was organized by the "Stagnant Slab Project" (SSP) research group to present the results of the 5-year project and to facilitate intensive discussion with well-known international researchers in related fields. The SSP and the symposium were supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (16075101) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government. In the symposium, key issues discussed by participants included: transportation of water into the deep mantle and its role in slab-related dynamics; observational and experimental constraints on deep slab properties and the slab environment; modeling of slab stagnation to constrain its mechanisms in comparison with observational and experimental data; observational, experimental and modeling constraints on the fate of stagnant slabs; eventual accumulation of stagnant slabs on the core-mantle boundary and its geodynamic implications. This special issue is a collection of papers presented in the symposium and other papers related to the subject of the symposium. The collected papers provide an overview of the wide range of multidisciplinary studies of mantle dynamics, particularly in the context of subduction, stagnation, and the fate of deep slabs.

  2. Implications of slab mineralogy for subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, Craig R.; Stein, Seth; Marton, Frederic C.; Van Ark, Emily M.

    2001-12-01

    Phase relations among mantle minerals are perturbed by the thermal environment of subducting slabs, both under equilibrium and disequilibrium (metastable) conditions. Such perturbations yield anomalies not only in seismic velocities but also in density. The buoyancy forces arising from these density anomalies may exert several important effects. They contribute to the stress field within the slab, in a fashion consistent with observed patterns of seismicity. They may affect subduction rates, both by inducing time-dependent velocity changes under equilibrium conditions and by imposing velocity limits through a thermal feedback loop under disequilibrium conditions. They may affect slab morphology, possibly inhibiting penetration of slabs into the lower mantle and allowing temporary stagnation of deflected or detached slabs. Latent heat release from phase transitions under disequilibrium conditions in slabs can yield isobaric superheating, which may generate adiabatic shear instabilities capable of triggering deep seismicity.

  3. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N.; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H2O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  4. Vibration Analysis of Beam and Block Precast Slab System due to Human Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Kamil, M. R. H.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2018-04-01

    Beam and block precast slabs system are very efficient which generally give maximum structural performance where their voids based on the design of the unit soffit block allow a significant reduction of the whole slab self-weight. Initially for some combinations of components or the joint connection of the structural slab, this structural system may be susceptible to excessive vibrations that could effects the performance and also serviceability. Dynamic forces are excited from people walking and jumping which produced vibrations to the slab system in the buildings. Few studies concluded that human induced vibration on precast slabs system may be harmful to structural performance and mitigate the human comfort level. This study will investigate the vibration analysis of beam and block precast slab by using finite element method at the school building. Human activities which are excited from jumping and walking will induce the vibrations signal to the building. Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure the dynamic responses of slab towards the vibration sources. Five different points were assigned specifically where each of location will determine the behaviour of the entire slabs. The finite element analyses were developed in ABAQUS software and the data was further processed in MATLAB ModalV to assess the vibration criteria. The results indicated that the beam and block precast systems adequate enough to the vibration serviceability and human comfort criteria. The overall vibration level obtained was fell under VC-E curve which it is generally under the maximum permissible level of vibrations. The vibration level on the slab is acceptable within the limit that have been used by Gordon.

  5. Bridge approach slabs for Missouri DOT field evaluation of alternative and cost efficient bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-05-01

    Based on a recent study on cost efficient alternative bridge approach slab (BAS) designs (Thiagarajan et : al. 2010) has recommended three new BAS designs for possible implementation by MoDOT namely a) 20 feet cast-inplace : slab with sleeper slab (C...

  6. A slab expression in the Gibraltar arc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2017-04-01

    The present-day geodynamic setting of the Gibraltar arc region results from several Myrs of subduction rollback in the overall (oblique) convergence of Africa and Iberia. As for most rollback settings in a convergence zone, the interaction of these two components is complex and distinctly non-stationary. Gibraltar slab rollback is considered to have stalled, or at least diminished largely in magnitude, since the late Miocene/early Pliocene, suggesting that the effect of the slab on present-day surface motions is negligible. However, GPS measurements indicate that the Gibraltar arc region has an anomalous motion with respect to both Iberia and Africa, i.e., the Gibraltar arc region does not move as part of the rigid Iberian, or the rigid African plate. A key question is whether this surface motion is an expression of the Gibraltar slab. Seismic activity in the Gibraltar region is diffuse and considerable in magnitude, making it a region of high seismic risk. Unlike the North African margin to the east, where thrust earthquakes dominate the focal mechanism tables, a complex pattern is observed with thrust, normal and strike-slip earthquakes in a region stretching between the northern Moroccan Atlas across the Gibraltar arc and Alboran Sea (with the Trans-Alboran Shear Zone) to the Betics of southern Spain. Even though no large mega-thrust earthquakes have been observed in recent history, slab rollback may not have completely ceased. However, since no activity has been observed in the accretionary wedge, probably since the Pliocene, it is likely that the subduction interface is locked. In this study, we perform a series of numerical models in which we combine the relative plate convergence, variable magnitude of friction on fault segments, regional variations in gravitational potential energy and slab pull of the Gibraltar slab. We seek to reproduce the GPS velocities and slip sense on regional faults and thereby determine whether the Gibraltar slab has an effect on

  7. Subducting Slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, C.; Braun, J.; Husson, L.; Le Carlier de Veslud, C.; Thieulot, C.; Yamato, P.; Grujic, D.

    2010-12-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  8. Subducting slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, Christelle; Braun, Jean; Husson, Laurent; Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian; Thieulot, Cedric; Yamato, Philippe; Grujic, Djordje

    2010-08-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  9. Slab-pull and slab-push earthquakes in the Mexican, Chilean and Peruvian subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, A.; Madariaga, R.; Campos, J.

    2002-09-01

    We studied intermediate depth earthquakes in the Chile, Peru and Mexican subduction zones, paying special attention to slab-push (down-dip compression) and slab-pull (down-dip extension) mechanisms. Although, slab-push events are relatively rare in comparison with slab-pull earthquakes, quite a few have occurred recently. In Peru, a couple slab-push events occurred in 1991 and one slab-pull together with several slab-push events occurred in 1970 near Chimbote. In Mexico, several slab-push and slab-pull events occurred near Zihuatanejo below the fault zone of the 1985 Michoacan event. In central Chile, a large M=7.1 slab-push event occurred in October 1997 that followed a series of four shallow Mw>6 thrust earthquakes on the plate interface. We used teleseismic body waveform inversion of a number of Mw>5.9 slab-push and slab-pull earthquakes in order to obtain accurate mechanisms, depths and source time functions. We used a master event method in order to get relative locations. We discussed the occurrence of the relatively rare slab-push events in the three subduction zones. Were they due to the geometry of the subduction that produces flexure inside the downgoing slab, or were they produced by stress transfer during the earthquake cycle? Stress transfer can not explain the occurence of several compressional and extensional intraplate intermediate depth earthquakes in central Chile, central Mexico and central Peru. It seemed that the heterogeneity of the stress field produced by complex slab geometry has an important influence on intraplate intermediate depth earthquakes.

  10. Slab Penetration vs. Slab Stagnation: Mantle Reflectors as an Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeler, A.; Gu, Y. J.; Schultz, R.; Contenti, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Subducting oceanic lithosphere along convergent margins may stagnate near the base of the upper mantle or penetrate into the lower mantle. These dynamic processes cause extensive thermal and compositional variations, which can be observed in terms of impedance contrast (reflectivity) and topography of mantle transition zone (MTZ) discontinuities, i.e., 410- and 660-km discontinuities. In this study, we utilize ~ 15000 surface-reflected shear waves (SS) and their precursory arrivals (S410S and S660S) to analyze subduction related deformations on mantle reflectivity structure. We apply pre-stack, time-to-depth migration technique to SS precursors, and move weak underside reflections using PREM-predicted travel-time curves. Common Mid-point gathers are formed to investigate structure under the western Pacific, south America, and Mediterranean convergent boundaries. In general, mantle reflectivity structures are consistent with previous seismic tomography models. In regions of slab penetration (e.g., southern Kurile arc, Aegean Sea), our results show 1) a substantial decrease in S660S amplitude, and 2) strong lower mantle reflector(s) at ~ 900 km depth. These reflective structures are supported by zones of high P and S velocities extending into the lower mantle. Our 1-D synthetic simulations suggest that the decreasing S660S amplitudes are, at least partially, associated with shear wave defocusing due to changes in reflector depth (by ±20 km) within averaging bin. Assuming a ~500 km wide averaging area, a dipping reflector with 6-8 % slope can reduce the amplitude of a SS precursor by ~50%. On the other hand, broad depressions with strong impedance contrast at the base of the MTZ characterize the regions of slab stagnation, such as beneath the Tyrrhenian Sea and northeastern China. For the latter region, substantial topography on the 660-km discontinuity west of the Wadati-Benioff zone suggests that the stagnant part of the Pacific plate across Honshu arc is not

  11. Overturned Alboran slab beneath westernmost Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Miller, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    The geological evolution of the westernmost Mediterranean holds an important piece of the puzzle of how whole western Mediterranean evolved due to the convergence of Africa with Eurasia. The idea of continuous slab roll back acting a prominent force in this region is strongly supported by tomographic images with near vertical high velocity structure connecting the surface beneath the Alboran domain [Spakman and Wortel, 2004; Bezada et al., 2013]. However, the slab shape, width, and sharpness of its edges are not well resolved. Here, we use the waveforms recorded from the PICASSO (XB) array and IberArray (IA) for the deep 2010 earthquake beneath Granada to study the detailed Alboran slab structure. We found: (1) A low velocity structure (7 km thickness, δVs = -20%) surrounding the earthquake to explain the second arrivals observed in many stations at Spain. (2) A thin low velocity layer sits on the bottom of the high velocity slab-like structure to explain the high frequency second arrivals and long coda after the P and S arrivals on stations in the Rif Mountains of Morocco. The most feasible explanation of the low velocity structure is the dehydrated surface of the slab lithosphere extending from the 600 km to the shallow mantle. However, such geometry is contradictory with our observation, which the low velocity layer is at the bottom of the slab. We proposed that the Albora slab had undergone significant "roll-over" movement, which overturned the slab surface.

  12. Precast concrete replacement slabs for bridge decks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-01-01

    The report illustrates and evaluates the first use in Virginia of precast concrete replacement slabs for bridge decks. It shows that a bridge deck can be replaced with the precast slabs while traffic is maintained in the adjacent traffic lane. The qu...

  13. 0-6722 : spread prestressed concrete slab beam bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-08-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation uses : precast prestressed concrete slab beam bridges for : shorter-span bridges of approximately 3050 ft in : length. Conventional slab beam bridges have slab : beams placed immediately adjacent to one anoth...

  14. SciT

    Miley, G.H.

    Remarks made in the author{close_quote}s acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. {open_quote}{open_quote}Patience{close_quote}{close_quote} and {open_quote}{open_quote}optimism{close_quote}{close_quote} are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the {open_quote}{open_quote}zig-zag{close_quote}{close_quote} path to fusion energy production. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Slab stagnation and detachment under northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Results of tomography models around the Japanese Islands show the existence of a gap between the horizontally lying (stagnant) slab extending under northeastern China and the fast seismic velocity anomaly in the lower mantle. A simple conversion from the fast velocity anomaly to the low-temperature anomaly shows a similar feature. This feature appears to be inconsistent with the results of numerical simulations on the interaction between the slab and phase transitions with temperature-dependent viscosity. Such numerical models predict a continuous slab throughout the mantle. I extend previous analyses of the tomography model and model calculations to infer the origins of the gap beneath northeastern China. Results of numerical simulations that take the geologic history of the subduction zone into account suggest two possible origins for the gap: (1) the opening of the Japan Sea led to a breaking off of the otherwise continuous subducting slab, or (2) the western edge of the stagnant slab is the previous subducted ridge, which was the plate boundary between the extinct Izanagi and the Pacific plates. Origin (2) suggesting the present horizontally lying slab has accumulated since the ridge subduction, is preferable for explaining the present length of the horizontally lying slab in the upper mantle. Numerical models of origin (1) predict a stagnant slab in the upper mantle that is too short, and a narrow or non-existent gap. Preferred models require rather stronger flow resistance of the 660-km phase change than expected from current estimates of the phase transition property. Future detailed estimates of the amount of the subducted Izanagi plate and the present stagnant slab would be useful to constrain models. A systematic along-arc variation of the slab morphology from the northeast Japan to Kurile arcs is also recognized, and its understanding may constrain the 3D mantle flow there.

  16. Polymer photonic crystal slab waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguda, C.; Böttger, G.; Kuligk, A.; Blum, R.; Eich, M.; Roth, H.; Kunert, J.; Morgenroth, W.; Elsner, H.; Meyer, H. G.

    2001-04-01

    We present details of the fabrication, calculations, and transmission measurements for finite two-dimensional (2D) polymer photonic crystal (PC) slab waveguides, which were fabricated from a benzocyclobutene polymer on a low refractive index substrate from Teflon. A square air hole lattice (500 nm lattice constant, 300 nm hole diameter) was realized by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Polarization and wavelength dependent transmission results show TE-like and TM-like stop gaps at 1.3 μm excitation wavelengths and are in good agreement with the calculated data obtained by 2D and three-dimensional finite difference time domain methods. Transmission was suppressed by 15 dB in the center of the TE-like stop gap for a PC length of ten lattice constants.

  17. Earthquakes and strain in subhorizontal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudzinski, Michael R.; Chen, Wang-Ping

    2005-08-01

    Using an extensive database of fault plane solutions and precise locations of hypocenters, we show that the classic patterns of downdip extension (DDE) or downdip compression (DDC) in subduction zones deteriorate when the dip of the slab is less than about 20°. This result is depth-independent, demonstrated by both intermediate-focus (depths from 70 to 300 km) and deep-focus (depths greater than 300 km) earthquakes. The absence of pattern in seismic strain in subhorizontal slabs also occurs locally over scales of about 10 km, as evident from a detailed analysis of a large (Mw 7.1) earthquake sequence beneath Fiji. Following the paradigm that a uniform strain of DDE/DDC results from sinking of the cold, dense slab as it encounters resistance from the highly viscous mantle at depth, breakdown of DDE/DDC in subhorizontal slabs reflects waning negative buoyancy ("slab pull") in the downdip direction. Our results place a constraint on the magnitude of slab pull that is required to dominate over localized sources of stress and to align seismic strain release in dipping slabs. Under the condition of a vanishing slab pull, eliminating the only obvious source of regional stress, the abundance of earthquakes in subhorizontal slabs indicates that a locally variable source of stress is both necessary and sufficient to sustain the accumulation of elastic strain required to generate intermediate- and deep-focus seismicity. Evidence is growing that the process of seismogenesis under high pressures, including localized sources of stress, is tied to the presence of petrologic anomalies.

  18. Comment on: Diffusion through a slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseler, U. D. J.; Kirk, J. G.

    1997-05-01

    Mahan [J. Math. Phys. 36, 6758 (1995)] has calculated the transmission coefficient and angular distribution of particles which enter a thick slab at normal incidence and which diffuse in the slab with linear anisotropic, non-absorbing, scattering. Using orthogonality relations derived by McCormick and Kuščer [J. Math. Phys. 6, 1939 (1965); 7, 2036 (1966)] for the eigenfunctions of the problem, this calculation is generalized to a boundary condition with particle input at arbitrary angles. It is also shown how to use the orthogonality relations to relax in a simple way the restriction to a thick slab.

  19. Subduction starts by stripping slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Prigent, Cécile; Plunder, Alexis; Yamato, Philippe; Guillot, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to tectonic slices welded beneath most large-scale ophiolites. These slivers of oceanic crust metamorphosed up to granulite facies conditions are interpreted as having formed during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction from heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge towards the top of the subducting plate. Our study reappraises the formation of metamorphic sole through detailed field and petrological work on three classical key sections across the Semail ophiolite (Oman and United Arab Emirates). Geothermobarometry and thermodynamic modelling show that metamorphic soles do not record a continuous temperature gradient, as expected from simple heating by the upper plate or by shear heating and proposed by previous studies. The upper, high-temperature metamorphic sole is subdivided in at least two units, testifying to the stepwise formation, detachment and accretion of successive slices from the downgoing slab to the mylonitic base of the ophiolite. Estimated peak pressure-temperature conditions through the metamorphic sole are, from top to bottom, 850˚C - 1GPa, 725°C - 0.8 GPa and 530°C - 0.5 GPa. These estimates appear constant within each unit but separated by a gap of 100 to 200˚C and 0.2 GPa. Despite being separated by hundreds of kilometres below the Semail ophiolite and having contrasting locations with respect to the ophiolite ridge axis, metamorphic soles show no evidence for significant petrological variations along strike. These constraints allow to refine the tectonic-petrological model for the genesis of metamorphic soles, formed through the stepwise stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust and its sedimentary cover. Metamorphic soles do not so much result from downward heat transfer (ironing effect) but rather from progressive metamorphism during strain localization and cooling of the plate interface. The successive thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole (initially at the

  20. Constraints of subducted slab geometries on trench migration and subduction velocities: flat slabs and slab curtains in the mantle under Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Renqi, L.; Lin, C.; Kanda, R. V.

    2013-12-01

    The past locations, shapes and polarity of subduction trenches provide first-order constraints for plate tectonic reconstructions. Analogue and numerical models of subduction zones suggest that relative subducting (Vs) and overriding (Vor) plate velocities may strongly influence final subducted slab geometries. Here we have mapped the 3D geometries of subducted slabs in the upper and lower mantle of Asia from global seismic tomography. We have incorporated these slabs into plate tectonic models, which allows us to infer the subducting and overriding plate velocities. We describe two distinct slab geometry styles, ';flat slabs' and ';slab curtains', and show their implications for paleo-trench positions and subduction geometries in plate tectonic reconstructions. When compared to analogue and numerical models, the mapped slab styles show similarities to modeled slabs that occupy very different locations within Vs:Vor parameter space. ';Flat slabs' include large swaths of sub-horizontal slabs in the lower mantle that underlie the well-known northward paths of India and Australia from Eastern Gondwana, viewed in a moving hotspot reference. At India the flat slabs account for a significant proportion of the predicted lost Ceno-Tethys Ocean since ~100 Ma, whereas at Australia they record the existence of a major 8000km by 2500-3000km ocean that existed at ~43 Ma between East Asia, the Pacific and Australia. Plate reconstructions incorporating the slab constraints imply these flat slab geometries were generated when continent overran oceanic lithosphere to produce rapid trench retreat, or in other words, when subducting and overriding velocities were equal (i.e. Vs ~ Vor). ';Slab curtains' include subvertical Pacific slabs near the Izu-Bonin and Marianas trenches that extend from the surface down to 1500 km in the lower mantle and are 400 to 500 km thick. Reconstructed slab lengths were assessed from tomographic volumes calculated at serial cross-sections. The ';slab

  1. Polymer impregnated bridge slabs : interim report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-01-01

    The procedure used for producing precast slabs of polymer impregnated concrete (PIC) and described in this report was generally satisfactory from an operational standpoint. A strength loss of 14%, attributable to the drying step, was observed in PIC ...

  2. Experimental sensitivity analysis of subsoil-slab behaviour regarding degree of fibre-concrete slab reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubesova, E.; Lahuta, H.; Mohyla, M.; Quang, T. B.; Phi, N. D.

    2018-04-01

    The paper is focused on the sensitivity analysis of behaviour of the subsoil – foundation system as regards the variant properties of fibre-concrete slab resulting into different relative stiffness of the whole cooperating system. The character of slab and its properties are very important for the character of external load transfer, but the character of subsoil cannot be neglected either because it determines the stress-strain behaviour of the all system and consequently the bearing capacity of structure. The sensitivity analysis was carried out based on experimental results, which include both the stress values in soil below the foundation structure and settlements of structure, characterized by different quantity of fibres in it. Flat dynamometers GEOKON were used for the stress measurements below the observed slab, the strains inside slab were registered by tensometers, the settlements were monitored geodetically. The paper is focused on the comparison of soil stresses below the slab for different quantity of fibres in structure. The results obtained from the experimental stand can contribute to more objective knowledge of soil – slab interaction, to the evaluation of real carrying capacity of the slab, to the calibration of corresponding numerical models, to the optimization of quantity of fibres in the slab, and finally, to higher safety and more economical design of slab.

  3. Four-Pass Coupler for Laser-Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-pass optical coupler affords increased (in comparison with related prior two-pass optical couplers) utilization of light generated by a laser diode in side pumping of a solid-state laser slab. The original application for which this coupler was conceived involves a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) crystal slab, which, when pumped by a row of laser diodes at a wavelength of 809 nm, lases at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. Heretofore, typically, a thin laser slab has been pumped in two passes, the second pass occurring by virtue of reflection of pump light from a highly reflective thin film on the side opposite the side through which the pump light enters. In two-pass pumping, a Nd:YAG slab having a thickness of 2 mm (which is typical) absorbs about 84 percent of the 809-nm pump light power, leaving about 16 percent of the pump light power to travel back toward the laser diodes. This unused power can cause localized heating of the laser diodes, thereby reducing their lifetimes. Moreover, if the slab is thinner than 2 mm, then even more unused power travels back toward the laser diodes. The four-pass optical coupler captures most of this unused pump light and sends it back to the laser slab for two more passes. As a result, the slab absorbs more pump light, as though it were twice as thick. The gain and laser cavity beam quality of a smaller laser slab in conjunction with this optical coupler can thus be made comparable to those of a larger two-pass-pumped laser slab.

  4. Solar-pumped solid state Nd lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Zapata, L.

    1985-01-01

    Solid state neodymium lasers are considered candidates for space-based polar-pumped laser for continuous power transmission. Laser performance for three different slab laser configurations has been computed to show the excellent power capability of such systems if heat problems can be solved. Ideas involving geometries and materials are offered as potential solutions to the heat problem.

  5. Thermal management in inertial fusion energy slab amplifiers

    SciT

    Sutton, S.B.; Albrecht, G.F.

    As the technology associated with the development of solid-state drivers for inertial fusion energy (IFE) has evolved, increased emphasis has been placed on the development of an efficient approach for managing the waste heat generated in the laser media. This paper addresses the technical issues associated with the gas cooling of large aperture slabs, where the laser beam propagates through the cooling fluid. It is shown that the major consequence of proper thermal management is the introduction of simple wedge, or beam steering, into the system. Achieving proper thermal management requires careful consideration of the geometry, cooling fluid characteristics, coolingmore » flow characteristics, as well as the thermal/mechanical/optical characteristics of the laser media. Particularly important are the effects of cooling rate variation and turbulent scattering on the system optical performance. Helium is shown to have an overwhelming advantage with respect to turbulent scattering losses. To mitigate cooling rate variations, the authors introduce the concept of flow conditioning. Finally, optical path length variations across the aperture are calculated. A comparison of two laser materials (S-FAP and YAG) shows the benefit of a nearly a-thermal material on optical variations in the system.« less

  6. Tunable solid state lasers for remote sensing; Proceedings of the Conference, Stanford University, CA, October 1-3, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L. (Editor); Trebino, R. (Editor); Gustafson, E. K. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented on solid-state lasers for remote sensing, diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers, and tunable solid-state-laser systems. Topics discussed include titanium-sapphire tunable laser systems, the performance of slab geometry, and the development of slab lasers. Consideration is given to garnet host solid-state lasers, the growth of lasers and nonlinear materials, and nonlinear frequency conversion and tunable sources.

  7. Refining the Tonga Slab Geometry Using Slab Phases of Seismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alongi, T.; Wei, S. S.; Blackman, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    Although the Tonga subducting slab geometry has been previously mapped by earthquake distribution, its detailed morphology is poorly constrained. The uncertainties of the slab surface relative to earthquakes can be translated into large errors in predicted temperature of hypocenters that is considered as a chief control of intermediate-depth seismicity. Seismic waves converted at the interface between the slab crust and the overlying mantle wedge can provide additional constraints on the location of the slab surface. A PS phase converted at the slab interface is observable in the horizontal components, whereas an SP converted phase can be seen in the vertical component. In this study, we analyze PS and SP phases in the seismic dataset of the 2009-2010 Ridge2000 Lau Spreading Center project, which consisted of 50 ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) and 17 island-based seismic stations deployed in Fiji, Tonga, and the Lau Basin for about one year. More than 1,000 PS arrivals from local events were manually picked, predominantly with a 1-3 Hz filter. Next, the PS-P differential travel times will be inverted to determine improved depths of the slab surface relative to the local earthquakes and the receiving stations. The refined slab geometry will allow us to assess the thermal structure and dehydration reactions of the Tonga slab, lending further insight into the mechanisms of intermediate-depth seismicity.

  8. Polymer impregnated bridge slabs : interim report, condition of slabs after three years of service life.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-01-01

    The condition of six concrete bridge slabs that had been in service for three years was evaluated. The top 2 in. of the four slabs that had been impregnated to a depth of about 1 in. with a methyl methacrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate m...

  9. Modeling Slab-Slab Interactions: Dynamics of Outward Dipping Double-Sided Subduction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Ágnes; Holt, Adam F.; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio; Capitanio, Fabio A.

    2018-03-01

    Slab-slab interaction is a characteristic feature of tectonically complex areas. Outward dipping double-sided subduction is one of these complex cases, which has several examples on Earth, most notably the Molucca Sea and Adriatic Sea. This study focuses on developing a framework for linking plate kinematics and slab interactions in an outward dipping subduction geometry. We used analog and numerical models to better understand the underlying subduction dynamics. Compared to a single subduction model, double-sided subduction exhibits more time-dependent and vigorous toroidal flow cells that are elongated (i.e., not circular). Because both the Molucca and Adriatic Sea exhibit an asymmetric subduction configuration, we also examine the role that asymmetry plays in the dynamics of outward dipping double-sided subduction. We introduce asymmetry in two ways; with variable initial depths for the two slabs ("geometric" asymmetry), and with variable buoyancy within the subducting plate ("mechanical" asymmetry). Relative to the symmetric case, we probe how asymmetry affects the overall slab kinematics, whether asymmetric behavior intensifies or equilibrates as subduction proceeds. While initial geometric asymmetry disappears once the slabs are anchored to the 660 km discontinuity, the mechanical asymmetry can cause more permanent differences between the two subduction zones. In the most extreme case, the partly continental slab stops subducting due to the unequal slab pull force. The results show that the slab-slab interaction is most effective when the two trenches are closer than 10-8 cm in the laboratory, which is 600-480 km when scaled to the Earth.

  10. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    Meighan, Hallie E.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  11. How to measure slab-off and reverse slab prism in spectacle lenses.

    PubMed

    Christoff, Alexander; Guyton, David L

    2007-08-01

    It is well known that new spectacle lenses for the correction of anisometropia can induce diplopia with reading. The difference in the powers of the lenses induces a net prismatic effect that can cause double vision through off-center areas of the lenses. This is particularly bothersome when patients try to read, often noting vertical double vision in attempted downgaze, especially through multifocal add segments. This induced prismatic effect can be compensated at one level of downgaze by the use of slab-off or reverse slab prism. Typically the slab-off correction is ground into the stronger minus, or weaker plus lens. Reverse slab is ground into the weaker minus, or stronger plus, lens. Unfortunately, determining the amount of slab-off prism already incorporated into spectacle lenses is nonintuitive and inconvenient. This usually requires the use of a lens clock, which is not widely accessible to many ophthalmology practices. A simple technique, described in the past but poorly known, is illustrated here for quickly measuring slab-off and reverse slab prism prescription lenses in the clinic with a common manual lens meter.

  12. Active isotropic slabs: conditions for amplified reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Liliana I.; Matteo, Claudia L.; Etcheverry, Javier; Duplaá, María Celeste

    2012-12-01

    We analyse in detail the necessary conditions to obtain amplified reflection (AR) in isotropic interfaces when a plane wave propagates from a transparent medium towards an active one. First, we demonstrate analytically that AR is not possible if a single interface is involved. Then, we study the conditions for AR in a very simple configuration: normal incidence on an active slab immersed in transparent media. Finally, we develop an analysis in the complex plane in order to establish a geometrical method that not only describes the behaviour of active slabs but also helps to simplify the calculus.

  13. Extensive decarbonation of continuously hydrated subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, F.; Burton, M. R.; La Spina, G.; Macpherson, C.

    2016-12-01

    CO2 release from subducting slabs is a key element of Earth's carbon cycle, consigning slab carbon either to mantle burial or recycling to the surface through arc volcanism, however, what controls subducted carbon's fate is poorly understood. Fluids mobilized by devolatilization of subducting slabs play a fundamental role in the melting of mantle wedges and in global geochemical cycles [1]. The effect of such fluids on decarbonation in subducting lithologies has been investigated recently [2-5] but mechanisms of carbon transfer from the slab to wedge are poorly understood [2-6]. Several thermodynamic models [2-3], and experimental studies [6] suggest that carbon-bearing phases are stable at sub-arc depths (80-140 km; 2.6-4.5 GPa), implying that this carbon can be subducted to mantle depths of >140 km. This is inconsistent with observations of voluminous CO2 release from arc volcanoes [7-10], located above slabs that are at 2.6-4.5 GPa pressure. Here, we show that continuous hydrated of sediment veneers on subducting slabs by H2O released from oceanic crust and serpentinised mantle lithosphere [11-13], produces extensive slab decarbonation over a narrow, sub-arc pressure range, even for low temperature subduction pathways. This explains the location of CO2-rich volcanism, quantitatively links the sedimentary composition of slab material to the degree of decarbonation and greatly increases estimates for the magnitude of carbon flux through the arc in subduction zones. [1] Hilton, D.R. et al. (2002) Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 47, 319-370. [2] Gorman, P.J. et al. (2006) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 7. [3] Kerrick, D.M. and Connolly, J.A.D. (2001) Nature 411, 293-296. [4] Cook-Kollars, J. et al. (2014) Chem. Geol. 386, 31-48. [5] Collins, N.C. et al. (2015) Chem. Geol. 412, 132-150. [6] Poli, S. et al. (2009) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 278, 350-360. [7] Sano, Y. and Williams, S.N. (1996) Geophys. Res. Lett. 23, 2749-2752. [8] Marty, B. and Tolstikhin, I.N. (1998) Chem. Geol

  14. The 2017 Mw = 8.2 Tehuantepec earthquake: a slab bending or slab pull rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duputel, Z.; Gombert, B.; Simons, M.; Fielding, E. J.; Rivera, L. A.; Bekaert, D. P.; Jiang, J.; Liang, C.; Moore, A. W.; Liu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    On September 8th 2017, a regionally destructive Mw 8.2 intra-slab earthquake struck Mexico in the Gulf of Tehuantepec. While large intermediate depth intra-slab earthquakes are a major hazard, we have only a limited knowledge of the strain budgets within subducting slabs. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain intraplate earthquakes in subduction zones. Bending stresses might cause the occurrence of seismic events located at depths where the slab dip changes abruptly. However, an alternative explanation is needed if the ruptures are found to propagate through the entire lithosphere. Depending on the coupling of the subduction interface, intraplate earthquakes occurring updip or downdip of the locked zone could also be caused by the negative buoyancy of the sinking slab (i.e., slab pull). The increasing availability of near-fault data provides a unique opportunity to better constrain the seismogenic behavior of large intra-slab earthquakes. Teleseismic analyses of the 2017 Tehuantepec earthquake lead to contrasting statements about the depth extent of the rupture: while most of long period centroid moment tensor inversions yield fairly large centroid depths (>40 km), some finite-fault models suggest much shallower slip concentrated at depths less than 30 km. In this study, we analyze GPS, InSAR, tsunami and seismological data to constrain the earthquake location, fault geometry and slip distribution. We use a Bayesian approach devoid of significant spatial smoothing to characterize the range of allowable rupture depths. In addition, to cope with potential artifacts in centroid depth estimates due to unmodeled lateral heterogeneities, we also analyze long-period seismological data using a full 3D Earth model. Preliminary results suggest a fairly deep rupture consistent with a slab-pull process breaking a significant proportion of the lithosphere and potentially reflecting at least local detachment of the slab.

  15. Behaviour of reinforced concrete slabs with steel fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baarimah, A. O.; Syed Mohsin, S. M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper investigates the potential effect of steel fiber added into reinforced concrete slabs. Four-point bending test is conducted on six slabs to investigate the structural behaviour of the slabs by considering two different parameters; (i) thickness of slab (ii) volume fraction of steel fiber. The experimental work consists of six slabs, in which three slabs are designed in accordance to Eurocode 2 to fulfil shear capacity characteristic, whereas, the other three slabs are designed with 17% less thickness, intended to fail in shear. Both series of slabs are added with steel fiber with a volume fraction of Vf = 0%, Vf = 1% and Vf = 2% in order to study the effect and potential of fiber to compensate the loss in shear capacity. The slab with Vf = 0% steel fiber and no reduction in thickness is taken as the control slab. The experimental result suggests promising improvement of the load carrying capacity (up to 32%) and ductility (up to 87%) as well as delayed in crack propagation for the slabs with Vf = 2%. In addition, it is observed that addition of fibers compensates the reduction in the slab thickness as well as changes the failure mode of the slab from brittle to a more ductile manner.

  16. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  19. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one.

  20. Development Length for Headed Bars in Slab-Column Joints of RC Slab Bridges

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-12-04

    In accordance with the Caltrans Seismic Design Criteria, the superstructure in a slab bridge should remain essentially elastic and only the pile extensions/columns are permitted to develop inelastic deformations during a seismic event. Hence, the lon...

  1. The FLAME-slab method for electromagnetic wave scattering in aperiodic slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansha, Shampy; Tsukerman, Igor; Chong, Y. D.

    2017-12-01

    The proposed numerical method, "FLAME-slab," solves electromagnetic wave scattering problems for aperiodic slab structures by exploiting short-range regularities in these structures. The computational procedure involves special difference schemes with high accuracy even on coarse grids. These schemes are based on Trefftz approximations, utilizing functions that locally satisfy the governing differential equations, as is done in the Flexible Local Approximation Method (FLAME). Radiation boundary conditions are implemented via Fourier expansions in the air surrounding the slab. When applied to ensembles of slab structures with identical short-range features, such as amorphous or quasicrystalline lattices, the method is significantly more efficient, both in runtime and in memory consumption, than traditional approaches. This efficiency is due to the fact that the Trefftz functions need to be computed only once for the whole ensemble.

  2. Field evaluation of alternative and cost efficient bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    Based on a recent study on cost efficient alternative bridge approach slab (BAS) designs (Thiagarajan et al. 2010) has recommended : three new BAS designs for possible implementation by MoDOT namely a) 20 feet cast-inplace slab with sleeper slab (CIP...

  3. High-order harmonic generation in solid slabs beyond the single-active-electron approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Kenneth K.; Deffge, Tobias; Bauer, Dieter

    2017-11-01

    High-harmonic generation by a laser-driven solid slab is simulated using time-dependent density functional theory. Multiple harmonic plateaus up to very high harmonic orders are observed already at surprisingly low field strengths. The full all-electron harmonic spectra are, in general, very different from those of any individual Kohn-Sham orbital. Freezing the Kohn-Sham potential instead is found to be a good approximation for the laser intensities and harmonic orders considered. The origins of the plateau cutoffs are explained in terms of band gaps that can be reached by Kohn-Sham electrons and holes moving through the band structure.

  4. TES premapping data: Slab ice and snow flurries in the Martian north polar night

    Titus, T.N.; Kieffer, H.H.; Mullins, K.F.; Christensen, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    In the 1970s, Mariner and Viking spacecraft observations of the north polar region of Mars revealed polar brightness temperatures that were significantly below the expected kinetic temperatures for CO2 sublimation. For the past few decades, the scientific community has speculated as to the nature of these Martian polar cold spots. Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) thermal spectral data have shown these cold spots to result largely from fine-grained, CO2 and have constrained most of these cold spots to the surface (or near-surface). Cold spot formation is strongly dependent on topography, forming preferentially near craters and on polar slopes. TES data, combined with Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) cloud data, suggest atmospheric condensates form a small fraction of the observed cold spots. TES observations of spectra close to a blackbody indicate that another major component of the polar cap is slab CO2 ice; these spectrally bland regions commonly have a low albedo. The cause is uncertain but may result from most of the light being reflected toward the specular direction, from the slab ice being intrinsically dark, or from it being transparent. Regions of the cap where the difference between the brightness temperatures at 18 ??m (T18) and 25 ??m (T25) is less than 5?? are taken to indicate deposits of slab ice. Slab ice is the dominant component of the polar cap at latitudes outside of the polar night. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Imaging the Peruvian flat slab with Rayliegh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja

    In subduction zones the oceanic plates descend at a broad range of dip angles. A "flat slab" is an oceanic plate that starts to subduct steeply, but bends at 100 km depth and continues almost horizontally for several hundred kilometers. This unusual slab geometry has been linked to various geologic features, including the cessation of arc volcanism, basement core uplifts removed far from subducting margins, and the formation of high plateaus. Despite the prevalence of flat slabs worldwide since the Proterozoic, questions on how flat slabs form, persist, and re-steepen remains a topic of ongoing research. Even less clear is how this phenomenon relates to unusual features observed at the surface. To better understand the causes and consequences of slab flattening I focus on the Peruvian flat slab. This is not only the biggest flat slab region today, but due to the oblique angle at which the Nazca Plate subducts under the South American Plate, it also provides unique opportunity to get insights into the temporal evolution of the flat slab. Using ambient noise and earthquake-generated Rayleigh waves recorded at several contemporary dense seismic networks, I was able to perform unprecedentedly high resolution imaging of the subduction zone in southern Peru. Surprisingly, instead of imaging a vast flat slab region as expected, I found that the flat slab tears and re-steepens north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. The change in slab geometry is associated with variations in the slab's internal strain along strike, as inferred from slab-related anisotropy. Based on newly-discovered features I discuss the critical role of the subducting ridges in the formation and longevity of flat slabs. The slab tear created a new mantle pathway between the torn slab and the flat slab remnant to the east, and is possibly linked to the profound low velocity anomaly located under the eastern corner of the flat slab. Finally, I re-evaluate the connection between slab flattening and volcanic

  6. Continental underplating after slab break-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, V.; Allen, M. B.; van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the dynamics of continental collision, and in particular what happens to the subducted continental lithosphere after oceanic slab break-off. We find that in some scenarios the subducting continental lithosphere underthrusts the overriding plate not immediately after it enters the trench, but after oceanic slab break-off. In this case, the continental plate first subducts with a steep angle and then, after the slab breaks off at depth, it rises back towards the surface and flattens below the overriding plate, forming a thick horizontal layer of continental crust that extends for about 200 km beyond the suture. This type of behaviour depends on the width of the oceanic plate marginal to the collision zone: wide oceanic margins promote continental underplating and marginal back-arc basins; narrow margins do not show such underplating unless a far field force is applied. Our models show that, as the subducted continental lithosphere rises, the mantle wedge progressively migrates away from the suture and the continental crust heats up, reaching temperatures >900 °C. This heating might lead to crustal melting, and resultant magmatism. We observe a sharp peak in the overriding plate rock uplift right after the occurrence of slab break-off. Afterwards, during underplating, the maximum rock uplift is smaller, but the affected area is much wider (up to 350 km). These results can be used to explain the dynamics that led to the present-day crustal configuration of the India-Eurasia collision zone and its consequences for the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution.

  7. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  8. Capillary sample introduction of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products separated in ultrathin slab gels.

    PubMed

    Bullard, K M; Hietpas, P B; Ewing, A G

    1998-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified short tandem repeat (STR) samples from the HUMVWF locus have been analyzed using a unique sample introduction and separation technique. A single capillary is used to transfer samples onto an ultrathin slab gel (57 microm thin). This ultrathin nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel is used to separate the amplified fragments, and laser-induced fluorescence with ethidium bromide is used for detection. The feasibility of performing STR analysis using this system has been investigated by examining the reproducibility for repeated samples. Reproducibility is examined by comparing the migration of the 14 and 17 HUMVWF alleles on three consecutive separations on the ultrathin slab gel. Using one locus, separations match in migration time with the two alleles 42 s apart for each of the three consecutive separations. This technique shows potential to increase sample throughput in STR analysis techniques although separation resolution still needs to be improved.

  9. Viscous Dissipation and Criticality of Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Mike; Karato, Shun; Yuen, Dave

    2016-04-01

    Rheology of subducting lithosphere appears to be complicated. In the shallow part, deformation is largely accomodated by brittle failure, whereas at greater depth, at higher confining pressures, ductile creep is expected to control slab strength. The amount of viscous dissipation ΔQ during subduction at greater depth, as constrained by experimental rock mechanics, can be estimated on the basis of a simple bending moment equation [1,2] 2ɛ˙0(z) ∫ +h/2 2 M (z) = h ṡ -h/2 4μ(y,z)y dy , (1) for a complex multi-phase rheology in the mantle transition zone, including the effects of a metastable phase transition as well as the pressure, temperature, grain-size and stress dependency of the relevant creep mechanisms; μ is here the effective viscosity and ɛ˙0(z) is a (reference) strain rate. Numerical analysis shows that the maximum bending moment, Mcrit, that can be sustained by a slab is of the order of 1019 Nm per m according to Mcrit˜=σp ∗h2/4, where σp is the Peierl's stress limit of slab materials and h is the slab thickness. Near Mcrit, the amount of viscous dissipation grows strongly as a consequence of a lattice instability of mantle minerals (dislocation glide in olivine), suggesting that thermo-mechanical instabilities become prone to occur at places where a critical shear-heating rate is exceeded, see figure. This implies that the lithosphere behaves in such cases like a perfectly plastic solid [3]. Recently available detailed data related to deep seismicity [4,5] seems to provide support to our conclusion. It shows, e.g., that thermal shear instabilities, and not transformational faulting, is likely the dominating mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone, in accordance with this suggested "deep criticality" model. These new findings are therefore briefly outlined and possible implications are discussed. References [1] Riedel, M. R., Karato, S., Yuen, D. A. Criticality of Subducting Slabs. University of Minnesota

  10. Extensive decarbonation of continuously hydrated subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Burton, Mike; La Spina, Giuseppe; Macpherson, Colin G.

