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Sample records for zigzag slab geometry

  1. The slab geometry laser. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Kane, T. J.; Kuhn, K.; Byer, R. L.; Unternahrer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Slab geometry solid-state lasers offer significant performance improvements over conventional rod-geometry lasers. A detailed theoretical description of the thermal, stress, and beam-propagation characteristics of a slab laser is presented. The analysis includes consideration of the effects of the zig-zag optical path, which eliminates thermal and stress focusing and reduces residual birefringence.

  2. Thermal Lens Measurement in Diode-Pumped Nd:YAG Zig-Zag Slab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoak, M. C.; Kay, R. B.; Coyle, D. B.; Hopf, D.

    1998-01-01

    A major advantage that solid state zig-zag slab lasers have over conventional rod-based designs is that a much weaker thermal lens is produced in the slab when side-pumped with Quasi-CW laser diode arrays, particularly if the pump radiation is kept well away from the Brewster-cut ends. This paper reports on a rather strong thermal lens produced when diode pump radiation is collimated into a narrow portion of the zig-zag slab. The collimation of multi-bar pump packages to increase brightness and improve overlap is a direct consequence of designs which seek to maximize performance and efficiency. Our slab design employed a 8.1 cm x 2.5 mm x 5 mm slab with opposing Brewster end faces. It was pumped through the 2.5 mm direction by seven laser diode array packages, each housing four 6OW diode bars, 1 cm in width. The pump face, anti-reflection (AR) coated at 809 nm, was 6.8 cm in width and the 8.1 cm opposing side, high-reflection (HR) coated at 809 nm, reflected the unabsorbed pump beam for a second pass through the slab.

  3. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  4. Wavefront improvement in an end-pumped high-power Nd:YAG zigzag slab laser.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Sung; Cha, Yong-Ho; Lim, Gwon; Kim, Yonghee; Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Cha, Byung Heon; Lee, Hyeon Cheor; Kim, Sangin; Koh, Kwang Uoong; Kim, Hyun Tae

    2017-08-07

    Techniques for wavefront improvement in an end-pumped Nd:YAG zigzag slab laser amplifier were proposed and demonstrated experimentally. First, a study on the contact materials was conducted to improve the heat transfer between the slab and cooling blocks and to increase the cooling uniformity. Among many attempts, only the use of silicon oil showed an improvement in the wavefront. Thus, the appropriate silicone oil was applied to the amplifier as a contact material. In addition, the wavefront compensation method using a glass rod array was also applied to the amplifier. A very low wavefront distortion was obtained through the use of a silicone-oil contact and glass rod array. The variance of the optical path difference for the entire beam height was 3.87 μm at a pump power of 10.6 kW, and that for the 80% section was 1.69 μm. The output power from the oscillator was 3.88 kW, which means the maximum output extracted from the amplifier at a pump power of 10.6 kW.

  5. Refining the Tonga Slab Geometry Using Slab Phases of Seismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alongi, T.; Wei, S. S.; Blackman, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    Although the Tonga subducting slab geometry has been previously mapped by earthquake distribution, its detailed morphology is poorly constrained. The uncertainties of the slab surface relative to earthquakes can be translated into large errors in predicted temperature of hypocenters that is considered as a chief control of intermediate-depth seismicity. Seismic waves converted at the interface between the slab crust and the overlying mantle wedge can provide additional constraints on the location of the slab surface. A PS phase converted at the slab interface is observable in the horizontal components, whereas an SP converted phase can be seen in the vertical component. In this study, we analyze PS and SP phases in the seismic dataset of the 2009-2010 Ridge2000 Lau Spreading Center project, which consisted of 50 ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) and 17 island-based seismic stations deployed in Fiji, Tonga, and the Lau Basin for about one year. More than 1,000 PS arrivals from local events were manually picked, predominantly with a 1-3 Hz filter. Next, the PS-P differential travel times will be inverted to determine improved depths of the slab surface relative to the local earthquakes and the receiving stations. The refined slab geometry will allow us to assess the thermal structure and dehydration reactions of the Tonga slab, lending further insight into the mechanisms of intermediate-depth seismicity.

  6. Slab2 - Updated Subduction Zone Geometries and Modeling Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G.; Hayes, G. P.; Portner, D. E.; Furtney, M.; Flamme, H. E.; Hearne, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey database of global subduction zone geometries (Slab1.0), is a highly utilized dataset that has been applied to a wide range of geophysical problems. In 2017, these models have been improved and expanded upon as part of the Slab2 modeling effort. With a new data driven approach that can be applied to a broader range of tectonic settings and geophysical data sets, we have generated a model set that will serve as a more comprehensive, reliable, and reproducible resource for three-dimensional slab geometries at all of the world's convergent margins. The newly developed framework of Slab2 is guided by: (1) a large integrated dataset, consisting of a variety of geophysical sources (e.g., earthquake hypocenters, moment tensors, active-source seismic survey images of the shallow slab, tomography models, receiver functions, bathymetry, trench ages, and sediment thickness information); (2) a dynamic filtering scheme aimed at constraining incorporated seismicity to only slab related events; (3) a 3-D data interpolation approach which captures both high resolution shallow geometries and instances of slab rollback and overlap at depth; and (4) an algorithm which incorporates uncertainties of contributing datasets to identify the most probable surface depth over the extent of each subduction zone. Further layers will also be added to the base geometry dataset, such as historic moment release, earthquake tectonic providence, and interface coupling. Along with access to several queryable data formats, all components have been wrapped into an open source library in Python, such that suites of updated models can be released as further data becomes available. This presentation will discuss the extent of Slab2 development, as well as the current availability of the model and modeling tools.

  7. Automatic low-order aberrations compensator for a conduction-cooled end-pumped solid-state zigzag slab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin; Dong, Lizhi; Lai, Boheng; Yang, Ping; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Xun; Liu, Yong; Tang, Guomao; Xu, Bing

    2017-11-01

    In order to solve the problem of large low-order aberrations with solid-state zigzag slab lasers, an automatic compensator has been developed in this paper. In this compensator, three lenses are mounted on a motorized rail, whose positions can be obtained using ray tracing method based on the beam parameters detected by a wave-front sensor. The initial peak to valley (PV) values of the wave-front range up to several tens of microns. Both simulated and experimental results show that the PV values of the wave-front can be reduced to around 1 . 6 μm with the proposed automatic compensator.

  8. Direction-dependent waist-shift-difference of Gaussian beam in a multiple-pass zigzag slab amplifier and geometrical optics compensation method.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoyang; Kurita, Takashi; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2017-10-20

    Zigzag and non-zigzag beam waist shifts in a multiple-pass zigzag slab amplifier are investigated based on the propagation of a Gaussian beam. Different incident angles in the zigzag and non-zigzag planes would introduce a direction-dependent waist-shift-difference, which distorts the beam quality in both the near- and far-fields. The theoretical model and analytical expressions of this phenomenon are presented, and intensity distributions in the two orthogonal planes are simulated and compared. A geometrical optics compensation method by a beam with 90° rotation is proposed, which not only could correct the direction-dependent waist-shift-difference but also possibly average the traditional thermally induced wavefront-distortion-difference between the horizontal and vertical beam directions.

  9. Constraints of subducted slab geometries on trench migration and subduction velocities: flat slabs and slab curtains in the mantle under Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Renqi, L.; Lin, C.; Kanda, R. V.

    2013-12-01

    The past locations, shapes and polarity of subduction trenches provide first-order constraints for plate tectonic reconstructions. Analogue and numerical models of subduction zones suggest that relative subducting (Vs) and overriding (Vor) plate velocities may strongly influence final subducted slab geometries. Here we have mapped the 3D geometries of subducted slabs in the upper and lower mantle of Asia from global seismic tomography. We have incorporated these slabs into plate tectonic models, which allows us to infer the subducting and overriding plate velocities. We describe two distinct slab geometry styles, ';flat slabs' and ';slab curtains', and show their implications for paleo-trench positions and subduction geometries in plate tectonic reconstructions. When compared to analogue and numerical models, the mapped slab styles show similarities to modeled slabs that occupy very different locations within Vs:Vor parameter space. ';Flat slabs' include large swaths of sub-horizontal slabs in the lower mantle that underlie the well-known northward paths of India and Australia from Eastern Gondwana, viewed in a moving hotspot reference. At India the flat slabs account for a significant proportion of the predicted lost Ceno-Tethys Ocean since ~100 Ma, whereas at Australia they record the existence of a major 8000km by 2500-3000km ocean that existed at ~43 Ma between East Asia, the Pacific and Australia. Plate reconstructions incorporating the slab constraints imply these flat slab geometries were generated when continent overran oceanic lithosphere to produce rapid trench retreat, or in other words, when subducting and overriding velocities were equal (i.e. Vs ~ Vor). ';Slab curtains' include subvertical Pacific slabs near the Izu-Bonin and Marianas trenches that extend from the surface down to 1500 km in the lower mantle and are 400 to 500 km thick. Reconstructed slab lengths were assessed from tomographic volumes calculated at serial cross-sections. The ';slab

  10. Optimal design of wavy microchannel and comparison of heat transfer characteristics with zigzag and straight geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zekeriya

    2018-05-01

    Design concept of microchannel heat exchangers is going to plan with new flow microchannel configuration to reduce the pressure drop and improve heat transfer performance. The study aims to find optimum microchannel design providing the best performance of flow and heat transfer characterization in a heat sink. Therefore, three different types of microchannels in which water is used, straight, wavy and zigzag have been studied. The optimization operation has been performed to find optimum geometry with ANSYS's Response Surface Optimization Tool. Primarily, CFD analysis has been performed by parameterizing a wavy microchannel geometry. Optimum wavy microchannel design has been obtained by the response surface created for the range of velocity from 0.5 to 5, the range of amplitude from 0.06 to 0.3, the range of microchannel height from 0.1 to 0.2, the range of microchannel width from 0.1 to 0.2 and range of sinusoidal wave length from 0.25 to 2.0. All simulations have been performed in the laminar regime for Reynolds number ranging from 100 to 900. Results showed that the Reynolds number range corresponding to the industrial pressure drop limits is between 100 and 400. Nu values obtained in this range for optimum wavy geometry were found at a rate of 10% higher than those of the zigzag channel and 40% higher than those of the straight channels. In addition, when the pressure values of the straight channel did not exceed 10 kPa, the inlet pressure data calculated for zigzag and wavy channel data almost coincided with each other.

  11. Narrow-linewidth, quasi-continuous-wave ASE source based on a multiple-pass Nd:YAG zigzag slab amplifier configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Lu, Yanhua; Hu, Hao; Tong, Lixin; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Yi; Wang, Juntao; Ren, Huaijin; Xu, Liu

    2018-03-05

    We present investigations into a narrow-linewidth, quasi-continuous-wave pulsed all-solid-state amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source by use of a novel multiple-pass zigzag slab amplifier. The SE fluorescence emitted from a Nd:YAG slab active medium acts as the seed and is amplified back and forth 8 times through the same slab. Thanks to the angular multiplexing nature of the zigzag slab, high-intensity 1064-nm ASE output can be produced without unwanted self-lasing in this configuration. Experimentally, the output energy, optical conversion efficiency, pulse dynamics, spectral property, and beam quality of the ASE source are studied when the Nd:YAG slab end-pumped by two high-brightness laser diode arrays. The maximum single pulse energy of 347 mJ is generated with an optical efficiency of ~5.9% and a beam quality of 3.5/17 in the thickness/width direction of the slab. As expected, smooth pulses without relaxing spikes and continuous spectra are achieved. Moreover, the spectral width of the ASE source narrows versus the pump energy, getting a 3-dB linewidth of as narrow as 20 pm (i.e. 5.3 GHz). Via the sum frequency generation, high-intensity, smooth-pulse, and narrow-linewidth ASE sources are preferred for solving the major problem of saturation of the mesospheric sodium atoms and can create a much brighter sodium guide star to meet the needs of adaptive imaging applications in astronomy.

  12. Comparison of Slab and Cylinder Expansion Test Geometries for PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott; Anderson, Eric; Aslam, Tariq; Whitley, Von

    2017-06-01

    The slab expansion test or ``sandwich test'' is the two-dimensional analog of the axisymmetric cylinder expansion test. The test consists of a high-aspect-ratio rectangular cuboid of high explosive with the two large sides confined by a thin metal confiner. Analysis of the confiner motion after the passage of the detonation yields the detonation product isentrope, which is a specialized form of the product equation of state. The slab expansion geometry inherently exhibits a lower product expansion rate and lower plastic work on the confiner than the cylinder expansion geometry. The slab geometry does, however, have a shorter test time. We review recent slab and cylinder expansion data with PBX 9501, the associated equation of state analysis, and the advantages of each geometry for different applications.

  13. Flowing Air-Water Cooled Slab Nd: Glass Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Baida; Cai, Bangwei; Liao, Y.; Xu, Shifa; Xin, Z.

    1989-03-01

    A zig-zag optical path slab geometry Nd: glass laser cooled through flowing air-water is developed by us. Theoretical studies on temperature distribution of slab and rod configurations in the unsteady state clarify the advantages of the slab geometry laser. The slab design and processing are also reported. In our experiments main laser output characteristics, e. g. laser efficiency, polarization, far-field divergence angle as well as resonator misalignment are investigated. The slab phosphate glass laser in combination with a crossed Porro-prism resonator demonstrates a good laser performance.

  14. Geometry of slab, intraslab stress field and its tectonic implication in the Nankai trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Kono, Y.

    2002-07-01

    The characteristics of geometry of slabs and the intraslab stress field in the Nankai subduction zone, Japan, were analyzed based on highly accurate hypocentral data and focal mechanism solutions. The results suggest that the shallow seismic zone of the Philippine Sea slab subducts with dip angels between 10 and 22 degrees beneath Shikoku and the Kii peninsula, and between 11 and 40 degrees beneath Kyushu. Two types of seismogenic stress field exist within the slab. The stress field of down-dip compression type can be seen in the slab beneath Shikoku and the Kii peninsula, where the horizontal component of regional compression stress is NNW. On the other hand the stress field of down-dip extension type within the slab is dominant in the region from western Shikoku to Kyushu, where the direction of horizontal compressive stress is near WWN. The existence of the two types of stress field is related to the differences of slab geometry and slab age of the subduciton zone. These properties imply that slab beneath Kyushu (40 Ma) probably is older than that beneath Shikoku and the Kii peninsula (11-20 Ma). The young slab of the oceanic Philippine Sea plate subducts with a shallow angle beneath the Eurasian plate in Shikoku and the Kii peninsula. The subduction has encountered strong resistance there, resulting in a down-dip compression stress field. The down-dip extension stress field may be related to the older slab of the Philippine Sea plate which subducts beneath Kyushu with a steeper dip angle.

  15. Visualizing Three-dimensional Slab Geometries with ShowEarthModel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, B.; Jadamec, M. A.; Fischer, K. M.; Kreylos, O.; Yikilmaz, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic data that characterize the morphology of modern subducted slabs on Earth suggest that a two-dimensional paradigm is no longer adequate to describe the subduction process. Here we demonstrate the effect of data exploration of three-dimensional (3D) global slab geometries with the open source program ShowEarthModel. ShowEarthModel was designed specifically to support data exploration, by focusing on interactivity and real-time response using the Vrui toolkit. Sixteen movies are presented that explore the 3D complexity of modern subduction zones on Earth. The first movie provides a guided tour through the Earth's major subduction zones, comparing the global slab geometry data sets of Gudmundsson and Sambridge (1998), Syracuse and Abers (2006), and Hayes et al. (2012). Fifteen regional movies explore the individual subduction zones and regions intersecting slabs, using the Hayes et al. (2012) slab geometry models where available and the Engdahl and Villasenor (2002) global earthquake data set. Viewing the subduction zones in this way provides an improved conceptualization of the 3D morphology within a given subduction zone as well as the 3D spatial relations between the intersecting slabs. This approach provides a powerful tool for rendering earth properties and broadening capabilities in both Earth Science research and education by allowing for whole earth visualization. The 3D characterization of global slab geometries is placed in the context of 3D slab-driven mantle flow and observations of shear wave splitting in subduction zones. These visualizations contribute to the paradigm shift from a 2D to 3D subduction framework by facilitating the conceptualization of the modern subduction system on Earth in 3D space.

  16. Juan de Fuca slab geometry and its relation to Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Waldhause, Felix; Oppenheimer, David H.

    2012-01-01

    A new model of the subducted Juan de Fuca plate beneath western North America allows first-order correlations between the occurrence of Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes and slab geometry, temperature, and hydration state. The geo-referenced 3D model, constructed from weighted control points, integrates depth information from earthquake locations and regional seismic velocity studies. We use the model to separate earthquakes that occur in the Cascadia forearc from those that occur within the underlying Juan de Fuca plate and thereby reveal previously obscured details regarding the spatial distribution of earthquakes. Seismicity within the slab is most prevalent where the slab is warped beneath northwestern California and western Washington suggesting that slab flexure, in addition to expected metamorphic dehydration processes, promotes earthquake occurrence within the subducted oceanic plate. Earthquake patterns beneath western Vancouver Island are consistent with slab dehydration processes. Conversely, the lack of slab earthquakes beneath western Oregon is consistent with an anhydrous slab. Double-differenced relocated seismicity resolves a double seismic zone within the slab beneath northwestern California that strongly constrains the location of the plate interface and delineates a cluster of seismicity 10 km above the surface that includes the 1992 M7.1 Mendocino earthquake. We infer that this earthquake ruptured a surface within the Cascadia accretionary margin above the Juan de Fuca plate. We further speculate that this earthquake is associated with a detached fragment of former Farallon plate. Other subsurface tectonic elements within the forearc may have the potential to generate similar damaging earthquakes.

  17. Slab Geometry and Segmentation on Seismogenic Subduction Zone; Insight from gravity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswati, A. T.; Mazzotti, S.; Cattin, R.; Cadio, C.

    2017-12-01

    Slab geometry is a key parameter to improve seismic hazard assessment in subduction zones. In many cases, information about structures beneath subduction are obtained from geophysical dedicated studies, including geodetic and seismic measurements. However, due to the lack of global information, both geometry and segmentation in seismogenic zone of many subductions remain badly-constrained. Here we propose an alternative approach based on satellite gravity observations. The GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) mission enables to probe Earth deep mass structures from gravity gradients, which are more sensitive to spatial structure geometry and directional properties than classical gravitational data. Gravity gradients forward modeling of modeled slab is performed by using horizontal and vertical gravity gradient components to better determine slab geophysical model rather than vertical gradient only. Using polyhedron method, topography correction on gravity gradient signal is undertaken to enhance the anomaly signal of lithospheric structures. Afterward, we compare residual gravity gradients with the calculated signals associated with slab geometry. In this preliminary study, straightforward models are used to better understand the characteristic of gravity gradient signals due to deep mass sources. We pay a special attention to the delineation of slab borders and dip angle variations.

  18. Novel Design for Centrifugal Countercurrent Chromatography: II. Studies on Novel Geometries of Zigzag Toroidal Tubing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Aisa, Haji Akber; Ito, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    The toroidal column using a zigzag pattern has been improved in both retention of the stationary phase and peak resolution. To further improve the retention of stationary phase and peak resolution, a series of novel geometric designs of tubing (plain, mid-clamping, flattened and flat-twisted tubing) was evaluated their performance in CCC. The results showed that the tubing which was flattened vertically against centrifugal force (vert-flattened tubing) produced the best peak resolution among them. Using vert-flattened tubing a series of experiments was performed to study the effects of column capacity and sample size. The results indicated that a 0.25 ml capacity column is ideal for analysis of small amount samples. PMID:20454530

  19. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Wald, David J.; Johnson, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of `average' active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested.

  20. Slab Geometry and Stress State of the Southwestern Colombia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying

    A high rate of intermediate-depth earthquakes is concentrates in the Cauca cluster (3.5°N-5.5°N) and isolated from nearby seismicity in the southwestern Colombia subduction zone. Previously-studied nests of intermediate-depth earthquakes show that a high seismicity rate is often associated with a slab tear, detachment, or contortion. The cause of the less-studied Cauca cluster is unknown. To investigate the cause, we image the slab geometry using precise relative locations of intermediate-depth earthquakes. We use the earthquake catalog produced and seismic waveforms recorded by the Colombian National Seismic Network from January 2010 to March 2014. We calculate the focal mechanisms to examine whether the earthquakes reactivate pre-existing faults or form new fractures. The focal mechanisms are inverted for the intraslab stress field to check the stress guide hypothesis and to evaluate the stress orientations with regard to the change in the slab geometry. The earthquake relocations indicate that the Cauca segment has a continuous 20 km thick seismic zone and increases in dip angle from north to south. Two 40-km-tall fingers of earthquakes extend out of the slab and into the mantle wedge. Different from the previously-studied nests, the Cauca cluster does not correspond to slab contortions or tearing. The cluster may be associated with a high amount of dehydrated fluid. The determined focal mechanisms of 69 earthquakes have various types and variably-oriented nodal planes, corresponding to the reactivation of pre-existing faults and the formation of new fractures. The results of stress inversion show that the extensional axis in the northern Cauca segment is in the plane of the slab and 25° from the downdip direction, and the southern part has along-strike extension. The compression is subnormal to the plane of the slab. The stress field supports the stress guide hypothesis and shows a consistent rotation with increase in slab dip angle.

  1. Investigation of detection limits for diffuse optical tomography systems: II. Analysis of slab and cup geometry for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Ronny; Brendel, Bernhard; Rinneberg, Herbert; Nielsen, Tim

    2009-01-21

    Using a statistical (chi-square) test on simulated data and a realistic noise model derived from the system's hardware we study the performance of diffuse optical tomography systems for fluorescence imaging. We compare the predicted smallest size of detectable lesions at various positions in slab and cup geometry and model how detection sensitivity depends on breast compression and lesion fluorescence contrast. Our investigation shows that lesion detection is limited by relative noise in slab geometry and by absolute noise in cup geometry.

  2. Slab geometry of the South American margin from joint inversion of body waves and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Portner, D. E.; Lynner, C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.

    2016-12-01

    The western margin of South America is a long subduction zone with a complex, highly three -dimensional geometry. The first order structure of the slab has previously been inferred from seismicity patterns and locations of volcanoes, but confirmation of the slab geometry by seismic imaging for the entire margin has been limited by either shallow, lithospheric scale models or broader, upper mantle images, often defined on a limited spatial footprint. Here, we present new teleseismic tomographic SV seismic models of the upper mantle from 10°S to 40°S along the South American subduction zone with resolution to a depth of 1000 km as inferred from checkerboard tests. In regions near the Peru Bolivia border (12°S to 18°S) and near central Chile and western Argentina (29.5°S to 33°S) we jointly invert the multi-band direct S and SKS relative delay times with Rayleigh wave phase velocities from ambient noise and teleseismic surface wave tomography. This self-consistent model provides information from the upper crust to below the mantle transition zone along the western margin in these two regions. This consistency allows tracing the slab from the South American coastline to the sub-transition zone upper mantle. From this model we image several features, but most notable is a significant eastward step near the southern edge of the margin (24°-30° S). West of this step, a large high shear velocity body is imaged in the base of and below the transition zone. We suggest this may be a stagnant slab, which is descending into the lower mantle now that it is no longer attached to the surface. This suggests a new component to the subduction history of western South America when an older slab lead the convergence before anchoring in the transition zone, breaking off from the surface, and being overtaken by the modern, actively subducting slab now located further east.

  3. Inferring rupture characteristics using new databases for 3D slab geometry and earthquake rupture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, G. P.; Plescia, S. M.; Moore, G.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center has recently published a database of finite fault models for globally distributed M7.5+ earthquakes since 1990. Concurrently, we have also compiled a database of three-dimensional slab geometry models for all global subduction zones, to update and replace Slab1.0. Here, we use these two new and valuable resources to infer characteristics of earthquake rupture and propagation in subduction zones, where the vast majority of large-to-great-sized earthquakes occur. For example, we can test questions that are fairly prevalent in seismological literature. Do large ruptures preferentially occur where subduction zones are flat (e.g., Bletery et al., 2016)? Can `flatness' be mapped to understand and quantify earthquake potential? Do the ends of ruptures correlate with significant changes in slab geometry, and/or bathymetric features entering the subduction zone? Do local subduction zone geometry changes spatially correlate with areas of low slip in rupture models (e.g., Moreno et al., 2012)? Is there a correlation between average seismogenic zone dip, and/or seismogenic zone width, and earthquake size? (e.g., Hayes et al., 2012; Heuret et al., 2011). These issues are fundamental to the understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics and subduction zone seismogenesis, and yet many are poorly understood or are still debated in scientific literature. We attempt to address these questions and similar issues in this presentation, and show how these models can be used to improve our understanding of earthquake hazard in subduction zones.

  4. The linear Boltzmann equation in slab geometry - Development and verification of a reliable and efficient solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamnes, K.; Lie-Svendsen, O.; Rees, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    The linear Boltzmann equation can be cast in a form mathematically identical to the radiation-transport equation. A multigroup procedure is used to reduce the energy (or velocity) dependence of the transport equation to a series of one-speed problems. Each of these one-speed problems is equivalent to the monochromatic radiative-transfer problem, and existing software is used to solve this problem in slab geometry. The numerical code conserves particles in elastic collisions. Generic examples are provided to illustrate the applicability of this approach. Although this formalism can, in principle, be applied to a variety of test particle or linearized gas dynamics problems, it is particularly well-suited to study the thermalization of suprathermal particles interacting with a background medium when the thermal motion of the background cannot be ignored. Extensions of the formalism to include external forces and spherical geometry are also feasible.

  5. Simulations of Coulomb systems with slab geometry using an efficient 3D Ewald summation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Alexandre P.; Girotto, Matheus; Levin, Yan

    2016-04-01

    We present a new approach to efficiently simulate electrolytes confined between infinite charged walls using a 3d Ewald summation method. The optimal performance is achieved by separating the electrostatic potential produced by the charged walls from the electrostatic potential of electrolyte. The electric field produced by the 3d periodic images of the walls is constant inside the simulation cell, with the field produced by the transverse images of the charged plates canceling out. The non-neutral confined electrolyte in an external potential can be simulated using 3d Ewald summation with a suitable renormalization of the electrostatic energy, to remove a divergence, and a correction that accounts for the conditional convergence of the resulting lattice sum. The new algorithm is at least an order of magnitude more rapid than the usual simulation methods for the slab geometry and can be further sped up by adopting a particle-particle particle-mesh approach.

  6. Nonlinear modeling of forced magnetic reconnection in slab geometry with NIMROD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beidler, M. T.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2017-05-01

    The nonlinear, extended-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code NIMROD is benchmarked with the theory of time-dependent forced magnetic reconnection induced by small resonant fields in slab geometry in the context of visco-resistive MHD modeling. Linear computations agree with time-asymptotic, linear theory of flow screening of externally applied fields. The inclusion of flow in nonlinear computations can result in mode penetration due to the balance between electromagnetic and viscous forces in the time-asymptotic state, which produces bifurcations from a high-slip state to a low-slip state as the external field is slowly increased. We reproduce mode penetration and unlocking transitions by employing time-dependent externally applied magnetic fields. Mode penetration and unlocking exhibit hysteresis and occur at different magnitudes of applied field. We also establish how nonlinearly determined flow screening of the resonant field is affected by the square of the magnitude of the externally applied field. These results emphasize that the inclusion of nonlinear physics is essential for accurate prediction of the reconnected field in a flowing plasma.

  7. High energy efficient solid state laser sources. [slab geometry laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Slab glass performance studies demonstate 18 J of output at 2 Hz with 2.3% wall plug efficiency. The goal is to achieve 10 J per pulse at 10 Hz and 3% wall plug efficiency during the next annual period. The slab concept was extended to Nd:YAG and to Nd:GGG. To date over 80 W of CW output power at 2% efficiency was generated in slab Nd:YAG. A multiplexed slab Nd:YAG pre-amplifier was invented and a Nd:YAG oscillator was demonstrated with 100kHz linewidth for eventual use in wind velocity measurements.

  8. Stability of a two-volume MRxMHD model in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuen, Li Huey

    background and perturbed magnetic fields to existing cylindrical working. An expression is formulated for the stability eigenvalues by creating a model for the slab geometry system. The eigenvalues for system stability at a minimum energy state are found to depend upon the rationality of the magnetic field pitch at resonant surfaces. Various system parameter scans are conducted to determine their affect upon system stability and their implications. While tearing instabilities exist at low order rational resonances, investigating the instability of high-order rationals requires study of pressure-driven instabilities.

  9. Frequency-selective near-field radiative heat transfer between photonic crystal slabs: a computational approach for arbitrary geometries and materials.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Ilic, Ognjen; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Johnson, Steven G

    2011-09-09

    We demonstrate the possibility of achieving enhanced frequency-selective near-field radiative heat transfer between patterned (photonic-crystal) slabs at designable frequencies and separations, exploiting a general numerical approach for computing heat transfer in arbitrary geometries and materials based on the finite-difference time-domain method. Our simulations reveal a tradeoff between selectivity and near-field enhancement as the slab-slab separation decreases, with the patterned heat transfer eventually reducing to the unpatterned result multiplied by a fill factor (described by a standard proximity approximation). We also find that heat transfer can be further enhanced at selective frequencies when the slabs are brought into a glide-symmetric configuration, a consequence of the degeneracies associated with the nonsymmorphic symmetry group.

  10. Flat-Band Slow Light in a Photonic Crystal Slab Waveguide by Vertical Geometry Adjustment and Selective Infiltration of Optofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri-Birjandi, Mohammad Ali; Janfaza, Morteza; Tavousi, Alireza

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a photonic crystal slab waveguide (PhCSW) for slow light applications is presented. To obtain widest possible flat-bands of slow light regions—regions with large group index ( n g), and very low group velocity dispersion (GVD)—two core parameters of PhCSW structure are investigated. The design procedure is based on vertical shifting of the first row of the air holes adjacent to the waveguide center and concurrent selective optofluidic infiltration of the second row. The criteria of < n_g > ± 10% variations is used for ease of definition and comparison of flat-band regions. By applying various geometry optimizations for the first row, our results suggest that a waveguide core of W 1.09 would provide a reasonable wide flat-band. Furthermore, infiltration of optofluidics in the second row alongside with geometry adjustments of the first row result in flexible control of 10 < n g < 32 and provide flat-band regions with large bandwidth (10 nm < Δ λ < 21.5 nm). Also, negligible GVD as low as β 2 = 10-24 (s2/m) is achieved. Numerical simulations are calculated by means of the three-dimensional plane wave expansion method.

  11. Influence of increasing convergence obliquity and shallow slab geometry onto tectonic deformation and seismogenic behavior along the Northern Lesser Antilles zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurencin, M.; Graindorge, D.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Marcaillou, B.; Evain, M.

    2018-06-01

    In subduction zones, the 3D geometry of the plate interface is one of the key parameters that controls margin tectonic deformation, interplate coupling and seismogenic behavior. The North American plate subducts beneath the convex Northern Lesser Antilles margin. This convergent plate boundary, with a northward increasing convergence obliquity, turns into a sinistral strike-slip limit at the northwestern end of the system. This geodynamic context suggests a complex slab geometry, which has never been imaged before. Moreover, the seismic activity and particularly the number of events with thrust focal mechanism compatible with subduction earthquakes, increases northward from the Barbuda-Anguilla segment to the Anguilla-Virgin Islands segment. One of the major questions in this area is thus to analyze the influence of the increasing convergence obliquity and the slab geometry onto tectonic deformation and seismogenic behavior of the subduction zone. Based on wide-angle and multichannel reflection seismic data acquired during the Antithesis cruises (2013-2016), we decipher the deep structure of this subduction zone. Velocity models derived from wide-angle data acquired across the Anegada Passage are consistent with the presence of a crust of oceanic affinity thickened by hotspot magmatism and probably affected by the Upper Cretaceous-Eocene arc magmatism forming the 'Great Arc of the Caribbean'. The slab is shallower beneath the Anguilla-Virgin Islands margin segment than beneath the Anguilla-Barbuda segment which is likely to be directly related to the convex geometry of the upper plate. This shallower slab is located under the forearc where earthquakes and partitioning deformations increase locally. Thus, the shallowing slab might result in local greater interplate coupling and basal friction favoring seismic activity and tectonic partitioning beneath the Virgin Islands platform.

  12. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.F.; Comaskey, B.; Sutton, S.B.

    1994-04-19

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends. 11 figures.

  13. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Comaskey, Brian; Sutton, Steven B.

    1994-01-01

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends.

  14. Geometry, bonding and magnetism in planar triangulene graphene molecules with D3h symmetry: Zigzag Cm∗∗2+4m+1H3m+3 (m = 2, …, 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Michael R.; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2008-12-01

    Ab initio plane wave based all valence electron DFT calculations with geometry optimization are reported for the electronic structure of planar zigzag edged triangular shaped graphene molecules CH where the zigzag ring number m = 2, …, 15. The largest molecule C 286H 48 has a 3.8 nm side length and retains D3h symmetric geometry. The zone in the middle of the molecules, where the geometry and electronic properties resemble infinite single sheet graphite (graphene), expands with increasing ring number m, driving deviations in geometry, charge and spin to the perimeter. If a molecule is viewed as a set of nested triangular rings of carbon, then the zone where the lattice resembles an infinite sheet of graphene with CC = 142 pm, extends to the middle of the penultimate ring. The radial bonds joining the perimeter carbon atoms to the interior are long CC = 144 pm, except near the three apexes where the bonds are shorter. Isometric surfaces of the total charge density show that the two bonds joined at the apex have the highest valence charge. The perimeter CC bonds establish a simple pattern as the zigzag number increases, which shares some features with the zigzag edges in the D2h linear acenes C 4m+2H 2m+4 and the D6h hexangulenes CH6m but not the D6h symmetric annulenes (CH). The two CC bonds forming each apex are short (≈139 pm), next comes one long bond CC ≈ 142 pm and a middle region where all the CC bonds have length ≈141 pm. The homo-lumo gap declines from 0.53 eV at m = 2 to approximately 0.29 V at m = 15, the latter being larger than found for linear or hexagonal shaped graphenes with comparable edge lengths. Across the molecule the charge on the carbon atoms undergoes a small oscillation following the bipartite lattice. The magnitude of the charge in the same nested triangle decreases monotonically with the distance of the row from the center of the molecule. These systems are predicted to have spin polarized ground states with S = ½( m - 1), in

  15. Solubility of NaCl in water and its melting point by molecular dynamics in the slab geometry and a new BK3-compatible force field.

    PubMed

    Kolafa, Jiří

    2016-11-28

    Saturated concentration of rock salt in water is determined by a simulation of brine in contact with a crystal in the slab geometry. The NaCl crystals are rotated to expose facets with higher Miller indices than [001] to brine. The rock salt melting point is obtained by both the standard and adiabatic simulations in the slab geometry with attention paid to finite size effects as well as to a possible influence of facets with higher Miller indices and applied stress. Two force fields are used, the Lennard-Jones-based model by Young and Cheatham with SPC/E water and the Kiss and Baranyai polarizable model with BK3 water. The latter model is refitted to thermomechanical properties of crystal NaCl leading to better values of solubility and the melting point.

  16. Solubility of NaCl in water and its melting point by molecular dynamics in the slab geometry and a new BK3-compatible force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolafa, Jiří

    2016-11-01

    Saturated concentration of rock salt in water is determined by a simulation of brine in contact with a crystal in the slab geometry. The NaCl crystals are rotated to expose facets with higher Miller indices than [001] to brine. The rock salt melting point is obtained by both the standard and adiabatic simulations in the slab geometry with attention paid to finite size effects as well as to a possible influence of facets with higher Miller indices and applied stress. Two force fields are used, the Lennard-Jones-based model by Young and Cheatham with SPC/E water and the Kiss and Baranyai polarizable model with BK3 water. The latter model is refitted to thermomechanical properties of crystal NaCl leading to better values of solubility and the melting point.

  17. Comparison of kinetic and extended magnetohydrodynamics computational models for the linear ion temperature gradient instability in slab geometry

    SciT

    Schnack, D. D.; Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706; Cheng, J.

    We perform linear stability studies of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability in unsheared slab geometry using kinetic and extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models, in the regime k{sub ∥}/k{sub ⊥}≪1. The ITG is a parallel (to B) sound wave that may be destabilized by finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) effects in the presence of a gradient in the equilibrium ion temperature. The ITG is stable in both ideal and resistive MHD; for a given temperature scale length L{sub Ti0}, instability requires that either k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} or ρ{sub i}/L{sub Ti0} be sufficiently large. Kinetic models capture FLR effects to all ordersmore » in either parameter. In the extended MHD model, these effects are captured only to lowest order by means of the Braginskii ion gyro-viscous stress tensor and the ion diamagnetic heat flux. We present the linear electrostatic dispersion relations for the ITG for both kinetic Vlasov and extended MHD (two-fluid) models in the local approximation. In the low frequency fluid regime, these reduce to the same cubic equation for the complex eigenvalue ω=ω{sub r}+iγ. An explicit solution is derived for the growth rate and real frequency in this regime. These are found to depend on a single non-dimensional parameter. We also compute the eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions with the extended MHD code NIMROD, and a hybrid kinetic δf code that assumes six-dimensional Vlasov ions and isothermal fluid electrons, as functions of k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} and ρ{sub i}/L{sub Ti0} using a spatially dependent equilibrium. These solutions are compared with each other, and with the predictions of the local kinetic and fluid dispersion relations. Kinetic and fluid calculations agree well at and near the marginal stability point, but diverge as k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} or ρ{sub i}/L{sub Ti0} increases. There is good qualitative agreement between the models for the shape of the unstable global eigenfunction for L{sub Ti0}/ρ{sub i}=30 and 20. The results quantify

  18. Slab Geometry and Deformation in the Northern Nazca Subduction Zone Inferred From The Relocation and Focal mechanisms of Intermediate-Depth Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.; Warren, L. M.; Prieto, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the northern Nazca subduction zone, the Nazca plate is subducting to the east beneath the South American Plate. At ~5.6ºN, the subducting plate has a 240-km east-west offset associated with a slab tear, called the Caldas tear, that separates the northern and southern segments. Our study seeks to better define the slab geometry and deformation in the southern segment, which has a high rate of intermediate-depth earthquakes (50-300 km) between 3.6ºN and 5.2ºN in the Cauca cluster. From Jan 2010 to Mar 2014, 228 intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Cauca cluster with local magnitude Ml 2.5-4.7 were recorded by 65 seismic stations of the Colombian National Seismic Network. We review and, if necessary, adjust the catalog P and S wave arrival picks. We use the travel times to relocate the earthquakes using a double difference relocation method. For earthquakes with Ml ≥3.8, we also use waveform modeling to compute moment tensors . The distribution of earthquake relocations shows an ~15-km-thick slab dipping to the SE. The dip angle increases from 20º at the northern edge of the cluster to 38º at the southern edge. Two concentrated groups of earthquakes extend ~40 km vertically above the general downdip trend, with a 20 km quiet gap between them at ~100 km depth. The earthquakes in the general downdip seismic zone have downdip compressional axes, while earthquakes close to the quiet gap and in the concentrated groups have an oblique component. The general decrease in slab dip angle to the north may be caused by mantle flow through the Caldas tear. The seismicity gap in the slab may be associated with an active deformation zone and the concentrated groups of earthquakes with oblique focal mechanisms could be due to a slab fold.

  19. Electroosmotic flow mixing in zigzag microchannels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Kun; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2007-03-01

    In this study we performed numerical and experimental investigations into the mixing of EOFs in zigzag microchannels with two different corner geometries, namely sharp corners and flat corners. In the zigzag microchannel with sharp corners, the flow travels more rapidly near the inner wall of the corner than near the outer wall as a result of the higher electric potential drop. The resulting velocity gradient induces a racetrack effect, which enhances diffusion within the fluid and hence improves the mixing performance. The simulation results reveal that the mixing index is approximately 88.83%. However, the sharp-corner geometry causes residual liquid or bubbles to become trapped in the channel at the point where the flow is almost stationary, when the channel is in the process of cleaning. Accordingly, a zigzag microchannel with flat-corner geometry is developed. The flat-corner geometry forms a convergent-divergent type nozzle which not only enhances the mixing performance in the channel, but also prevents the accumulation of residual liquid or bubbles. Scaling analysis reveals that this corner geometry leads to an effective increase in the mixing length. The experimental results reveal that the mixing index is increased to 94.30% in the flat-corner zigzag channel. Hence, the results demonstrate that the mixing index of the flat-corner zigzag channel is better than that of the conventional sharp-corner microchannel. Finally, the results of Taguchi analysis indicate that the attainable mixing index is determined primarily by the number of corners in the microchannel and by the flow passing height at each corner.

  20. Constraints on the Geometry of the Farallon Slab from the Joint Interpretation of All Available Imaging Results from the Earthscope USArray Deployment in the Lower 48 States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esker, A.; Pavlis, G. L.

    2017-12-01

    We assembled all available seismic tomography models distributed through the IRIS DMC and other sources. We combined these images with our own results using 3D plane wave migration of P to S conversion data derived from the USArray data set and other broadband seismic stations in the lower 48 states. All the tomography models were converted into SEGY format and interpolated onto a regular grid in a UTM reference frame. That innovation makes joint interpretation feasible using a seismic interpretation software (Petrel) because we treat both the tomography models and scattered wave image results as if they were 3D seismic reflection data. The careful designed interface of a modern exploration package makes exploring a range of interpretation packages much faster and allowed us to produce a more comprehensive interpretation of all available data. The tomography models are nearly an order of magnitude smoother than the scattered wave images, so we use the tomography models as a cross-validation in interpretation unless the scattered wave images are ambiguous. The focus of this study is testing a conjecture in an earlier paper (Pavlis, 2011) for the presence of a single continuous horizon interpreted as the top of the Farallon Slab. As in the previous paper we constrained the western edge of this surface with the location of Cascadia trench as well as a virtual edge from a back projection of the Mendocino triple junction using Pacific-North America motion over the past 30 Ma. We also simulated crustal multiple effects on the plane wave migration results using crustal geometry estimates produced by the Earthscope Automated Receiver Survey (EARS). This confirmed the scattered wave images were not reliable in the upper mantle at depths shallower than 200 km due to contamination by crustal multiples. Most tomography models show a steep dip in the slab immediately east of the volcanic arc and our surface follows the average geometry defined by a visual comparison of all the

  1. The northern Lesser Antilles oblique subduction zone: new insight about the upper plate deformation, 3D slab geometry and interplate coupling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcaillou, B.; Laurencin, M.; Graindorge, D.; Klingelhoefer, F.

    2017-12-01

    In subduction zones, the 3D geometry of the plate interface is thought to be a key parameter for the control of margin tectonic deformation, interplate coupling and seismogenic behavior. In the northern Caribbean subduction, precisely between the Virgin Islands and northern Lesser Antilles, these subjects remain controversial or unresolved. During the ANTITHESIS cruises (2013-2016), we recorded wide-angle seismic, multichannel reflection seismic and bathymetric data along this zone in order to constrain the nature and the geometry of the subducting and upper plate. This experiment results in the following conclusions: 1) The Anegada Passage is a 450-km long structure accross the forearc related to the extension due to the collision with the Bahamas platform. 2) More recently, the tectonic partitioning due to the plate convergence obliquity re-activated the Anegada Passage in the left-lateral strike-slip system. The partitioning also generated the left-lateral strike-slip Bunce Fault, separating the accretionary prism from the forearc. 3) Offshore of the Virgin Islands margin, the subducting plate shows normal faults parallel to the ancient spreading center that correspond to the primary fabric of the oceanic crust. In contrast, offshore of Barbuda Island, the oceanic crust fabric is unresolved (fracture zone?, exhumed mantle? ). 4) In the direction of the plate convergence vector, the slab deepening angle decreases northward. It results in a shallower slab beneath the Virgin Islands Platform compared to the St Martin-Barbuda forearc. In the past, the collision of the Bahamas platform likely changed the geodynamic settings of the northeastern corner of the Caribbean subduction zone and we present a revised geodynamic history of the region. Currently, various features are likely to control the 3D geometry of the slab: the margin convexity, the convergence obliquity, the heterogeneity of the primary fabric of the oceanic crust and the Bahamas docking. We suggest that

  2. Unraveling metamaterial properties in zigzag-base folded sheets.

    PubMed

    Eidini, Maryam; Paulino, Glaucio H

    2015-09-01

    Creating complex spatial objects from a flat sheet of material using origami folding techniques has attracted attention in science and engineering. In the present work, we use the geometric properties of partially folded zigzag strips to better describe the kinematics of known zigzag/herringbone-base folded sheet metamaterials such as Miura-ori. Inspired by the kinematics of a one-degree of freedom zigzag strip, we introduce a class of cellular folded mechanical metamaterials comprising different scales of zigzag strips. This class of patterns combines origami folding techniques with kirigami. Using analytical and numerical models, we study the key mechanical properties of the folded materials. We show that our class of patterns, by expanding on the design space of Miura-ori, is appropriate for a wide range of applications from mechanical metamaterials to deployable structures at small and large scales. We further show that, depending on the geometry, these materials exhibit either negative or positive in-plane Poisson's ratios. By introducing a class of zigzag-base materials in the current study, we unify the concept of in-plane Poisson's ratio for similar materials in the literature and extend it to the class of zigzag-base folded sheet materials.

  3. Zigzagging Across Pluto

    2015-12-16

    This high-resolution swat of Pluto sweeps over the cratered plains at the west of the New Horizons' encounter hemisphere and across numerous prominent faults, skimming the eastern margin of the dark, forbidding region informally known as Cthulhu Regio, and finally passing over the mysterious, possibly cryovolcanic edifice Wright Mons, before reaching the terminator or day-night line. Among the many notable details shown are the overlapping and infilling relationships between units of the relatively smooth, bright volatile ices from Sputnik Planum (at the edge of the mosaic) and the dark edge or "shore" of Cthulhu. The pictures in this mosaic were taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) in "ride-along" mode with the LEISA spectrometer, which accounts for the 'zigzag' or step pattern. Taken shortly before New Horizons' July 14 closest approach to Pluto, details as small as 500 yards (500 meters) can be seen. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20286

  4. Subducted Slab Dynamics: Toward Understanding the Causes of Slab Stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. D.; Frost, D. J.; Rubie, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    The evolution and dynamics of subducted slabs are controlled by a number of factors, including rheology and composition. The correlation of the transformations from olivine to wadslayite and ringwoodite to perovskite plus magnesiowüstite with the seismic velocity discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depth, along with the density changes have been extensively investigated in terms of their impact on slab dynamics. Owing to the relatively smaller changes in density extending over a broader depth range, the impact of the pyroxene-garnet system has received less attention. Recent experimental work has found that the majorite component in garnet--a product of the transition from pyroxene into garnet--is one of the slowest-diffusing components in Earth's mantle. At the relatively low temperatures of the slab, this slow diffusion inhibits the dissolution of pyroxene into garnet, so that the slab remains buoyant relative to the ambient mantle and stagnates. We present dynamic subduction calculations that illustrate the effect of the non-equilibrium pyroxene to garnet transition on slab dynamics. If the transition between equilibrium and non-equilibrium behavior is below 1000 K, we find no impact on slab dynamics. If the transition occurs at 1200 K, it is enough to cause the slab to thicken and stagnate in the transition zone for an extended period of time. Our analysis suggests that cold slabs should be more likely to stagnate in the transition zone and we will compare a global compilation of slab geometries with slab thermal structure to evaluate.

  5. Magnetotransport Properties of Graphene Nanoribbons with Zigzag Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang; Liu, Bing; Shen, Cheng; Li, Si; Huang, Xiaochun; Lu, Xiaobo; Chen, Peng; Wang, Guole; Wang, Duoming; Liao, Mengzhou; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Shuopei; Yang, Wei; Yang, Rong; Shi, Dongxia; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yao, Yugui; Wang, Weihua; Zhang, Guangyu

    2018-05-01

    The determination of the electronic structure by edge geometry is unique to graphene. In theory, an evanescent nonchiral edge state is predicted at the zigzag edges of graphene. Up to now, the approach used to study zigzag-edged graphene has mostly been limited to scanning tunneling microscopy. The transport properties have not been revealed. Recent advances in hydrogen plasma-assisted "top-down" fabrication of zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons (Z-GNRs) have allowed us to investigate edge-related transport properties. In this Letter, we report the magnetotransport properties of Z-GNRs down to ˜70 nm wide on an h -BN substrate. In the quantum Hall effect regime, a prominent conductance peak is observed at Landau ν =0 , which is absent in GNRs with nonzigzag edges. The conductance peak persists under perpendicular magnetic fields and low temperatures. At a zero magnetic field, a nonlocal voltage signal, evidenced by edge conduction, is detected. These prominent transport features are closely related to the observable density of states at the hydrogen-etched zigzag edge of graphene probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, which qualitatively matches the theoretically predicted electronic structure for zigzag-edged graphene. Our study gives important insights for the design of new edge-related electronic devices.

  6. Coupling of Armchair and Zigzag Tubes to a Free Electron Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of nanotube chirality is of prime importance in determining its electronic properties. We address the issue of how chirality affects the coupling of a nanotube to metal contacts. We model coupling of armchair and zigzag nanotubes to metal contacts, in both the side- and end-contacted geometries. In the side-contacted geometry, the coupling of armchair and metallic-zigzag nanotubes to a free electron metal are significantly different. Namely, it is possible to drive a larger current through a metallic-zigzag nanotube. The predicted difference holds good when both (a) the entire circumference and (b) only a finite sector of the nanotube makes contact to the metal electrode. It might be possible to observe the predicted difference between armchair and zigzag nanotubes using gold contacts.

  7. Automatic low-order aberration compensator for solid-state slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin; Dong, Lizhi; Lai, Boheng; Yang, Ping; Kong, Qingfeng; Yang, Kangjian; Liu, Yong; Tang, Guomao; Xu, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Slab geometry is a promising architecture for power scaling of solid-state lasers. By propagating the laser beams along zigzag path in the gain medium, the thermal effects can be well compensated. However, in the non-zigzag direction, the thermal effects are not compensated. Among the overall aberrations in the slab lasers, the major contributors are two low-order aberrations: astigmatism and defocus, which can range up to over 100 microns (peak to valley), leading to detracted beam quality. Another problem with slab lasers is that the output beams are generally in a rectangular aperture with high aspect ratio (normally 1:10), where square beams are favorable for many applications. In order to solve these problems, we propose an automatic low-order aberration compensation system. This system is composed of three lenses fixed on a motorized rail, one is a spherical lens and the others are cylindrical lenses. Astigmatism and defocus can be compensated by merely adjusting the distances between the lenses. Two wave-front sensors are employed in this compensation system, one is used for detecting the initial parameters of the beams, and the other one is used for detecting the remaining aberrations after correction. The adjustments of the three lenses are directly calculated based on beam parameters using ray tracing method. The initial size of the beam is 3.2mm by 26mm, and peak to valley(PV) value of the wave-front is 33.07λ(λ=1064nm). After correction, the dimension becomes 40mm by 40mm, and peak to valley (PV) value of the wave-front is less than 2 microns.

  8. The dynamics of double slab subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A. F.; Royden, L. H.; Becker, T. W.

    2017-04-01

    We use numerical models to investigate the dynamics of two interacting slabs with parallel trenches. Cases considered are: a single slab reference, outward dipping slabs (out-dip), inward dipping slabs (in-dip) and slabs dipping in the same direction (same-dip). Where trenches converge over time (same-dip and out-dip systems), large positive dynamic pressures in the asthenosphere are generated beneath the middle plate and large trench-normal extensional forces are transmitted through the middle plate. This results in slabs that dip away from the middle plate at depth, independent of trench geometry. The single slab, the front slab in the same-dip case and both out-dip slabs undergo trench retreat and exhibit stable subduction. However, slabs within the other double subduction systems tend to completely overturn at the base of the upper mantle, and exhibit either trench advance (rear slab in same-dip), or near-stationary trenches (in-dip). For all slabs, the net slab-normal dynamic pressure at 330 km depth is nearly equal to the slab-normal force induced by slab buoyancy. For double subduction, the net outward force on the slabs due to dynamic pressure from the asthenosphere is effectively counterbalanced by the net extensional force transmitted through the middle plate. Thus, dynamic pressure at depth, interplate coupling and lithospheric stresses are closely linked and their effects cannot be isolated. Our results provide insights into both the temporal evolution of double slab systems on Earth and, more generally, how the various components of subduction systems, from mantle flow/pressure to interplate coupling, are dynamically linked.

  9. Slab-pull and slab-push earthquakes in the Mexican, Chilean and Peruvian subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, A.; Madariaga, R.; Campos, J.

    2002-09-01

    We studied intermediate depth earthquakes in the Chile, Peru and Mexican subduction zones, paying special attention to slab-push (down-dip compression) and slab-pull (down-dip extension) mechanisms. Although, slab-push events are relatively rare in comparison with slab-pull earthquakes, quite a few have occurred recently. In Peru, a couple slab-push events occurred in 1991 and one slab-pull together with several slab-push events occurred in 1970 near Chimbote. In Mexico, several slab-push and slab-pull events occurred near Zihuatanejo below the fault zone of the 1985 Michoacan event. In central Chile, a large M=7.1 slab-push event occurred in October 1997 that followed a series of four shallow Mw>6 thrust earthquakes on the plate interface. We used teleseismic body waveform inversion of a number of Mw>5.9 slab-push and slab-pull earthquakes in order to obtain accurate mechanisms, depths and source time functions. We used a master event method in order to get relative locations. We discussed the occurrence of the relatively rare slab-push events in the three subduction zones. Were they due to the geometry of the subduction that produces flexure inside the downgoing slab, or were they produced by stress transfer during the earthquake cycle? Stress transfer can not explain the occurence of several compressional and extensional intraplate intermediate depth earthquakes in central Chile, central Mexico and central Peru. It seemed that the heterogeneity of the stress field produced by complex slab geometry has an important influence on intraplate intermediate depth earthquakes.

  10. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  11. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  12. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1985-03-12

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  13. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, F.R.; DeZubay, E.A.; Murray, A.P.; Vidt, E.J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations are disclosed particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant. 14 figs.

  14. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  15. Overturned Alboran slab beneath westernmost Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Miller, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    The geological evolution of the westernmost Mediterranean holds an important piece of the puzzle of how whole western Mediterranean evolved due to the convergence of Africa with Eurasia. The idea of continuous slab roll back acting a prominent force in this region is strongly supported by tomographic images with near vertical high velocity structure connecting the surface beneath the Alboran domain [Spakman and Wortel, 2004; Bezada et al., 2013]. However, the slab shape, width, and sharpness of its edges are not well resolved. Here, we use the waveforms recorded from the PICASSO (XB) array and IberArray (IA) for the deep 2010 earthquake beneath Granada to study the detailed Alboran slab structure. We found: (1) A low velocity structure (7 km thickness, δVs = -20%) surrounding the earthquake to explain the second arrivals observed in many stations at Spain. (2) A thin low velocity layer sits on the bottom of the high velocity slab-like structure to explain the high frequency second arrivals and long coda after the P and S arrivals on stations in the Rif Mountains of Morocco. The most feasible explanation of the low velocity structure is the dehydrated surface of the slab lithosphere extending from the 600 km to the shallow mantle. However, such geometry is contradictory with our observation, which the low velocity layer is at the bottom of the slab. We proposed that the Albora slab had undergone significant "roll-over" movement, which overturned the slab surface.

  16. A slab expression in the Gibraltar arc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2017-04-01

    surface motion. Slab shape and slab continuity to the surface, allowing slab pull to be transfered to the surface lithosphere, are key factors controlling the force balance in the region. We explore slab geometries with or without continuity at the Betics (with a slab window between the known subduction interface and a possible Betics connection) and/or continental material attached to the slab (which lowers the slab pull magnitude). Through our methodology, we are able to study which slab shape of those proposed in the literature best fits the surface data.

  17. Investigating Different Patterns of Slab Deformation in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; McNamara, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    The geometry of slabs within the upper mantle have been relatively well-imaged by tomography and regional seismic studies; however, the style of slab deformation in the lower mantle remains poorly understood. Although tomography models reveal that the lower mantle beneath paleo-subduction regions are faster-than-average, the resolution is not high enough to resolve how slabs are actually deforming there. Slabs have long been hypothesized as viscous, tabular sheets that subduct at the surface, descend through the mantle, and impinge on the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Geodynamical studies have shown a wide range of possible deformational behaviors, ranging from stiff, buckling slabs to more-ductile masses of accumulating slab material undergoing pure shear. Of particular interest is how rheology and 3D spherical geometry control the shape and deformational style of slabs as they descend deeper into the mantle. We performed high resolution 3D spherical calculations to explore slab deformation in deep mantle as a function of slab strength. In our model, kinematic velocity boundary conditions are imposed on the surface to simulate a moving plate which guides the formation of a subducting slab. In addition, a viscosity jump at the transition zone is applied. We find that although a slab subducts as a large tabular sheet from the surface, it doesn't always maintain such geometry. Instead, it typically breaks apart into a few smaller and narrower sheets which can even turn into cylindrical-shaped downwelling after subducting into deep mantle. Since seismic anisotropy is hypothesized to originate from crystal preferred orientation (CPO) in a slab when it impinges on the CMB and is predicted with significant help of time-dependent deformation information from the geodynamic models, our findings on lower mantle slab deformation patterns may enhance the understanding towards the cause of characteristic patterns of predicted seismic anisotropy.

  18. Linearly exact parallel closures for slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D.; Jhang, Hogun

    2013-08-01

    Parallel closures are obtained by solving a linearized kinetic equation with a model collision operator using the Fourier transform method. The closures expressed in wave number space are exact for time-dependent linear problems to within the limits of the model collision operator. In the adiabatic, collisionless limit, an inverse Fourier transform is performed to obtain integral (nonlocal) parallel closures in real space; parallel heat flow and viscosity closures for density, temperature, and flow velocity equations replace Braginskii's parallel closure relations, and parallel flow velocity and heat flow closures for density and temperature equations replace Spitzer's parallel transport relations. It is verified that the closures reproduce the exact linear response function of Hammett and Perkins [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 3019 (1990)] for Landau damping given a temperature gradient. In contrast to their approximate closures where the vanishing viscosity coefficient numerically gives an exact response, our closures relate the heat flow and nonvanishing viscosity to temperature and flow velocity (gradients).

  19. Imaging the Peruvian flat slab with Rayliegh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja

    In subduction zones the oceanic plates descend at a broad range of dip angles. A "flat slab" is an oceanic plate that starts to subduct steeply, but bends at 100 km depth and continues almost horizontally for several hundred kilometers. This unusual slab geometry has been linked to various geologic features, including the cessation of arc volcanism, basement core uplifts removed far from subducting margins, and the formation of high plateaus. Despite the prevalence of flat slabs worldwide since the Proterozoic, questions on how flat slabs form, persist, and re-steepen remains a topic of ongoing research. Even less clear is how this phenomenon relates to unusual features observed at the surface. To better understand the causes and consequences of slab flattening I focus on the Peruvian flat slab. This is not only the biggest flat slab region today, but due to the oblique angle at which the Nazca Plate subducts under the South American Plate, it also provides unique opportunity to get insights into the temporal evolution of the flat slab. Using ambient noise and earthquake-generated Rayleigh waves recorded at several contemporary dense seismic networks, I was able to perform unprecedentedly high resolution imaging of the subduction zone in southern Peru. Surprisingly, instead of imaging a vast flat slab region as expected, I found that the flat slab tears and re-steepens north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. The change in slab geometry is associated with variations in the slab's internal strain along strike, as inferred from slab-related anisotropy. Based on newly-discovered features I discuss the critical role of the subducting ridges in the formation and longevity of flat slabs. The slab tear created a new mantle pathway between the torn slab and the flat slab remnant to the east, and is possibly linked to the profound low velocity anomaly located under the eastern corner of the flat slab. Finally, I re-evaluate the connection between slab flattening and volcanic

  20. Bandgaps and directional propagation of elastic waves in 2D square zigzag lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we propose various types of two-dimensional (2D) square zigzag lattice structures, and we study their bandgaps and directional propagation of elastic waves. The band structures and the transmission spectra of the systems are calculated by using the finite element method. The effects of the geometry parameters of the 2D-zigzag lattices on the bandgaps are investigated and discussed. The mechanism of the bandgap generation is analyzed by studying the vibration modes at the bandgap edges. Multiple wide complete bandgaps are found in a wide porosity range owing to the separation of the degeneracy by introducing bending arms. The bandgaps are sensitive to the geometry parameters of the systems. The deformed displacement fields of the transient response of finite structures subjected to time-harmonic loads are presented to show the directional wave propagation. The research in this paper is relevant to the practical design of cellular structures with enhanced vibro-acoustics performance.

  1. Slab interactions in 3-D subduction settings: The Philippine Sea Plate region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Adam F.; Royden, Leigh H.; Becker, Thorsten W.; Faccenna, Claudio

    2018-05-01

    The importance of slab-slab interactions is manifested in the kinematics and geometry of the Philippine Sea Plate and western Pacific subduction zones, and such interactions offer a dynamic basis for the first-order observations in this complex subduction setting. The westward subduction of the Pacific Sea Plate changes, along-strike, from single slab subduction beneath Japan, to a double-subduction setting where Pacific subduction beneath the Philippine Sea Plate occurs in tandem with westward subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate beneath Eurasia. Our 3-D numerical models show that there are fundamental differences between single slab systems and double slab systems where both subduction systems have the same vergence. We find that the observed kinematics and slab geometry of the Pacific-Philippine subduction can be understood by considering an along-strike transition from single to double subduction, and is largely independent from the detailed geometry of the Philippine Sea Plate. Important first order features include the relatively shallow slab dip, retreating/stationary trenches, and rapid subduction for single slab systems (Pacific Plate subducting under Japan), and front slabs within a double slab system (Philippine Sea Plate subducting at Ryukyu). In contrast, steep to overturned slab dips, advancing trench motion, and slower subduction occurs for rear slabs in a double slab setting (Pacific subducting at the Izu-Bonin-Mariana). This happens because of a relative build-up of pressure in the asthenosphere beneath the Philippine Sea Plate, where the asthenosphere is constrained between the converging Ryukyu and Izu-Bonin-Mariana slabs. When weak back-arc regions are included, slab-slab convergence rates slow and the middle (Philippine) plate extends, which leads to reduced pressure build up and reduced slab-slab coupling. Models without back-arcs, or with back-arc viscosities that are reduced by a factor of five, produce kinematics compatible with present

  2. Modeling Slab-Slab Interactions: Dynamics of Outward Dipping Double-Sided Subduction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Ágnes; Holt, Adam F.; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio; Capitanio, Fabio A.

    2018-03-01

    Slab-slab interaction is a characteristic feature of tectonically complex areas. Outward dipping double-sided subduction is one of these complex cases, which has several examples on Earth, most notably the Molucca Sea and Adriatic Sea. This study focuses on developing a framework for linking plate kinematics and slab interactions in an outward dipping subduction geometry. We used analog and numerical models to better understand the underlying subduction dynamics. Compared to a single subduction model, double-sided subduction exhibits more time-dependent and vigorous toroidal flow cells that are elongated (i.e., not circular). Because both the Molucca and Adriatic Sea exhibit an asymmetric subduction configuration, we also examine the role that asymmetry plays in the dynamics of outward dipping double-sided subduction. We introduce asymmetry in two ways; with variable initial depths for the two slabs ("geometric" asymmetry), and with variable buoyancy within the subducting plate ("mechanical" asymmetry). Relative to the symmetric case, we probe how asymmetry affects the overall slab kinematics, whether asymmetric behavior intensifies or equilibrates as subduction proceeds. While initial geometric asymmetry disappears once the slabs are anchored to the 660 km discontinuity, the mechanical asymmetry can cause more permanent differences between the two subduction zones. In the most extreme case, the partly continental slab stops subducting due to the unequal slab pull force. The results show that the slab-slab interaction is most effective when the two trenches are closer than 10-8 cm in the laboratory, which is 600-480 km when scaled to the Earth.

  3. Early Earth slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Van Hunen, J.

    2016-12-01

    At present day, the Earth's mantle exhibits a combination of stagnant and penetrating slabs within the transition zone, indicating a intermittent convection mode between layered and whole-mantle convection. Isoviscous thermal convection calculations show that in a hotter Earth, the natural mode of convection was dominated by double-layered convection, which may imply that slabs were more prone to stagnate in the transition zone. Today, slab penetration is to a large extent controlled by trench mobility for a plausible range of lower mantle viscosity and Clapeyron slope of the mantle phase transitions. Trench mobility is, in turn, governed by slab strength and density and upper plate forcing. In this study, we systematically investigate the slab-transition zone internation in the Early Earth, using 2D self-consistent numerical subduction models. Early Earth's higher mantle temperature facilitates decoupling between the plates and the underlying asthenosphere, and may result in slab sinking almost without trench retreat. Such behaviour together with a low resistance of a weak lower mantle may allow slabs to penetrate. The ability of slab to sink into the lower mantle throughout Earth's history may have important implications for Earth's evolution: it would provide efficient mass and heat flux through the transition zone therefore provide an efficient way to cool and mix the Earth's mantle.

  4. The 2017 Mw = 8.2 Tehuantepec earthquake: a slab bending or slab pull rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duputel, Z.; Gombert, B.; Simons, M.; Fielding, E. J.; Rivera, L. A.; Bekaert, D. P.; Jiang, J.; Liang, C.; Moore, A. W.; Liu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    On September 8th 2017, a regionally destructive Mw 8.2 intra-slab earthquake struck Mexico in the Gulf of Tehuantepec. While large intermediate depth intra-slab earthquakes are a major hazard, we have only a limited knowledge of the strain budgets within subducting slabs. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain intraplate earthquakes in subduction zones. Bending stresses might cause the occurrence of seismic events located at depths where the slab dip changes abruptly. However, an alternative explanation is needed if the ruptures are found to propagate through the entire lithosphere. Depending on the coupling of the subduction interface, intraplate earthquakes occurring updip or downdip of the locked zone could also be caused by the negative buoyancy of the sinking slab (i.e., slab pull). The increasing availability of near-fault data provides a unique opportunity to better constrain the seismogenic behavior of large intra-slab earthquakes. Teleseismic analyses of the 2017 Tehuantepec earthquake lead to contrasting statements about the depth extent of the rupture: while most of long period centroid moment tensor inversions yield fairly large centroid depths (>40 km), some finite-fault models suggest much shallower slip concentrated at depths less than 30 km. In this study, we analyze GPS, InSAR, tsunami and seismological data to constrain the earthquake location, fault geometry and slip distribution. We use a Bayesian approach devoid of significant spatial smoothing to characterize the range of allowable rupture depths. In addition, to cope with potential artifacts in centroid depth estimates due to unmodeled lateral heterogeneities, we also analyze long-period seismological data using a full 3D Earth model. Preliminary results suggest a fairly deep rupture consistent with a slab-pull process breaking a significant proportion of the lithosphere and potentially reflecting at least local detachment of the slab.

  5. Charge transport in doped zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourbakhsh, Zahra; Asgari, Reza

    2018-06-01

    The effects of lattice distortion and chemical disorder on charge transport properties of two-terminal zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons (zPNRs), which shows resonant tunneling behavior under an electrical applied bias, are studied. Our comprehensive study is based on ab initio quantum transport calculations on the basis of the Landauer theory. We use nitrogen and silicon substitutional dopant atoms, and employ different physical quantities such as the I -V curve, voltage drop behavior, transmission spectrum, transmission pathway, and atomic current to explore the transport mechanism of zPNR devices under a bias voltage. The calculated transmission pathways show the transition from a ballistic transport regime to a diffusive and in some particular cases to localized transport regimes. Current flowing via the chemical bonds and hopping are monitored; however, the conductance originates mainly from the charge traveling through the chemical bonds in the vicinity of the zigzag edges. Our results show that in the doped systems, the device conductance decreases and the negative differential resistance characteristic becomes weak or is eliminated. Besides, the conductance in a pure zPNR system is almost independent of the ribbon width.

  6. 3-D electrical structure across the Yadong-Gulu rift revealed by magnetotelluric data: New insights on the extension of the upper crust and the geometry of the underthrusting Indian lithospheric slab in southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wei, Wenbo; Ye, Gaofeng; Jin, Sheng; Jing, Jianen; Zhang, Letian; Dong, Hao; Xie, Chengliang; Omisore, Busayo O.; Guo, Zeqiu

    2017-09-01

    The approximately north-south trending Cenozoic Yadong-Gulu rift (YGR) in the eastern Lhasa block is an ideal location to investigate the extensional kinematic mechanism of the upper crust and the deformation characteristics of the Indian lithospheric slab in southern Tibet. The magnetotelluric (MT) method has been widely used in probing subsurface structures at lithospheric scale and is sensitive to high electrically conductive body (conductor). A three-dimensional (3-D) inversion of MT data was conducted to derive the east-west electrical structures across the northern segment of the YGR. The result reveals that the conductors in the middle crust are not continuous in the east-west direction. The deep conductor underneath the YGR is interpreted to result from the tearing of the Indian lithospheric slab. The upper crust to the east of the YGR is significantly intruded by underlying conductors. Based on the features of the 3-D inversion result from this study and other geophysical observations, the formation of the YGR is most likely caused by tearing of the Indian lithospheric slab through the pull of mid-lower crustal conductors that have locally weak strength beneath the YGR.

  7. Slab replacement maturity guidelines.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the use of maturity method to determine early age strength of concrete in slab : replacement application. Specific objectives were (1) to evaluate effects of various factors on the compressive : maturity-strength relationship ...

  8. Alternate approach slab reinforcement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-01

    The upper mat of reinforcing steel, in exposed concrete bridge approach slabs, is prone to corrosion damage. Chlorides applied to the highways : for winter maintenance can penetrate this concrete layer. Eventually chlorides reach the steel and begin ...

  9. High power tube solid-state laser with zigzag propagation of pump and laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savich, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A novel resonator and pumping design with zigzag propagation of pumping and laser beams permits to design an improved tube Solid State Laser (SSL), solving the problem of short absorption path to produce a high power laser beam (100 - 1000kW). The novel design provides an amplifier module and laser oscillator. The tube-shaped SSL includes a gain element fiber-optically coupled to a pumping source. The fiber optic coupling facilitates light entry at compound Brewster's angle of incidence into the laser gain element and uses internal reflection to follow a "zigzag" path in a generally spiral direction along the length of the tube. Optics are arranged for zigzag propagation of the laser beam, while the cryogenic cooling system is traditional. The novel method of lasing uses advantages of cylindrical geometry to reach the high volume of gain medium with compactness and structural rigidity, attain high pump density and uniformity, and reach a low threshold without excessive increase of the temperature of the crystal. The design minimizes thermal lensing and stress effects, and provides high gain amplification, high power extraction from lasing medium, high pumping and lasing efficiency and a high beam quality.

  10. A structural and electronic comparison of armchair and zigzag epitaxial graphene sidewall nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevius, Meredith; Wang, F.; Palacio, I.; Celis, A.; Tejeda, A.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; de Heer, W.; Berger, C.; Conrad, E.

    2014-03-01

    Graphene grown on sidewalls of trenches etched in SiC shows particular promise as a candidate for post-Si CMOS electronics because of its ballistic transport, exceptional mobilities, low intrinsic doping, and the opening of a large band gap. However, before definitive progress can be made toward epitaxial graphene-based transistors, we must fully understand the nuances of graphene ribbon growth on different SiC facets. We have now confirmed that sidewall ribbons grown in graphene's two primary crystallographic directions (``armchair'' and ``zigzag'') differ greatly in both structure and electronic band-structure. We present data from both geometries obtained using low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), micro-ARPES and dark-field micro-ARPES. We demonstrate that while graphene grows on stable facets of trenches oriented for armchair edge growth, trenches oriented for zigzag edge growth prefer narrow ribbons of graphene on the (0001) surface near the trench edge. The structure of these zigzag edge graphene ribbons is complex and paramount to understanding their transport. This work was supported by the NSF under grants DMR-1005880 and DMR-0820382, the W. M. Keck Foundation and the Partner University Fund from the Embassy of France

  11. Tomographic imaging of the effects of Peruvian flat slab subduction on the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle under central and southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scire, A. C.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Bishop, B.; Biryol, C. B.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The modern central Peruvian Andes are dominated by a laterally extensive region of flat slab subduction. The Peruvian flat slab extends for ~1500 km along the strike of the Andes, correlating with the subduction of the Nazca Ridge in the south and the theorized Inca Plateau in the north. We have used data from the CAUGHT and PULSE experiments for finite frequency teleseismic P- and S-wave tomography to image the Nazca slab in the upper mantle below 95 km depth under central Peru between 10°S and 18°S as well as the surrounding mantle. Since the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge is mostly aseismic, our results provide important constraints on the geometry of the subducting Nazca slab in this region. Our images of the Nazca slab suggest that steepening of the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge locally occurs ~100 km further inland than was indicated in previous studies. The region where we have imaged the steepening of the Nazca slab inboard of the Nazca Ridge correlates with the location of the Fitzcarrald Arch, a long wavelength upper plate topographic feature which has been suggested to be a consequence of ridge subduction. When the slab steepens inboard of the flat slab region, it does so at a very steep (~70°) angle. The transition from the Peruvian flat slab to the more normally dipping slab south of 16°S below Bolivia is characterized by an abrupt bending of the slab anomaly in the mantle in response to the shift from flat to normal subduction. The slab anomaly appears to be intact south of the Nazca Ridge with no evidence for tearing of the slab in response to the abrupt change in slab dip. A potential tear in the slab is inferred from an observed offset in the slab anomaly north of the Nazca Ridge extending subparallel to the ridge axis between 130 and 300 km depth. A high amplitude (-5-6%) slow S-wave velocity anomaly is observed below the projection of the Nazca Ridge. This anomaly appears to be laterally confined to the mantle

  12. Kilohertz Pulse Repetition Frequency Slab Ti:sapphire Lasers with High Average Power (10 W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, William J.; Coutts, David W.; Webb, Colin E.

    1999-11-01

    High-average-power broadband 780-nm slab Ti:sapphire lasers, pumped by a kilohertz pulse repetition frequency copper vapor laser (CVL), were demonstrated. These lasers are designed for damage-free power scaling when pumped by CVL s configured for maximum output power (of order 100 W) but with poor beam quality ( M 2 300 ). A simple Brewster-angled slab laser side pumped by a CVL produced 10-W average power (1.25-mJ pulses at 8 kHz) with 4.2-ns FWHM pulse duration at an absolute efficiency of 15% (68-W pump power). Thermal lensing in the Brewster slab laser resulted in multitransverse mode output, and pump absorption was limited to 72% by the maximum doping level for commercially available Ti:sapphire (0.25%). A slab laser with a multiply folded zigzag path was therefore designed and implemented that produced high-beam-quality (TEM 00 -mode) output when operated with cryogenic cooling and provided a longer absorption path for the pump. Excessive scattering of the Ti:sapphire beam at the crystal surfaces limited the efficiency of operation for the zigzag laser, but fluorescence diagnostic techniques, gain measurement, and modeling suggest that efficient power extraction ( 15 W TEM 00 , 23% efficiency) from this laser would be possible for crystals with an optical quality surface polish.

  13. Slab Leaf Bowls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suitor, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    In science class, fourth graders investigate the structure of plants and leaves from trees and how the process of photosynthesis turns sunlight into sugar proteins. In this article, the author fuses art and science for a creative and successful clay slab project in her elementary art classroom. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  14. Bandgaps and directional properties of two-dimensional square beam-like zigzag lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we propose four kinds of two-dimensional square beam-like zigzag lattice structures and study their bandgaps and directional propagation of elastic waves. The band structures are calculated by using the finite element method. Both the in-plane and out-of-plane waves are investigated simultaneously via the three-dimensional Euler beam elements. The mechanism of the bandgap generation is analyzed by studying the vibration modes at the bandgap edges. The effects of the geometry parameters of the xy- and z-zigzag lattices on the bandgaps are investigated and discussed. Multiple complete bandgaps are found owing to the separation of the degeneracy by introducing bending arms. The bandgaps are sensitive to the geometry parameters of the periodic systems. The deformed displacement fields of the harmonic responses of a finite lattice structure subjected to harmonic loads at different positions are illustrated to show the directional wave propagation. An extension of the proposed concept to the hexagonal lattices is also presented. The research work in this paper is relevant to the practical design of cellular structures with enhanced vibro-acoustics performance.

  15. Fabricating and Controlling Silicon Zigzag Nanowires by Diffusion-Controlled Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Liyi; Tuan, Chia-Chi; Wu, Fan; Chen, Xin; Gao, Jian; Ding, Yong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2017-07-12

    Silicon (Si) zigzag nanowires (NWs) have a great potential in many applications because of its high surface/volume ratio. However, fabricating Si zigzag NWs has been challenging. In this work, a diffusion-controlled metal-assisted chemical etching method is developed to fabricate Si zigzag NWs. By tailoring the composition of etchant to change its diffusivity, etching direction, and etching time, various zigzag NWs can be easily fabricated. In addition, it is also found that a critical length of NW (>1 μm) is needed to form zigzag nanowires. Also, the amplitude of zigzag increases as the location approaches the center of the substrate and the length of zigzag nanowire increases. It is also demonstrated that such zigzag NWs can help the silicon substrate for self-cleaning and antireflection. This method may provide a feasible and economical way to fabricate zigzag NWs and novel structures for broad applications.

  16. Regional body wave tomography of the Peruvian flat slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. E.; Wagner, L. S.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kumar, A.; Beck, S. L.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    Local travel time data from the PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment (PULSE) were used to create three dimensional tomographic models of Vp and Vs above the flat slab in southern Peru. In the flat slab subduction regions of Peru and central Chile/Argentina, the Nazca plate subducts normally to a depth of ~100 km and then bends and progresses subhorizontally for several hundreds of kilometers before it resumes steep subduction. The Peruvian flat slab segment, located between 3°S and 15°S, corresponds to a gap in the volcanic arc and far-field thick-skinned deformation in the Eastern Cordillera. Despite ongoing research, there is still little consensus on the causes and consequences of flat slab subduction. In western North American, it has been suggested that flat subduction may have been responsible for the formation of the Rocky Mountains and ignimbrite flare-up during the Laramide orogeny. Preliminary tomography results show high shear wave velocities above the slab for a region that coincides with the location of the Nazca ridge, a 200 km wide bathymetric high that is currently subducting at ~15°S. Meanwhile, P wave velocities appear to be relatively normal. North of the ridge location, shear wave velocities can be separated into sublinear high (near the coast) and low (inland) velocity zones oriented approximately parallel to the trench. This geometry corresponds well with the organization of geotectonic and morphological terrains in Peru. High shear wave velocities above the slab are consistent with results from the 2000-2002 CHARGE deployment in central Chile/Argentina. This could indicate the presence of silica enriched, dry continental lithosphere, or it may be due to the presence of an anisotropic layer of hydrous phases directly above the slab. Future comparisons with results from Rayleigh wave tomography aim to address the role of anisotropy in observed shear wave velocities above flat slabs.

  17. Analysis of surface wave propagation in a grounded dielectric slab covered by a resistive sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Both parallel and perpendicular polarized surface waves are known to propagate on lossless and lossy grounded dielectric slabs. Surface wave propagation on a grounded dielectric slab covered with a resistive sheet is considered. Both parallel and perpendicular polarizations are examined. Transcendental equations are derived for each polarization and are solved using iterative techniques. Attenuation and phase velocity are shown for representative geometries. The results are applicable to both a grounded slab with a resistive sheet and an ungrounded slab covered on each side with a resistive sheet.

  18. Iris Segmentation and Normalization Algorithm Based on Zigzag Collarette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizky Faundra, M.; Ratna Sulistyaningrum, Dwi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed iris segmentation and normalization algorithm based on the zigzag collarette. First of all, iris images are processed by using Canny Edge Detection to detect pupil edge, then finding the center and the radius of the pupil with the Hough Transform Circle. Next, isolate important part in iris based zigzag collarette area. Finally, Daugman Rubber Sheet Model applied to get the fixed dimensions or normalization iris by transforming cartesian into polar format and thresholding technique to remove eyelid and eyelash. This experiment will be conducted with a grayscale eye image data taken from a database of iris-Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Automation (CASIA). Data iris taken is the data reliable and widely used to study the iris biometrics. The result show that specific threshold level is 0.3 have better accuracy than other, so the present algorithm can be used to segmentation and normalization zigzag collarette with accuracy is 98.88%

  19. A Refined Zigzag Beam Theory for Composite and Sandwich Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Sciuva, Marco Di; Gherlone, Marco

    2009-01-01

    A new refined theory for laminated composite and sandwich beams that contains the kinematics of the Timoshenko Beam Theory as a proper baseline subset is presented. This variationally consistent theory is derived from the virtual work principle and employs a novel piecewise linear zigzag function that provides a more realistic representation of the deformation states of transverse-shear flexible beams than other similar theories. This new zigzag function is unique in that it vanishes at the top and bottom bounding surfaces of a beam. The formulation does not enforce continuity of the transverse shear stress across the beam s cross-section, yet is robust. Two major shortcomings that are inherent in the previous zigzag theories, shear-force inconsistency and difficulties in simulating clamped boundary conditions, and that have greatly limited the utility of these previous theories are discussed in detail. An approach that has successfully resolved these shortcomings is presented herein. Exact solutions for simply supported and cantilevered beams subjected to static loads are derived and the improved modelling capability of the new zigzag beam theory is demonstrated. In particular, extensive results for thick beams with highly heterogeneous material lay-ups are discussed and compared with corresponding results obtained from elasticity solutions, two other zigzag theories, and high-fidelity finite element analyses. Comparisons with the baseline Timoshenko Beam Theory are also presented. The comparisons clearly show the improved accuracy of the new, refined zigzag theory presented herein over similar existing theories. This new theory can be readily extended to plate and shell structures, and should be useful for obtaining relatively low-cost, accurate estimates of structural response needed to design an important class of high-performance aerospace structures.