    2017-04-01

    CO2 release from subducting slabs is a key element of Earth's carbon cycle, consigning slab carbon either to mantle burial or recycling to the surface through arc volcanism, however, what controls subducted carbon's fate is poorly understood. Fluids mobilized by devolatilization of subducting slabs play a fundamental role in the melting of mantle wedges and in global geochemical cycles [1]. The effect of such fluids on decarbonation in subducting lithologies has been investigated recently [2-5], but several thermodynamic models [2-3], and experimental studies [6] suggest that carbon-bearing phases are stable at sub-arc depths (80-140 km; 2.6-4.5 GPa), implying that this carbon can be carried to mantle depths of >140 km. This is inconsistent with observations of voluminous CO2 release from arc volcanoes [7-10], located above slabs that are at 2.6-4.5 GPa pressure. The aim of this study is to re-evaluate the role of metamorphic decarbonation, showing if decarbonation reactions could be feasible at sub-arc depths combined with a continuous hydration scenario. We used the PerpleX software combined with a custom-designed algorithm to simulate a pervasive fluid infiltration characterized by "continuous hydration" combined with a distillation model, in which is possible to remove CO2 when decarbonation occurs, to obtain an open-system scenario. This is performed by repeatedly flushing the sediment with pure H2O at 0.5, 1.0 or 5 wt.% until no further decarbonation occurs. Here we show that continuous hydrated of sediment veneers on subducting slabs by H2O released from oceanic crust and serpentinised mantle lithosphere [11-13], produces extensive slab decarbonation over a narrow, sub-arc pressure range, even for low temperature subduction pathways. This explains the location of CO2-rich volcanism, quantitatively links the sedimentary composition of slab material to the degree of decarbonation and greatly increases estimates for the magnitude of carbon flux through the arc

  11. Investigating Different Patterns of Slab Deformation in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; McNamara, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    The geometry of slabs within the upper mantle have been relatively well-imaged by tomography and regional seismic studies; however, the style of slab deformation in the lower mantle remains poorly understood. Although tomography models reveal that the lower mantle beneath paleo-subduction regions are faster-than-average, the resolution is not high enough to resolve how slabs are actually deforming there. Slabs have long been hypothesized as viscous, tabular sheets that subduct at the surface, descend through the mantle, and impinge on the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Geodynamical studies have shown a wide range of possible deformational behaviors, ranging from stiff, buckling slabs to more-ductile masses of accumulating slab material undergoing pure shear. Of particular interest is how rheology and 3D spherical geometry control the shape and deformational style of slabs as they descend deeper into the mantle. We performed high resolution 3D spherical calculations to explore slab deformation in deep mantle as a function of slab strength. In our model, kinematic velocity boundary conditions are imposed on the surface to simulate a moving plate which guides the formation of a subducting slab. In addition, a viscosity jump at the transition zone is applied. We find that although a slab subducts as a large tabular sheet from the surface, it doesn't always maintain such geometry. Instead, it typically breaks apart into a few smaller and narrower sheets which can even turn into cylindrical-shaped downwelling after subducting into deep mantle. Since seismic anisotropy is hypothesized to originate from crystal preferred orientation (CPO) in a slab when it impinges on the CMB and is predicted with significant help of time-dependent deformation information from the geodynamic models, our findings on lower mantle slab deformation patterns may enhance the understanding towards the cause of characteristic patterns of predicted seismic anisotropy.

  12. Tectonic controls on earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate: slab buoyancy and slab bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are clear variations in maximum earthquake magnitude among Earth's subduction zones. These variations have been studied extensively and attributed to differences in tectonic properties in subduction zones, such as relative plate velocity and subducting plate age [Ruff and Kanamori, 1980]. In addition to maximum earthquake magnitude, the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes also differs among subduction zones, such as the b-value (i.e., the slope of the earthquake size distribution) and the frequency of seismic events. However, the casual relationship between the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes and subduction zone tectonics has been unclear. Here we divide Earth's subduction zones into over 100 study regions following Ide [2013] and estimate b-values and the background seismicity rate—the frequency of seismic events excluding aftershocks—for subduction zones worldwide using the maximum likelihood method [Utsu, 1965; Aki, 1965] and the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model [Ogata, 1988]. We demonstrate that the b-value varies as a function of subducting plate age and trench depth, and that the background seismicity rate is related to the degree of slab bending at the trench. Large earthquakes tend to occur relatively frequently (lower b-values) in shallower subduction zones with younger slabs, and more earthquakes occur in subduction zones with deeper trench and steeper dip angle. These results suggest that slab buoyancy, which depends on subducting plate age, controls the earthquake size distribution, and that intra-slab faults due to slab bending, which increase with the steepness of the slab dip angle, have influence on the frequency of seismic events, because they produce heterogeneity in plate coupling and efficiently inject fluid to elevate pore fluid pressure on the plate interface. This study reveals tectonic factors that control earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate, and these relationships between seismicity and

  13. Imaging performance of an isotropic negative dielectric constant slab.

    PubMed

    Shivanand; Liu, Huikan; Webb, Kevin J

    2008-11-01

    The influence of material and thickness on the subwavelength imaging performance of a negative dielectric constant slab is studied. Resonance in the plane-wave transfer function produces a high spatial frequency ripple that could be useful in fabricating periodic structures. A cost function based on the plane-wave transfer function provides a useful metric to evaluate the planar slab lens performance, and using this, the optimal slab dielectric constant can be determined.

  14. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOEpatents

    Martin, R.J.

    1985-12-24

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes. 5 figs.

  15. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, Joseph W.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Davidson, James C.; Koo, Jackson C.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  16. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald J.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes.

  17. Stress regime in the Philippine Sea slab beneath Kanto, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Junichi; Hasegawa, Akira; Hirose, Fuyuki

    2011-08-01

    We determine the focal mechanisms of earthquakes within the Philippine Sea slab beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area, and perform stress tensor inversions to investigate the detailed stress field within the slab. The results show a characteristic spatial variation in earthquake-generating stress. Slab stress in northeastern part of the PHS slab is characterized by down-dip tension (DDT), except for the uppermost tip of the seismic portion of the slab where down-dip compression (DDC) stress is dominant. We interpret that DDT is caused by the net slab pull and DDC is attributable to local resistance to subduction at the tip of the slab. In southwestern part of the PHS slab, σ1 and σ3 are generally rotated oblique to the dip of the slab, suggesting that earthquakes occur under stress conditions of neither DDC nor DDT. The rotations in σ1 and σ3 may be related to stress accumulation by the slip deficit along the asperity of the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9).

  18. MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE RUN OUT INCLUDES THE TRAVELING TORCH WHICH CUTS SLABS TO DESIRED LENGTH, AN IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM TO INDICATE HEAT NUMBER AND TRACE IDENTITY OF EVERY SLAB, AND A DEBURRING DEVICE TO SMOOTH SLABS. AT LEFT OF ROLLS IS THE DUMMY BAR. DUMMY BAR IS INSERTED UP THROUGH CONTAINMENT SECTION INTO MOLD PRIOR TO START OF CAST. WHEN STEEL IS INTRODUCED INTO MOLD IT CONNECTS WITH BAR AS CAST BEGINS, AT RUN OUT DUMMY BAR DISCONNECTS AND IS STORED. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  19. MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE RUN OUT INCLUDES THE TRAVELING TORCH WHICH CUTS SLABS TO DESIRED LENGTH, AN IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM TO INDICATE HEAT NUMBER AND TRACE IDENTITY OF EVERY SLAB, AND A DEBURRING DEVICE TO SMOOTH SLABS. AT LEFT OF ROLLS IS THE DUMMY BAR. DUMMY BAR IS INSERTED UP THROUGH CONTAINMENT SECTION INTO MOLD PRIOR TO START OF CAST. WHEN STEEL IS INTRODUCED INTO MOLD IT CONNECTS WITH BAR AS CAST BEGINS, AT RUN OUT DUMMY BAR DISCONNECTS AND IS STORED - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Sub-slab vs. Near-slab Soil Vapor Profiles at a Chlorinated Solvent Site (1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical issue in assessing the vapor intrusion pathway is the distribution and migration of VOCs from the subsurface source to the near surface environment. Of particular importance is the influence of a slab. Therefore, EPA/ORD is funding a research program with the primary...

  1. Slab temperature controls on the Tonga double seismic zone and slab mantle dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Wei, S. Shawn; Wiens, Douglas A.; van Keken, Peter E.; Cai, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Double seismic zones are two-layered distributions of intermediate-depth earthquakes that provide insight into the thermomechanical state of subducting slabs. We present new precise hypocenters of intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Tonga subduction zone obtained using data from local island–based, ocean-bottom, and global seismographs. The results show a downdip compressional upper plane and a downdip tensional lower plane with a separation of about 30 km. The double seismic zone in Tonga extends to a depth of about 300 km, deeper than in any other subduction system. This is due to the lower slab temperatures resulting from faster subduction, as indicated by a global trend toward deeper double seismic zones in colder slabs. In addition, a line of high seismicity in the upper plane is observed at a depth of 160 to 280 km, which shallows southward as the convergence rate decreases. Thermal modeling shows that the earthquakes in this “seismic belt” occur at various pressures but at a nearly constant temperature, highlighting the important role of temperature in triggering intermediate-depth earthquakes. This seismic belt may correspond to regions where the subducting mantle first reaches a temperature of ~500°C, implying that metamorphic dehydration of mantle minerals in the slab provides water to enhance faulting. PMID:28097220

  2. Plate deformation at depth under northern California: Slab gap or stretched slab?

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Shimizu, N.; Molzer, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    Plate kinematic interpretations for northern California predict a gap in the underlying subducted slab caused by the northward migration of the Pacific-North America-Juan de Fuca triple junction. However, large-scale decompression melting and asthenospheric upwelling to the base of the overlying plate within the postulated gap are not supported by geophysical and geochemical observations. We suggest a model for the interaction between the three plates which is compatible with the observations. In this 'slab stretch' model the Juan de Fuca plate under coastal northern California deforms by stretching and thinning to fill the geometrical gap formed in the wake of the northward migrating Mendocino triple junction. The stretching is in response to boundary forces acting on the plate. The thinning results in an elevated geothermal gradient, which may be roughly equivalent to a 4 Ma oceanic lithosphere, still much cooler than that inferred by the slab gap model. We show that reequilibration of this geothermal gradient under 20-30 km thick overlying plate can explain the minor Neogene volcanic activity, its chemical composition, and the heat flow. In contrast to northern California, geochemical and geophysical consequences of a 'true' slab gap can be observed in the California Inner Continental Borderland offshore Los Angeles, where local asthenospheric upwelling probably took place during the Miocene as a result of horizontal extension and rotation of the overlying plate. The elevated heat flow in central California can be explained by thermal reequilibration of the stalled Monterey microplate under the Coast Ranges, rather than by a slab gap or viscous shear heating in the mantle.

  3. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciT

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M., E-mail: cliddell@ccmr.cornell.edu

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd,more » even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.« less

  4. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, François; Douté, Sylvain; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze massive hyperspectral data by a Bayesian approach. We designed it for planetary surface ice studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are assumed to be close to spherical and constituted of any type of material other than the ice matrix. It can be any other type of ice, mineral, or even bubbles defined by their optical constants. We assume a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and thus is suitable for high-resolution hyperspectral data analysis.

  5. Tunable cw Single-Frequency Source for Injection Seeding 2-micrometer Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Nd:glass Slab Asilomar, CA, January, 1989. Laser for X-ray Lithography ," presented at Lasers 11. R. L. Byer, "Solid State Lasers for Accelerator 89, New...Alumni Association (Stanford Club of M.K. Reed and R.L. Byer, "A Nd:glass Slab Connecticut), April, 1989. Laserfor X-ray Lithography ," to be...and R.L. Byer, "A Nd:Glass Slab asymmetric quantum wells," invited paper QWA1 Laser for Soft X-ray Lithography ", paper MB4, International Quantum

  6. Lamb waves in phononic crystal slabs with square or rectangular symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Thomas; Vasseur, Jérôme; Bonello, Bernard; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Hladky-Hennion, Anne-Christine

    2008-08-01

    We report on both numerical and experimental results showing the occurrence of band gaps for Lamb waves propagating in phononic crystal plates. The structures are made of centered rectangular and square arrays of holes drilled in a silicon plate. A supercell plane wave expansion method is used to calculate the band structures and to predict the position and the magnitude of the gaps. The band structures of phononic crystal slabs are then measured using a laser ultrasonic technique. Lamb waves in the megahertz range and with wave vectors ranging over more than the first two reduced Brillouin zones are investigated.

  7. Light-assisted, templated self-assembly using a photonic-crystal slab.

    PubMed

    Jaquay, Eric; Martínez, Luis Javier; Mejia, Camilo A; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-05-08

    We experimentally demonstrate the technique of light-assisted, templated self-assembly (LATS). We excite a guided-resonance mode of a photonic-crystal slab with 1.55 μm laser light to create an array of optical traps. We demonstrate assembly of a square lattice of 520 nm diameter polystyrene particles spaced by 860 nm. Our results demonstrate how LATS can be used to fabricate reconfigurable structures with symmetries different from traditional colloidal self-assembly, which is limited by free energetic constraints.

  8. Manipulation of enhanced absorption with tilted hexagonal boron nitride slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohu; Fu, Ceji

    2018-04-01

    The wavevector of electromagnetic wave propagation in a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) slab can be controlled by tilting its optical axis. This property can be used to manipulate the absorption in a hBN slab. By carefully analyzing the dependence of the absorptivity of a thin hBN slab on the tilted angle of its optical axis, we propose a structure that can realize great absorptivity enhancement in a band by stacking hBN slabs of different tilted angles. Our numerical results show that the absorptivity of a structure made of 91 stacked hBN slabs can be achieved higher than 0.94 in the wavenumber range from 1367 to 1580 cm-1 when the tilted angles of the slabs are properly arranged. The strong absorption is attributed to the combination of impedance matching at the slab interfaces and enlarged wavevectors in the slabs. This work reveals a novel way to realize strong absorption with anisotropic materials for applications in areas such as thermal radiative energy harvesting and conversion.

  9. Polymer-impregnated bridge slabs : performance over 10 years.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the performance over a 10-year period of slabs that were impregnated to a depth of about 1 in with a monomer that was subsequently polymerized (shallow polymer impregnation). The slabs were used...

  10. Precast alternative for flat slab bridges : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-10-26

    The cast-in-place (CIP) concrete slab bridge and the hollow core flat slab bridge are two very common bridge types utilized by the : South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT). The CIP bridge is durable but has a long construction time while...

  11. 42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. THE MOLD, WHICH HAS A RAISED DESIGN, LEAVES AND OUTLINE IN THE SLAB, THE PIECES THUS DEFINED, ARE THEN CUT APART TO BE FIRED SEPARATELY AND REASSEMBLED. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  12. Accelerated slab replacement using temporary precast panels and self-consolidating concrete : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-01

    Researchers at Florida State University demonstrated the feasibility of using precast reinforced concrete panels to temporarily fill slab removal pits. The precast slabs can be driven on so traffic lanes can be open during the day, and new slab casti...

  13. Over 10-watt pico-second diffraction-limited output from a Nd:YVO4 slab amplifier with a phase conjugate mirror.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Yasukuni; Nawata, Kouji; Omatsu, Takashige

    2005-10-31

    We have produced a high beam quality pico-second laser based on a continuous-wave diode pumped Nd:YVO4 slab amplifier with a photorefractive phase conjugate mirror. 12.8W diffraction-limited output with a pulse width of 8.7ps was obtained.

  14. Global Adjoint Tomography - Hotspots and Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Modrak, R. T.; Smith, J. A.; Orsvuran, R.; Bozdag, E.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Plumes rise from the deep mantle due to thermal or/and chemical buoyancy, forming hotspots at the surface, and oceanic plates subduct underneath continents, piling up at discontinuities or sinking down to the core-mantle boundary. Despite these basic convection mechanisms, many questions remain about the origin of mantle plumes, slab subduction, their interaction with mantle convection, and their relationship with the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle. Plume and slab morphology at depth provide further insight into these questions but imaging them in the mid and lower mantle is known to be very challenging due to a lack of data coverage and resolvability limits of conventional body-wave traveltime tomography. The deployment of regional dense arrays (e.g., USArray) and development of full waveform inversion techniques provide opportunities to resolve finer 3D details of mantle plumes and slabs. Harnessing the power of supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we employed a spectral-element method to accurately simulate seismograms in complex 3D Earth models and an adjoint method to obtain model updates. Bozdag et al. (2016) iteratively determined a transversely isotropic earth model (GLAD_M15) using 253 events. To achieve higher resolution and better coverage in the deep mantle, we expanded our database to 1,040 events; a 1/3 of them are deep earthquakes (>500 km). We reinverted source parameters using model GLAD_M15, recalculated synthetic seismograms, selected time windows that show good agreement between data and the synthetics, and made measurements within these windows. From the measurements, we further assess the overall quality of each event and station and exclude bad measurements using very conservative criteria. Thus far, we assimilated more than 10 million windows in three period bands from 17-250 s. As the model improves, we correct the centroid time and scalar moment of each event using its mean

  15. Drug release from slabs and the effects of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Kalosakas, George; Martini, Dimitra

    2015-12-30

    We discuss diffusion-controlled drug release from slabs or thin films. Analytical and numerical results are presented for slabs with flat surfaces, having a uniform thickness. Then, considering slabs with rough surfaces, the influence of a non-uniform slab thickness on release kinetics is numerically investigated. The numerical release profiles are obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. Release kinetics is quantified through the stretched exponential (or Weibull) function and the resulting dependence of the two parameters of this function on the thickness of the slab, for flat surfaces, and the amplitude of surface fluctuations (or the degree of thickness variability) in case of roughness. We find that a higher surface roughness leads to a faster drug release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Regional body-wave tomography of the Peruvian flat slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Bissett E.

    Local travel time data were used to create three dimensional tomography models of Vp and Vs above the flat slab in southern Peru, where the Nazca plate subducts subhorizontally beneath the continental lithosphere. The Peruvian flat slab segment corresponds to a gap in the volcanic arc and far-field thick-skinned deformation in the Eastern Cordillera. Despite ongoing research, there is little consensus on the causes and consequences of flat slab subduction. We present results from regional body-wave tomography which show high S-wave velocities above the slab for a region that coincides with the location of the Nazca ridge, a bathymetric high subducting at ~15°S. We propose that fast S-wave arrivals can be explained by mantle anisotropy. We attribute low Vs observed in the mantle north of the ridge to the presence of hydrous phases, resulting from the depth dependent dehydration of amphibole in an area where the slab is deeper.

  17. Electromagnetic Tunneling and Resonances in Pseudochiral Omega Slabs

    PubMed Central

    Razzaz, Faroq; Alkanhal, Majeed A. S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical investigation of the electromagnetic wave tunneling and anomalous transmission around the trapped modes in a pseudochiral omega slab. The dispersion relation, the conditions of the trapped modes, and the evanescent wave coupling and tunneling in two different reciprocal pseudochiral omega slab structures are derived. The Berreman’s matrix method is applied to obtain the transmission coefficients across the pseudochiral omega slab. When the structure is perturbed, a resonance phenomenon is detected around the trapped modes. This resonance results in transmission anomalies (total transmission and total reflection) and dramatic field amplifications around the trapped modes. The number of the discrete trapped modes and then the resonance frequencies are prescribed by the parameters of the pseudochiral omega slab such as the value of the omega parameter and its orientation and the slab thickness. PMID:28165058

  18. Characterizing wet slab and glide slab avalanche occurrence along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.; Reardon, Blase

    2010-01-01

    Wet slab and glide slab snow avalanches are dangerous and yet can be particularly difficult to predict. Both wet slab and glide slab avalanches are thought to depend upon free water moving through the snowpack but are driven by different processes. In Glacier National Park, Montana, both types of avalanches can occur in the same year and affect the Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR). Both wet slab and glide slab avalanches along the GTSR from 2003-2010 are investigated. Meteorological data from two high-elevation weather stations and one SNOTEL site are used in conjunction with an avalanche database and snowpit profiles. These data were used to characterize years when only glide slab avalanches occurred and those years when both glide slab and wet slab avalanches occurred. Results of 168 glide slab and 57 wet slab avalanches along the GTSR suggest both types of avalanche occurrence depend on sustained warming periods with intense solar radiation (or rain on snow) to produce free water in the snowpack. Differences in temperature and net radiation metrics between wet slab and glide slab avalanches emerge as one moves from one day to seven days prior to avalanche occurrence. On average, a more rapid warming precedes wet slab avalanche occurrence. Glide slab and wet slab avalanches require a similar amount of net radiation. Wet slab avalanches do not occur every year, while glide slab avalanches occur annually. These results aim to enhance understanding of the required meteorological conditions for wet slab and glide slab avalanches and aid in improved wet snow avalanche forecasting.

  19. Untangling Slab Dynamics Using 3-D Numerical and Analytical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A. F.; Royden, L.; Becker, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Increasingly sophisticated numerical models have enabled us to make significant strides in identifying the key controls on how subducting slabs deform. For example, 3-D models have demonstrated that subducting plate width, and the related strength of toroidal flow around the plate edge, exerts a strong control on both the curvature and the rate of migration of the trench. However, the results of numerical subduction models can be difficult to interpret, and many first order dynamics issues remain at least partially unresolved. Such issues include the dominant controls on trench migration, the interdependence of asthenospheric pressure and slab dynamics, and how nearby slabs influence each other's dynamics. We augment 3-D, dynamically evolving finite element models with simple, analytical force-balance models to distill the physics associated with subduction into more manageable parts. We demonstrate that for single, isolated subducting slabs much of the complexity of our fully numerical models can be encapsulated by simple analytical expressions. Rates of subduction and slab dip correlate strongly with the asthenospheric pressure difference across the subducting slab. For double subduction, an additional slab gives rise to more complex mantle pressure and flow fields, and significantly extends the range of plate kinematics (e.g., convergence rate, trench migration rate) beyond those present in single slab models. Despite these additional complexities, we show that much of the dynamics of such multi-slab systems can be understood using the physics illuminated by our single slab study, and that a force-balance method can be used to relate intra-plate stress to viscous pressure in the asthenosphere and coupling forces at plate boundaries. This method has promise for rapid modeling of large systems of subduction zones on a global scale.

  20. Slab anisotropy from subduction zone guided waves in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. H.; Tseng, Y. L.; Hu, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Frozen-in anisotropic structure in the oceanic lithosphere and faulting/hydration in the upper layer of the slab are expected to play an important role in anisotropic signature of the subducted slab. Over the past several decades, despite the advances in characterizing anisotropy using shear wave splitting method and its developments, the character of slab anisotropy remains poorly understood. In this study we investigate the slab anisotropy using subduction zone guided waves characterized by long path length in the slab. In the southernmost Ryukyu subduction zone, seismic waves from events deeper than 100 km offshore northern Taiwan reveal wave guide behavior: (1) a low-frequency (< 1 Hz) first arrival recognized on vertical and radial components but not transverse component (2) large, sustained high-frequency (3-10 Hz) signal in P and S wave trains. The depth dependent high-frequency content (3-10Hz) confirms the association with a waveguide effect in the subducting slab rather than localized site amplification effects. Using the selected subduction zone guided wave events, we further analyzed the shear wave splitting for intermediate-depth earthquakes in different frequency bands, to provide the statistically meaningful shear wave splitting parameters. We determine shear wave splitting parameters from the 34 PSP guided events that are deeper than 100 km with ray path traveling along the subducted slab. From shear wave splitting analysis, the slab and crust effects reveal consistent polarization pattern of fast directions of EN-WS and delay time of 0.13 - 0.27 sec. This implies that slab anisotropy is stronger than the crust effect (<0.1 s) but weaker than the mantle wedge and sub-slab mantle effect (0.3-1.3 s) in Taiwan.

  1. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, J.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Davidson, J.C.; Koo, J.C.

    1998-05-05

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system is described. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate. 4 figs.

  2. Theoretical Investigation of Light Transmission in a Slab Cavity via Kerr Nonlinearity of Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dot Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solookinejad, Gh.; Jabbari, M.; Sangachin, E. Ahmadi; Asadpour, S. H.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the transmission properties of weak probe laser field propagate through slab cavity with defect layer of carbon-nanotube quantum dot (CNT-QD) nanostructure. We show that due to spin-orbit coupling, the double electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) windows appear and the giant Kerr nonlinearity of the intracavity medium can lead to manipulating of transmission coefficient of weak probe light. The thickness effect of defect layer medium has also been analyzed on transmission properties of probe laser field. Our proposed model may be useful for integrated photonics devices based on CNT-QD for applications in all-optical systems which require multiple EIT effect.

  3. A dipping, thick Farallon slab below central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Gurnis, M.; Saleeby, J.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that much of the Laramide orogeny was caused by dynamic effects induced by an extensive flat slab during a period of plateau subduction. A particularly thick block containing the Shatsky Rise conjugate, now in the mid-mantle, left a distinctive deformation footprint from southern California to Denver, Colorado. Thus mid-mantle, relic slabs can provide fundamental information about past subduction and the history of plate tectonics if properly imaged. Here we find clear evidence for a northeastward dipping (35° dip), slab-like, but fat (up to 400-500 km thick) seismic anomaly within the top of the lower mantle below the central United States. Using a deep focus earthquake below Spain with direct seismic paths that propagate along the top and bottom of the anomaly, we find that the observed, stacked seismic waveforms recorded with the dense USArray show multi-pathing indicative of sharp top and bottom surfaces. Plate tectonic reconstructions in which the slab is migrated back in time suggest strong coupling of the slab to North America. In combination with the reconstructions, we interpret the structure as arising from eastward dipping Farallon subduction at the western margin of North America during the Cretaceous, in contrast with recent interpretations. The slab could have been fattened through a combination of pure shear thickening during flat-slab subduction and a folding instability during penetration into the lower mantle.

  4. Effect of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed Mohsin, S. M.; Baarimah, A. O.; Jokhio, G. A.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of kenaf fibers in reinforced concrete slab with different thickness is discusses and presented in this paper. Kenaf fiber is a type of natural fiber and is added in the reinforced concrete slab to improve the structure strength and ductility. For this study, three types of mixtures were prepared with fiber volume fraction of 0%, 1% and 2%, respectively. The design compressive strength considered was 20 MPa. Six cubes were prepared to be tested at 7th and 28th day. A total of six reinforced concrete slab with two variances of thickness were also prepared and tested under four-point bending test. The differences in the thickness is to study the potential of kenaf fiber to serve as part of shear reinforcement in reinforced concrete slab that was design to fail in shear. It was observed that, addition of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab improves the flexural strength and ductility of the reinforced concrete slab. In the slab with reduction in thickness, the mode of failure change from brittle to ductile with the inclusion of kenaf fiber.

  5. Constraining Slab Breakoff Induced Magmatism through Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburn, R.; Van Hunen, J.; Maunder, B. L.; Magni, V.; Bouilhol, P.

    2015-12-01

    Post-collisional magmatism is markedly different in nature and composition than pre-collisional magmas. This is widely interpreted to mark a change in the thermal structure of the system due to the loss of the oceanic slab (slab breakoff), allowing a different source to melt. Early modelling studies suggest that when breakoff takes place at depths shallower than the overriding lithosphere, magmatism occurs through both the decompression of upwelling asthenopshere into the slab window and the thermal perturbation of the overriding lithosphere (Davies & von Blanckenburg, 1995; van de Zedde & Wortel, 2001). Interpretations of geochemical data which invoke slab breakoff as a means of generating magmatism mostly assume these shallow depths. However more recent modelling results suggest that slab breakoff is likely to occur deeper (e.g. Andrews & Billen, 2009; Duretz et al., 2011; van Hunen & Allen, 2011). Here we test the extent to which slab breakoff is a viable mechanism for generating melting in post-collisional settings. Using 2-D numerical models we conduct a parametric study, producing models displaying a range of dynamics with breakoff depths ranging from 150 - 300 km. Key models are further analysed to assess the extent of melting. We consider the mantle wedge above the slab to be hydrated, and compute the melt fraction by using a simple parameterised solidus. Our models show that breakoff at shallow depths can generate a short-lived (< 3 Myr) pulse of mantle melting, through the hydration of hotter, undepleted asthenosphere flowing in from behind the detached slab. However, our results do not display the widespread, prolonged style of magmatism, observed in many post-collisional areas, suggesting that this magmatism may be generated via alternative mechanisms. This further implies that using magmatic observations to constrain slab breakoff is not straightforward.

  6. Regional body wave tomography of the Peruvian flat slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. E.; Wagner, L. S.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kumar, A.; Beck, S. L.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    Local travel time data from the PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment (PULSE) were used to create three dimensional tomographic models of Vp and Vs above the flat slab in southern Peru. In the flat slab subduction regions of Peru and central Chile/Argentina, the Nazca plate subducts normally to a depth of ~100 km and then bends and progresses subhorizontally for several hundreds of kilometers before it resumes steep subduction. The Peruvian flat slab segment, located between 3°S and 15°S, corresponds to a gap in the volcanic arc and far-field thick-skinned deformation in the Eastern Cordillera. Despite ongoing research, there is still little consensus on the causes and consequences of flat slab subduction. In western North American, it has been suggested that flat subduction may have been responsible for the formation of the Rocky Mountains and ignimbrite flare-up during the Laramide orogeny. Preliminary tomography results show high shear wave velocities above the slab for a region that coincides with the location of the Nazca ridge, a 200 km wide bathymetric high that is currently subducting at ~15°S. Meanwhile, P wave velocities appear to be relatively normal. North of the ridge location, shear wave velocities can be separated into sublinear high (near the coast) and low (inland) velocity zones oriented approximately parallel to the trench. This geometry corresponds well with the organization of geotectonic and morphological terrains in Peru. High shear wave velocities above the slab are consistent with results from the 2000-2002 CHARGE deployment in central Chile/Argentina. This could indicate the presence of silica enriched, dry continental lithosphere, or it may be due to the presence of an anisotropic layer of hydrous phases directly above the slab. Future comparisons with results from Rayleigh wave tomography aim to address the role of anisotropy in observed shear wave velocities above flat slabs.

  7. Interaction of an ion bunch with a plasma slab

    SciT

    Krasovitskiy, V. B., E-mail: krasovit@mail.ru; Turikov, V. A.

    2016-11-15

    Charge neutralization of a short ion bunch passing through a plasma slab is studied by means of numerical simulation. It is shown that a fraction of plasma electrons are trapped by the bunch under the action of the collective charge separation field. The accelerated electrons generated in this process excite beam−plasma instability, thereby violating the trapping conditions. The process of electron trapping is also strongly affected by the high-frequency electric field caused by plasma oscillations at the slab boundaries. It is examined how the degree of charge neutralization depends on the parameters of the bunch and plasma slab.

  8. Dynamic Eigenvalue Problem of Concrete Slab Road Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Urszula; Szczecina, Michał

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the dynamic eigenvalue problem of concrete slab road surface. A sample concrete slab was modelled using Autodesk Robot Structural Analysis software and calculated with Finite Element Method. The slab was set on a one-parameter elastic subsoil, for which the modulus of elasticity was separately calculated. The eigen frequencies and eigenvectors (as maximal vertical nodal displacements) were presented. On the basis of the results of calculations, some basic recommendations for designers of concrete road surfaces were offered.

  9. Light-assisted templated self assembly using photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Camilo A; Dutt, Avik; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2011-06-06

    We explore a technique which we term light-assisted templated self-assembly. We calculate the optical forces on colloidal particles over a photonic crystal slab. We show that exciting a guided resonance mode of the slab yields a resonantly-enhanced, attractive optical force. We calculate the lateral optical forces above the slab and predict that stably trapped periodic patterns of particles are dependent on wavelength and polarization. Tuning the wavelength or polarization of the light source may thus allow the formation and reconfiguration of patterns. We expect that this technique may be used to design all-optically reconfigurable photonic devices.

  10. Effect of nonlinearity saturation on hot-image formation in cascaded saturable nonlinear medium slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youwen; Dai, Zhiping; Ling, Xiaohui; Chen, Liezun; Lu, Shizhuan; You, Kaiming

    2016-11-01

    In high-power laser system such as Petawatt lasers, the laser beam can be intense enough to result in saturation of nonlinear refraction index of medium. Based on the standard linearization method of small-scale self-focusing and the split-step Fourier numerical calculation method, we present analytical and simulative investigations on the hot-image formation in cascaded saturable nonlinear medium slabs, to disclose the effect of nonlinearity saturation on the distribution and intensity of hot images. The analytical and simulative results are found in good agreement. It is shown that, saturable nonlinearity does not change the distribution of hot images, while may greatly affect the intensity of hot images, i.e., for a given saturation light intensity, with the intensity of the incident laser beam, the intensity of hot images firstly increases monotonously and eventually reaches a saturation; for the incident laser beam of a given intensity, with the saturation light intensity lowering, the intensity of hot images decreases rapidly, even resulting in a few hot images too weak to be visible.

  11. Numerical modeling of Farallon Plate flat-slab subduction: Influence of lithosphere structure and rheology on slab dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Currie, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    The subducted Farallon plate is believed to have evolved to a flat geometry underneath North America plate during Late Cretaceous, triggering Laramide deformation within the continental interior. However, the mechanism that caused the oceanic slab to flatten and the factors that control the flat-slab depth remain uncertain. In this work, we use 2D thermal-mechanical models using the SOPALE code to study the subduction dynamics from 90 Ma to 50 Ma. During this period, an oceanic plateau (Shatsky Conjugate) is inferred to have subducted beneath western North America and interacted with the continental lithosphere, including areas of thicker lithosphere such as the Colorado Plateau and Wyoming Craton. Based on seismic tomography and plate reconstruction data sets, we built a set of models to examine the influence of the structure and rheology of the oceanic and continental plates on slab dynamics. Models include a 600 km wide oceanic plateau consisting of 18 km thick crust and a 36 km thick underlying harzburgite layer, and we ran a series of model experiments to test different continental thicknesses (80 km, 120 km, & 180 km) and continental mantle lithosphere strengths (approximating conditions from wet olivine to dry olivine). Consistent with earlier studies, we find that creation of a long flat slab requires a buoyant oceanic plateau (i.e., non-eclogitized crust) and trenchward motion of the continent. In addition, our models demonstrate the upper plate has an important control on slab dynamics. A flat slab requires either a thin continent or, if the continent is thick, its mantle lithosphere must be relatively weak so that it can be displaced by the flattening slab. The depth of the flat slab is mainly controlled by two factors: (1) the continental thickness and (2) the strength of the continental mantle lithosphere. For the same initial lithosphere thickness (120 km), a shallower flat slab ( 90 km depth) occurs for the weakest mantle lithosphere ( wet olivine

  12. Rotational flow in tapered slab rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Tony; Sams, Oliver C.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    Internal flow modeling is a requisite for obtaining critical parameters in the design and fabrication of modern solid rocket motors. In this work, the analytical formulation of internal flows particular to motors with tapered sidewalls is pursued. The analysis employs the vorticity-streamfunction approach to treat this problem assuming steady, incompressible, inviscid, and nonreactive flow conditions. The resulting solution is rotational following the analyses presented by Culick for a cylindrical motor. In an extension to Culick's work, Clayton has recently managed to incorporate the effect of tapered walls. Here, an approach similar to that of Clayton is applied to a slab motor in which the chamber is modeled as a rectangular channel with tapered sidewalls. The solutions are shown to be reducible, at leading order, to Taylor's inviscid profile in a porous channel. The analysis also captures the generation of vorticity at the surface of the propellant and its transport along the streamlines. It is from the axial pressure gradient that the proper form of the vorticity is ascertained. Regular perturbations are then used to solve the vorticity equation that prescribes the mean flow motion. Subsequently, numerical simulations via a finite volume solver are carried out to gain further confidence in the analytical approximations. In illustrating the effects of the taper on flow conditions, comparisons of total pressure and velocity profiles in tapered and nontapered chambers are entertained. Finally, a comparison with the axisymmetric flow analog is presented.

  13. Photonic slab heterostructures based on opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Lidon, Elisa; Galisteo-Lopez, Juan F.; Juarez, Beatriz H.; Lopez, Cefe

    2004-09-01

    In this paper the fabrication of photonic slab heterostructures based on artificial opals is presented. The innovated method combines high-quality thin-films growing of opals and silica infiltration by Chemical Vapor Deposition through a multi-step process. By varying structure parameters, such as lattice constant, sample thickness or refractive index, different heterostructures have been obtained. The optical study of these systems, carried out by reflectance and transmittance measurements, shows that the prepared samples are of high quality further confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy micrographs. The proposed novel method for sample preparation allows a high control of the involved structure parameters, giving the possibility of tunning their photonic behavior. Special attention in the optical response of these materials has been addressed to the study of planar defects embedded in opals, due to their importance in different photonic fields and future technological applications. Reflectance and transmission measurements show a sharp resonance due to localized states associated with the presence of planar defects. A detailed study of the defect mode position and its dependance on defect thickness and on the surrounding photonic crystal is presented as well as evidence showing the scalability of the problem. Finally, it is also concluded that the proposed method is cheap and versatile allowing the preparation of opal-based complex structures.

  14. The rideability of a deflected bridge approach slab.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the findings associated with the development of a new pavement roughness index called the Posted Speed Localized Roughness Index (LRIPS) that can be used to rate the ride quality on bridge approach slabs. Currently established pa...

  15. Field demonstration of new bridge approach slab designs and performance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    The Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) has initiated a major effort to minimize the bridge end bump problem associated : with differential settlement. As a result, a new design for the approach slab was proposed, which requ...

  16. 5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR LOOKING NORTH. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH 7 INCH DIAMETER HOLE FOR SUPPORT CARRIAGE LOCKING PIN. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT FAR CENTER RIGHT. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE SOUTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE SOUTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  20. 13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHWESTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHWESTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  1. 12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEASTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEASTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. 2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  4. 12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  5. 9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. 7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 9. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 8. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, ACCESS RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, ACCESS RAMP IN FOREGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. 13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Improved load rating of reinforced concrete slab bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-09-01

    In New Mexico, many reinforced concrete slab (RCS) bridges provide service on interstates I-10, I-25, and I-40. An accurate strength evaluation of interstate bridges is essential to avoid unnecessary load restrictions. The AASHTO load rating factor f...

  12. Recommendations for design, construction, and maintenance of bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-09-01

    Settlement and heave related movements of bridge approach slabs relative to bridge decks create a bump in : the roadway. Several problems arise from these bumps, which include poor riding conditions, potential : vehicle damage, loss of vehicle contro...

  13. Integral bridge abutment-to-approach slab connection.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-06-01

    The Iowa Department of Transportation has long recognized that approach slab pavements of integral abutment bridges are prone to settlement and cracking, which manifests as the "bump at the end of the bridge". A commonly recommended solution is to in...

  14. Use of fiber reinforced concrete in bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-12-01

    Bridge approach slabs are deteriorating at a much faster rate than expected resulting in a massive need for repairs and premature replacement : costing millions of dollars annually. Both environmental and traffic loading causes the concrete to worsen...

  15. 34. VAL, DETAIL OF STAIRS ON COUNTERWEIGHT SLAB WITH COUNTERWEIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VAL, DETAIL OF STAIRS ON COUNTERWEIGHT SLAB WITH COUNTERWEIGHT CAR RAILS ON RIGHT AND PERSONNEL CAR RAILS ON LEFT. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 23. Surrender interview site, showing Pemberton Avenue concrete slab road ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Surrender interview site, showing Pemberton Avenue concrete slab road type with gutter (asphalt construction typical on Union and Confederate Avenues), view to the sw. - Vicksburg National Military Park Roads & Bridges, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  17. In-house fabrication of precast concrete bridge slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1976-01-01

    Information is reported on the labor, equipment, material, and cost required for seven bridge maintenance situations in which state forces widened or replaced an existing short span structure. Precast concrete slabs were installed at three of the loc...

  18. The rideability of a deflected bridge approach slab.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the findings associated with the development of a new pavement roughness index : called the Posted Speed Localized Roughness Index (LRIPS) that can be used to rate the ride quality on : bridge approach slabs. Currently establishe...

  19. Asymptotic behavior of exact exchange potential of slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E.

    2014-06-01

    In this contribution the exact exchange potential vx of density functional theory is examined for slabs such as graphene, for which one has a Bravais lattice in the x-y directions, while the electrons are confined to the finite region -L≤z≤L in the z direction. It is demonstrated analytically that the exact vx behaves as -e2/z for z ≫L. This result extends the corresponding statement of Horowitz, Proetto, and Rigamonti [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 026802 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.026802] for jellium slabs to slabs with arbitrary periodic density distributions. Application of the exact exchange to a Si(111) slab (within the Krieger-Li-Iafrate approximation) indicates that the corrugation of the exact vx is more pronounced than that of the local density approximation for vx.

  20. Benchmark study for total enery electrons in thick slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, I.

    2002-01-01

    The total energy deposition profiles when highenergy electrons impinge on a thick slab of elemental aluminum, copper, and tungsten have been computed using representative Monte Carlo codes (NOVICE, TIGER, MCNP), and compared in this paper.

  1. Use of precast slabs for pavement rehabilitation on I-66.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-06-01

    Highway agencies continuously strive to expedite pavement construction and repairs and to evaluate materials and : methods to provide long-lasting pavements. As part of this effort, agencies have used precast concrete slabs for more than 10 : years w...

  2. 9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE NEAR GIANT SLIDE TRAIL MARKER ON AROUND-THE-MOUNTAIN LOOP. - Rockefeller Carriage Roads, Mount Desert Island, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  3. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEASTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEASTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS AT LEFT AND RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  4. Slab2 - Updated Subduction Zone Geometries and Modeling Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G.; Hayes, G. P.; Portner, D. E.; Furtney, M.; Flamme, H. E.; Hearne, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey database of global subduction zone geometries (Slab1.0), is a highly utilized dataset that has been applied to a wide range of geophysical problems. In 2017, these models have been improved and expanded upon as part of the Slab2 modeling effort. With a new data driven approach that can be applied to a broader range of tectonic settings and geophysical data sets, we have generated a model set that will serve as a more comprehensive, reliable, and reproducible resource for three-dimensional slab geometries at all of the world's convergent margins. The newly developed framework of Slab2 is guided by: (1) a large integrated dataset, consisting of a variety of geophysical sources (e.g., earthquake hypocenters, moment tensors, active-source seismic survey images of the shallow slab, tomography models, receiver functions, bathymetry, trench ages, and sediment thickness information); (2) a dynamic filtering scheme aimed at constraining incorporated seismicity to only slab related events; (3) a 3-D data interpolation approach which captures both high resolution shallow geometries and instances of slab rollback and overlap at depth; and (4) an algorithm which incorporates uncertainties of contributing datasets to identify the most probable surface depth over the extent of each subduction zone. Further layers will also be added to the base geometry dataset, such as historic moment release, earthquake tectonic providence, and interface coupling. Along with access to several queryable data formats, all components have been wrapped into an open source library in Python, such that suites of updated models can be released as further data becomes available. This presentation will discuss the extent of Slab2 development, as well as the current availability of the model and modeling tools.

  5. Numerical models of the magmatic processes induced by slab breakoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburn, Rebecca; Bouilhol, Pierre; Maunder, Ben; Magni, Valentina; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2017-11-01

    After the onset of continental collision, magmatism often persists for tens of millions of years, albeit with a different composition, in reduced volumes, and with a more episodic nature and more widespread spatial distribution, compared to normal arc magmatism. Kinematic modelling studies have suggested that slab breakoff can account for this post-collisional magmatism through the formation of a slab window and subsequent heating of the overriding plate and decompression melting of upwelling asthenosphere, particularly if breakoff occurs at depths shallower than the overriding plate. To constrain the nature of any melting and the geodynamic conditions required, we numerically model the collision of two continental plates following a period of oceanic subduction. A thermodynamic database is used to determine the (de)hydration reactions and occurrence of melt throughout this process. We investigate melting conditions within a parameter space designed to generate a wide range of breakoff depths, timings and collisional styles. Under most circumstances, slab breakoff occurs deeper than the depth extent of the overriding plate; too deep to generate any decompressional melting of dry upwelling asthenosphere or thermal perturbation within the overriding plate. Even if slab breakoff is very shallow, the hot mantle inflow into the slab window is not sustained long enough to sufficiently heat the hydrated overriding plate to cause significant magmatism. Instead, for relatively fast, shallow breakoff we observe melting of asthenosphere above the detached slab through the release of water from the tip of the heating detached slab. Melting of the subducted continental crust during necking and breakoff is a more common feature and may be a more reliable indicator of the occurrence of breakoff. We suggest that magmatism from slab breakoff alone is unable to explain several of the characteristics of post-collisional magmatism, and that additional geodynamical processes need to be

  6. Grating enhanced solid-state laser amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Erlandson, Alvin C.; Britten, Jerald A.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. Such an invention, as disclosed herein, uses diffraction gratings to increase gain, stored energy density, and pumping efficiency of solid-state laser gain media, such as, but not limited to rods, disks and slabs. By coupling predetermined gratings to solid-state gain media, such as crystal or ceramic laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  7. Seismic anisotropy and mantle flow below subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpole, Jack; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael; Masters, T.-Guy

    2017-05-01

    Subduction is integral to mantle convection and plate tectonics, yet the role of the subslab mantle in this process is poorly understood. Some propose that decoupling from the slab permits widespread trench parallel flow in the subslab mantle, although the geodynamical feasibility of this has been questioned. Here, we use the source-side shear wave splitting technique to probe anisotropy beneath subducting slabs, enabling us to test petrofabric models and constrain the geometry of mantle fow. Our global dataset contains 6369 high quality measurements - spanning ∼ 40 , 000 km of subduction zone trenches - over the complete range of available source depths (4 to 687 km) - and a large range of angles in the slab reference frame. We find that anisotropy in the subslab mantle is well characterised by tilted transverse isotropy with a slow-symmetry-axis pointing normal to the plane of the slab. This appears incompatible with purely trench-parallel flow models. On the other hand it is compatible with the idea that the asthenosphere is tilted and entrained during subduction. Trench parallel measurements are most commonly associated with shallow events (source depth < 50 km) - suggesting a separate region of anisotropy in the lithospheric slab. This may correspond to the shape preferred orientation of cracks, fractures, and faults opened by slab bending. Meanwhile the deepest events probe the upper lower mantle where splitting is found to be consistent with deformed bridgmanite.