  20. Seismic anisotropy and mantle flow below subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpole, Jack; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael; Masters, T.-Guy

    2017-05-01

    Subduction is integral to mantle convection and plate tectonics, yet the role of the subslab mantle in this process is poorly understood. Some propose that decoupling from the slab permits widespread trench parallel flow in the subslab mantle, although the geodynamical feasibility of this has been questioned. Here, we use the source-side shear wave splitting technique to probe anisotropy beneath subducting slabs, enabling us to test petrofabric models and constrain the geometry of mantle fow. Our global dataset contains 6369 high quality measurements - spanning ∼ 40 , 000 km of subduction zone trenches - over the complete range of available source depths (4 to 687 km) - and a large range of angles in the slab reference frame. We find that anisotropy in the subslab mantle is well characterised by tilted transverse isotropy with a slow-symmetry-axis pointing normal to the plane of the slab. This appears incompatible with purely trench-parallel flow models. On the other hand it is compatible with the idea that the asthenosphere is tilted and entrained during subduction. Trench parallel measurements are most commonly associated with shallow events (source depth < 50 km) - suggesting a separate region of anisotropy in the lithospheric slab. This may correspond to the shape preferred orientation of cracks, fractures, and faults opened by slab bending. Meanwhile the deepest events probe the upper lower mantle where splitting is found to be consistent with deformed bridgmanite.

  1. On the consistency of tomographically imaged lower mantle slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Grace E.; Matthews, Kara J.; Hosseini, Kasra; Domeier, Mathew

    2017-04-01

    Over the last few decades numerous seismic tomography models have been published, each constructed with choices of data input, parameterization and reference model. The broader geoscience community is increasingly utilizing these models, or a selection thereof, to interpret Earth's mantle structure and processes. It follows that seismically identified remnants of subducted slabs have been used to validate, test or refine relative plate motions, absolute plate reference frames, and mantle sinking rates. With an increasing number of models to include, or exclude, the question arises - how robust is a given positive seismic anomaly, inferred to be a slab, across a given suite of tomography models? Here we generate a series of "vote maps" for the lower mantle by comparing 14 seismic tomography models, including 7 s-wave and 7 p-wave. Considerations include the retention or removal of the mean, the use of a consistent or variable reference model, the statistical value which defines the slab "contour", and the effect of depth interpolation. Preliminary results will be presented that address the depth, location and degree of agreement between seismic tomography models, both for the 14 combined, and between the p-waves and s-waves. The analysis also permits a broader discussion of slab volumes and subduction flux. And whilst the location and geometry of slabs, matches some the documented regions of long-lived subduction, other features do not, illustrating the importance of a robust approach to slab identification.

  2. Numerical modeling of Farallon Plate flat-slab subduction: Influence of lithosphere structure and rheology on slab dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Currie, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    The subducted Farallon plate is believed to have evolved to a flat geometry underneath North America plate during Late Cretaceous, triggering Laramide deformation within the continental interior. However, the mechanism that caused the oceanic slab to flatten and the factors that control the flat-slab depth remain uncertain. In this work, we use 2D thermal-mechanical models using the SOPALE code to study the subduction dynamics from 90 Ma to 50 Ma. During this period, an oceanic plateau (Shatsky Conjugate) is inferred to have subducted beneath western North America and interacted with the continental lithosphere, including areas of thicker lithosphere such as the Colorado Plateau and Wyoming Craton. Based on seismic tomography and plate reconstruction data sets, we built a set of models to examine the influence of the structure and rheology of the oceanic and continental plates on slab dynamics. Models include a 600 km wide oceanic plateau consisting of 18 km thick crust and a 36 km thick underlying harzburgite layer, and we ran a series of model experiments to test different continental thicknesses (80 km, 120 km, & 180 km) and continental mantle lithosphere strengths (approximating conditions from wet olivine to dry olivine). Consistent with earlier studies, we find that creation of a long flat slab requires a buoyant oceanic plateau (i.e., non-eclogitized crust) and trenchward motion of the continent. In addition, our models demonstrate the upper plate has an important control on slab dynamics. A flat slab requires either a thin continent or, if the continent is thick, its mantle lithosphere must be relatively weak so that it can be displaced by the flattening slab. The depth of the flat slab is mainly controlled by two factors: (1) the continental thickness and (2) the strength of the continental mantle lithosphere. For the same initial lithosphere thickness (120 km), a shallower flat slab ( 90 km depth) occurs for the weakest mantle lithosphere ( wet olivine

  3. Geometrical optics of dense aerosols: forming dense plasma slabs.

    PubMed

    Hay, Michael J; Valeo, Ernest J; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2013-11-01

    Assembling a freestanding, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rarefied than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed field, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the finite particle density reduces the effective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing.

  4. Long-life slab replacement concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-01

    This research was initiated following reports of high incidence of cracking on FDOT concrete pavement replacement : slab projects. Field slabs were instrumented for data acquisition from high-early-strength concrete pavement : replacement slabs place...

  5. Non-equilibrium tunneling in zigzag graphene nanoribbon break-junction results in spin filtering

    SciT

    Jiang, Liming; Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010; National ICT Australia, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010

    Spintronic devices promise new faster and lower energy-consumption electronic systems. Graphene, a versatile material and candidate for next generation electronics, is known to possess interesting spintronic properties. In this paper, by utilizing density functional theory and non-equilibrium green function formalism, we show that Fano resonance can be generated by introducing a break junction in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR). Using this effect, we propose a new spin filtering device that can be used for spin injection. Our theoretical results indicate that the proposed device could achieve high spin filtering efficiency (over 90%) at practical fabrication geometries. Furthermore, our results indicatemore » that the ZGNR break junction lattice configuration can dramatically affect spin filtering efficiency and thus needs to be considered when fabricating real devices. Our device can be fabricated on top of spin transport channel and provides good integration between spin injection and spin transport.« less

  6. Refined Zigzag Theory for Homogeneous, Laminated Composite, and Sandwich Plates: A Homogeneous Limit Methodology for Zigzag Function Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; DiSciuva, Marco; Gherlone, marco

    2010-01-01

    The Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) for homogeneous, laminated composite, and sandwich plates is presented from a multi-scale formalism starting with the inplane displacement field expressed as a superposition of coarse and fine contributions. The coarse kinematic field is that of first-order shear-deformation theory, whereas the fine kinematic field has a piecewise-linear zigzag distribution through the thickness. The condition of limiting homogeneity of transverse-shear properties is proposed and yields four distinct sets of zigzag functions. By examining elastostatic solutions for highly heterogeneous sandwich plates, the best-performing zigzag functions are identified. The RZT predictive capabilities to model homogeneous and highly heterogeneous sandwich plates are critically assessed, demonstrating its superior efficiency, accuracy ; and a wide range of applicability. The present theory, which is derived from the virtual work principle, is well-suited for developing computationally efficient CO-continuous finite elements, and is thus appropriate for the analysis and design of high-performance load-bearing aerospace structures.

  7. Deceased Slabs Drive Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, H. J.; Hannah, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    The application of Re-Os isotope geochemistry to dating single oils is a nascent field [1,2]. Challenges include dissection of oils into asphaltene-maltene (ASPH-MALT) components in a way that preserves meaningful chronologic and source information. Significantly, oil-water mixing rapidly transfers Os to the oil, while Re exchange is sluggish [3]. The Os initial ratio of the oil is shifted in the direction of Os carried in the aqueous fluid, whereas the Re-Os isotopic age is preserved. We show that this phenomenon is operative in natural systems. Further, we show that deserpentinization of old oceanic slabs [4], may be linked to expulsion of Os-enriched waters into overlying sedimentary sections - a process that may be of fundamental importance for oil generation. This conclusion does not diminish the role of traditional organic-rich shales as source rocks for the hydrocarbon, but shows that external fluids are essential to petroleum generation. Moreover, the external fluids may be an important driver for expulsion and migration of oils. We have taken apart several petroleum systems from source rock, to residual oil, to tar mat development, to in situ live oil, through to produced oil. In many cases, a fluid with low 187Os/188Os - unlike that of normal basinal brines - provides a critical component to the oil-water mixture. Funding - CHRONOS project supported by Norwegian petroleum industry (Eni-Norge, Lundin, Aker BP) Acknowledgement - Christine Fichler [4], who first queried us on old slabs and oil, and stimulated ideas. [1] Georgiev, S.V., Stein, H.J., Hannah, J.L., Galimberti, R., Nali, M., Yang, G., and Zimmerman, A. (2016) Re-Os dating of maltenes and asphaltenes within single samples of crude oil: Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 179: 53-75. [doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2016.01.016] [2] DiMarzio, J., Georgiev, S.V., Stein, H.J., and Hannah, J.L. (in press) Residency of rhenium and osmium in a heavy crude oil: Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. [3] Hurtig, N.C., Georgiev, S

  8. Sub-wavelength grating mode transformers in silicon slab waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bock, Przemek J; Cheben, Pavel; Schmid, Jens H; Delâge, André; Xu, Dan-Xia; Janz, Siegfried; Hall, Trevor J

    2009-10-12

    We report on several new types of sub-wavelength grating (SWG) gradient index structures for efficient mode coupling in high index contrast slab waveguides. Using a SWG, an adiabatic transition is achieved at the interface between silicon-on-insulator waveguides of different geometries. The SWG transition region minimizes both fundamental mode mismatch loss and coupling to higher order modes. By creating the gradient effective index region in the direction of propagation, we demonstrate that efficient vertical mode transformation can be achieved between slab waveguides of different core thickness. The structures which we propose can be fabricated by a single etch step. Using 3D finite-difference time-domain simulations we study the loss, polarization dependence and the higher order mode excitation for two types (triangular and triangular-transverse) of SWG transition regions between silicon-on-insulator slab waveguides of different core thicknesses. We demonstrate two solutions to reduce the polarization dependent loss of these structures. Finally, we propose an implementation of SWG structures to reduce loss and higher order mode excitation between a slab waveguide and a phase array of an array waveguide grating (AWG). Compared to a conventional AWG, the loss is reduced from -1.4 dB to < -0.2 dB at the slab-array interface.

  9. Slab replacement maturity guidelines : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-04-01

    Concrete sets in hours at moderate temperatures, : but the bonds that make concrete strong continue : to mature over days to years. However, for : replacement concrete slabs on highways, it is : crucial that concrete develop enough strength : within ...

  10. Tensor-guided fitting of subduction slab depths

    Bazargani, Farhad; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2013-01-01

    Geophysical measurements are often acquired at scattered locations in space. Therefore, interpolating or fitting the sparsely sampled data as a uniform function of space (a procedure commonly known as gridding) is a ubiquitous problem in geophysics. Most gridding methods require a model of spatial correlation for data. This spatial correlation model can often be inferred from some sort of secondary information, which may also be sparsely sampled in space. In this paper, we present a new method to model the geometry of a subducting slab in which we use a data‐fitting approach to address the problem. Earthquakes and active‐source seismic surveys provide estimates of depths of subducting slabs but only at scattered locations. In addition to estimates of depths from earthquake locations, focal mechanisms of subduction zone earthquakes also provide estimates of the strikes of the subducting slab on which they occur. We use these spatially sparse strike samples and the Earth’s curved surface geometry to infer a model for spatial correlation that guides a blended neighbor interpolation of slab depths. We then modify the interpolation method to account for the uncertainties associated with the depth estimates.

  11. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  12. Band-selective filter in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kurihara, Susumu

    2009-02-13

    Electric transport of a zigzag graphene nanoribbon through a steplike potential and a barrier potential is investigated by using the recursive Green's function method. In the case of the steplike potential, we demonstrate numerically that scattering processes obey a selection rule for the band indices when the number of zigzag chains is even; the electrons belonging to the "even" ("odd") bands are scattered only into the even (odd) bands so that the parity of the wave functions is preserved. In the case of the barrier potential, by tuning the barrier height to be an appropriate value, we show that it can work as the "band-selective filter", which transmits electrons selectively with respect to the indices of the bands to which the incident electrons belong. Finally, we suggest that this selection rule can be observed in the conductance by applying two barrier potentials.

  13. Sensory Organ Like Response of Zigzag Edge Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Vijay; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2011-03-01

    Using a continuum Dirac theory, we study the density and spin response of zigzag edge terminated graphene ribbons subjected to edge potentials and Zeeman fields. Our analytical calculations of the density and spin responses of the closed system (fixed particle number) to the static edge fields, show a highly nonlinear Weber-Fechner type behavior where the response depends logarithmically on the edge potential. The dependence of the response on the size of the system (e.g.~width of a nanoribbon) is also uncovered. Zigzag edge graphene nanoribbons, therefore, provide a realization of response of organs such as the eye and ear that obey Weber-Fechner law. We validate our analytical results with tight binding calculations. These results are crucial in understanding important effects of electron-electron interactions in graphene nanoribbons such as edge magnetism etc., and also suggest possibilities for device applications of graphene nanoribbons. Work supported by DST, India through MONAMI and Ramanujan grants.

  14. All-zigzag graphene nanoribbons for planar interconnect application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-An; Chiang, Meng-Hsueh; Hsu, Wei-Chou

    2017-07-01

    A feasible "lightning-shaped" zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) structure for planar interconnects is proposed. Based on the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function, the electron transport properties are evaluated. The lightning-shaped structure increases significantly the conductance of the graphene interconnect with an odd number of zigzag chains. This proposed technique can effectively utilize the linear I-V characteristic of asymmetric ZGNRs for interconnect application. Variability study accounting for width/length variation and the edge effect is also included. The transmission spectra, transmission eigenstates, and transmission pathways are analyzed to gain the physical insights. This lightning-shaped ZGNR enables all 2D material-based devices and circuits on flexible and transparent substrates.

  15. Nematic liquid crystals on sinusoidal channels: the zigzag instability.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Romero-Enrique, Jose M; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2017-01-11

    Substrates which are chemically or topographically patterned induce a variety of liquid crystal textures. The response of the liquid crystal to competing surface orientations, typical of patterned substrates, is determined by the anisotropy of the elastic constants and the interplay of the relevant lengths scales, such as the correlation length and the surface geometrical parameters. Transitions between different textures, usually with different symmetries, may occur under a wide range of conditions. We use the Landau-de Gennes free energy to investigate the texture of nematics in sinusoidal channels with parallel anchoring bounded by nematic-air interfaces that favour perpendicular (hometropic) anchoring. In micron size channels 5CB was observed to exhibit a non-trivial texture characterized by a disclination line, within the channel, which is broken into a zigzag pattern. Our calculations reveal that when the elastic anisotropy of the nematic does not favour twist distortions the defect is a straight disclination line that runs along the channel, which breaks into a zigzag pattern with a characteristic period, when the twist elastic constant becomes sufficiently small when compared to the splay and bend constants. The transition occurs through a twist instability that drives the defect line to rotate from its original position. The interplay between the energetically favourable twist distortions that induce the defect rotation and the liquid crystal anchoring at the surfaces leads to the zigzag pattern. We investigate in detail the dependence of the periodicity of the zigzag pattern on the geometrical parameters of the sinusoidal channels, which in line with the experimental results is found to be non-linear.

  16. Refined Zigzag Theory for Laminated Composite and Sandwich Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; DiSciuva, Marco; Gherlone, Marco

    2009-01-01

    A refined zigzag theory is presented for laminated-composite and sandwich plates that includes the kinematics of first-order shear deformation theory as its baseline. The theory is variationally consistent and is derived from the virtual work principle. Novel piecewise-linear zigzag functions that provide a more realistic representation of the deformation states of transverse-shear-flexible plates than other similar theories are used. The formulation does not enforce full continuity of the transverse shear stresses across the plate s thickness, yet is robust. Transverse-shear correction factors are not required to yield accurate results. The theory is devoid of the shortcomings inherent in the previous zigzag theories including shear-force inconsistency and difficulties in simulating clamped boundary conditions, which have greatly limited the accuracy of these theories. This new theory requires only C(sup 0)-continuous kinematic approximations and is perfectly suited for developing computationally efficient finite elements. The theory should be useful for obtaining relatively efficient, accurate estimates of structural response needed to design high-performance load-bearing aerospace structures.

  17. Topological superfluids confined in a nanoscale slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, John

    2013-03-01

    Nanofluidic samples of superfluid 3He provide a route to explore odd-parity topological superfluids and their surface, edge and defect-bound excitations under well controlled conditions. We have cooled superfluid 3He confined in a precisely defined nano-fabricated cavity to well below 1 mK for the first time. We fingerprint the order parameter by nuclear magnetic resonance, exploiting a SQUID NMR spectrometer of exquisite sensitivity. We demonstrate that dimensional confinement, at length scales comparable to the superfluid Cooper-pair diameter, has a profound influence on the superfluid order of 3He. The chiral A-phase is stabilized at low pressures, in a cavity of height 650 nm. At higher pressures we observe 3He-B with a surface induced planar distortion. 3He-B is a time-reversal invariant topological superfluid, supporting gapless Majorana surface states. In the presence of the small symmetry breaking NMR static magnetic field we observe two possible B-phase states of the order parameter manifold, which can coexist as domains. Non-linear NMR on these states enables a measurement of the surface induced planar distortion, which determines the spectral weight of the surface excitations. The expected structure of the domain walls is such that, at the cavity surface, the line separating the two domains is predicted to host fermion zero modes, protected by symmetry and topology. Increasing confinement should stabilize new p-wave superfluid states of matter, such as the quasi-2D gapped A phase, which breaks time reversal symmetry, has a protected chiral edge mode, and may host half-quantum vortices with a Majorana zero-mode at the core. We discuss experimental progress toward this phase, through measurements on a 100 nm cavity. On the other hand, a cavity height of 1000 nm may stabilize a novel ``striped'' superfluid with spatially modulated order parameter. Supported by EPSRC (UK) GR/J022004/1 and European Microkelvin Consortium, FP7 grant 228464

  18. A review of the geodynamic evolution of flat slab subduction in Mexico, Peru, and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Manea, Marina; Ferrari, Luca; Orozco, María Teresa; Wong Valenzuela, Raul; Husker, Allen Leroy; Kostoglodovc, Vlad; Ionescu, Constantin

    2017-04-01

    Subducting plates around the globe display a large variability in terms of slab geometry, including regions where smooth and little variation in subduction parameters is observed. While the vast majority of subduction slabs plunge into the mantle at different, but positive dip angles, the end-member case of flat-slab subduction seems to strongly defy this rule and move horizontally several hundreds of kilometers before diving into the surrounding hotter mantle. By employing a comparative assessment for the Mexican, Peruvian and Chilean flat-slab subduction zones we find a series of parameters that apparently facilitate slab flattening. Among them, trench roll-back, as well as strong variations and discontinuities in the structure of oceanic and overriding plates seem to be the most important. However, we were not able to find the necessary and sufficient conditions that provide an explanation for the formation of flat slabs in all three subduction zones. In order to unravel the origin of flat-slab subduction, it is probably necessary a numerical approach that considers also the influence of surrounding plates, and their corresponding geometries, on 3D subduction dynamics.

  19. A review of the geodynamic evolution of flat slab subduction in Mexico, Peru, and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, V. C.; Manea, M.; Ferrari, L.; Orozco-Esquivel, T.; Valenzuela, R. W.; Husker, A.; Kostoglodov, V.

    2017-01-01

    Subducting plates around the globe display a large variability in terms of slab geometry, including regions where smooth and little variation in subduction parameters is observed. While the vast majority of subduction slabs plunge into the mantle at different, but positive dip angles, the end-member case of flat-slab subduction seems to strongly defy this rule and move horizontally several hundreds of kilometers before diving into the surrounding hotter mantle. By employing a comparative assessment for the Mexican, Peruvian and Chilean flat-slab subduction zones we find a series of parameters that apparently facilitate slab flattening. Among them, trench roll-back, as well as strong variations and discontinuities in the structure of oceanic and overriding plates seem to be the most important. However, we were not able to find the necessary and sufficient conditions that provide an explanation for the formation of flat slabs in all three subduction zones. In order to unravel the origin of flat-slab subduction, it is probably necessary a numerical approach that considers also the influence of surrounding plates, and their corresponding geometries, on 3D subduction dynamics.

  20. The study of the transition regime between slab and mixed slab-toroidal electron temperature gradient modes in a basic experiment

    SciT

    Balbaky, Abed; Sokolov, Vladimir; Sen, Amiya K.

    2015-05-15

    Electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes are suspected sources of anomalous electron thermal transport in magnetically confined plasmas as in tokamaks. Prior work in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) has been able to produce and identify slab ETG modes in a slab geometry [Wei et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 042108 (2010)]. Now by modifying CLM to introduce curvature to the confining axial magnetic field, we have excited mixed slab-toroidal modes. Linear theory predicts a transition between slab and toroidal ETG modes when (k{sub ∥}R{sub c})/(k{sub y}ρ) ∼1 [J. Kim and W. Horton, Phys. Fluids B 3, 1167 (1991)]. We observe changesmore » in the mode amplitude for levels of curvature R{sub c}{sup −1}≪(k{sub ∥,slab})/(k{sub ⊥}ρ) , which may be explained by reductions in k{sub ∥} in the transition from slab to mixed slab-toroidal modes, as also predicted by theory. We present mode amplitude scaling as a function of magnetic field curvature. Over the range of curvature available in CLM experimentally we find a modest increase in saturated ETG potential fluctuations (∼1.5×), and a substantial increase in the power density of individual mode peaks (∼4–5×)« less

  1. The Packing of Helical and Zigzag Chains and Distribution of Interstitial Voids in Expanded Liquid Se near the Semiconductor to Metal Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Kenji; Hiroi (Sato), Satoshi; Endo, Hirohisa; Hoshino, Hideoki; Odagaki, Takashi; Hensel, Friedrich

    2017-08-01

    The reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) and Voronoi-Delaunay (VD) void analyses were applied to study the modification of chain geometries near the semiconductor (SC) to metal (M) transition in expanded liquid Se along the isochore of d = 3.4 g/cm3. Fluctuations of dihedral angles with increasing temperature and pressure cause modification of the helical (H) chain to the planar zigzag (Z) chain conformations. The distribution of voids size (rV ) supported by chain segments and distances to the 4th 6th neighbor atoms on the chain segments provide information on the stacking of planar zigzag chains compensated by empty space (L-voids, rV 3.6 Å) which leads to the formation of metallic domains. Near SC-M transition region the number fraction NZ/NH for Z and H chain segments increases.

  2. Capacity improvement of the carbon-based electrochemical capacitor by zigzag-edge introduced graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Naoki; Tomai, Takaaki; Oka, Nobuto; Honma, Itaru

    2018-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of graphene edge has been attracted much attention. Especially, zigzag edge has high electrochemical activity because neutral radical exits on edge. However, due to a lack of efficient production method for zigzag graphene, the electrochemical properties of zigzag edge have not been experimentally demonstrated and the capacitance enhancement of carbonaceous materials in energy storage devices by the control in their edge states is still challenge. In this study, we fabricated zigzag-edge-rich graphene by a one-step method combining graphene exfoliation in supercritical fluid and anisotropic etching by catalytic nanoparticles. This efficient production of zigzag-edge-rich graphene allows us to investigate the electrochemical activity of zigzag edge. By cyclic voltammetry, we revealed the zigzag edge-introduced graphene exhibited unique redox reaction in aqueous acid solution. Moreover, by the calculation on the density function theory (DFT), this unique redox potential for zigzag edge-introduced graphene can be attributed to the proton-insertion/-extraction reactions at the zigzag edge. This finding indicates that the graphene edge modification can contribute to the further increase in the capacitance of the carbon-based electrochemical capacitor.

  3. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-04

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction.

  4. Follow up of injected polyurethane slab jacking.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-08-01

    GLENN JACKSON BRIDGE FOLLOW-UP REPORT The elevation monitoring in the report entitled Injected Polyurethane Slab Jacking (Soltesz 2000) is continued in this current report. The elevations of the concrete slabs are being monitored to see if polyuretha...

  5. Long-life slab replacement concrete : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    Concrete slab replacement projects in Florida have demonstrated a high incidence of : replacement slab cracking. Causes of cracking have not been reliably determined. University of South Florida researchers : sought to identify the factors or : param...

  6. Injected polyurethane slab jacking : interim report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-09-01

    Conventional methods for raising in-place concrete slabs to align roadway sections or to counteract subsidence requires pressure-injecting grout under the slab. As other transportation organizations have had success with the URETEK Method, which util...

  7. Injected polyurethane slab jacking : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-06-01

    Conventional methods for raising in-place concrete slabs to align roadway sections or to counteract subsidence requires pressure-injecting grout under the slab. As other transportation organizations have had success with the URETEK Method, which util...

  8. Dimensional stability of concrete slabs on grade.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    Drying shrinkage is one of the major causes of cracking in concrete slabs on grade. The moisture : difference between the top and bottom surface of the slabs causes a dimensional or shrinkage gradient : to develop through the depth of the slabs...

  9. Spread prestressed concrete slab beam bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    TxDOT uses prestressed slab beam bridges for short-span bridges ranging from approximately 3050 ft in : length. These bridges have precast, pretensioned slab beams placed immediately adjacent to one another : with a cast-in-place slab made composi...

  10. Optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2010-11-01

    In a realistic three-dimensional model, optical matrix element and linear optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in the tight binding approximation are studied. In terms of absolute value of dipole matrix elements of the first three direct transitions at kz=0, we divided the zigzag BNNTs into three groups and investigated their optical absorption spectrum in energy ranges E<5, 77.5 eV. We found that in lower energies, E<5 eV, all groups show different behaviors while in the higher energies, 77.5 eV, their behaviors depend on their even or odd nanotube index. We also found that in the energy range 7

  11. Slab edge interaction with a back-arc spreading center: 3D instantaneous mantle flow models of Vanuatu, SW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, K. A.; Jadamec, M.; Durance-Sie, P. M.; Moresi, L. N.

    2011-12-01

    The Vanuatu area of the south-west Pacific is a dynamic region of high heat-flow and strain-rate, dominated by ongoing plate boundary processes. At the southern termination of the Vanuatu arc the curved geometry of the New Hebrides trench juxtaposes the slab edge perpendicular to its back-arc spreading center. While existing 3D subduction models have demonstrated the importance of mantle flow around a slab edge, the nature of interaction between back-arc upwelling and circum-slab edge mantle flow is not well understood. We use 3D instantaneous numerical models of a Newtonian mantle rheology to test the effect of the slab edge and back-arc upwelling on the mantle flow vector field beneath southern Vanuatu. These high-resolution models simulate temperature-dependent buoyancy-driven deformation of the lithosphere and mantle for a realistic slab geometry. Model results show a small but significant component of vertical mantle flow velocity associated with the slab edge and back-arc spreading center. We also see strain-rate and dynamic topography commensurate with surface observations. Mantle flow by toroidal-type motion brings hotter mantle material from behind the slab into the mantle wedge, elevating geothermal gradients in the slab edge vicinity. The implications of moderate vertical displacement of this hot mantle material at the slab edge are wide-ranging, and such a tectonic framework might aid interpretation of a number of surface observations. For example, induced decompression partial-melting in the mantle wedge and/or slab, and thermal erosion of the slab may contribute to the diverse magma compositions from this region.

  12. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Preferential functionalization on zigzag graphene nanoribbons: first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoonkyung

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the functionalization of functional groups to graphene nanoribbons with zigzag and armchair edges using first-principles calculations. We find that the formation energy for the configuration of the functional groups functionalized to the zigzag edge is ~ 0.2 eV per functional group lower than that to the armchair edge. The formation energy difference arises from a structural deformation on the armchair edge by the functionalization whereas there is no structural deformation on the zigzag edge. Selective functionalization on the zigzag edge takes place at a condition of the temperature and the pressure of ~ 25 °C and 10 - 5 atm. Our findings show that selective functionalization can offer the opportunity for an approach to the separation of zigzag graphene nanoribbons with their solubility change.

  13. The opposite induced magnetic moment in narrow zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Hu, Bian; Liu, Na

    2016-11-01

    Based on the analysis of band structure and edge states on zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs), we can study theoretically the origination of two minimal quantum conductance. At the two energy points - 0.20 eV and 0.15 eV corresponding to the two dips of quantum conductance, the spin-polarized quantum conductance is about 45%. Furthermore, the two types of edge-localized carriers in the opposite transport directions along the two opposite edge sides form the quantum internal loop current, which can generate one big magnetic moment. At these two energy points - 0.17 eV and 0.15 eV the two induced magnetic moments are in opposite signals.

  14. Aspects of electron transport in zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Pankaj; Pratap, Surender

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the aspects of electron transport in the zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) using the nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism. The latter is an esoteric tool in mesoscopic physics. It is used to perform an analysis of ZGNRs by considering potential well. Within this potential, the dependence of transmission coefficient, local density of states (LDOS) and electron transport properties on number of atoms per unit cell is discussed. It is observed that there is an increment in electron and thermal conductance with increasing number of atoms. In addition to these properties, the dependence of same is also studied in figure of merit. The results infer that the contribution of electrons to enhance the figure of merit is important above the crossover temperature.

  15. Negative differential resistance and magnetoresistance in zigzag borophene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiayi; Wu, Jiaxin; Chen, Changpeng; Han, Lu; Zhu, Ziqing; Wu, Jinping

    2018-02-01

    Since borophene has been grown experimentally, its extraordinary characteristics have attracted more and more attentions. In this paper, we construct pristine zigzag-edged borophene nanoribbons (ZBNRs) of different widths to study the transport properties, using the first-principles calculations. The differences of the quantum transport properties are discussed, where even-N ZBNRs and odd-N ZBNRs have different current-voltage relationships. Especially, the negative differential resistance (NDR) can be observed within certain bias range in 5-ZBNR and 7-ZBNR, while 6-ZBNR behaves like a metal whose current rises with the increase of the voltage. Moreover, borophene nanoribbon shows interesting magnetic transport properties. The spin-filtering effect can be revealed when the two electrodes have opposite magnetization directions. Besides, the magnetoresistance effect appears to exist in even-N ZBNRs and the maximum value can reach 70%. The mechanisms of these phenomena are proposed in detail.

  16. Eccentric mastectomy and zigzag periareolar incision for gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lung-Chen; Tung, Kwang-Yi; Chen, Heng-Chang; Huang, Wen-Chen; Hsiao, Hung-Tao

    2009-07-01

    Gynecomastia is enlargement of the male breast caused by gland proliferation. Surgery is performed for symptom relief or for cosmetic reasons. The authors used a modified operative procedure, then evaluated the results and safety. Between 2001 and 2005, 22 men (median age, 26 years; range, 13-63 years) with gynecomastia underwent surgery. The operative procedure included a zigzag periareolar skin incision, eccentric subcutaneous mastectomy, and liposuction, with postoperative compression. All the patients were satisfied with the results of the surgery, which produced a chest contour resembling a normal male chest rather than simply a smaller breast. The only complication was a hematoma. One patient was found to have breast cancer. The normal male chest contour can be restored by the described method of eccentric subcutaneous mastectomy.

  17. A first-principles study of electronic properties of H and F-terminated zigzag BNC nanoribbons

    SciT

    Alaal, Naresh; Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.; Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria -3800, Australia.

    2016-05-06

    Nanoribbons are quasi one-dimensional structures which have interesting electronic properties on the basis of their edge geometries, and width. We studied the electronic properties of hydrogen and fluorine-terminated zigzag BNC nanoribbons (BNCNRs) using a first-principles based density functional theory approach. We considered BNCNRs that were composed of an equal number of C-C and B-N dimers; one of the edges ends with an N atom and opposite edge ends with a C atom. These two edge atoms are passivated by H or F atoms. Our results suggest that hydrogen-terminated BNCNRs (H-BNCNRs) and flourine-terminated BNCNRs (F-BNCNRs) have different electronic properties. H-BNCNRs exhibitmore » intrinsic half-metallic behavior while F-BNCNRs are indirect band gap semiconductors. Chemical functionalization of BNCNRs with H and F atoms show that BNCNRs have a diverse range of electronic properties.« less

  18. Preface: Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig R.; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to publish this special issue of the journal Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors entitled "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics". This issue is an outgrowth of the international symposium "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics", which was held on February 25-27, 2009, in Kyoto, Japan. This symposium was organized by the "Stagnant Slab Project" (SSP) research group to present the results of the 5-year project and to facilitate intensive discussion with well-known international researchers in related fields. The SSP and the symposium were supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (16075101) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government. In the symposium, key issues discussed by participants included: transportation of water into the deep mantle and its role in slab-related dynamics; observational and experimental constraints on deep slab properties and the slab environment; modeling of slab stagnation to constrain its mechanisms in comparison with observational and experimental data; observational, experimental and modeling constraints on the fate of stagnant slabs; eventual accumulation of stagnant slabs on the core-mantle boundary and its geodynamic implications. This special issue is a collection of papers presented in the symposium and other papers related to the subject of the symposium. The collected papers provide an overview of the wide range of multidisciplinary studies of mantle dynamics, particularly in the context of subduction, stagnation, and the fate of deep slabs.

  19. 250-W RF-excited slab CO2 lasers using gold catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyun, V. V.; Samorodov, V. G.; Shishkanov, E. F.

    2003-11-01

    The investigations and constructions of compact RF-excitation CO2 lasers with slab discharge channel geometry and unstable-waveguide resonators are described. The output average power scale up to 260 W from electrode area of 198 cm2 have been obtained in sealed-off mode because use a catalyst effect in discharge volume.

  20. Improved Photo-Detection Using Zigzag TiO2 Nanostructures as an Active Medium.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, A K; Mondal, A; Mahajan, B K; Choudhuri, B; Goswami, T; Sarkar, M B; Chakrabartty, S; Ngangbam, C; Saha, S

    2015-07-01

    Zigzag TiO2 nanostructures were fabricated using oblique angle deposition technique. The field emission gun-scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) image shows that the TiO2 zigzag nanostructures were ~500 nm in length. Averagely two times enhanced UV-Vis absorption was recorded for zigzag structure compared to perpendicular TiO2 nanowires. The main band transition was observed at ~3.4 eV. The zigzag TiO2 exhibited high turn on voltage (+11 V) than that of nanowire (+2 V) detector under dark which were reduced to +0.2 V and +1.0 V under white light illumination, respectively. A maximum ~6 fold photo-responsivity was observed for the zigzag TiO2 compared with nanowire device at + 1.0 V applied potential. The maximum photo-responsivity of 0.36 A/W at 370 nm was measured for the zigzag TiO2 detector. The TiO2 zigzag detector showed slow response with rise time of 10.2 s and fall time of 10.3 s respectively. The UV (370 nm) to visible (450 nm) wavelength rejection ratio of photo-responsivity was recorded ~4 times for the detector.

  1. Pacific slab beneath northeast China revealed by regional and teleseismic waveform modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, X.; Chen, Q. F.; Wei, S.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate velocity and geometry of the slab is essential for better understanding of the thermal, chemical structure of the mantle earth, as well as geodynamics. Recent tomography studies show similar morphology of the subducting Pacific slab beneath northeast China, which was stagnant in the mantle transition zone with thickness of more than 200km and an average velocity perturbation of ~1.5% [Fukao and Obayashi, 2013]. Meanwhile, waveform-modeling studies reveal that the Pacific slab beneath Japan and Kuril Island has velocity perturbation up to 5% and thickness up to 90km [Chen et al., 2007; Zhan et al., 2014]. These discrepancies are probably caused by the smoothing and limited data coverage in the tomographic inversions. Here we adopted 1D and 2D waveform modeling methods to study the fine structure of Pacific slab beneath northeast China using dense regional permanent and temporary broadband seismic records. The residual S- and P-wave travel time, difference between data and 1D synthetics, shows significant difference between the eastern and western stations. S-wave travel time residuals indicate 5-10s earlier arrivals for stations whose ray path lies within the slab, compared with those out of the slab. Teleseimic waveforms were used to rule out the major contribution of the possible low velocity structure above 200km. Furthermore, we use 2D finite-difference waveform modeling to confirm the velocity perturbation and geometry of the slab. Our result shows that the velocity perturbation in the slab is significantly higher than those reported in travel-time tomography studies. ReferencesChen, M., J. Tromp, D. Helmberger, and H. Kanamori (2007), Waveform modeling of the slab beneath Japan, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 112(B2), 19, doi:10.1029/2006jb004394.Fukao, Y., and M. Obayashi (2013), Subducted slabs stagnant above, penetrating through, and trapped below the 660 km discontinuity, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 118(11), 5920-5938, doi:10.1002/2013jb010466

  2. Implications of slab mineralogy for subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, Craig R.; Stein, Seth; Marton, Frederic C.; Van Ark, Emily M.

    2001-12-01

    Phase relations among mantle minerals are perturbed by the thermal environment of subducting slabs, both under equilibrium and disequilibrium (metastable) conditions. Such perturbations yield anomalies not only in seismic velocities but also in density. The buoyancy forces arising from these density anomalies may exert several important effects. They contribute to the stress field within the slab, in a fashion consistent with observed patterns of seismicity. They may affect subduction rates, both by inducing time-dependent velocity changes under equilibrium conditions and by imposing velocity limits through a thermal feedback loop under disequilibrium conditions. They may affect slab morphology, possibly inhibiting penetration of slabs into the lower mantle and allowing temporary stagnation of deflected or detached slabs. Latent heat release from phase transitions under disequilibrium conditions in slabs can yield isobaric superheating, which may generate adiabatic shear instabilities capable of triggering deep seismicity.

  3. Nonthermal and geometric effects on the symmetric and anti-symmetric surface waves in a Lorentzian dusty plasma slab

    SciT

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr; Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791

    2015-02-15

    The nonthermal and geometric effects on the propagation of the surface dust acoustic waves are investigated in a Lorentzian dusty plasma slab. The symmetric and anti-symmetric dispersion modes of the dust acoustic waves are obtained by the plasma dielectric function with the spectral reflection conditions the slab geometry. The variation of the nonthermal and geometric effects on the symmetric and the anti-symmetric modes of the surface plasma waves is also discussed.

  4. Study on zigzag maneuver characteristics of V-U very large crude oil (VLCC) tankers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaswar, Maimun, A.; Wahid, M. A.; Priyanto, A.; Zamani, Pauzi, Saman

    2012-06-01

    The Department of Marine Technology at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University Teknologi Malaysia has recently developed an Ship Maneuverability tool which intends to upgrade student's level understanding the application of fluid dynamic on interaction between hull, propeller, and rudder during maneuvering. This paper discusses zigzag maneuver for conventional Very Large Crude Oil (VLCC) ships with the same principal dimensions but different stern flame shape. 10/10 zigzag maneuver characteristics of U and V types of VLCC ships are investigated. Simulation results for U-type show a good agreement with the experimental data, but V-type not good agreement with experimental one. Further study on zigzag maneuver characteristics are required.

  5. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N.; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H2O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  6. Surface correlation effects in two-band strongly correlated slabs.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, D Nasr; Covaci, L; Peeters, F M

    2014-02-19

    Using an extension of the Gutzwiller approximation for an inhomogeneous system, we study the two-band Hubbard model with unequal band widths for a slab geometry. The aim is to investigate the mutual effect of individual bands on the spatial distribution of quasi-particle weight and charge density, especially near the surface of the slab. The main effect of the difference in band width is the presence of two different length scales corresponding to the quasi-particle profile of each band. This is enhanced in the vicinity of the critical interaction of the narrow band where an orbitally selective Mott transition occurs and a surface dead layer forms for the narrow band. For the doped case, two different regimes of charge transfer between the surface and the bulk of the slab are revealed. The charge transfer from surface/center to center/surface depends on both the doping level and the average relative charge accumulated in each band. Such effects could also be of importance when describing the accumulation of charges at the interface between structures made of multi-band strongly correlated materials.

  7. Bridge approach slabs for Missouri DOT field evaluation of alternative and cost efficient bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-05-01

    Based on a recent study on cost efficient alternative bridge approach slab (BAS) designs (Thiagarajan et : al. 2010) has recommended three new BAS designs for possible implementation by MoDOT namely a) 20 feet cast-inplace : slab with sleeper slab (C...

  8. Vertical slab sinking and westward subduction offshore of Mesozoic North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigloch, Karin; Mihalynuk, Mitchell G.

    2013-04-01

    Subducted slabs in the mantle, as imaged by seismic tomography, preserve a record of ancient subduction zones. Ongoing debate concerns how direct this link is. How long ago did each parcel of slab subduct, and where was the trench located relative to the imaged slab position? Resolving these questions will benefit paleogeographic reconstructions, and restrict the range of plausible rheologies for mantle convection simulations. We investigate one of the largest and best-constrained Mesozoic slab complexes, the "Farallon" in the transition zone and lower mantle beneath North America. We quantitatively integrate observations from whole-mantle P-wave tomography, global plate reconstructions, and land geological evidence from the North American Cordillera. These three data sets permit us to test the simplest conceivable hypothesis for linking slabs to paleo-trenches: that each parcel of slab sank only vertically shortly after entering the trench That is, we test whether within the limits of tomographic resolution, all slab material lies directly below the location where it subducted beneath its corresponding arc. Crucially and in contrast to previous studies, we do not accept or impose an Andean-style west coast trench (Farallon-beneath-continent subduction) since Jurassic times, as this scenario is inconsistent with many geological observations. Slab geometry alone suggests that trenches started out as intra-oceanic because tomography images massive, linear slab "walls" in the lower mantle, extending almost vertically from about 800 km to 2000+ km depth. Such steep geometries would be expected from slabs sinking vertically beneath trenches that were quasi-stationary over many tens of millions of years. Intra-oceanic trenches west of Mesozoic North America could have been stationary, whereas a coastal Farallon trench could not, because the continent moved westward continuously as the Atlantic opened. Overlap of North American west-coast positions, as reconstructed in a

  9. Subducting Slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, C.; Braun, J.; Husson, L.; Le Carlier de Veslud, C.; Thieulot, C.; Yamato, P.; Grujic, D.

    2010-12-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  10. Subducting slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, Christelle; Braun, Jean; Husson, Laurent; Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian; Thieulot, Cedric; Yamato, Philippe; Grujic, Djordje

    2010-08-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  11. A Two-Dimensional 'Zigzag' Silica Polymorph on a Metal Support.

    PubMed

    Kuhness, David; Yang, Hyun Jin; Klemm, Hagen W; Prieto, Mauricio; Peschel, Gina; Fuhrich, Alexander; Menzel, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Yu, Xin; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Lewandowski, Adrian; Heyde, Markus; Kelemen, Anna; Włodarczyk, Radosław; Usvyat, Denis; Schütz, Martin; Sauer, Joachim; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2018-05-16

    We present a new polymorph of the two-dimensional (2D) silica film with a characteristic 'zigzag' line structure and a rectangular unit cell which forms on a Ru(0001) metal substrate. This new silica polymorph may allow for important insights into growth modes and transformations of 2D silica films as a model system for the study of glass transitions. Based on scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements on the one hand, and density functional theory calculations on the other, a structural model for the 'zigzag' polymorph is proposed. In comparison to established monolayer and bilayer silica, this 'zigzag' structure system has intermediate characteristics in terms of coupling to the substrate and stoichiometry. The silica 'zigzag' phase is transformed upon reoxidation at higher annealing temperature into a SiO 2 silica bilayer film which is chemically decoupled from the substrate.

  12. Patterning monolayer graphene with zigzag edges on hexagonal boron nitride by anisotropic etching

    SciT

    Wang, Guole; Wu, Shuang; Zhang, Tingting

    2016-08-01

    Graphene nanostructures are potential building blocks for nanoelectronic and spintronic devices. However, the production of monolayer graphene nanostructures with well-defined zigzag edges remains a challenge. In this paper, we report the patterning of monolayer graphene nanostructures with zigzag edges on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrates by an anisotropic etching technique. We found that hydrogen plasma etching of monolayer graphene on h-BN is highly anisotropic due to the inert and ultra-flat nature of the h-BN surface, resulting in zigzag edge formation. The as-fabricated zigzag-edged monolayer graphene nanoribbons (Z-GNRs) with widths below 30 nm show high carrier mobility and width-dependent energy gaps atmore » liquid helium temperature. These high quality Z-GNRs are thus ideal structures for exploring their valleytronic or spintronic properties.« less

  13. Analytische Geometrie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemnitz, Arnfried

    Der Grundgedanke der Analytischen Geometrie besteht darin, dass geometrische Untersuchungen mit rechnerischen Mitteln geführt werden. Geometrische Objekte werden dabei durch Gleichungen beschrieben und mit algebraischen Methoden untersucht.

  14. Evidences of a Stalled-slab Beneath the Coast Ranges, California, From Seismicity and Converted Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, A.; Liu, K. H.; Gao, S. S.

    2001-12-01

    In spite of numerous geophysical studies, the existence and geometry of a stalled slab beneath the Coast Ranges remains vague. In this study we use the distribution of mantle earthquakes and P-to-S converted phases from tilt interfaces to address the problem. Based on the CNSS catalog, in the period between 01/1960 and 04/2001, there were about 450 earthquakes occurred at depth larger than 35 km in the vicinity of the Coast Ranges. When plotted along east-west cross-sections, those earthquakes show a clear slab-like image, similar to the upper part of classic Benioff zones along subducting oceanic slabs. One of such cross-sections, which has a width of 20 km and a latitude of 39N, is located in the so-called 'slabless window' suggested by several previous geologic and geophysic studies, implying the existence of a stalled-slab along the cross-section. The mantle earthquakes can be explained as the result of stress concentration caused by heterogeneities in elastic properties associated with the cold slab, and of changes in mineralogical phases in the upper-most mantle in and around the slab. The existence of the slab is supported by clear azimuthal variations of the amplitude and arrival time of P-to-S converted phases from a tilt interface at about 70 km depth recorded by a broadband seismic station in the area. Our analysis shows that the converted phase is probably from a subducted oceanic lithosphere dipping to the east. The strike of the slab is approximately parallel to the Coast Ranges.

  15. Optimization of the nanotwin-induced zigzag surface of copper by electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Ping; Huang, Chun-Wei; Wang, Chun-Wen; Wu, Wen-Wei; Liao, Chien-Neng; Chen, Lih-Juann; Tu, King-Ning

    2016-01-01

    By adding nanotwins to Cu, the surface electromigration (EM) slows down. The atomic mobility of the surface step-edges is retarded by the triple points where a twin meets a free surface to form a zigzag-type surface. We observed that EM can alter the zigzag surface structure to optimize the reduction of EM, according to Le Chatelier's principle. Statistically, the optimal alternation is to change an arbitrary (111)/(hkl) zigzag pair to a pair having a very low index (hkl) plane, especially the (200) plane. Using in situ ultrahigh vacuum and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we examined the effects of different zigzag surfaces on the rate of EM. The calculated rate of surface EM can be decreased by a factor of ten.By adding nanotwins to Cu, the surface electromigration (EM) slows down. The atomic mobility of the surface step-edges is retarded by the triple points where a twin meets a free surface to form a zigzag-type surface. We observed that EM can alter the zigzag surface structure to optimize the reduction of EM, according to Le Chatelier's principle. Statistically, the optimal alternation is to change an arbitrary (111)/(hkl) zigzag pair to a pair having a very low index (hkl) plane, especially the (200) plane. Using in situ ultrahigh vacuum and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we examined the effects of different zigzag surfaces on the rate of EM. The calculated rate of surface EM can be decreased by a factor of ten. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05418d

  16. Slab Penetration vs. Slab Stagnation: Mantle Reflectors as an Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeler, A.; Gu, Y. J.; Schultz, R.; Contenti, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Subducting oceanic lithosphere along convergent margins may stagnate near the base of the upper mantle or penetrate into the lower mantle. These dynamic processes cause extensive thermal and compositional variations, which can be observed in terms of impedance contrast (reflectivity) and topography of mantle transition zone (MTZ) discontinuities, i.e., 410- and 660-km discontinuities. In this study, we utilize ~ 15000 surface-reflected shear waves (SS) and their precursory arrivals (S410S and S660S) to analyze subduction related deformations on mantle reflectivity structure. We apply pre-stack, time-to-depth migration technique to SS precursors, and move weak underside reflections using PREM-predicted travel-time curves. Common Mid-point gathers are formed to investigate structure under the western Pacific, south America, and Mediterranean convergent boundaries. In general, mantle reflectivity structures are consistent with previous seismic tomography models. In regions of slab penetration (e.g., southern Kurile arc, Aegean Sea), our results show 1) a substantial decrease in S660S amplitude, and 2) strong lower mantle reflector(s) at ~ 900 km depth. These reflective structures are supported by zones of high P and S velocities extending into the lower mantle. Our 1-D synthetic simulations suggest that the decreasing S660S amplitudes are, at least partially, associated with shear wave defocusing due to changes in reflector depth (by ±20 km) within averaging bin. Assuming a ~500 km wide averaging area, a dipping reflector with 6-8 % slope can reduce the amplitude of a SS precursor by ~50%. On the other hand, broad depressions with strong impedance contrast at the base of the MTZ characterize the regions of slab stagnation, such as beneath the Tyrrhenian Sea and northeastern China. For the latter region, substantial topography on the 660-km discontinuity west of the Wadati-Benioff zone suggests that the stagnant part of the Pacific plate across Honshu arc is not

  17. Air slab-correction for Γ-ray attenuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh

    2017-12-01

    Gamma (γ)-ray shielding behaviour (GSB) of a material can be ascertained from its linear attenuation coefficient (μ, cm-1). Narrow-beam transmission geometry is required for μ-measurement. In such measurements, a thin slab of the material has to insert between point-isotropic γ-ray source and detector assembly. The accuracy in measurements requires that sample's optical thickness (OT) remain below 0.5 mean free path (mfp). Sometimes it is very difficult to produce thin slab of sample (absorber), on the other hand for thick absorber, i.e. OT >0.5 mfp, the influence of the air displaced by it cannot be ignored during μ-measurements. Thus, for a thick sample, correction factor has been suggested which compensates the air present in the transmission geometry. The correction factor has been named as an air slab-correction (ASC). Six samples of low-Z engineering materials (cement-black, clay, red-mud, lime-stone, cement-white and plaster-of-paris) have been selected for investigating the effect of ASC on μ-measurements at three γ-ray energies (661.66, 1173.24, 1332.50 keV). The measurements have been made using point-isotropic γ-ray sources (Cs-137 and Co-60), NaI(Tl) detector and multi-channel-analyser coupled with a personal computer. Theoretical values of μ have been computed using a GRIC2-toolkit (standardized computer programme). Elemental compositions of the samples were measured with Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) analyser. Inter-comparison of measured and computed μ-values, suggested that the application of ASC helps in precise μ-measurement for thick samples of low-Z materials. Thus, this hitherto widely ignored ASC factor is recommended to use in similar γ-ray measurements.

  18. Ab initio study of gold-doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Dhar, Subhra; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.

    2014-12-01

    The electronic transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) through covalent functionalization of gold (Au) atoms is investigated by using non-equilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. It is revealed that the electronic properties of Au-doped ZGNRs vary significantly due to spin and its non-inclusion. We find that the DOS profiles of Au-adsorbed ZGNR due to spin reveal very less number of states available for conduction, whereas non-inclusion of spin results in higher DOS across the Fermi level. Edge Au-doped ribbons exhibit stable structure and are energetically more favorable than the center Au-doped ZGNRs. Though the chemical interaction at the ZGNR-Au interface modifies the Fermi level, Au-adsorbed ZGNR reveals semimetallic properties. A prominent qualitative change of the I-V curve from linear to nonlinear is observed as the Au atom shifts from center toward the edges of the ribbon. Number of peaks present near the Fermi level ensures conductance channels available for charge transport in case of Au-center-substituted ZGNR. We predict semimetallic nature of the Au-adsorbed ZGNR with a high DOS peak distributed over a narrow energy region at the Fermi level and fewer conductance channels. Our calculations for the magnetic properties predict that Au functionalization leads to semiconducting nature with different band gaps for spin up and spin down. The outcomes are compared with the experimental and theoretical results available for other materials.

  19. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons

    SciT

    Hu, Tao; Hong, Jisang, E-mail: hongj@pknu.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    We investigated the electronic structure and magnetism of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons (ZBPNRs) using first principles density functional theory calculations by changing the widths of ZBPNRs from 1.5 to 5 nm. In addition, the effect of H and O passivation was explored as well. The ZBPNRs displayed intra-edge antiferromagnetic ground state with a semiconducting band gap of ∼0.35 eV; and this was insensitive to the edge structure relaxation effect. However, the edge magnetism of ZBPNRs disappeared with H-passivation. Moreover, the band gap of H-passivated ZBPNRs was greatly enhanced because the calculated band gap was ∼1.77 eV, and this was almost the same asmore » that of two-dimensional blue phosphorene layer. For O-passivated ZBPNRs, we also found an intra-edge antiferromagnetic state. Besides, both unpassivated and O-passivated ZBPNRs preserved almost the same band gap. We predict that the electronic band structure and magnetic properties can be controlled by means of passivation. Moreover, the edge magnetism can be also modulated by the strain. Nonetheless, the intrinsic physical properties are size independent. This feature can be an advantage for device applications because it may not be necessary to precisely control the width of the nanoribbon.« less

  20. A computational NMR study on zigzag aluminum nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodaghi, Ali; Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Seif, Ahmad; Giahi, Masoud

    2008-12-01

    A computational nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study is performed to investigate the electronic structure properties of the single-walled zigzag aluminum nitride nanotubes (AlNNTs). The chemical-shielding (CS) tensors are calculated at the sites of Al-27 and N-15 nuclei in three structural forms of AlNNT including H-saturated, Al-terminated, and N-terminated ones. The structural forms are firstly optimized and then the calculated CS tensors in the optimized structures are converted to chemical-shielding isotropic (CSI) and chemical-shielding anisotropic (CSA) parameters. The calculated parameters reveal that various Al-27 and N-15 nuclei are divided into some layers with equivalent electrostatic properties; furthermore, Al and N can act as Lewis base and acid, respectively. In the Al-terminated and N-terminated forms of AlNNT, in which one mouth of the nanotube is terminated by aluminum and nitrogen nuclei, respectively, just the CS tensors of the nearest nuclei to the mouth of the nanotube are significantly changed due to removal of saturating hydrogen atoms. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed using GAUSSIAN 98 package of program.

  1. Adiabatic quantum pump in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin

    2015-11-01

    The adiabatic electron transport is theoretically studied in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) junction with two time-dependent pumping electric fields. By modeling a ZGNR p-n junction and applying the Keldysh Green’s function method, we find that a pumped charge current is flowing in the device at a zero external bias, which mainly comes from the photon-assisted tunneling process and the valley selection rule in an even-chain ZGNR junction. The pumped charge current and its ON and OFF states can be efficiently modulated by changing the system parameters such as the pumping frequency, the pumping phase difference, and the Fermi level. A ferromagnetic ZGNR device is also studied to generate a pure spin current and a fully polarized spin current due to the combined spin pump effect and the valley valve effect. Our finding might pave the way to manipulate the degree of freedom of electrons in a graphene-based electronic device. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 110704033), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK2010416), and the Natural Science Foundation for Colleges and Universities in Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. 13KJB140005).

  2. Negative differential resistance in oxidized zigzag graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Li, Chang Ming

    2011-01-28

    A theoretical study of zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) with an epoxy-pair chain (ZGO) is performed. The electronic transport properties are mainly evaluated by non-equilibrium Green's functions using the TRANSIESTA package. The results indicate that the graphene oxide can have a negative differential resistance (NDR) phenomenon, supported by bias-dependent transmission curves of different spin orientations. Applying non-zero bias voltages makes the density of states (DOS) of the right electrodes shift down. Due to an energy gap between the LUMO and LUMO+1 in ZGOs, with a certain bias, the conduction band of the right electrode cannot match the LUMO of the scattering region, then NDR occurs. With a larger bias, NDR ends when the second conduction band of the right electrode's DOS covers the LUMO of the scattering region. Since most of proposed ZGO systems possess such a gap between the LUMO and LUMO+1, NDR can be widely observed and this discovery may provide great potential applications in NDR-based nanoelectronics by using modified graphene materials.

  3. Deformation of the Tonga Slab: Evidence for Interaction with a Small-scale Secondary Plume in the Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.; Bikoba, J. Z.; Tarlow, S.

    2015-12-01

    Magali I. Billen and John Z. BikobaThe Tonga Slab is the most seismically active subduction zone providing a uniquely detailed picture of the internal deformation of the slab, with apparent warping and folding, from the surface through the transition zone. Here, we investigate the dynamical origin of a irregular feature in the seismicity within the transition zone located at 21-28oS, using 3D visualization and analysis of the seismicity and compression/tension (P/T) axis from the moment tensor solutions to characterize the geometry of, and the orientation of forces acting on, the slab. This irregular feature can be described as narrow region of upward deflection of the slab, with a gap in seismicity beyond (down-dip of) the deflected region, and flanked by two narrow V-shaped gaps in seismicity suggestive of tearing of the slab. The P/T axis show a dominate down-dip orientation of the P axis above the deflection point, which rotate to a nearly vertical orientation within the central region of the deflected slab. The adjacent attached regions (down-dip of the two flanking slab gaps) also have rotated and more heterogeneous P/T axis orientations. In contrast, the adjacent section of the slab to the north of 21oS has continuous seismicity throughout the transition zone, with a roughly uniform planar shape, and generally down-dip orientation of the P axis. We explore three possible hypothesis for the observed deformation including: 1) deflection due to a buoyant metastable olivine wedge, 2) a buckling feature in the slab as previously proposed by Myhill (GJI., 2013), and interaction with a small-scale, secondary plume upwelling below the slab. If the newly-observed gaps in seismicity indicate physical gaps or significant thinning of the slab, then these observations are not consistent with the buckling hypothesis. The lack of significant along-strike variation in slab age or subduction rate also suggests that a localized region of metastable olivine is unlikely

  4. Exact image theory for the problem of dielectric/magnetic slab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, I. V.

    1987-01-01

    Exact image method, recently introduced for the exact solution of electromagnetic field problems involving homogeneous half spaces and microstrip-like geometries, is developed for the problem of homogeneous slab of dielectric and/or magnetic material in free space. Expressions for image sources, creating the exact reflected and transmitted fields, are given and their numerical evaluation is demonstrated. Nonradiating modes, guided by the slab and responsible for the loss of convergence of the image functions, are considered and extracted. The theory allows, for example, an analysis of finite ground planes in microstrip antenna structures.

  5. Precast concrete replacement slabs for bridge decks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-01-01

    The report illustrates and evaluates the first use in Virginia of precast concrete replacement slabs for bridge decks. It shows that a bridge deck can be replaced with the precast slabs while traffic is maintained in the adjacent traffic lane. The qu...

  6. Effectiveness of zigzag Incision and 1.5-Layer method for frontotemporal craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Noriaki; Kimura, Toshikazu; Kohmura, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Background: In this era of minimally invasive treatment, it is important to make operative scars as inconspicuous as possible, and there is a great deal of room for improvement in daily practice. Zigzag incision with coronal incision has been described mainly in the field of plastic surgery, and its applicability for skin incision in general neurosurgery has not been reported. Methods: Zigzag incision with 1.5-layer method was applied to 14 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysm between April 2011 and August 2012. A questionnaire survey was administered among patients with unruptured aneurysm using SF-36v2 since April 2010. The results were compared between patients with zigzag incision and a previous cohort with traditional incision. Results: There were no cases of complications associated with the operative wound. In the questionnaire survey, all parameters tended to be better in the patients with zigzag incision, and role social component score (RCS) was significantly higher in the zigzag group than in the traditional incision group (P =0.0436). Conclusion: Zigzag incision using the 1.5-layer method with frontotemporal craniotomy seems to represent an improvement over the conventional curvilinear incision with regard to cosmetic outcome and RCS. PMID:24991472

  7. 0-6722 : spread prestressed concrete slab beam bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-08-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation uses : precast prestressed concrete slab beam bridges for : shorter-span bridges of approximately 3050 ft in : length. Conventional slab beam bridges have slab : beams placed immediately adjacent to one anoth...

  8. Slab stagnation and detachment under northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Results of tomography models around the Japanese Islands show the existence of a gap between the horizontally lying (stagnant) slab extending under northeastern China and the fast seismic velocity anomaly in the lower mantle. A simple conversion from the fast velocity anomaly to the low-temperature anomaly shows a similar feature. This feature appears to be inconsistent with the results of numerical simulations on the interaction between the slab and phase transitions with temperature-dependent viscosity. Such numerical models predict a continuous slab throughout the mantle. I extend previous analyses of the tomography model and model calculations to infer the origins of the gap beneath northeastern China. Results of numerical simulations that take the geologic history of the subduction zone into account suggest two possible origins for the gap: (1) the opening of the Japan Sea led to a breaking off of the otherwise continuous subducting slab, or (2) the western edge of the stagnant slab is the previous subducted ridge, which was the plate boundary between the extinct Izanagi and the Pacific plates. Origin (2) suggesting the present horizontally lying slab has accumulated since the ridge subduction, is preferable for explaining the present length of the horizontally lying slab in the upper mantle. Numerical models of origin (1) predict a stagnant slab in the upper mantle that is too short, and a narrow or non-existent gap. Preferred models require rather stronger flow resistance of the 660-km phase change than expected from current estimates of the phase transition property. Future detailed estimates of the amount of the subducted Izanagi plate and the present stagnant slab would be useful to constrain models. A systematic along-arc variation of the slab morphology from the northeast Japan to Kurile arcs is also recognized, and its understanding may constrain the 3D mantle flow there.

  9. Polymer photonic crystal slab waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguda, C.; Böttger, G.; Kuligk, A.; Blum, R.; Eich, M.; Roth, H.; Kunert, J.; Morgenroth, W.; Elsner, H.; Meyer, H. G.

    2001-04-01

    We present details of the fabrication, calculations, and transmission measurements for finite two-dimensional (2D) polymer photonic crystal (PC) slab waveguides, which were fabricated from a benzocyclobutene polymer on a low refractive index substrate from Teflon. A square air hole lattice (500 nm lattice constant, 300 nm hole diameter) was realized by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Polarization and wavelength dependent transmission results show TE-like and TM-like stop gaps at 1.3 μm excitation wavelengths and are in good agreement with the calculated data obtained by 2D and three-dimensional finite difference time domain methods. Transmission was suppressed by 15 dB in the center of the TE-like stop gap for a PC length of ten lattice constants.

  10. Using thermal and compositional modeling to assess the role of water in Alaskan flat slab subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S. E.; Porter, R. C.; Hoisch, T. D.

    2017-12-01

    Although plate tectonic theory is well established in the geosciences, the mechanisms and details of various plate-tectonics related phenomena are not always well understood. In some ( 10%) convergent plate boundaries, subduction of downgoing oceanic plates is characterized by low angle geometries and is termed "flat slab subduction." The mechanism(s) driving this form of subduction are not well understood. The goal of this study is to explore the role that water plays in these flat slab subduction settings. This is important for a better understanding of the behavior of these systems and for assessing volcanic hazards associated with subduction and slab rollback. In southern Alaska, the Pacific Plate is subducting beneath the North American plate at a shallow angle. This low-angle subduction within the region is often attributed to the subduction of the Yakutat block, a terrane accreting to the south-central coast of Alaska. This flat slab region is bounded by the Aleution arc to the west and the strike-slip Queen Charlotte fault to the east. Temperature and compositional models for a 500-km transect across this subduction zone in Alaska were run for ten million years (the length of time that flat slab subduction has been ongoing in Alaska) and allow for interpretation of present-day conditions at depth. This allows for an evaluation of two hypotheses regarding the role of water in flat-slab regions: (1) slab hydration and dehydration help control slab buoyancy which influences whether flat slab subduction will be maintained or ended. (2) slab hydration/dehydration of the overlying lithosphere impacts deformation within the upper plate as water encourages plate deformation. Preliminary results from thermal modeling using Thermod8 show that cooling of the mantle to 500 °C is predicted down to 100 km depth at 10 million years after the onset of low-angle subduction (representing present-day). Results from compositional modeling in Perple_X show the maximum amount

  11. Transport gap engineering by contact geometry in graphene nanoribbons: Experimental and theoretical studies on artificial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmann, Thomas; Franco-Villafañe, John A.; Kuhl, Ulrich; Mortessagne, Fabrice; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    Electron transport in small graphene nanoribbons is studied by microwave emulation experiments and tight-binding calculations. In particular, it is investigated under which conditions a transport gap can be observed. Our experiments provide evidence that armchair ribbons of width 3 m +2 with integer m are metallic and otherwise semiconducting, whereas zigzag ribbons are metallic independent of their width. The contact geometry, defining to which atoms at the ribbon edges the source and drain leads are attached, has strong effects on the transport. If leads are attached only to the inner atoms of zigzag edges, broad transport gaps can be observed in all armchair ribbons as well as in rhomboid-shaped zigzag ribbons. All experimental results agree qualitatively with tight-binding calculations using the nonequilibrium Green's function method.

  12. Dual-mode characteristics of the Buneman instability in a bounded slab plasma

    SciT

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr; Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791

    2015-06-15

    The dual-mode characteristics of the Buneman instability are investigated in a slab plasma, including the geometric effects. The dual symmetric and anti-symmetric dispersion modes of the Buneman instability are obtained by the plasma dielectric function with the spectral reflection conditions for the slab geometry. The result shows that the magnitudes of the growth rate for the symmetric mode are always greater than those for the anti-symmetric mode. It is also found that the geometric effect suppresses the position of the maximum growth rate for the Buneman instability in bounded slab plasmas since the maximum conditions for the symmetric and anti-symmetricmore » modes of the Buneman instability are given by 0.60« less

  13. Detecting lower-mantle slabs beneath Asia and the Aleutians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, L.; Thomas, C.

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the descend of subducted slabs we search for and analyse seismic arrivals that reflected off the surface of the slab. In order to distinguish between such arrivals and other seismic phases, we search for waves that reach a seismic array with a backazimuth deviating from the theoretical backazimuth of the earthquake. Source-receiver combinations are chosen in a way that their great circle paths do not intersect the slab region, hence the direct arrivals can serve as reference. We focus on the North and Northwest Pacific region by using earthquakes from Japan, the Philippines and the Hindu Kush area recorded at North American networks (e.g. USArray, Alaska and Canada). Using seismic array techniques for analysing the data and record information on slowness, backazimuth and traveltime of the observed out-of-plane arrivals we use these measurements to trace the wave back through a 1-D velocity model to its scattering/reflection location. We find a number of out-of-plane reflections. Assuming only single scattering, most out-of-plane signals have to travel as P-to-P phases and only a few as S-to-P phases, due to the length of the seismograms we processed. The located reflection points present a view of the 3-D structures within the mantle. In the upper mantle and the transition zone they correlate well with the edges of fast velocity regions in tomographic images. We also find reflection points in the mid- and lower mantle and their locations generally agree with fast velocities mapped by seismic tomography models suggesting that in the subduction regions we map, slabs enter the lower mantle. To validate our approach, we calculate and process synthetic seismograms for 3-D wave field propagation through a model containing a slab-like heterogeneity. We show, that depending on the source-receiver geometry relative to the reflection plane, it is indeed possible to observe and back-trace out-of-plane signals.

  14. Electronic transport across a junction between armchair graphene nanotube and zigzag nanoribbon. Transmission in an armchair nanotube without a zigzag half-line of dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Basant Lal

    2018-05-01

    Based on the well known nearest-neighbor tight-binding approximation for graphene, an exact expression for the electronic conductance across a zigzag nanoribbon/armchair nanotube junction is presented for non-interacting electrons. The junction results from the removal of a half-row of zigzag dimers in armchair nanotube, or equivalently by partial rolling of zigzag nanoribbon and insertion of a half-row of zigzag dimers in between. From the former point of view, a discrete form of Dirichlet condition is imposed on a zigzag half-line of dimers assuming the vanishing of wave function outside the physical structure. A closed form expression is provided for the reflection and transmission moduli for the outgoing wave modes for each given electronic wave mode incident from either side of the junction. It is demonstrated that such a contact junction between the nanotube and nanoribbon exhibits negligible backscattering, and the transmission has been found to be nearly ballistic. In contrast to the previously reported studies for partially unzipped carbon nanotubes (CNTs), using the same tight binding model, it is found that due to the "defect" there is certain amount of mixing between the electronic wave modes with even and odd reflection symmetries. But the junction remains a perfect valley filter for CNTs at certain energy ranges. Applications aside from the electronic case, include wave propagation in quasi-one-dimensional honeycomb structures of graphene-like constitution. The paper includes several numerical calculations, analytical derivations, and graphical results, which complement the provision of succinct closed form expressions.

  15. Earthquakes and strain in subhorizontal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudzinski, Michael R.; Chen, Wang-Ping

    2005-08-01

    Using an extensive database of fault plane solutions and precise locations of hypocenters, we show that the classic patterns of downdip extension (DDE) or downdip compression (DDC) in subduction zones deteriorate when the dip of the slab is less than about 20°. This result is depth-independent, demonstrated by both intermediate-focus (depths from 70 to 300 km) and deep-focus (depths greater than 300 km) earthquakes. The absence of pattern in seismic strain in subhorizontal slabs also occurs locally over scales of about 10 km, as evident from a detailed analysis of a large (Mw 7.1) earthquake sequence beneath Fiji. Following the paradigm that a uniform strain of DDE/DDC results from sinking of the cold, dense slab as it encounters resistance from the highly viscous mantle at depth, breakdown of DDE/DDC in subhorizontal slabs reflects waning negative buoyancy ("slab pull") in the downdip direction. Our results place a constraint on the magnitude of slab pull that is required to dominate over localized sources of stress and to align seismic strain release in dipping slabs. Under the condition of a vanishing slab pull, eliminating the only obvious source of regional stress, the abundance of earthquakes in subhorizontal slabs indicates that a locally variable source of stress is both necessary and sufficient to sustain the accumulation of elastic strain required to generate intermediate- and deep-focus seismicity. Evidence is growing that the process of seismogenesis under high pressures, including localized sources of stress, is tied to the presence of petrologic anomalies.

  16. Comment on: Diffusion through a slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseler, U. D. J.; Kirk, J. G.

    1997-05-01

    Mahan [J. Math. Phys. 36, 6758 (1995)] has calculated the transmission coefficient and angular distribution of particles which enter a thick slab at normal incidence and which diffuse in the slab with linear anisotropic, non-absorbing, scattering. Using orthogonality relations derived by McCormick and Kuščer [J. Math. Phys. 6, 1939 (1965); 7, 2036 (1966)] for the eigenfunctions of the problem, this calculation is generalized to a boundary condition with particle input at arbitrary angles. It is also shown how to use the orthogonality relations to relax in a simple way the restriction to a thick slab.

  17. Subduction starts by stripping slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Prigent, Cécile; Plunder, Alexis; Yamato, Philippe; Guillot, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to tectonic slices welded beneath most large-scale ophiolites. These slivers of oceanic crust metamorphosed up to granulite facies conditions are interpreted as having formed during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction from heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge towards the top of the subducting plate. Our study reappraises the formation of metamorphic sole through detailed field and petrological work on three classical key sections across the Semail ophiolite (Oman and United Arab Emirates). Geothermobarometry and thermodynamic modelling show that metamorphic soles do not record a continuous temperature gradient, as expected from simple heating by the upper plate or by shear heating and proposed by previous studies. The upper, high-temperature metamorphic sole is subdivided in at least two units, testifying to the stepwise formation, detachment and accretion of successive slices from the downgoing slab to the mylonitic base of the ophiolite. Estimated peak pressure-temperature conditions through the metamorphic sole are, from top to bottom, 850˚C - 1GPa, 725°C - 0.8 GPa and 530°C - 0.5 GPa. These estimates appear constant within each unit but separated by a gap of 100 to 200˚C and 0.2 GPa. Despite being separated by hundreds of kilometres below the Semail ophiolite and having contrasting locations with respect to the ophiolite ridge axis, metamorphic soles show no evidence for significant petrological variations along strike. These constraints allow to refine the tectonic-petrological model for the genesis of metamorphic soles, formed through the stepwise stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust and its sedimentary cover. Metamorphic soles do not so much result from downward heat transfer (ironing effect) but rather from progressive metamorphism during strain localization and cooling of the plate interface. The successive thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole (initially at the

  18. Seismic anisotropy in the Hellenic subduction zone: Effects of slab segmentation and subslab mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    The segmentation and differentiation of subducting slabs have considerable effects on mantle convection and tectonics. The Hellenic subduction zone is a complex convergent margin with strong curvature and fast slab rollback. The upper mantle seismic anisotropy in the region is studied focusing at its western and eastern edges in order to explore the effects of possible slab segmentation on mantle flow and fabrics. Complementary to new SKS shear-wave splitting measurements in regions not adequately sampled so far, the source-side splitting technique is applied to constrain the depth of anisotropy and to densify measurements. In the western Hellenic arc, a trench-normal subslab anisotropy is observed near the trench. In the forearc domain, source-side and SKS measurements reveal a trench-parallel pattern. This indicates subslab trench-parallel mantle flow, associated with return flow due to the fast slab rollback. The passage from continental to oceanic subduction in the western Hellenic zone is illustrated by a forearc transitional anisotropy pattern. This indicates subslab mantle flow parallel to a NE-SW smooth ramp that possibly connects the two subducted slabs. A young tear fault initiated at the Kefalonia Transform Fault is likely not entirely developed, as this trench-parallel anisotropy pattern is observed along the entire western Hellenic subduction system, even following this horizontal offset between the two slabs. At the eastern side of the Hellenic subduction zone, subslab source-side anisotropy measurements show a general trench-normal pattern. These are associated with mantle flow through a possible ongoing tearing of the oceanic lithosphere in the area. Although the exact geometry of this slab tear is relatively unknown, SKS trench-parallel measurements imply that the tear has not reached the surface yet. Further exploration of the Hellenic subduction system is necessary; denser seismic networks should be deployed at both its edges in order to achieve

  19. A GEM readout with radial zigzag strips and linear charge-sharing response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aiwu; Hohlmann, Marcus; Azmoun, Babak; Purschke, Martin L.; Woody, Craig

    2018-04-01

    We study the position sensitivity of radial zigzag strips intended to read out large GEM detectors for tracking at future experiments. Zigzag strips can cover a readout area with fewer strips than regular straight strips while maintaining good spatial resolution. Consequently, they can reduce the number of required electronic channels and related cost for large-area GEM detector systems. A non-linear relation between incident particle position and hit position measured from charge sharing among zigzag strips was observed in a previous study. We significantly reduce this non-linearity by improving the interleaving of adjacent physical zigzag strips. Zigzag readout structures are implemented on PCBs and on a flexible foil and are tested using a 10 cm × 10 cm triple-GEM detector scanned with a strongly collimated X-ray gun on a 2D motorized stage. Angular resolutions of 60-84 μrad are achieved with a 1.37 mrad angular strip pitch at a radius of 784 mm. On a linear scale this corresponds to resolutions below 100 μm.

  20. A GEM readout with radial zigzag strips and linear charge-sharing response

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Aiwu; Hohlmann, Marcus; Azmoun, Babak; ...

    2018-01-10

    Here, we study the position sensitivity of radial zigzag strips intended to read out large GEM detectors for tracking at future experiments. Zigzag strips can cover a readout area with fewer strips than regular straight strips while maintaining good spatial resolution. Consequently, they can reduce the number of required electronic channels and related cost for large-area GEM detector systems. A non-linear relation between incident particle position and hit position measured from charge sharing among zigzag strips was observed in a previous study. We significantly reduce this non-linearity by improving the interleaving of adjacent physical zigzag strips. Zigzag readout structures aremore » implemented on PCBs and on a flexible foil and are tested using a 10 cm × 10 cm triple-GEM detector scanned with a strongly collimated X-ray gun on a 2D motorized stage. Lastly, angular resolutions of 60–84 μrad are achieved with a 1.37 mrad angular strip pitch at a radius of 784 mm. On a linear scale this corresponds to resolutions below 100 μm.« less

  1. Polymer impregnated bridge slabs : interim report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-01-01

    The procedure used for producing precast slabs of polymer impregnated concrete (PIC) and described in this report was generally satisfactory from an operational standpoint. A strength loss of 14%, attributable to the drying step, was observed in PIC ...

  2. Can we approach the gas-liquid critical point using slab simulations of two coexisting phases?

    PubMed

    Goujon, Florent; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2016-09-28

    In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to approach the gas-liquid critical point of the Lennard-Jones fluid by performing simulations in a slab geometry using a cut-off potential. In the slab simulation geometry, it is essential to apply an accurate tail correction to the potential energy, applied during the course of the simulation, to study the properties of states close to the critical point. Using the Janeček slab-based method developed for two-phase Monte Carlo simulations [J. Janec̆ek, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 6264 (2006)], the coexisting densities and surface tension in the critical region are reported as a function of the cutoff distance in the intermolecular potential. The results obtained using slab simulations are compared with those obtained using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of isotropic systems and the finite-size scaling techniques. There is a good agreement between these two approaches. The two-phase simulations can be used in approaching the critical point for temperatures up to 0.97 T C ∗ (T ∗ = 1.26). The critical-point exponents describing the dependence of the density, surface tension, and interfacial thickness on the temperature are calculated near the critical point.

  3. Experimental sensitivity analysis of subsoil-slab behaviour regarding degree of fibre-concrete slab reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubesova, E.; Lahuta, H.; Mohyla, M.; Quang, T. B.; Phi, N. D.

    2018-04-01

    The paper is focused on the sensitivity analysis of behaviour of the subsoil – foundation system as regards the variant properties of fibre-concrete slab resulting into different relative stiffness of the whole cooperating system. The character of slab and its properties are very important for the character of external load transfer, but the character of subsoil cannot be neglected either because it determines the stress-strain behaviour of the all system and consequently the bearing capacity of structure. The sensitivity analysis was carried out based on experimental results, which include both the stress values in soil below the foundation structure and settlements of structure, characterized by different quantity of fibres in it. Flat dynamometers GEOKON were used for the stress measurements below the observed slab, the strains inside slab were registered by tensometers, the settlements were monitored geodetically. The paper is focused on the comparison of soil stresses below the slab for different quantity of fibres in structure. The results obtained from the experimental stand can contribute to more objective knowledge of soil – slab interaction, to the evaluation of real carrying capacity of the slab, to the calibration of corresponding numerical models, to the optimization of quantity of fibres in the slab, and finally, to higher safety and more economical design of slab.

  4. Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, James T.

    2018-07-01

    We develop the properties of Weyl geometry, beginning with a review of the conformal properties of Riemannian spacetimes. Decomposition of the Riemann curvature into trace and traceless parts allows an easy proof that the Weyl curvature tensor is the conformally invariant part of the Riemann curvature, and shows the explicit change in the Ricci and Schouten tensors required to insure conformal invariance. We include a proof of the well-known condition for the existence of a conformal transformation to a Ricci-flat spacetime. We generalize this to a derivation of the condition for the existence of a conformal transformation to a spacetime satisfying the Einstein equation with matter sources. Then, enlarging the symmetry from Poincaré to Weyl, we develop the Cartan structure equations of Weyl geometry, the form of the curvature tensor and its relationship to the Riemann curvature of the corresponding Riemannian geometry. We present a simple theory of Weyl-covariant gravity based on a curvature-linear action, and show that it is conformally equivalent to general relativity. This theory is invariant under local dilatations, but not the full conformal group.

  5. A new security solution to JPEG using hyper-chaotic system and modified zigzag scan coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiao-yong; Bai, Sen; Guo, Yu; Guo, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Though JPEG is an excellent compression standard of images, it does not provide any security performance. Thus, a security solution to JPEG was proposed in Zhang et al. (2014). But there are some flaws in Zhang's scheme and in this paper we propose a new scheme based on discrete hyper-chaotic system and modified zigzag scan coding. By shuffling the identifiers of zigzag scan encoded sequence with hyper-chaotic sequence and accurately encrypting the certain coefficients which have little relationship with the correlation of the plain image in zigzag scan encoded domain, we achieve high compression performance and robust security simultaneously. Meanwhile we present and analyze the flaws in Zhang's scheme through theoretical analysis and experimental verification, and give the comparisons between our scheme and Zhang's. Simulation results verify that our method has better performance in security and efficiency.

  6. Application of the Refined Zigzag Theory to the Modeling of Delaminations in Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groh, Rainer M. J.; Weaver, Paul M.; Tessler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Refined Zigzag Theory is applied to the modeling of delaminations in laminated composites. The commonly used cohesive zone approach is adapted for use within a continuum mechanics model, and then used to predict the onset and propagation of delamination in five cross-ply composite beams. The resin-rich area between individual composite plies is modeled explicitly using thin, discrete layers with isotropic material properties. A damage model is applied to these resin-rich layers to enable tracking of delamination propagation. The displacement jump across the damaged interfacial resin layer is captured using the zigzag function of the Refined Zigzag Theory. The overall model predicts the initiation of delamination to within 8% compared to experimental results and the load drop after propagation is represented accurately.

  7. Seismic anisotropy and slab dynamics from SKS splitting recorded in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, Robert W.; Becker, Thorsten W.; Monsalve, Gaspar

    2014-12-01

    The Nazca, Caribbean, and South America plates meet in northwestern South America where the northern end of the Andean volcanic arc and Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity indicate ongoing subduction. However, the termination of Quaternary volcanism at ~5.5°N and eastward offset in seismicity underneath Colombia suggest the presence of complex slab geometry. To help link geometry to dynamics, we analyze SKS splitting for 38 broadband stations of the Colombian national network. Measurements of fast polarization axes in western Colombia close to the trench show dominantly trench-perpendicular orientations. Orientations measured at stations in the back arc, farther to the east, however, abruptly change to roughly trench parallel anisotropy. This may indicate along-arc mantle flow, possibly related to the suggested "Caldas" slab tear, or a lithospheric signature, but smaller-scale variations in anisotropy remain to be explained. Our observations are atypical globally and challenge our understanding of the complexities of subduction zone seismic anisotropy.