  8. On the consistency of tomographically imaged lower mantle slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Grace E.; Matthews, Kara J.; Hosseini, Kasra; Domeier, Mathew

    2017-04-01

    Over the last few decades numerous seismic tomography models have been published, each constructed with choices of data input, parameterization and reference model. The broader geoscience community is increasingly utilizing these models, or a selection thereof, to interpret Earth's mantle structure and processes. It follows that seismically identified remnants of subducted slabs have been used to validate, test or refine relative plate motions, absolute plate reference frames, and mantle sinking rates. With an increasing number of models to include, or exclude, the question arises - how robust is a given positive seismic anomaly, inferred to be a slab, across a given suite of tomography models? Here we generate a series of "vote maps" for the lower mantle by comparing 14 seismic tomography models, including 7 s-wave and 7 p-wave. Considerations include the retention or removal of the mean, the use of a consistent or variable reference model, the statistical value which defines the slab "contour", and the effect of depth interpolation. Preliminary results will be presented that address the depth, location and degree of agreement between seismic tomography models, both for the 14 combined, and between the p-waves and s-waves. The analysis also permits a broader discussion of slab volumes and subduction flux. And whilst the location and geometry of slabs, matches some the documented regions of long-lived subduction, other features do not, illustrating the importance of a robust approach to slab identification.

  9. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.F.; Comaskey, B.; Sutton, S.B.

    1994-04-19

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends. 11 figures.

  10. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Comaskey, Brian; Sutton, Steven B.

    1994-01-01

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends.

  11. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    PubMed Central

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin–Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system—spectrally dependent losses—achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin–Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering. PMID:27503708

  12. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-09

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  13. Tomographic imaging of the effects of Peruvian flat slab subduction on the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle under central and southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scire, A. C.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Bishop, B.; Biryol, C. B.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The modern central Peruvian Andes are dominated by a laterally extensive region of flat slab subduction. The Peruvian flat slab extends for ~1500 km along the strike of the Andes, correlating with the subduction of the Nazca Ridge in the south and the theorized Inca Plateau in the north. We have used data from the CAUGHT and PULSE experiments for finite frequency teleseismic P- and S-wave tomography to image the Nazca slab in the upper mantle below 95 km depth under central Peru between 10°S and 18°S as well as the surrounding mantle. Since the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge is mostly aseismic, our results provide important constraints on the geometry of the subducting Nazca slab in this region. Our images of the Nazca slab suggest that steepening of the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge locally occurs ~100 km further inland than was indicated in previous studies. The region where we have imaged the steepening of the Nazca slab inboard of the Nazca Ridge correlates with the location of the Fitzcarrald Arch, a long wavelength upper plate topographic feature which has been suggested to be a consequence of ridge subduction. When the slab steepens inboard of the flat slab region, it does so at a very steep (~70°) angle. The transition from the Peruvian flat slab to the more normally dipping slab south of 16°S below Bolivia is characterized by an abrupt bending of the slab anomaly in the mantle in response to the shift from flat to normal subduction. The slab anomaly appears to be intact south of the Nazca Ridge with no evidence for tearing of the slab in response to the abrupt change in slab dip. A potential tear in the slab is inferred from an observed offset in the slab anomaly north of the Nazca Ridge extending subparallel to the ridge axis between 130 and 300 km depth. A high amplitude (-5-6%) slow S-wave velocity anomaly is observed below the projection of the Nazca Ridge. This anomaly appears to be laterally confined to the mantle

  14. Sub-wavelength grating mode transformers in silicon slab waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bock, Przemek J; Cheben, Pavel; Schmid, Jens H; Delâge, André; Xu, Dan-Xia; Janz, Siegfried; Hall, Trevor J

    2009-10-12

    We report on several new types of sub-wavelength grating (SWG) gradient index structures for efficient mode coupling in high index contrast slab waveguides. Using a SWG, an adiabatic transition is achieved at the interface between silicon-on-insulator waveguides of different geometries. The SWG transition region minimizes both fundamental mode mismatch loss and coupling to higher order modes. By creating the gradient effective index region in the direction of propagation, we demonstrate that efficient vertical mode transformation can be achieved between slab waveguides of different core thickness. The structures which we propose can be fabricated by a single etch step. Using 3D finite-difference time-domain simulations we study the loss, polarization dependence and the higher order mode excitation for two types (triangular and triangular-transverse) of SWG transition regions between silicon-on-insulator slab waveguides of different core thicknesses. We demonstrate two solutions to reduce the polarization dependent loss of these structures. Finally, we propose an implementation of SWG structures to reduce loss and higher order mode excitation between a slab waveguide and a phase array of an array waveguide grating (AWG). Compared to a conventional AWG, the loss is reduced from -1.4 dB to < -0.2 dB at the slab-array interface.

  15. Analysis and design of composite slab by varying different parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambe, Kedar; Siddh, Sharda

    2018-03-01

    Composite deck slabs are in demand because of its faster, lighter and economical construction work. Composite slab consists of cold formed deck profiled sheet and concrete either lightweight or normal. Investigation of shear behaviour of the composite slab is very complex. Shear bond strength depends on the various parameter such as a shape of sheeting, a thickness of the sheet, type of embossment and its frequency of use, shear stiffener or intermediate stiffener, type of load, an arrangement of load, length of shear span, the thickness of concrete and support friction etc. In present study finite element analysis is carried out with ABAQUS 6.13, a simply supported composite slab is considered for the investigation of the shear bond behaviour of the composite slab by considering variation in three different parameters, the shape of a sheet, thickness of sheet and shear span. Different shear spans of two different shape of cold formed deck profiled sheet i.e. with intermediate stiffeners and without intermediate stiffeners are considered with two different thicknesses (0.8 mm and 1.2 mm) for simulation. In present work, simulation of models has done for static loading with 20 mm mesh size is considered.

  16. Systematic variation in the depths of slabs beneath arc volcanoes

    England, P.; Engdahl, R.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    The depths to the tops of the zones of intermediate-depth seismicity beneath arc volcanoes are determined using the hypocentral locations of Engdahl et al. These depths are constant, to within a few kilometres, within individual arc segments, but differ by tens of kilometres from one arc segment to another. The range in depths is from 65 km to 130 km, inconsistent with the common belief that the volcanoes directly overlie the places where the slabs reach a critical depth that is roughly constant for all arcs. The depth to the top of the intermediate-depth seismicity beneath volcanoes correlates neither with age of the descending ocean floor nor with the thermal parameter of the slab. This depth does, however, exhibit an inverse correlation with the descent speed of the subducting plate, which is the controlling factor both for the thermal structure of the wedge of mantle above the slab and for the temperature at the top of the slab. We interpret this result as indicating that the location of arc volcanoes is controlled by a process that depends critically upon the temperature at the top of the slab, or in the wedge of mantle, immediately below the volcanic arc.

  17. Fossil slabs attached to unsubducted fragments of the Farallon plate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Forsyth, Donald W; Rau, Christina J; Carriero, Nina; Schmandt, Brandon; Gaherty, James B; Savage, Brian

    2013-04-02

    As the Pacific-Farallon spreading center approached North America, the Farallon plate fragmented into a number of small plates. Some of the microplate fragments ceased subducting before the spreading center reached the trench. Most tectonic models have assumed that the subducting oceanic slab detached from these microplates close to the trench, but recent seismic tomography studies have revealed a high-velocity anomaly beneath Baja California that appears to be a fossil slab still attached to the Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates. Here, using surface wave tomography, we establish the lateral extent of this fossil slab and show that it is correlated with the distribution of high-Mg andesites thought to derive from partial melting of the subducted oceanic crust. We also reinterpret the high seismic velocity anomaly beneath the southern central valley of California as another fossil slab extending to a depth of 200 km or more that is attached to the former Monterey microplate. The existence of these fossil slabs may force a reexamination of models of the tectonic evolution of western North America over the last 30 My.

  18. Slab interactions in 3-D subduction settings: The Philippine Sea Plate region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Adam F.; Royden, Leigh H.; Becker, Thorsten W.; Faccenna, Claudio

    2018-05-01

    The importance of slab-slab interactions is manifested in the kinematics and geometry of the Philippine Sea Plate and western Pacific subduction zones, and such interactions offer a dynamic basis for the first-order observations in this complex subduction setting. The westward subduction of the Pacific Sea Plate changes, along-strike, from single slab subduction beneath Japan, to a double-subduction setting where Pacific subduction beneath the Philippine Sea Plate occurs in tandem with westward subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate beneath Eurasia. Our 3-D numerical models show that there are fundamental differences between single slab systems and double slab systems where both subduction systems have the same vergence. We find that the observed kinematics and slab geometry of the Pacific-Philippine subduction can be understood by considering an along-strike transition from single to double subduction, and is largely independent from the detailed geometry of the Philippine Sea Plate. Important first order features include the relatively shallow slab dip, retreating/stationary trenches, and rapid subduction for single slab systems (Pacific Plate subducting under Japan), and front slabs within a double slab system (Philippine Sea Plate subducting at Ryukyu). In contrast, steep to overturned slab dips, advancing trench motion, and slower subduction occurs for rear slabs in a double slab setting (Pacific subducting at the Izu-Bonin-Mariana). This happens because of a relative build-up of pressure in the asthenosphere beneath the Philippine Sea Plate, where the asthenosphere is constrained between the converging Ryukyu and Izu-Bonin-Mariana slabs. When weak back-arc regions are included, slab-slab convergence rates slow and the middle (Philippine) plate extends, which leads to reduced pressure build up and reduced slab-slab coupling. Models without back-arcs, or with back-arc viscosities that are reduced by a factor of five, produce kinematics compatible with present

  19. Improved Nazca slab structure from teleseismic P-wave tomography along the Andean margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, D. E.; Beck, S. L.; Scire, A. C.; Zandt, G.

    2017-12-01

    South America marks the longest continuous ocean-continent subduction zone. As such, there is significant along-strike variability in the subducting Nazca slab structure and the tectonics of the South American margin. Most notably two gaps in the otherwise continuous volcanic arc are correlated with regions of flat slab subduction, indicating that the structure of the Nazca slab plays a controlling role in South American tectonics. Traditionally in subduction zones, our knowledge of slab structure is defined by Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes. While this method allows for the determination of large-scale variations in Nazca slab structure such as regions of flat slab subduction, a scarcity of intermediate-depth earthquakes hinders our ability to observe the smaller-scale structural variations in the slab that may be critical to our understanding of the geologic record. We use an updated, larger dataset for finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomography including relative arrival times from >700 seismic stations along the Andean margin to image the detailed Nazca slab structure throughout the upper mantle and uppermost lower mantle between latitudes 5°S and 45°S. Our results show prominent variations in slab character along the margin. Slab dip varies significantly, from sub-vertical inboard of the Peruvian flat slab segment to 30° dip south of the Pampean flat slab, while the slab's velocity anomaly amplitude changes dramatically near the Pampean flat slab region. High slab velocities north of the Pampean region relative to the south indicate variable slab thermal structures that correspond roughly with the locations of deep (>500 km depth) earthquakes that also occur exclusively north of the Pampean region. Additionally, a wider regional footprint increases our sampling of the upper-lower mantle boundary, improving constraints on the slab's interaction with the 660 km discontinuity along strike. We see that the Nazca slab appears to penetrate into the lower

  20. Cleanliness for the NIF 1ω Laser Amplifiers

    SciT

    Spaeth, M. L.; Manes, K. R.; Honig, J.

    During the years before the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system, a set of generally accepted cleaning procedures had been developed for the large 1ω amplifiers of an inertial confinement fusion laser, and up until 1999 similar procedures were planned for NIF. Several parallel sets of test results were obtained from 1992 to 1999 for large amplifiers using these accepted cleaning procedures in the Beamlet physics test bed and in the Amplifier Module Prototype Laboratory (AMPLAB), a four-slab-high prototype large amplifier structure. Both of these showed damage to their slab surfaces that, if projected to operating conditions for NIF, wouldmore » lead to higher than acceptable slab-refurbishment rates. Finally, this study tracks the search for the smoking gun origin of this damage and describes the solution employed in NIF for avoiding flashlamp-induced aerosol damage to its 1ω amplifier slabs.« less

  1. Cleanliness for the NIF 1ω Laser Amplifiers

    DOE PAGES

    Spaeth, M. L.; Manes, K. R.; Honig, J.

    2017-03-23

    During the years before the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system, a set of generally accepted cleaning procedures had been developed for the large 1ω amplifiers of an inertial confinement fusion laser, and up until 1999 similar procedures were planned for NIF. Several parallel sets of test results were obtained from 1992 to 1999 for large amplifiers using these accepted cleaning procedures in the Beamlet physics test bed and in the Amplifier Module Prototype Laboratory (AMPLAB), a four-slab-high prototype large amplifier structure. Both of these showed damage to their slab surfaces that, if projected to operating conditions for NIF, wouldmore » lead to higher than acceptable slab-refurbishment rates. Finally, this study tracks the search for the smoking gun origin of this damage and describes the solution employed in NIF for avoiding flashlamp-induced aerosol damage to its 1ω amplifier slabs.« less

  2. Exceptional points of resonant states on a periodic slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrabou, Amgad; Lu, Ya Yan

    2018-06-01

    A special kind of degeneracy, known as exceptional points (EPs), for resonant states on a dielectric periodic slab are investigated. Due to their unique properties, EPs have found important applications in lasing, sensing, unidirectional operations, etc. In general, EPs may appear in non-Hermitian eigenvalue problems, including those related to -parity-time-symmetric systems and those for open dielectric structures (due to the existence of radiation loss). In this paper, we study EPs on a simple periodic structure: a slab with a periodic array of gaps. By using an efficient numerical method, we calculate the EPs and study their dependence on geometric parameters. Analytic results are obtained for the limit as the periodic slab approaches a uniform one. Our work provides a simple platform for further studies concerning EPs on dielectric periodic structures, their unusual properties, and applications.

  3. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage

    PubMed Central

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-01-01

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound. PMID:25605890

  4. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-02-03

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound.

  5. Dynamic triggering of deep earthquakes within a fossil slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chen; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2016-09-01

    The 9 November 2009 Mw 7.3 Fiji deep earthquake is the largest event in a region west of the Tonga slab defined by scattered seismicity and velocity anomalies. The main shock rupture was compact, but the aftershocks were distributed along a linear feature at distances of up to 126 km. The aftershocks and some background seismicity define a sharp northern boundary to the zone of outboard earthquakes, extending westward toward the Vitiaz deep earthquake cluster. The northern earthquake lineament is geometrically similar to tectonic reconstructions of the relict Vitiaz subduction zone at 8-10 Ma, suggesting the earthquakes are occurring in the final portion of the slab subducted at the now inactive Vitiaz trench. A Coulomb stress change calculation suggests many of the aftershocks were dynamically triggered. We propose that fossil slabs contain material that is too warm for earthquake nucleation but may be near the critical stress susceptible to dynamic triggering.

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in accelerated elastic-solid slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piriz, S. A.; Piriz, A. R.; Tahir, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    We develop the linear theory for the asymptotic growth of the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an accelerated solid slab of density ρ2, shear modulus G , and thickness h , placed over a semi-infinite ideal fluid of density ρ1<ρ2 . It extends previous results for Atwood number AT=1 [B. J. Plohr and D. H. Sharp, Z. Angew. Math. Phys. 49, 786 (1998), 10.1007/s000330050121] to arbitrary values of AT and unveil the singular feature of an instability threshold below which the slab is stable for any perturbation wavelength. As a consequence, an accelerated elastic-solid slab is stable if ρ2g h /G ≤2 (1 -AT) /AT .

  7. Cost Effectiveness of Precast Reinforced Concrete Roof Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parskiy, N. D.; Molodtsov, M. V.; Molodtsova, V. E.

    2017-11-01

    Engineers always seek to free interior space from intermediate supporting elements. Nowadays plants, being at the forefront of technology, produce a new generation of exclusive patented prefabricated reinforced concrete elements with a high load-bearing capacity, excellent heat resistance characteristics combined with the aesthetics and beauty. It is a system of Seagull Gabbiano prestressed roof slabs for the spans of 12m - 40m. The article shows the advantages of the Seagull slabs over conventional precast reinforced concrete and metal roof trusses. It also gives the analysis of the technical and economic indices of design and construction of a building with the Seagull slabs depending on the size of spans to cover. The use of structural systems with increased spans allows for the modern buildings and structures of prefabricated reinforced concrete with enhanced functionality and aesthetics alongside with a wide range of planning solutions.

  8. Using the level set method in slab detachment modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, B.; Geenen, T.; Spakman, W.; van den Berg, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    Slab detachment plays an important role in the dynamics of several regions in the world such as the Mediterranean-Carpathian region and the Anatolia-Aegean Region. It is therefore important to gain better insights in the various aspects of this process by further modeling of this phenomenon. In this study we model slab detachment using a visco-plastic composite rheology consisting of diffusion, dislocation and Peierls creep. In order to gain more control over this visco-plastic composite rheology, as well as some deterministic advantages, the models presented in this study make use of the level set method (Osher and Sethian J. Comp. Phys., 1988). The level set method is a computational method to track interfaces. It works by creating a signed distance function which is zero at the interface of interest which is then advected by the flow field. This does not only allow one to track the interface but also to determine on which side of the interface a certain point is located since the level set function is determined in the entire domain and not just on the interface. The level set method is used in a wide variety of scientific fields including geophysics. In this study we use the level set method to keep track of the interface between the slab and the mantle. This allows us to determine more precisely the moment and depth of slab detachment. It also allows us to clearly distinguish the mantle from the slab and have therefore more control over their different rheologies. We focus on the role of Peierls creep in the slab detachment process and on the use of the level set method in modeling this process.

  9. Why and Where do Large Shallow Slab Earthquakes Occur?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2001-12-01

    Within a shallow portion (20-60 km depth) of subducting slabs, it has been believed that large earthquakes seldom occur because the differential stress is generally expected to be low between bending at the trench-outer rise and unbending at the intermediate-depth. However, there are several regions in which large ( M>=7.0 ) earthquakes, including three events early in this year, have occurred in this portion. Searching such events from published individual studies and Harvard University centroid moment tensor catalogue, we find nineteen events in eastern Hokkaido, Kyushu-SW Japan, Mariana, Manila, Sumatra, Vanuatu, Chile, Peru, El Salvador, Mexico, and Cascadia. Slab stresses revealed from the mechanism solutions of those large events and smaller events are tensional in a slab dip direction. However, ages of the subducting oceanic plates are generally young, which denies a possibility that the slab pull works as a cause. Except for Manila and Sumatra, the stresses in the overriding plates are characterized by the change in {σ }Hmax direction from arc-parallel in the back-arc to arc-perpendicular in the fore-arc, which implies that a horizontal stress gradient exists in the across-arc direction. Peru and Chile, where the back-arc is compressional, can be categorized into this type, because a horizontal stress gradient exists over the continent from tension in east to compression in the west. In these regions, it is expected that mantle drag forces are operating beneath the upper plates, which drive the upper plates to the trenchward overriding the subducting oceanic plates. Assuming that the mantle drag forces beneath the upper plates originate from the mantle convection currents or upwelling plumes, we infer that the upper plates driven by the convection suck the oceanic plates, making the shallow portion of the slabs in extra-tension, thus resulting in the large shallow slab earthquakes in this tectonic regime.

  10. Detectivity enhancement in quantum well infrared photodetectors utilizing a photonic crystal slab resonator.

    PubMed

    Kalchmair, S; Gansch, R; Ahn, S I; Andrews, A M; Detz, H; Zederbauer, T; Mujagić, E; Reininger, P; Lasser, G; Schrenk, W; Strasser, G

    2012-02-27

    We characterize the performance of a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), which is fabricated as a photonic crystal slab (PCS) resonator. The strongest resonance of the PCS is designed to coincide with the absorption peak frequency at 7.6 µm of the QWIP. To accurately characterize the detector performance, it is illuminated by using single mode mid-infrared lasers. The strong resonant absorption enhancement yields a detectivity increase of up to 20 times. This enhancement is a combined effect of increased responsivity and noise current reduction. With increasing temperature, we observe a red shift of the PCS-QWIP resonance peak of -0.055 cm(-1)/K. We attribute this effect to a refractive index change and present a model based on the revised plane wave method.

  11. Geometrical optics of dense aerosols: forming dense plasma slabs.

    PubMed

    Hay, Michael J; Valeo, Ernest J; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2013-11-01

    Assembling a freestanding, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rarefied than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed field, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the finite particle density reduces the effective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing.

  12. Resonance-enhanced optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Victor; Povinelli, Michelle; Fan, Shanhui

    2009-11-23

    The behaviors of lateral and normal optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs are analyzed. We show that the optical force is periodic with displacement, resulting in stable and unstable equilibrium positions. Moreover, the forces are strongly enhanced by guided resonances of the coupled slabs. Such enhancement is particularly prominent near dark states of the system, and the enhancement effect is strongly dependent on the types of guided resonances involved. These structures lead to enhancement of light-induced pressure over larger areas, in a configuration that is directly accessible to externally incident, free-space optical beams.

  13. Expansion of a cold non-neutral plasma slab

    SciT

    Karimov, A. R.; Department of Electrophysical Facilities, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoye shosse 31, Moscow 115409; Yu, M. Y., E-mail: myyu@zju.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    Expansion of the ion and electron fronts of a cold non-neutral plasma slab with a quasi-neutral core bounded by layers containing only ions is investigated analytically and exact solutions are obtained. It is found that on average, the plasma expansion time scales linearly with the initial inverse ion plasma frequency as well as the degree of charge imbalance, and no expansion occurs if the cold plasma slab is stationary and overall neutral. However, in both cases, there can exist prominent oscillations on the electron front.

  14. Links between fluid circulation, temperature, and metamorphism in subducting slabs

    Spinelli, G.A.; Wang, K.

    2009-01-01

    The location and timing of metamorphic reactions in subducting lithosph??re are influenced by thermal effects of fluid circulation in the ocean crust aquifer. Fluid circulation in subducting crust extracts heat from the Nankai subduction zone, causing the crust to pass through cooler metamorphic faci??s than if no fluid circulation occurs. This fluid circulation shifts the basalt-to-eclogite transition and the associated slab dehydration 14 km deeper (35 km farther landward) than would be predicted with no fluid flow. For most subduction zones, hydrothermal cooling of the subducting slab will delay eclogitization relative to estimates made without considering fluid circulation. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Defect inspection in hot slab surface: multi-source CCD imaging based fuzzy-rough sets method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liming; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Xiaodong; Xiao, Hong; Huang, Chao

    2016-09-01

    To provide an accurate surface defects inspection method and make the automation of robust image region of interests(ROI) delineation strategy a reality in production line, a multi-source CCD imaging based fuzzy-rough sets method is proposed for hot slab surface quality assessment. The applicability of the presented method and the devised system are mainly tied to the surface quality inspection for strip, billet and slab surface etcetera. In this work we take into account the complementary advantages in two common machine vision (MV) systems(line array CCD traditional scanning imaging (LS-imaging) and area array CCD laser three-dimensional (3D) scanning imaging (AL-imaging)), and through establishing the model of fuzzy-rough sets in the detection system the seeds for relative fuzzy connectedness(RFC) delineation for ROI can placed adaptively, which introduces the upper and lower approximation sets for RIO definition, and by which the boundary region can be delineated by RFC region competitive classification mechanism. For the first time, a Multi-source CCD imaging based fuzzy-rough sets strategy is attempted for CC-slab surface defects inspection that allows an automatic way of AI algorithms and powerful ROI delineation strategies to be applied to the MV inspection field.

  16. DBR, Sub-wavelength grating, and Photonic crystal slab Fabry-Perot cavity design using phase analysis by FDTD.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hwan Eric; Chrostowski, Lukas; Bisaillon, Eric; Plant, David V

    2007-08-06

    We demonstrate a Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) phase methodology to estimate resonant wavelengths in Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity structures. We validate the phase method in a conventional Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) structure using a transfer-matrix method, and compare results with a FDTD reflectance method. We extend this approach to a Sub-Wavelength Grating (SWG) and a Photonic Crystal (Phc) slab, either of which may replace one of the Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBRs) in the VCSEL, and predict resonant conditions with varying lithographic parameters. Finally, we compare the resonant tunabilities of three different VCSEL structures, taking quality factors into account.

  17. Narrow-linewidth, quasi-continuous-wave ASE source based on a multiple-pass Nd:YAG zigzag slab amplifier configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Lu, Yanhua; Hu, Hao; Tong, Lixin; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Yi; Wang, Juntao; Ren, Huaijin; Xu, Liu

    2018-03-05

    We present investigations into a narrow-linewidth, quasi-continuous-wave pulsed all-solid-state amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source by use of a novel multiple-pass zigzag slab amplifier. The SE fluorescence emitted from a Nd:YAG slab active medium acts as the seed and is amplified back and forth 8 times through the same slab. Thanks to the angular multiplexing nature of the zigzag slab, high-intensity 1064-nm ASE output can be produced without unwanted self-lasing in this configuration. Experimentally, the output energy, optical conversion efficiency, pulse dynamics, spectral property, and beam quality of the ASE source are studied when the Nd:YAG slab end-pumped by two high-brightness laser diode arrays. The maximum single pulse energy of 347 mJ is generated with an optical efficiency of ~5.9% and a beam quality of 3.5/17 in the thickness/width direction of the slab. As expected, smooth pulses without relaxing spikes and continuous spectra are achieved. Moreover, the spectral width of the ASE source narrows versus the pump energy, getting a 3-dB linewidth of as narrow as 20 pm (i.e. 5.3 GHz). Via the sum frequency generation, high-intensity, smooth-pulse, and narrow-linewidth ASE sources are preferred for solving the major problem of saturation of the mesospheric sodium atoms and can create a much brighter sodium guide star to meet the needs of adaptive imaging applications in astronomy.

  18. Defect detection in slab surface: a novel dual Charge-coupled Device imaging-based fuzzy connectedness strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liming; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Dengfu; Udupa, Jayaram K; Wang, Huiqian; Zeng, Yuebin

    2014-11-01

    To provide an accurate surface defects inspection system and make the automation of robust image segmentation method a reality in routine production line, a general approach is presented for continuous casting slab (CC-slab) surface defects extraction and delineation. The applicability of the system is not tied to CC-slab exclusively. We combined the line array CCD (Charge-coupled Device) traditional scanning imaging (LS-imaging) and area array CCD laser three-dimensional (3D) scanning imaging (AL-imaging) strategies in designing the system. Its aim is to suppress the respective imaging system's limitations. In the system, the images acquired from the two CCD sensors are carefully aligned in space and in time by maximum mutual information-based full-fledged registration schema. Subsequently, the image information is fused from these two subsystems such as the unbroken 2D information in LS-imaging and 3D depressed information in AL-imaging. Finally, on the basis of the established dual scanning imaging system the region of interest (ROI) localization by seed specification was designed, and the delineation for ROI by iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC) algorithm was utilized to get a precise inspection result. Our method takes into account the complementary advantages in the two common machine vision (MV) systems and it performs competitively with the state-of-the-art as seen from the comparison of experimental results. For the first time, a joint imaging scanning strategy is proposed for CC-slab surface defect inspection that allows a feasible way of powerful ROI delineation strategies to be applied to the MV inspection field. Multi-ROI delineation by using IRFC in this research field may further improve the results.

  19. Determination of interaction between bridge concrete approach slab and embankment settlement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-07-01

    The main objective of this research is to correlate the deformation and internal force of the approach slab with the approach embankment settlements and the approach slab parameters such as length and thickness. Finite element analysis was carried ou...

  20. Investigation of approach slab and its settlement for roads and bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-01-01

    Approach slabs serve as a transitional system between an approach road and a bridge. Settlement of bridge approach slabs and their : supporting backfill has been experienced by more than ten Departments of Transportation throughout the United States....

  1. Spontaneous emission in semiconductor laser amplifiers

    SciT

    Arnaud, J.; Coste, F.; Fesqueet, J.

    1985-06-01

    In a mode matched configuration, spontaneous emission in semiconductor laser amplifiers is enhanced by a factor which is larger than unity but which is significantly smaller than the K-factor calculated by Petermann. Using thin-slab model, we find that in typical situations, the factor is about K/2.

  2. 18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH BLOCKS AND PULLEYS OVERHEAD LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  3. Slab flattening and exhumation of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siravo, G.; Faccenna, C.; Fellin, M. G.; Herman, F.; Becker, T. W.; Molin, P.

    2017-12-01

    Mountain belt topography is shaped by processes acting at different time scales and depths, from the surface down to the crust and mantle. In particular, subduction dynamics is expected to strongly affect upper plate topography. Here, we present the case of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) in Colombia as a case history for dynamic mantle forcing from a subduction zone on the upper plate topography. The EC is an active double-vergent fold and thrust belt formed during the Cenozoic by the inversion of a Mesozoic rift, and topography there has grown up to 5000 m (Cocuy Sierra). The EC is located far ( 500 km) from the trench where the Nazca slab subducts below the South American plate. Tomography and seismicity show the presence of a flat slab subduction north of 5° N (Chiarabba et al., 2016). Slab flattening may have occurred transitionally from 10 to 5 Ma shutting down the arc volcanism (Wagner et al., 2017). We reconstruct the exhumation of the EC based on previously published and new thermochronologic data collected in the area of the Cocuy Sierra. Results of this analysis show notably fast exhumation rates since Late Miocene. We also analyze the likely contributions to topography and show that neither the present-day crustal thickness nor the cumulative shortening in the Cenozoic as extracted form balanced cross section can isostatically explain the present day topography. We conclude that fast EC exhumation and uplift are driven by mantle dynamics and likely occurred during the recent episode of slab flattening.

  4. Emplacement of the Kodiak batholith and slab-window migration

    Farris, David W.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Friedman, Richard; Paterson, Scott R.; Saltus, R.W.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    The Kodiak batholith is one of the largest, most elongate intrusive bodies in the forearc Sanak-Baranof plutonic belt located in southern Alaska. This belt is interpreted to have formed during the subduction of an oceanic spreading center and the associated migration of a slab window. Individual plutons of the Kodiak batholith track the location and evolution of the underlying slab window. Six U/Pb zircon ages from the axis of the batholith exhibit a northeastward-decreasing age progression of 59.2 ± 0.2 Ma at the southwest end to 58.4 ± 0.2 Ma at the northeast tip. The trench-parallel rate of age progression is within error of the average slab-window migration rate for the entire Sanak-Baranof belt (~19 cm/yr). Structural relationships, U/Pb ages, and a model of new gravity data indicate that magma from the Kodiak batholith ascended 5-10 km as a northeastward-younging series of 1-8-km-diameter viscoelastic diapirs. Individual plutons ascended by multiple emplacement mechanisms including downward flow, collapse of wall rock, stoping, and diking. Stokes flow xenolith calculations suggest ascent rates of 5-100 m/yr and an effective magmatic viscosity of 107-108 Pa s. Pre-existing structural or lithologic heterogeneities did not dominantly control the location of the main batholith. Instead, its location was determined by migration of the slab window at depth. 

  5. Tensor-guided fitting of subduction slab depths

    Bazargani, Farhad; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2013-01-01

    Geophysical measurements are often acquired at scattered locations in space. Therefore, interpolating or fitting the sparsely sampled data as a uniform function of space (a procedure commonly known as gridding) is a ubiquitous problem in geophysics. Most gridding methods require a model of spatial correlation for data. This spatial correlation model can often be inferred from some sort of secondary information, which may also be sparsely sampled in space. In this paper, we present a new method to model the geometry of a subducting slab in which we use a data‐fitting approach to address the problem. Earthquakes and active‐source seismic surveys provide estimates of depths of subducting slabs but only at scattered locations. In addition to estimates of depths from earthquake locations, focal mechanisms of subduction zone earthquakes also provide estimates of the strikes of the subducting slab on which they occur. We use these spatially sparse strike samples and the Earth’s curved surface geometry to infer a model for spatial correlation that guides a blended neighbor interpolation of slab depths. We then modify the interpolation method to account for the uncertainties associated with the depth estimates.

  6. 30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE PROJECTILE LOADING CAR AND LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO THE PROJECTILE LOADING DECK AND LAUNCHER BRIDGE. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 63. VIEW LOOKING DOWN VAL LAUNCHING SLAB SHOWING DRIVE GEARS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW LOOKING DOWN VAL LAUNCHING SLAB SHOWING DRIVE GEARS, CABLES, LAUNCHER RAILS, PROJECTILE CAR AND SUPPORT CARRIAGE, April 8, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER DRAINAGE AREA IN THE DISTANCE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. 6. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, CONNECTING TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, CONNECTING TUNNEL VISIBLE AT CENTER RIGHT AND FAR RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Toward improving the performance of highway bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the amount of rotation that could develop between an approach slab, after base settlement, and a bridge abutment. A better approach-bridge transition could then be developed by using a ductile concrete to d...

  11. Alternative and cost-effective bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-01

    The primary objectives of the proposed project are to investigate the causes for any bumps at the end of the bridge approach slab : and to develop remedial measures or alternative designs for a replacement. It is clear that the problem stems from geo...

  12. Use of fiber reinforced concrete for concrete pavement slab replacement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-03-01

    Unlike ordinary concrete pavement, replacement concrete slabs need to be open to traffic within 24 hours (sooner in : some cases). Thus, high early-strength concrete is used; however, it frequently cracks prematurely as a result of high : heat of hyd...

  13. Vibration Prediction Model for Floating-Slab Rail Transit Track

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-08-01

    This report presents the theoretical development of a model to predict the vibration reduction by floating-slab tracks in subway tunnels. Data from a field study in New York City are also presented. The report is one of three reports dealing with noi...

  14. Puzzling features of western Mediterranean tectonics explained by slab dragging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakman, Wim; Chertova, Maria V.; van den Berg, Arie.; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2018-03-01

    The recent tectonic evolution of the western Mediterranean region is enigmatic. The causes for the closure of the Moroccan marine gateway prior to the Messinian salinity crisis, for the ongoing shortening of the Moroccan Rif and for the origin of the seismogenic Trans-Alboran shear zone and eastern Betics extension are unclear. These puzzling tectonic features cannot be fully explained by subduction of the east-dipping Gibraltar slab in the context of the regional relative plate motion frame. Here we use a combination of geological and geodetic data, as well as three-dimensional numerical modelling of subduction, to show that these unusual tectonic features could be the consequence of slab dragging—the north to north-eastward dragging of the Gibraltar slab by the absolute motion of the African Plate. Comparison of our model results to patterns of deformation in the western Mediterranean constrained by geological and geodetic data confirm that slab dragging provides a plausible mechanism for the observed deformation. Our results imply that the impact of absolute plate motion on subduction is identifiable from crustal observations. Identifying such signatures elsewhere may improve the mantle reference frame and provide insights on subduction evolution and associated crustal deformation.

  15. Square cants from round bolts without slabs or sawdust

    Peter Koch

    1960-01-01

    For maximum efficiency a headrig for converting bark-free bolts into cants must (1) have a fast cycle time, (2) require minimum handling of bolts and refuse, and (3) convert the volume represented by slabs and kerf into a salable byproduct.

  16. Structure of the Flat Slab in Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Clayton, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the detailed structure of the flat-subduction portion of the subduction zone in Southern Peru using converted phases recorded by the PeruSE seismic array. The migrated image along a profile above the flat subduction is shown in the figure, overlain by the receiver functions of one well-recorded event. We see that the slab descends to 100 km depth at a distance of about 100 km inland from the coast, and then it rises to 90 km depth and remains flat for the next 300 km distance before diving into the mantle. The Moho itself has about 10 km relief above the flat slab, which is anti-correlated with the surface topography indicating Airy compensation. Interestingly, the flat slab image is missing under this part of Moho. The mid-crust structure is also evident. In the west, it coincides with the Andean Low Velocity Zone (ALVZ) mapped in this region (Ma and Clayton, 2014). In the east, it is related with the underthrusting Brazilian Shield (Phillips and Clayton, 2014). In this paper, we further investigate the causes of the missing or weak flat slab signal, possibly due to anomalous attenuation of S waves in the mantle wedge (but not P wave, since Moho is well imaged). We will also extend our study to the flat-normal transition area beneath the array.

  17. Applications of acoustics in the measurement of coal slab thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J., Jr.; Mills, J. M.; Pierce, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the possibility of employing acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies for measurements of thicknesses of slabs of coal backed by shale is investigated. Fundamental information concerning the acoustical properties of coal, and the relationship between these properties and the structural and compositional parameters used to characterize coal samples was also sought. The testing device, which utilizes two matched transducers, is described.

  18. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE WESTERN EDGE, ACCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE WESTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS AT LEFT AND RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 52. SLABBING AND BLOOMING MILLS AND FOUNDRY (IN FOREGROUND), AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. SLABBING AND BLOOMING MILLS AND FOUNDRY (IN FOREGROUND), AS SEEN FROM THE CLARK AVENUE BRIDGE. AT RIGHT, REAR, IS THE BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE. VIEW LOOKING NORTH. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Enhancement of polarizabilities of cylinders with cylinder-slab resonances

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Meng; Huang, Xueqin; Liu, H.; Chan, C. T.

    2015-01-01

    If an object is very small in size compared with the wavelength of light, it does not scatter light efficiently. It is hence difficult to detect a very small object with light. We show using analytic theory as well as full wave numerical calculation that the effective polarizability of a small cylinder can be greatly enhanced by coupling it with a superlens type metamaterial slab. This kind of enhancement is not due to the individual resonance effect of the metamaterial slab, nor due to that of the object, but is caused by a collective resonant mode between the cylinder and the slab. We show that this type of particle-slab resonance which makes a small two-dimensional object much “brighter” is actually closely related to the reverse effect known in the literature as “cloaking by anomalous resonance” which can make a small cylinder undetectable. We also show that the enhancement of polarizability can lead to strongly enhanced electromagnetic forces that can be attractive or repulsive, depending on the material properties of the cylinder. PMID:25641391

  1. Slab melting and magma formation beneath the southern Cascade arc

    Walowski, Kristina J.; Wallace, Paul J.; Clynne, Michael A.; Rasmussen, D.J.; Weis, D.

    2016-01-01

    The processes that drive magma formation beneath the Cascade arc and other warm-slab subduction zones have been debated because young oceanic crust is predicted to largely dehydrate beneath the forearc during subduction. In addition, geochemical variability along strike in the Cascades has led to contrasting interpretations about the role of volatiles in magma generation. Here, we focus on the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc, where previous work has demonstrated across-arc geochemical variations related to subduction enrichment, and H-isotope data suggest that H2O in basaltic magmas is derived from the final breakdown of chlorite in the mantle portion of the slab. We use naturally glassy, olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) from the tephra deposits of eight primitive (MgO>7 wt%) basaltic cinder cones to quantify the pre-eruptive volatile contents of mantle-derived melts in this region. The melt inclusions have B concentrations and isotope ratios that are similar to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), suggesting extensive dehydration of the downgoing plate prior to reaching sub-arc depths and little input of slab-derived B into the mantle wedge. However, correlations of volatile and trace element ratios (H2O/Ce, Cl/Nb, Sr/Nd) in the melt inclusions demonstrate that geochemical variability is the result of variable addition of a hydrous subduction component to the mantle wedge. Furthermore, correlations between subduction component tracers and radiogenic isotope ratios show that the subduction component has less radiogenic Sr and Pb than the Lassen sub-arc mantle, which can be explained by melting of subducted Gorda MORB beneath the arc. Agreement between pMELTS melting models and melt inclusion volatile, major, and trace element data suggests that hydrous slab melt addition to the mantle wedge can produce the range in primitive compositions erupted in the Lassen region. Our results provide further evidence that chlorite-derived fluids from the mantle portion of the

  2. Equilibrium Slab Models of Lyman-Alpha Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.; Salpeter, Edwin E.; Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    We model the L(sub y(alpha)) clouds as slabs of hydrogen with an ionizing extragalactic radiation field incident from both sides. In general, the equilibrium configuration of a slab at redshift z approx. less than 5 is determined by a balance of the gas pressure, gravity (including the effects of a dark matter halo), and the pressure exerted by the inter-galactic medium, P(sub ext). These models have been used to make predictions of the number of slabs as a function of the neutral hydrogen column density, N(sub H). A break in the curve is predicted at the transition between regimes where gravity and pressure are the dominant confining forces, with a less rapid decrease at larger N(sub H). The transition from optically thin to optically thick slabs leads to a gap in the distribution, whose location is governed largely by the spectrum of ionizing radiation. There are certain parallels between lines of sight through the outer HI disk of spiral galaxy with increasing radius, and the progression from damped, to Lyman limit, to forest clouds. We discuss briefly the possibility that at least some of the observed low z forest clouds may be a separate population, associated with galaxies, as suggested by the observations of Bahcall et al. This population could dominate the forest at present if the dark matter attached to galaxies should lead to gravity confinement for this disk population, while the isolated clouds remain pressure confined. The formalism developed in this paper will allow a more detailed study. We also discuss a more general parameter study of the equilibrium configuration of slabs, including mock gravity and L(sub y(alpha)) photon trapping.

  3. Seismicity Structure of the Downgoing Nazca Slab in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, C.; Schurr, B.

    2017-12-01

    We applied an automatized earthquake detection and location algorithm to 8 years of continuous seismic data from the IPOC network in Northern Chile, located in the forearc between about 18.5°S and 24°S. The resulting seismicity catalog contains more than 113k double-difference relocated earthquake hypocenters and features a completeness magnitude around 2.8. Despite the occurrence of two megathrust earthquakes with vigorous aftershock seismicity in the studied time period (the 2007 Tocopilla and the 2014 Iquique earthquakes), >60% of the retrieved seismicity is located in a highly active band of intermediate-depth earthquakes (80-120 km deep) within the downgoing Nazca slab.We obtain a triple seismic zone in the updip part of the slab, with the three parallel dipping planes corresponding to the plate interface, the oceanic Moho (ca. 8 km below the interface) and a third band in the mantle lithosphere 26-28 km beneath the slab top. The plate interface seismicity terminates abruptly at a depth of 55 km. At about 80-90 km depth, the remaining two planes of seismicity then merge into the single, 20 km thick cluster of vigorous seismicity mentioned above, which terminates at 120 km depth. This cluster is located directly beneath the volcanic arc and shows a pronounced kink in the slab dipping angle. Intra-slab seismicity is most likely related to metamorphic dehydration reactions, hence our high-resolution earthquake distribution can be considered a map of metamorphic reactions (although a possibly incomplete one, since not all reactions necessarily invoke seismicity). By correlating this distribution with isotherms from thermal models as well as geophysical imaging results from previous studies, we attempt to get a glimpse at the processes that produce the different patches of intraslab seismicity at intermediate depths.