  8. Detonation Propagation in Slabs and Axisymmetric Rate Sticks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romick, Christopher; Aslam, Tariq

    Insensitive high explosives (IHE) have many benefits; however, these IHEs exhibit longer reaction zones than more conventional high explosives (HE). This makes IHEs less ideal explosives and more susceptible to edge effects as well as other performance degradation issues. Thus, there is a resulting reduction in the detonation speed within the explosive. Many HE computational models, e. g. WSD, SURF, CREST, have shock-dependent reaction rates. This dependency places a high value on having an accurate shock speed. In the common practice of shock-capturing, there is ambiguity in the shock-state due to smoothing of the shock-front. Moreover, obtaining an accurate shock speed with shock-capturing becomes prohibitively computationally expensive in multiple dimensions. The use of shock-fitting removes the ambiguity of the shock-state as it is one of the boundaries. As such, the required resolution for a given error in the detonation speed is less than with shock-capturing. This allows for further insight into performance degradation. A two-dimensional shock-fitting scheme has been developed for unconfined slabs and rate sticks of HE. The HE modeling is accomplished by Euler equations utilizing several models with single-step irreversible kinetics in slab and rate stick geometries. Department of Energy - LANL.

  9. Slab-plume interaction beneath the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrebski, Mathias; Allen, Richard M.; Xue, Mei; Hung, Shu-Huei

    2010-07-01

    The Pacific Northwest has undergone complex plate reorganization and intense tectono-volcanic activity to the east during the Cenozoic (last 65 Ma). Here we show new high-resolution tomographic images obtained using shear and compressional data from the ongoing USArray deployment that demonstrate first that there is a continuous, whole-mantle plume beneath the Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) and second, that the subducting Juan de Fuca (JdF) slab is fragmented and even absent beneath Oregon. The analysis of the geometry of our tomographic models suggests that the arrival and emplacement of the large Yellowstone plume had a substantial impact on the nearby Cascadia subduction zone, promoting the tearing and weakening of the JdF slab. This interpretation also explains several intriguing geophysical properties of the Cascadia trench that contrast with most other subduction zones, such as the absence of deep seismicity and the trench-normal fast direction of mantle anisotropy. The DNA velocity models are available for download and slicing at http://dna.berkeley.edu.

  10. Magnonic quantum spin Hall state in the zigzag and stripe phases of the antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki Hoon; Chung, Suk Bum; Park, Kisoo; Park, Je-Geun

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the topological property of magnon bands in the collinear magnetic orders of zigzag and stripe phases for the antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice and identified Berry curvature and symmetry constraints on the magnon band structure. Different symmetries of both zigzag and stripe phases lead to different topological properties, in particular, the magnon bands of the stripe phase being disentangled with a finite Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) term with nonzero spin Chern number. This is corroborated by calculating the spin Nernst effect. Our study establishes the existence of a nontrivial magnon band topology for all observed collinear antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattices in the presence of the DM term.

  11. Pillared graphene on the basis of zigzag carbon nanotubes for adsorption in medicine: mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikova, Anna S.; Mazepa, Margarita M.

    2018-02-01

    In nowadays the nanoscale materials are actively used in medicine, based on the properties of adsorption. One of the main problems of this field of medicine is the increase in specific surface of sorbent. We proposed to use carbon composites consisting of an extended in its directions graphene sheet with attached to it by chemical bonds zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNT). This paper presents the results of a theoretical study of the mechanical properties of graphene based on the CNT zigzag depending on the geometric dimensions of the composite (length and diameter of CNTs).

  12. The electrical and thermal transport properties of hybrid zigzag graphene-BN nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Song; Lu, Wei; Zheng, Guo-Hui; Jia, Yalei; Ke, San-Huang

    2017-06-01

    The electron and phonon transport in hybrid graphene-BN zigzag nanoribbons are investigated by the nonequilibrium Green’s function method combined with density functional theory calculations. A 100% spin-polarized electron transport in a large energy window around the Fermi level is found and this behavior is independent of the ribbon width as long as there contain 3 zigzag carbon chains. The phonon transport calculations show that the ratio of C-chain number to BN-chain number will modify the thermal conductance of the hybrid nanoribbon in a complicated manner.

  13. Analytische Geometrie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemnitz, Arnfried

    Der Grundgedanke der Analytischen Geometrie besteht darin, dass geometrische Untersuchungen mit rechnerischen Mitteln geführt werden. Geometrische Objekte werden dabei durch Gleichungen beschrieben und mit algebraischen Methoden untersucht. Behandelt werden folgende Themen: Koordinatensysteme: Kartesisches Koordinatensystem der Ebene und des Raumes, Polarkoordinatensystem der Ebene, Zusammenhang zwischen kartesischen und Polarkoordinaten; Geraden: Geradengleichungen, Abstände von Geraden; Kreise: Kreisgleichungen, Kreisberechnungen; Kugeln; Kegelschnitte; Ellipsen; Hyperbeln; Parabeln; Anwendungen von Kegelschnitten aus Technik und Mathematik; Vektoren: Definitionen, Addition, Multiplikation, Komponentendarstellung in der Ebene und im Raum, Skalarprodukt, Vektorprodukt. Zu den einzelnen Themenkreisen sind Beispiele aufgeführt. Wichtige Regeln und Gesetze sind durch Umrandung besonders kenntlich gemacht.

  14. Polymer impregnated bridge slabs : interim report, condition of slabs after three years of service life.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-01-01

    The condition of six concrete bridge slabs that had been in service for three years was evaluated. The top 2 in. of the four slabs that had been impregnated to a depth of about 1 in. with a methyl methacrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate m...

  15. Subduction and Slab Advance at Orogen Syntaxes: Predicting Exhumation Rates and Thermochronometric Ages with Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettesheim, Matthias; Ehlers, Todd A.; Whipp, David M.

    2017-04-01

    The change in plate boundary orientation and subducting plate geometry along orogen syntaxes may have major control on the subduction and exhumation dynamics at these locations. Previous work documents that the curvature of subducting plates in 3D at orogen syntaxes forces a buckling and flexural stiffening of the downgoing plate. The geometry of this stiffened plate region, also called indenter, can be observed in various subduction zones around the world (e.g. St. Elias Range, Alaska; Cascadia, USA; Andean syntaxis, South America). The development of a subducting, flexurally stiffened indenter beneath orogen syntaxes influences deformation in the overriding plate and can lead to accelerated and focused rock uplift above its apex. Moreover, the style of deformation in the overriding plate is influenced by the amount of trench or slab advance, which is the amount of overall shortening not accommodated by underthrusting. While many subduction zones exhibit little to no slab advance, the Nazca-South America subduction and especially the early stages of the India-Eurasia collision provide end-member examples. Here, we use a transient, lithospheric-scale, thermomechanical 3D model of an orogen syntaxis to investigate the effects of subducting a flexurally stiffened plate geometry and slab advance on upper plate deformation. A visco-plastic upper-plate rheology is used, along with a buckled, rigid subducting plate. The free surface of the thermomechanical model is coupled to a landscape evolution model that accounts for erosion by fluvial and hillslope processes. The cooling histories of exhumed rocks are used to predict the evolution of low-temperature thermochronometer ages on the surface. With a constant overall shortening for all simulations, the magnitude of slab advance is varied stepwise from no advance, with all shortening accommodated by underthrusting, to full slab advance, i.e. no motion on the megathrust. We show that in models where most shortening is

  16. Shear Wave Velocities in the Pampean Flat Slab Region from Rayleigh Wave Tomography: Implications for Crustal Composition and Upper Mantle Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. C.; Gilbert, H. J.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Warren, L. M.; Calkins, J. A.; Alvarado, P. M.; Anderson, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Pampean flat slab region, located in Chile and western Argentina between 29° and 34° S, is characterized by the subducting Nazca plate assuming a sub-horizontal geometry for ~300 km laterally before resuming a more "normal" angle of subduction. The onset of flat slab subduction is associated with the cessation of regional arc related volcanism and the migration of deformation inboard from the high Andes into the thin-skinned Precordillera and thick-skinned Sierras Pampeanas. Developing a better understanding of this region's geology is of particular importance, as it is an ideal area to study flat slab subduction and serves as a modern analogue to Laramide flat slab subduction in the western US. To study the crustal and mantle structure in the region, we combine ambient noise tomography and ballistic surface wave tomography to produce a regional 3D shear wave velocity model that encompasses flat slab subduction in the north and normal subduction geometry in the south, allowing for a comparison of the two. Results from this work show that shear velocities within the upper crust are largely determined by composition, with sedimentary basins and areas with active volcanism exhibiting slower velocities than basement cored uplifts and other bedrock exposures. Though surface waves are not particularly sensitive to the depth of sharp velocity contrasts, we observe an eastward increase in shear velocity at depth that correlates with an eastward decrease in crustal thickness. In both the slab and overlying mantle, we observe significant variations in shear wave velocity. North of 32° S, where flat slab subduction is occurring, the Nazca plate contains low-velocity zones (LVZs) beneath the high Andes and Precordillera that are not present in the east beneath the Sierras Pampeanas. An opposite transition is observed in the overlying mantle, which changes from fast in the west to slow in the east. Both of these observations are consistent with an initially hydrated slab

  17. Subduction Thermal Regime, Slab Dehydration, and Seismicity Distribution Beneath Hikurangi Based on 3-D Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenaga, Nobuaki; Ji, Yingfeng; Yoshioka, Shoichi; Feng, Deshan

    2018-04-01

    The downdip limit of seismogenic interfaces inferred from the subduction thermal regime by thermal models has been suggested to relate to the faulting instability caused by the brittle failure regime in various plate convergent systems. However, the featured three-dimensional thermal state, especially along the horizontal (trench-parallel) direction of a subducted oceanic plate, remains poorly constrained. To robustly investigate and further map the horizontal (trench-parallel) distribution of the subduction regime and subsequently induced slab dewatering in a descending plate beneath a convergent margin, we construct a regional thermal model that incorporates an up-to-date three-dimensional slab geometry and the MORVEL plate velocity to simulate the plate subduction history in Hikurangi. Our calculations suggest an identified thrust zone featuring remarkable slab dehydration near the Taupo volcanic arc in the North Island distributed in the Kapiti, Manawatu, and Raukumara region. The calculated average subduction-associated slab dehydration of 0.09 to 0.12 wt%/km is greater than the dehydration in other portions of the descending slab and possibly contributes to an along-arc variation in the interplate pore fluid pressure. A large-scale slab dehydration (>0.05 wt%/km) and a high thermal gradient (>4 °C/km) are also identified in the Kapiti, Manawatu, and Raukumara region and are associated with frequent deep slow slip events. An intraslab dehydration that exceeds 0.2 wt%/km beneath Manawatu near the source region of tectonic tremors suggests an unknown relationship in the genesis of slow earthquakes.

  18. Slab stagnation and buckling in the mantle transition zone: Rheology, phase transition, trench migration, and seismic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, Craig; Cizkova, Hana

    2014-05-01

    Subducting slabs may exhibit buckling instabilities and consequent folding behavior in the mantle transition zone for various combinations of dynamical parameters, accompanied by temporal variations in dip angle, plate velocity, and trench retreat. Parameters governing such behavior include both viscous forces (slab and mantle rheology) and buoyancy forces (slab thermal structure and mineral phase relations). 2D numerical experiments show that many parameter sets lead to slab deflection at the base of the transition zone, typically accompanied by quasi-periodic oscillations (consistent with previous scaling analyses) in largely anticorrelated plate and rollback velocities, resulting in undulating stagnant slabs as buckle folds accumulate subhorizontally atop the lower mantle. Slab interactions with mantle phase transitions are important components of this process (Bina and Kawakatsu, 2010; Čížková and Bina, 2013). For terrestrial parameter sets, trench retreat is found to be nearly ubiquitous, and trench advance is quite rare - due to both rheological structure and ridge-push effects (Čížková and Bina, 2013). Recent analyses of global plate motions indicate that significant trench advance is also rare on Earth, being largely restricted to the Izu-Bonin arc (Matthews et al., 2013). Consequently, we explore the conditions necessary for terrestrial trench advance through dynamical models involving the unusual geometry associated with the Philippine Sea region. Detailed images of buckled stagnant slabs are difficult to resolve due to smoothing effects inherent in seismic tomography, but velocity structures computed for compositionally layered slabs, using laboratory data on relevant mineral assemblages, can be spatially low-pass filtered for comparison with tomographic images of corresponding resolution. When applied to P-wave velocity anomalies from stagnant slab material beneath northeast China, model slabs which undulate due to compound buckling fit

  19. Pressure-induced zigzag phosphorus chain and superconductivity in boron monophosphide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Qin, Jiaqian; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Shiliang; Ma, Mingzhen; Luo, Wei; Liu, Riping; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-03-04

    We report on the prediction of the zinc-blende structure BP into a novel C2/m phase from 113 to 208 GPa which possesses zigzag phosphorus chain structure, followed by another P42/mnm structure above 208 GPa above using the particle-swarm search method. Strong electron-phonon coupling λ in compressed BP is found, in particular for C2/m phase with the zigzag phosphorus chain, which has the highest λ (0.56-0.61) value among them, leading to its high superconducting critical temperature Tc (9.4 K-11.5 K), which is comparable with the 4.5 K to 13 K value of black phosphorus phase I (orthorhombic, Cmca). This is the first system in the boron phosphides which shows superconductivity from the present theoretical calculations. Our results show that pressure-induced zigzag phosphorus chain in BP exhibit higher superconducting temperature TC, opening a new route to search and design new superconductor materials with zigzag phosphorus chains.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of silver nanowires with zigzag morphology in N, N-dimethylformamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Zhao, Xiujian; Chen, Yunxia; Feng, Jinyang; Sun, Zhenya

    2007-08-01

    Zigzag silver nanowires with a uniform diameter of 20±5 nm were prepared by reducing silver nitrate (AgNO 3) with N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) and acetylacetone (AcAc) at 373 K for 18 h. X-ray and selected area electron diffraction (XRD and SAED) patterns reveal that the prepared product is made of pure silver with face centered cubic structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations suggest that the amount of silver nanowires is enhanced with increase in reaction time, and the end-to-end assemblies of silver nanorods are observed during the reaction process. After 18 h reaction, silver nanowires with zigzag morphology are obtained. In this paper, a possible growth process of silver nanowires with this interesting shape is described. Silver nanoparticles with small sizes were obtained by reducing Ag + ions with DMF, providing seeds for homogeneous growth of silver nanorods. With the extending reaction time, the synthesized silver nanorods were connected in an end-to-end manner, and the interface between the connections of two nanorods gradually disappeared. The final product shows zigzag morphology with various angles. The angles between two connecting straight parts of zigzag nanowires exhibit an alterable range of 74-151°. These silver nanowires show tremendous potential applications in future nanoscale electronic circuits.

  1. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    Meighan, Hallie E.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  2. How to measure slab-off and reverse slab prism in spectacle lenses.

    PubMed

    Christoff, Alexander; Guyton, David L

    2007-08-01

    It is well known that new spectacle lenses for the correction of anisometropia can induce diplopia with reading. The difference in the powers of the lenses induces a net prismatic effect that can cause double vision through off-center areas of the lenses. This is particularly bothersome when patients try to read, often noting vertical double vision in attempted downgaze, especially through multifocal add segments. This induced prismatic effect can be compensated at one level of downgaze by the use of slab-off or reverse slab prism. Typically the slab-off correction is ground into the stronger minus, or weaker plus lens. Reverse slab is ground into the weaker minus, or stronger plus, lens. Unfortunately, determining the amount of slab-off prism already incorporated into spectacle lenses is nonintuitive and inconvenient. This usually requires the use of a lens clock, which is not widely accessible to many ophthalmology practices. A simple technique, described in the past but poorly known, is illustrated here for quickly measuring slab-off and reverse slab prism prescription lenses in the clinic with a common manual lens meter.

  3. Active isotropic slabs: conditions for amplified reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Liliana I.; Matteo, Claudia L.; Etcheverry, Javier; Duplaá, María Celeste

    2012-12-01

    We analyse in detail the necessary conditions to obtain amplified reflection (AR) in isotropic interfaces when a plane wave propagates from a transparent medium towards an active one. First, we demonstrate analytically that AR is not possible if a single interface is involved. Then, we study the conditions for AR in a very simple configuration: normal incidence on an active slab immersed in transparent media. Finally, we develop an analysis in the complex plane in order to establish a geometrical method that not only describes the behaviour of active slabs but also helps to simplify the calculus.

  4. Extensive decarbonation of continuously hydrated subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, F.; Burton, M. R.; La Spina, G.; Macpherson, C.

    2016-12-01

    CO2 release from subducting slabs is a key element of Earth's carbon cycle, consigning slab carbon either to mantle burial or recycling to the surface through arc volcanism, however, what controls subducted carbon's fate is poorly understood. Fluids mobilized by devolatilization of subducting slabs play a fundamental role in the melting of mantle wedges and in global geochemical cycles [1]. The effect of such fluids on decarbonation in subducting lithologies has been investigated recently [2-5] but mechanisms of carbon transfer from the slab to wedge are poorly understood [2-6]. Several thermodynamic models [2-3], and experimental studies [6] suggest that carbon-bearing phases are stable at sub-arc depths (80-140 km; 2.6-4.5 GPa), implying that this carbon can be subducted to mantle depths of >140 km. This is inconsistent with observations of voluminous CO2 release from arc volcanoes [7-10], located above slabs that are at 2.6-4.5 GPa pressure. Here, we show that continuous hydrated of sediment veneers on subducting slabs by H2O released from oceanic crust and serpentinised mantle lithosphere [11-13], produces extensive slab decarbonation over a narrow, sub-arc pressure range, even for low temperature subduction pathways. This explains the location of CO2-rich volcanism, quantitatively links the sedimentary composition of slab material to the degree of decarbonation and greatly increases estimates for the magnitude of carbon flux through the arc in subduction zones. [1] Hilton, D.R. et al. (2002) Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 47, 319-370. [2] Gorman, P.J. et al. (2006) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 7. [3] Kerrick, D.M. and Connolly, J.A.D. (2001) Nature 411, 293-296. [4] Cook-Kollars, J. et al. (2014) Chem. Geol. 386, 31-48. [5] Collins, N.C. et al. (2015) Chem. Geol. 412, 132-150. [6] Poli, S. et al. (2009) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 278, 350-360. [7] Sano, Y. and Williams, S.N. (1996) Geophys. Res. Lett. 23, 2749-2752. [8] Marty, B. and Tolstikhin, I.N. (1998) Chem. Geol

  5. Enrichment Activities for Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiskin, Zalman

    1983-01-01

    Enrichment activities that teach about geometry as they instruct in geometry are given for some significant topics. The facets of geometry included are tessellations, round robin tournaments, geometric theorems on triangles, and connections between geometry and complex numbers. (MNS)

  6. Numerical simulations of water transport in subduction zone: Influences of serpentinized layer in oceanic slabs on subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, A.; Hikaru, I.; Nakakuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakamura, H.

    2017-12-01

    Water liberated from subducting oceanic slabs can affect the subduction dynamics such as mantle wedge flows and plate motion (e.g., Gerya & Meilick, 2011; Horiuchi & Iwamori, 2016; Nakao et al., 2016). However, how water liberated from the slabs, in particular a hydrated part within the oceanic lithosphere (e.g., Fujie et al., 2013), is transported and affects the subduction dynamics has not been fully understood. In order to clarify the roles of water in subduction dynamics, we conducted 2-D dynamical simulations of water transport and mantle convection without imposing the geometry and velocity of subducting slabs. Using the simulations with various thicknesses (0-20 km) of a partially serpentinized layer (hereafter referred to as "SL") underlaying the altered oceanic basalt crust (AOC) in the subducting oceanic lithosphere, we estimate the subduction rate, back-arc spreading, trench migration, and slab geometry. The simulations show that the plate motion significantly changes depending on the amount of liberated water. When the SL is absent (0 km thick), the AOC mostly dehydrates at shallow depths (< 70 km). In this case, the plate subducts slowly, the trench is stationary, and the slab penetrates the 660-km boundary. If the SL is 7.5 km in thickness, it dehydrates at a greater depth compared to AOC, and more water enters the mantle wedge and the back-arc region. The liberated water reduces the viscosity of mantle wedge, and consequently, the subduction rate increases, the trench migrates seaward, and the slab stagnates on the 660-km. If the SL is 20 km in thickness, the upper SL releases much water into the mantle wedge and the back-arc region, whereas the lower SL does not dehydrate because of water uptake by phase A and phase D. In this case, because buoyancy of the subducting slab increases, the subduction is slow, back-arc spreading is weakened, and the slab penetrates the 660-km. Our results imply that the observed variety of subducting slabs reflects

  7. Behaviour of reinforced concrete slabs with steel fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baarimah, A. O.; Syed Mohsin, S. M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper investigates the potential effect of steel fiber added into reinforced concrete slabs. Four-point bending test is conducted on six slabs to investigate the structural behaviour of the slabs by considering two different parameters; (i) thickness of slab (ii) volume fraction of steel fiber. The experimental work consists of six slabs, in which three slabs are designed in accordance to Eurocode 2 to fulfil shear capacity characteristic, whereas, the other three slabs are designed with 17% less thickness, intended to fail in shear. Both series of slabs are added with steel fiber with a volume fraction of Vf = 0%, Vf = 1% and Vf = 2% in order to study the effect and potential of fiber to compensate the loss in shear capacity. The slab with Vf = 0% steel fiber and no reduction in thickness is taken as the control slab. The experimental result suggests promising improvement of the load carrying capacity (up to 32%) and ductility (up to 87%) as well as delayed in crack propagation for the slabs with Vf = 2%. In addition, it is observed that addition of fibers compensates the reduction in the slab thickness as well as changes the failure mode of the slab from brittle to a more ductile manner.

  8. Modes competition in superradiant emission from an inverted sub-wavelength thick slab of two-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manassah, Jamal T.

    2016-08-01

    Using the expansion in the eigenmodes of 1-D Lienard-Wiechert kernel, the temporal and spectral profiles of the radiation emitted by a fully inverted collection of two-level atoms in a sub-wavelength slab geometry are computed. The initial number of amplifying modes determine the specific regime of radiation. In particular, the temporal profile of the field intensity is oscillatory and the spectral profile is non-Lorentzian with two unequal height peaks in a narrow band centered at the slab thickness value at which the real parts of the lowest order odd and even eigenvalues are equal.

  9. Thermal, Petrologic, and Structural Conditions for the September 2017 M=8.2 and M=7.1 intra-slab earthquakes in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Gao, X.; Rogers, G. C.

    2017-12-01

    The M=8.2 Tehuantepec and M=7.1 Puebla earthquakes of September 2017 are similar to the 1999 Oaxaca (M=7.5, Mexico), 2001 Geiyo (M=6.7, Nankai), and 2001 Nisqually (M=6.8, Cascadia) earthquakes. All these events are normal-faulting events in the 40-60 km depth range within young and warm subducting slabs. They all ruptured the mantle part of the slab. To investigate the thermal and petrologic conditions of these earthquakes, we have developed finite element thermal models in the areas of the two September events. Along the northern transect for the M=7.1 event, where the age of the incoming plate is 13.5 Ma, the slab geometry is well constrained by previous receiver function and earthquake location studies. Two available hypocenter locations of the main shock fall within or at the lower boundary of our model-predicted zone of serpentine (antigorite) stability in the slab mantle. Along the southern transect for the M=8.2 event, where the age of the incoming plate is 25.5 Ma, the slab geometry is less well known, and we have considered two published geometrical models. Several available hypocenter locations of the main shock are within or below the serpentine stability zone, depending on which slab geometry is assumed. Most of the rupture zone is shallower than the hypocenter. The model results support the following hypothesis. The two September earthquakes probably ruptured pre-existing normal faults that extended into the oceanic mantle and had been locally hydrated prior to and during the beginning phase of subduction. The earthquakes may have initiated at the dehydration boundary of antigorite or chlorite, facilitated by elevated pore fluid pressure (dehydration embrittlement). Most of the rupture was in the uppermost mantle part of the slab but may have involved parts of the slab crust. That large intra-slab earthquakes of this type tend to involve mantle rupture has been explained as due to the structural condition caused by warm-slab metamorphism (Wang et al

  10. Reconciling surface plate motions with rapid three-dimensional mantle flow around a slab edge.

    PubMed

    Jadamec, Margarete A; Billen, Magali I

    2010-05-20

    The direction of tectonic plate motion at the Earth's surface and the flow field of the mantle inferred from seismic anisotropy are well correlated globally, suggesting large-scale coupling between the mantle and the surface plates. The fit is typically poor at subduction zones, however, where regional observations of seismic anisotropy suggest that the direction of mantle flow is not parallel to and may be several times faster than plate motions. Here we present three-dimensional numerical models of buoyancy-driven deformation with realistic slab geometry for the Alaska subduction-transform system and use them to determine the origin of this regional decoupling of flow. We find that near a subduction zone edge, mantle flow velocities can have magnitudes of more than ten times the surface plate motions, whereas surface plate velocities are consistent with plate motions and the complex mantle flow field is consistent with observations from seismic anisotropy. The seismic anisotropy observations constrain the shape of the eastern slab edge and require non-Newtonian mantle rheology. The incorporation of the non-Newtonian viscosity results in mantle viscosities of 10(17) to 10(18) Pa s in regions of high strain rate (10(-12) s(-1)), and this low viscosity enables the mantle flow field to decouple partially from the motion of the surface plates. These results imply local rapid transport of geochemical signatures through subduction zones and that the internal deformation of slabs decreases the slab-pull force available to drive subducting plates.

  11. Big mantle wedge, anisotropy, slabs and earthquakes beneath the Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng

    2017-09-01

    The Japan Sea is a part of the western Pacific trench-arc-backarc system and has a complex bathymetry and intense seismic activities in the crust and upper mantle. Local seismic tomography revealed strong lateral heterogeneities in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the eastern margin of the Japan Sea, which was determined using P and S wave arrival times of suboceanic earthquakes relocated precisely with sP depth phases. Ambient-noise tomography revealed a thin crust and a thin lithosphere beneath the Japan Sea and significant low-velocity (low-V) anomalies in the shallow mantle beneath the western and eastern margins of the Japan Sea. Observations with ocean-bottom seismometers and electromagnetometers revealed low-V and high-conductivity anomalies at depths of 200-300 km in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the subducting Pacific slab, and the anomalies are connected with the low-V zone in the normal mantle wedge beneath NE Japan, suggesting that both shallow and deep slab dehydrations occur and contribute to the arc and back-arc magmatism. The Pacific slab has a simple geometry beneath the Japan Sea, and earthquakes occur actively in the slab down to a depth of ∼600 km beneath the NE Asian margin. Teleseismic P and S wave tomography has revealed that the Philippine Sea plate has subducted aseismically down to the mantle transition zone (MTZ, 410-660 km) depths beneath the southern Japan Sea and the Tsushima Strait, and a slab window is revealed within the aseismic Philippine Sea slab. Seismic anisotropy tomography revealed a NW-SE fast-velocity direction in the BMW, which reflects corner flows induced by the fast deep subduction of the Pacific slab. Large deep earthquakes (M > 7.0; depth > 500 km) occur frequently beneath the Japan Sea western margin, which may be related to the formation of the Changbai and Ulleung intraplate volcanoes. A metastable olivine wedge is revealed within the cold core of the Pacific slab at the MTZ depth, which may be related

  12. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  13. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one.

  14. Multiple stationary solutions of an irradiated slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. D.; Feltham, D. L.

    2005-04-01

    A mathematical model describing the heat budget of an irradiated medium is introduced. The one-dimensional form of the equations and boundary conditions are presented and analysed. Heat transport at one face of the slab occurs by absorption (and reflection) of an incoming beam of short-wave radiation with a fraction of this radiation penetrating into the body of the slab, a diffusive heat flux in the slab and a prescribed incoming heat flux term. The other face of the slab is immersed in its own melt and is considered to be a free surface. Here, temperature continuity is prescribed and evolution of the surface is determined by a Stefan condition. These boundary conditions are flexible enough to describe a range of situations such as a laser shining on an opaque medium, or the natural environment of polar sea ice or lake ice. A two-stream radiation model is used which replaces the simple Beer's law of radiation attenuation frequently used for semi-infinite domains. The stationary solutions of the governing equations are sought and it is found that there exists two possible stationary solutions for a given set of boundary conditions and a range of parameter choices. It is found that the existence of two stationary solutions is a direct result of the model of radiation absorption, due to its effect on the albedo of the medium. A linear stability analysis and numerical calculations indicate that where two stationary solutions exist, the solution corresponding to a larger thickness is always stable and the solution corresponding to a smaller thickness is unstable. Numerical simulations reveal that when there are two solutions, if the slab is thinner than the smaller stationary thickness it will melt completely, whereas if the slab is thicker than the smaller stationary thickness it will evolve toward the larger stationary thickness. These results indicate that other mechanisms (e.g. wave-induced agglomeration of crystals) are necessary to grow a slab from zero initial

  15. Development Length for Headed Bars in Slab-Column Joints of RC Slab Bridges

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-12-04

    In accordance with the Caltrans Seismic Design Criteria, the superstructure in a slab bridge should remain essentially elastic and only the pile extensions/columns are permitted to develop inelastic deformations during a seismic event. Hence, the lon...

  16. The FLAME-slab method for electromagnetic wave scattering in aperiodic slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansha, Shampy; Tsukerman, Igor; Chong, Y. D.

    2017-12-01

    The proposed numerical method, "FLAME-slab," solves electromagnetic wave scattering problems for aperiodic slab structures by exploiting short-range regularities in these structures. The computational procedure involves special difference schemes with high accuracy even on coarse grids. These schemes are based on Trefftz approximations, utilizing functions that locally satisfy the governing differential equations, as is done in the Flexible Local Approximation Method (FLAME). Radiation boundary conditions are implemented via Fourier expansions in the air surrounding the slab. When applied to ensembles of slab structures with identical short-range features, such as amorphous or quasicrystalline lattices, the method is significantly more efficient, both in runtime and in memory consumption, than traditional approaches. This efficiency is due to the fact that the Trefftz functions need to be computed only once for the whole ensemble.

  17. Field evaluation of alternative and cost efficient bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    Based on a recent study on cost efficient alternative bridge approach slab (BAS) designs (Thiagarajan et al. 2010) has recommended : three new BAS designs for possible implementation by MoDOT namely a) 20 feet cast-inplace slab with sleeper slab (CIP...

  18. Nonimaging concentrators for diode-pumped slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacovara, Philip; Gleckman, Philip L.; Holman, Robert L.; Winston, Roland

    1991-10-01

    Diode-pumped slab lasers require concentrators for high-average power operation. We detail the properties of diode lasers and slab lasers which set the concentration requirements and the concentrator design methodologies that are used, and describe some concentrator designs used in high-average power slab lasers at Lincoln Laboratory.

  19. Magnetotelluric imaging of the subducting slab in Cascadia with constraints from seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Egbert, G. D.; Kelbert, A.; Humphreys, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from three-dimensional (3D) inversion of long-period magnetotelluric (MT) data from Cascadia, using seismological constraints on plate geometry and back-arc structure, to refine 3D images of electrical resistivity across this subduction zone. For this study we employed the impedances and vertical transfer functions from 144 sites from the EarthScope Transportable Array, along with data from previous higher density MT profiles from Cascadia (EMSLAB, CAFE-MT etc.). Morphological parameters for the subducting Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates (e.g. upper boundary and thickness) were extracted from McCrory et al (2012) and Schmandt and Humphreys (2010) seismological models and used to define a resistive subducting slab structure in 3D. This was then either used as a prior model, or fixed (both resistivity and geometry) during the MT inversion. By imposing constraints on the geometry of the slab (which is otherwise imaged as an amorphous broad resistive zone) we improve recovery and resolution of subduction related conductivity features. The constrained inversions also allowed us to test sensitivity of the MT data to variants on slab geometry, such as the proposed slab "tear" near the Oregon-Washington border suggested by some seismic tomography models, and to explore consistency of the MT data with seismic models, which suggest segmentation of back-arc upwelling. Three zones of substantially reduced resistivity were found, all exhibiting significant along-strike variability. In the forearc, an N-S stripe of high conductivity (10 ohm-m or less) was found just above the plate interface, near the tip of the mantle wedge. This conductive feature is spatially coincident with mapped locations of episodic tremor and slip, and likely represents aqueous fluids associated with slab dehydration. To the east, a second, clearly separated, N-S elongate zone of similarly high conductivity occurs in the mid-lower crust and upper mantle beneath the modern arc, again

  20. Vanishing Thermal Conductance of Carbon Nanotube upon Encapsulation by Zigzag Sulfur Chain.

    PubMed

    Koley, Sayantanu; Sen, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Swapan

    2018-06-07

    We report an unprecedented enhancement of thermoelectric properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube upon encapsulation of a zigzag sulfur chain inside the nanocore. Our calculations on a 70 Å long [5, 5] carbon nanotube reveal that the encapsulation of zigzag sulfur chain will lead to a 10 7 % increase in the thermoelectric figure of merit and concomitant quenching of thermal conductance by 90%. We have noticed that finite transmission gradient at the Fermi level combined with destructive quantum interference at the sulfur sites and structural conformation-dependent scattering-induced damping of phonon transmission are attributed to the dramatic improvement of thermoelectric behavior of this material. This finding indeed will help circumvent the long-standing problem in the fabrication of carbon-nanotube-based ultrafast device.

  1. Study of structural and optical properties of ZnS zigzag nanostructured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahchamani, Seyyed Zabihollah; Rezagholipour Dizaji, Hamid; Ehsani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-11-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) nanostructured thin films of different thicknesses with zigzag shapes have been deposited on glass substrates by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique. Employing a homemade accessory attached to the substrate holder enabled the authors to control the substrate temperature and substrate angle. The prepared samples were subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-VIS. spectroscopy techniques. The structural studies revealed that the film deposited at room temperature crystallized in cubic structure. The FESEM images of the samples confirmed the formation of zigzag nano-columnar shape with mean diameter about 60-80 nm. By using the data obtained from optical studies, the real part of the refractive index (n), the absorption coefficient (α) and the band gap (Eg) of the samples were calculated. The results show that the refractive indices of the prepared films are very sensitive to deposition conditions.

  2. Polypyrrole polyvinylidene difluoride composite stripe and zigzag actuators for use in facial robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Yonas; Priya, Shashank; Ramannair Chenthamarakshan, C.; de Tacconi, Norma R.; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2008-04-01

    Composite stripe and zigzag actuators consisting of a sandwich polypyrrole (PPy)/polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF)/PPy structure were synthesized using potentiodynamic film growth on gold electrodes. The synthesis was done from an aqueous solution containing tetrabutylammonium perchlorate and pyrrole by polymerization at room temperature. The actuator displacement was modeled using finite element simulations. For depositing thin PPy films and thereby minimizing the response time, experimental optimization of the deposition conditions was performed. The number of current-potential (potentiodynamic) growth cycles and the thickness of the deposited PPy film were highly correlated in the initial stages of polymer film growth. The actuation response measurements indicate that the zigzag shaped actuators provide promising properties to develop artificial muscle.

  3. Which nanowire couples better electrically to a metal contact: Armchair or zigzag nanotube?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental question of how chirality affects tile electronic coupling of a nanotube to metal contacts is important for tile application of nanotubes as nanowires. We show that metallic-zigzag nanotubes are superior to armchair nanotubes as nanowires, by modeling the metal-nanotube interface. More specifically, we show that as a function of coupling strength, the total electron transmission of armchair nanotubes increases and tends to be pinned close to unity for a metal with Fermi wave vector close to that of gold. In contrast, the transmission probability of zigzag nanotubes increases to the maximum possible value of two. The origin of these effects lies in the details of the wave function, which is explained.

  4. Enhancement of thermoelectric figure of merit in zigzag graphene nanoribbons with periodic edge vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, D. V.; Sadykova, O. G.; Osipov, V. A.

    2017-06-01

    The influence of periodic edge vacancies and antidot arrays on the thermoelectric properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) are investigated. Using Green’s function method, the tight-binding approximation for the electron Hamiltonian and the 4th nearest neighbor approximation for the phonon dynamical matrix, we calculate the Seebeck coefficient and the thermoelectric figure of merit. It is found that, at a certain periodic arrangement of vacancies on both edges of zigzag nanoribbon, a finite band gap opens and almost twofold degenerate energy levels appear. As a result, a marked increase in the Seebeck coefficient takes place. It is shown that an additional enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit can be achieved by a combination of periodic edge defects with an antidot array.

  5. Zigzagging causility model of EPR correlations and on the interpretation of quantum mechanics

    SciT

    de Beauregard, O.C.

    1988-09-01

    Being formalized inside the S-matrix scheme, the zigzagging causility model of EPR correlations has full Lorentz and CPT invariance. EPR correlations, proper or reversed, and Wheeler's smoky dragon metaphor are respectively pictured in a spacetime or in the momentum-energy space, as V-shaped, anti LAMBDA-shaped, or C-shaped ABC zigzags, with a summation at B over virtual states absolute value B>=*. The reversibility = * implies that causality is CPT-invariant, or arrowless, at the microlevel. Arrowed causality is a macroscopic emergence, corollary to wave retardation and probability increase. Factlike irreversibility states repression, not suppression, of blind statistical retrodiction- that is, of finalmore » cause.« less

  6. A distributed parameter electromechanical model for bimorph piezoelectric energy harvesters based on the refined zigzag theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chung-De

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a distributed parameter electromechanical model for bimorph piezoelectric energy harvesters based on the refined zigzag theory (RZT) is developed. In this model, the zigzag function is incorporated into the axial displacement, and the zigzag distribution of the displacement between the adjacent layers of the bimorph structure can be considered. The governing equations, including three equations of motions and one equation of circuit, are derived using Hamilton’s principle. The natural frequency, its corresponding modal function and the steady state response of the base excitation motion are given in exact forms. The presented results are benchmarked with the finite element method and two beam theories, the first-order shear deformation theory and the classical beam theory. Comparing examples shows that the RZT provides predictions of output voltage and generated power at high accuracy, especially for the case of a soft middle layer. Variation of the parameters, such as the beam thickness, excitation frequencies and the external electrical loads, is investigated and its effects on the performance of the energy harvesters are studied by using the RZT developed in this paper. Based on this refined theory, analysts and engineers can capture more details on the electromechanical behavior of piezoelectric harvesters.

  7. Thermally induced spin-dependent current based on Zigzag Germanene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Danial; Faez, Rahim

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, using first principle calculation and non-equilibrium Green's function, the thermally induced spin current in Hydrogen terminated Zigzag-edge Germanene Nanoribbon (ZGeNR-H) is investigated. In this model, because of the difference between the source and the drain temperature of ZGeNR device, the spin up and spin down currents flow in the opposite direction with two different threshold temperatures (Tth). Hence, a pure spin polarized current which belongs to spin down is obtained. It is shown that, for temperatures above the threshold temperature spin down current increases with the increasing temperature up to 75 K and then decreases. But spin up current rises steadily and in the high temperature we can obtain polarized spin up current. In addition, we show an acceptable spin current around the room temperature for ZGeNR. The transmission peaks in ZGeNR which are closer to the Fermi level rather than Zigzag Graphene Nanoribbon (ZGNRS) which causes ZGeNR to have spin current at higher temperatures. Finally, it is indicated that by tuning the back gate voltage, the spin current can be completely modulated and polarized. Simulation results verify the Zigzag Germanene Nanoribbon as a promising candidate for spin caloritronics devices, which can be applied in future low power consumption technology.

  8. Refinement of Timoshenko Beam Theory for Composite and Sandwich Beams Using Zigzag Kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; DiSciuva, Marco; Gherlone, Marco

    2007-01-01

    A new refined theory for laminated-composite and sandwich beams that contains the kinematics of the Timoshenko Beam Theory as a proper baseline subset is presented. This variationally consistent theory is derived from the virtual work principle and employs a novel piecewise linear zigzag function that provides a more realistic representation of the deformation states of transverse shear flexible beams than other similar theories. This new zigzag function is unique in that it vanishes at the top and bottom bounding surfaces of a beam. The formulation does not enforce continuity of the transverse shear stress across the beam s cross-section, yet is robust. Two major shortcomings that are inherent in the previous zigzag theories, shear-force inconsistency and difficulties in simulating clamped boundary conditions, and that have greatly limited the utility of these previous theories are discussed in detail. An approach that has successfully resolved these shortcomings is presented herein. This new theory can be readily extended to plate and shell structures, and should be useful for obtaining accurate estimates of structural response of laminated composites.

  9. Continental underplating after slab break-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, V.; Allen, M. B.; van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the dynamics of continental collision, and in particular what happens to the subducted continental lithosphere after oceanic slab break-off. We find that in some scenarios the subducting continental lithosphere underthrusts the overriding plate not immediately after it enters the trench, but after oceanic slab break-off. In this case, the continental plate first subducts with a steep angle and then, after the slab breaks off at depth, it rises back towards the surface and flattens below the overriding plate, forming a thick horizontal layer of continental crust that extends for about 200 km beyond the suture. This type of behaviour depends on the width of the oceanic plate marginal to the collision zone: wide oceanic margins promote continental underplating and marginal back-arc basins; narrow margins do not show such underplating unless a far field force is applied. Our models show that, as the subducted continental lithosphere rises, the mantle wedge progressively migrates away from the suture and the continental crust heats up, reaching temperatures >900 °C. This heating might lead to crustal melting, and resultant magmatism. We observe a sharp peak in the overriding plate rock uplift right after the occurrence of slab break-off. Afterwards, during underplating, the maximum rock uplift is smaller, but the affected area is much wider (up to 350 km). These results can be used to explain the dynamics that led to the present-day crustal configuration of the India-Eurasia collision zone and its consequences for the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution.

  10. Impulsively Generated Wave Trains in Coronal Structures. II. Effects of Transverse Structuring on Sausage Waves in Pressurelesss Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Guo, Ming-Zhe; Yu, Hui; Chen, Shao-Xia

    2018-03-01

    Impulsively generated sausage wave trains in coronal structures are important for interpreting a substantial number of observations of quasi-periodic signals with quasi-periods of order seconds. We have previously shown that the Morlet spectra of these wave trains in coronal tubes depend crucially on the dispersive properties of trapped sausage waves, the existence of cutoff axial wavenumbers, and the monotonicity of the dependence of the axial group speed on the axial wavenumber in particular. This study examines the difference a slab geometry may introduce, for which purpose we conduct a comprehensive eigenmode analysis, both analytically and numerically, on trapped sausage modes in coronal slabs with a considerable number of density profiles. For the profile descriptions examined, coronal slabs can trap sausage waves with longer axial wavelengths, and the group speed approaches the internal Alfvén speed more rapidly at large wavenumbers in the cylindrical case. However, common to both geometries, cutoff wavenumbers exist only when the density profile falls sufficiently rapidly at distances far from coronal structures. Likewise, the monotonicity of the group speed curves depends critically on the profile steepness right at the structure axis. Furthermore, the Morlet spectra of the wave trains are shaped by the group speed curves for coronal slabs and tubes alike. Consequently, we conclude that these spectra have the potential for inferring the subresolution density structuring inside coronal structures, although their detection requires an instrumental cadence of better than ∼1 s.

  11. Radiative heat transport during the vertical Bridgman growth of oxide single crystals: slabs versus cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virozub, Alexander; Brandon, Simon

    1998-10-01

    Internal radiative heat transport in oxide crystals during their growth via the vertical Bridgman technique is known to promote severely deflected melt/crystal interface shapes. These highly curved interfaces are likely to encourage unwanted phenomena such as inhomogeneous distribution of impurities in the solidified crystalline material. Past computational analyses of oxide growth systems have mostly been confined to cylindrical geometries. In this letter a two-dimensional finite-element model, describing the growth of slab-shaped oxide crystals via the vertical Bridgman technique, is presented; internal radiative heat transport through the transparent crystalline phase is accounted for in the formulation. Comparison with calculations of cylindrical-shaped crystal growth systems shows a strong dependence of thermal fields and of melt/crystal interface shapes on the crystal geometry. Specifically, the interface position is strongly shifted toward the hot zone and its curvature dramatically increases in slab-shaped systems compared to what is observed in cylindrical geometries. This significant qualitative difference in interface shapes is shown to be linked to large quantitative differences in values of the viewing angle between the hot melt/crystal interface and the cold part of the crucible.

  12. Viscous Dissipation and Criticality of Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Mike; Karato, Shun; Yuen, Dave

    2016-04-01

    Rheology of subducting lithosphere appears to be complicated. In the shallow part, deformation is largely accomodated by brittle failure, whereas at greater depth, at higher confining pressures, ductile creep is expected to control slab strength. The amount of viscous dissipation ΔQ during subduction at greater depth, as constrained by experimental rock mechanics, can be estimated on the basis of a simple bending moment equation [1,2] 2ɛ˙0(z) ∫ +h/2 2 M (z) = h ṡ -h/2 4μ(y,z)y dy , (1) for a complex multi-phase rheology in the mantle transition zone, including the effects of a metastable phase transition as well as the pressure, temperature, grain-size and stress dependency of the relevant creep mechanisms; μ is here the effective viscosity and ɛ˙0(z) is a (reference) strain rate. Numerical analysis shows that the maximum bending moment, Mcrit, that can be sustained by a slab is of the order of 1019 Nm per m according to Mcrit˜=σp ∗h2/4, where σp is the Peierl's stress limit of slab materials and h is the slab thickness. Near Mcrit, the amount of viscous dissipation grows strongly as a consequence of a lattice instability of mantle minerals (dislocation glide in olivine), suggesting that thermo-mechanical instabilities become prone to occur at places where a critical shear-heating rate is exceeded, see figure. This implies that the lithosphere behaves in such cases like a perfectly plastic solid [3]. Recently available detailed data related to deep seismicity [4,5] seems to provide support to our conclusion. It shows, e.g., that thermal shear instabilities, and not transformational faulting, is likely the dominating mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone, in accordance with this suggested "deep criticality" model. These new findings are therefore briefly outlined and possible implications are discussed. References [1] Riedel, M. R., Karato, S., Yuen, D. A. Criticality of Subducting Slabs. University of Minnesota

  13. Extensive decarbonation of continuously hydrated subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Burton, Mike; La Spina, Giuseppe; Macpherson, Colin G.

    2017-04-01

    CO2 release from subducting slabs is a key element of Earth's carbon cycle, consigning slab carbon either to mantle burial or recycling to the surface through arc volcanism, however, what controls subducted carbon's fate is poorly understood. Fluids mobilized by devolatilization of subducting slabs play a fundamental role in the melting of mantle wedges and in global geochemical cycles [1]. The effect of such fluids on decarbonation in subducting lithologies has been investigated recently [2-5], but several thermodynamic models [2-3], and experimental studies [6] suggest that carbon-bearing phases are stable at sub-arc depths (80-140 km; 2.6-4.5 GPa), implying that this carbon can be carried to mantle depths of >140 km. This is inconsistent with observations of voluminous CO2 release from arc volcanoes [7-10], located above slabs that are at 2.6-4.5 GPa pressure. The aim of this study is to re-evaluate the role of metamorphic decarbonation, showing if decarbonation reactions could be feasible at sub-arc depths combined with a continuous hydration scenario. We used the PerpleX software combined with a custom-designed algorithm to simulate a pervasive fluid infiltration characterized by "continuous hydration" combined with a distillation model, in which is possible to remove CO2 when decarbonation occurs, to obtain an open-system scenario. This is performed by repeatedly flushing the sediment with pure H2O at 0.5, 1.0 or 5 wt.% until no further decarbonation occurs. Here we show that continuous hydrated of sediment veneers on subducting slabs by H2O released from oceanic crust and serpentinised mantle lithosphere [11-13], produces extensive slab decarbonation over a narrow, sub-arc pressure range, even for low temperature subduction pathways. This explains the location of CO2-rich volcanism, quantitatively links the sedimentary composition of slab material to the degree of decarbonation and greatly increases estimates for the magnitude of carbon flux through the arc

  14. Multimode Bose-Hubbard model for quantum dipolar gases in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartarius, Florian; Minguzzi, Anna; Morigi, Giovanna

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically consider ultracold polar molecules in a wave guide. The particles are bosons: They experience a periodic potential due to an optical lattice oriented along the wave guide and are polarized by an electric field orthogonal to the guide axis. The array is mechanically unstable by opening the transverse confinement in the direction orthogonal to the polarizing electric field and can undergo a transition to a double-chain (zigzag) structure. For this geometry we derive a multimode generalized Bose-Hubbard model for determining the quantum phases of the gas at the mechanical instability, taking into account the quantum fluctuations in all directions of space. Our model limits the dimension of the numerically relevant Hilbert subspace by means of an appropriate decomposition of the field operator, which is obtained from a field theoretical model of the linear-zigzag instability. We determine the phase diagrams of small systems using exact diagonalization and find that, even for tight transverse confinement, the aspect ratio between the two transverse trap frequencies controls not only the classical but also the quantum properties of the ground state in a nontrivial way. Convergence tests at the linear-zigzag instability demonstrate that our multimode generalized Bose-Hubbard model can catch the essential features of the quantum phases of dipolar gases in confined geometries with a limited computational effort.

  15. Tectonic controls on earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate: slab buoyancy and slab bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are clear variations in maximum earthquake magnitude among Earth's subduction zones. These variations have been studied extensively and attributed to differences in tectonic properties in subduction zones, such as relative plate velocity and subducting plate age [Ruff and Kanamori, 1980]. In addition to maximum earthquake magnitude, the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes also differs among subduction zones, such as the b-value (i.e., the slope of the earthquake size distribution) and the frequency of seismic events. However, the casual relationship between the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes and subduction zone tectonics has been unclear. Here we divide Earth's subduction zones into over 100 study regions following Ide [2013] and estimate b-values and the background seismicity rate—the frequency of seismic events excluding aftershocks—for subduction zones worldwide using the maximum likelihood method [Utsu, 1965; Aki, 1965] and the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model [Ogata, 1988]. We demonstrate that the b-value varies as a function of subducting plate age and trench depth, and that the background seismicity rate is related to the degree of slab bending at the trench. Large earthquakes tend to occur relatively frequently (lower b-values) in shallower subduction zones with younger slabs, and more earthquakes occur in subduction zones with deeper trench and steeper dip angle. These results suggest that slab buoyancy, which depends on subducting plate age, controls the earthquake size distribution, and that intra-slab faults due to slab bending, which increase with the steepness of the slab dip angle, have influence on the frequency of seismic events, because they produce heterogeneity in plate coupling and efficiently inject fluid to elevate pore fluid pressure on the plate interface. This study reveals tectonic factors that control earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate, and these relationships between seismicity and

  16. Recording of interference fringe structure by femtosecond laser pulses in samples of silver-containing porous glass and thick slabs of dichromated gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Olga V.; Dement'ev, Dmitry A.; Chekalin, Sergey V.; Kompanets, V. O.; Matveets, Yu. A.; Serov, Oleg B.; Smolovich, Anatoly M.

    2002-05-01

    The recording geometry and recording media for the method of achromatic wavefront reconstruction are discussed. The femtosecond recording on the thick slabs of dichromated gelatin and the samples of silver-containing porous glass was obtained. The applications of the method to ultrafast laser spectroscopy and to phase conjugation were suggested.

  17. Thermal management in inertial fusion energy slab amplifiers

    SciT

    Sutton, S.B.; Albrecht, G.F.

    As the technology associated with the development of solid-state drivers for inertial fusion energy (IFE) has evolved, increased emphasis has been placed on the development of an efficient approach for managing the waste heat generated in the laser media. This paper addresses the technical issues associated with the gas cooling of large aperture slabs, where the laser beam propagates through the cooling fluid. It is shown that the major consequence of proper thermal management is the introduction of simple wedge, or beam steering, into the system. Achieving proper thermal management requires careful consideration of the geometry, cooling fluid characteristics, coolingmore » flow characteristics, as well as the thermal/mechanical/optical characteristics of the laser media. Particularly important are the effects of cooling rate variation and turbulent scattering on the system optical performance. Helium is shown to have an overwhelming advantage with respect to turbulent scattering losses. To mitigate cooling rate variations, the authors introduce the concept of flow conditioning. Finally, optical path length variations across the aperture are calculated. A comparison of two laser materials (S-FAP and YAG) shows the benefit of a nearly a-thermal material on optical variations in the system.« less

  18. Imaging performance of an isotropic negative dielectric constant slab.

    PubMed

    Shivanand; Liu, Huikan; Webb, Kevin J

    2008-11-01

    The influence of material and thickness on the subwavelength imaging performance of a negative dielectric constant slab is studied. Resonance in the plane-wave transfer function produces a high spatial frequency ripple that could be useful in fabricating periodic structures. A cost function based on the plane-wave transfer function provides a useful metric to evaluate the planar slab lens performance, and using this, the optimal slab dielectric constant can be determined.

  19. An Evaluation of Proposed Mechanisms of Slab Flattening in Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Steven M.; Clayton, Robert W.

    2011-08-01

    Central Mexico is the site of an enigmatic zone of flat subduction. The general geometry of the subducting slab has been known for some time and is characterized by a horizontal zone bounded on either side by two moderately dipping sections. We systematically evaluate proposed hypotheses for shallow subduction in Mexico based on the spatial and temporal evidence, and we find no simple or obvious explanation for the shallow subduction in Mexico. We are unable to locate an oceanic lithosphere impactor, or the conjugate of an impactor, that is most often called upon to explain shallow subduction zones as in South America, Japan, and Laramide deformation in the US. The only bathymetric feature that is of the right age and in the correct position on the conjugate plate is a set of unnamed seamounts that are too small to have a significant effect on the buoyancy of the slab. The only candidate that we cannot dismiss is a change in the dynamics of subduction through a change in wedge viscosity, possibly caused by water brought in by the slab.

  20. Characteristics of the surface plasma wave in a self-gravitating magnetized dusty plasma slab

    SciT

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr; Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588

    2015-11-15

    The dispersion properties of surface dust ion-acoustic waves in a self-gravitating magnetized dusty plasma slab are investigated. The dispersion relation is derived by using the low-frequency magnetized dusty dielectric function and the surface wave dispersion integral for the slab geometry. We find that the self-gravitating effect suppresses the frequency of surface dust ion-acoustic wave for the symmetric mode in the long wavelength regime, whereas it hardly changes the frequency for the anti-symmetric mode. As the slab thickness and the wave number increase, the surface wave frequency slowly decreases for the symmetric mode but increases significantly for the anti-symmetric mode. Themore » influence of external magnetic field is also investigated in the case of symmetric mode. We find that the strength of the magnetic field enhances the frequency of the symmetric-mode of the surface plasma wave. The increase of magnetic field reduces the self-gravitational effect and thus the self-gravitating collapse may be suppressed and the stability of dusty objects in space is enhanced.« less

  1. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOEpatents

    Martin, R.J.

    1985-12-24

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes. 5 figs.

  2. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, Joseph W.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Davidson, James C.; Koo, Jackson C.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  3. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald J.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes.

  4. Stress regime in the Philippine Sea slab beneath Kanto, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Junichi; Hasegawa, Akira; Hirose, Fuyuki

    2011-08-01

    We determine the focal mechanisms of earthquakes within the Philippine Sea slab beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area, and perform stress tensor inversions to investigate the detailed stress field within the slab. The results show a characteristic spatial variation in earthquake-generating stress. Slab stress in northeastern part of the PHS slab is characterized by down-dip tension (DDT), except for the uppermost tip of the seismic portion of the slab where down-dip compression (DDC) stress is dominant. We interpret that DDT is caused by the net slab pull and DDC is attributable to local resistance to subduction at the tip of the slab. In southwestern part of the PHS slab, σ1 and σ3 are generally rotated oblique to the dip of the slab, suggesting that earthquakes occur under stress conditions of neither DDC nor DDT. The rotations in σ1 and σ3 may be related to stress accumulation by the slip deficit along the asperity of the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9).

  5. MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE RUN OUT INCLUDES THE TRAVELING TORCH WHICH CUTS SLABS TO DESIRED LENGTH, AN IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM TO INDICATE HEAT NUMBER AND TRACE IDENTITY OF EVERY SLAB, AND A DEBURRING DEVICE TO SMOOTH SLABS. AT LEFT OF ROLLS IS THE DUMMY BAR. DUMMY BAR IS INSERTED UP THROUGH CONTAINMENT SECTION INTO MOLD PRIOR TO START OF CAST. WHEN STEEL IS INTRODUCED INTO MOLD IT CONNECTS WITH BAR AS CAST BEGINS, AT RUN OUT DUMMY BAR DISCONNECTS AND IS STORED. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  6. MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE RUN OUT INCLUDES THE TRAVELING TORCH WHICH CUTS SLABS TO DESIRED LENGTH, AN IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM TO INDICATE HEAT NUMBER AND TRACE IDENTITY OF EVERY SLAB, AND A DEBURRING DEVICE TO SMOOTH SLABS. AT LEFT OF ROLLS IS THE DUMMY BAR. DUMMY BAR IS INSERTED UP THROUGH CONTAINMENT SECTION INTO MOLD PRIOR TO START OF CAST. WHEN STEEL IS INTRODUCED INTO MOLD IT CONNECTS WITH BAR AS CAST BEGINS, AT RUN OUT DUMMY BAR DISCONNECTS AND IS STORED - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Sub-slab vs. Near-slab Soil Vapor Profiles at a Chlorinated Solvent Site (1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical issue in assessing the vapor intrusion pathway is the distribution and migration of VOCs from the subsurface source to the near surface environment. Of particular importance is the influence of a slab. Therefore, EPA/ORD is funding a research program with the primary...

  8. Slab temperature controls on the Tonga double seismic zone and slab mantle dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Wei, S. Shawn; Wiens, Douglas A.; van Keken, Peter E.; Cai, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Double seismic zones are two-layered distributions of intermediate-depth earthquakes that provide insight into the thermomechanical state of subducting slabs. We present new precise hypocenters of intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Tonga subduction zone obtained using data from local island–based, ocean-bottom, and global seismographs. The results show a downdip compressional upper plane and a downdip tensional lower plane with a separation of about 30 km. The double seismic zone in Tonga extends to a depth of about 300 km, deeper than in any other subduction system. This is due to the lower slab temperatures resulting from faster subduction, as indicated by a global trend toward deeper double seismic zones in colder slabs. In addition, a line of high seismicity in the upper plane is observed at a depth of 160 to 280 km, which shallows southward as the convergence rate decreases. Thermal modeling shows that the earthquakes in this “seismic belt” occur at various pressures but at a nearly constant temperature, highlighting the important role of temperature in triggering intermediate-depth earthquakes. This seismic belt may correspond to regions where the subducting mantle first reaches a temperature of ~500°C, implying that metamorphic dehydration of mantle minerals in the slab provides water to enhance faulting. PMID:28097220

  9. Armchair and zigzag nanoribbons of gold and silver: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents the results from a DFT-based computational study of structural and electronic properties of zigzag and armchair edge shaped nanoribbons of gold and silver in hexagonal phase. The cohesive energy of the considered nanoribbons are found to be more than the corresponding 2D counterpart, thereby, suggesting Au and Ag nanoribbons to be more stable in 1D as compared to 2D. All nanoribbons are found to be metallic with a modulation in quantum ballistic conductance with length and edge type of the nanoribbon. Au nanoribbons are found to have higher conductance than Ag nanoribbon. There is increase in conductance with increase in length of nanoribbon.

  10. Focusing and directional beaming effects of airborne sound through a planar lens with zigzag slits

    SciT

    Tang, Kun; Qiu, Chunyin, E-mail: cyqiu@whu.edu.cn; Lu, Jiuyang

    2015-01-14

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle, we design a planar lens to efficiently realize the interconversion between the point-like sound source and Gaussian beam in ambient air. The lens is constructed by a planar plate perforated elaborately with a nonuniform array of zigzag slits, where the slit exits act as subwavelength-sized secondary sources carrying desired sound responses. The experiments operated at audible regime agree well with the theoretical predictions. This compact device could be useful in daily life applications, such as for medical and detection purposes.

  11. Oxygen vacancy effect on dielectric and hysteretic properties of zigzag ferroelectric iron dioxide nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zriouel, S.; Taychour, B.; Yahyaoui, F. El; Drissi, L. B.

    2017-07-01

    Zigzag FeO2 nanoribbon defected by the removal of oxygen atoms is simulated using Monte Carlo simulations. All possible arrangements of positions and number of oxygen vacancy are investigated. Temperature dependence of polarization, dielectric susceptibility, internal energy, specific heat and dielectric hysteresis loops are all studied. Results show the presence of second order phase transition and Q - type behavior. Dielectric properties dependence on ribbon's edge, positions and number of oxygen vacancy are discussed in detail. Moreover, single and square hysteresis loops are observed whatever the number of oxygen vacancy in the system.

  12. Effect of edge defects on band structure of zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Payal; Kumar, Shailesh; Dhilip Kumar, T. J.; Shukla, Alok; Kumar, Rakesh

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we report band structure studies of zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) on introducing defects (sp3 hybridized carbon atoms) in different concentrations at edges by varying the ratio of sp3 to sp2 hybridized carbon atoms. On the basis of theoretical analyses, bandgap values of ZGNRs are found to be strongly dependent on the relative arrangement of sp3 to sp2 hybridized carbon atoms at the edges for a defect concentration; so the findings would greatly help in understanding the bandgap of nanoribbons for their electronic applications.

  13. Deep earthquakes beneath the Fiji Basin, SW Pacific: Earth's most intense deep seismicity in stagnant slabs

    Okal, E.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that many of the deep earthquakes beneath the Fiji Basin occur in slab material that has been detached and foundered to the bottom of the transition zone or has been laid down by trench migration in a similar recumbent position. Since nowhere else in the Earth do so many earthquakes occur in slabs stagnated in the transition zone, these earthquakes merit closer study. Accordingly, we have assembled from historical and modern data a comprehensive catalogue of the relocated hypocenters and focal mechanisms of well-located deep events in the geographic area between the bottoms of the main Vanuatu and Tonga Wadati-Benioff zones. Two regions of deep seismogenesis are recognized there: (i) 163 deep shocks have occurred north of 15??S in the Vityaz Group from 1949 to 1996. These seismological observations and the absence of other features characteristic of active subduction suggest that the Vityaz group represents deep failure in a detached slab that has foundered to a horizontal orientation near the bottom of the transition zone. (ii) Another group of nearly 50 'outboard' deep shocks occur between about 450 and 660 km depth, west of the complexly buckled and offset western edge of the Tonga Wadati-Benioff zone. Their geometry is in the form of two or possibly three small-circle arcs that roughly parallel the inferred motion of Tonga trench migration. Earthquakes in the southernmost of these arcs occur in a recumbent high-seismic-wavespeed slab anomaly that connects both to the main inclined Tonga anomaly to the east and a lower mantle anomaly to the west [Van der Hilst, R., 1995. Complex morphology of subducted lithosphere in the mantle beneath the Tonga trench. Nature, Vol. 374, pp. 154-157.]. Both groups show complexity in their focal mechanisms. The major question raised by these observations is the cause of this apparent temporary arrest in the descent of the Tonga slab into the lower mantle. We approach these questions by considering the

  14. Lithospheric Structure and Shape of Subducting Nazca Plate in the Pampean Flat Slab Region of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkimer, L.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Alvarado, P. M.; Anderson, M. L.; Gilbert, H. J.; Zhang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Juan Fernandez Ridge offshore (~100 km), and together with the shape of the slab contours may reflect the response of the geometry of the slab to the southward migration of the buoyant ridge. The non-uniform spatial distribution of the slab seismicity may reflect the variability in the hydration state of the subducting Nazca Plate with greater release of water from the subducted ridge region.

  15. Shape of Subducting Nazca Plate and Lithospheric Structure in the Pampean Flat Slab Region of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkimer, L.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Alvarado, P. M.; Anderson, M. L.; Gilbert, H. J.; Zhang, H.

    2013-05-01

    Juan Fernandez Ridge offshore (~100 km), and together with the shape of the slab contours may reflect the response of the geometry of the slab to the southward migration of the buoyant ridge. The non-uniform spatial distribution of the slab seismicity may reflect the variability in the hydration state of the subducting Nazca Plate with greater release of water from the subducted ridge region.

  16. Learning Geometry through Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsythe, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates effective teaching and learning of geometrical concepts using dynamic geometry software (DGS). Based from her students' reactions to her project, the author found that her students' understanding of the concepts was better than if they had learned geometry through paper-based tasks. However, mixing computer…

  17. Magneto-acoustic Waves in a Magnetic Slab Embedded in an Asymmetric Magnetic Environment: The Effects of Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsámberger, Noémi Kinga; Allcock, Matthew; Erdélyi, Róbert

    2018-02-01

    Modeling the behavior of magnetohydrodynamic waves in a range of magnetic geometries mimicking solar atmospheric waveguides, from photospheric flux tubes to coronal loops, can offer a valuable contribution to the field of solar magneto-seismology. The present study uses an analytical approach to derive the dispersion relation for magneto-acoustic waves in a magnetic slab of homogeneous plasma enclosed on its two sides by semi-infinite plasma of different densities, temperatures, and magnetic field strengths, providing an asymmetric plasma environment. This is a step further in the generalization of the classic magnetic slab model, which is symmetric about the slab, was developed by Roberts, and is an extension of the work by Allcock & Erdélyi where a magnetic slab is sandwiched in an asymmetric nonmagnetic plasma environment. In contrast to the symmetric case, the dispersion relation governing the asymmetric slab cannot be factorized into separate sausage and kink eigenmodes. The solutions obtained resemble these well-known modes; however, their properties are now mixed. Therefore we call these modes quasi-sausage and quasi-kink modes. If conditions on the two sides of the slab do not differ strongly, then a factorization of the dispersion relation can be achieved for the further analytic study of various limiting cases representing a solar environment. In the current paper, we examine the incompressible limit in detail and demonstrate its possible application to photospheric magnetic bright points. After the introduction of a mechanical analogy, we reveal a relationship between the external plasma and magnetic parameters, which allows for the existence of quasi-symmetric modes.

  18. P-wave tomography of the western United States: Insight into the Yellowstone hotspot and the Juan de Fuca slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, You; Zhao, Dapeng

    2012-06-01

    We used 190,947 high-quality P-wave arrival times from 8421 local earthquakes and 1,098,022 precise travel-time residuals from 6470 teleseismic events recorded by the EarthScope/USArray transportable array to determine a detailed three-dimensional P-wave velocity model of the crust and mantle down to 1000 km depth under the western United States (US). Our tomography revealed strong heterogeneities in the crust and upper mantle under the western US. Prominent high-velocity anomalies are imaged beneath Idaho Batholith, central Colorado Plateau, Cascadian subduction zone, stable North American Craton, Transverse Ranges, and Southern Sierra Nevada. Prominent low-velocity anomalies are imaged at depths of 0-200 km beneath Snake River Plain, which may represent a small-scale convection beneath the western US. The low-velocity structure deviates variably from a narrow vertical plume conduit extending down to ˜1000 km depth, suggesting that the Yellowstone hotspot may have a lower-mantle origin. The Juan de Fuca slab is imaged as a dipping high-velocity anomaly under the western US. The slab geometry and its subducted depth vary in the north-south direction. In the southern parts the slab may have subducted down to >600 km depth. A "slab hole" is revealed beneath Oregon, which shows up as a low-velocity anomaly at depths of ˜100 to 300 km. The formation of the slab hole may be related to the Newberry magmatism. The removal of flat subducted Farallon slab may have triggered the vigorous magmatism in the Basin and Range and southern part of Rocky Mountains and also resulted in the uplift of the Colorado Plateau and Rocky Mountains.

  19. Plate deformation at depth under northern California: Slab gap or stretched slab?

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Shimizu, N.; Molzer, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    Plate kinematic interpretations for northern California predict a gap in the underlying subducted slab caused by the northward migration of the Pacific-North America-Juan de Fuca triple junction. However, large-scale decompression melting and asthenospheric upwelling to the base of the overlying plate within the postulated gap are not supported by geophysical and geochemical observations. We suggest a model for the interaction between the three plates which is compatible with the observations. In this 'slab stretch' model the Juan de Fuca plate under coastal northern California deforms by stretching and thinning to fill the geometrical gap formed in the wake of the northward migrating Mendocino triple junction. The stretching is in response to boundary forces acting on the plate. The thinning results in an elevated geothermal gradient, which may be roughly equivalent to a 4 Ma oceanic lithosphere, still much cooler than that inferred by the slab gap model. We show that reequilibration of this geothermal gradient under 20-30 km thick overlying plate can explain the minor Neogene volcanic activity, its chemical composition, and the heat flow. In contrast to northern California, geochemical and geophysical consequences of a 'true' slab gap can be observed in the California Inner Continental Borderland offshore Los Angeles, where local asthenospheric upwelling probably took place during the Miocene as a result of horizontal extension and rotation of the overlying plate. The elevated heat flow in central California can be explained by thermal reequilibration of the stalled Monterey microplate under the Coast Ranges, rather than by a slab gap or viscous shear heating in the mantle.

  20. Putting the slab back: First steps of creating a synthetic seismic section of subducted lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zertani, S.; John, T.; Tilmann, F. J.; Leiss, B.; Labrousse, L.; Andersen, T. B.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging subducted lithosphere is a difficult task which is usually tackled with geophysical methods. To date, the most promising method is receiver function imaging (RF), which concentrates on first order conversions from p- to s-waves at boundaries (e.g. lithological and structural) with contrasting seismic velocities. The resolution is high for the upper parts of the subducting material. However, in greater depths (40-80 km) the visualization of the subducted slab becomes increasingly blurry, until the slab cannot be distinguished from Earth's mantle anymore, rendering a visualization impossible. This blurry zone is thought to occur due to advancing eclogitization of the subducting slab. However, it is not well understood how micro- to macro-scale structures related to progressive eclogitization affect RF signals. The island of Holsnoy in the Bergen Arcs of western Norway represents a partially eclogitized formerly subducted block of lower crust and serves as an analogue to the aforementioned blurry zone in RF images. This eclogitization can be observed in static fluid induced eclogitization patches or fingers, but is mainly present in localized shear zones of variable sizes (mm to 100s of meters). We mapped the area to gain a better understanding of the geometries of such shear zones, which could possibly function as seismic reflectors. Further, we calculated seismic velocities from thermodynamic modelling on the basis of XRF whole rock analysis and compared these results to velocities calculated from a combination of thin section information, EMPA and physical mineral properties (Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging). Both methods yield consistent results for p- and s-wave velocities of eclogites and granulites from Holsnoy. In combination with X-ray measurements to identify the microtextures of the characteristic samples to incorporate seismic anisotropy caused by e.g. foliation or lineation, these seismic velocities are used as an input for seismic models to

  1. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciT

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M., E-mail: cliddell@ccmr.cornell.edu

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd,more » even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.« less

  2. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, François; Douté, Sylvain; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze massive hyperspectral data by a Bayesian approach. We designed it for planetary surface ice studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are assumed to be close to spherical and constituted of any type of material other than the ice matrix. It can be any other type of ice, mineral, or even bubbles defined by their optical constants. We assume a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and thus is suitable for high-resolution hyperspectral data analysis.

  3. Drift Wave Simulation in Toroidal Geometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, Maurice Joseph, III

    1988-12-01

    The drift wave, a general category of plasma behavior arising from a plasma inhomogeneity, is studied using the particle simulation method. In slab geometry, the drift wave (or universal mode) is stabilized by any finite amount of magnetic shear. In toroidal geometry, however, the coupling of the poloidal harmonics gives rise to a new branch of drift wave eigenmodes called the toroidicity -induced mode, which is predicted to be unstable in some regimes. The drift wave in a toroidal system is intrinsically three-dimensional, and is sensitive to the handling of the parallel electron dynamics, the (nearly) perpendicular wave dynamics, and the radial variation of magnetic field vector (shear). A simulation study must therefore be kinetic in nature, motivating the extension of particle simulation techniques to complex geometries. From this effort a three dimensional particle code in a toroidal coordinate system has been developed and applied to the toroidal drift wave problem. The code uses an (r,theta,phi) -type coordinate system, and a nonuniform radial grid that increases resolution near the mode-rational surfaces. Full ion dynamics and electron guiding center dynamics are employed. Further, the algorithm incorporates a straightforward limiting process to cylindrical geometry and slab geometry, enabling comparison to the theoretical results in these regimes. Simulations of the density-driven modes in toroidal geometry retain a single toroidal mode number (n = 9). In this regime, the poloidal harmonics are expected to be strongly coupled, giving rise to the marginally unstable toroidicity-induced drift mode. Analysis of the simulation data reveals a strong, low-frequency response that peaks near each mode rational surface. Further, the characteristic oscillation frequencies persist from one mode rational surface to the next, which identifies them as multiple harmonics of the toroidicity-induced mode. The lowest harmonic occurs at a frequency of omega/ omega^{*} ~ 0

  4. Benchmark study for charge deposition by high energy electrons in thick slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, I.

    2002-01-01

    The charge deposition profiles created when highenergy (1, 10, and 100 MeV) electrons impinge ona thick slab of elemental aluminum, copper, andtungsten are presented in this paper. The chargedeposition profiles were computed using existing representative Monte Carlo codes: TIGER3.0 (1D module of ITS3.0) and MCNP version 4B. The results showed that TIGER3.0 and MCNP4B agree very well (within 20% of each other) in the majority of the problem geometry. The TIGER results were considered to be accurate based on previous studies. Thus, it was demonstrated that MCNP, with its powerful geometry capability and flexible source and tally options, could be used in calculations of electron charging in high energy electron-rich space radiation environments.

  5. Formation of Stone-Wales edge: Multistep reconstruction and growth mechanisms of zigzag nanographene.

    PubMed

    Dang, Jing-Shuang; Wang, Wei-Wei; Zheng, Jia-Jia; Nagase, Shigeru; Zhao, Xiang

    2017-10-05

    Although the existence of Stone-Wales (5-7) defect at graphene edge has been clarified experimentally, theoretical study on the formation mechanism is still imperfect. In particular, the regioselectivity of multistep reactions at edge (self-reconstruction and growth with foreign carbon feedstock) is essential to understand the kinetic behavior of reactive boundaries but investigations are still lacking. Herein, by using finite-sized models, multistep reconstructions and carbon dimer additions of a bared zigzag edge are introduced using density functional theory calculations. The zigzag to 5-7 transformation is proved as a site-selective process to generate alternating 5-7 pairs sequentially and the first step with largest barrier is suggested as the rate-determining step. Conversely, successive C 2 insertions on the active edge are calculated to elucidate the formation of 5-7 edge during graphene growth. A metastable intermediate with a triple sequentially fused pentagon fragment is proved as the key structure for 5-7 edge formation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Geometric effects on mixing performance in a novel passive micromixer with trapezoidal-zigzag channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le The, Hai; Ta, Bao Quoc; Le Thanh, Hoa; Dong, Tao; Nguyen Thoi, Trung; Karlsen, Frank

    2015-09-01

    A novel passive micromixer, called a trapezoidal-zigzag micromixer (TZM), is reported. A TZM is composed of trapezoidal channels in a zigzag and split-recombine arrangement that enables multiple mixing mechanisms, including splitting-recombining, twisting, transversal flows, vortices, and chaotic advection. The effects of geometric parameters of the TZM on mixing performance are systematically investigated by the Taguchi method and numerical simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics. The number of mixing units, the slope angle of the trapezoidal channel, the height of the constriction element, and the width ratio between the middle-trapezoidal channel and the side-trapezoidal channel are the four parameters under study. The mixing performance of the TZM is investigated at three different Reynolds number (Re) values of 0.5, 5, and 50. The results showed that a TZM with six mixing units, a trapezoidal slope angle of 75°, a constricting height of 100 µm, and a width ratio of 0.5 has the highest mixing efficiency. This optimal TZM has a mixing efficiency greater than 85% for Re values from 0.1 to 80. In particular, for Re  ⩽  0.9 and Re  ⩾  20, the mixing efficiency of the optimal TZM is greater than 90%. The proposed TZM has a higher mixing efficiency and a smaller footprint than previously reported micromixers.

  7. Soliton Analysis in Complex Molecular Systems: A Zig-Zag Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, P. L.; Savin, A. V.; Zolotaryuk, A. V.

    1997-06-01

    A simple numerical method for seeking solitary wavesolutions of a permanent profile in molecular systems of big complexity is presented. The method is essentially based on the minimization of a finite-dimensional function which is chosen under an appropriate discretization of time derivatives in equations of motion. In the present paper, it is applied to a zig-zag chain backbone of coupled particles, each of which has twodegrees of freedom (longitudinal and transverse). Both topological and nontopological soliton solutions are treated for this chain when it is (i) subjected to a two-dimensional periodic substrate potential or (ii) considered as an isolated object, respectively. In the first case, which may be considered as a zig-zag generalization of the Frenkel-Kontorova chain model, two types of kink solutions with different topological charges, describing vacancies of one or two atoms (I- or II-kinks) and defects with excess one or two atoms in the chain (I- or II-antikinks), have been found. The second case (isolated chain) is a generalization of the well-known Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain model, which takes into account transverse degrees of freedom of the chain molecules. Two types of stable nontopological soliton solutions which describe either (i) a supersonic solitary wave of longitudinal stretching accompanied by transverse slendering or (ii) supersonic pulses of longitudinal compression propagating together with localized transverse thickening (bulge) have been obtained.

  8. Quantum phase transitions in effective spin-ladder models for graphene zigzag nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, Cornelie; Wessel, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    We examine the magnetic correlations in quantum spin models that were derived recently as effective low-energy theories for electronic correlation effects on the edge states of graphene nanoribbons. For this purpose, we employ quantum Monte Carlo simulations to access the large-distance properties, accounting for quantum fluctuations beyond mean-field-theory approaches to edge magnetism. For certain chiral nanoribbons, antiferromagnetic interedge couplings were previously found to induce a gapped quantum disordered ground state of the effective spin model. We find that the extended nature of the intraedge couplings in the effective spin model for zigzag nanoribbons leads to a quantum phase transition at a large, finite value of the interedge coupling. This quantum critical point separates the quantum disordered region from a gapless phase of stable edge magnetism at weak intraedge coupling, which includes the ground states of spin-ladder models for wide zigzag nanoribbons. To study the quantum critical behavior, the effective spin model can be related to a model of two antiferromagnetically coupled Haldane-Shastry spin-half chains with long-ranged ferromagnetic intrachain couplings. The results for the critical exponents are compared also to several recent renormalization-group calculations for related long-ranged interacting quantum systems.

  9. Optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes in axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated the effect of axial magnetic field on the band structure, dipole matrix elements and absorption spectrum in different energy ranges, using tight binding approximation. It is found that magnetic field breaks the degeneracy in the band structure and creates new allowed transitions in the dipole matrix which leads to creation of new peaks in the absorption spectrum. It is found that, unlike to CNTs which show metallic-semiconductor transition, the BNNTs remain semiconductor in any magnetic field strength. By calculation the diameter dependence of peak positions, we found that the positions of three first peaks in the lower energy region (E <5.3 eV) are proportional to n-2. In the middle energy region (7 < E < 7.5 eV) all (n, 0) zigzag BNNTs, with even and odd nanotube index, have two distinct peaks in the absence of magnetic field which these peaks may be used to identify zigzag BNNTs from other tube chiralities. For odd (even) tubes, in the middle energy region, applying the magnetic field leads to splitting of these two peaks into three (five) distinct peaks.

  10. Spin density waves predicted in zigzag puckered phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene nanoribbons

    SciT

    Wu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Xianlong

    2016-04-15

    The pursuit of controlled magnetism in semiconductors has been a persisting goal in condensed matter physics. Recently, Vene (phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene) has been predicted as a new class of 2D-semiconductor with suitable band gap and high carrier mobility. In this work, we investigate the edge magnetism in zigzag puckered Vene nanoribbons (ZVNRs) based on the density functional theory. The band structures of ZVNRs show half-filled bands crossing the Fermi level at the midpoint of reciprocal lattice vectors, indicating a strong Peierls instability. To remove this instability, we consider two different mechanisms, namely, spin density wave (SDW) caused by electron-electronmore » interaction and charge density wave (CDW) caused by electron-phonon coupling. We have found that an antiferromagnetic Mott-insulating state defined by SDW is the ground state of ZVNRs. In particular, SDW in ZVNRs displays several surprising characteristics:1) comparing with other nanoribbon systems, their magnetic moments are antiparallelly arranged at each zigzag edge and almost independent on the width of nanoribbons; 2) comparing with other SDW systems, its magnetic moments and band gap of SDW are unexpectedly large, indicating a higher SDW transition temperature in ZVNRs; 3) SDW can be effectively modified by strains and charge doping, which indicates that ZVNRs have bright prospects in nanoelectronic device.« less

  11. Spinorial Geometry and Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloane, Peter

    2007-09-01

    We adapt the spinorial geometry method introduced in [J. Gillard, U. Gran and G. Papadopoulos, "The spinorial geometry of supersymmetric backgrounds," Class. Quant. Grav. 22 (2005) 1033 [ arXiv:hep-th/0410155

  12. Manipulation of enhanced absorption with tilted hexagonal boron nitride slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohu; Fu, Ceji

    2018-04-01

    The wavevector of electromagnetic wave propagation in a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) slab can be controlled by tilting its optical axis. This property can be used to manipulate the absorption in a hBN slab. By carefully analyzing the dependence of the absorptivity of a thin hBN slab on the tilted angle of its optical axis, we propose a structure that can realize great absorptivity enhancement in a band by stacking hBN slabs of different tilted angles. Our numerical results show that the absorptivity of a structure made of 91 stacked hBN slabs can be achieved higher than 0.94 in the wavenumber range from 1367 to 1580 cm-1 when the tilted angles of the slabs are properly arranged. The strong absorption is attributed to the combination of impedance matching at the slab interfaces and enlarged wavevectors in the slabs. This work reveals a novel way to realize strong absorption with anisotropic materials for applications in areas such as thermal radiative energy harvesting and conversion.