  4. Field demonstration of new bridge approach slab designs and performance : [research project capsule].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-10-01

    A normal bridge approach slab in Louisiana is a reinforced concrete slab. It connects : the bridge deck to the adjacent paved roadway. Its intended functions are: : 1. To span the void that may develop below the slab due to soil erosion or : embankme...

  5. Solid state laser technology - A NASA perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.

    1985-01-01

    NASA's program for developing solid-state laser technology and applying it to the Space Shuttle and Space Platform is discussed. Solid-state lasers are required to fulfill the Earth Observation System's requirements. The role of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology in developing a NASA tunable solid-state laser program is described. The major goals of the program involve developing a solid-state pump laser in the green, using AlGaAs array technology, pumping a Nd:YAG/SLAB crystal or glass, and fabricating a lidar system, with either a CO2 laser at 10.6 microns or a Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 microns, to measure tropospheric winds to an accuracy of + or - 1 m/s and a vertical resolution of 1 km. The procedures to be followed in order to visualize this technology plan include: (1) material development and characterization, (2) laser development, and (3) implementation of the lasers.

  6. Effect of rheological approximations on slab detachment in 3D numerical simulations of continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2017-04-01

    It is commonly accepted that slab detachment results from the development of extensional stresses within the subducting slab. Subduction slowdown due to arrival of buoyant continental material at the trench is considered to cause such stress build up in the slab. Following slab detachment, slab pull partially or completely loses its strength and hot asthenosphere may flow through the slab window, which can have major consequences for continental collision. The dynamics of slab detachment has been extensively studied in 2D (i.e. analytical and numerical), but 3D models of slab detachment during continental collision remain largely unexplored. Some of the previous 3D models have investigated the role of an asymmetric margin on the propagation of slab detachment (van Hunen and Allen, 2011), the impact of slab detachment on the curvature of orogenic belts (Capitanio and Replumaz, 2013), the role of the collision rate on slab detachment depth (Li et al., 2013) or the effect of along-trench variations on slab detachment (Duretz et al., 2014). However, rheology of mantle and lithosphere is known to have a major influence on the dynamics of subduction. Here, we explore a range of different rheological approximations to understand their sensitivity on the possible scenarios. We employ the code LaMEM (Kaus et al., 2016) to perform 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear, to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow, dominated by viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, dominated by plastic breaking and inducing strong mantle flow in

  7. Photonic crystal slab waveguides in moderate index contrast media: Generalized transverse Bragg waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, David Bruce

    One of the anticipated advantages of photonic crystal waveguides is the ability to tune waveguide dispersion and propagation characteristics to achieve desired properties. The majority of research into photonic crystal waveguides centers around high index contrast photonic crystal waveguides with complete in-plane bandgaps in the photonic crystal cladding. This work focuses on linear photonic crystal waveguides in moderate index materials, with insufficient index contrast to guarantee a complete in-plane bandgap. Using a technique called Interferometric Lithography (IL) as well as standard semiconductor processing steps, a process flow for creating large area (˜cm 2), linear photonic crystal waveguides in a spin-deposited photocurable polymer is outlined. The study of such low index contrast photonic crystal waveguides offers a unique opportunity to explore the mechanisms governing waveguide confinement and photonic crystal behavior in general. Results from two optical characterization experiments are provided. In the first set of experiments, rhodamine 590 organic laser dye was incorporated into the polymer prior to fabrication of the photonic crystal slab. Emission spectra from waveguide core modes exhibit no obvious spectral selectivity owing to variation in the periodicity or geometry of the photonic crystal. In addition, grating coupled waveguides were fabricated, and a single frequency diode laser was coupled into the waveguide in order to study the transverse mode structure. To this author's knowledge, the optical mode profile images are the first taken of photonic crystal slab waveguides, exhibiting both simple low order mode structure as well as complex high order mode structure inconsistent with effective index theory. However, no obvious correlation between the mode structure and photonic crystal period or geometry was evident. Furthermore, in both the laser dye-doped and grating coupled waveguides, low loss waveguiding was observed regardless of

  8. Production of High Quality Die Steels from Large ESR Slab Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xin; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Li, Hua-bing; Liu, Fu-bin; Li, Xing

    With the rapid development of manufacture industry in China, die steels are in great need of large slab ingot of high quality and large tonnage, such as P20, WSM718R and so on. Solidification structure and size of large slab ingots produced with conventional methods are not satisfied. However, large slab ingots manufactured by ESR process have a good solidification structure and enough section size. In the present research, the new slab ESR process was used to produce the die steels large slab ingots with the maximum size of 980×2000×3200mm. The compact and sound ingot can be manufactured by the slab ESR process. The ultra-heavy plates with the maximum thickness of 410 mm can be obtained after rolling the 49 tons ingots. Due to reducing the cogging and forging process, the ESR for large slab ingots process can increase greatly the yield and production efficiency, and evidently cut off product costs.

  9. Negotiating Multicollinearity with Spike-and-Slab Priors

    PubMed Central

    Ročková, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    In multiple regression under the normal linear model, the presence of multicollinearity is well known to lead to unreliable and unstable maximum likelihood estimates. This can be particularly troublesome for the problem of variable selection where it becomes more difficult to distinguish between subset models. Here we show how adding a spike-and-slab prior mitigates this difficulty by filtering the likelihood surface into a posterior distribution that allocates the relevant likelihood information to each of the subset model modes. For identification of promising high posterior models in this setting, we consider three EM algorithms, the fast closed form EMVS version of Rockova and George (2014) and two new versions designed for variants of the spike-and-slab formulation. For a multimodal posterior under multicollinearity, we compare the regions of convergence of these three algorithms. Deterministic annealing versions of the EMVS algorithm are seen to substantially mitigate this multimodality. A single simple running example is used for illustration throughout. PMID:25419004

  10. Negotiating Multicollinearity with Spike-and-Slab Priors.

    PubMed

    Ročková, Veronika; George, Edward I

    2014-08-01

    In multiple regression under the normal linear model, the presence of multicollinearity is well known to lead to unreliable and unstable maximum likelihood estimates. This can be particularly troublesome for the problem of variable selection where it becomes more difficult to distinguish between subset models. Here we show how adding a spike-and-slab prior mitigates this difficulty by filtering the likelihood surface into a posterior distribution that allocates the relevant likelihood information to each of the subset model modes. For identification of promising high posterior models in this setting, we consider three EM algorithms, the fast closed form EMVS version of Rockova and George (2014) and two new versions designed for variants of the spike-and-slab formulation. For a multimodal posterior under multicollinearity, we compare the regions of convergence of these three algorithms. Deterministic annealing versions of the EMVS algorithm are seen to substantially mitigate this multimodality. A single simple running example is used for illustration throughout.

  11. Seismic Behaviour of Masonry Vault-Slab Structures

    SciT

    Chesi, Claudio; Butti, Ferdinando; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-07-08

    Spandrel walls typically play a structural role in masonry buildings, transferring load from a slab to the supporting vault. Some indications are given in the literature on the behaviour of spandrels under the effect of vertical loads, but little attention is given to the effect coming from lateral forces acting on the building. An opportunity to investigate this problem has come from the need of analyzing a monumental building which was damaged by the Nov. 24, 2004 Val Sabbia earthquake in the north of Italy. The finite element model set up for the analysis of the vault-spandrel-slab system is presentedmore » and the structural role resulting for the spandrels is discussed.« less

  12. Slab detachment under the Eastern Alps seen by seismic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Bianchi, Irene; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-01-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian–Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW–NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW–SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW–SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle. PMID:25843968

  13. Slab detachment under the Eastern Alps seen by seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Bianchi, Irene; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-01-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian-Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW-NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW-SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW-SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle.

  14. Characteristics of Recycled Concrete Aggregates from Precast Slab Block Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkrbec, Václav; Nováková, Iveta; Henková, Svatava

    2017-10-01

    Precast slab block buildings (PSBB) typically and frequently occur in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as elsewhere in the world. Some of these buildings are currently used beyond their service life capacity. The utilization of recycled materials from these buildings with regard to applying the principles of sustainable construction and using recycled materials will probably be significant in the following years. Documentation from the manufacturing processes of prefabricated blocks for precast slab block buildings is not available, and also it is difficult to declare technological discipline during the construction of these buildings. Therefore, properties of recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) produced from construction and demolition waste (C&DW) of precast slab block buildings build between 1950s to 1990s are not sufficiently known. The demolition of these buildings is very rare today, but it can be assumed an increase in demolitions of these buildings in the future. The use of RCA in new concrete requires verification/testing of the geometrical and physical properties of RCA according to the EN 12 620+A1 standard. The aim of the contribution is to present a case study of the demolition of slab block building with emphasis on RCA usage. The paper presents the results of the tests according to European standards for determining selected geometrical and physical properties of the RCA. The paper describes and evaluates tests such as determination of particle size distribution - Sieve Analysis, content of fine particles, determination of density and water absorption. The results of the properties testing of RCA are compared with the properties of natural aggregate. The general boundary conditions of RCA particular tests are presented.

  15. Coherent perfect absorber and laser modes in purely imaginary metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yangyang; Cao, Yanyan; Cummer, Steven A.; Xu, Yadong; Chen, Huanyang

    2017-10-01

    Conjugate metamaterials, in which the permittivity and the permeability are complex conjugates of each other, possess the elements of loss and gain simultaneously. By employing a conjugate metamaterial with a purely imaginary form, we propose a mechanism for realizing both coherent perfect absorber (CPA) and laser modes. Moreover, the general conditions for obtaining CPA and laser modes, including obtaining them simultaneously, are revealed by analyzing the wave scattering properties of a slab made of purely imaginary metamaterials (PIMs). Specifically, in a PIM slab with a subunity effective refractive index, the CPA mode can be simplified as a perfect absorption mode and the incident wave from one side could be perfectly absorbed.

  16. System for loading slab-gel holders for electrophoresis separation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Norman G.; Anderson, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    A slab-gel loading system includes a prismatic chamber for filling a plurality of slab-gel holders simultaneously. Each slab-gel holder comprises a pair of spaced apart plates defining an intermediate volume for gel containment. The holders are vertically positioned in the chamber with their major surfaces parallel to the chamber end walls. A liquid inlet is provided at the corner between the bottom and a side wall of the chamber for distributing a polymerizable monomer solution or a coagulable colloidal solution into each of the holders. The chamber is rotatably supported so that filling can begin with the corner having the liquid inlet directed downwardly such that the solution is gently funneled upwardly, without mixing, along the diverging side and bottom surfaces. As filling proceeds, the chamber is gradually rotated to position the bottom wall in a horizontal mode. The liquid filling means includes a plastic envelope with a septum dividing it into two compartments for intermixing two solutions of different density and thereby providing a liquid flow having a density gradient. The resulting gels have a density gradient between opposite edges for subsequent use in electrophoresis separations.

  17. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciT

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulationmore » at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.« less

  18. Surface correlation effects in two-band strongly correlated slabs.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, D Nasr; Covaci, L; Peeters, F M

    2014-02-19

    Using an extension of the Gutzwiller approximation for an inhomogeneous system, we study the two-band Hubbard model with unequal band widths for a slab geometry. The aim is to investigate the mutual effect of individual bands on the spatial distribution of quasi-particle weight and charge density, especially near the surface of the slab. The main effect of the difference in band width is the presence of two different length scales corresponding to the quasi-particle profile of each band. This is enhanced in the vicinity of the critical interaction of the narrow band where an orbitally selective Mott transition occurs and a surface dead layer forms for the narrow band. For the doped case, two different regimes of charge transfer between the surface and the bulk of the slab are revealed. The charge transfer from surface/center to center/surface depends on both the doping level and the average relative charge accumulated in each band. Such effects could also be of importance when describing the accumulation of charges at the interface between structures made of multi-band strongly correlated materials.

  19. Design of energy efficient building with radiant slab cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen

    2007-12-01

    Air-conditioning comprises a substantial fraction of commercial building energy use because of compressor-driven refrigeration and fan-driven air circulation. Core regions of large buildings require year-round cooling due to heat gains from people, lights and equipment. Negative environmental impacts include CO2 emissions from electric generation and leakage of ozone-depleting refrigerants. Some argue that radiant cooling simultaneously improves building efficiency and occupant thermal comfort, and that current thermal comfort models fail to reflect occupant experience with radiant thermal control systems. There is little field evidence to test these claims. The University of Calgary's Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Building, is a pioneering radiant slab cooling installation in North America. Thermal comfort and energy performance were evaluated. Measurements included: (1) heating and cooling energy use, (2) electrical energy use for lighting and equipment, and (3) indoor temperatures. Accuracy of a whole building energy simulation model was evaluated with these data. Simulation was then used to compare the radiant slab design with a conventional (variable air volume) system. The radiant system energy performance was found to be poorer mainly due to: (1) simultaneous cooling by the slab and heating by other systems, (2) omission of low-exergy (e.g., groundwater) cooling possible with the high cooling water temperatures possible with radiant slabs and (3) excessive solar gain and conductive heat loss due to the wall and fenestration design. Occupant thermal comfort was evaluated through questionnaires and concurrent measurement of workstation comfort parameters. Analysis of 116 sets of data from 82 occupants showed that occupant assessment was consistent with estimates based on current thermal comfort models. The main thermal comfort improvements were reductions in (1) local discomfort from draft and (2) vertical air temperature stratification. The

  20. Detecting lower-mantle slabs beneath Asia and the Aleutians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, L.; Thomas, C.

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the descend of subducted slabs we search for and analyse seismic arrivals that reflected off the surface of the slab. In order to distinguish between such arrivals and other seismic phases, we search for waves that reach a seismic array with a backazimuth deviating from the theoretical backazimuth of the earthquake. Source-receiver combinations are chosen in a way that their great circle paths do not intersect the slab region, hence the direct arrivals can serve as reference. We focus on the North and Northwest Pacific region by using earthquakes from Japan, the Philippines and the Hindu Kush area recorded at North American networks (e.g. USArray, Alaska and Canada). Using seismic array techniques for analysing the data and record information on slowness, backazimuth and traveltime of the observed out-of-plane arrivals we use these measurements to trace the wave back through a 1-D velocity model to its scattering/reflection location. We find a number of out-of-plane reflections. Assuming only single scattering, most out-of-plane signals have to travel as P-to-P phases and only a few as S-to-P phases, due to the length of the seismograms we processed. The located reflection points present a view of the 3-D structures within the mantle. In the upper mantle and the transition zone they correlate well with the edges of fast velocity regions in tomographic images. We also find reflection points in the mid- and lower mantle and their locations generally agree with fast velocities mapped by seismic tomography models suggesting that in the subduction regions we map, slabs enter the lower mantle. To validate our approach, we calculate and process synthetic seismograms for 3-D wave field propagation through a model containing a slab-like heterogeneity. We show, that depending on the source-receiver geometry relative to the reflection plane, it is indeed possible to observe and back-trace out-of-plane signals.

  1. Tomography of the subducting Pacific slab and the 2015 Bonin deepest earthquake (Mw 7.9).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dapeng; Fujisawa, Moeto; Toyokuni, Genti

    2017-03-15

    On 30 May 2015 an isolated deep earthquake (~670 km, Mw 7.9) occurred to the west of the Bonin Islands. To clarify its causal mechanism and its relationship to the subducting Pacific slab, we determined a detailed P-wave tomography of the deep earthquake source zone using a large number of arrival-time data. Our results show that this large deep event occurred within the subducting Pacific slab which is penetrating into the lower mantle. In the Izu-Bonin region, the Pacific slab is split at ~28° north latitude, i.e., slightly north of the 2015 deep event hypocenter. In the north the slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone, whereas in the south the slab is directly penetrating into the lower mantle. This deep earthquake was caused by joint effects of several factors, including the Pacific slab's fast deep subduction, slab tearing, slab thermal variation, stress changes and phase transformations in the slab, and complex interactions between the slab and the ambient mantle.

  2. Too much slab waving in South America? Wet plumes as an alternative to flat slab steepening as the cause of back arc large volcanic provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, J. R.; Burd, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    A widely held view is that the Nazca Slab under western S. America acts like a tattered flag waving in the wind: It is segmented and the dip angle of segments flap up and down with time. There are presently two flat segments - one under Peru and the other, the "Pampean" flat slab (centered around 31S) under central Chile and Argentina. Both are correlated with subduction of buoyant crust of oceanic aseismic ridges, complete cessation of Andean arc volcanism and very thick crust. It has been argued that the waxing and waning of flat subduction is responsible for much of the time variations in tectonics and volcanism up to 800 km east of the S. American coast for at least 100 MA. For instance, the back arc Payenia igneous plateau (35-38S) and the Somuncura igneous plateau (40.5-43S) are both thought to follow from the steepening of flat slabs at about 2 and 27 MA. Each flat slab existed for more than 5 MA. However, the case for the existence of these flat slabs rests heavily on volcanism with "arc signature" hundreds of km east of the modern volcanic arc at a time when an asthenospheric wedge would be in its final stages of being squeezed out of the space between the slab and the lithosphere. Arc signature can be summarized as the geochemical consequence of mantle melting in the presence of water. If there is a source of water in the mantle other than a shallow slab, the strongest argument for a flat slab dissolves. We have found two electrically conductive plumes rising from below 350 km near the top of the Mantle Transition Zone (MTZ). One passes through a window in the Pampean flat slab but does not penetrate the lithosphere. The other rises under Payenia. The maximum resistivity at the core of these plumes is less than 10 Ohm-m. Partial melt can explain such low resistivity, but will not be buoyant and rise from below 350 km. We propose that the low resistivity is more likely due to water and that we are seeing "wet plumes" that have been proposed to explain

  3. Cenozoic tectonics of western North America controlled by evolving width of Farallon slab.

    PubMed

    Schellart, W P; Stegman, D R; Farrington, R J; Freeman, J; Moresi, L

    2010-07-16

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere occurs through two modes: subducting plate motion and trench migration. Using a global subduction zone data set and three-dimensional numerical subduction models, we show that slab width (W) controls these modes and the partitioning of subduction between them. Subducting plate velocity scales with W(2/3), whereas trench velocity scales with 1/W. These findings explain the Cenozoic slowdown of the Farallon plate and the decrease in subduction partitioning by its decreasing slab width. The change from Sevier-Laramide orogenesis to Basin and Range extension in North America is also explained by slab width; shortening occurred during wide-slab subduction and overriding-plate-driven trench retreat, whereas extension occurred during intermediate to narrow-slab subduction and slab-driven trench retreat.

  4. Flexural strength and behaviour of SFRSCC ribbed slab under four point bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Hazrina; Hashim, Mohd Hisbany Mohd; Bakar, Afidah Abu; Hamzah, Siti Hawa; Rahman, Fadhillah Abdul

    2017-11-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to study the ultimate strength and behaviour of SFRSCC ribbed slab under four point bending. Comparison was been made between ribbed slab that was fully reinforced with steel fibres (SFWS) with conventionally reinforced concrete ribbed slab (CS and CRC). The volume fraction of the 35 mm hooked end steel fibres used in the mix was 1% (80 kg/m3) with the aspect ratio of 65. Three full scale slab samples with the dimension of 2.8 x 1.2 m with 0.2 m thickness was constructed for the purpose of this study. The slab samples was loaded until failure in a four point bending test. As a whole, based on the results, it can be concluded that the performance of the steel fiber reinforced samples (SFWS) was found to be almost equivalent to the conventionally reinforced concrete ribbed slab sample (CRC).

  5. Image transfer properties by photonic crystal slab with negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongbo; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Zhou, Renlong; Lu, Wei

    2008-04-01

    We have studied the properties of image transferred by photonic crystal (PhC) slab with negative refractive index n=-1 and confirmed the negative refractive phonomenon, but not found the saturated image properties as expected. It is found that real images will not be formed when the source distance larger than the thickness of PhC, and the transferred images are virtual images. Furthermore, comparing the quality of images transferred by a PhC slab and a cascaded stack of photonic crystal slab (CSPS), we found that the transferred images are distorted in both situations. The image resolution is good along the direction parallel to the slab interface, but bad along the direction normal to the slab interface. Simulation results show that the image formed by a CSPS is no better than a PhC slab.

  6. Microwave Quantitative NDE Technique for Dielectric Slab Thickness Estimation Using the Music Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.; Zoughi, R.

    2007-03-01

    Non-invasive monitoring of dielectric slab thickness is of great interest in various industrial applications. This paper focuses on estimating the thickness of dielectric slabs, and consequently monitoring their variations, utilizing wideband microwave signals and the MUtiple SIgnal Characterization (MUSIC) algorithm. The performance of the proposed approach is assessed by validating simulation results with laboratory experiments. The results clearly indicate the utility of this overall approach for accurate dielectric slab thickness evaluation.

  7. Aseismic deep subduction of the Philippine Sea plate and slab window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhouchuan; Zhao, Dapeng; Hasegawa, Akira; Umino, Norihito; Park, Jung-Ho; Kang, Ik-Bum

    2013-10-01

    We have made great efforts to collect and combine a large number of high-quality data from local earthquakes and teleseismic events recorded by the dense seismic networks in both South Korea and West Japan. This is the first time that a large number of Korean and Japanese seismic data sets are analyzed jointly. As a result, a high-resolution 3-D P-wave velocity model down to 700-km depth is determined, which clearly shows that the Philippine Sea (PHS) plate has subducted aseismically down to ˜460 km depth under the Japan Sea, Tsushima Strait and East China Sea. The aseismic PHS slab is visible in two areas: one is under the Japan Sea off western Honshu, and the other is under East China Sea off western Kyushu. However, the aseismic PHS slab is not visible between the two areas, where a slab window has formed. The slab window is located beneath the center of the present study region where many teleseismic rays crisscross. Detailed synthetic tests were conducted, which indicate that both the aseismic PHS slab and the slab window are robust features. Using the teleseismic data recorded by the Japanese stations alone, the aseismic PHS slab and the slab window were also revealed (Zhao et al., 2012), though the ray paths in the Japanese data set crisscross less well offshore. The slab window may be caused by the subducted Kyushu-Palau Ridge and Kinan Seamount Chain where the PHS slab may be segmented. Hot mantle upwelling is revealed in the big mantle wedge above the Pacific slab under the present study region, which may have facilitated the formation of the PHS slab window. These novel findings may shed new light on the subduction history of the PHS plate and the dynamic evolution of the Japan subduction zone.

  8. Air slab-correction for Γ-ray attenuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh

    2017-12-01

    Gamma (γ)-ray shielding behaviour (GSB) of a material can be ascertained from its linear attenuation coefficient (μ, cm-1). Narrow-beam transmission geometry is required for μ-measurement. In such measurements, a thin slab of the material has to insert between point-isotropic γ-ray source and detector assembly. The accuracy in measurements requires that sample's optical thickness (OT) remain below 0.5 mean free path (mfp). Sometimes it is very difficult to produce thin slab of sample (absorber), on the other hand for thick absorber, i.e. OT >0.5 mfp, the influence of the air displaced by it cannot be ignored during μ-measurements. Thus, for a thick sample, correction factor has been suggested which compensates the air present in the transmission geometry. The correction factor has been named as an air slab-correction (ASC). Six samples of low-Z engineering materials (cement-black, clay, red-mud, lime-stone, cement-white and plaster-of-paris) have been selected for investigating the effect of ASC on μ-measurements at three γ-ray energies (661.66, 1173.24, 1332.50 keV). The measurements have been made using point-isotropic γ-ray sources (Cs-137 and Co-60), NaI(Tl) detector and multi-channel-analyser coupled with a personal computer. Theoretical values of μ have been computed using a GRIC2-toolkit (standardized computer programme). Elemental compositions of the samples were measured with Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) analyser. Inter-comparison of measured and computed μ-values, suggested that the application of ASC helps in precise μ-measurement for thick samples of low-Z materials. Thus, this hitherto widely ignored ASC factor is recommended to use in similar γ-ray measurements.

  9. The fate of carbonates along a subducting slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, P.; Debret, B.; Inglis, E.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon long-term cycling is a subject of recent controversy as new mass balance calculations suggest that most carbon is transferred from the slab to the mantle wedge by fluids during subduction, limiting the efficiency of carbon recycling to the deep mantle. Here, we examine the mobility of carbon at large scale during subduction through field, petrographic and geochemical studies on exhumed portion of the alpine slab that have recorded different metamorphic conditions during subduction. We studied serpentinite samples, metasomatic horizon between serpentinites and sediments, as well as veins hosted in serpentinites. Samples are from the Western Alps (Queyras and Zermatt) and have recorded a prograde metamorphic history from low temperature blueshist to eclogite facies P-T conditions. We show that during subduction there are several stages of carbonate precipitation and dissolution at metasomatic interfaces between metasedimentary and ultramafic rocks in the slab, as well as within the serpentinites. The early stage of subduction sees carbonate precipitation from the sediment derived fluids into the serpentnites. At higher temperature, when the dehydration shift from sediment to serpentinite dominated, the carbonates are dissolved, inducing the release of CO2 rich fluids. This occurs before the eclogite facies is attained, providing strong evidence for the mobility of carbon in fluids during the early stages of subduction. These fluids are a potential metasomatic agent for the fore-arc mantle wedge, corroborating the observation of carbonate bearing veins in sub-arc mantle ultramafic rocks. In eclogite facies conditions, olivine and carbonate veins within the serpentinites witness the mobility of CO2 during serpentinite dehydration, and may provide clues about the large scale recycling of CO2 within the deep mantle, as well as secondary precipitation associated with exhumation. Trace elements, Fe and Zn isotopic composition of the different samples provides

  10. The study of the transition regime between slab and mixed slab-toroidal electron temperature gradient modes in a basic experiment

    SciT

    Balbaky, Abed; Sokolov, Vladimir; Sen, Amiya K.

    2015-05-15

    Electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes are suspected sources of anomalous electron thermal transport in magnetically confined plasmas as in tokamaks. Prior work in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) has been able to produce and identify slab ETG modes in a slab geometry [Wei et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 042108 (2010)]. Now by modifying CLM to introduce curvature to the confining axial magnetic field, we have excited mixed slab-toroidal modes. Linear theory predicts a transition between slab and toroidal ETG modes when (k{sub ∥}R{sub c})/(k{sub y}ρ) ∼1 [J. Kim and W. Horton, Phys. Fluids B 3, 1167 (1991)]. We observe changesmore » in the mode amplitude for levels of curvature R{sub c}{sup −1}≪(k{sub ∥,slab})/(k{sub ⊥}ρ) , which may be explained by reductions in k{sub ∥} in the transition from slab to mixed slab-toroidal modes, as also predicted by theory. We present mode amplitude scaling as a function of magnetic field curvature. Over the range of curvature available in CLM experimentally we find a modest increase in saturated ETG potential fluctuations (∼1.5×), and a substantial increase in the power density of individual mode peaks (∼4–5×)« less

  11. Slab dehydration recorded in subducted serpentine sea-mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, K.; Fukumura, S.; Ishimori, C.; Jung, H.

    2014-12-01

    It has been considered that there is a correlation between the double seismic zones and metamorphic dehydration reaction in deep slab. The lower seismic plane of the double seismic zone is considered to be located on the 600 oC isotherm in the subducting lithosphere. Antigorite terminal reaction is highly temperature sensitive around 600 oC. Therefore it has been proposed that the oceanic lithosphere was hydrated forming serpentine prior to subduction, then serpentine was decomposed to release fluid causing dehydration embrittlement in the slab. In order to unravel relation between dehydration and seismic deformation, we have investigated dehydration process of natural metamorphic rocks recording very cold geothermal history in the crust and lithosphere in the slab. Metamorphic olivine after antigorite has been described in Italian Alps and also from the Mt. Shiraga, Japan [1]. However, the olivine was formed with talc and fluid by antigorite breakdown reaction in pressures lower than 1.5 GPa. Spinifex olivine with opx in the Cerro del Almirez [2], is the product at pressures (P > 1.5 GPa) relevant to the lower seismic plane beneath Northeast Japan. It clearly indicates the presence of large amount of water facilitate crystallization of elongated olivine with opx. It is also supported by LPO pattern of olivines determined by EBSD. Fine-grained olivine-rich samples shows that Type-C fabric pattern is dominant, suggesting deformation under water-rich condition [3]. With metamorphic olivines, chlorite was also recrystallized, suggesting that water would be transported farther down to deep. The estimated dehydration reaction has a negative P-T slope at pressures higher than 1.5 GPa. The reaction is volume reducing reaction and the olivine-opx spinifex texture was formed under volume reducing reaction. In the warm slab beneath SW Japan, the reaction has a positive slope in P-T space and forms olivine+talc+fluid. From microstrucral and petrological analysis of the

  12. Boundary element analysis of post-tensioned slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashed, Youssef F.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the boundary element method is applied to carry out the structural analysis of post-tensioned flat slabs. The shear-deformable plate-bending model is employed. The effect of the pre-stressing cables is taken into account via the equivalent load method. The formulation is automated using a computer program, which uses quadratic boundary elements. Verification samples are presented, and finally a practical application is analyzed where results are compared against those obtained from the finite element method. The proposed method is efficient in terms of computer storage and processing time as well as the ease in data input and modifications.

  13. WORKERS FABRICATE ROOF SLABS FOR MTR BUILDING AT THE CONSTRUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORKERS FABRICATE ROOF SLABS FOR MTR BUILDING AT THE CONSTRUCTION SITE. FORMS WERE MADE OF STEEL. AFTER AN INCH OF CONCRETE HAD BEEN POURED IN THE FORM, A MAT OF REINFORCING STEEL WAS PLACED ON IT. THE REMAINDER OF THE FORM WAS FILLED, AND THE CONCRETE WAS VIBRATED, STRUCK, AND TROWELED. GROOVES AT CORNER WILL HAVE 1/4 INCH RODS WELDED INTO THE EYE OF THE STEEL MAT FOR GROUNDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 578. Unknown Photographer, 9/1/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Tectonic evolution of the Mexico flat slab and patterns of intraslab seismicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Sandiford, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Cocos plate slab is horizontal for about 250 km beneath the Guerrero region of southern Mexico. Analogous morphologies can spontaneously develop in subduction models, through the presence of a low-viscosity mantle wedge. The Mw 7.1 Puebla earthquake appears to have ruptured the inboard corner of the Mexican flat slab; likely in close proximity to the mantle wedge corner. In addition to the historical seismic record, the Puebla earthquake provides a valuable constraint through which to assess geodynamic models for flat slab evolution. Slab deformation predicted by the "weak wedge" model is consistent with past seismicity in the both the upper plate and slab. Below the flat section, the slab is anomalously warm relative to its depth; the lack of seismicity in the deeper part of the slab fits the global pattern of temperature-controlled slab seismicity. This has implications for understanding the deeper structure of the slab, including the seismic hazard from source regions downdip of the Puebla rupture (epicenters closer to Mexico City). While historical seismicity provides a deformation pattern consistent with the weak wedge model , the Puebla earthquake is somewhat anomalous. The earthquake source mechanism is consistent with stress orientations in our models, however it maps to a region of relatively low deviatoric stress.

  15. Tomography of the subducting Pacific slab and the 2015 Bonin deepest earthquake (Mw 7.9)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dapeng; Fujisawa, Moeto; Toyokuni, Genti

    2017-01-01

    On 30 May 2015 an isolated deep earthquake (~670 km, Mw 7.9) occurred to the west of the Bonin Islands. To clarify its causal mechanism and its relationship to the subducting Pacific slab, we determined a detailed P-wave tomography of the deep earthquake source zone using a large number of arrival-time data. Our results show that this large deep event occurred within the subducting Pacific slab which is penetrating into the lower mantle. In the Izu-Bonin region, the Pacific slab is split at ~28° north latitude, i.e., slightly north of the 2015 deep event hypocenter. In the north the slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone, whereas in the south the slab is directly penetrating into the lower mantle. This deep earthquake was caused by joint effects of several factors, including the Pacific slab’s fast deep subduction, slab tearing, slab thermal variation, stress changes and phase transformations in the slab, and complex interactions between the slab and the ambient mantle. PMID:28295018

  16. Tomography of the subducting Pacific slab and the 2015 Bonin deepest earthquake (Mw 7.9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Fujisawa, Moeto; Toyokuni, Genti

    2017-03-01

    On 30 May 2015 an isolated deep earthquake (~670 km, Mw 7.9) occurred to the west of the Bonin Islands. To clarify its causal mechanism and its relationship to the subducting Pacific slab, we determined a detailed P-wave tomography of the deep earthquake source zone using a large number of arrival-time data. Our results show that this large deep event occurred within the subducting Pacific slab which is penetrating into the lower mantle. In the Izu-Bonin region, the Pacific slab is split at ~28° north latitude, i.e., slightly north of the 2015 deep event hypocenter. In the north the slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone, whereas in the south the slab is directly penetrating into the lower mantle. This deep earthquake was caused by joint effects of several factors, including the Pacific slab’s fast deep subduction, slab tearing, slab thermal variation, stress changes and phase transformations in the slab, and complex interactions between the slab and the ambient mantle.

  17. Leaky unstable modes and electromagnetic radiation amplification by an anisotropic plasma slab

    SciT

    Vagin, K. Yu., E-mail: vagin@sci.lebedev.ru; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru

    2015-09-15

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and a photoionized plasma slab with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution is studied. It is shown that the fields of leaky modes are amplified due to the development of aperiodic instability in the slab, which leads to an increase in both the reflected and transmitted fields. The transmitted field can significantly increase only if the slab thickness does not exceed the ratio of the speed of light to the electron plasma frequency, whereas there is no upper bound on the slab thickness for the reflected signal to be amplified.

  18. Meteorological variables to aid forecasting deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers

    Marienthal, Alex; Hendrikx, Jordy; Birkeland, Karl; Irvine, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Deep slab avalanches are particularly challenging to forecast. These avalanches are difficult to trigger, yet when they release they tend to propagate far and can result in large and destructive avalanches. We utilized a 44-year record of avalanche control and meteorological data from Bridger Bowl ski area in southwest Montana to test the usefulness of meteorological variables for predicting seasons and days with deep slab avalanches. We defined deep slab avalanches as those that failed on persistent weak layers deeper than 0.9 m, and that occurred after February 1st. Previous studies often used meteorological variables from days prior to avalanches, but we also considered meteorological variables over the early months of the season. We used classification trees and random forests for our analyses. Our results showed seasons with either dry or wet deep slabs on persistent weak layers typically had less precipitation from November through January than seasons without deep slabs on persistent weak layers. Days with deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers often had warmer minimum 24-hour air temperatures, and more precipitation over the prior seven days, than days without deep slabs on persistent weak layers. Days with deep wet slab avalanches on persistent weak layers were typically preceded by three days of above freezing air temperatures. Seasonal and daily meteorological variables were found useful to aid forecasting dry and wet deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers, and should be used in combination with continuous observation of the snowpack and avalanche activity.

  19. Analysis of surface wave propagation in a grounded dielectric slab covered by a resistive sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Both parallel and perpendicular polarized surface waves are known to propagate on lossless and lossy grounded dielectric slabs. Surface wave propagation on a grounded dielectric slab covered with a resistive sheet is considered. Both parallel and perpendicular polarizations are examined. Transcendental equations are derived for each polarization and are solved using iterative techniques. Attenuation and phase velocity are shown for representative geometries. The results are applicable to both a grounded slab with a resistive sheet and an ungrounded slab covered on each side with a resistive sheet.

  20. Cause Analysis on the Void under Slabs of Cement Concrete Pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Li; Zhu, Guo Xin; Baozhu

    2017-06-01

    This paper made a systematic analysis on the influence of the construction, environment, water and loads on the void beneath road slabs, and also introduced the formation process of structural void and pumping void, and summarizes the deep reasons for the bottom of the cement concrete pavement. Based on the analysis above, this paper has found out the evolution law of the void under slabs which claimed that the void usually appeared in the slab corners and then the cross joint, resulting void in the four sides with the void area under the front slab larger than the rear one.

  1. D4Z - a new renumbering for iterative solution of ground-water flow and solute- transport equations

    Kipp, K.L.; Russell, T.F.; Otto, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    D4 zig-zag (D4Z) is a new renumbering scheme for producing a reduced matrix to be solved by an incomplete LU preconditioned, restarted conjugate-gradient iterative solver. By renumbering alternate diagonals in a zig-zag fashion, a very low sensitivity of convergence rate to renumbering direction is obtained. For two demonstration problems involving groundwater flow and solute transport, iteration counts are related to condition numbers and spectra of the reduced matrices.

  2. High efficiency 2 micrometer laser utilizing wing-pumped Tm.sup.3+ and a laser diode array end-pumping architecture

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    Wing pumping a Tm.sup.3+ doped, end pumped solid state laser generates 2 .mu.m laser radiation at high average powers with high efficiency. Using laser diode arrays to end-pump the laser rod or slab in the wing of the Tm.sup.3+ absorption band near 785 nm results in 2-for-1 quantum efficiency in Tm.sup.3+ because high Tm.sup.3+ concentrations can be used. Wing pumping allows the thermal power generated in the rod or slab to be distributed over a large enough volume to make thermal management practical in the laser gain medium even at high average power operation. The approach is applicable to CW, Q-switched, and rep-pulsed free-laser operation.

  3. High efficiency 2 micrometer laser utilizing wing-pumped Tm{sup 3+} and a laser diode array end-pumping architecture

    DOEpatents

    Beach, R.J.

    1997-11-18

    Wing pumping a Tm{sup 3+} doped, end pumped solid state laser generates 2 {micro}m laser radiation at high average powers with high efficiency. Using laser diode arrays to end-pump the laser rod or slab in the wing of the Tm{sup 3+} absorption band near 785 nm results in 2-for-1 quantum efficiency in Tm{sup 3+} because high Tm{sup 3+} concentrations can be used. Wing pumping allows the thermal power generated in the rod or slab to be distributed over a large enough volume to make thermal management practical in the laser gain medium even at high average power operation. The approach is applicable to CW, Q-switched, and rep-pulsed free-laser operation. 7 figs.

  4. A Dosimetric Study on Slab-pinewood-slab Phantom for Developing the Heterogeneous Chest Phantom Mimicking Actual Human Chest

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Om Prakash; Paliwal, Radha Kishan; Mishra, Surendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    The aim is to study the density, isodose depths, and doses at different points in slab-pinewood-slab (SPS) phantom, solid phantom SP34 (made up of polystyrene), and chest level of actual patient for developing heterogeneous chest phantom mimicking thoracic region of human body. A 6 MV photon beam of field size of 10 cm × 10 cm was directed perpendicular to the surface of computed tomography (CT) images of chest level of patient, SPS phantom, and SP34 phantom. Dose was calculated using anisotropic analytical algorithm. Hounsfield units were used to calculate the density of each medium. Isodose depths in all the three sets of CT images were measured. Variations between planned doses on treatment planning system (TPS) and measured on linear accelerator (LA) were calculated for three points, namely, near slab–pinewood interfaces (6 and 18 cm depths) and 10 cm depth in SPS phantom and at the same depths in SP34 phantom. Density of pinewood, SP34 slabs, chest wall, lung, and soft tissue behind lung was measured as 0.329 ± 0.08, 0.999 ± 0.02, 0.898 ± 0.02, 0.291 ± 0.12, and 1.002 ± 0.03 g/cc, respectively. Depths of 100% and 90% isodose curves in all the three sets of CT images were found to be similar. Depths of 80%, 70%, 60%, 50%, and 40% isodose lines in SPS phantom images were found to be equivalent to that in chest images, while it was least in SP34 phantom images. Variations in doses calculated at 6, 10, and 18 cm depths on TPS and measured on LA were found to be 0.36%, 1.65%, and 2.23%, respectively, in case of SPS phantom, while 0.24%, 0.90%, and 0.93%, respectively, in case of SP34 slab phantom. SPS phantom seemed equivalent to the chest level of human body. Dosimetric results of this study indicate that patient-specific quality assurance can be done using chest phantom mimicking thoracic region of human body, which has been fabricated using polystyrene and pinewood. PMID:28706353

  5. Detonation Propagation in Slabs and Axisymmetric Rate Sticks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romick, Christopher; Aslam, Tariq

    Insensitive high explosives (IHE) have many benefits; however, these IHEs exhibit longer reaction zones than more conventional high explosives (HE). This makes IHEs less ideal explosives and more susceptible to edge effects as well as other performance degradation issues. Thus, there is a resulting reduction in the detonation speed within the explosive. Many HE computational models, e. g. WSD, SURF, CREST, have shock-dependent reaction rates. This dependency places a high value on having an accurate shock speed. In the common practice of shock-capturing, there is ambiguity in the shock-state due to smoothing of the shock-front. Moreover, obtaining an accurate shock speed with shock-capturing becomes prohibitively computationally expensive in multiple dimensions. The use of shock-fitting removes the ambiguity of the shock-state as it is one of the boundaries. As such, the required resolution for a given error in the detonation speed is less than with shock-capturing. This allows for further insight into performance degradation. A two-dimensional shock-fitting scheme has been developed for unconfined slabs and rate sticks of HE. The HE modeling is accomplished by Euler equations utilizing several models with single-step irreversible kinetics in slab and rate stick geometries. Department of Energy - LANL.

  6. Slab waveguide photobioreactors for microalgae based biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Erica Eunjung; Kalontarov, Michael; Doud, Devin F R; Ooms, Matthew D; Angenent, Largus T; Sinton, David; Erickson, David

    2012-10-07

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for sustainable biofuel production. At present, however, there are a number of challenges that limit the economic viability of the process. Two of the major challenges are the non-uniform distribution of light in photobioreactors and the inefficiencies associated with traditional biomass processing. To address the latter limitation, a number of studies have demonstrated organisms that directly secrete fuels without requiring organism harvesting. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel optofluidic photobioreactor that can help address the light distribution challenge while being compatible with these chemical secreting organisms. Our approach is based on light delivery to surface bound photosynthetic organisms through the evanescent field of an optically excited slab waveguide. In addition to characterizing organism growth-rates in the system, we also show here, for the first time, that the photon usage efficiency of evanescent field illumination is comparable to the direct illumination used in traditional photobioreactors. We also show that the stackable nature of the slab waveguide approach could yield a 12-fold improvement in the volumetric productivity.

  7. The slab thickness of the mid-latitude ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titheridge, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The thickness of the peak of the ionosphere depends primarily on the temperature T sub n of the neutral gas, and corresponds approximately to an alpha-Chapman layer at a temperature of 0.87T sub n. The overall slab thickness, as given by Faraday rotation measurements, is then tau = 0.22T sub n + 7 km. Expansion of the topside ionosphere, and changes in the E- and F1-regions increase tau by about 20 km during the day in summer. Near solar minimum, tau is increased by a lowering of the O(+)/H(+) transition height; if the neutral temperature T sub n is estimated, this height can be obtained from observed values of tau. Hourly values of slab thickness were determined over a period of 6 yr at 34 and 42 S. Near solar maximum the nighttime values were about 260 km in all seasons. The corresponding neutral temperatures agree with satellite drag values; they show a semiannual variation of 14% and a seasonal change of 5%. Daytime values of tau were about 230 km in winter and 320 km in summer, implying a seasonal change of 30% in T sub n.

  8. Slab-plume interaction beneath the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrebski, Mathias; Allen, Richard M.; Xue, Mei; Hung, Shu-Huei

    2010-07-01

    The Pacific Northwest has undergone complex plate reorganization and intense tectono-volcanic activity to the east during the Cenozoic (last 65 Ma). Here we show new high-resolution tomographic images obtained using shear and compressional data from the ongoing USArray deployment that demonstrate first that there is a continuous, whole-mantle plume beneath the Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) and second, that the subducting Juan de Fuca (JdF) slab is fragmented and even absent beneath Oregon. The analysis of the geometry of our tomographic models suggests that the arrival and emplacement of the large Yellowstone plume had a substantial impact on the nearby Cascadia subduction zone, promoting the tearing and weakening of the JdF slab. This interpretation also explains several intriguing geophysical properties of the Cascadia trench that contrast with most other subduction zones, such as the absence of deep seismicity and the trench-normal fast direction of mantle anisotropy. The DNA velocity models are available for download and slicing at http://dna.berkeley.edu.

  9. Flat slabs seen from above: aeromagnetic data in Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, M.; Manea, V. C.

    2006-12-01

    The aeromagnetic map of Mexico shows a magnetic "quiet zone" in Guerrero and Oaxaca (Central Mexico), characterized by a general lack of short-wavelength magnetic anomalies. In order to investigate the magnetic quiet zone in relation with the thermal sources, spectral analysis has been applied to the aeromagnetic data. The results show the existence of deep magnetic sources (30-40 km) which we consider to be the Currie depth (corresponding to a temperature of 575-600°). Above the Curie temperature spontaneous magnetization vanishes and the minerals exhibit only a small paramagnetic susceptibility. Our estimates of magnetic basal depth are consistent with the heat flow measurements in the area (20-30 mW/m2). In order to explain such deep magnetic source and small heat flow estimates, we infer the thermal structure associated with the subduction of the Cocos plate beneath Central Mexico, using a finite element approach. The modeling results show that the 575-600°C isotherm is subhorisontal due to the flat slab regime in the area. Also, the heat flow estimates from thermal models and spectral analysis of aeromagnetic anomalies are in good agreement. We conclude that the magnetic quiet zone is associated with a flat slab subduction regime in Central Mexico, and proved to be an important constraint for the thermal structure associated with subduction zones.

  10. Investigation on the properties of the formation and coherence of intense fringe near nonlinear medium slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yonghua; Qiu, Yaqiong; Li, Yang; Shi, Lin

    2018-03-01

    Near medium intense (NMI) fringe is a kind of intense fringe which can be formed near Kerr medium in high-power laser beam propagation. The formation properties of NMI fringe and the relations between NMI fringe and related important parameters are systematically investigated. It is found that it is the co-existence of two wirelike phase-typed scatterers in the incident beam spot which is mainly responsible for the high intensity of NMI fringe. From the viewpoint of coherent superposition, the formation process of NMI fringe is analyzed, and the mechanism that NMI fringe is formed by the coherent superposition of the localized bright fringes in the exit field of Kerr medium slab is demonstrated. The fluctuations of NMI fringe properties with beam wavelength, scatterer spacing and object distance are studied, the coherence of NMI fringe are revealed, and the approximate periodicity of the appearance of remarkable NMI fringe for these parameters are obtained. Especially, it is found that the intensity of NMI fringe is very sensitive to scatterer spacing. Besides, the laws about how NMI fringe properties will be changed by the modulation properties of scatterers and the medium thickness are demonstrated.

  11. Experimental and finite element study of ultimate strength of continuous composite concrete slabs with steel decking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholamhoseini, Alireza

    2018-03-01

    Composite one-way concrete slabs with profiled steel decking as permanent formwork are commonly used in the construction industry. The steel decking supports the wet concrete of a cast in situ reinforced or post-tensioned concrete slab and, after the concrete sets, acts as external reinforcement. In this type of slab, longitudinal shear failure between the concrete and the steel decking is the most common type of failure at the ultimate load stage. Design codes require the experimental evaluation of the ultimate load capacity and longitudinal shear strength of each type of steel decking using full-scale tests on simple-span slabs. There is also no procedure in current design codes to evaluate the ultimate load capacity and longitudinal shear strength of continuous composite slabs and this is often assessed experimentally by full-scale tests. This paper presents the results of three full-scale tests up to failure on continuous composite concrete slabs cast with trapezoidal steel decking profile (KF70) that is widely used in Australia. Slab specimens were tested in four-point bending at each span with shear spans of span/4. The longitudinal shear failure of each slab is evaluated and the measured mid-span deflection, the end slip and the mid-span steel and concrete strains are also presented and discussed. Redistribution of bending moment in each slab is presented and discussed. A finite element model is proposed and verified by experimental data using interface element to model the bond properties between steel decking and concrete slab and investigate the ultimate strength of continuous composite concrete slabs.

  12. X-Ray Laser Program Final Report for FY92

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    also produced population inversion. Ultra- intense , femtosecond- pulsed laboratory lasers ranging from the ultraviolet to the infrared represent an...with pulse lengths of 650 femtoseconds normally Incident on a 2p. thick planar aluminum slab. Comparisons are made for two laser Intensities , two...prepulse is subsequently irradiated by the main high intensity pulse . The persistence of the heliumlike ground state raises the possibility that a photon

  13. A seismological constraint on the age of a subducting slab: the Huatung basin offshore Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.; Kuo, B.

    2010-12-01

    At the northwestern corner of the Philippine basin, collision and subduction are taking place simultaneously as the Philippine Sea plate is obliquely subducting beneath the Ryukyu trench and NE Taiwan. What is engaging in these processes is the Huatung basin (HB) lithosphere, a small piece of oceanic lithosphere which, unlike the rest of the Philippine Sea plate, is controversial in its age and structure. Because certain ages of lithosphere correspond to certain overall velocity structures, we examine how old the subducting slab of the HB has to be to satisfy seismological observations. We select from broadband seismic networks on Taiwan a rough linear array that points to the events in the Kuril trench region, rendering a slab dipping towards the upcoming P wave field. The slab thus defocuses seismic energy and produces an amplitude low along the array with magnitude and spread controlled by the age of the slab. We employ a 2D finite-difference waveform technique and experimented with 2 types of slab models with various ages: a simplistic conduction model and a high-resolution slab-wedge convection model. The older and thicker the slab, the more widely the predicted amplitude low spreads. Comparison with the observations indicates that the best slab ages fall into 20-50 Ma. This is at odds with the 125 Ma Ar-Ar dating model. Now the issue is not how to make the chronologically old lithosphere seismologically young, but why those basaltic rock samples dated to be old are located on the HB.

  14. Juan de Fuca slab geometry and its relation to Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Waldhause, Felix; Oppenheimer, David H.

    2012-01-01

    A new model of the subducted Juan de Fuca plate beneath western North America allows first-order correlations between the occurrence of Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes and slab geometry, temperature, and hydration state. The geo-referenced 3D model, constructed from weighted control points, integrates depth information from earthquake locations and regional seismic velocity studies. We use the model to separate earthquakes that occur in the Cascadia forearc from those that occur within the underlying Juan de Fuca plate and thereby reveal previously obscured details regarding the spatial distribution of earthquakes. Seismicity within the slab is most prevalent where the slab is warped beneath northwestern California and western Washington suggesting that slab flexure, in addition to expected metamorphic dehydration processes, promotes earthquake occurrence within the subducted oceanic plate. Earthquake patterns beneath western Vancouver Island are consistent with slab dehydration processes. Conversely, the lack of slab earthquakes beneath western Oregon is consistent with an anhydrous slab. Double-differenced relocated seismicity resolves a double seismic zone within the slab beneath northwestern California that strongly constrains the location of the plate interface and delineates a cluster of seismicity 10 km above the surface that includes the 1992 M7.1 Mendocino earthquake. We infer that this earthquake ruptured a surface within the Cascadia accretionary margin above the Juan de Fuca plate. We further speculate that this earthquake is associated with a detached fragment of former Farallon plate. Other subsurface tectonic elements within the forearc may have the potential to generate similar damaging earthquakes.

  15. ENGINEERING DESIGN CRITERIA FOR SUB-SLAB DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS IN LOW-PERMEABILTY SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of engineering design criteria for the successful design, installation, and operation of sub-slab depressurization systems, based on radon (Rn) mitigation experience on 14 slab-on-grade houses in South Central Florida. The Florida houses are c...

  16. Anomalous refraction of a low divergence monochromatic light beam in a transparent slab.

    PubMed

    Lequime, Michel; Amra, Claude

    2018-04-01

    An exact formulation for the propagation of a monochromatic wave packet impinging on a transparent, homogeneous, isotropic, and parallel slab at oblique incidence is given. Approximate formulas are derived for low divergence light beams. These formulas show the presence of anomalous refraction phenomena at any slab thickness, including negative refraction and flat lensing effects, induced by reflection at the rear face.

  17. Degradation and mechanism of the mechanics and durability of reinforced concrete slab in a marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheng-xing; Liu, Guan-guo; Bian, Han-bing; Lv, Wei-bo; Jiang, Jian-hua

    2016-04-01

    An experimental research was conducted to determine the corrosion and bearing capacity of a reinforced concrete (RC) slab at different ages in a marine environment. Results show that the development of corrosion-induced cracks on a slab in a marine environment can be divided into three stages according to crack morphology at the bottom of the slab. In the first stage, cracks appear. In the second stage, cracks develop from the edges to the middle of the slab. In the third stage, longitudinal and transverse corrosion-induced cracks coexist. The corrosion ratio of reinforcements nonlinearly increases with the age, and the relationship between the corrosion ratio of the reinforcements and the corrosion-induced crack width of the concrete is established. The flexural capacity of the corroded RC slab nonlinearly decreases with the age, and the model for the bearing capacity factor of the corroded RC slab is established. The mid-span deflection of the corroded RC slab that corresponds to the yield of the reinforcements linearly increases with the increase in corrosion ratio. Finally, the mechanisms of corrosion morphology and the degradation of the mechanical properties of an RC slab in a marine environment are discussed on the basis of the basic theories of steel corrosion in concrete and concrete structure design.

  18. Slab track field test and demonstration program for shared freight and high-speed passenger service

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-08-01

    Two types of slab tracks were installed on the High Tonnage Loop at the Facility for Accelerated Service Testing. Direct fixation slab track (DFST) and independent dual block track (IDBT) were installed into a 5-degree curve with 4-inch superelevatio...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLING PROTOCOL TO SUPPORT ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary purpose of this research effort is to develop a methodology for sub-slab sampling to support the EPA guidance and vapor intrusion investigations after vapor intrusion has been established at a site. Methodologies for sub-slab air sampling are currently lacking in ref...

  20. Flexural performance of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) ribbed slab with various topping thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Fadhillah Abdul; Bakar, Afidah Abu; Hashim, Mohd Hisbany Mohd; Ahmad, Hazrina

    2017-11-01

    Ribbed slab provides lighter slab than an equivalent solid slab which helps in reducing the weight with its voids. However, in order to overcome the drawbacks in the construction process, the application of steel fibre reinforcement concrete (SFRC) is seen as an alternative material to be used in the slab. This study is performed to investigate the behaviour of SFRC as the main material in ribbed slab, omitting the conventional reinforcements, under four-point bending test. Three equivalent samples of ribbed slabs were prepared for this study with variations in the topping thickness of 100, 75 and 50 mm. The flexural strength of ribbed slab with 100 mm topping shows similar loading carrying capacity with the 75mm topping while 50 mm gave the lowest ultimate loading. First cracks for all slabs occurred at the topping. The cracks began from the external ribs and propagates toward the internal rib. Incorporation of steel fibres help in giving a longer deflection softening than a sudden brittle failure, thus proves its ability to increase energy absorption capacity and improving cracking behaviour.

  1. Accelerated slab replacement using temporary precast panels and self-consolidating concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-06

    Slab replacement is the main activity in any concrete pavement rehabilitation project. According to a survey of industry and FDOT, contractor productivity in slab replacements has been very low, ranging between 25 to 50 cu. yds. The low number of sla...

  2. Time-to-Corrosion of Reinforcing Steel in Concrete Slabs, Vol. 4: Galvanized Reinforcing Steel

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-12-01

    Four-ft. by 5-ft. by 6-inch (1.2m x 1.5m x 0.15m) reinforced concrete slabs were fabricated, cured and subjected to 7 years of daily salting at an outdoor exposure yard. Subsequently, the slabs were modified and instrumented to allow direct measureme...

  3. Farallon slab detachment and deformation of the Magdalena Shelf, southern Baja California

    Brothers, Daniel S.; Harding, Alistair J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Antonio; Holbrook, W.S. Steven; Kent, Graham M.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Fletcher, John M.; Lizarralde, Daniel; Umhoefer, Paul J.; Axen, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Subduction of the Farallon plate beneath northwestern Mexico stalled by ~12 Ma when the Pacific-Farallon spreading-ridge approached the subduction zone. Coupling between remnant slab and the overriding North American plate played an important role in the capture of the Baja California (BC) microplate by the Pacific Plate. Active-source seismic reflection and wide-angle seismic refraction profiles across southwestern BC (~24.5°N) are used to image the extent of remnant slab and study its impact on the overriding plate. We infer that the hot, buoyant slab detached ~40 km landward of the fossil trench. Isostatic rebound following slab detachment uplifted the margin and exposed the Magdalena Shelf to wave-base erosion. Subsequent cooling, subsidence and transtensional opening along the shelf (starting ~8 Ma) starved the fossil trench of terrigenous sediment input. Slab detachment and the resultant rebound of the margin provide a mechanism for rapid uplift and exhumation of forearc subduction complexes.

  4. Experimental validation of systematically designed acoustic hyperbolic meta material slab exhibiting negative refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Rasmus E.; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-09-01

    This Letter reports on the experimental validation of a two-dimensional acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial slab optimized to exhibit negative refractive behavior. The slab was designed using a topology optimization based systematic design method allowing for tailoring the refractive behavior. The experimental results confirm the predicted refractive capability as well as the predicted transmission at an interface. The study simultaneously provides an estimate of the attenuation inside the slab stemming from the boundary layer effects—insight which can be utilized in the further design of the metamaterial slabs. The capability of tailoring the refractive behavior opens possibilities for different applications. For instance, a slab exhibiting zero refraction across a wide angular range is capable of funneling acoustic energy through it, while a material exhibiting the negative refractive behavior across a wide angular range provides lensing and collimating capabilities.

  5. Mantle flow through a tear in the Nazca slab inferred from shear wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynner, Colton; Anderson, Megan L.; Portner, Daniel E.; Beck, Susan L.; Gilbert, Hersh

    2017-07-01

    A tear in the subducting Nazca slab is located between the end of the Pampean flat slab and normally subducting oceanic lithosphere. Tomographic studies suggest mantle material flows through this opening. The best way to probe this hypothesis is through observations of seismic anisotropy, such as shear wave splitting. We examine patterns of shear wave splitting using data from two seismic deployments in Argentina that lay updip of the slab tear. We observe a simple pattern of plate-motion-parallel fast splitting directions, indicative of plate-motion-parallel mantle flow, beneath the majority of the stations. Our observed splitting contrasts previous observations to the north and south of the flat slab region. Since plate-motion-parallel splitting occurs only coincidentally with the slab tear, we propose mantle material flows through the opening resulting in Nazca plate-motion-parallel flow in both the subslab mantle and mantle wedge.

  6. Field evaluation of corrosion inhibitors for concrete. Interim report 1, Evaluation of exposure slabs repaired with corrosion inhibitors.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-six exposure slabs have been constructed with and without a variety of combinations of corrosion inhibiting admixtures and topically applied inhibitors. To accelerate corrosion one hundred and thirty-six of the slabs were constr...

  7. Unusually deep Bonin earthquake of 30 May 2015: A precursory signal to slab penetration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoshio; Yoshimitsu, Junko

    2017-02-01

    An M7.9 earthquake occurred on 30 May 2015 at an unusual depth of 680 km downward and away from the well-defined Wadati-Benioff (WB) zone of the southern Bonin arc. To the north (northern Bonin), the subducted slab is stagnant above the upper-lower mantle boundary at 660-km depth, where the WB zone bends forward to sub-horizontal. To the south (northern Mariana), it penetrates the boundary, where the WB zone extends near-vertically down to the boundary. Thus, the southern Bonin slab can be regarded as being in a transitional state from slab stagnation to penetration. The transition is shown to happen rapidly within the northern half of the southern Bonin slab where the heel part of the shoe-like configured stagnant slab hits the significantly depressed 660-km discontinuity. The mainshock and aftershocks took place in this heel part where they are sub-vertically aligned in approximate parallel to their maximum compressional axes. Here, the dips of the compressional axes of WB zone earthquakes change rapidly across the thickness of the slab from the eastern to western side and along the strike of the slab from the northern to southern side, suggesting rapid switching of the downdip compression axis in the shoe-shaped slab. Elastic deformation associated with the WB zone seismicity is calculated by viewing it as an integral part of the slab deformation process. With this deformation, the heel part is deepened relative to the arch part and is compressed sub-vertically and stretched sub-horizontally, a tendency consistent with the idea of progressive decent of the heel part in which near-vertical compressional stress is progressively accumulated to generate isolated shocks like the 2015 event and eventually to initiate slab penetration.

  8. Geometry of slab, intraslab stress field and its tectonic implication in the Nankai trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Kono, Y.

    2002-07-01

    The characteristics of geometry of slabs and the intraslab stress field in the Nankai subduction zone, Japan, were analyzed based on highly accurate hypocentral data and focal mechanism solutions. The results suggest that the shallow seismic zone of the Philippine Sea slab subducts with dip angels between 10 and 22 degrees beneath Shikoku and the Kii peninsula, and between 11 and 40 degrees beneath Kyushu. Two types of seismogenic stress field exist within the slab. The stress field of down-dip compression type can be seen in the slab beneath Shikoku and the Kii peninsula, where the horizontal component of regional compression stress is NNW. On the other hand the stress field of down-dip extension type within the slab is dominant in the region from western Shikoku to Kyushu, where the direction of horizontal compressive stress is near WWN. The existence of the two types of stress field is related to the differences of slab geometry and slab age of the subduciton zone. These properties imply that slab beneath Kyushu (40 Ma) probably is older than that beneath Shikoku and the Kii peninsula (11-20 Ma). The young slab of the oceanic Philippine Sea plate subducts with a shallow angle beneath the Eurasian plate in Shikoku and the Kii peninsula. The subduction has encountered strong resistance there, resulting in a down-dip compression stress field. The down-dip extension stress field may be related to the older slab of the Philippine Sea plate which subducts beneath Kyushu with a steeper dip angle.

  9. Slab detachment during continental collision: Influence of crustal rheology and interaction with lithospheric delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T. V.

    2013-08-01

    Collision between continents can lead to the subduction of continental material. If the crust remains coupled to the downgoing slab, a large buoyancy force is generated. This force slows down convergence and promotes slab detachment. If the crust resists to subduction, it may decouple from the downgoing slab and be subjected to buoyant extrusion. We employ two-dimensional thermo-mechanical modelling to study the importance of crustal rheology on the evolution of subduction-collision systems. We propose simple quantifications of the mechanical decoupling between lithospheric levels (σ*) and the potential for buoyant extrusion of the crust (ξ*). The modelling results indicate that a variable crustal rheological structure results in slab detachment, delamination, or the combination of both mechanisms. A strong crust provides coupling at the Moho (low σ*) and remains coherent during subduction (low ξ). It promotes deep subduction of the crust (180 km) and slab detachment. Exhumation occurs in coherent manners via eduction and thrusting. Slab detachment triggers the development of topography (> 4.5 km) close to the suture. A contrasting style of collision occurs using a weak crustal rheology. Mechanical decoupling at the Moho (high σ*) promotes the extrusion of the crust (high ξ), disabling slab detachment. Ongoing shortening leads to buckling of the crust and development of topography on the lower plate. Collisions involving rheologically layered crust allow decoupling at mid-crustal depths. This structure favours both the extrusion of upper crust and the subduction of the lower crust. Such collisions are successively affected by delamination and slab detachment. Topography develops together with the buoyant extrusion of crust onto the foreland and is further amplified by slab detachment. Our results suggest that the occurrence of both delamination (Apennines) and slab detachment (Himalayas) in orogens may indicate differences in the initial crustal structure of

  10. Diffusive Propagation of Exciton-Polaritons through Thin Crystal Slabs

    PubMed Central

    Zaitsev, D. A.; Il’ynskaya, N. D.; Koudinov, A. V.; Poletaev, N. K.; Nikitina, E. V.; Egorov, A. Yu.; Kavokin, A. V.; Seisyan, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    If light beam propagates through matter containing point impurity centers, the amount of energy absorbed by the media is expected to be either independent of the impurity concentration N or proportional to N, corresponding to the intrinsic absorption or impurity absorption, respectively. Comparative studies of the resonant transmission of light in the vicinity of exciton resonances measured for 15 few-micron GaAs crystal slabs with different values of N, reveal a surprising tendency. While N spans almost five decimal orders of magnitude, the normalized spectrally-integrated absorption of light scales with the impurity concentration as N1/6. We show analytically that this dependence is a signature of the diffusive mechanism of propagation of exciton-polaritons in a semiconductor. PMID:26088555

  11. High-Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciT

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    A more accurate assessment of slab-on-grade foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulationmore » at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated).« less

  12. Electron emission produced by photointeractions in a slab target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thinger, B. E.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The current density and energy spectrum of escaping electrons generated in a uniform plane slab target which is being irradiated by the gamma flux field of a nuclear reactor are calculated by using experimental gamma energy transfer coefficients, electron range and energy relations, and escape probability computations. The probability of escape and the average path length of escaping electrons are derived for an isotropic distribution of monoenergetic photons. The method of estimating the flux and energy distribution of electrons emerging from the surface is outlined, and a sample calculation is made for a 0.33-cm-thick tungsten target located next to the core of a nuclear reactor. The results are to be used as a guide in electron beam synthesis of reactor experiments.

  13. Lasers '81

    SciT

    Collins, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in lasers is discussed. The subjects addressed include: excimer lasers, surface spectroscopy, modern laser spectroscopy, free electron lasers, cavities and propagation, lasers in medicine, X-ray and gamma ray lasers, laser spectroscopy of small molecules and clusters, optical bistability, excitons, nonlinear optics in the X-ray and gamma ray regions, collective atomic phenomena, tunable IR lasers, far IR/submillimeter lasers, and laser-assisted collisions. Also treated are: special applications, multiphoton processes in atoms and small molecules, nuclear pumped lasers, material processing and applications, polarization, high energy lasers, laser chemistry, IR molecular lasers, laser applications of collision and dissociation phenomena, solid state laser materials,more » phase conjugation, advances in laser technology for fusion, metal vapor lasers, picosecond phenomena, laser ranging and geodesy, and laser photochemistry of complex molecules.« less

  14. Research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass for high power laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lili; He, Dongbing; Chen, Huiyu; Wang, Xin; Meng, Tao; Wen, Lei; Hu, Junjiang; Xu, Yongchun; Li, Shunguang; Chen, Youkuo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shubin; Tang, Jingping; Wang, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Neodymium phosphate laser glass is a key optical element for high-power laser facility. In this work, the latest research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM), China, is addressed. Neodymium phosphate laser glasses, N31, N41, NAP2, and NAP4, for high peak power and high average power applications have been developed. The properties of these glasses are presented and compared to those of other commercial neodymium phosphate laser glass from the Schott and Hoya companies and the Vavilov State Optical Institute (GOI), Russia. Continuous melting and edge cladding are the two key fabrication techniques that are used for the mass production of neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs. These techniques for the fabrication of large-aperture N31 neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs with low stress birefringence and residual reflectivity have been developed by us The effect of acid etching on the microstructure, optical transmission, and mechanical properties of NAP2 glass is also discussed.

  15. Research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass for high power laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lili; He, Dongbing; Chen, Huiyu; Wang, Xin; Meng, Tao; Wen, Lei; Hu, Junjiang; Xu, Yongchun; Li, Shunguang; Chen, Youkuo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shubin; Tang, Jingping; Wang, Biao

    2016-12-01

    Neodymium phosphate laser glass is a key optical element for high-power laser facility. In this work, the latest research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM), China, is addressed. Neodymium phosphate laser glasses, N31, N41, NAP2, and NAP4, for high peak power and high average power applications have been developed. The properties of these glasses are presented and compared to those of other commercial neodymium phosphate laser glass from the Schott and Hoya companies and the Vavilov State Optical Institute (GOI), Russia. Continuous melting and edge cladding are the two key fabrication techniques that are used for the mass production of neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs. These techniques for the fabrication of large-aperture N31 neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs with low stress birefringence and residual reflectivity have been developed by us The effect of acid etching on the microstructure, optical transmission, and mechanical properties of NAP2 glass is also discussed.

  16. A review of the geodynamic evolution of flat slab subduction in Mexico, Peru, and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Manea, Marina; Ferrari, Luca; Orozco, María Teresa; Wong Valenzuela, Raul; Husker, Allen Leroy; Kostoglodovc, Vlad; Ionescu, Constantin

    2017-04-01

    Subducting plates around the globe display a large variability in terms of slab geometry, including regions where smooth and little variation in subduction parameters is observed. While the vast majority of subduction slabs plunge into the mantle at different, but positive dip angles, the end-member case of flat-slab subduction seems to strongly defy this rule and move horizontally several hundreds of kilometers before diving into the surrounding hotter mantle. By employing a comparative assessment for the Mexican, Peruvian and Chilean flat-slab subduction zones we find a series of parameters that apparently facilitate slab flattening. Among them, trench roll-back, as well as strong variations and discontinuities in the structure of oceanic and overriding plates seem to be the most important. However, we were not able to find the necessary and sufficient conditions that provide an explanation for the formation of flat slabs in all three subduction zones. In order to unravel the origin of flat-slab subduction, it is probably necessary a numerical approach that considers also the influence of surrounding plates, and their corresponding geometries, on 3D subduction dynamics.

  17. A review of the geodynamic evolution of flat slab subduction in Mexico, Peru, and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, V. C.; Manea, M.; Ferrari, L.; Orozco-Esquivel, T.; Valenzuela, R. W.; Husker, A.; Kostoglodov, V.

    2017-01-01

    Subducting plates around the globe display a large variability in terms of slab geometry, including regions where smooth and little variation in subduction parameters is observed. While the vast majority of subduction slabs plunge into the mantle at different, but positive dip angles, the end-member case of flat-slab subduction seems to strongly defy this rule and move horizontally several hundreds of kilometers before diving into the surrounding hotter mantle. By employing a comparative assessment for the Mexican, Peruvian and Chilean flat-slab subduction zones we find a series of parameters that apparently facilitate slab flattening. Among them, trench roll-back, as well as strong variations and discontinuities in the structure of oceanic and overriding plates seem to be the most important. However, we were not able to find the necessary and sufficient conditions that provide an explanation for the formation of flat slabs in all three subduction zones. In order to unravel the origin of flat-slab subduction, it is probably necessary a numerical approach that considers also the influence of surrounding plates, and their corresponding geometries, on 3D subduction dynamics.

  18. Tottori earthquakes and Daisen volcano: Effects of fluids, slab melting and hot mantle upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Liu, Xin; Hua, Yuanyuan

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the 3-D seismic structure of source areas of the 6 October 2000 Western Tottori earthquake (M 7.3) and the 21 October 2016 Central Tottori earthquake (M 6.6) which occurred near the Daisen volcano in SW Japan. The two large events took place in a high-velocity zone in the upper crust, whereas low-velocity (low-V) and high Poisson's ratio (high-σ) anomalies are revealed in the lower crust and upper mantle. Low-frequency micro-earthquakes (M 0.0-2.1) occur in or around the low-V and high-σ zones, which reflect upward migration of magmatic fluids from the upper mantle to the crust under the Daisen volcano. The nucleation of the Tottori earthquakes may be affected by the ascending fluids. The flat subducting Philippine Sea (PHS) slab has a younger lithosphere age and so a higher temperature beneath the Daisen and Tottori area, facilitating the PHS slab melting. It is also possible that a PHS slab window has formed along the extinct Shikoku Basin spreading ridge beneath SW Japan, and mantle materials below the PHS slab may ascend to the shallow area through the slab window. These results suggest that the Daisen adakite magma was affected by the PHS slab melting and upwelling flow in the upper mantle above the subducting Pacific slab.

  19. Age of the Subducting Philippine Sea Slab and Mechanism of Low-Frequency Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Yixian; Liu, Xin

    2018-03-01

    Nonvolcanic low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) usually occur in young and warm subduction zones under condition of near-lithostatic pore fluid pressure. However, the relation between the LFEs and the subducting slab age has never been documented so far. Here we estimate the lithospheric age of the subducting Philippine Sea (PHS) slab beneath the Nankai arc by linking seismic tomography and a plate reconstruction model. Our results show that the LFEs in SW Japan take place in young parts ( 17-26 Myr) of the PHS slab. However, no LFE occurs beneath the Kii channel where the PHS slab is very young ( 15 Myr) and thin ( 29 km), forming an LFE gap there. According to the present results and previous works, we think that the LFE gap at the Kii channel is caused by joint effects of several factors, including the youngest slab age, high temperature, low fluid content, high permeability of the overlying plate, a slab tear, and hot upwelling flow below the PHS slab.

  20. Meteorological variables associated with deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers

    Marienthal, Alex; Hendrikx, Jordy; Birkeland, Karl; Irvine, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Deep slab avalanches are a particularly challenging avalanche forecasting problem. These avalanches are typically difficult to trigger, yet when they are triggered they tend to propagate far and result in large and destructive avalanches. For this work we define deep slab avalanches as those that fail on persistent weak layers deeper than 0.9m (3 feet), and that occur after February 1st. We utilized a 44-year record of avalanche control and meteorological data from Bridger Bowl Ski Area to test the usefulness of meteorological variables for predicting deep slab avalanches. As in previous studies, we used data from the days preceding deep slab cycles, but we also considered meteorological metrics over the early months of the season. We utilized classification trees for our analyses. Our results showed warmer temperatures in the prior twenty-four hours and more loading over the seven days before days with deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers. In line with previous research, extended periods of above freezing temperatures led to days with deep wet slab avalanches on persistent weak layers. Seasons with either dry or wet avalanches on deep persistent weak layers typically had drier early months, and often had some significant snow depth prior to those dry months. This paper provides insights for ski patrollers, guides, and avalanche forecasters who struggle to forecast deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers late in the season.

  1. Review of Punching Shear Behaviour of Flat Slabs Reinforced with FRP Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Osama A.; Khattab, Rania

    2017-10-01

    Using Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bars to reinforce two-way concrete slabs can extend the service life, reduce maintenance cost and improve-life cycle cost efficiency. FRP reinforcing bars are more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional reinforcing steel. Shear behaviour of reinforced concrete structural members is a complex phenomenon that relies on the development of internal load-carrying mechanisms, the magnitude and combination of which is still a subject of research. Many building codes and design standards provide design formulas for estimation of punching shear capacity of FRP reinforced flat slabs. Building code formulas take into account the effects of the axial stiffness of main reinforcement bars, the ratio of the perimeter of the critical section to the slab effective depth, and the slab thickness on the punching shear capacity of two-way slabs reinforced with FRP bars or grids. The goal of this paper is to compare experimental data published in the literature to the equations offered by building codes for the estimation of punching shear capacity of concrete flat slabs reinforced with FRP bars. Emphasis in this paper is on two North American codes, namely, ACI 440.1R-15 and CSA S806-12. The experimental data covered in this paper include flat slabs reinforced with GFRP, BFRP, and CFRP bars. Both ACI 440.1R-15 and CSA S806-12 are shown to be in good agreement with test results in terms of predicting the punching shear capacity.

  2. Low electrical resistivity associated with plunging of the Nazca flat slab beneath Argentina.

    PubMed

    Booker, John R; Favetto, Alicia; Pomposiello, M Cristina

    2004-05-27

    Beneath much of the Andes, oceanic lithosphere descends eastward into the mantle at an angle of about 30 degrees (ref. 1). A partially molten region is thought to form in a wedge between this descending slab and the overlying continental lithosphere as volatiles given off by the slab lower the melting temperature of mantle material. This wedge is the ultimate source for magma erupted at the active volcanoes that characterize the Andean margin. But between 28 degrees and 33 degrees S the subducted Nazca plate appears to be anomalously buoyant, as it levels out at about 100 km depth and extends nearly horizontally under the continent. Above this 'flat slab', volcanic activity in the main Andean Cordillera terminated about 9 million years ago as the flattening slab presumably squeezed out the mantle wedge. But it is unknown where slab volatiles go once this happens, and why the flat slab finally rolls over to descend steeply into the mantle 600 km further eastward. Here we present results from a magnetotelluric profile in central Argentina, from which we infer enhanced electrical conductivity along the eastern side of the plunging slab, indicative of the presence of partial melt. This conductivity structure may imply that partial melting occurs to at least 250 km and perhaps to more than 400 km depth, or that melt is supplied from the 410 km discontinuity, consistent with the transition-zone 'water-filter' model of Bercovici and Karato.

  3. High-quality slab-based intermixing method for fusion rendering of multiple medical objects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joon; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Juneseuk; Kim, Kyoung Won; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    The visualization of multiple 3D objects has been increasingly required for recent applications in medical fields. Due to the heterogeneity in data representation or data configuration, it is difficult to efficiently render multiple medical objects in high quality. In this paper, we present a novel intermixing scheme for fusion rendering of multiple medical objects while preserving the real-time performance. First, we present an in-slab visibility interpolation method for the representation of subdivided slabs. Second, we introduce virtual zSlab, which extends an infinitely thin boundary (such as polygonal objects) into a slab with a finite thickness. Finally, based on virtual zSlab and in-slab visibility interpolation, we propose a slab-based visibility intermixing method with the newly proposed rendering pipeline. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method delivers more effective multiple-object renderings in terms of rendering quality, compared to conventional approaches. And proposed intermixing scheme provides high-quality intermixing results for the visualization of intersecting and overlapping surfaces by resolving aliasing and z-fighting problems. Moreover, two case studies are presented that apply the proposed method to the real clinical applications. These case studies manifest that the proposed method has the outstanding advantages of the rendering independency and reusability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ian A. D.; Mousavi, S. Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100× wavelength reduction from graphene’s large kinetic inductance. The atomically thin graphene further leads to excellent out-of-plane confinement, and consequently photonic-crystal-slab band structures that closely resemble those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crystals, graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs confine light along line defects, forming waveguides with the propagation lengths on the order of tens of lattice constants. The proposed structure opens up the possibility to dramatically reduce the size of terahertz photonic systems by orders of magnitude. PMID:27143314

  5. Closure behavior of spherical void in slab during hot rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rong; Zhang, Jiongming; Wang, Bo

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical properties of steels are heavily deteriorated by voids. The influence of voids on the product quality should be eliminated through rolling processes. The study on the void closure during hot rolling processes is necessary. In present work, the closure behavior of voids at the center of a slab at 800 °C during hot rolling processes has been simulated with a 3D finite element model. The shape of the void and the plastic strain distribution of the slab are obtained by this model. The void decreases along the slab thickness direction and spreads along the rolling direction but hardly changes along the strip width direction. The relationship between closure behavior of voids and the plastic strain at the center of the slab is analyzed. The effects of rolling reduction, slab thickness and roller diameter on the closure behavior of voids are discussed. The larger reduction, thinner slab and larger roller diameter all improve the closure of voids during hot rolling processes. Experimental results of the closure behavior of a void in the slab during hot rolling process mostly agree with the simulation results..

  6. Imaging the slab structure in the Alpine region by high-resolution P-wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Stéphane; Zhao, Liang; Paul, Anne; Malusà, Marco G.; Xu, Xiaobing; Zheng, Tianyu; Solarino, stefano; Schwartz, Stéphane; Dumont, Thierry; Salimbeni, Simone; Aubert, Coralie; Pondrelli, Silvia; Wang, Qingchen; Zhu, Rixiang

    2017-04-01

    Based upon a finite-frequency inversion of traveltimes, we computed a new high-resolution tomography model using P-wave data from 527 broadband seismic stations, both from permanent networks and temporary experiments (Zhao et al., 2016). This model provides an improved image of the slab structure in the Alpine region, and fundamental pin-points for the analysis of Cenozoic magmatism, (U)HP metamorphism and Alpine topography. Our results document the lateral continuity of the European slab from the Western to the Central Alps, and the down-dip slab continuity beneath the Central Alps, ruling out the hypothesis of slab breakoff to explain Cenozoic Alpine magmatism. A low velocity anomaly is observed in the upper mantle beneath the core of the Western Alps, pointing to dynamic topography effects (Malusà et al., this meeting). A NE-dipping Adriatic slab, consistent with Dinaric subduction, is possibly observed beneath the Eastern Alps, whereas the laterally continuous Adriatic slab of the Northern Apennines shows major gaps at the boundary with the Southern Apennines, and becomes near vertical in the Alps-Apennines transition zone. Tear faults accommodating opposite-dipping subductions during Alpine convergence may represent reactivated lithospheric faults inherited from Tethyan extension. Our results suggest that the interpretations of previous tomography results that include successive slab breakoffs along the Alpine-Zagros-Himalaya orogenic belt might be proficiently reconsidered. Malusà M.G. et alii (2017) On the potential asthenospheric linkage between Apenninic slab rollback and Alpine topographic uplift: insights from P wave tomography and seismic anisotropy analysis. EGU 2017. Zhao L. et alii (2016), Continuity of the Alpine slab unraveled by high-resolution P wave tomography. J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2016JB013310.

  7. Diode pumped solid-state laser oscillators for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Basu, S.; Fan, T. Y.; Kozlovsky, W. J.; Nabors, C. D.; Nilsson, A.; Huber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The rapid improvement in diode laser pump sources has led to the recent progress in diode laser pumped solid state lasers. To date, electrical efficiencies of greater than 10 percent were demonstrated. As diode laser costs decrease with increased production volume, diode laser and diode laser array pumped solid state lasers will replace the traditional flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser sources. The use of laser diode array pumping of slab geometry lasers will allow efficient, high peak and average power solid state laser sources to be developed. Perhaps the greatest impact of diode laser pumped solid state lasers will be in spectroscopic applications of miniature, monolithic devices. Single-stripe diode-pumped operation of a continuous-wave 946 nm Nd:YAG laser with less than 10 m/w threshold was demonstrated. A slope efficiency of 16 percent near threshold was shown with a projected slope efficiency well above a threshold of 34 percent based on results under Rhodamine 6G dye-laser pumping. Nonlinear crystals for second-harmonic generation of this source were evaluated. The KNbO3 and periodically poled LiNbO3 appear to be the most promising.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation of slabs on ground subjected to concentrated loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Øverli, Jan

    2014-09-01

    An experimental program is presented where a slab on ground is subjected to concentrated loading at the centre, the edges and at the corners. Analytical solutions for the ultimate load capacity fit well with the results obtained in the tests. The non-linear behaviour of the slab is captured by performing nonlinear finite element analyses. The soil is modelled as a no-tension bedding and a smeared crack approach is employed for the concrete. Through a parametric study, the finite element model has been used to assess the influence of subgrade stiffness and shrinkage. The results indicate that drying shrinkage can cause severe cracking in slabs on grade.

  9. Software Analytical Instrument for Assessment of the Process of Casting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franěk, Zdeněk; Kavička, František; Štětina, Josef; Masarik, Miloš

    2010-06-01

    The paper describes the original proposal of ways of solution and function of the program equipment for assessment of the process of casting slabs. The program system LITIOS was developed and implemented in EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel Ostrava on the equipment of continuous casting of steel (further only ECC). This program system works on the data warehouse of technological parameters of casting and quality parameters of slabs. It enables an ECC technologist to analyze the course of casting melt and with using statistics methods to set the influence of single technological parameters on the duality of final slabs. The system also enables long term monitoring and optimization of the production.

  10. Dissipative instability in a partially ionised prominence plasma slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballai, I.; Pintér, B.; Oliver, R.; Alexandrou, M.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We aim to investigate the nature of dissipative instability appearing in a prominence planar thread filled with partially ionised plasma in the incompressible limit. The importance of partial ionisation is investigated in terms of the ionisation factor and the wavelength of sausage and kink waves propagating in the slab. Methods: In order to highlight the role of partial ionisation, we have constructed models describing various situations we can meet in solar prominence fine structure. Matching the solutions for the transversal component of the velocity and total pressure at the interfaces between the prominence slab and surrounding plasmas, we derived a dispersion relation whose imaginary part describes the evolution of the instability. Results were obtained in the limit of weak dissipation. We have investigated the appearance of instabilities in prominence dark plumes using single and two-fluid approximations. Results: Using simple analytical methods, we show that dissipative instabilities appear for flow speeds that are less than the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability threshold. The onset of instability is determined by the equilibrium flow strength, the ionisation factor of the plasma, the wavelength of waves and the ion-neutral collisional rate. For a given wavelength and for ionisation degrees closer to a neutral gas, the propagating waves become unstable for a narrow band of flow speeds, meaning that neutrals have a stabilising effect. Our results show that the partially ionised plasma describing prominence dark plumes becomes unstable only in a two-fluid (charged particles-neutrals) model, that is for periods that are smaller than the ion-neutral collision time. Conclusions: The present study improves our understanding of the complexity of dynamical processes and stability of solar prominences and the role partial ionisation in destabilising the plasma. We showed the necessity of two-fluid approximation when discussing the nature of instabilities: waves in

  11. Structural vulnerability assessment using reliability of slabs in avalanche area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Philomène; Bertrand, David; Eckert, Nicolas; Naaim, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    Improvement of risk assessment or hazard zoning requires a better understanding of the physical vulnerability of structures. To consider natural hazard issue such as snow avalanches, once the flow is characterized, highlight on the mechanical behaviour of the structure is a decisive step. A challenging approach is to quantify the physical vulnerability of impacted structures according to various avalanche loadings. The main objective of this presentation is to introduce methodology and outcomes regarding the assessment of vulnerability of reinforced concrete buildings using reliability methods. Reinforced concrete has been chosen as it is one of the usual material used to build structures exposed to potential avalanche loadings. In avalanche blue zones, structures have to resist to a pressure up to 30kPa. Thus, by providing systematic fragility relations linked to the global failure of the structure, this method may serve the avalanche risk assessment. To do so, a slab was numerically designed. It represented the avalanche facing wall of a house. Different configuration cases of the element in stake have been treated to quantify numerical aspects of the problem, such as the boundary conditions or the mechanical behaviour of the structure. The structure is analysed according to four different limit states, semi-local and global failures are considered to describe the slab behaviour. The first state is attained when cracks appear in the tensile zone, then the two next states are described consistent with the Eurocode, the final state is the total collapse of the structure characterized by the yield line theory. Failure probability is estimated in accordance to the reliability framework. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to quantify the fragility to different loadings. Sensitivity of models in terms of input distributions were defined with statistical tools such as confidence intervals and Sobol's indexes. Conclusion and discussion of this work are established to

  12. Casimir forces on a bi-anisotropic absorbing magneto-dielectric slab between two parallel conducting plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amooshahi, Majid; Shoughi, Ali

    2018-05-01

    A fully canonical quantization of electromagnetic field in the presence of a bi-anisotropic absorbing magneto-dielectric slab is demonstrated. The electric and the magnetic polarization densities of the magneto-dielectric slab are defined in terms of the dynamical variables modeling the slab and the coupling tensors that couple the electromagnetic field to the slab. The four susceptibility tensors of the bi-anisotropic magneto-dielectric slab are expressed in terms of the coupling tensors that couple an electromagnetic field to the slab. It is shown that the four susceptibility tensors of the bi-anisotropic magneto-dielectric slab satisfy Kramers-Kronig relations. The Maxwell’s equations are exactly solved in the presence of the bi-anisotropic magneto-dielectric slab. The tangential and the normal components of the Casimir forces exerted on the bi-anisotropic magnet-dielectric slab exactly are calculated in the vacuum state and thermal state of the total system. It is shown that the tangential components of the Casimir forces vanish when the bi-anisotropic slab is converted to an isotropic slab.