  13. Polymer-impregnated bridge slabs : performance over 10 years.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the performance over a 10-year period of slabs that were impregnated to a depth of about 1 in with a monomer that was subsequently polymerized (shallow polymer impregnation). The slabs were used...

  14. Precast alternative for flat slab bridges : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-10-26

    The cast-in-place (CIP) concrete slab bridge and the hollow core flat slab bridge are two very common bridge types utilized by the : South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT). The CIP bridge is durable but has a long construction time while...

  15. 42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. THE MOLD, WHICH HAS A RAISED DESIGN, LEAVES AND OUTLINE IN THE SLAB, THE PIECES THUS DEFINED, ARE THEN CUT APART TO BE FIRED SEPARATELY AND REASSEMBLED. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  16. Accelerated slab replacement using temporary precast panels and self-consolidating concrete : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-01

    Researchers at Florida State University demonstrated the feasibility of using precast reinforced concrete panels to temporarily fill slab removal pits. The precast slabs can be driven on so traffic lanes can be open during the day, and new slab casti...

  17. The structures and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons with periodically embedded with four- and eight-membered rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Guiping; Lu, Junzhe; Zhu, Hengjiang; Li, Fangfang; Ma, Miaomiao; Wang, Xiaoning

    2018-07-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT), we have studied the structure of a zigzag silicene nanoribbons (SiNRs) with periodically embedded with four- and eight-membered rings, and studied their electronic properties by calculating its band structures and density of states (DOS). The results showed that the zigzag SiNRs have a sp2 hybridization, in addition, the band gap gradually decreased with the increase of the width by layer, and gradually changed from semiconductor properties to metal properties. The existence of vacancy defects increased the band gap and energies, but their positions could not change the structure and the electronic properties.

  18. Global Adjoint Tomography - Hotspots and Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Modrak, R. T.; Smith, J. A.; Orsvuran, R.; Bozdag, E.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Plumes rise from the deep mantle due to thermal or/and chemical buoyancy, forming hotspots at the surface, and oceanic plates subduct underneath continents, piling up at discontinuities or sinking down to the core-mantle boundary. Despite these basic convection mechanisms, many questions remain about the origin of mantle plumes, slab subduction, their interaction with mantle convection, and their relationship with the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle. Plume and slab morphology at depth provide further insight into these questions but imaging them in the mid and lower mantle is known to be very challenging due to a lack of data coverage and resolvability limits of conventional body-wave traveltime tomography. The deployment of regional dense arrays (e.g., USArray) and development of full waveform inversion techniques provide opportunities to resolve finer 3D details of mantle plumes and slabs. Harnessing the power of supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we employed a spectral-element method to accurately simulate seismograms in complex 3D Earth models and an adjoint method to obtain model updates. Bozdag et al. (2016) iteratively determined a transversely isotropic earth model (GLAD_M15) using 253 events. To achieve higher resolution and better coverage in the deep mantle, we expanded our database to 1,040 events; a 1/3 of them are deep earthquakes (>500 km). We reinverted source parameters using model GLAD_M15, recalculated synthetic seismograms, selected time windows that show good agreement between data and the synthetics, and made measurements within these windows. From the measurements, we further assess the overall quality of each event and station and exclude bad measurements using very conservative criteria. Thus far, we assimilated more than 10 million windows in three period bands from 17-250 s. As the model improves, we correct the centroid time and scalar moment of each event using its mean

  19. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  20. Drug release from slabs and the effects of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Kalosakas, George; Martini, Dimitra

    2015-12-30

    We discuss diffusion-controlled drug release from slabs or thin films. Analytical and numerical results are presented for slabs with flat surfaces, having a uniform thickness. Then, considering slabs with rough surfaces, the influence of a non-uniform slab thickness on release kinetics is numerically investigated. The numerical release profiles are obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. Release kinetics is quantified through the stretched exponential (or Weibull) function and the resulting dependence of the two parameters of this function on the thickness of the slab, for flat surfaces, and the amplitude of surface fluctuations (or the degree of thickness variability) in case of roughness. We find that a higher surface roughness leads to a faster drug release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Regional body-wave tomography of the Peruvian flat slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Bissett E.

    Local travel time data were used to create three dimensional tomography models of Vp and Vs above the flat slab in southern Peru, where the Nazca plate subducts subhorizontally beneath the continental lithosphere. The Peruvian flat slab segment corresponds to a gap in the volcanic arc and far-field thick-skinned deformation in the Eastern Cordillera. Despite ongoing research, there is little consensus on the causes and consequences of flat slab subduction. We present results from regional body-wave tomography which show high S-wave velocities above the slab for a region that coincides with the location of the Nazca ridge, a bathymetric high subducting at ~15°S. We propose that fast S-wave arrivals can be explained by mantle anisotropy. We attribute low Vs observed in the mantle north of the ridge to the presence of hydrous phases, resulting from the depth dependent dehydration of amphibole in an area where the slab is deeper.

  2. Electromagnetic Tunneling and Resonances in Pseudochiral Omega Slabs

    PubMed Central

    Razzaz, Faroq; Alkanhal, Majeed A. S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical investigation of the electromagnetic wave tunneling and anomalous transmission around the trapped modes in a pseudochiral omega slab. The dispersion relation, the conditions of the trapped modes, and the evanescent wave coupling and tunneling in two different reciprocal pseudochiral omega slab structures are derived. The Berreman’s matrix method is applied to obtain the transmission coefficients across the pseudochiral omega slab. When the structure is perturbed, a resonance phenomenon is detected around the trapped modes. This resonance results in transmission anomalies (total transmission and total reflection) and dramatic field amplifications around the trapped modes. The number of the discrete trapped modes and then the resonance frequencies are prescribed by the parameters of the pseudochiral omega slab such as the value of the omega parameter and its orientation and the slab thickness. PMID:28165058

  3. A tale of two arcs? Plate tectonics of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc using subducted slab constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Renqi, L.; Kanda, R. V. S.

    2014-12-01

    Published plate reconstructions typically show the Izu-Bonin Marianas arc (IBM) forming as a result of long-lived ~50 Ma Pacific subduction beneath the Philippine Sea. These reconstructions rely on the critical assumption that the Philippine Sea was continuously coupled to the Pacific during the lifetime of the IBM arc. Because of this assumption, significant (up to 1500 km) Pacific trench retreat is required to accommodate the 2000 km of Philippine Sea/IBM northward motion since the Eocene that is constrained by paleomagnetic data. In this study, we have mapped subducted slabs of mantle lithosphere from MITP08 global seismic tomography (Li et al., 2008) and restored them to a model Earth surface to constrain plate tectonic reconstructions. Here we present two subducted slab constraints that call into question current IBM arc reconstructions: 1) The northern and central Marianas slabs form a sub-vertical 'slab wall' down to maximum 1500 km depths in the lower mantle. This slab geometry is best explained by a near-stationary Marianas trench that has remained +/- 250 km E-W of its present-day position since ~45 Ma, and does not support any significant Pacific slab retreat. 2) A vanished ocean is revealed by an extensive swath of sub-horizontal slabs at 700 to 1000 km depths in the lower mantle below present-day Philippine Sea to Papua New Guinea. We call this vanished ocean the 'East Asian Sea'. When placed in an Eocene plate reconstruction, the East Asian Sea fits west of the reconstructed Marianas Pacific trench position and north of the Philippine Sea plate. This implies that the Philippine Sea and Pacific were not adjacent at IBM initiation, but were in fact separated by a lost ocean. Here we propose a new IBM arc reconstruction constrained by subducted slabs mapped under East Asia. At ~50 Ma, the present-day IBM arc initiated at equatorial latitudes from East Asian Sea subduction below the Philippine Sea. A separate arc was formed from Pacific subduction below

  4. Characterizing wet slab and glide slab avalanche occurrence along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.; Reardon, Blase

    2010-01-01

    Wet slab and glide slab snow avalanches are dangerous and yet can be particularly difficult to predict. Both wet slab and glide slab avalanches are thought to depend upon free water moving through the snowpack but are driven by different processes. In Glacier National Park, Montana, both types of avalanches can occur in the same year and affect the Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR). Both wet slab and glide slab avalanches along the GTSR from 2003-2010 are investigated. Meteorological data from two high-elevation weather stations and one SNOTEL site are used in conjunction with an avalanche database and snowpit profiles. These data were used to characterize years when only glide slab avalanches occurred and those years when both glide slab and wet slab avalanches occurred. Results of 168 glide slab and 57 wet slab avalanches along the GTSR suggest both types of avalanche occurrence depend on sustained warming periods with intense solar radiation (or rain on snow) to produce free water in the snowpack. Differences in temperature and net radiation metrics between wet slab and glide slab avalanches emerge as one moves from one day to seven days prior to avalanche occurrence. On average, a more rapid warming precedes wet slab avalanche occurrence. Glide slab and wet slab avalanches require a similar amount of net radiation. Wet slab avalanches do not occur every year, while glide slab avalanches occur annually. These results aim to enhance understanding of the required meteorological conditions for wet slab and glide slab avalanches and aid in improved wet snow avalanche forecasting.

  5. Untangling Slab Dynamics Using 3-D Numerical and Analytical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A. F.; Royden, L.; Becker, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Increasingly sophisticated numerical models have enabled us to make significant strides in identifying the key controls on how subducting slabs deform. For example, 3-D models have demonstrated that subducting plate width, and the related strength of toroidal flow around the plate edge, exerts a strong control on both the curvature and the rate of migration of the trench. However, the results of numerical subduction models can be difficult to interpret, and many first order dynamics issues remain at least partially unresolved. Such issues include the dominant controls on trench migration, the interdependence of asthenospheric pressure and slab dynamics, and how nearby slabs influence each other's dynamics. We augment 3-D, dynamically evolving finite element models with simple, analytical force-balance models to distill the physics associated with subduction into more manageable parts. We demonstrate that for single, isolated subducting slabs much of the complexity of our fully numerical models can be encapsulated by simple analytical expressions. Rates of subduction and slab dip correlate strongly with the asthenospheric pressure difference across the subducting slab. For double subduction, an additional slab gives rise to more complex mantle pressure and flow fields, and significantly extends the range of plate kinematics (e.g., convergence rate, trench migration rate) beyond those present in single slab models. Despite these additional complexities, we show that much of the dynamics of such multi-slab systems can be understood using the physics illuminated by our single slab study, and that a force-balance method can be used to relate intra-plate stress to viscous pressure in the asthenosphere and coupling forces at plate boundaries. This method has promise for rapid modeling of large systems of subduction zones on a global scale.

  6. Slab anisotropy from subduction zone guided waves in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. H.; Tseng, Y. L.; Hu, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Frozen-in anisotropic structure in the oceanic lithosphere and faulting/hydration in the upper layer of the slab are expected to play an important role in anisotropic signature of the subducted slab. Over the past several decades, despite the advances in characterizing anisotropy using shear wave splitting method and its developments, the character of slab anisotropy remains poorly understood. In this study we investigate the slab anisotropy using subduction zone guided waves characterized by long path length in the slab. In the southernmost Ryukyu subduction zone, seismic waves from events deeper than 100 km offshore northern Taiwan reveal wave guide behavior: (1) a low-frequency (< 1 Hz) first arrival recognized on vertical and radial components but not transverse component (2) large, sustained high-frequency (3-10 Hz) signal in P and S wave trains. The depth dependent high-frequency content (3-10Hz) confirms the association with a waveguide effect in the subducting slab rather than localized site amplification effects. Using the selected subduction zone guided wave events, we further analyzed the shear wave splitting for intermediate-depth earthquakes in different frequency bands, to provide the statistically meaningful shear wave splitting parameters. We determine shear wave splitting parameters from the 34 PSP guided events that are deeper than 100 km with ray path traveling along the subducted slab. From shear wave splitting analysis, the slab and crust effects reveal consistent polarization pattern of fast directions of EN-WS and delay time of 0.13 - 0.27 sec. This implies that slab anisotropy is stronger than the crust effect (<0.1 s) but weaker than the mantle wedge and sub-slab mantle effect (0.3-1.3 s) in Taiwan.

  7. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, J.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Davidson, J.C.; Koo, J.C.

    1998-05-05

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system is described. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate. 4 figs.

  8. The A-B transition in superfluid helium-3 under confinement in a thin slab geometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhelev, N.; Abhilash, T. S.; Smith, E. N.; Bennett, R. G.; Rojas, X.; Levitin, L.; Saunders, J.; Parpia, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of confinement on the phases of superfluid helium-3 is studied using the torsional pendulum method. We focus on the transition between the A and B phases, where the A phase is stabilized by confinement and a spatially modulated stripe phase is predicted at the A–B phase boundary. Here we discuss results from superfluid helium-3 contained in a single 1.08-μm-thick nanofluidic cavity incorporated into a high-precision torsion pendulum, and map the phase diagram between 0.1 and 5.6 bar. We observe only small supercooling of the A phase, in comparison to bulk or when confined in aerogel, with evidence for a non-monotonic pressure dependence. This suggests that an intrinsic B-phase nucleation mechanism operates under confinement. Both the phase diagram and the relative superfluid fraction of the A and B phases, show that strong coupling is present at all pressures, with implications for the stability of the stripe phase. PMID:28671184

  9. Exponential Characteristic Spatial Quadrature for Discrete Ordinates Neutral Particle Transport in Slab Geometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    left bdy = 0 vacuum current incident at left boundary = I type of current incident at left bdy = 0 isotropic surface Src region# cR SigmaR SourceR nc...0 type of current incident at left bdy = 0 isotropic surface Src region# cR SigmaR SourceR nc Right Bdy 1 0.5000 .3OD+00 0.0000D+00 256. 16.0000 2... SigmaR SourceR nc Right Bdy 1 0.1000 1.0000D+00 0.0000D+00 256. 16.0000 2 0.9500 1.0(OOD+00 1.0000D+00 256. 32.0000 type of right bdy = 0 vacuum current

  10. Fourier mode analysis of slab-geometry transport iterations in spatially periodic media

    SciT

    Larsen, E; Zika, M

    1999-04-01

    We describe a Fourier analysis of the diffusion-synthetic acceleration (DSA) and transport-synthetic acceleration (TSA) iteration schemes for a spatially periodic, but otherwise arbitrarily heterogeneous, medium. Both DSA and TSA converge more slowly in a heterogeneous medium than in a homogeneous medium composed of the volume-averaged scattering ratio. In the limit of a homogeneous medium, our heterogeneous analysis contains eigenvalues of multiplicity two at ''resonant'' wave numbers. In the presence of material heterogeneities, error modes corresponding to these resonant wave numbers are ''excited'' more than other error modes. For DSA and TSA, the iteration spectral radius may occur at these resonantmore » wave numbers, in which case the material heterogeneities most strongly affect iterative performance.« less

  11. Fokker-Planck-Based Acceleration for SN Equations with Highly Forward Peaked Scattering in Slab Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Japan

    Short mean free paths are characteristic of charged particles. High energy charged particles often have highly forward peaked scattering cross sections. Transport problems involving such charged particles are also highly optically thick. When problems simultaneously have forward peaked scattering and high optical thickness, their solution, using standard iterative methods, becomes very inefficient. In this dissertation, we explore Fokker-Planck-based acceleration for solving such problems.

  12. Impact of Mantle Wind on Subducting Plate Geometry and Interplate Pressure: Insights From Physical Modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D.; Cruden, A. R.

    2005-12-01

    from compression to extension. The density contrast between the downgoing plate and asthenosphere is varied from 0% to ~2% in order to investigate the relative contributions of mantle flow and slab pull force on the geometry of the slab and tectonic regime (compressional or extensional).

  13. Intense conductivity suppression by edge defects in zigzag MoS2 and WSe2 nanoribbons: a density functional based tight-binding study.

    PubMed

    Silva, F W N; Costa, A L M T; Liu, Lei; Barros, E B

    2016-11-04

    The effects of edge vacancies on the electron transport properties of zigzag MoS2/WSe2 nanoribbons are studied using a density functional theory (DFT)-based tight-binding model with a sp(3)d(5) basis set for the electronic structure calculation and applying the Landauer-Büttiker approach for the electronic transport. Our results show that the presence of a single edge vacancy, with a missing MoS2/WSe2 triplet, is enough to suppress the conductance of the system by almost one half for most energies around the Fermi level. Furthermore, the presence of other single defects along the same edge has little effect on the overall conductance, indicating that the conductance of that particular edge has been strongly suppressed by the first defect. The presence of another defect on the opposite edge further suppresses the quantum conductance, independently of the relative position between the two defects in opposite edges. The introduction of other defects cause the suppression to be energy dependent, leading to conductance peaks which depend on the geometry of the edges. The strong conductance dependence on the presence of edge defects is corroborated by DFT calculations using SIESTA, which show that the electronic bands near the Fermi energy are strongly localized at the edge.

  14. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. I. Semi-infinite slab approximations

    SciT

    Berkel, M. van; Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science; FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM- FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a number of new approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The approximations are based on semi-infinite slab approximations of the heat equation. The main result is the approximation of χ under the influence of V and τ based on the phase of two harmonics making the estimate less sensitive to calibration errors. To understand why the slab approximations can estimate χ well in cylindrical geometry, the relationships betweenmore » heat transport models in slab and cylindrical geometry are studied. In addition, the relationship between amplitude and phase with respect to their derivatives, used to estimate χ, is discussed. The results are presented in terms of the relative error for the different derived approximations for different values of frequency, transport coefficients, and dimensionless radius. The approximations show a significant region in which χ, V, and τ can be estimated well, but also regions in which the error is large. Also, it is shown that some compensation is necessary to estimate V and τ in a cylindrical geometry. On the other hand, errors resulting from the simplified assumptions are also discussed showing that estimating realistic values for V and τ based on infinite domains will be difficult in practice. This paper is the first part (Part I) of a series of three papers. In Part II and Part III, cylindrical approximations based directly on semi-infinite cylindrical domain (outward propagating heat pulses) and inward propagating heat pulses in a cylindrical domain, respectively, will be treated.« less

  15. A dipping, thick Farallon slab below central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Gurnis, M.; Saleeby, J.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that much of the Laramide orogeny was caused by dynamic effects induced by an extensive flat slab during a period of plateau subduction. A particularly thick block containing the Shatsky Rise conjugate, now in the mid-mantle, left a distinctive deformation footprint from southern California to Denver, Colorado. Thus mid-mantle, relic slabs can provide fundamental information about past subduction and the history of plate tectonics if properly imaged. Here we find clear evidence for a northeastward dipping (35° dip), slab-like, but fat (up to 400-500 km thick) seismic anomaly within the top of the lower mantle below the central United States. Using a deep focus earthquake below Spain with direct seismic paths that propagate along the top and bottom of the anomaly, we find that the observed, stacked seismic waveforms recorded with the dense USArray show multi-pathing indicative of sharp top and bottom surfaces. Plate tectonic reconstructions in which the slab is migrated back in time suggest strong coupling of the slab to North America. In combination with the reconstructions, we interpret the structure as arising from eastward dipping Farallon subduction at the western margin of North America during the Cretaceous, in contrast with recent interpretations. The slab could have been fattened through a combination of pure shear thickening during flat-slab subduction and a folding instability during penetration into the lower mantle.

  16. Effect of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed Mohsin, S. M.; Baarimah, A. O.; Jokhio, G. A.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of kenaf fibers in reinforced concrete slab with different thickness is discusses and presented in this paper. Kenaf fiber is a type of natural fiber and is added in the reinforced concrete slab to improve the structure strength and ductility. For this study, three types of mixtures were prepared with fiber volume fraction of 0%, 1% and 2%, respectively. The design compressive strength considered was 20 MPa. Six cubes were prepared to be tested at 7th and 28th day. A total of six reinforced concrete slab with two variances of thickness were also prepared and tested under four-point bending test. The differences in the thickness is to study the potential of kenaf fiber to serve as part of shear reinforcement in reinforced concrete slab that was design to fail in shear. It was observed that, addition of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab improves the flexural strength and ductility of the reinforced concrete slab. In the slab with reduction in thickness, the mode of failure change from brittle to ductile with the inclusion of kenaf fiber.

  17. The Effect of Acceleration Sprint and Zig-zag Drill Combination to Increase Students’ Speed and Agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bana, O.; Mintarto, E.; Kusnanik, N. W.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the following factors: (1) how far the effect of exercise acceleration sprint on the speed and agility (2) how much influence the zig-zag drill combination to the speed and agility (3) and is there any difference between the effects of exercise acceleration sprint and practice zig-zag drill combination of the speed and agility. This research is quantitative with quasi-experimental approach. The design of this study is matching only design.This study was conducted on 33 male students who take part in extracurricular and divided into 3 groups with 11 students in each group. Group 1 was given training of acceleration sprint, group 2 was given zig-zag training combination drills of conventional and exercises for group 3, for 8 weeks. The data collection was using sprint 30 meter to test the speed and agility t-test to test agility. Data were analyzed using t-test and analysis of variance. The conclusion of the research is (1) there is a significant effect of exercise acceleration sprint for the speed and agility, (2) there is a significant influence combination zig-zag drills, on speed and agility (3) and exercise acceleration sprint have more effect on the speed and agility.

  18. Constraining Slab Breakoff Induced Magmatism through Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburn, R.; Van Hunen, J.; Maunder, B. L.; Magni, V.; Bouilhol, P.

    2015-12-01

    Post-collisional magmatism is markedly different in nature and composition than pre-collisional magmas. This is widely interpreted to mark a change in the thermal structure of the system due to the loss of the oceanic slab (slab breakoff), allowing a different source to melt. Early modelling studies suggest that when breakoff takes place at depths shallower than the overriding lithosphere, magmatism occurs through both the decompression of upwelling asthenopshere into the slab window and the thermal perturbation of the overriding lithosphere (Davies & von Blanckenburg, 1995; van de Zedde & Wortel, 2001). Interpretations of geochemical data which invoke slab breakoff as a means of generating magmatism mostly assume these shallow depths. However more recent modelling results suggest that slab breakoff is likely to occur deeper (e.g. Andrews & Billen, 2009; Duretz et al., 2011; van Hunen & Allen, 2011). Here we test the extent to which slab breakoff is a viable mechanism for generating melting in post-collisional settings. Using 2-D numerical models we conduct a parametric study, producing models displaying a range of dynamics with breakoff depths ranging from 150 - 300 km. Key models are further analysed to assess the extent of melting. We consider the mantle wedge above the slab to be hydrated, and compute the melt fraction by using a simple parameterised solidus. Our models show that breakoff at shallow depths can generate a short-lived (< 3 Myr) pulse of mantle melting, through the hydration of hotter, undepleted asthenosphere flowing in from behind the detached slab. However, our results do not display the widespread, prolonged style of magmatism, observed in many post-collisional areas, suggesting that this magmatism may be generated via alternative mechanisms. This further implies that using magmatic observations to constrain slab breakoff is not straightforward.

  19. Effect of edge modification on the zigzag BC2N nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiang; Li, Hong; Tie, Jun; Lu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    We use first principles calculations to investigate the effects of edge modification with nonmetal species on zigzag-edged BC2N nanoribbons (ZBC2NNRs). These ZBC2NNRs show either semiconducting or metallic behaviors depending on the edge modifications and ribbon widths. We find that the O-modification induces a ferromagnetic ground state with a metallic behavior for all the ribbon widths investigated. And when the ribbon width is more than 3.32 nm (NZ ⩾ 16), an antiferromagnetic ground state with a half-metallic behavior is realized in the H-passivated ZBC2NNRs. These versatile electronic properties render the ZBC2NNRs a promising candidate material in nanoelectronics and nanospintronics.

  20. Antisymmetric Spin-Orbit Coupling in a d-p Model on a Zigzag Chain

    DOE PAGES

    Sugita, Yusuke; Hayami, Satoru; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2015-12-29

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate how an antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling emerges in electrons moving on lattice structures which are centrosymmetric but break the spatial inversion symme- try at atomic positions. We construct an effective d-p model on the simplest lattice structure, a zigzag chain of edge-sharing octahedra, with taking into account the crystalline electric field, the spin-orbit coupling, and on-site and inter-site d-p hybridizations. We show that an effective antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling arises in the sublattice-dependent form, which results in a hidden spin polarization in the band structure. Finally, we explicitly derive the effective antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling for dmore » electrons, which not only explains the hidden spin polarization but also indicates how to enhance it.« less

  1. Cubic Zig-Zag Enrichment of the Classical Kirchhoff Kinematics for Laminated and Sandwich Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed anaylsis and examples are presented that show how to enrich the kinematics of classical Kirchhoff plate theory by appending them with a set of continuous piecewise-cubic functions. This analysis is used to obtain functions that contain the effects of laminate heterogeneity and asymmetry on the variations of the inplane displacements and transverse shearing stresses, for use with a {3, 0} plate theory in which these distributions are specified apriori. The functions used for the enrichment are based on the improved zig-zag plate theory presented recently by Tessler, Di Scuva, and Gherlone. With the approach presented herein, the inplane displacements are represented by a set of continuous piecewise-cubic functions, and the transverse shearing stresses and strains are represented by a set of piecewise-quadratic functions that are discontinuous at the ply interfaces.

  2. Prediction of Composite Laminate Strength Properties Using a Refined Zigzag Plate Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barut, Atila; Madenci, Erdogan; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an approach that uses the refined zigzag element, RZE(exp2,2) in conjunction with progressive failure criteria to predict the ultimate strength of composite laminates based on only ply-level strength properties. The methodology involves four major steps: (1) Determination of accurate stress and strain fields under complex loading conditions using RZE(exp2,2)-based finite element analysis, (2) Determination of failure locations and failure modes using the commonly accepted Hashin's failure criteria, (3) Recursive degradation of the material stiffness, and (4) Non-linear incremental finite element analysis to obtain stress redistribution until global failure. The validity of this approach is established by considering the published test data and predictions for (1) strength of laminates under various off-axis loading, (2) strength of laminates with a hole under compression, and (3) strength of laminates with a hole under tension.

  3. Two-dimensional thermography image retrieval from zig-zag scanned data with TZ-SCAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Ryohei; Arai, Kohei

    2008-10-01

    TZ-SCAN is a simple and low cost thermal imaging device which consists of a single point radiation thermometer on a tripod with a pan-tilt rotator, a DC motor controller board with a USB interface, and a laptop computer for rotator control, data acquisition, and data processing. TZ-SCAN acquires a series of zig-zag scanned data and stores the data as CSV file. A 2-D thermal distribution image can be retrieved by using the second quefrency peak calculated from TZ-SCAN data. An experiment is conducted to confirm the validity of the thermal retrieval algorithm. The experimental result shows efficient accuracy for 2-D thermal distribution image retrieval.

  4. Ab-initio study of structural, electronic, and transport properties of zigzag GaP nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Jain, Sumit Kumar; Khare, Purnima Swarup

    2014-03-01

    Stability and electronic properties of zigzag (3 ≤ n ≤ 16) gallium phosphide nanotubes (GaP NTs) have been analyzed by employing a systematic ab-intio approach based on density functional theory using generalized gradient approximation with revised Perdew Burke Ernzerhoff type parameterization. Diameter dependence of bond length, buckling, binding energy, and band gap has been investigated and the analysis shows that the bond length and buckling decreases with increasing diameter of the tube, highest binding energy of (16, 0) confirms this as the most stable amongst all the NTs taken into consideration. The present GaP NTs shows direct band gap and it increases with diameter of the tubes. Using a two probe model for (4, 0) NT the I-V relationship shows an exponential increase in current on applying bias voltage beyond 1.73 volt.

  5. Effects of an electric field on the electronic and optical properties of zigzag boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the electro-optical properties of zigzag BNNTs, under an external electric field, using the tight binding approximation. It is found that an electric field modifies the band structure and splits the band degeneracy. Also the large electric strength leads to coupling the neighbor subbands which these effects reflect in the DOS and JDOS spectrum. It has been shown that, unlike CNTs, the band gap of BNNTs can be reduced linearly by applying a transverse external electric field. Also we show that the larger diameter tubes are more sensitive than small ones. The semiconducting metallic transition can be achieved through increasing the applied fields. The number and position of peaks in the JDOS spectrum are dependent on electric field strength. It is found that at a high electric field, the two lowest subbands are oscillatory with multiple nodes at the Fermi level.

  6. Functionalization and migration of bromine adatoms on zigzag graphene nanoribbons: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Kumar, Amit; Patel, Chandrabhan

    2018-05-01

    Tailoring the electronic band gap of graphene nanoribbons (GNR) through edge functionalization and understanding the adsorption of guest adatoms on GNR is crucial for realization of upcoming organic devices. In the present work, we have investigated the structural stability and electronic property of bromine (Br) termination at the edges of zigzag GNR (ZGNR). The migration pathways of Br adatom on ZGNR have also been discussed along four different diffusion paths. It is revealed that Br termination induces metallicity in ZGNR and caused upward shifting of Fermi level. Further, the migration is predicted to take place preferable along the ribbon edges whereas across the ribbon width, migration is least probable to take place due to sufficiently higher migration barrier of ˜160 meV.

  7. Tailoring graphene magnetism by zigzag triangular holes: A first-principles thermodynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Khan, Muhammad Ejaz; Zhang, P.; Sun, Yi -Yang; ...

    2016-03-30

    In this study, we discuss the thermodynamic stability and magnetic property of zigzag triangular holes (ZTHs) in graphene based on the results of first-principles density functional theory calculations. We find that ZTHs with hydrogen-passivated edges in mixed sp 2/sp 3 configurations (z 211) could be readily available at experimental thermodynamic conditions, but ZTHs with 100% sp 2 hydrogen-passivation (z 1) could be limitedly available at high temperature and ultra-high vacuum conditions. Graphene magnetization near the ZTHs strongly depends on the type and the size of the triangles. While metallic z 1 ZTHs exhibit characteristic edge magnetism due to the same-sublatticemore » engineering, semiconducting z 211 ZTHs do show characteristic corner magnetism when the size is small < 2 nm. Our findings could be useful for experimentally tailoring metal-free carbon magnetism by simply fabricating triangular holes in graphene.« less

  8. Study on the Electronic Transport Properties of Zigzag GaN Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enling; Wang, Xiqiang; Hou, Liping; Zhao, Danna; Dai, Yuanbin; Wang, Xuewen

    2011-02-01

    The electronic transport properties of zigzag GaN nanotubes (n, 0) (4 <= n <= 9) have been calculated using the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions method. Firstly, the density functional theory (DFT) is used to optimize and calculate the electronic structure of GaNNTs (n, 0) (4<=n<=9). Secondly, DFT and non-equilibrium Green function (NEGF) method are also used to predict the electronic transport properties of GaNNTs two-probe system. The results showed: there is a corresponding relation between the electronic transport properties and the valley of state density of each GaNNT. In addition, the volt-ampere curve of GaNNT is approximately linear.

  9. Antisymmetric Spin-Orbit Coupling in a d-p Model on a Zigzag Chain

    SciT

    Sugita, Yusuke; Hayami, Satoru; Motome, Yukitoshi

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate how an antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling emerges in electrons moving on lattice structures which are centrosymmetric but break the spatial inversion symme- try at atomic positions. We construct an effective d-p model on the simplest lattice structure, a zigzag chain of edge-sharing octahedra, with taking into account the crystalline electric field, the spin-orbit coupling, and on-site and inter-site d-p hybridizations. We show that an effective antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling arises in the sublattice-dependent form, which results in a hidden spin polarization in the band structure. Finally, we explicitly derive the effective antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling for dmore » electrons, which not only explains the hidden spin polarization but also indicates how to enhance it.« less

  10. Width-Tuned Magnetic Order Oscillation on Zigzag Edges of Honeycomb Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Chao; Zhou, Yuan; Yu, Shun-Li; Yin, Wei-Guo; Gong, Chang-De

    2017-07-12

    Quantum confinement and interference often generate exotic properties in nanostructures. One recent highlight is the experimental indication of a magnetic phase transition in zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons at the critical ribbon width of about 7 nm [ Magda , G. Z. et al. Nature 2014 , 514 , 608 ]. Here we show theoretically that with further increase in the ribbon width, the magnetic correlation of the two edges can exhibit an intriguing oscillatory behavior between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic, driven by acquiring the positive coherence between the two edges to lower the free energy. The oscillation effect is readily tunable in applied magnetic fields. These novel properties suggest new experimental manifestation of the edge magnetic orders in graphene nanoribbons and enhance the hopes of graphene-like spintronic nanodevices functioning at room temperature.

  11. Application of silicon zig-zag wall arrays for anodes of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. V.; Rumyantsev, A. M.; Levitskii, V. S.; Beregulin, E. V.; Zhdanov, V. V.; Terukov, E. I.; Astrova, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic tests of anodes based on zigzag wall arrays fabricated by the electrochemical etching and post-anodization treatment of silicon have been performed. Compared with anodes based on nanowires and planar thin films, these structures have several advantages. An ex situ analysis of the morphology and structural transformations in a material subjected to cyclic lithiation was conducted by electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The effect of geometrical parameters and a cycling mode on the degradation rate was studied. It is shown that a significant rise in the cycle life of the anode can be obtained by the restriction of the inserted amount of lithium. The anode, subjected to galvanostatic cycling at a rate C/2.8 at a limited charge capacity of 1000 mA · h g-1, demonstrates no degradation after 1200 cycles.

  12. Electronic structure and transport properties of zigzag MoS2 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Uma Shankar; Shah, Rashmi; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar

    2018-05-01

    In present study, electronic and transport properties of the 8zigzag MoS2 nanoribbons (8ZMoS2NRs) are investigated using ab-initio density functional theory [DFT]. The calculations were performed using nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism based on DFT as implemented in the TranSiesta code. Results show that the defect can introduces few extra states into the energy gap, which lead nanoribbons to reveal a metallic characteristic. The voltage-current (VI) graph of 8ZMoS2NRs show a threshold current increases after introducing Mo defect in the devices. when introducing a Mo vacancy under low biases, the current will be suppressed—whereas under high biases, the current through the defected 8ZMoS2NRs will increases rapidly, due to the other channel being opened, that make possibility of 8ZMoS2NRs application in electronic devices such as voltage regulation.

  13. Dense zig-zag microstructures in YSZ thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stender, Dieter; Schäuble, Nina; Weidenkaff, Anke; Montagne, Alex; Ghisleni, Rudy; Michler, Johann; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The very brittle oxygen ion conductor yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a typical solid electrolyte for miniaturized thin film fuel cells. In order to decrease the fuel cell operating temperature, the thickness of yttria stabilized zirconia thin films is reduced. Often, these thin membranes suffer from mechanical failure and gas permeability. To improve these mechanical issues, a glancing angle deposition approach is used to grow yttria stabilized zirconia thin films with tilted columnar structures. Changes of the material flux direction during the deposition result in a dense, zigzag-like structure with columnar crystallites. This structure reduces the elastic modulus of these membranes as compared to columnar yttria stabilized zirconia thin films as monitored by nano-indentation which makes them more adaptable to applied stress.

  14. Width-Tuned Magnetic Order Oscillation on Zigzag Edges of Honeycomb Nanoribbons

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wen-Chao; Zhou, Yuan; Yu, Shun-Li; ...

    2017-06-24

    Quantum confinement and interference often generate exotic properties in nanostructures. One recent highlight is the experimental indication of a magnetic phase transition in zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons at the critical ribbon width of about 7 nm [Magda, G. Z. et al. Nature 2014, 514, 608]. Here in this work, we show theoretically that with further increase in the ribbon width, the magnetic correlation of the two edges can exhibit an intriguing oscillatory behavior between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic, driven by acquiring the positive coherence between the two edges to lower the free energy. The oscillation effect is readily tunable in applied magneticmore » fields. In conclusion, these novel properties suggest new experimental manifestation of the edge magnetic orders in graphene nanoribbons and enhance the hopes of graphene-like spintronic nanodevices functioning at room temperature.« less

  15. Effects of edge magnetism on the Kohn anomalies of zigzag graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Culchac, F J; Capaz, Rodrigo B

    2016-02-12

    The effects of edge magnetism on the Kohn anomaly (KA) of the G-band phonons of zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) are studied using a combination of the tight-binding and mean-field Hubbard models. We show that the opening of an energy gap, induced by magnetic ordering, significantly changes the KA effects, particularly for narrow ribbons in which the gap is larger than the phonon energy. Therefore, the G-band phonon frequency and lifetime are altered for a magnetically-ordered edge state with respect to an unpolarized edge state. The effects of temperature, ZGNR width, doping and transverse electric fields are systematically investigated. We propose using this effect to probe the magnetic order of edge states in graphene nanoribbons using Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Frustrated quantum magnetism in the Kondo lattice on the zigzag ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschke, Matthias; Rausch, Roman; Potthoff, Michael

    2018-03-01

    The interplay between the Kondo effect, indirect magnetic interaction, and geometrical frustration is studied in the Kondo lattice on the one-dimensional zigzag ladder. Using the density-matrix renormalization group, the ground-state and various short- and long-range spin- and density-correlation functions are calculated for the model at half filling as a function of the antiferromagnetic Kondo interaction down to J =0.3 t , where t is the nearest-neighbor hopping on the zigzag ladder. Geometrical frustration is shown to lead to at least two critical points: Starting from the strong-J limit, where almost local Kondo screening dominates and where the system is a nonmagnetic Kondo insulator, antiferromagnetic correlations between nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor local spins become stronger and stronger, until at Jcdim≈0.89 t frustration is alleviated by a spontaneous breaking of translational symmetry and a corresponding transition to a dimerized state. This is characterized by antiferromagnetic correlations along the legs and by alternating antiferro- and ferromagnetic correlations on the rungs of the ladder. A mechanism of partial Kondo screening that has been suggested for the Kondo lattice on the two-dimensional triangular lattice is not realized in the one-dimensional case. Furthermore, within the symmetry-broken dimerized state, there is a magnetic transition to a 90∘ quantum spin spiral with quasi-long-range order at Jcmag≈0.84 t . The quantum-critical point is characterized by a closure of the spin gap (with decreasing J ) and a divergence of the spin-correlation length and of the spin-structure factor S (q ) at wave vector q =π /2 . This is opposed to the model on the one-dimensional bipartite chain, which is known to have a finite spin gap for all J >0 at half filling.

  17. On the zigzagging causility model of EPR correlations and on the interpretation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beauregard, O. Costa

    1988-09-01

    Being formalized inside the S-matrix scheme, the zigzagging causility model of EPR correlations has full Lorentz and CPT invariance. EPR correlations, proper or reversed, and Wheeler's smoky dragon metaphor are respectively pictured in spacetime or in the momentum-energy space, as V-shaped, A-shaped, or C-shaped ABC zigzags, with a summation at B over virtual states |B>

  18. Tight binding simulation study on zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Deepa; Jaggi, Neena; Gupta, Vishu

    2018-01-01

    Tight binding simulation studies using the density functional tight binding (DFTB) model have been performed on various zigzag single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs) to investigate their electronic properties using DFTB module of the Material Studio Software version 7.0. Various combinations of different eigen-solvers and charge mixing schemes available in the DFTB Module have been tried to chalk out the electronic structure. The analytically deduced values of the bandgap of (9, 0) SWCNT were compared with the experimentally determined value reported in the literature. On comparison, it was found that the tight binding approximations tend to drastically underestimate the bandgap values. However, the combination of Anderson charge mixing method with standard eigensolver when implemented using the smart algorithm was found to produce fairly close results. These optimized model parameters were then used to determine the band structures of various zigzag SWCNTs. (9, 0) Single-walled Nanotube which is extensively being used for sensing NH3, CH4 and NO2 has been picked up as a reference material since its experimental bandgap value has been reported in the literature. It has been found to exhibit a finite energy bandgap in contrast to its expected metallic nature. The study is of utmost significance as it not only probes and validates the simulation route for predicting suitable properties of nanomaterials but also throws light on the comparative efficacy of the different approximation and rationalization quantum mechanical techniques used in simulation studies. Such simulation studies if used intelligently prove to be immensely useful to the material scientists as they not only save time and effort but also pave the way to new experiments by making valuable predictions.

  19. Interaction of an ion bunch with a plasma slab

    SciT

    Krasovitskiy, V. B., E-mail: krasovit@mail.ru; Turikov, V. A.

    2016-11-15

    Charge neutralization of a short ion bunch passing through a plasma slab is studied by means of numerical simulation. It is shown that a fraction of plasma electrons are trapped by the bunch under the action of the collective charge separation field. The accelerated electrons generated in this process excite beam−plasma instability, thereby violating the trapping conditions. The process of electron trapping is also strongly affected by the high-frequency electric field caused by plasma oscillations at the slab boundaries. It is examined how the degree of charge neutralization depends on the parameters of the bunch and plasma slab.