  13. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  14. Probing the liquid crystal alignment interface and switching dynamics in a slab waveguide architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotjen, Henry G.; Kolacz, Jakub; Myers, Jason D.; Frantz, Jesse A.; Bekele, Robel Y.; Naciri, Jawad; Spillmann, Christopher M.

    2018-02-01

    A non-mechanical refractive laser beam steering device has been developed to provide continuous, two-dimensional steering of infrared beams. The technology implements a dielectric slab waveguide architecture with a liquid crystal (LC) cladding. With voltage control, the birefringence of the LC can be leveraged to tune the effective index of the waveguide under an electrode. With a clever prism electrode design a beam coupled into the waveguide can be deflected continuously in two dimensions as it is coupled out into free space. The optical interaction with LC in this beamsteerer is unique from typical LC applications: only the thin layer of LC (100s of nm) near the alignment interface interacts with the beam's evanescent field. Whereas most LC interactions take place over short path lengths (microns) in the bulk of the material, here we can interrogate the behavior of LC near the alignment interface over long path lengths (centimeters). In this work the beamsteerer is leveraged as a tool to study the behavior of LC near the alignment layer in contrast to the bulk material. We find that scattering is substantially decreased near the alignment interface due to the influence of the surface anchoring energy to suppress thermal fluctuations. By tracking the position of the deflected beam with a high speed camera, we measure response times of the LC near the interface in off-to-on switching ( ms) and on-to-off switching ( 100ms). Combined, this work will provide a path for improved alignment techniques, greater optical throughput, and faster response times in this unique approach to non-mechanical beamsteering.

  15. Switches in subduction polarity, slab tearing and the opening of slab gaps along the Alpine chain - a view from the bottom up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, M. R.; Ustaszewski, K. M.; Kissling, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    Kinematic reconstructions of the Alpine orogen from Late Cretaceous to present time reveal that slab tearing and switches of subduction polarity are related to two slab gaps presently imaged as low-velocity anomalies at the transition of the Eastern and Central Alps, and beneath the northern Dinarides. A lithosphere-scale transfer fault at the Alps-Dinarides join (ADT) linked S-directed subduction of the oceanic part of the European plate in the Alps with N-directed subduction of the continental part of the Adriatic plate in the Dinarides in Late Cretaceous to Paleogene time. Transfer faulting in the Dinarides was initially situated along a suture zone, then jumped westward no later than 40 Ma as thrusting and subduction affected more external units of the Alps and Dinarides. Late Eocene Alpine collision led to a slowing of Adria-Europe convergence and initial rupturing of the European and Adriatic slabs in Eocene-Oligocene time, when most of the oceanic lithosphere broke off. This thermally preconditioned the lithosphere for a radical reorganization of slabs and mantle flow in the Alpine domain beginning in early Miocene time. This included the onset of Carpathian rollback subduction, as well as counterclockwise rotation and N-ward subduction of Adriatic continental lithosphere into the space beneath the Eastern Alps that was vacated by foundering and renewed tearing of the European slab in Oligocene-early Miocene time. Our plate reconstructions indicate that this tear nucleated at the tip of a subducted sliver of European continental lithosphere coinciding with the present location of the narrow slab gap between the Eastern and Central Alps. This tear then propagated horizontally to the NE along the subducted boundary of the European margin and the Carpathian embayment of the Alpine Tethyan ocean. The surface response to slab tearing included peneplainization and uplift of part of the Eastern Alps. Transfer faulting along the ADT gave way to back-arc extension

  16. Analysis of prestressed concrete slab-and-beam structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapountzakis, E. J.; Katsikadelis, J. T.

    In this paper a solution to the problem of prestressed concrete slab-and-beam structures including creep and shrinkage effect is presented. The adopted model takes into account the resulting inplane forces and deformations of the plate as well as the axial forces and deformations of the beam, due to combined response of the system. The analysis consists in isolating the beams from the plate by sections parallel to the lower outer surface of the plate. The forces at the interface, which produce lateral deflection and inplane deformation to the plate and lateral deflection and axial deformation to the beam, are established using continuity conditions at the interface. The influence of creep and shrinkage effect relative with the time of the casting and the time of the loading of the plate and the beams is taken into account. The estimation of the prestressing axial force of the beams is accomplished iteratively. Both instant (e.g. friction, slip of anchorage) and time dependent losses are encountered. The solution of the arising plate and beam problems, which are nonlinearly coupled, is achieved using the analog equation method (AEM). The adopted model, compared with those ignoring the inplane forces and deformations, describes better the actual response of the plate-beams system and permits the evaluation of the shear forces at the interfaces, the knowledge of which is very important in the design of prefabricated ribbed plates.

  17. Temporary vs. Permanent Sub-slab Ports: A Comparative ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vapor intrusion (VI) is the migration of subsurface vapors, including radon and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), from the subsurface to indoor air. The VI exposure pathway extends from the contaminant source, which can be impacted soil, non-aqueous phase liquid, or contaminated groundwater, to indoor air-exposure points. Therefore, contaminated matrices may include groundwater, soil, soil gas, and indoor air. VOC contaminants of concern typically include halogenated solvents such as trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and chloroform, as well as petroleum hydrocarbons, such as the aromatic VOCs benzene, toluene, and xylenes. Radon is a colorless radioactive gas that is released by radioactive decay of radionuclides in rock and soil that migrate into homes through VI in a similar fashion to VOCs. This project focused on the performance of permanent versus temporary sub-slab sampling ports for the determination of VI of halogenated VOCs and radon into an unoccupied house. VOC and radon concentrations measured simultaneously in soil gas using collocated temporary and permanent ports appeared to be independent of the type of port. The variability between collocated temporary and permanent ports was much less than the spatial variability between different locations within a single residential duplex. The agreement of the majority of VOC and radon concentrations, 0–36% relative percent difference, and 2–19% relative standard deviation respectively, of each sub-sl

  18. Analysis of Meniscus Fluctuation in a Continuous Casting Slab Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaitian; Liu, Jianhua; Cui, Heng; Xiao, Chao

    2018-06-01

    A water model of slab mold was established to analyze the microscopic and macroscopic fluctuation of meniscus. The fast Fourier transform and wavelet entropy were adopted to analyze the wave amplitude, frequency, and components of fluctuation. The flow patterns under the meniscus were measured by using particle image velocimetry measurement and then the mechanisms of meniscus fluctuation were discussed. The results reflected that wavelet entropy had multi-scale and statistical properties, and it was suitable for the study of meniscus fluctuation details both in time and frequency domain. The basic wave, frequency of which exceeding 1 Hz in the condition of no mold oscillation, was demonstrated in this work. In fact, three basic waves were found: long-wave with low frequency, middle-wave with middle frequency, and short-wave with high frequency. In addition, the upper roll flow in mold had significant effect on meniscus fluctuation. When the position of flow impinged was far from the meniscus, long-wave dominated the fluctuation and the stability of meniscus was enhanced. However, when the velocity of flow was increased, the short-wave dominated the meniscus fluctuation and the meniscus stability was decreased.

  19. Flow field predictions for a slab delta wing at incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, R. J.; Thomas, P. D.; Chou, Y. S.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical results are presented for the structure of the hypersonic flow field of a blunt slab delta wing at moderately high angle of attack. Special attention is devoted to the interaction between the boundary layer and the inviscid entropy layer. The results are compared with experimental data. The three-dimensional inviscid flow is computed numerically by a marching finite difference method. Attention is concentrated on the windward side of the delta wing, where detailed comparisons are made with the data for shock shape and surface pressure distributions. Surface streamlines are generated, and used in the boundary layer analysis. The three-dimensional laminar boundary layer is computed numerically using a specially-developed technique based on small cross-flow in streamline coordinates. In the rear sections of the wing the boundary layer decreases drastically in the spanwise direction, so that it is still submerged in the entropy layer at the centerline, but surpasses it near the leading edge. Predicted heat transfer distributions are compared with experimental data.

  20. Forensic investigation of two voided slab bridges in the Virginia Department of Transportation's Richmond District.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-06-01

    The precast prestressed concrete voided slab structure is a popular bridge design because of its rapid construction and cost : savings in terms of eliminating formwork at the jobsite. However, the longitudinal shear transfer mechanism often fails, le...

  1. Slab Track at Facility for Accelerated Service Testing: Performance and Serviceability

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-02-01

    The Transportation Technology Center, Inc., with funding by the Portland Cement Association and the Federal Railroad Administration, documented the available records associated with the performance of the concrete slab track section in the High Tonna...

  2. Vertical slab sinking and westward subduction offshore of Mesozoic North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigloch, Karin; Mihalynuk, Mitchell G.

    2013-04-01

    Subducted slabs in the mantle, as imaged by seismic tomography, preserve a record of ancient subduction zones. Ongoing debate concerns how direct this link is. How long ago did each parcel of slab subduct, and where was the trench located relative to the imaged slab position? Resolving these questions will benefit paleogeographic reconstructions, and restrict the range of plausible rheologies for mantle convection simulations. We investigate one of the largest and best-constrained Mesozoic slab complexes, the "Farallon" in the transition zone and lower mantle beneath North America. We quantitatively integrate observations from whole-mantle P-wave tomography, global plate reconstructions, and land geological evidence from the North American Cordillera. These three data sets permit us to test the simplest conceivable hypothesis for linking slabs to paleo-trenches: that each parcel of slab sank only vertically shortly after entering the trench That is, we test whether within the limits of tomographic resolution, all slab material lies directly below the location where it subducted beneath its corresponding arc. Crucially and in contrast to previous studies, we do not accept or impose an Andean-style west coast trench (Farallon-beneath-continent subduction) since Jurassic times, as this scenario is inconsistent with many geological observations. Slab geometry alone suggests that trenches started out as intra-oceanic because tomography images massive, linear slab "walls" in the lower mantle, extending almost vertically from about 800 km to 2000+ km depth. Such steep geometries would be expected from slabs sinking vertically beneath trenches that were quasi-stationary over many tens of millions of years. Intra-oceanic trenches west of Mesozoic North America could have been stationary, whereas a coastal Farallon trench could not, because the continent moved westward continuously as the Atlantic opened. Overlap of North American west-coast positions, as reconstructed in a

  3. Transverse shifts of a light beam reflected from a uniaxially anisotropic chiral slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoding; Li, Jun; Xiao, Yuting; Mao, Hongmin; Sun, Jian; Pan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    We study for the first time the transverse shifts of a Gaussian beam reflected from a uniaxially anisotropic chiral (UAC) slab, where the chirality appears only in one direction and the host medium is a uniaxial crystal or an electric plasma. The results indicate that the transverse shifts are closely related to the propagation behaviors of the eigenwaves in the slab. Specifically, when one or both of the eigenwaves are totally reflected at the second interface of the slab, the spatial transverse shift becomes resonances but is not enhanced; when one eigenwave is totally reflected at the first interface and the other is transmitted at the second interface, the larger and negative transverse shifts can be obtained. The propagation behaviors of the eigenwaves in the UAC slab provide more abundant information about the transverse shifts than in a single interface structure.

  4. Comparison of Slab and Cylinder Expansion Test Geometries for PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott; Anderson, Eric; Aslam, Tariq; Whitley, Von

    2017-06-01

    The slab expansion test or ``sandwich test'' is the two-dimensional analog of the axisymmetric cylinder expansion test. The test consists of a high-aspect-ratio rectangular cuboid of high explosive with the two large sides confined by a thin metal confiner. Analysis of the confiner motion after the passage of the detonation yields the detonation product isentrope, which is a specialized form of the product equation of state. The slab expansion geometry inherently exhibits a lower product expansion rate and lower plastic work on the confiner than the cylinder expansion geometry. The slab geometry does, however, have a shorter test time. We review recent slab and cylinder expansion data with PBX 9501, the associated equation of state analysis, and the advantages of each geometry for different applications.

  5. Evaluating the Effect of Slab Curling on IRI for South Carolina Concrete Pavements

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-01

    Concrete pavements are known to curl due to a temperature gradient within the concrete caused by both daily : and seasonal temperature variations. This research project measured the magnitude of concrete pavement slab : curling of two newly construct...

  6. Seismic evidence for rotating mantle flow around subducting slab edge associated with oceanic microplate capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Stephen G.; Audet, Pascal; L'Heureux, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    Tectonic plate reorganization at a subduction zone edge is a fundamental process that controls oceanic plate fragmentation and capture. However, the various factors responsible for these processes remain elusive. We characterize seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle in the Explorer region at the northern limit of the Cascadia subduction zone from teleseismic shear wave splitting measurements. Our results show that the mantle flow field beneath the Explorer slab is rotating anticlockwise from the convergence-parallel motion between the Juan de Fuca and the North America plates, re-aligning itself with the transcurrent motion between the Pacific and North America plates. We propose that oceanic microplate fragmentation is driven by slab stretching, thus reorganizing the mantle flow around the slab edge and further contributing to slab weakening and increase in buoyancy, eventually leading to cessation of subduction and microplate capture.

  7. Bridge approach slabs for Missouri DOT looking at alternative and cost efficient approaches.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this project is to develop innovative and cost effective structural solutions for the construction of : both new and replacement deteriorated Bridge Approach Slabs (BAS). A cost study and email survey was performed to identify : stat...

  8. Experimental use of fly ash concrete in prefabricated bridge-deck slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-01-01

    Hydraulic cement concretes with and without fly ash were investigated to assess the suitability of using fly ash in bridge-deck concrete. Eight prefabricated concrete slabs were prepared: four were control and the remaining contained fly ash. They we...

  9. Evaluation of concrete slab fracturing techniques in mitigating reflective cracking through asphalt overlays.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-09-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of concrete slab fracturing techniques as a means of arresting or retarding reflective cracking through asphalt overlays placed on severely distressed portland cement concrete pavement. The study invo...

  10. Slab replacement and dowel bar retrofit, district 11, San Diego County

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    The project Resident Engineer requested that the Office of Rigid Pavement Materials and Structural Concrete examine cracking in replacement slabs and dowel bar retrofit installations on a project rehabilitating a section of Route 08 in District 11 ne...

  11. 22. SPILLWAY CHANNEL SLAB REINFORCEMENT DETAILS, NO. 1. Sheet S4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SPILLWAY CHANNEL SLAB REINFORCEMENT DETAILS, NO. 1. Sheet S-4, February, 1939. File no. SA 343/67. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  12. 28. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 1. Sheet S37, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 1. Sheet S-37, December, 1939. File no. SA 342/47. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  13. 30. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 4. Sheet S44, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 4. Sheet S-44, December, 1939. File no. SA 342/50. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  14. 29. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 3. Sheet S40, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 3. Sheet S-40, December, 1939. File no. SA 342/49. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  15. Recommendations for design, construction, and maintenance of bridge approach slabs : synthesis report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-04-01

    Bridge approaches provide smooth and safe transition of vehicles from highway pavements to bridge : structures. However, settlement of the bridge approach slab relative to bridge decks usually creates a : bump in the roadway. The bump causes inconven...

  16. Reasonable Temperature Schedules for Cold or Hot Charging of Continuously Cast Steel Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Chen, Xin; Liu, Ke; Wang, Jing; Wen, Jin; Zhang, Jiaquan

    2013-12-01

    Some continuously cast steel slabs are sensitive to transverse fracture problems during transportation or handling away from their storage state, while some steel slabs are sensitive to surface transverse cracks during the following rolling process in a certain hot charging temperature range. It is revealed that the investigated steel slabs with high fracture tendency under room cooling condition always contain pearlite transformation delayed elements, which lead to the internal brittle bainitic structure formation, while some microalloyed steels exhibit high surface crack susceptibility to hot charging temperatures due to carbonitride precipitation. According to the calculated internal cooling rates and CCT diagrams, the slabs with high fracture tendency during cold charging should be slowly cooled after cutting to length from hot strand or charged to the reheating furnace directly above their bainite formation temperatures. Based on a thermodynamic calculation for carbonitride precipitation in austenite, the sensitive hot charging temperature range of related steels was revealed for the determination of reasonable temperature schedules.

  17. Guidelines For The Use, Design, And Construction Of Bridge Approach Slabs

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-11-01

    Differential settlement at the roadway/bridge interface typically results in an abrupt grade change, causing driver discomfort impairing driver safety, and exerting potentially excessive impact traffic loading on the abutment. Bridge approach slabs a...

  18. Analytical and numerical treatment of resistive drift instability in a plasma slab

    SciT

    Mirnov, V. V., E-mail: vvmirnov@wisc.edu; Sauppe, J. P.; Hegna, C. C.

    An analytic approach combining the effect of equilibrium diamagnetic flows and the finite ionsound gyroradius associated with electron−ion decoupling and kinetic Alfvén wave dispersion is derived to study resistive drift instabilities in a plasma slab. Linear numerical computations using the NIMROD code are performed with cold ions and hot electrons in a plasma slab with a doubly periodic box bounded by two perfectly conducting walls. A linearly unstable resistive drift mode is observed in computations with a growth rate that is consistent with the analytic dispersion relation. The resistive drift mode is expected to be suppressed by magnetic shear inmore » unbounded domains, but the mode is observed in numerical computations with and without magnetic shear. In the slab model, the finite slab thickness and the perfectly conducting boundary conditions are likely to account for the lack of suppression.« less

  19. The rideability of a deflected bridge approach slab : research project capsule.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-08-01

    The Localized Roughness Index (LRI) is a parameter that was developed at the Louisiana : Transportation Research Center (LTRC) to quantify localized pavement distresses, such as : pavement surface dips and bumps, concrete slab joint faulting, bridge-...

  20. Field demonstration of new bridge approach slab designs and performance : [tech summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    The Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) has launched a major e ort to solve : the bridge bump problem by changing the design of approach slabs where di erential settlement is expected. : The objective is to nd a fe...

  1. Using thermal and compositional modeling to assess the role of water in Alaskan flat slab subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S. E.; Porter, R. C.; Hoisch, T. D.

    2017-12-01

    Although plate tectonic theory is well established in the geosciences, the mechanisms and details of various plate-tectonics related phenomena are not always well understood. In some ( 10%) convergent plate boundaries, subduction of downgoing oceanic plates is characterized by low angle geometries and is termed "flat slab subduction." The mechanism(s) driving this form of subduction are not well understood. The goal of this study is to explore the role that water plays in these flat slab subduction settings. This is important for a better understanding of the behavior of these systems and for assessing volcanic hazards associated with subduction and slab rollback. In southern Alaska, the Pacific Plate is subducting beneath the North American plate at a shallow angle. This low-angle subduction within the region is often attributed to the subduction of the Yakutat block, a terrane accreting to the south-central coast of Alaska. This flat slab region is bounded by the Aleution arc to the west and the strike-slip Queen Charlotte fault to the east. Temperature and compositional models for a 500-km transect across this subduction zone in Alaska were run for ten million years (the length of time that flat slab subduction has been ongoing in Alaska) and allow for interpretation of present-day conditions at depth. This allows for an evaluation of two hypotheses regarding the role of water in flat-slab regions: (1) slab hydration and dehydration help control slab buoyancy which influences whether flat slab subduction will be maintained or ended. (2) slab hydration/dehydration of the overlying lithosphere impacts deformation within the upper plate as water encourages plate deformation. Preliminary results from thermal modeling using Thermod8 show that cooling of the mantle to 500 °C is predicted down to 100 km depth at 10 million years after the onset of low-angle subduction (representing present-day). Results from compositional modeling in Perple_X show the maximum amount

  2. Pacific slab beneath northeast China revealed by regional and teleseismic waveform modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, X.; Chen, Q. F.; Wei, S.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate velocity and geometry of the slab is essential for better understanding of the thermal, chemical structure of the mantle earth, as well as geodynamics. Recent tomography studies show similar morphology of the subducting Pacific slab beneath northeast China, which was stagnant in the mantle transition zone with thickness of more than 200km and an average velocity perturbation of ~1.5% [Fukao and Obayashi, 2013]. Meanwhile, waveform-modeling studies reveal that the Pacific slab beneath Japan and Kuril Island has velocity perturbation up to 5% and thickness up to 90km [Chen et al., 2007; Zhan et al., 2014]. These discrepancies are probably caused by the smoothing and limited data coverage in the tomographic inversions. Here we adopted 1D and 2D waveform modeling methods to study the fine structure of Pacific slab beneath northeast China using dense regional permanent and temporary broadband seismic records. The residual S- and P-wave travel time, difference between data and 1D synthetics, shows significant difference between the eastern and western stations. S-wave travel time residuals indicate 5-10s earlier arrivals for stations whose ray path lies within the slab, compared with those out of the slab. Teleseimic waveforms were used to rule out the major contribution of the possible low velocity structure above 200km. Furthermore, we use 2D finite-difference waveform modeling to confirm the velocity perturbation and geometry of the slab. Our result shows that the velocity perturbation in the slab is significantly higher than those reported in travel-time tomography studies. ReferencesChen, M., J. Tromp, D. Helmberger, and H. Kanamori (2007), Waveform modeling of the slab beneath Japan, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 112(B2), 19, doi:10.1029/2006jb004394.Fukao, Y., and M. Obayashi (2013), Subducted slabs stagnant above, penetrating through, and trapped below the 660 km discontinuity, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 118(11), 5920-5938, doi:10.1002/2013jb010466

  3. Packaged, High-Power, Narrow-Linewidth Slab-Coupled Optical Waveguide External Cavity Laser (SCOWECL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    1946. [21 Y. Li and P. Herczfe1d, "Coherent PM Optical Link Employing ACP-PPLL," 1. Light\\\\"{l\\’e TechI /O!., vol. 27 . pp. 1086-1094, 2009. [31 C...Lightli"rn·e TechI /O!. , vol. 22, pp. 57- 62.2004. [4] G. A. finll, C. E. Holton, G. Hull-Allen, ::md W. W. l\\·lorey. ඄ mW 1.5 )1111 si ngle

  4. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Millet, F.; Divoky, M.; Rus, B.

    2013-11-01

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  5. Evidences of a Stalled-slab Beneath the Coast Ranges, California, From Seismicity and Converted Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, A.; Liu, K. H.; Gao, S. S.

    2001-12-01

    In spite of numerous geophysical studies, the existence and geometry of a stalled slab beneath the Coast Ranges remains vague. In this study we use the distribution of mantle earthquakes and P-to-S converted phases from tilt interfaces to address the problem. Based on the CNSS catalog, in the period between 01/1960 and 04/2001, there were about 450 earthquakes occurred at depth larger than 35 km in the vicinity of the Coast Ranges. When plotted along east-west cross-sections, those earthquakes show a clear slab-like image, similar to the upper part of classic Benioff zones along subducting oceanic slabs. One of such cross-sections, which has a width of 20 km and a latitude of 39N, is located in the so-called 'slabless window' suggested by several previous geologic and geophysic studies, implying the existence of a stalled-slab along the cross-section. The mantle earthquakes can be explained as the result of stress concentration caused by heterogeneities in elastic properties associated with the cold slab, and of changes in mineralogical phases in the upper-most mantle in and around the slab. The existence of the slab is supported by clear azimuthal variations of the amplitude and arrival time of P-to-S converted phases from a tilt interface at about 70 km depth recorded by a broadband seismic station in the area. Our analysis shows that the converted phase is probably from a subducted oceanic lithosphere dipping to the east. The strike of the slab is approximately parallel to the Coast Ranges.

  6. Defect modes in photonic crystal slabs studied using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhongping; Pearce, Jeremy; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2004-09-01

    We describe broadband coherent transmission studies of two-dimensional photonic crystals consisting of a hexagonal array of air holes in a dielectric slab in a planar waveguide. By filling several of the air holes in the photonic crystal slab, we observe the signature of a defect mode within the stop band, in both the amplitude and phase spectra. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical calculations using the transfer matrix method.

  7. Slab rupture and delamination under the Betics and Rif constrained from receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancilla, Flor de Lis; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Stich, Daniel; Pérez-Peña, José Vicente; Morales, José; Azañón, José Miguel; Martin, Rosa; Giaconia, Flavio

    2015-11-01

    We map the lithospheric structure under the westernmost Mediterranean convergent setting interpreting P-receiver functions obtained from a dense seismic network. No orogenic root occurs under the eastern and great part of the central Betics. However, the subducted South Iberian continental lithosphere is found beneath the western Betics where the Iberian Moho reaches depths of approximately 65 km, dipping gently towards the SE. Meanwhile, at the Rif, strong crustal and lithospheric thickness contrasts occur across the Nekor NW-SE sinistral fault that overlies the region of present slab tearing. East of the Nekor fault there is no orogenic root and the crust has been thinned to approximately 22 km, whilst to the west the crust reaches 55 km thickness and the Maghrebian continental lithosphere is attached to the lithospheric slab imaged by tomography under the Alboran basin. These data suggest that subduction rollback under the Alboran and Algerian basins, together with continental slab tearing or detachment producing edge delamination under the Betics and Rif have been the main tectonic mechanisms driving extension, magmatism and regional uplift in the westernmost Mediterranean since the Late Miocene until present. The surface expression of edge-delamination and slab tearing is marked by regional uplift, denudation of HP rocks in elongated core-complex type domes, late Miocene volcanism in the Eastern Betics and Rif, and by large NE-SW strike-slip transfer faults like the Alpujarras, Crevillente, Torcal or Nekor faults that accommodate strong gradients in crustal displacements. The Iberian slab is still attached to the oceanic slab imaged under the Alboran basin at the western Betics where intermediate depth seismicity, recent dextral strike-slip faulting and folding, could reflect slab tearing. Meanwhile, active faulting and differential GPS-measured displacements would mark slab tearing beneath the Rif coinciding with the trace of the sinistral Nekor fault.

  8. Slab Geometry and Stress State of the Southwestern Colombia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying

    A high rate of intermediate-depth earthquakes is concentrates in the Cauca cluster (3.5°N-5.5°N) and isolated from nearby seismicity in the southwestern Colombia subduction zone. Previously-studied nests of intermediate-depth earthquakes show that a high seismicity rate is often associated with a slab tear, detachment, or contortion. The cause of the less-studied Cauca cluster is unknown. To investigate the cause, we image the slab geometry using precise relative locations of intermediate-depth earthquakes. We use the earthquake catalog produced and seismic waveforms recorded by the Colombian National Seismic Network from January 2010 to March 2014. We calculate the focal mechanisms to examine whether the earthquakes reactivate pre-existing faults or form new fractures. The focal mechanisms are inverted for the intraslab stress field to check the stress guide hypothesis and to evaluate the stress orientations with regard to the change in the slab geometry. The earthquake relocations indicate that the Cauca segment has a continuous 20 km thick seismic zone and increases in dip angle from north to south. Two 40-km-tall fingers of earthquakes extend out of the slab and into the mantle wedge. Different from the previously-studied nests, the Cauca cluster does not correspond to slab contortions or tearing. The cluster may be associated with a high amount of dehydrated fluid. The determined focal mechanisms of 69 earthquakes have various types and variably-oriented nodal planes, corresponding to the reactivation of pre-existing faults and the formation of new fractures. The results of stress inversion show that the extensional axis in the northern Cauca segment is in the plane of the slab and 25° from the downdip direction, and the southern part has along-strike extension. The compression is subnormal to the plane of the slab. The stress field supports the stress guide hypothesis and shows a consistent rotation with increase in slab dip angle.

  9. Visualizing Three-dimensional Slab Geometries with ShowEarthModel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, B.; Jadamec, M. A.; Fischer, K. M.; Kreylos, O.; Yikilmaz, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic data that characterize the morphology of modern subducted slabs on Earth suggest that a two-dimensional paradigm is no longer adequate to describe the subduction process. Here we demonstrate the effect of data exploration of three-dimensional (3D) global slab geometries with the open source program ShowEarthModel. ShowEarthModel was designed specifically to support data exploration, by focusing on interactivity and real-time response using the Vrui toolkit. Sixteen movies are presented that explore the 3D complexity of modern subduction zones on Earth. The first movie provides a guided tour through the Earth's major subduction zones, comparing the global slab geometry data sets of Gudmundsson and Sambridge (1998), Syracuse and Abers (2006), and Hayes et al. (2012). Fifteen regional movies explore the individual subduction zones and regions intersecting slabs, using the Hayes et al. (2012) slab geometry models where available and the Engdahl and Villasenor (2002) global earthquake data set. Viewing the subduction zones in this way provides an improved conceptualization of the 3D morphology within a given subduction zone as well as the 3D spatial relations between the intersecting slabs. This approach provides a powerful tool for rendering earth properties and broadening capabilities in both Earth Science research and education by allowing for whole earth visualization. The 3D characterization of global slab geometries is placed in the context of 3D slab-driven mantle flow and observations of shear wave splitting in subduction zones. These visualizations contribute to the paradigm shift from a 2D to 3D subduction framework by facilitating the conceptualization of the modern subduction system on Earth in 3D space.

  10. van der Waals torque and force between anisotropic topological insulator slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the character of the van der Waals (vdW) torque and force between two coplanar and dielectrically anisotropic topological insulator (TI) slabs separated by a vacuum gap in the nonretardation regime, where the optic axes of the slabs are each perpendicular to the normal direction to the slab-gap interface and also generally differently oriented from each other. We find that in addition to the magnetoelectric coupling strength, the anisotropy can also influence the sign of the vdW force, viz., a repulsive vdW force can become attractive if the anisotropy is increased sufficiently. In addition, the vdW force oscillates as a function of the angular difference between the optic axes of the TI slabs, being most repulsive/least attractive (least repulsive/most attractive) for angular differences that are integer (half-integer) multiples of π . Our third finding is that the vdW torque for TI slabs is generally weaker than that for ordinary dielectric slabs. Our work provides an instance in which the vector potential appears in a calculation of the vdW interaction for which the limit is nonretarded or static.

  11. Gaps, tears and seismic anisotropy around the subducting slabs of the Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaphorst, David; Kendall, J.-Michael; Baptie, Brian; Latchman, Joan L.; Tait, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Seismic anisotropy in and beneath the subducting slabs of the Antilles is investigated using observations of shear-wave splitting. We use a combination of teleseismic and local events recorded at three-component broadband seismic stations on every major island in the area to map anisotropy in the crust, the mantle wedge and the slab/sub-slab mantle. To date this is the most comprehensive study of anisotropy in this region, involving 52 stations from 8 seismic networks. Local event delay times (0.21 ± 0.12 s) do not increase with depth, indicating a crustal origin in anisotropy and an isotropic mantle wedge. Teleseismic delay times are much larger (1.34 ± 0.47 s), with fast shear-wave polarisations that are predominantly parallel to trend of the arc. These observations can be interpreted three ways: (1) the presence of pre-existing anisotropy in the subducting slab; (2) anisotropy due to sub-slab mantle flow around the eastern margin of the nearly stationary Caribbean plate; (3) some combination of both mechanisms. However, there are two notable variations in the trench-parallel pattern of anisotropy - trench-perpendicular alignment is observed in narrow regions east of Puerto Rico and south of Martinique. These observations support previously proposed ideas of eastward sublithospheric mantle flow through gaps in the slab. Furthermore, the pattern of anisotropy south of Martinique, near Saint Lucia is consistent with a previously proposed location for the boundary between the North and South American plates.

  12. Modified creep and shrinkage prediction model B3 for serviceability limit state analysis of composite slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholamhoseini, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Relatively little research has been reported on the time-dependent in-service behavior of composite concrete slabs with profiled steel decking as permanent formwork and little guidance is available for calculating long-term deflections. The drying shrinkage profile through the thickness of a composite slab is greatly affected by the impermeable steel deck at the slab soffit, and this has only recently been quantified. This paper presents the results of long-term laboratory tests on composite slabs subjected to both drying shrinkage and sustained loads. Based on laboratory measurements, a design model for the shrinkage strain profile through the thickness of a slab is proposed. The design model is based on some modifications to an existing creep and shrinkage prediction model B3. In addition, an analytical model is developed to calculate the time-dependent deflection of composite slabs taking into account the time-dependent effects of creep and shrinkage. The calculated deflections are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  13. Seismic evidence for hydration of the Central American slab: Guatemala through Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Thurber, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Central American subduction zone exhibits a wide variability in along-arc slab hydration as indicated by geochemical studies. These studies generally show maximum slab contributions to magma beneath Nicaragua and minimum contributions beneath Costa Rica, while intermediate slab fluid contributions are found beneath El Salvador and Guatemala. Geophysical studies suggest strong slab serpentinization and fluid release beneath Nicaragua, and little serpentinization beneath Costa Rica, but the remainder of the subduction zone is poorly characterized seismically. To obtain an integrated seismic model for the Central American subduction zone, we combine 250,000 local seismic arrivals and 1,000,000 differential arrivals for 6,500 shallow and intermediate-depth earthquakes from the International Seismic Centre, the Central American Seismic Center, and the temporary PASSCAL TUCAN array. Using this dataset, we invert for Vp, Vs, and hypocenters using a variable-mesh double-difference tomography algorithm. By observing low-Vp areas within the normally high-Vp slab, we identify portions of the slab that are likely to contain serpentinized mantle, and thus contribute to higher degrees of melting and higher volatile components observable in arc lavas.

  14. Plate tectonic reconstruction of the northeast Eurasian margin and Alaska since 50 Ma using subducted slab constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Chen, Y. W.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic tomographic studies have revealed a swath of flat slab anomalies in the mantle transition zone at 410 to 660 km depths under Japan, Korea and NE China that continue northwards at deeper depths under the Russian Far East. These slab anomalies are remarkable because they appear to be continuous from their western edge far inland (>2000 km) under the NE Eurasian margin to the present-day NW Pacific subduction zones, which suggests they are Pacific slabs that were subducted in the Cenozoic. Other studies have proposed that some of these slabs were subducted at an ancient subduction zone during the Mesozoic or earlier. Here we discuss the fate of these slabs and their implications for the plate tectonic reconstruction of the NW Pacific margin along NE Asia and Alaska. We present both new and recently published slab mapping (Wu et al., 2016; JGR Solid Earth) including 30 major and minor slabs mapped in 3D from MITP08 global seismic tomography. We unfolded our mapped slabs to a spherical Earth model to estimate their pre-subduction size, shape and locations. The slab constraints were input into GPlates software to constrain a new regional NW Pacific plate tectonic reconstruction in the Cenozoic. Mapped slabs included the Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Japan and Kuril slabs, the Philippine Sea slabs and Aleutian slabs under the Bering Sea. Our mapped western Pacific slabs between the southernmost Izu-Bonin trench and the western Aleutians had unfolded E-W lengths of 3400 to 4900 km. Our plate model shows that these slabs are best reconstructed as Pacific slabs that were subducted in the Cenozoic and account for fast Pacific subduction along the NE Eurasian margin since plate reorganization at 50 Ma. Our mapped northern Kuril slab edge near the western Aleutians and a southern edge at the southernmost Izu-Bonin trench are roughly east-west and consistent with the orientations of Pacific absolute motions since 50 Ma. We interpret these long E-W slab edges as STEP fault

  15. Distribution of slab-derived fluids around the edge of the Philippine Sea Plate from Central to Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hitomi; Iwamori, Hikaru; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Tatsuji

    2018-01-01

    Marginal parts of a plate and subducting slab can play important roles in geodynamics. This is because in areas where a plate interacts with other plates or with the mantle thermal, geochemical, and mechanical interactions are expected. The Philippine Sea (PHS) slab that subducts beneath the Japan arcs has such an edge. To examine the relationship between arc magmatism and the slab edge in the transition zone from Northeast Japan to Central Japan, we investigated isotopic systematics of the regional volcanic rocks, incorporating data from literature and new data for five isotopic ratios of Sr, Nd, and Pb. The new data included major element compositions of 22 samples from the back-arc area, and 5 isotopic ratios for 6 samples selected from Pleistocene to early Quaternary epochs. Consequently, several findings were determined based on the spatial variation of the isotopic ratios and the estimated amount of slab-derived fluid: (1) the amount of fluid derived from the two subducting slabs (i.e., the Pacific slab and the PHS slab) decreases northward from a significantly high value ( 5 wt% fluid added to the source mantle), away from the seismically determined edge of the PHS slab; (2) the proportion of the PHS component in the total slab-derived fluid also decays northward; and (3) the PHS component spreads to the north beyond the seismically determined edge of the PHS slab. These observations strongly suggest that the existence of an aseismic PHS slab beneath southernmost parts of Northeast Japan delivers the PHS component to the arc magmatism. As was indicated by previous geodynamical studies, subduction of the PHS and PAC slabs may generate suction force towards the corner of mantle wedge, which might account for the large amount of fluid near the seismically determined slab edge as described in (1) above.

  16. Constraints from Water on Mantle Melting and Slab Fluid Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Wade, J.

    2005-12-01

    Water drives mantle melting and fluid migration in subduction zones, but most models for these phenomena have been developed without constraints from water measurements in arc magmas. For example, the Central American volcanic arc (CAVA) records systematic variations in La/Yb, Ba/La and d18O, and these proxies have been used to predict the extent of mantle melting during decompression [1] and water-addition [2]. Here we use water concentrations in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from arc tephra, along with estimates derived from a clinopyroxene hygrometer [3], to test different models for mantle melting and slab fluid composition along the CAVA (from Nicaragua to Costa Rica). We use Ti as a proxy for mantle melt fraction (F) and invert H2O concentrations in CAVA magmas to obtain those in the mantle source (H2Oo), as in [4]. The relationship between F and H2Oo is nominally linear for Costa Rica mantle, with wet melting productivity dF/dH2O = 30 (wt%/wt%), higher than that used in [2], but consistent with experimentally-determined and MELTS-calculated productivity at 50 degrees above the dry solidus. This predicts mantle temperature beneath Costa Rica of at least 1350°C, and allows for a small (1-2% F) decompression-melting contribution, relative to the wet melting contribution (8-20% F). The percent of wet melting correlates locally with Ba/La, but not regionally, and so the use of Ba/La as a wet melting proxy [1] should be limited to single volcanoes or clusters. The water content of the CAVA melting region varies from 2500-9000 ppm H2O but does not decrease monotonically from Nicaragua to Costa Rica as does Ba/La. The relationship between H2Oo and Ba/La is thus complex, and requires a large along-strike decrease in Ba/La and H2O/La in the slab fluids towards the southeast. Such variation appears to be driven largely by La concentration, reflecting more dilute fluids (higher H2O/La) beneath Nicaragua and more solute-rich fluids (e.g., sediment melts with high La/ H

  17. Proton transfer in liquid water confined inside graphene slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahat, Amani; Martí, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    The microscopic structure and dynamics of an excess proton in water constrained in narrow graphene slabs between 0.7 and 3.1 nm wide has been studied by means of a series of molecular dynamics simulations. Interaction of water and carbon with the proton species was modeled using a multistate empirical valence bond Hamiltonian model. The analysis of the effects of confinement on proton solvation structure and on its dynamical properties has been considered for varying densities. The system is organized in one interfacial and a bulk-like region, both of variable size. In the widest interplate separations, the lone proton shows a marked tendency to place itself in the bulk phase of the system, due to the repulsive interaction with the carbon atoms. However, as the system is compressed and the proton is forced to move to the vicinity of graphene walls it moves closer to the interface, producing a neat enhancement of the local structure. We found a marked slowdown of proton transfer when the separation of the two graphene plates is reduced. In the case of lowest distances between graphene plates (0.7 and 0.9 nm), only one or two water layers persist and the two-dimensional character of water structure becomes evident. By means of spectroscopical analysis, we observed the persistence of Zundel and Eigen structures in all cases, although at low interplate separations a signature frequency band around 2500 cm-1 suffers a blue shift and moves to characteristic values of asymmetric hydronium ion vibrations, indicating some unstability of the typical Zundel-Eigen moieties and their eventual conversion to a single hydronium species solvated by water.

  18. Wind slab formation in snow: experimental setup and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Christian; Lehning, Michael; Fierz, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The formation of wind-hardened surface layers, also known as wind slabs or wind crusts, is studied. Better knowledge about which processes and parameters are important will lead to an improved understanding of the mass balances in polar and alpine areas. It will also improve snow-cover models (i.e. SNOWPACK) as well as the forecast of avalanche danger. A ring-shaped wind tunnel has been built and instrumented. The facility is ring-shaped to simulate an infinitely long snow surface (infinite fetch). A SnowMicroPen (SMP) is used to measure the snow hardness. Other sensors measure environmental conditions such as wind velocity, air temperature, air humidity, the temperature of the snow and of the snow surface. A camera is used to detect drifting particles and to measure the Specific Surface Area (SSA) at the snow surface via near-infrared photography. First experiments indicate that mechanical fragmentation followed by sintering is the most efficient process to harden the surface. The hardness increased rapidly during drifting snow events, but only slowly or not at all when the wind speed was kept below the threshold for drifting snow. With drifting, the penetration resistance increased from the original 0.07 N to around 0.3 N in about an hour. Without drifting, a slow, further increase in resistance was observed. In about six hours, the hardness of the top 1-2 cm increased to 0.5 N. During this eight-hour experiment consisting of about two hours with intermittent drifting and six hours without drifting, the density at the surface increased from 66 kg/m3 to around 170 kg/m3. In the unaffected region close to the ground, the density increased from 100 kg/m3 to 110 kg/m3.

  19. Optical vortex generation from a diode-pumped alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. M.; Minassian, A.; Damzen, M. J.

    2018-04-01

    We present the demonstration of an optical vortex mode directly generated from a diode-pumped alexandrite slab laser, operating in the bounce geometry. This is the first demonstration of an optical vortex mode generated from an alexandrite laser or from any other vibronic laser. An output power of 2 W for a vortex mode with a ‘topological charge’ of 1 was achieved and the laser was made to oscillate with both left- and right-handed vorticity. The laser operated at two distinct wavelengths simultaneously, 755 and 759 nm, due to birefringent filtering in the alexandrite gain medium. The result offers the prospect of broadly wavelength tunable vortex generation directly from a laser.

  20. Dense and Dry Mantle Between the Continental Crust and the Oceanic Slab: Folding, Faulting and Tearing in the Slab in the Pampean Flat Slab, Southern Central Andes Evidenced by 3D Body Wave Tomography Along the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake Rupture Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, D.; Farías, M.; Roecker, S. W.; Brandon, M. T.

    2017-12-01

    The 2015 Illapel interplate earthquake Mw 8.4 generated a large amount of aftershocks that was recorded by the Chile-Illapel Aftershock Experiment (CHILLAX) during a year after the mainshock. Using this database, along with previous seismological campaigns, an improved 3D body wave tomographic image was obtained, allowing us to visualize first-order lithospheric discontinuities. This new analysis confirms not only the presence of this dense block, but also that the Benioff zone extends with a 30° dip even below the 100 km depth, where the Nazca plate has been interpreted to be flat. Recent results of seismic anisotropy show that the oceanic plate has been detached at depths greater than 300 km. We propose that: i) The dry, cold mantle beneath the continental crust is an entrapped mantle, cooled by the slab flattening, while the western part would be hydrated by slab-derived fluid; ii) The Nazca plate would be faulted and is now subducting with a normal dip beneath the flattened slab segment. Considering that the slab segment is detached from deeper part of the subducted plate, slab pull on the flat segment would be reduced, decreasing its eastward advance. In the western side, the flat segment of the slab has been observed to be slightly folded. We propose that the current normal subduction is related to the slab break-off resulting from the loss of a slab-pull force, producing the accretion of the slab beneath the dry and cold mantle. Considering that the flat slab segment does not occur at depths shallower than 100 km, rollback of the slab is not expected. In turn, suction forces would have induced the shortening in the flat segment considering its eastward slowing down due to slab break-off, thus producing a breakthrough faulting. This proposition implies that the underplated flat slab segment, along with the overlying dense and dry mantle may be delaminated by gravitional instabilities and ablative subduction effects.

  1. Slab dragging and the recent geodynamic evolution of the western Mediterranean plate boundary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakman, Wim; Chertova, Maria V.; van den Berg, Arie P.; Thieulot, Cedric; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tortonian-Present geodynamic evolution of the plate boundary between North Africa and Iberia is characterized by first-order enigmas. This concerns, e.g., the diffuse tectonic activity of the plate boundary; the crustal thickening below the Rif; the closing of the northern Moroccan marine gateways prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis; crustal extension of the central to eastern Betics; the origin and sense of motion of the large left-lateral Trans Alboran Shear Zone (TASZ) and Eastern Betic Shear Zone (EBSZ); and lithosphere delamination of the North African continental edge. Many explanations have been given for each of these seemingly disparate tectonic features, which invariably have been addressed in the plate tectonic context of the NW-SE relative plate convergence between the major plates since the Tortonian, mostly independently from each other. Usually there is no clear role for the subducted slab underlying the region, except for presumed rollback, either to SW or to the W, depending on the type of observations that require explanation. Here we integrate the dynamic role of the slab with the NW-SE relative plate convergence by 3-D numerical modelling of the slab evolution constrained by absolute plate motions (Chertova et al., JGR,2014 & Gcubed 2014). By combining observations and predictions from seismology, geology, and geodesy, with our numerical 3-D slab-mantle dynamics modelling, we developed a new and promising geodynamic framework that provides explanations of all noted tectonic enigmas in a coherent and connected way. From the Tortonian until today, we propose that mantle-resisted slab dragging combines with the NW-SE plate convergence across the (largely) unbroken plate boundary to drive the crustal deformation of the region. Slab dragging is the lateral transport, pushing or pulling, of slab through the mantle by the absolute motion of the subducting plate (Chertova et al., Gcubed, 2014). Because the slab is connected to both the Iberian

  2. Mathematical modeling of laser based potato cutting and peeling.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, A Carlos O; Mittal, Gauri S; Bilanski, Walter K; Abdullah, Hussein A

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed and validated to predict the depth of cut in potato tuber slabs as a function of laser power and travel speed. The model considers laser processing parameters such as input power, spot size and exposure time as well as the properties of the material being cut such as specific heat, thermal conductivity, surface reflectance, etc. The model also considers the phase change of water in potato and the ignition temperature of the solid portion. The composition of the potato tuber is assumed to be of water and solid. The model also assumes that the ablation process is accomplished through ejection of liquid water, debris and water vapour, and combustion of solid. A CO(2) laser operating in c.w. mode was chosen for the experimental work because water absorbs laser energy highly at 10.6 microm, and CO(2) laser units with relatively high output power are available. Slabs of potato tuber were chosen to be laser processed since potato contains high moisture and large amounts of relatively homogeneous tissue. The results of the preliminary calculations and experiments concluded that the model is able to predict the depth of cut in potato tuber parenchyma when subjected to a CO(2) laser beam.

  3. In situ study of the anticariogenic potential of fluoride varnish combined with CO2 laser on enamel.

    PubMed

    Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Colucci, Vivian; Tenuta, Lívia Maria Andaló; Serra, Mônica Campos; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2015-06-01

    This in situ study evaluated the effect of fluoride varnish combined with CO2 laser in controlling enamel demineralization caused by cariogenic challenges. In a crossover study conducted in 2 phases of 14 days each, 14 volunteers (n = 14) wore palatal appliances with bovine enamel slabs treated with fluoride varnish + CO2 laser (FV + CO2), fluoride varnish (FV), nonfluoride placebo varnish (PV) and nonfluoride placebo varnish + CO2 laser (PV + CO2). Drops of sucrose solution were dripped onto enamel slabs allowing the accumulation of biofilm. At the first phase, half of the volunteers received 4 enamel slabs treated with FV while the remainders received slabs exposed to the PV with and without CO2 laser. In the second phase, the vonlunteers were reversed treatments. The slabs were evaluated for cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH) and the concentration of loosely bound fluoride (CaF2) and firmly bound fluoride (FAp). The concentration of fluoride in biofilm were also determined. Two-way ANOVA showed that the CSMH values were higher in laser-irradiated enamel, regardless of the fluoride varnish. Friedman test showed that FV group presented significantly larger amount of fluoride in biofilm (P < 0.05). In the enamel, the largest amount of fluoride was found in the groups FV + CO2, which was not different from FV (P > 0.05). The synergistic effect of fluoride varnish and CO2 laser on enamel demineralization was not observed, however, CO2 laser reduces enamel demineralization. CO2 laser might reduce the demineralization of subsurface enamel, although its association with a high concentrated fluoride therapy may not result in a positive synergistic interaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The intermediate-depth Tonga double-seismic zone and relationship to slab thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S. S.; Wiens, D.; Van Keken, P. E.; Adams, A. N.; Cai, C.

    2015-12-01

    We used data from the ocean bottom seismographs and island-based stations deployed in the Tonga-Fiji area from 2009 to 2010 to investigate the seismicity of the Tonga subducting slab. We relocated 785 events from the Reviewed ISC Bulletin with local array data, 379 newly detected intermediate-depth events, as well as 1976-2012 events with Global Centroid-Moment-Tensor (CMT) solutions. The events were relocated with both local and teleseismic P, pP, and S arrivals using a hypocentroidal decomposition relative location algorithm. The results show a double-seismic zone (DSZ) with a separation of about 30 km along the Tonga slab within a depth range of about 70 - 300 km. The upper plane is more seismically active and characterized by downdip compressional stress whereas the lower plane is characterized by downdip tensional stress, consistent with the slab unbending model. Accordingly, focal mechanisms of the earthquakes along the surface of the slab show downdip extension above the depth of 80 km, but turn to compression below it, coinciding with the change of the slab dip angle from 30˚ to 60˚ at the same depth. The lower limit of the DSZ beneath Tonga is significantly deeper than that in Japan and Mariana (about 200 km), implying the importance of thermal variations in controlling the DSZ. Since the Tonga slab, with the fastest subduction rate, is cooler than other slabs, thermally controlled processes such as dehydration embrittlement can occur at greater depths, resulting in a deeper depth extent of the DSZ.

  5. Signature of slab fragmentation beneath Anatolia from full-waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, Rob; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    When oceanic basins close after a long period of convergence and subduction, continental collision and mountain building is a common consequence. Slab segmentation is expected to have been relatively common just prior to closure of other oceans in the geological past, and may explain some of the complexity that geologists have documented in the Tibetan plateau also. We focus on the eastern Mediterranean basin, which is the last remainder of a once hemispherical neo-Tethys ocean that has nearly disappeared due to convergence of the India and Africa/Arabia plates with the Eurasia plate. We present new results of full-waveform tomography that allow us to image both the crust and upper mantle in great detail. We show that a major discontinuity exists between western Anatolia lithosphere and the region to the east of it. Also, the correlation of geological features and the crustal velocities is substantially stronger in the west than in the east. We interpret these observations as the imprint in the overriding plate of fragmentation of the neo-Tethys slab below it. This north-dipping slab may have fragmented following the Eocene (about 35 million years ago) arrival of a continental promontory (Central Anatolian Core Complex) at the subduction contact. From the Eocene through the Miocene, slab roll-back ensued in the Aegean and west Anatolia, while the Cyprus-Bitlis slab subducted horizontally beneath central and east Anatolia. Following collision of Arabia (about 16 million years ago), the Cyprus-Bitlis slab steepened, exposing the crust of central and east Anatolia to high temperature, and resulting in the velocity structure that we image today. Slab fragmentation thus was a major driver of the evolution of the overriding plate as collision unfolded.

  6. Exact exchange plane-wave-pseudopotential calculations for slabs: Extending the width of the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Eberhard

    2018-04-01

    Standard plane-wave pseudopotential (PWPP) calculations for slabs such as graphene become extremely demanding, as soon as the exact exchange (EXX) of density functional theory is applied. Even if the Krieger-Li-Iafrate (KLI) approximation for the EXX potential is utilized, such EXX-PWPP calculations suffer from the fact that an accurate representation of the occupied states throughout the complete vacuum between the replicas of the slab is required. In this contribution, a robust and efficient extension scheme for the PWPP states is introduced, which ensures the correct exponential decay of the slab states in the vacuum for standard cutoff energies and therefore facilitates EXX-PWPP calculations for very wide vacua and rather thick slabs. Using this scheme, it is explicitly verified that the Slater component of the EXX/KLI potential decays as -1 /z over an extended region sufficiently far from the surface (assumed to be perpendicular to the z direction) and from the middle of the vacuum, thus reproducing the asymptotic behavior of the exact EXX potential of a single slab. The calculations also reveal that the orbital-shift component of the EXX/KLI potential is quite sizable in the asymptotic region. In spite of the long-range exchange potential, the replicas of the slab decouple rather quickly with increasing width of the vacuum. Relying on the identity of the work function with the Fermi energy obtained with a suitably normalized total potential, the present EXX/KLI calculations predict work functions for both graphene and the Si(111) surface which are substantially larger than the corresponding experimental data. Together with the size of the orbital-shift potential in the asymptotic region, the very large EXX/KLI work functions indicate a failure of the KLI approximation for nonmetallic slabs.

  7. Wet plume atop of the flattening slab: Insight into intraplate volcanism in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lijuan

    2017-08-01

    Geophysical observations imply the intraplate volcanism in East Asia is related to dehydration of slab stagnating in the transition zone. To better understand the dynamics of such process, a thermochemical mantle convection model is constructed to simulate numerically the thermal evolution of slab and the transportation of water in the process of slab downgoing, flattening and stagnation. Equation of water transfer is included, and water effects on density and viscosity are considered. Model results indicate the warming of slab by surrounding mantle is rather slow. Water could be successfully dragged into the transition zone if the reference viscosity of the hydrous layer (with initial water of 2 wt%) is higher than 1017 Pa s and that of mantle is 1021 Pa s. Wet plumes could then originate in the flat-lying part of the slab, relatively far from the trench. Generally, the viscosity of the hydrous layer governs the initiation of wet plume, whereas the viscosity of the overlying mantle wedge controls the activity of the ascending wet plumes - they are more active in the weaker wedge. The complex fluid flow superposed by corner flow and free thermal convection influences greatly the water transport pattern in the upper mantle. Modeling results together with previous modeling infer three stages of water circulation in the big mantle wedge: 1) water is brought into the mantle transition zone by downward subducting slab under some specific thermo-rheological conditions, otherwise water is released at shallow depth near wedge tip; 2) wet plume generates from surface of the flattening slab warmed by surrounding mantle, and 3) water spreads over the big mantle wedge. Wet plume from the flattening Pacific Plate arrives at the lithospheric base and induces melting, which can explain the intraplate Cenozoic volcanoes in East Asia.

  8. Seismic anisotropy in the Hellenic subduction zone: Effects of slab segmentation and subslab mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    The segmentation and differentiation of subducting slabs have considerable effects on mantle convection and tectonics. The Hellenic subduction zone is a complex convergent margin with strong curvature and fast slab rollback. The upper mantle seismic anisotropy in the region is studied focusing at its western and eastern edges in order to explore the effects of possible slab segmentation on mantle flow and fabrics. Complementary to new SKS shear-wave splitting measurements in regions not adequately sampled so far, the source-side splitting technique is applied to constrain the depth of anisotropy and to densify measurements. In the western Hellenic arc, a trench-normal subslab anisotropy is observed near the trench. In the forearc domain, source-side and SKS measurements reveal a trench-parallel pattern. This indicates subslab trench-parallel mantle flow, associated with return flow due to the fast slab rollback. The passage from continental to oceanic subduction in the western Hellenic zone is illustrated by a forearc transitional anisotropy pattern. This indicates subslab mantle flow parallel to a NE-SW smooth ramp that possibly connects the two subducted slabs. A young tear fault initiated at the Kefalonia Transform Fault is likely not entirely developed, as this trench-parallel anisotropy pattern is observed along the entire western Hellenic subduction system, even following this horizontal offset between the two slabs. At the eastern side of the Hellenic subduction zone, subslab source-side anisotropy measurements show a general trench-normal pattern. These are associated with mantle flow through a possible ongoing tearing of the oceanic lithosphere in the area. Although the exact geometry of this slab tear is relatively unknown, SKS trench-parallel measurements imply that the tear has not reached the surface yet. Further exploration of the Hellenic subduction system is necessary; denser seismic networks should be deployed at both its edges in order to achieve

  9. Transient radiative transfer in a scattering slab considering polarization.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hongliang; Ben, Xun; Tan, Heping

    2013-11-04

    The characteristics of the transient and polarization must be considered for a complete and correct description of short-pulse laser transfer in a scattering medium. A Monte Carlo (MC) method combined with a time shift and superposition principle is developed to simulate transient vector (polarized) radiative transfer in a scattering medium. The transient vector radiative transfer matrix (TVRTM) is defined to describe the transient polarization behavior of short-pulse laser propagating in the scattering medium. According to the definition of reflectivity, a new criterion of reflection at Fresnel surface is presented. In order to improve the computational efficiency and accuracy, a time shift and superposition principle is applied to the MC model for transient vector radiative transfer. The results for transient scalar radiative transfer and steady-state vector radiative transfer are compared with those in published literatures, respectively, and an excellent agreement between them is observed, which validates the correctness of the present model. Finally, transient radiative transfer is simulated considering the polarization effect of short-pulse laser in a scattering medium, and the distributions of Stokes vector in angular and temporal space are presented.

  10. Bulldozing of Basal Continental Mantle Lithosphere During Flat-Slab Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axen, G. J.; van Wijk, J.; Currie, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Flat-slab subduction occurs along 10% of subduction margins, forming magmatic gaps and causing inland migration of upper-plate deformation. We suggest that basal continental mantle lithosphere (CML) can be bulldozed ahead of the flat portion of horizontally-subducted oceanic lithosphere, forming a growing and advancing keel of thickened CML. This process fills the asthenospheric mantle wedge with CML, precluding melting. The bulldozed CML keel may transmit tectonic stresses ahead of the flat slab itself, causing upper-plate deformation ahead of the slab hinge. We designed 2-D numerical models after the North American Laramide orogeny, with subduction of a thick, buoyant oceanic plateau (conjugate Shatsky Rise) and with the continent advancing trenchward over the initial slab hinge. This results in slab-flattening, and removal of CML material. In our models, the thickness of the CML layer removed by this process depends on overriding plate rheology and is up to 25 km. The removed material is bulldozed ahead of the hinge and may fill up the asthenospheric wedge. Low-density (depleted) CML favors formation of bulldozed keels, which increase in width as CML strength decreases. Regular-density and/or stronger CML forms smaller bulldozed keels that are more likely to sink with the slab as eclogitization and densification proceed. When the flat slab rolls back, it leaves a step in the CML at the farthest extent of the slab. Relics of this step may remain below North America or may have dripped off. We interpret an upper-mantle fast-velocity anomaly below SE New Mexico and W Texas as a drip/keel, and the step in lithosphere thickness in southwestern Colorado as a fossil step, caused by the removal of the CML layer. Our model predicts that the Laramide bulldozed CML keel may have aided in stress transmission that caused basement uplifts as far as NE Wyoming and subsurface folds even farther N and E. Modern examples may exist in South American flat slab segments.

  11. Seismic imaging of slab metamorphism and genesis of intermediate-depth intraslab earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Nakajima, Junichi

    2017-12-01

    We review studies of intermediate-depth seismicity and seismic imaging of the interior of subducting slabs in relation to slab metamorphism and their implications for the genesis of intermediate-depth earthquakes. Intermediate-depth events form a double seismic zone in the depth range of c. 40-180 km, which occur only at locations where hydrous minerals are present, and are particularly concentrated along dehydration reaction boundaries. Recent studies have revealed detailed spatial distributions of these events and a close relationship with slab metamorphism. Pressure-temperature paths of the crust for cold slabs encounter facies boundaries with large H2O production rates and positive total volume change, which are expected to cause highly active seismicity near the facies boundaries. A belt of upper-plane seismicity in the crust nearly parallel to 80-90 km depth contours of the slab surface has been detected in the cold Pacific slab beneath eastern Japan, and is probably caused by slab crust dehydration with a large H2O production rate. A seismic low-velocity layer in the slab crust persists down to the depth of this upper-plane seismic belt, which provides evidence for phase transformation of dehydration at this depth. Similar low-velocity subducting crust closely related with intraslab seismicity has been detected in several other subduction zones. Seismic tomography studies in NE Japan and northern Chile also revealed the presence of a P-wave low-velocity layer along the lower plane of a double seismic zone. However, in contrast to predictions based on the serpentinized mantle, S-wave velocity along this layer is not low. Seismic anisotropy and pore aspect ratio may play a role in generating this unique structure. Although further validation is required, observations of these distinct low P-wave velocities along the lower seismic plane suggest the presence of hydrated rocks or fluids within that layer. These observations support the hypothesis that dehydration

  12. Depth to the Juan De Fuca slab beneath the Cascadia subduction margin - a 3-D model for sorting earthquakes

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Oppenheimer, David H.; Walter, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    We present an updated model of the Juan de Fuca slab beneath southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and northern California, and use this model to separate earthquakes occurring above and below the slab surface. The model is based on depth contours previously published by Fluck and others (1997). Our model attempts to rectify a number of shortcomings in the original model and update it with new work. The most significant improvements include (1) a gridded slab surface in geo-referenced (ArcGIS) format, (2) continuation of the slab surface to its full northern and southern edges, (3) extension of the slab surface from 50-km depth down to 110-km beneath the Cascade arc volcanoes, and (4) revision of the slab shape based on new seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction studies. We have used this surface to sort earthquakes and present some general observations and interpretations of seismicity patterns revealed by our analysis. For example, deep earthquakes within the Juan de Fuca Plate beneath western Washington define a linear trend that may mark a tear within the subducting plate Also earthquakes associated with the northern stands of the San Andreas Fault abruptly terminate at the inferred southern boundary of the Juan de Fuca slab. In addition, we provide files of earthquakes above and below the slab surface and a 3-D animation or fly-through showing a shaded-relief map with plate boundaries, the slab surface, and hypocenters for use as a visualization tool.

  13. The double seismic zone in downgoing slabs and the viscosity of the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    The seismic zone beneath several island arcs between about 100 and 200 km depth consists of an upper zone having down-dip compression and a lower zone having down-dip tension. Several numerical models of the Aleutian arc were computed to test the hypothesis that these double seismic zones are due to sagging of the slab under its own weight. This sagging occurs because the asthenosphere (between about 100 and 200 km) provides little support or resistance to the slab, which is supported from below by the more viscous mesosphere and from above by the lithosphere. The viscosity of the mesosphere was constrained to the interval between 0.25 x 10 to the 22nd and 0.5 x 10 to the 22nd P by noting that the slab would have mainly down-dip compression at higher viscosities and mainly down-dip tension at lower viscosities. The deviatoric stress in the slab and the fault plane between the slab and the island arc is about 200-300 bars (expressed as shear stress). The models were calibrated to the observed depth and gravity anomalies in the trench.

  14. Evaluation of the deflected mode of the monolithic span pieces and preassembled slabs combined action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchina, Svetlana; Ezzi, Hisham; Shishov, Ivan; Lukin, Mikhail; Sergeev, Michael

    2017-10-01

    In single-story industrial buildings, the cost of roof covering comprises 40-55% of the total cost of the buildings. Therefore, research, development and application of new structural forms of reinforced concrete rafter structures, that allow to reduce material consumption and reduce the sub-assembly weight of structures, are the main tasks in the field of improving the existing generic solutions. The article suggests a method for estimating the relieving effect in the rafter structure as the result of combined deformation of the roof slabs with the end arrises. Calculated and experimental method for determining the stress and strain state of the rafter structure upper belt and the roof slabs with regard to their rigid connection has been proposed. A model of a highly effective roof structure providing a significant reduction in the construction height of the roofing and the cubic content of the building at the same time allowing to include the end arrises and a part of the slabs shelves with the help of the monolithic concrete has been proposed. The proposed prefabricated monolithic concrete rafter structure and its rigid connection with ribbed slabs allows to reduce the consumption of the prestressed slabs reinforcement by 50%.

  15. Mechanism of Macrosegregation Formation in Continuous Casting Slab: A Numerical Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dongbin; Wang, Weiling; Luo, Sen; Ji, Cheng; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-12-01

    Solidified shell bulging is supposed to be the main reason for slab center segregation, while the influence of thermal shrinkage rarely has been considered. In this article, a thermal shrinkage model coupled with the multiphase solidification model is developed to investigate the effect of the thermal shrinkage, solidification shrinkage, grain sedimentation, and thermal flow on solute transport in the continuous casting slab. In this model, the initial equiaxed grains contract freely with the temperature decrease, while the coherent equiaxed grains and columnar phase move directionally toward the slab surface. The results demonstrate that the center positive segregation accompanied by negative segregation in the periphery zone is mainly caused by thermal shrinkage. During the solidification process, liquid phase first transports toward the slab surface to compensate for thermal shrinkage, which is similar to the case considering solidification shrinkage, and then it moves opposite to the slab center near the solidification end. It is attributed to the sharp decrease of center temperature and the intensive contract of solid phase, which cause the enriched liquid to be squeezed out. With the effect of grain sedimentation and thermal flow, the negative segregation at the external arc side (zone A1) and the positive segregation near the columnar-to-equiaxed transition at the inner arc side (position B1) come into being. Besides, it is found that the grain sedimentation and thermal flow only influence solute transport before equiaxed grains impinge with each other, while the solidification and thermal shrinkage still affect solute redistribution in the later stage.

  16. Plate interface rheological switches during subduction infancy: Control on slab penetration and metamorphic sole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Yamato, P.; Soret, M.; Prigent, C.; Guillot, S.; Plunder, A.; Dubacq, B.; Chauvet, A.; Monié, P.

    2016-10-01

    Subduction infancy corresponds to the first few million years following subduction initiation, when slabs start their descent into the mantle. It coincides with the transient (yet systematic) transfer of material from the top of the slab to the upper plate, as witnessed by metamorphic soles welded beneath obducted ophiolites. Combining structure-lithology-pressure-temperature-time data from metamorphic soles with flow laws derived from experimental rock mechanics, this study highlights two main successive rheological switches across the subduction interface (mantle wedge vs. basalts, then mantle wedge vs. sediments; at ∼800 °C and ∼600 °C, respectively), during which interplate mechanical coupling is maximized by the existence of transiently similar rheologies across the plate contact. We propose that these rheological switches hinder slab penetration and are responsible for slicing the top of the slab and welding crustal pieces (high- then low-temperature metamorphic soles) to the base of the mantle wedge during subduction infancy. This mechanism has implications for the rheological properties of the crust and mantle (and for transient episodes of accretion/exhumation of HP-LT rocks in mature subduction systems) and highlights the role of fluids in enabling subduction to overcome the early resistance to slab penetration.

  17. Slab melting beneath the Cascade Arc driven by dehydration of altered oceanic peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walowski, K. J.; Wallace, P. J.; Hauri, E. H.; Wada, I.; Clynne, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Water is returned to Earth’s interior at subduction zones. However, the processes and pathways by which water leaves the subducting plate and causes melting beneath volcanic arcs are complex; the source of the water--subducting sediment, altered oceanic crust, or hydrated mantle in the downgoing plate--is debated; and the role of slab temperature is unclear. Here we analyse the hydrogen-isotope and trace-element signature of melt inclusions in ash samples from the Cascade Arc, where young, hot lithosphere subducts. Comparing these data with published analyses, we find that fluids in the Cascade magmas are sourced from deeper parts of the subducting slab--hydrated mantle peridotite in the slab interior--compared with fluids in magmas from the Marianas Arc, where older, colder lithosphere subducts. We use geodynamic modelling to show that, in the hotter subduction zone, the upper crust of the subducting slab rapidly dehydrates at shallow depths. With continued subduction, fluids released from the deeper plate interior migrate into the dehydrated parts, causing those to melt. These melts in turn migrate into the overlying mantle wedge, where they trigger further melting. Our results provide a physical model to explain melting of the subducted plate and mass transfer from the slab to the mantle beneath arcs where relatively young oceanic lithosphere is subducted.

  18. Mid-Mantle Interaction Between the Big, Active Samoan Plume and the Tonga-Kermadec Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. J.; Ferreira, A. M. G.; Faccenda, M.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle plumes play an efficient role in transferring heat from the core-mantle boundary to the surface, where they significantly influence plate tectonics. It is well known that, upon impinging on the lithosphere at spreading ridges or intra-oceanic settings, mantle plumes generate hotspots, Large Igneous Provinces and considerable dynamic topography. However, it is still poorly understood which is the active role of mantle plumes on subducting slabs. Here we show that the stagnancy and fastest trench retreat of the Tonga slab in Southwestern Pacific are consistent with an interaction with the big Samoan plume and the Hikurangi plateau. Our findings are based on comparisons between 3-D anisotropic tomography images and 3-D petrological-thermo-mechanical models, which show complex mantle flow around the slab and intense deformation and anisotropy in the transition zone, explaining several unique features in the Fiji-Tonga area self-consistently. We also found that horizontally polarized shear waves (SH) are faster than vertically polarized shear waves (SV) in the mid mantle beneath the Tonga slab, which may indicate a dominant dislocation creep mechanism during the slab-plume interaction. We propose possible slip systems of bridgmanite in the lower mantle that reconcile the observed seismic anisotropy with thermo-mechanical calculations.

  19. Mantle transition zone, stagnant slab and intraplate volcanism in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuanxu; Zhao, Dapeng; Tian, You; Wu, Shiguo; Hasegawa, Akira; Lei, Jianshe; Park, Jung-Ho; Kang, Ik-Bum

    2017-04-01

    3-D P- and S-wave velocity structures of the mantle down to a depth of 800 km beneath NE Asia are investigated using ∼981 000 high-quality arrival-time data of local earthquakes and teleseismic events recorded at 2388 stations of permanent and portable seismic networks deployed in NE China, Japan and South Korea. Our results do not support the existence of a gap (or a hole) in the stagnant slab under the Changbai volcano, which was proposed by a previous study of teleseismic tomography. In this work we conducted joint inversions of both local-earthquake arrival times and teleseismic relative traveltime residuals, leading to a robust tomography of the upper mantle and the mantle transition zone (MTZ) beneath NE Asia. Our joint inversion results reveal clearly the subducting Pacific slab beneath the Japan Islands and the Japan Sea, as well as the stagnant slab in the MTZ beneath the Korean Peninsula and NE China. A big mantle wedge (BMW) has formed in the upper mantle and the upper part of the MTZ above the stagnant slab. Localized low-velocity anomalies are revealed clearly in the crust and the BMW directly beneath the active Changbai and Ulleung volcanoes, indicating that the intraplate volcanism is caused by hot and wet upwelling in the BMW associated with corner flows in the BMW and deep slab dehydration as well.

  20. Evaluation of punching shear strength of flat slabs supported on rectangular columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Valery

    2018-03-01

    The article presents the methodology and results of an analytical study of structural parameters influence on the value of punching force for the joint of columns and flat reinforced concrete slab. This design solution is typical for monolithic reinforced concrete girderless frames, which have a wide application in the construction of high-rise buildings. As the results of earlier studies show the punching shear strength of slabs at rectangular columns can be lower than at square columns with a similar length of the control perimeter. The influence of two structural parameters on the punching strength of the plate is investigated - the ratio of the side of the column cross-section to the effective depth of slab C/d and the ratio of the sides of the rectangular column Cmax/Cmin. According to the results of the study, graphs of reduction the control perimeter depending on the structural parameters are presented for columns square and rectangular cross-sections. Comparison of results obtained by proposed approach and MC2010 simplified method are shown, that proposed approach gives a more conservative estimate of the influence of the structural parameters. A significant influence of the considered structural parameters on punching shear strength of reinforced concrete slabs is confirmed by the results of experimental studies. The results of the study confirm the necessity of taking into account the considered structural parameters when calculating the punching shear strength of flat reinforced concrete slabs and further development of code design methods.

  1. Hydrodynamic electron flow in a Weyl semimetal slab: Role of Chern-Simons terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbar, E. V.; Miransky, V. A.; Shovkovy, I. A.; Sukhachov, P. O.

    2018-05-01

    The hydrodynamic flow of the chiral electron fluid in a Weyl semimetal slab of finite thickness is studied by using the consistent hydrodynamic theory. The latter includes viscous, anomalous, and vortical effects, as well as accounts for dynamical electromagnetism. The energy and momentum separations between the Weyl nodes are taken into account via the topological Chern-Simons contributions in the electric current and charge densities in Maxwell's equations. When an external electric field is applied parallel to the slab, it is found that the electron fluid velocity has a nonuniform profile determined by the viscosity and the no-slip boundary conditions. Most remarkably, the fluid velocity field develops a nonzero component across the slab that gradually dissipates when approaching the surfaces. This abnormal component of the flow arises due to the anomalous Hall voltage induced by the topological Chern-Simons current. Another signature feature of the hydrodynamics in Weyl semimetals is a strong modification of the anomalous Hall current along the slab in the direction perpendicular to the applied electric field. Additionally, it is found that the topological current induces an electric potential difference between the surfaces of the slab that is strongly affected by the hydrodynamic flow.

  2. Slab Geometry and Segmentation on Seismogenic Subduction Zone; Insight from gravity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswati, A. T.; Mazzotti, S.; Cattin, R.; Cadio, C.

    2017-12-01

    Slab geometry is a key parameter to improve seismic hazard assessment in subduction zones. In many cases, information about structures beneath subduction are obtained from geophysical dedicated studies, including geodetic and seismic measurements. However, due to the lack of global information, both geometry and segmentation in seismogenic zone of many subductions remain badly-constrained. Here we propose an alternative approach based on satellite gravity observations. The GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) mission enables to probe Earth deep mass structures from gravity gradients, which are more sensitive to spatial structure geometry and directional properties than classical gravitational data. Gravity gradients forward modeling of modeled slab is performed by using horizontal and vertical gravity gradient components to better determine slab geophysical model rather than vertical gradient only. Using polyhedron method, topography correction on gravity gradient signal is undertaken to enhance the anomaly signal of lithospheric structures. Afterward, we compare residual gravity gradients with the calculated signals associated with slab geometry. In this preliminary study, straightforward models are used to better understand the characteristic of gravity gradient signals due to deep mass sources. We pay a special attention to the delineation of slab borders and dip angle variations.

  3. Collision-induced light scattering in a thin xenon layer between graphite slabs - MD study.

    PubMed

    Dawid, A; Górny, K; Wojcieszyk, D; Dendzik, Z; Gburski, Z

    2014-08-14

    The collision-induced light scattering many-body correlation functions and their spectra in thin xenon layer located between two parallel graphite slabs have been investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The results have been obtained at three different distances (densities) between graphite slabs. Our simulations show the increased intensity of the interaction-induced light scattering spectra at low frequencies for xenon atoms in confined space, in comparison to the bulk xenon sample. Moreover, we show substantial dependence of the interaction-induced light scattering correlation functions of xenon on the distances between graphite slabs. The dynamics of xenon atoms in a confined space was also investigated by calculating the mean square displacement functions and related diffusion coefficients. The structural property of confined xenon layer was studied by calculating the density profile, perpendicular to the graphite slabs. Building of a fluid phase of xenon in the innermost part of the slot was observed. The nonlinear dependence of xenon diffusion coefficient on the separation distance between graphite slabs has been found. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Assessing the role of slab rheology in coupled plate-mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Léa; Coltice, Nicolas; Tackley, Paul J.; Dietmar Müller, R.; Cannon, John

    2015-11-01

    Reconstructing the 3D structure of the Earth's mantle has been a challenge for geodynamicists for about 40 yr. Although numerical models and computational capabilities have substantially progressed, parameterizations used for modeling convection forced by plate motions are far from being Earth-like. Among the set of parameters, rheology is fundamental because it defines in a non-linear way the dynamics of slabs and plumes, and the organization of lithosphere deformation. In this study, we evaluate the role of the temperature dependence of viscosity (variations up to 6 orders of magnitude) and the importance of pseudo-plasticity on reconstructing slab evolution in 3D spherical models of convection driven by plate history models. Pseudo-plasticity, which produces plate-like behavior in convection models, allows a consistent coupling between imposed plate motions and global convection, which is not possible with temperature-dependent viscosity alone. Using test case models, we show that increasing temperature dependence of viscosity enhances vertical and lateral coherence of slabs, but leads to unrealistic slab morphologies for large viscosity contrasts. Introducing pseudo-plasticity partially solves this issue, producing thin laterally and vertically more continuous slabs, and flat subduction where trench retreat is fast. We evaluate the differences between convection reconstructions employing different viscosity laws to be very large, and similar to the differences between two models with the same rheology but using two different plate histories or initial conditions.

  5. Simulating the effect of slab features on vapor intrusion of crack entry

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yijun; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    In vapor intrusion screening models, a most widely employed assumption in simulating the entry of contaminant into a building is that of a crack in the building foundation slab. Some modelers employed a perimeter crack hypothesis while others chose not to identify the crack type. However, few studies have systematically investigated the influence on vapor intrusion predictions of slab crack features, such as the shape and distribution of slab cracks and related to this overall building foundation footprint size. In this paper, predictions from a three-dimensional model of vapor intrusion are used to compare the contaminant mass flow rates into buildings with different foundation slab crack features. The simulations show that the contaminant mass flow rate into the building does not change much for different assumed slab crack shapes and locations, and the foundation footprint size does not play a significant role in determining contaminant mass flow rate through a unit area of crack. Moreover, the simulation helped reveal the distribution of subslab contaminant soil vapor concentration beneath the foundation, and the results suggest that in most cases involving no biodegradation, the variation in subslab concentration should not exceed an order of magnitude, and is often significantly less than this. PMID:23359620

  6. Experimental evidence and structural modeling of nonstoichiometric (010) surfaces coexisting in hydroxyapatite nano-crystals.

    PubMed

    Ospina, C A; Terra, J; Ramirez, A J; Farina, M; Ellis, D E; Rossi, A M

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations of electronic structure were combined to investigate the structure of the hydroxyapatite (HA) (010) surface, which plays an important role in HA interactions with biological media. HA was synthesized by in vitro precipitation at 37°C. HRTEM images revealed thin elongated rod nanoparticles with preferential growth along the [001] direction and terminations parallel to the (010) plane. The focal series reconstruction (FSR) technique was applied to develop an atomic-scale structural model of the high-resolution images. The HRTEM simulations identified the coexistence of two structurally distinct terminations for (010) surfaces: a rather flat Ca(II)-terminated surface and a zig-zag structure with open OH channels. Density functional theory (DFT) was applied in a periodic slab plane-wave pseudopotential approach to refine details of atomic coordination and bond lengths of Ca(I) and Ca(II) sites in hydrated HA (010) surfaces, starting from the HRTEM model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Clarification of the interaction between Au atoms and the anatase TiO2 (112) surface using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Kohei; Koga, Hiroaki; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Tanaka, Shingo

    2018-04-01

    A model (112) surface slab of anatase TiO2 (112) was optimized, and the adsorption of Au atoms onto the (112) surface was investigated by first-principles calculations based on DFT (density functional theory) with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Furthermore, the results were compared with those of Au/anatase TiO2 (101) system. The (112) surface has a ridge and a groove (zig-zag structure). The Au atoms were strongly adsorbed in the grooves but became unstable as they climbed toward the ridges, and the promotion of electrons in the 5d orbitals to the 6s and 6p orbitals in the absorbed Au atom occurred. At the Au/anatase TiO2 interface, the Au-Ti4+ coordinate bond in the (112) system is stronger than that in the (101) system because the promotion of electrons is greater in the former interaction than the latter. The results suggest that Au/anatase TiO2 catalysts with a higher dispersion of Au nanoparticles could be prepared when the (112) surface is preferentially exposed.

  8. Three-dimensional Finite Element Modelling of Composite Slabs for High Speed Rails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlilo, Nhlanganiso; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-12-01

    Currently precast steel-concrete composite slabs are being considered on railway bridges as a viable alternative replacement for timber sleepers. However, due to their nature and the loading conditions, their behaviour is often complex. Present knowledge of the behaviour of precast steel-concrete composite slabs subjected to rail loading is limited. FEA is an important tool used to simulate real life behaviour and is widely accepted in many disciples of engineering as an alternative to experimental test methods, which are often costly and time consuming. This paper seeks to detail FEM of precast steel-concrete slabs subjected to standard in-service loading in high-speed rail with focus on the importance of accurately defining material properties, element type, mesh size, contacts, interactions and boundary conditions that will give results representative of real life behaviour. Initial finite element model show very good results, confirming the accuracy of the modelling procedure

  9. Dual-mode characteristics of the Buneman instability in a bounded slab plasma

    SciT

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr; Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791

    2015-06-15

    The dual-mode characteristics of the Buneman instability are investigated in a slab plasma, including the geometric effects. The dual symmetric and anti-symmetric dispersion modes of the Buneman instability are obtained by the plasma dielectric function with the spectral reflection conditions for the slab geometry. The result shows that the magnitudes of the growth rate for the symmetric mode are always greater than those for the anti-symmetric mode. It is also found that the geometric effect suppresses the position of the maximum growth rate for the Buneman instability in bounded slab plasmas since the maximum conditions for the symmetric and anti-symmetricmore » modes of the Buneman instability are given by 0.60« less

  10. Landau damping of the dust-acoustic surface waves in a Lorentzian dusty plasma slab

    SciT

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr; Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590

    2016-01-15

    Landau damping of a dust-acoustic surface wave propagating at the interfaces of generalized Lorentzian dusty plasma slab bounded by a vacuum is kinetically derived as the surface wave displays the symmetric and the anti-symmetric mode in a plasma slab. In the limiting case of small scaled wave number, we have found that Landau damping is enhanced as the slab thickness is increased. In particular, the damping of anti-symmetric mode is much stronger for a Lorentzian plasma than for a Maxwellian plasma. We have also found that the damping is more affected by superthermal particles in a Lorentzian plasma than bymore » a Maxwellian plasma for both of the symmetric and the anti-symmetric cases. The variations of Landau damping with various parameters are also discussed.« less

  11. Polariton excitation in epsilon-near-zero slabs: Transient trapping of slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciattoni, Alessandro; Marini, Andrea; Rizza, Carlo; Scalora, Michael; Biancalana, Fabio

    2013-05-01

    We numerically investigate the propagation of a spatially localized and quasimonochromatic electromagnetic pulse through a slab with a Lorentz dielectric response in the epsilon-near-zero regime, where the real part of the permittivity vanishes at the pulse carrier frequency. We show that the pulse is able to excite a set of virtual polariton modes supported by the slab, with the excitation undergoing a generally slow damping due to absorption and radiation leakage. Our numerical and analytical approaches indicate that in its transient dynamics the electromagnetic field displays the very same enhancement of the field component perpendicular to the slab, as in the monochromatic regime. The transient trapping is inherently accompanied by a significantly reduced group velocity ensuing from the small dielectric permittivity, thus providing an alternative platform for achieving control and manipulation of slow light.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Bulging Deformation for Wide-Thick Slab Under Uneven Cooling Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chenhui; Ji, Cheng; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2018-06-01

    In the present work, the bulging deformation of a wide-thick slab under uneven cooling conditions was studied using finite element method. The non-uniform solidification was first calculated using a 2D heat transfer model. The thermal material properties were derived based on a microsegregation model, and the water flux distribution was measured and applied to calculate the cooling boundary conditions. Based on the solidification results, a 3D bulging model was established. The 2D heat transfer model was verified by the measured shell thickness and the slab surface temperature, and the 3D bulging model was verified by the calculated maximum bulging deflections using formulas. The bulging deformation behavior of the wide-thick slab under uneven cooling condition was then determined, and the effect of uneven solidification, casting speed, and roll misalignment were investigated.

  13. Subduction of thick oceanic plateau and high-angle normal-fault earthquakes intersecting the slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Ryuta; Kodaira, Shuichi; Yamada, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki; Nishizawa, Azusa; Oikawa, Mitsuhiro

    2017-06-01

    The role of seamounts on interplate earthquakes has been debated. However, its impact on intraslab deformation is poorly understood. Here we present unexpected evidence for large normal-fault earthquakes intersecting the slab just ahead of a subducting seamount. In 1995, a series of earthquakes with maximum magnitude of 7.1 occurred in northern Ryukyu where oceanic plateaus are subducting. The aftershock distribution shows that conjugate faults with an unusually high dip angle of 70-80° ruptured the entire subducting crust. Seismic reflection images reveal that the plate interface is displaced over 1 km along one of the fault planes of the 1995 events. These results suggest that a lateral variation in slab buoyancy can produce sufficient differential stress leading to near-vertical normal-fault earthquakes within the slab. On the contrary, the upper surface of the seamount (plate interface) may correspond to a weakly coupled region, reflecting the dual effects of seamounts/plateaus on subduction earthquakes.

  14. SYNTHETIC HYDROGEN SPECTRA OF OSCILLATING PROMINENCE SLABS IMMERSED IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciT

    Zapiór, M.; Heinzel, P.; Oliver, R.

    We study the behavior of H α and H β spectral lines and their spectral indicators in an oscillating solar prominence slab surrounded by the solar corona, using an MHD model combined with a 1D radiative transfer code taken in the line of sight perpendicular to the slab. We calculate the time variation of the Doppler shift, half-width, and maximum intensity of the H α and H β spectral lines for different modes of oscillation. We find a non-sinusoidal time dependence of some spectral parameters with time. Because H α and H β spectral indicators have different behavior for differentmore » modes, caused by differing optical depths of formation and different plasma parameter variations in time and along the slab, they may be used for prominence seismology, especially to derive the internal velocity field in prominences.« less

  15. Analysis of Slab-column Shearwall Structure of 6000 Tons Cold Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dongqing; Song, Pengwei; Jie, Pengyu

    2018-05-01

    Combining with the functional requirements, the site conditions and the 6000 tons load characteristics of cold storage, so determine its structure system for the slab-column-shear wall structure. The paper recommends the design of foundation, the settings of column cap, the arrangement of shear wall, the punching shear of floor slab and the analysis and calculation results of main structure. By addition shear wall in slab-column structure to increase the overall stiffness of structure and improve the seismic performance of structure. Take the detached form between the main structure and the external wall insulation, while set anchorage beam between in the main floor and the ring beam along the axis of the column grid to enhance the overall stability of the external wall insulation.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Bulging Deformation for Wide-Thick Slab Under Uneven Cooling Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chenhui; Ji, Cheng; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, the bulging deformation of a wide-thick slab under uneven cooling conditions was studied using finite element method. The non-uniform solidification was first calculated using a 2D heat transfer model. The thermal material properties were derived based on a microsegregation model, and the water flux distribution was measured and applied to calculate the cooling boundary conditions. Based on the solidification results, a 3D bulging model was established. The 2D heat transfer model was verified by the measured shell thickness and the slab surface temperature, and the 3D bulging model was verified by the calculated maximum bulging deflections using formulas. The bulging deformation behavior of the wide-thick slab under uneven cooling condition was then determined, and the effect of uneven solidification, casting speed, and roll misalignment were investigated.

  17. Deformation of the Tonga Slab: Evidence for Interaction with a Small-scale Secondary Plume in the Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.; Bikoba, J. Z.; Tarlow, S.

    2015-12-01

    Magali I. Billen and John Z. BikobaThe Tonga Slab is the most seismically active subduction zone providing a uniquely detailed picture of the internal deformation of the slab, with apparent warping and folding, from the surface through the transition zone. Here, we investigate the dynamical origin of a irregular feature in the seismicity within the transition zone located at 21-28oS, using 3D visualization and analysis of the seismicity and compression/tension (P/T) axis from the moment tensor solutions to characterize the geometry of, and the orientation of forces acting on, the slab. This irregular feature can be described as narrow region of upward deflection of the slab, with a gap in seismicity beyond (down-dip of) the deflected region, and flanked by two narrow V-shaped gaps in seismicity suggestive of tearing of the slab. The P/T axis show a dominate down-dip orientation of the P axis above the deflection point, which rotate to a nearly vertical orientation within the central region of the deflected slab. The adjacent attached regions (down-dip of the two flanking slab gaps) also have rotated and more heterogeneous P/T axis orientations. In contrast, the adjacent section of the slab to the north of 21oS has continuous seismicity throughout the transition zone, with a roughly uniform planar shape, and generally down-dip orientation of the P axis. We explore three possible hypothesis for the observed deformation including: 1) deflection due to a buoyant metastable olivine wedge, 2) a buckling feature in the slab as previously proposed by Myhill (GJI., 2013), and interaction with a small-scale, secondary plume upwelling below the slab. If the newly-observed gaps in seismicity indicate physical gaps or significant thinning of the slab, then these observations are not consistent with the buckling hypothesis. The lack of significant along-strike variation in slab age or subduction rate also suggests that a localized region of metastable olivine is unlikely

  18. Slab edge interaction with a back-arc spreading center: 3D instantaneous mantle flow models of Vanuatu, SW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, K. A.; Jadamec, M.; Durance-Sie, P. M.; Moresi, L. N.

    2011-12-01

    The Vanuatu area of the south-west Pacific is a dynamic region of high heat-flow and strain-rate, dominated by ongoing plate boundary processes. At the southern termination of the Vanuatu arc the curved geometry of the New Hebrides trench juxtaposes the slab edge perpendicular to its back-arc spreading center. While existing 3D subduction models have demonstrated the importance of mantle flow around a slab edge, the nature of interaction between back-arc upwelling and circum-slab edge mantle flow is not well understood. We use 3D instantaneous numerical models of a Newtonian mantle rheology to test the effect of the slab edge and back-arc upwelling on the mantle flow vector field beneath southern Vanuatu. These high-resolution models simulate temperature-dependent buoyancy-driven deformation of the lithosphere and mantle for a realistic slab geometry. Model results show a small but significant component of vertical mantle flow velocity associated with the slab edge and back-arc spreading center. We also see strain-rate and dynamic topography commensurate with surface observations. Mantle flow by toroidal-type motion brings hotter mantle material from behind the slab into the mantle wedge, elevating geothermal gradients in the slab edge vicinity. The implications of moderate vertical displacement of this hot mantle material at the slab edge are wide-ranging, and such a tectonic framework might aid interpretation of a number of surface observations. For example, induced decompression partial-melting in the mantle wedge and/or slab, and thermal erosion of the slab may contribute to the diverse magma compositions from this region.

  19. Subduction Thermal Regime, Slab Dehydration, and Seismicity Distribution Beneath Hikurangi Based on 3-D Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenaga, Nobuaki; Ji, Yingfeng; Yoshioka, Shoichi; Feng, Deshan

    2018-04-01

    The downdip limit of seismogenic interfaces inferred from the subduction thermal regime by thermal models has been suggested to relate to the faulting instability caused by the brittle failure regime in various plate convergent systems. However, the featured three-dimensional thermal state, especially along the horizontal (trench-parallel) direction of a subducted oceanic plate, remains poorly constrained. To robustly investigate and further map the horizontal (trench-parallel) distribution of the subduction regime and subsequently induced slab dewatering in a descending plate beneath a convergent margin, we construct a regional thermal model that incorporates an up-to-date three-dimensional slab geometry and the MORVEL plate velocity to simulate the plate subduction history in Hikurangi. Our calculations suggest an identified thrust zone featuring remarkable slab dehydration near the Taupo volcanic arc in the North Island distributed in the Kapiti, Manawatu, and Raukumara region. The calculated average subduction-associated slab dehydration of 0.09 to 0.12 wt%/km is greater than the dehydration in other portions of the descending slab and possibly contributes to an along-arc variation in the interplate pore fluid pressure. A large-scale slab dehydration (>0.05 wt%/km) and a high thermal gradient (>4 °C/km) are also identified in the Kapiti, Manawatu, and Raukumara region and are associated with frequent deep slow slip events. An intraslab dehydration that exceeds 0.2 wt%/km beneath Manawatu near the source region of tectonic tremors suggests an unknown relationship in the genesis of slow earthquakes.

  20. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Wald, David J.; Johnson, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of `average' active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested.

  1. Along-strike Translation of a Fossil Slab Beneath California (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    There are three places where subduction ceased before a spreading ridge was consumed at a trench, leaving behind remnant microplates that were incorporated into the non-subducting oceanic plate. In the cases of the Phoenix plate off the Antarctic peninsula and the Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates off Baja California, fossil slabs still attached to the microplates have been traced into the asthenosphere using seismological techniques. Apparently deep subducting plates can tear off from the surface plate leaving behind fossil pieces of young oceanic lithosphere extending 100 km or more into the asthenosphere. The young slab fragments may be close to neutral buoyancy with their asthenospheric surroundings. In the case of the Monterey microplate off central California, now part of the Pacific plate, oceanic crust has been traced beneath the continental margin using active source seismology. Nicholson et al. (1994) suggested that the translation of the Monterey microplate under North America dragged bits of the overriding plate with it, causing the rotation of the Transverse Ranges in southern California. They also suggested that the San Andreas initiated as a low angle fault between the overriding North American plate and the subducted Monterey plate. There is a gap in coastal, post-subduction volcanic activity opposite the microplate, perhaps because a slab window never formed. A steeply dipping seismic anomaly, the Isabella anomaly, also lies opposite the microplate, probably indicating the continuation of the Monterey slab deep into the asthenosphere. Between the Isabella anomaly and the surface remnants of the Monterey microplate lies the aseismic, creeping section of the San Andreas fault, which we speculate may be caused by the migration of fluids from the subducted plate. The Monterey case differs from the Phoenix and Guadalupe cases in that the hypothesized fossil slab lies beneath the North American plate, which is translating relative to the Pacific

  2. Interaction of the Cyprus/Tethys Slab With the Mantle Transition Zone Beneath Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. A.; Rost, S.; Taylor, G.; Cornwell, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    The geodynamics of the eastern Mediterranean are dominated by northward motion of the Arabian/African continents and subduction of the oldest oceanic crust on the planet along the Aegean and Cyprean trenches. These slabs have previously been imaged using seismic tomography on a continental scale, but detailed information regarding their descent from upper to lower mantle and how they interact with the mantle transition zone have been severely lacking. The Dense Array for North Anatolia (DANA) was a 73 station passive seismic deployment active between 2012-2013 with the primary aim of imaging shallow structure beneath the North Anatolian Fault. However, we exploit the exceptional dataset recorded by DANA to characterise a region where the Cyprus Slab impinges upon the mantle transition zone beneath northern Turkey, providing arguably the most detailed view of a slab as it transits from the upper to lower mantle. We map varying depths and amplitudes of the transition zone seismic discontinuities (`410', `520' and `660') in 3D using over 1500 high quality receiver functions over an area of approximately 200km x 300km. The `410' is observed close to its predicted depth, but the `660' is depressed to >670 km across the entirety of the study region. This is consistent with an accumulation of cold subducted material at the base of the upper mantle, and the presence of a `520' discontinuity in the vicinity of the slab surface also suggests that the slab is present deep within the transition zone. Anomalous low velocity layers above and within the transition zone are constrained and may indicate hydration and ongoing mass/fluid flux between upper and lower mantle in the presence of subduction. The results of the study have implications not only for the regional geodynamics of Anatolia, but also for slab dynamics globally.

  3. Slab geometry of the South American margin from joint inversion of body waves and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Portner, D. E.; Lynner, C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.

    2016-12-01

    The western margin of South America is a long subduction zone with a complex, highly three -dimensional geometry. The first order structure of the slab has previously been inferred from seismicity patterns and locations of volcanoes, but confirmation of the slab geometry by seismic imaging for the entire margin has been limited by either shallow, lithospheric scale models or broader, upper mantle images, often defined on a limited spatial footprint. Here, we present new teleseismic tomographic SV seismic models of the upper mantle from 10°S to 40°S along the South American subduction zone with resolution to a depth of 1000 km as inferred from checkerboard tests. In regions near the Peru Bolivia border (12°S to 18°S) and near central Chile and western Argentina (29.5°S to 33°S) we jointly invert the multi-band direct S and SKS relative delay times with Rayleigh wave phase velocities from ambient noise and teleseismic surface wave tomography. This self-consistent model provides information from the upper crust to below the mantle transition zone along the western margin in these two regions. This consistency allows tracing the slab from the South American coastline to the sub-transition zone upper mantle. From this model we image several features, but most notable is a significant eastward step near the southern edge of the margin (24°-30° S). West of this step, a large high shear velocity body is imaged in the base of and below the transition zone. We suggest this may be a stagnant slab, which is descending into the lower mantle now that it is no longer attached to the surface. This suggests a new component to the subduction history of western South America when an older slab lead the convergence before anchoring in the transition zone, breaking off from the surface, and being overtaken by the modern, actively subducting slab now located further east.

  4. Combustion of solid fuel slabs with gaseous oxygen in a hybrid motor analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Serin, Nadir; Johnson, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Using a high-pressure, two-dimensional hybrid motor, an experimental investigation was conducted on fundamental processes involved in hybrid rocket combustion. HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene) fuel cross-linked with diisocyanate was burned with gaseous oxygen (GOX) under various operating conditions. Large-amplitude pressure oscillations were encountered in earlier test runs. After identifying the source of instability and decoupling the GOX feed-line system and combustion chamber, the pressure oscillations were drastically reduced from plus or minus 20% of the localized mean pressure to an acceptable range of plus or minus 1.5%. Embedded fine--wire thermocouples indicated that the surface temperature of the burning fuel was around 1000 K depending upon axial locations and operating conditions. Also, except near the leading edge region, the subsurface thermal wave profiles in the upstream locations are thicker than those in the downstream locations since the solid-fuel regression rate, in general, increases with distance along the fuel slab. The recovered solid fuel slabs in the laminar portion of the boundary layer exhibited smooth surfaces, indicating the existence of a liquid melt layer on the burning fuel surface in the upstream region. After the transition section, which displayed distinct transverse striations, the surface roughness pattern became quite random and very pronounced in the downstream turbulent boundary-layer region. Both real-time X-ray radiography and ultrasonic pulse echo techniques were used to determine the instantaneous web thicknesses and instantaneous solid-fuel regression rates over certain portions of the fuel slabs. Globally averaged and axially dependent but time-averaged regression rates were also obtained and presented. Several tests were conducted using, simultaneously, one translucent fuel slab and one fuel slab processed with carbon black powder. The addition of carbon black did not affect the measured regression rates or

  5. A Numerical Method for Obtaining Monoenergetic Neutron Flux Distributions and Transmissions in Multiple-Region Slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Harold

    1959-01-01

    This method is investigated for semi-infinite multiple-slab configurations of arbitrary width, composition, and source distribution. Isotropic scattering in the laboratory system is assumed. Isotropic scattering implies that the fraction of neutrons scattered in the i(sup th) volume element or subregion that will make their next collision in the j(sup th) volume element or subregion is the same for all collisions. These so-called "transfer probabilities" between subregions are calculated and used to obtain successive-collision densities from which the flux and transmission probabilities directly follow. For a thick slab with little or no absorption, a successive-collisions technique proves impractical because an unreasonably large number of collisions must be followed in order to obtain the flux. Here the appropriate integral equation is converted into a set of linear simultaneous algebraic equations that are solved for the average total flux in each subregion. When ordinary diffusion theory applies with satisfactory precision in a portion of the multiple-slab configuration, the problem is solved by ordinary diffusion theory, but the flux is plotted only in the region of validity. The angular distribution of neutrons entering the remaining portion is determined from the known diffusion flux and the remaining region is solved by higher order theory. Several procedures for applying the numerical method are presented and discussed. To illustrate the calculational procedure, a symmetrical slab ia vacuum is worked by the numerical, Monte Carlo, and P(sub 3) spherical harmonics methods. In addition, an unsymmetrical double-slab problem is solved by the numerical and Monte Carlo methods. The numerical approach proved faster and more accurate in these examples. Adaptation of the method to anisotropic scattering in slabs is indicated, although no example is included in this paper.

  6. Technology Solutions Case Study: Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate, Southwestern Pennsylvania

    SciT

    None

    2014-07-01

    In this project, Building America team IBACOS worked with a builder of single- and multifamily homes in southwestern Pennsylvania (climate zone 5) to understand its methods of successfully using polyethylene sheeting over aggregate as a capillary break beneath the slab in new construction. This builder’s homes vary in terms of whether they have crawlspaces or basements. However, in both cases, the strategy protects the home from water intrusion via capillary action (e.g., water wicking into cracks and spaces in the slab), thereby helping to preserve the durability of the home.

  7. Structure and morphology of submarine slab slides: clues to origin and behavior

    O'Leary, Dennis W.

    1991-01-01

    Geologic features suggest that some slab slides probably result from long-term strength degradation of weak layers deep in the homoclinal section. Time-dependent strain in clay-rich layers can create potential slide surfaces of low frictional strength. Competent layers are weak in tension and probably fragment in the first instance of, or even prior to, translation, and the allochthonous mass is readily transformed into a high-momentum debris flow. The structure and geomorphology of slab slides provide important clues to their origin and behavior. -from Author

  8. Superprism effect in a metal-clad terahertz photonic crystal slab.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Tushar; Colvin, Vicki L; Jian, Zhongping; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2007-03-15

    We report an experimental demonstration of the superprism effect in a photonic crystal slab at terahertz frequencies. For a 10% frequency variation around 0.28 THz, the refraction angle at the output facet of a wedge-shaped photonic crystal varies by about 15 degrees. A comparison with the predictions of a band structure calculation demonstrates that a three-dimensional treatment, accurately modeling the finite slab thickness and the metallic boundary conditions, is required for even a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  9. Exact image theory for the problem of dielectric/magnetic slab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, I. V.

    1987-01-01

    Exact image method, recently introduced for the exact solution of electromagnetic field problems involving homogeneous half spaces and microstrip-like geometries, is developed for the problem of homogeneous slab of dielectric and/or magnetic material in free space. Expressions for image sources, creating the exact reflected and transmitted fields, are given and their numerical evaluation is demonstrated. Nonradiating modes, guided by the slab and responsible for the loss of convergence of the image functions, are considered and extracted. The theory allows, for example, an analysis of finite ground planes in microstrip antenna structures.

  10. Temporal and spatial variation in porosity and compaction pressure for the viscoelastic slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, M.; Van Keken, P. E.

    2017-12-01

    Fluid is considered to play key roles in subduction zones. It triggers various types of earthquakes by elevating pore-fluid pressure or forming hydrous minerals, and it also facilitates magma genesis by lowering the solidus temperatures of mantle and crustal rocks. Several previous numerical studies have worked on how fluid migrates and how porosity changes in time and space, but our knowledge of the fluid behavior remains limited. In this presentation, we demonstrate the detailed fluid behavior in the slab. The main features of this study are that (1) viscoelasticity is included, and that (2) fluid flow toward the inner part of the slab is also considered. We construct 2D and 3D finite element models for viscoelastic slab based on a theory of two-phase flow, which allows us to treat the movement of rock- and fluid- phases simultaneously. We solve the equations for porosity and compaction pressure which is defined as the pressure difference in between the two phases. Fluid source is fixed in time and space, and a uniform slab velocity is imposed for the whole model domain. There are several important parameters affecting the fluid behavior which includes bulk viscosity, bulk modulus, permeability, and fluid viscosity. Among these we fix bulk modulus and change the other parameters to investigate their effects on fluid migration. We find that when bulk viscosity is relatively high, elasticity is dominant and large amount of fluid is trapped in and around the fluid source. In addition, fluid migrates along the fluid source when relatively high ratio of permeability to fluid viscosity is assumed. Fluid generally moves with the slab when the ratio of permeability to fluid viscosity is low. One interesting feature is that in some cases porosity increases also in the deeper part of the fluid source due to the diffusion of compaction pressure. It suggests that the effects of resistance to volume change can be an alternative mechanism to effectively hydrate the inner part

  11. Numerical Investigation on Detection of Prestress Losses in a Prestressed Concrete Slab by Modal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalovs, A.; Rucevskis, S.; Akishin, P.; Kolupajevs, J.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents numerical results of loss of prestress in the reinforced prestressed precast hollow core slabs by modal analysis. Loss of prestress is investigated by the 3D finite element method, using ANSYS software. In the numerical examples, variables initial stresses were introduced into seven-wire stress-relieved strands of the concrete slabs. The effects of span and material properties of concrete on the modal frequencies of the concrete structure under initial stress were studied. Modal parameters computed from the finite element models were compared. Applicability and effectiveness of the proposed method was investigated.

  12. Temporal evolution of crack propagation propensity in snow in relation to slab and weak layer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Jürg; Reuter, Benjamin; van Herwijnen, Alec; Richter, Bettina; Gaume, Johan

    2016-11-01

    If a weak snow layer below a cohesive slab is present in the snow cover, unstable snow conditions can prevail for days or even weeks. We monitored the temporal evolution of a weak layer of faceted crystals as well as the overlaying slab layers at the location of an automatic weather station in the Steintälli field site above Davos (Eastern Swiss Alps). We focussed on the crack propagation propensity and performed propagation saw tests (PSTs) on 7 sampling days during a 2-month period from early January to early March 2015. Based on video images taken during the tests we determined the mechanical properties of the slab and the weak layer and compared them to the results derived from concurrently performed measurements of penetration resistance using the snow micro-penetrometer (SMP). The critical cut length, observed in PSTs, increased overall during the measurement period. The increase was not steady and the lowest values of critical cut length were observed around the middle of the measurement period. The relevant mechanical properties, the slab effective elastic modulus and the weak layer specific fracture, overall increased as well. However, the changes with time differed, suggesting that the critical cut length cannot be assessed by simply monitoring a single mechanical property such as slab load, slab modulus or weak layer specific fracture energy. Instead, crack propagation propensity is the result of a complex interplay between the mechanical properties of the slab and the weak layer. We then compared our field observations to newly developed metrics of snow instability related to either failure initiation or crack propagation propensity. The metrics were either derived from the SMP signal or calculated from simulated snow stratigraphy (SNOWPACK). They partially reproduced the observed temporal evolution of critical cut length and instability test scores. Whereas our unique dataset of quantitative measures of snow instability provides new insights into the

  13. Big mantle wedge, anisotropy, slabs and earthquakes beneath the Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng

    2017-09-01

    The Japan Sea is a part of the western Pacific trench-arc-backarc system and has a complex bathymetry and intense seismic activities in the crust and upper mantle. Local seismic tomography revealed strong lateral heterogeneities in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the eastern margin of the Japan Sea, which was determined using P and S wave arrival times of suboceanic earthquakes relocated precisely with sP depth phases. Ambient-noise tomography revealed a thin crust and a thin lithosphere beneath the Japan Sea and significant low-velocity (low-V) anomalies in the shallow mantle beneath the western and eastern margins of the Japan Sea. Observations with ocean-bottom seismometers and electromagnetometers revealed low-V and high-conductivity anomalies at depths of 200-300 km in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the subducting Pacific slab, and the anomalies are connected with the low-V zone in the normal mantle wedge beneath NE Japan, suggesting that both shallow and deep slab dehydrations occur and contribute to the arc and back-arc magmatism. The Pacific slab has a simple geometry beneath the Japan Sea, and earthquakes occur actively in the slab down to a depth of ∼600 km beneath the NE Asian margin. Teleseismic P and S wave tomography has revealed that the Philippine Sea plate has subducted aseismically down to the mantle transition zone (MTZ, 410-660 km) depths beneath the southern Japan Sea and the Tsushima Strait, and a slab window is revealed within the aseismic Philippine Sea slab. Seismic anisotropy tomography revealed a NW-SE fast-velocity direction in the BMW, which reflects corner flows induced by the fast deep subduction of the Pacific slab. Large deep earthquakes (M > 7.0; depth > 500 km) occur frequently beneath the Japan Sea western margin, which may be related to the formation of the Changbai and Ulleung intraplate volcanoes. A metastable olivine wedge is revealed within the cold core of the Pacific slab at the MTZ depth, which may be related

  14. Semi-analytical model for a slab one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libman, M.; Kondratyev, N. M.; Gorodetsky, M. L.

    2018-02-01

    In our work we justify the applicability of a dielectric mirror model to the description of a real photonic crystal. We demonstrate that a simple one-dimensional model of a multilayer mirror can be employed for modeling of a slab waveguide with periodically changing width. It is shown that this width change can be recalculated to the effective refraction index modulation. The applicability of transfer matrix method of reflection properties calculation was demonstrated. Finally, our 1-D model was employed to analyze reflection properties of a 2-D structure - a slab photonic crystal with a number of elliptic holes.

  15. Laser Stimulated Thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abtahi, Abdollah

    Techniques for localized heating of semi-infinite single-layer and two-layer structures are investigated theoretically and experimentally, motivated by applications in thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry of ionizing radiation. The heat-conduction equations are solved by the Green's function technique to obtain the transient temperature distribution caused by exposure to laser beams of Gaussian and uniform circular intensity profiles. It is shown that the spatio-temporal temperature response is readily monitored by the TL response that results when layer configuration contains a thermoluminescent phosphor. The experiments for the verification of the developed theory are performed with two specially constructed TL detection systems, one featuring a laser beam of Gaussian profile and the other a uniform circular laser beam. Measurements of the thermoluminescent emission from a number of different TL systems are performed and compared with computed responses on the basis of simple electron kinetics. We experiment exclusively with the commercial TL phosphor LiF:Mg,Ti(TLD-100, Harshaw), the most widely used material in thermoluminescence dosimetry. We study in detail localized Gaussian beam heating of it in the form of 0.9 mm thick slabs, self-supporting firms of fine-grain powder in a polyimide (Kapton) matrix, and on substrates of LiF single crystals or borosilicate glass. Thermoluminescent layers on glass substrates have been heated with Gaussian and uniform circular intensity profiles in two different modes: the laser beam impinges onto (a) the phosphor layer, and (b) the glass substrate. It is demonstrated that the optical and thermal behavior of the dosimeters can be determined by these methods and that, furthermore, the thermoluminescence response of a given configuration can be simulated as a function of a number of experimental parameters such as laser power, beam size, substrate and TL-layer thicknesses, and configuration of the dosimeters. In addition, we have

  16. Laser principles.

    PubMed

    Bogdan Allemann, Inja; Kaufman, Joely

    2011-01-01

    Since the construction of the first laser in the 1960s, the role that lasers play in various medical specialities, including dermatology, has steadily increased. However, within the last 2 decades, the technological advances and the use of lasers in the field of dermatology have virtually exploded. Many treatments have only become possible with the use of lasers. Especially in aesthetic medicine, lasers are an essential tool in the treatment armamentarium. Due to better research and understanding of the physics of light and skin, there is now a wide and increasing array of different lasers and devices to choose from. The proper laser selection for each indication and treatment requires a profound understanding of laser physics and the basic laser principles. Understanding these principles will allow the laser operator to obtain better results and help avoid complications. This chapter will give an in-depth overview of the physical principles relevant in cutaneous laser surgery. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Numerical analysis of the shifting slabs applied in a wireless power transfer system to enhance magnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yayun; Yang, Xijun; Jin, Nan; Li, Wenwen; Yao, Chen; Tang, Houjun

    2017-05-01

    Shifting medium is a kind of metamaterial, which can optically shift a space or an object a certain distance away from its original position. Based on the shifting medium, we propose a concise pair of shifting slabs covering the transmitting or receiving coil in a two-coil wireless power transfer system to decrease the equivalent distance between the coils. The electromagnetic parameters of the shifting slabs are calculated by transformation optics. Numerical simulations validate that the shifting slabs can approximately shift the electromagnetic fields generated by the covered coil; thus, the magnetic coupling and the efficiency of the system are enhanced while remaining the physical transmission distance unchanged. We also verify the advantages of the shifting slabs over the magnetic superlens. Finally, we provide two methods to fabricate shifting slabs based on split-ring resonators.

  18. Upper mantle anisotropy beneath Peru from SKS splitting: Constraints on flat slab dynamics and interaction with the Nazca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline M.; Long, Maureen D.; Wagner, Lara S.; Beck, Susan L.; Tavera, Hernando

    2015-02-01

    The Peruvian flat slab is by far the largest region of flat subduction in the world today, but aspects of its structure and dynamics remain poorly understood. In particular, questions remain over whether the relatively narrow Nazca Ridge subducting beneath southern Peru provides dynamic support for the flat slab or it is just a passive feature. We investigate the dynamics and interaction of the Nazca Ridge and the flat slab system by studying upper mantle seismic anisotropy across southern Peru. We analyze shear wave splitting of SKS, sSKS, and PKS phases at 49 stations distributed across the area, primarily from the PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment (PULSE). We observe distinct spatial variations in anisotropic structure along strike, most notably a sharp transition from coherent splitting in the north to pervasive null (non-split) arrivals in the south, with the transition coinciding with the northern limit of the Nazca Ridge. For both anisotropic domains there is evidence for complex and multi-layered anisotropy. To the north of the ridge our *KS splitting measurements likely reflect trench-normal mantle flow beneath the flat slab. This signal is then modified by shallower anisotropic layers, most likely in the supra-slab mantle, but also potentially from within the slab. To the south the sub-slab mantle is similarly anisotropic, with a trench-oblique fast direction, but widespread nulls appear to reflect dramatic heterogeneity in anisotropic structure above the flat slab. Overall the regional anisotropic structure, and thus the pattern of deformation, appears to be closely tied to the location of the Nazca Ridge, which further suggests that the ridge plays a key role in the mantle dynamics of the Peruvian flat slab system.

  19. Measurement of Debye length in laser-produced plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Debye length of an expanded plasma created by placing an evacuated chamber with an entrance slit in the path of a freely expanding laser produced plasma was measured, using the slab geometry. An independent measurement of electron density together with the observed value for the Debye length also provided a means for evaluating the plasma electron temperature. This temperature has applications in ascertaining plasma conductivity and magnetic field necessary for confinement of the laser produced plasma. Also, the temperature obtained would be useful in analyzing electron-ion recombination rates in the expanded plasma and the dynamics of the cooling process of the plasma expansion.

  20. Mantle wedge infiltrated with saline fluids from dehydration and decarbonation of subducting slab

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Mirabueno, Ma. Hannah T.; Okuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Slab-derived fluids play an important role in heat and material transfer in subduction zones. Dehydration and decarbonation reactions of minerals in the subducting slab have been investigated using phase equilibria and modeling of fluid flow. Nevertheless, direct observations of the fluid chemistry and pressure–temperature conditions of fluids are few. This report describes CO2-bearing saline fluid inclusions in spinel-harzburgite xenoliths collected from the 1991 Pinatubo pumice deposits. The fluid inclusions are filled with saline solutions with 5.1 ± 1.0% (wt) NaCl-equivalent magnesite crystals, CO2-bearing vapor bubbles, and a talc and/or chrysotile layer on the walls. The xenoliths contain tremolite amphibole, which is stable in temperatures lower than 830 °C at the uppermost mantle. The Pinatubo volcano is located at the volcanic front of the Luzon arc associated with subduction of warm oceanic plate. The present observation suggests hydration of forearc mantle and the uppermost mantle by slab-derived CO2-bearing saline fluids. Dehydration and decarbonation take place, and seawater-like saline fluids migrate from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. The presence of saline fluids is important because they can dissolve more metals than pure H2O and affect the chemical evolution of the mantle wedge. PMID:23716664

  1. Pathway from subducting slab to surface for melt and fluids beneath Mount Rainier.

    PubMed

    McGary, R Shane; Evans, Rob L; Wannamaker, Philip E; Elsenbeck, Jimmy; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2014-07-17

    Convergent margin volcanism originates with partial melting, primarily of the upper mantle, into which the subducting slab descends. Melting of this material can occur in one of two ways. The flow induced in the mantle by the slab can result in upwelling and melting through adiabatic decompression. Alternatively, fluids released from the descending slab through dehydration reactions can migrate into the hot mantle wedge, inducing melting by lowering the solidus temperature. The two mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. In either case, the buoyant melts make their way towards the surface to reside in the crust or to be extruded as lava. Here we use magnetotelluric data collected across the central state of Washington, USA, to image the complete pathway for the fluid-melt phase. By incorporating constraints from a collocated seismic study into the magnetotelluric inversion process, we obtain superior constraints on the fluids and melt in a subduction setting. Specifically, we are able to identify and connect fluid release at or near the top of the slab, migration of fluids into the overlying mantle wedge, melting in the wedge, and transport of the melt/fluid phase to a reservoir in the crust beneath Mt Rainier.

  2. Pathway from subducting slab to surface for melt and fluids beneath Mount Rainier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGary, R. Shane; Evans, Rob L.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Elsenbeck, Jimmy; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Convergent margin volcanism originates with partial melting, primarily of the upper mantle, into which the subducting slab descends. Melting of this material can occur in one of two ways. The flow induced in the mantle by the slab can result in upwelling and melting through adiabatic decompression. Alternatively, fluids released from the descending slab through dehydration reactions can migrate into the hot mantle wedge, inducing melting by lowering the solidus temperature. The two mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. In either case, the buoyant melts make their way towards the surface to reside in the crust or to be extruded as lava. Here we use magnetotelluric data collected across the central state of Washington, USA, to image the complete pathway for the fluid-melt phase. By incorporating constraints from a collocated seismic study into the magnetotelluric inversion process, we obtain superior constraints on the fluids and melt in a subduction setting. Specifically, we are able to identify and connect fluid release at or near the top of the slab, migration of fluids into the overlying mantle wedge, melting in the wedge, and transport of the melt/fluid phase to a reservoir in the crust beneath Mt Rainier.

  3. Discussion on the installation checking method of precast composite floor slab with lattice girders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Jin, Xing; Wang, Yahui; Zhou, Hele; Gu, Jianing

    2018-03-01

    Based on the installation checking requirements of China’s current standards and the international norms for prefabricated structural precast components, it proposed an installation checking method for precast composite floor slab with lattice girders. By taking an equivalent composite beam consisted of a single lattice girder and the precast concrete slab as the checking object, compression instability stress of upper chords and yield stress of slab distribution reinforcement at the maximum positive moment, tensile yield stress of upper chords, slab normal section normal compression stress and shear instability stress of diagonal bars at the maximum negative moment were checked. And the bending stress and deflection of support beams, strength and compression stability bearing capacity of the vertical support, shear bearing capacity of the bolt and compression bearing capacity of steel tube wall at the bolt were checked at the same time. Every different checking object was given a specific load value and load combination. Application of installation checking method was given and testified by example.

  4. Advanced bridge safety initiative : FRP flexural retrofit for concrete slab bridges - task 4 deliverables.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    Concrete slab bridges are being examined as part of the MaineDOT Advanced Bridge Safety Initiative. Under Tasks : 1 3 a finite element analysis program is developed, validated and applied to twenty bridges. : Task 4 investigates and develops a no...

  5. The ASMEx snow slab experiment: snow microwave radiative transfer (SMRT) model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandells, Melody; Löwe, Henning; Picard, Ghislain; Dumont, Marie; Essery, Richard; Floury, Nicolas; Kontu, Anna; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Maslanka, William; Mätzler, Christian; Morin, Samuel; Wiesmann, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    A major uncertainty in snow microwave modelling to date has been the treatment of the snow microstructure. Although observations of microstructural parameters such as the optical grain diameter, specific surface area and correlation length have improved drastically over the last few years, scale factors have been used to derive the parameters needed in microwave emission models from these observations. Previous work has shown that a major difference between electromagnetic models of scattering coefficients is due to the specific snow microstructure models used. The snow microwave radiative transfer model (SMRT) is a new model developed to advance understanding of the role of microstructure and isolate different assumptions in existing microwave models that collectively hinder interpretation of model intercomparison studies. SMRT is implemented in Python and is modular, thus allows switching between different representations in its various components. Here, the role of microstructure is examined with the Improved Born Approximation electromagnetic model. The model is evaluated against scattering and absorption coefficients derived from radiometer measurements of snow slabs taken as part of the Arctic Snow Microstructure Experiment (ASMEx), which took place in Sodankylä, Finland over two seasons. Microtomography observations of slab samples were used to determine parameters for five microstructure models: spherical, exponential, sticky hard sphere, Teubner-Strey and Gaussian random field. SMRT brightness temperature simulations are also compared with radiometric observations of the snow slabs over a reflector plate and an absorber substrate. Agreement between simulations and observations is generally good except for slabs that are highly anisotropic.

  6. Potential application of a homogeneous and anisotropic slab as an angle insensitive absorbing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Chang; Liu, Xiaoning; Niu, Tiaoming; Wang, Jing; Mei, Zhonglei; Qin, Jiayong

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a flat and incident angle independence absorbing material is proposed and numerically verified in the optical spectrum. A homogeneous and anisotropic dielectric slab as a non-reflecting layer is first reviewed, and a feasible realization strategy of the slab is then given by using layered isotropic materials. When the loss components of the constitutive materials are not zero, the slab will work as an angle insensitive absorbing layer, and the absorption rate augments with increase of the losses. As the numerical verifications, the field distributions of a metallic cylinder and a triangular metallic object individually covered by the designed absorbing layer are demonstrated. The simulation results show that the designed absorbing layer can efficiently absorb the incident waves with the property of incident angle independence at the operation frequency. This homogeneous slab can be used in one and two dimensional situations for the realization of an invisibility cloak, a carpet cloak and even a skin cloak, if it is used to conformally cover target objects.

  7. Slab melting beneath the Cascades Arc driven by dehydration of altered oceanic peridotite

    Walowski, Kristina J; Wallace, Paul J.; Hauri, E.H.; Wada, I.; Clynne, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Water is returned to Earth’s interior at subduction zones. However, the processes and pathways by which water leaves the subducting plate and causes melting beneath volcanic arcs are complex; the source of the water—subducting sediment, altered oceanic crust, or hydrated mantle in the downgoing plate—is debated; and the role of slab temperature is unclear. Here we analyse the hydrogen-isotope and trace-element signature of melt inclusions in ash samples from the Cascade Arc, where young, hot lithosphere subducts. Comparing these data with published analyses, we find that fluids in the Cascade magmas are sourced from deeper parts of the subducting slab—hydrated mantle peridotite in the slab interior—compared with fluids in magmas from the Marianas Arc, where older, colder lithosphere subducts. We use geodynamic modelling to show that, in the hotter subduction zone, the upper crust of the subducting slab rapidly dehydrates at shallow depths. With continued subduction, fluids released from the deeper plate interior migrate into the dehydrated parts, causing those to melt. These melts in turn migrate into the overlying mantle wedge, where they trigger further melting. Our results provide a physical model to explain melting of the subducted plate and mass transfer from the slab to the mantle beneath arcs where relatively young oceanic lithosphere is subducted.

  8. Western US volcanism due to intruding oceanic mantle driven by ancient Farallon slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Liu, Lijun; Hu, Jiashun

    2018-01-01

    The origin of late Cenozoic intraplate volcanism over the western United States is debated. One important reason is the lack of a clear understanding of the mantle dynamics during this volcanic history. Here we reconstruct the mantle thermal states beneath North America since 20 million years ago using a hybrid inverse geodynamic model with data assimilation. The model simultaneously satisfies the past subduction kinematics, present mantle tomographic image and the volcanic history. We find that volcanism in both the Yellowstone volcanic province and the Basin and Range province corresponds to a similar eastward-intruding mantle derived from beneath the Pacific Ocean and driven mostly by the sinking Farallon slab below the central-eastern United States. The hot mantle that forms the Columbia River flood basalt and subsequent Yellowstone-Newberry hotspot tracks first enters the western United States through tears within the Juan de Fuca slab. Subsequent coexistence of the westward asthenospheric flow above the retreating Juan de Fuca slab and eastward-propagating mantle beyond the back-arc region reproduces the bifurcating hotspot chains. A similar but weaker heat source intrudes below the Basin and Range around the southern edge of the slab, and can explain the diffuse basaltic volcanism in this region. According to our models, the putative Yellowstone plume contributes little to the formation of the Yellowstone volcanic province.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION USING INDOOR AND SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this investigation was to develop a method for evaluating vapor intrusion using indoor and sub-slab air measurement and at the same time directly assist EPA’s New England Regional Office in evaluating vapor intrusion in 15 homes and one business near the former R...

  10. Ground Source Heat Pump Sub-Slab Heat Exchange Loop Performance in a Cold Climate

    SciT

    Mittereder, N.; Poerschke, A.

    2013-11-01

    This report presents a cold-climate project that examines an alternative approach to ground source heat pump (GSHP) ground loop design. The innovative ground loop design is an attempt to reduce the installed cost of the ground loop heat exchange portion of the system by containing the entire ground loop within the excavated location beneath the basement slab. Prior to the installation and operation of the sub-slab heat exchanger, energy modeling using TRNSYS software and concurrent design efforts were performed to determine the size and orientation of the system. One key parameter in the design is the installation of the GSHPmore » in a low-load home, which considerably reduces the needed capacity of the ground loop heat exchanger. This report analyzes data from two cooling seasons and one heating season. Upon completion of the monitoring phase, measurements revealed that the initial TRNSYS simulated horizontal sub-slab ground loop heat exchanger fluid temperatures and heat transfer rates differed from the measured values. To determine the cause of this discrepancy, an updated model was developed utilizing a new TRNSYS subroutine for simulating sub-slab heat exchangers. Measurements of fluid temperature, soil temperature, and heat transfer were used to validate the updated model.« less

  11. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operations shall be designed and planned by a registered professional engineer who has experience in lift-slab construction. Such plans and designs shall be implemented by the employer and shall include detailed instructions and sketches indicating the prescribed method of erection. These plans and designs...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operations shall be designed and planned by a registered professional engineer who has experience in lift-slab construction. Such plans and designs shall be implemented by the employer and shall include detailed instructions and sketches indicating the prescribed method of erection. These plans and designs...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operations shall be designed and planned by a registered professional engineer who has experience in lift-slab construction. Such plans and designs shall be implemented by the employer and shall include detailed instructions and sketches indicating the prescribed method of erection. These plans and designs...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operations shall be designed and planned by a registered professional engineer who has experience in lift-slab construction. Such plans and designs shall be implemented by the employer and shall include detailed instructions and sketches indicating the prescribed method of erection. These plans and designs...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operations shall be designed and planned by a registered professional engineer who has experience in lift-slab construction. Such plans and designs shall be implemented by the employer and shall include detailed instructions and sketches indicating the prescribed method of erection. These plans and designs...

  16. Compositional mantle layering revealed by slab stagnation at ~1000-km depth

    PubMed Central

    Ballmer, Maxim D.; Schmerr, Nicholas C.; Nakagawa, Takashi; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Improved constraints on lower-mantle composition are fundamental to understand the accretion, differentiation, and thermochemical evolution of our planet. Cosmochemical arguments indicate that lower-mantle rocks may be enriched in Si relative to upper-mantle pyrolite, whereas seismic tomography images suggest whole-mantle convection and hence appear to imply efficient mantle mixing. This study reconciles cosmochemical and geophysical constraints using the stagnation of some slab segments at ~1000-km depth as the key observation. Through numerical modeling of subduction, we show that lower-mantle enrichment in intrinsically dense basaltic lithologies can render slabs neutrally buoyant in the uppermost lower mantle. Slab stagnation (at depths of ~660 and ~1000 km) and unimpeded slab sinking to great depths can coexist if the basalt fraction is ~8% higher in the lower mantle than in the upper mantle, equivalent to a lower-mantle Mg/Si of ~1.18. Global-scale geodynamic models demonstrate that such a moderate compositional gradient across the mantle can persist can in the presence of whole-mantle convection. PMID:26824060

  17. Can we approach the gas-liquid critical point using slab simulations of two coexisting phases?

    PubMed

    Goujon, Florent; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2016-09-28

    In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to approach the gas-liquid critical point of the Lennard-Jones fluid by performing simulations in a slab geometry using a cut-off potential. In the slab simulation geometry, it is essential to apply an accurate tail correction to the potential energy, applied during the course of the simulation, to study the properties of states close to the critical point. Using the Janeček slab-based method developed for two-phase Monte Carlo simulations [J. Janec̆ek, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 6264 (2006)], the coexisting densities and surface tension in the critical region are reported as a function of the cutoff distance in the intermolecular potential. The results obtained using slab simulations are compared with those obtained using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of isotropic systems and the finite-size scaling techniques. There is a good agreement between these two approaches. The two-phase simulations can be used in approaching the critical point for temperatures up to 0.97 T C ∗ (T ∗ = 1.26). The critical-point exponents describing the dependence of the density, surface tension, and interfacial thickness on the temperature are calculated near the critical point.

  18. Damage Assessment of Two-Way Bending RC Slabs Subjected to Blast Loadings

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haokai; Wu, Guiying

    2014-01-01

    Terrorist attacks on vulnerable structures and their individual structural members may cause considerable damage and loss of life. However, the research work on response and damage analysis of single structural components, for example, a slab to blast loadings, is limited in the literature and this is necessary for assessing its vulnerability. This study investigates the blast response and damage assessment of a two-way bending reinforced concrete (RC) slab subjected to blast loadings. Numerical modeling and analysis are carried out using the commercial finite element code LS-DYNA 971. A damage assessment criterion for the two-way bending RC slab is defined based on the original and residual uniformly distributed load-carrying capacity. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the effects of explosive weight and explosive position on the damage mode of the two-way RC slab. Some design parameters, such as the boundary conditions and the negative reinforcement steel bar length, are also discussed. The illustrated results show that the proposed criterion can apply to all failure modes. The damage assessment results are more accurate than the ones due to the conventional deformation criterion. PMID:25121134

  19. Falls from height during the floor slab formwork of buildings: current situation in Spain.

    PubMed

    Adam, Jose M; Pallarés, Francisco J; Calderón, Pedro A

    2009-01-01

    One of the phases with the highest risk of falls from a height in the construction of a building is during the floor slab formwork stage. This paper analyzes this particular risk, as well as the most frequently used fall-protection systems. A survey was carried out to define the current situation in Spain with regard to falls from a height during floor slab formwork and the fall-protection systems used to prevent such a risk. The results of the survey clarified the current situation in Spain with regard to this risk, and made it clear that there is considerable risk of falling from a height during the floor slab formwork stage. All the safety systems analyzed presented a series of weak points that should be studied in detail before they can be used on building sites. The risk of falling associated with floor slab formwork and the most frequently used protection systems are analyzed. As no research had been carried out to date on this type of risk, we consider the research presented in this article to be a pioneer in the field.

  20. Thermodiffusion in concrete slab as a driving force of indoor radon entry.

    PubMed

    Minkin, L

    2001-02-01

    The core of the hypotheses considered is that there is an additional strong driving force-the thermodiffusion of radon and soil air in concrete and soils, which can cause an intensive indoor radon entry. A vertical thermogradient in the slab causes thermodiffusion air flux through concrete into the house. The proof of this concept is based on consideration of concrete slab as a micro-porous system having a pore-size distribution that mostly pertains to Knudsen's region and a transition zone of pore sizes. The Knudsen's theory for a transition zone is developed, which is consistent with the known experimental data of thermodiffusion. Calculated thermodiffusion air flux across a concrete slab under thermogradient 80 K m(-1) approximately ranges 1 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-6) kg x m(-2) x s(-1). The calculated typical radon-bearing advective air velocity in soil due to thermogradient in the slab is about 1 x 10(-6) m x s(-1).