  20. Dynamic Eigenvalue Problem of Concrete Slab Road Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Urszula; Szczecina, Michał

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the dynamic eigenvalue problem of concrete slab road surface. A sample concrete slab was modelled using Autodesk Robot Structural Analysis software and calculated with Finite Element Method. The slab was set on a one-parameter elastic subsoil, for which the modulus of elasticity was separately calculated. The eigen frequencies and eigenvectors (as maximal vertical nodal displacements) were presented. On the basis of the results of calculations, some basic recommendations for designers of concrete road surfaces were offered.

  1. Light-assisted templated self assembly using photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Camilo A; Dutt, Avik; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2011-06-06

    We explore a technique which we term light-assisted templated self-assembly. We calculate the optical forces on colloidal particles over a photonic crystal slab. We show that exciting a guided resonance mode of the slab yields a resonantly-enhanced, attractive optical force. We calculate the lateral optical forces above the slab and predict that stably trapped periodic patterns of particles are dependent on wavelength and polarization. Tuning the wavelength or polarization of the light source may thus allow the formation and reconfiguration of patterns. We expect that this technique may be used to design all-optically reconfigurable photonic devices.

  2. Magmatic and Seismic Evidence for the Neogene Evolution of the Subducting Slab and Crustal and Mantle Lithosphere under the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, S. M.; Sandvol, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical models coupled with the distribution, chemistry and age of magmatic rocks provide powerful tools for reconstructing the thermal and material balance and deformational history of the Central Andean crust and lithosphere in time and space. Two examples are given. In the first, a model for changing slab geometry, delamination (foundering) of the crust and mantle and forearc subduction erosion beneath the southern Puna plateau comes from studies of Miocene to Recent magmatic rocks linked with seismic studies. The distribution and chemistry (e.g., Sm/Yb, La/Ta, Ba/La, isotopes) of the volcanic rocks support an 18-7 Ma period of slab shallowing, followed by slab steepening and forearc subduction erosion linked with backarc crustal and lithospheric delamination and eruption of large ignimbrites. Support for delamination comes from seismic attenuation and Vs tomographic images that reveal an 100 km wide high velocity anomaly associated with an irregular shear wave splitting pattern, which is interpreted as a delaminated block above a nearly aseismic segment of the subducting slab at a depth of 150-200 km (Calixto et al., 2013, 2014; Liang et al. 2014). This block underlies the < 7 Ma giant Cerro Galan dacitic ignimbrites and bordering mafic flows and glassy andesites and dacites to the east. The characteristics of the flows support equilibration of basaltic magmas at > 1350°C at 2 Gpa followed by fractionation and mixing with melts of garnet-pyroxene-amphibole bearing crust (Risse et al., 2013). In accord, the lavas are over a region where receiver functions indicate a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary at 60-80 km and a regionally thin 45-55 km thick crust with a low Vp/Vs (< 1.70) ratio (Heit et al., 2014). Calculations of crustal loss and gain allow up to 10% of the southern Puna lower crust to have been lost in the last 10 Ma. A second region where the characteristics of the magmatic rocks provide clues to the timing of slab shallowing and proposed slab

  3. Rotational flow in tapered slab rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Tony; Sams, Oliver C.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    Internal flow modeling is a requisite for obtaining critical parameters in the design and fabrication of modern solid rocket motors. In this work, the analytical formulation of internal flows particular to motors with tapered sidewalls is pursued. The analysis employs the vorticity-streamfunction approach to treat this problem assuming steady, incompressible, inviscid, and nonreactive flow conditions. The resulting solution is rotational following the analyses presented by Culick for a cylindrical motor. In an extension to Culick's work, Clayton has recently managed to incorporate the effect of tapered walls. Here, an approach similar to that of Clayton is applied to a slab motor in which the chamber is modeled as a rectangular channel with tapered sidewalls. The solutions are shown to be reducible, at leading order, to Taylor's inviscid profile in a porous channel. The analysis also captures the generation of vorticity at the surface of the propellant and its transport along the streamlines. It is from the axial pressure gradient that the proper form of the vorticity is ascertained. Regular perturbations are then used to solve the vorticity equation that prescribes the mean flow motion. Subsequently, numerical simulations via a finite volume solver are carried out to gain further confidence in the analytical approximations. In illustrating the effects of the taper on flow conditions, comparisons of total pressure and velocity profiles in tapered and nontapered chambers are entertained. Finally, a comparison with the axisymmetric flow analog is presented.

  4. Photonic slab heterostructures based on opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Lidon, Elisa; Galisteo-Lopez, Juan F.; Juarez, Beatriz H.; Lopez, Cefe

    2004-09-01

    In this paper the fabrication of photonic slab heterostructures based on artificial opals is presented. The innovated method combines high-quality thin-films growing of opals and silica infiltration by Chemical Vapor Deposition through a multi-step process. By varying structure parameters, such as lattice constant, sample thickness or refractive index, different heterostructures have been obtained. The optical study of these systems, carried out by reflectance and transmittance measurements, shows that the prepared samples are of high quality further confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy micrographs. The proposed novel method for sample preparation allows a high control of the involved structure parameters, giving the possibility of tunning their photonic behavior. Special attention in the optical response of these materials has been addressed to the study of planar defects embedded in opals, due to their importance in different photonic fields and future technological applications. Reflectance and transmission measurements show a sharp resonance due to localized states associated with the presence of planar defects. A detailed study of the defect mode position and its dependance on defect thickness and on the surrounding photonic crystal is presented as well as evidence showing the scalability of the problem. Finally, it is also concluded that the proposed method is cheap and versatile allowing the preparation of opal-based complex structures.

  5. The rideability of a deflected bridge approach slab.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the findings associated with the development of a new pavement roughness index called the Posted Speed Localized Roughness Index (LRIPS) that can be used to rate the ride quality on bridge approach slabs. Currently established pa...

  6. General analysis of slab lasers using geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Te-yuan; Bass, Michael

    2007-02-01

    A thorough and general geometrical optics analysis of a slab-shaped laser gain medium is presented. The length and thickness ratio is critical if one is to achieve the maximum utilization of absorbed pump power by the laser light in such a medium; e.g., the fill factor inside the slab is to be maximized. We point out that the conditions for a fill factor equal to 1, laser light entering and exiting parallel to the length of the slab, and Brewster angle incidence on the entrance and exit faces cannot all be satisfied at the same time. Deformed slabs are also studied. Deformation along the width direction of the largest surfaces is shown to significantly reduce the fill factor that is possible.

  7. Field demonstration of new bridge approach slab designs and performance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    The Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) has initiated a major effort to minimize the bridge end bump problem associated : with differential settlement. As a result, a new design for the approach slab was proposed, which requ...

  8. 5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR LOOKING NORTH. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH 7 INCH DIAMETER HOLE FOR SUPPORT CARRIAGE LOCKING PIN. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT FAR CENTER RIGHT. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  11. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE SOUTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE SOUTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHWESTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHWESTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEASTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEASTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  14. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  16. 12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  18. 7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 9. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  20. 8. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, ACCESS RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, ACCESS RAMP IN FOREGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  1. 13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. Improved load rating of reinforced concrete slab bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-09-01

    In New Mexico, many reinforced concrete slab (RCS) bridges provide service on interstates I-10, I-25, and I-40. An accurate strength evaluation of interstate bridges is essential to avoid unnecessary load restrictions. The AASHTO load rating factor f...

  4. Recommendations for design, construction, and maintenance of bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-09-01

    Settlement and heave related movements of bridge approach slabs relative to bridge decks create a bump in : the roadway. Several problems arise from these bumps, which include poor riding conditions, potential : vehicle damage, loss of vehicle contro...

  5. Integral bridge abutment-to-approach slab connection.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-06-01

    The Iowa Department of Transportation has long recognized that approach slab pavements of integral abutment bridges are prone to settlement and cracking, which manifests as the "bump at the end of the bridge". A commonly recommended solution is to in...

  6. Use of fiber reinforced concrete in bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-12-01

    Bridge approach slabs are deteriorating at a much faster rate than expected resulting in a massive need for repairs and premature replacement : costing millions of dollars annually. Both environmental and traffic loading causes the concrete to worsen...

  7. 34. VAL, DETAIL OF STAIRS ON COUNTERWEIGHT SLAB WITH COUNTERWEIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VAL, DETAIL OF STAIRS ON COUNTERWEIGHT SLAB WITH COUNTERWEIGHT CAR RAILS ON RIGHT AND PERSONNEL CAR RAILS ON LEFT. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 23. Surrender interview site, showing Pemberton Avenue concrete slab road ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Surrender interview site, showing Pemberton Avenue concrete slab road type with gutter (asphalt construction typical on Union and Confederate Avenues), view to the sw. - Vicksburg National Military Park Roads & Bridges, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  9. In-house fabrication of precast concrete bridge slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1976-01-01

    Information is reported on the labor, equipment, material, and cost required for seven bridge maintenance situations in which state forces widened or replaced an existing short span structure. Precast concrete slabs were installed at three of the loc...

  10. The rideability of a deflected bridge approach slab.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the findings associated with the development of a new pavement roughness index : called the Posted Speed Localized Roughness Index (LRIPS) that can be used to rate the ride quality on : bridge approach slabs. Currently establishe...

  11. Asymptotic behavior of exact exchange potential of slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E.

    2014-06-01

    In this contribution the exact exchange potential vx of density functional theory is examined for slabs such as graphene, for which one has a Bravais lattice in the x-y directions, while the electrons are confined to the finite region -L≤z≤L in the z direction. It is demonstrated analytically that the exact vx behaves as -e2/z for z ≫L. This result extends the corresponding statement of Horowitz, Proetto, and Rigamonti [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 026802 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.026802] for jellium slabs to slabs with arbitrary periodic density distributions. Application of the exact exchange to a Si(111) slab (within the Krieger-Li-Iafrate approximation) indicates that the corrugation of the exact vx is more pronounced than that of the local density approximation for vx.

  12. Benchmark study for total enery electrons in thick slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, I.

    2002-01-01

    The total energy deposition profiles when highenergy electrons impinge on a thick slab of elemental aluminum, copper, and tungsten have been computed using representative Monte Carlo codes (NOVICE, TIGER, MCNP), and compared in this paper.

  13. Use of precast slabs for pavement rehabilitation on I-66.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-06-01

    Highway agencies continuously strive to expedite pavement construction and repairs and to evaluate materials and : methods to provide long-lasting pavements. As part of this effort, agencies have used precast concrete slabs for more than 10 : years w...

  14. 9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE NEAR GIANT SLIDE TRAIL MARKER ON AROUND-THE-MOUNTAIN LOOP. - Rockefeller Carriage Roads, Mount Desert Island, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  15. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEASTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEASTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS AT LEFT AND RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  16. Numerical models of the magmatic processes induced by slab breakoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburn, Rebecca; Bouilhol, Pierre; Maunder, Ben; Magni, Valentina; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2017-11-01

    After the onset of continental collision, magmatism often persists for tens of millions of years, albeit with a different composition, in reduced volumes, and with a more episodic nature and more widespread spatial distribution, compared to normal arc magmatism. Kinematic modelling studies have suggested that slab breakoff can account for this post-collisional magmatism through the formation of a slab window and subsequent heating of the overriding plate and decompression melting of upwelling asthenosphere, particularly if breakoff occurs at depths shallower than the overriding plate. To constrain the nature of any melting and the geodynamic conditions required, we numerically model the collision of two continental plates following a period of oceanic subduction. A thermodynamic database is used to determine the (de)hydration reactions and occurrence of melt throughout this process. We investigate melting conditions within a parameter space designed to generate a wide range of breakoff depths, timings and collisional styles. Under most circumstances, slab breakoff occurs deeper than the depth extent of the overriding plate; too deep to generate any decompressional melting of dry upwelling asthenosphere or thermal perturbation within the overriding plate. Even if slab breakoff is very shallow, the hot mantle inflow into the slab window is not sustained long enough to sufficiently heat the hydrated overriding plate to cause significant magmatism. Instead, for relatively fast, shallow breakoff we observe melting of asthenosphere above the detached slab through the release of water from the tip of the heating detached slab. Melting of the subducted continental crust during necking and breakoff is a more common feature and may be a more reliable indicator of the occurrence of breakoff. We suggest that magmatism from slab breakoff alone is unable to explain several of the characteristics of post-collisional magmatism, and that additional geodynamical processes need to be

  17. Abrupt Upper-Plate Tilting Upon Slab-Transition-Zone Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, F.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    During its sinking, the remnant of a surface plate crosses and interacts with multiple boundaries in Earth's interior. The most-prominent dynamic interaction arises at the upper-mantle transition zone where the sinking plate is strongly affected by the higher-viscosity lower mantle. Within our numerical model, we unravel, for the first time, that this very collision of the sinking slab with the transition zone induces a sudden, dramatic downward tilt of the upper plate towards the subduction trench. The slab-transition zone collision sets parts of the higher-viscosity lower mantle in motion. Naturally, this then induces an overall larger return flow cell that, at its onset, tilts the upper plate abruptly by around 0.05 degrees and over around 10 Millions of years. Such a significant and abrupt variation in surface topography should be clearly visible in temporal geologic records of large-scale surface elevation and might explain continental-wide tilting as observed in Australia since the Eocene or North America during the Phanerozoic. Unravelling this crucial mantle-lithosphere interaction was possible thanks to state-of-the-art numerical modelling (powered by StagYY; Tackley 2008, PEPI) and post-processing (powered by StagLab; www.fabiocrameri.ch/software). The new model that is introduced here to study the dynamically self-consistent temporal evolution of subduction features accurate subduction-zone topography, robust single-sided plate sinking, stronger plates close to laboratory values, an upper-mantle phase transition and, crucially, simple continents at a free surface. A novel, fully-automated post-processing includes physical model diagnostics like slab geometry, mantle flow pattern, upper-plate tilt angle and trench location.

  18. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  19. Want to Play Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Matthew L.; Bomer, Megan A.; Powell, Nancy Norem

    2009-01-01

    Students enter the geometry classroom with a strong concept of fairness and a sense of what it means to "play by the rules," yet many students have difficulty understanding the postulates, or rules, of geometry and their implications. Although they may never have articulated the properties of an axiomatic system, they have gained a practical…

  20. The Beauty of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a geometry project that used the beauty of stained-glass-window designs to teach middle school students about geometric figures and concepts. Three honors prealgebra teachers and a middle school mathematics gifted intervention specialist created a geometry project that covered the curriculum and also assessed students'…

  1. Geometry for Pie Lovers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, William

    1982-01-01

    An approach to the instruction of maxima and minima problems that works with tools of geometry and algebra is presented. The focus is on a classic pie-cutting problem, which is viewed as an interesting and instructive task that is an excellent application of transformation geometry. (MP)

  2. Density structure and geometry of the Costa Rican subduction zone from 3-D gravity modeling and local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-07-01

    The eastern part of the oceanic Cocos Plate presents a heterogeneous crustal structure due to diverse origins and ages as well as plate-hot spot interactions which originated the Cocos Ridge, a structure that converges with the Caribbean Plate in southeastern Costa Rica. The complex structure of the oceanic plate directly influences the dynamics and geometry of the subduction zone along the Middle American Trench. In this paper an integrated interpretation of the slab geometry is presented based on three-dimensional density modeling of combined satellite and surface gravity data, constrained by available geophysical and geological data and seismological information obtained from local networks. The results show the continuation of steep subduction geometry from the Nicaraguan margin into Northwestern Costa Rica, followed by a moderate dipping slab under the Central Cordillera toward the end of the Central American Volcanic Arc. To the southeast end of the volcanic arc, our preferred model shows a steep, coherent slab that extends up to the landward projection of the Panama Fracture Zone. Overall, a gradual change in the depth of the intraplate seismicity is observed, reaching 220 km in the northwestern part, and becoming progressively shallower toward the southeast, where it reaches a terminal depth of 75 km. The changes in the terminal depth of the observed seismicity correlate with the increased density in the modeled slab. The absence of intermediate depth intraplate seismicity in the southeastern section and the higher densities for the subducted slab in this area, support a model in which dehydration reactions in the subducted slab cease at a shallower depth, originating an anhydrous and thus aseismic slab.

  3. Density structure and geometry of the Costa Rican subduction zone from 3-D gravity modeling and local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-10-01

    The eastern part of the oceanic Cocos Plate presents a heterogeneous crustal structure due to diverse origins and ages as well as plate-hot spot interactions which originated the Cocos Ridge, a structure that converges with the Caribbean Plate in southeastern Costa Rica. The complex structure of the oceanic plate directly influences the dynamics and geometry of the subduction zone along the Middle American Trench. In this paper an integrated interpretation of the slab geometry in Costa Rica is presented based on 3-D density modeling of combined satellite and surface gravity data, constrained by available geophysical and geological data and seismological information obtained from local networks. The results show the continuation of steep subduction geometry from the Nicaraguan margin into northwestern Costa Rica, followed by a moderate dipping slab under the Central Cordillera toward the end of the Central American Volcanic Arc. Contrary to commonly assumed, to the southeast end of the volcanic arc, our preferred model shows a steep, coherent slab that extends up to the landward projection of the Panama Fracture Zone. Overall, a gradual change in the depth of the intraplate seismicity is observed, reaching 220 km in the northwestern part, and becoming progressively shallower toward the southeast, where it reaches a maximum depth of 75 km. The changes in the terminal depth of the observed seismicity correlate with the increased density in the modeled slab. The absence of intermediate depth (> 75 km) intraplate seismicity in the southeastern section and the higher densities for the subducted slab in this area, support a model in which dehydration reactions in the subducted slab cease at a shallower depth, originating an anhydrous and thus aseismic slab.

  4. Automatic yield-line analysis of slabs using discontinuity layout optimization

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Matthew; He, Linwei; Smith, Colin C.; Le, Canh V.

    2014-01-01

    The yield-line method of analysis is a long established and extremely effective means of estimating the maximum load sustainable by a slab or plate. However, although numerous attempts to automate the process of directly identifying the critical pattern of yield-lines have been made over the past few decades, to date none has proved capable of reliably analysing slabs of arbitrary geometry. Here, it is demonstrated that the discontinuity layout optimization (DLO) procedure can successfully be applied to such problems. The procedure involves discretization of the problem using nodes inter-connected by potential yield-line discontinuities, with the critical layout of these then identified using linear programming. The procedure is applied to various benchmark problems, demonstrating that highly accurate solutions can be obtained, and showing that DLO provides a truly systematic means of directly and reliably automatically identifying yield-line patterns. Finally, since the critical yield-line patterns for many problems are found to be quite complex in form, a means of automatically simplifying these is presented. PMID:25104905

  5. Breaking the oceanic lithosphere of a subducting slab: the 2013 Khash, Iran earthquake

    Barnhart, William D.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Samsonov, S.; Fielding, E.; Seidman, L.

    2014-01-01

    [1] Large intermediate depth, intraslab normal faulting earthquakes are a common, dangerous, but poorly understood phenomenon in subduction zones owing to a paucity of near field geophysical observations. Seismological and high quality geodetic observations of the 2013 Mw7.7 Khash, Iran earthquake reveal that at least half of the oceanic lithosphere, including the mantle and entire crust, ruptured in a single earthquake, confirming with unprecedented resolution that large earthquakes can nucleate in and rupture through the oceanic mantle. A rupture width of at least 55 km is required to explain both InSAR observations and teleseismic waveforms, with the majority of slip occurring in the oceanic mantle. Combining our well-constrained earthquake slip distributions with the causative fault orientation and geometry of the local subduction zone, we hypothesize that the Khash earthquake likely occurred as the combined result of slab bending forces and dehydration of hydrous minerals along a preexisting fault formed prior to subduction.

  6. Automatic low-order aberration correction based on geometrical optics for slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Dong, Lizhi; Lai, Boheng; Yang, Ping; Liu, Yong; Kong, Qingfeng; Yang, Kangjian; Tang, Guomao; Xu, Bing

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, we present a method based on geometry optics to simultaneously correct low-order aberrations and reshape the beams of slab lasers. A coaxial optical system with three lenses is adapted. The positions of the three lenses are directly calculated based on the beam parameters detected by wavefront sensors. The initial sizes of the input beams are 1.8  mm×11  mm, and peak-to-valley (PV) values of the wavefront range up to several tens of microns. After automatic correction, the dimensions may reach nearly 22  mm×22  mm as expected, and PV values of the wavefront are less than 2 μm. The effectiveness and precision of this method are verified with experiments.

  7. Nonlinear saturation of the slab ITG instability and zonal flow generation with fully kinetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Sturdevant, Benjamin J.; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott E.

    2018-05-01

    Fully kinetic turbulence models are of interest for their potential to validate or replace gyrokinetic models in plasma regimes where the gyrokinetic expansion parameters are marginal. Here, we demonstrate fully kinetic ion capability by simulating the growth and nonlinear saturation of the ion-temperature-gradient instability in shearless slab geometry assuming adiabatic electrons and including zonal flow dynamics. The ion trajectories are integrated using the Lorentz force, and the cyclotron motion is fully resolved. Linear growth and nonlinear saturation characteristics show excellent agreement with analogous gyrokinetic simulations across a wide range of parameters. The fully kinetic simulation accurately reproduces the nonlinearly generated zonal flow. This work demonstrates nonlinear capability, resolution of weak gradient drive, and zonal flow physics, which are critical aspects of modeling plasma turbulence with full ion dynamics.

  8. Photon migration through a turbid slab described by a model based on diffusion approximation. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Contini, D; Martelli, F; Zaccanti, G

    1997-07-01

    The diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation is a model used widely to describe photon migration in highly diffusing media and is an important matter in biological tissue optics. An analysis of the time-dependent diffusion equation together with its solutions for the slab geometry and for a semi-infinite diffusing medium are reported. These solutions, presented for both the time-dependent and the continuous wave source, account for the refractive index mismatch between the turbid medium and the surrounding medium. The results have been compared with those obtained when different boundary conditions were assumed. The comparison has shown that the effect of the refractive index mismatch cannot be disregarded. This effect is particularly important for the transmittance. The discussion of results also provides an analysis of the role of the absorption coefficient in the expression of the diffusion coefficient.

  9. Intrastab Earthquakes: Dehydration of the Cascadia Slab

    Preston, L.A.; Creager, K.C.; Crosson, R.S.; Brocher, T.M.; Trehu, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    We simultaneously invert travel times of refracted and wide-angle reflected waves for three-dimensional compressional-wave velocity structure, earthquake locations, and reflector geometry in northwest Washington state. The reflector, interpreted to be the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, separates intrastab earthquakes into two groups, permitting a new understanding of the origins of intrastab earthquakes in Cascadia. Earthquakes up-dip of the Moho's 45-kilometer depth contour occur below the reflector, in the subducted oceanic mantle, consistent with serpentinite dehydration; earthquakes located down-dip occur primarily within the subducted crust, consistent with the basalt-to-eclogite transformation.

  10. Electro-optical properties of zigzag and armchair boron nitride nanotubes under a transverse electric field: Tight binding calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2012-02-01

    The electro-optical properties of zigzag and armchair BNNTs in a uniform transverse electric field are investigated within tight binding approximation. It is found that the electric field modifies the band structure and splits band degeneracy where these effects reflect in the DOS and JDOS spectra. A decrease in the band gap, as a function of the electric field, is observed. This gap reduction increases with the diameter and it is independent of chirality. An analytic function to estimate the electric field needed for band gap closing is proposed which is in good agreement with DFT results. In additional, we show that the larger diameter tubes are more sensitive than small ones. Number and position of peaks in DOS and JDOS spectra for armchair and zigzag tubes with similar radius are dependent on electric field strength.

  11. Experimental study and modeling of atomic-scale friction in zigzag and armchair lattice orientations of MoS2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Shi, Jialin; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Peng; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Physical properties of two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, black phosphorus, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide, exhibit significant dependence on their lattice orientations, especially for zigzag and armchair lattice orientations. Understanding of the atomic probe motion on surfaces with different orientations helps in the study of anisotropic materials. Unfortunately, there is no comprehensive model that can describe the probe motion mechanism. In this paper, we report a tribological study of MoS2 in zigzag and armchair orientations. We observed a characteristic power spectrum and friction force values. To explain our results, we developed a modified, two-dimensional, stick-slip Tomlinson model that allows simulation of the probe motion on MoS2 surfaces by combining the motion in the Mo layer and S layer. Our model fits well with the experimental data and provides a theoretical basis for tribological studies of two-dimensional materials. PMID:27877869

  12. Experimental study and modeling of atomic-scale friction in zigzag and armchair lattice orientations of MoS2.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Shi, Jialin; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Peng; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-01-01

    Physical properties of two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, black phosphorus, molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) and tungsten disulfide, exhibit significant dependence on their lattice orientations, especially for zigzag and armchair lattice orientations. Understanding of the atomic probe motion on surfaces with different orientations helps in the study of anisotropic materials. Unfortunately, there is no comprehensive model that can describe the probe motion mechanism. In this paper, we report a tribological study of MoS 2 in zigzag and armchair orientations. We observed a characteristic power spectrum and friction force values. To explain our results, we developed a modified, two-dimensional, stick-slip Tomlinson model that allows simulation of the probe motion on MoS 2 surfaces by combining the motion in the Mo layer and S layer. Our model fits well with the experimental data and provides a theoretical basis for tribological studies of two-dimensional materials.

  13. A New, Simple and Versatile Strategy for the Synthesis of Short Segments of Zigzag-Type Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    André, Etienne; Boutonnet, Baptiste; Charles, Pauline; Martini, Cyril; Aguiar-Hualde, Juan-Manuel; Latil, Sylvain; Guérineau, Vincent; Hammad, Karim; Ray, Priyanka; Guillot, Régis; Huc, Vincent

    2016-02-24

    Short segments of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were obtained from a calixarene scaffold by using a completely new, simple and expedited strategy that allowed fine-tuning of their diameters. This new approach also allows for functionalised short segments of zigzag SWCNTs to be obtained; a prerequisite towards their lengthening. These new SWCNT short segments/calixarene composites show interesting behaviour in solution. DFT analysis of these new compounds also suggests interesting photophysical behaviour. Along with the synthesis of various SWCNTs segments, this approach also constitutes a powerful tool for the construction of new, radially oriented π systems. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The large Bonin deep Event of 30 May 2015: Seismogenesis in a Detached and Fragmented Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, Emile; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2016-04-01

    The earthquake of 30 May 2015 in the Bonin Island was exceptional in many respects: it was the fifth largest deep earthquake ever recorded (7.8 E27 dyn*cm; Mw = 7.9); at h = 680 km, it was 100 km deeper than any known event in that subduction zone and 150 km distant from its nearest neighbor (including relocated historical events dating back to the 1920s); it was displaced as much as 150 km East of the prolongation of the mapped Wadati-Benioff Zone; and finally its focal mechanism was close to the opposite of the down-dip compression prevailing for the deepest known earthquakes. Other cases of "detached" deep earthquakes occurring in highwavespeed, high-Q slab material, have been described in front of subduction zones, notably by Fukao et al. [19092], Van der Hilst et al. [1993] aand Okal [2001]. The geometry of the 2015 Bonin event is reminiscent of that of the cluster of (much smaller) seismic events beneath the North Fiji Basin, which appear be unrelated to presently active W-B systems, but rather express seismogenesis in detached or fragmented slab material that has foundered to the bottom of the transition zone [Kirby et al., 1996; Okal and Kirby, 1998], where stresses may be generated by heterogeneous volume changes associated with the metastable olivine-spinel metamorphic reaction. How and why slab fragments become detached has been suggested to possibly involve collisions of oceanic plateaux or island arcs with oceanic forearcs, leading to arc reversal and/or fragmentation of normal oceanic and plateau lithosphere. In this context, the Igasawara Plateau is currently colliding with the Bonin forearc just to the South of the 2015 deep event. The Bonin Ridge to the North may represent a section of thick remnant crust that otherwise detached from its slab and later foundered in the mantle all the way to the bottom of the transition zone, stagnating to this day in the source region of the 2015 shock.

  15. Tearing of the Indian lithospheric slab beneath southern Tibet revealed by SKS-wave splitting measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Li, Wei; Yuan, Xiaohui; Badal, José; Teng, Jiwen

    2015-03-01

    Shear wave birefringence is a direct diagnostic of seismic anisotropy. It is often used to infer the northern limit of the underthrusting Indian lithosphere, based on the seismic anisotropy contrast between the Indian and Eurasian plates. Most studies have been made through several near north-south trending passive-source seismic experiments in southern Tibet. To investigate the geometry and the nature of the underthrusting Indian lithosphere, an east-west trending seismic array consisting of 48 seismographs was operated in the central Lhasa block from September 2009 to November 2010. Splitting of SKS waves was measured and verified with different methods. Along the profile, the direction of fast wave polarization is about 60° in average with small fluctuations. The delay time generally increases from east to west between 0.2 s and 1.0 s, and its variation correlates spatially with north-south oriented rifts in southern Tibet. The SKS wave arrives 1.0-2.0 s later at stations in the eastern part of the profile than in the west. The source of the anisotropy, estimated by non-overlapped parts of the Fresnel zones at stations with different splitting parameters, is concentrated above ca. 195 km depth. All the first-order features suggest that the geometry of the underthrusting Indian lithospheric slab in the Himalayan-Tibetan collision zone beneath southern Tibet is characterized by systematic lateral variations. A slab tearing and/or breakoff model of Indian lithosphere with different subduction angles is likely a good candidate to explain the observations.

  16. Atomistic full-quantum transport model for zigzag graphene nanoribbon-based structures: Complex energy-band method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Nan; Luo, Win-Jet; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Chung, Hsien-Ching; Lin, Chiun-Yan; Wu, Jhao-Ying

    2018-01-01

    Using a non-equilibrium Green’s function framework in combination with the complex energy-band method, an atomistic full-quantum model for solving quantum transport problems for a zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbon (zGNR) structure is proposed. For transport calculations, the mathematical expressions from the theory for zGNR-based device structures are derived in detail. The transport properties of zGNR-based devices are calculated and studied in detail using the proposed method.

  17. Designing of spin-filtering devices in zigzag graphene nanoribbons heterojunctions by asymmetric hydrogenation and B-N doping

    SciT

    Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Ouyang, Fangping

    2015-01-07

    Using nonequilibrium Green's function in combination with the spin-polarized density functional theory, the spin-dependent transport properties of boron and nitrogen doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) heterojunctions with single or double edge-saturated hydrogen have been investigated. Our results show that the perfect spin-filtering effect (100%), rectifying behavior and negative differential resistance can be realized in the ZGNRs-based systems. And the corresponding physical analysis has been given.

  18. Electron doping effects on the electrical conductivity of zigzag carbon nanotubes and corresponding unzipped armchair graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Hamze; Jalilvand, Samira; Kurdestany, Jamshid Moradi; Grabowski, Marek

    2017-10-01

    The Kubo formula is used to extract the electrical conductivity (EC) of different diameters of doped zigzag carbon nanotubes and their corresponding unzipped armchair graphene nanoribbons, as a function of temperature and chemical potential, within the tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's functions approach. The results reveal more sensitivity to temperature for semiconducting systems in addition to a decrease in EC of all systems with increasing cross-sections.

  19. Idiosyncratic Findings in Trichoscopy of Tinea Capitis: Comma, Zigzag Hairs, Corkscrew, and Morse Code-like Hair.

    PubMed

    Elghblawi, Ebtisam

    2016-01-01

    Dermoscopy is a method of growing significance in the diagnoses of dermatological pigmented skin diseases. However, in my case, mycology culture was negative and successful treatment was given on the basis of trichoscopy and wood lamp examination. I hereby describe a young boy with tinea capitis, multiple "comma hairs" and "zigzag hair" and a subtle additional feature "Morse code-like hair" when intensification was applied. Dermatoscopic aspects found skin Type 2 in a child of as a distinctive dermoscopic finding.

  20. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  1. Flyby Geometry Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.

    2007-01-01

    The Flyby Geometry Optimization Tool is a computer program for computing trajectories and trajectory-altering impulsive maneuvers for spacecraft used in radio relay of scientific data to Earth from an exploratory airplane flying in the atmosphere of Mars.

  2. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  3. Origami, geometry and art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wares, Arsalan; Elstak, Iwan

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the mathematics that emanates from the construction of an origami box. We first construct a simple origami box from a rectangular sheet and then discuss some of the mathematical questions that arise in the context of geometry and algebra. The activity can be used as a context for illustrating how algebra and geometry, like other branches of mathematics, are interrelated.

  4. Highly Efficient Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation to Methanol Catalyzed by Zigzag Platinum-Cobalt Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shuxing; Shao, Qi; Feng, Yonggang; Bu, Lingzheng; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2017-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) hydrogenation is an effective strategy for CO 2 utilization, while unsatisfied conversion efficiencies remain great challenges. It is reported herein that zigzag Pt-Co nanowires (NWs) with Pt-rich surfaces and abundant steps/edges can perform as highly active and stable CO 2 hydrogenation catalysts. It is found that tuning the Pt/Co ratio of the Pt-Co NWs, solvents, and catalyst supports could well optimize the CO 2 hydrogenation to methanol (CH 3 OH) with the Pt 4 Co NWs/C exhibiting the best performance, outperforming all the previous catalysts. They are also very durable with limited activity decays after six catalytic cycles. The diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy result of CO 2 adsorption shows that the Pt 4 Co NWs/C undergoes the adsorption/activation of CO 2 by forming appropriate carboxylate intermediates, and thus enhancing the CH 3 OH production. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Role of step stiffness and kinks in the relaxation of vicinal (001) with zigzag [110] steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, B.; Hamouda, Ajmi BH.; Einstein, TL.

    2017-08-01

    We present a kinetic Monte Carlo study of the relaxation dynamics and steady state configurations of 〈110〉 steps on a vicinal (001) simple cubic surface. This system is interesting because 〈110〉 (fully kinked) steps have different elementary excitation energetics and favor step diffusion more than 〈100〉 (nominally straight) steps. In this study we show how this leads to different relaxation dynamics as well as to different steady state configurations, including that 2-bond breaking processes are rate determining for 〈110〉 steps in contrast to 3-bond breaking processes for 〈100〉-steps found in previous work [Surface Sci. 602, 3569 (2008)]. The analysis of the terrace-width distribution (TWD) shows a significant role of kink-generation-annihilation processes during the relaxation of steps: the kinetic of relaxation, toward the steady state, is much faster in the case of 〈110〉-zigzag steps, with a higher standard deviation of the TWD, in agreement with a decrease of step stiffness due to orientation. We conclude that smaller step stiffness leads inexorably to faster step dynamics towards the steady state. The step-edge anisotropy slows the relaxation of steps and increases the strength of step-step effective interactions.

  6. The Relaxation of Vicinal (001) with ZigZag [110] Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Micah; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh; González-Cabrera, Diego Luis; Einstein, Theodore L.

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents a kinetic Monte Carlo study of the relaxation dynamics of [110] steps on a vicinal (001) simple cubic surface. This system is interesting because [110] steps have different elementary excitation energetics and favor step diffusion more than close-packed [100] steps. In this talk we show how this leads to relaxation dynamics showing greater fluctuations on a shorter time scale for [110] steps as well as 2-bond breaking processes being rate determining in contrast to 3-bond breaking processes for [100] steps. The existence of a steady state is shown via the convergence of terrace width distributions at times much longer than the relaxation time. In this time regime excellent fits to the modified generalized Wigner distribution (as well as to the Berry-Robnik model when steps can overlap) were obtained. Also, step-position correlation function data show diffusion-limited increase for small distances along the step as well as greater average step displacement for zigzag steps compared to straight steps for somewhat longer distances along the step. Work supported by NSF-MRSEC Grant DMR 05-20471 as well as a DOE-CMCSN Grant.

  7. Electronic and magnetic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons with Stone–Wales defects

    SciT

    Dong, Haixia; Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009; Fang, Dangqi

    2015-02-14

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Stone–Wales (SW) defects were investigated using first-principles calculations. We found that two types of SW defects (named SW-Ι and SW-ΙΙ) exist in ZSiNRs. The SW defect was found to be the most stable at the edge of the ZSiNR, independently of the defect orientation, even more stable than it is in an infinite silicene sheet. In addition, the ZSiNRs can transition from semiconductor to metal or half-metal by modifying the SW defect location and concentration. For the same defect concentration, the band structures influenced by the SW-Ι defectmore » are more distinct than those influenced by the SW-ΙΙ when the SW defect is at the edge. The present study suggests the possibility of tuning the electronic properties of ZSiNRs using the SW defects and might motivate their potential application in nanoelectronics and spintronics.« less

  8. Multicomponent Pt-Based Zigzag Nanowires as Selectivity Controllers for Selective Hydrogenation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shuxing; Bu, Lingzheng; Shao, Qi; Zhu, Xing; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2018-06-22

    The selective hydrogenation of α, β-unsaturated aldehyde is an extremely important transformation, while developing efficient catalysts with desirable selectivity to highly value-added products is challenging, mainly due to the coexistence of two conjugated unsaturated functional groups. Herein, we report that a series of Pt-based zigzag nanowires (ZNWs) can be adopted as selectivity controllers for α, β-unsaturated aldehyde hydrogenation, where the excellent unsaturated alcohol (UOL) selectivity (>95%) and high saturated aldehyde (SA) selectivity (>94%) are achieved on PtFe ZNWs and PtFeNi ZNWs+AlCl 3 , respectively. The excellent UOL selectivity of PtFe ZNWs is attributed to the lower electron density of the surface Pt atoms, while the high SA selectivity of PtFeNi ZNWs+AlCl 3 is due to synergy between PtFeNi ZNWs and AlCl 3 , highlighting the importance of Pt-based NWs with precisely controlled surface and composition for catalysis and beyond.

  9. Tunable magnetic states on the zigzag edges of hydrogenated and halogenated group-IV nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Wang, Tzu-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Su, Wan-Sheng; Guo, Guang-Yu

    The magnetic and electronic properties of hydrogenated and halogenated group-IV zigzag nanoribbons (ZNRs) are investigated by first-principles density functional calculations. Fascinatingly, we find that all the ZNRs have magnetic edges with a rich variety of electronic and magnetic properties tunable by selecting the parent and passivating elements as well as controlling the magnetization direction and external strain. In particular, the electric property of the edge band structure can be tuned from the conducting to insulating with a band gap up to 0.7 eV, depending on the parent and passivating elements as well as the applied strain, magnetic configuration and magnetization orientation. The last controllability would allow us to develop magnetic on-off nano-switches. Furthermore, ZNRs such as SiI, Ge, GeI and SnH, have fully spin-polarized metallic edge states and thus are promising materials for spintronics. The calculated magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy can be as large as 9 meV/edge-site, being 2000 time greater than that of bulk Ni and Fe ( 5 μeV/atom), and thus has great potential for high density magneto-electric data-storage devices. Finally, the calculated exchange coupling strength and thus magnetic transition temperature increases as the applied strain goes from -5 % to 5 %. Our findings thus show that these ZNRs would have exciting applications in next-generation electronic and spintronic nano-devices.

  10. Tunable magnetic states on the zigzag edges of hydrogenated and halogenated group-IV nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzu-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Su, Wan-Sheng; Guo, Guang-Yu

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic and electronic properties of hydrogenated and halogenated group-IV zigzag nanoribbons (ZNRs) are investigated by first-principles density functional calculations. Fascinatingly, we find that all the ZNRs have magnetic edges with a rich variety of electronic and magnetic properties tunable by selecting the parent and passivating elements as well as controlling the magnetization direction and external strain. In particular, the electric property of the edge band structure can be tuned from the conducting to insulating with a band gap up to 0.7 eV. The last controllability would allow us to develop magnetic on-off nano-switches. Furthermore, ZNRs such as SiI, Ge, GeI and SnH, have fully spin-polarized metallic edge states and thus are promising materials for spintronics. The calculated magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy can be as large as ~9 meV/edge-site, being 2×103 time greater than that of bulk Ni and Fe (~5 μeV/atom), and thus has great potential for high density magneto-electric data-storage devices. Finally, the calculated exchange coupling strength and thus magnetic transition temperature increases as the applied strain goes from -5% to 5%. Our findings thus show that these ZNRs would have exciting applications in next-generation electronic and spintronic nano-devices.

  11. Wortmannin-induced vacuole fusion enhances amyloplast dynamics in Arabidopsis zigzag1 hypocotyls

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Ashley Ann; Han, Sang Won; Toyota, Masatsugu; Brillada, Carla; Zheng, Jiameng; Gilroy, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Gravitropism in Arabidopsis shoots depends on the sedimentation of amyloplasts in the endodermis, and a complex interplay between the vacuole and F-actin. Gravity response is inhibited in zigzag-1 (zig-1), a mutant allele of VTI11, which encodes a SNARE protein involved in vacuole fusion. zig-1 seedlings have fragmented vacuoles that fuse after treatment with wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and underscore a role of phosphoinositides in vacuole fusion. Using live-cell imaging with a vertical stage microscope, we determined that young endodermal cells below the apical hook that are smaller than 70 μm in length are the graviperceptive cells in dark-grown hypocotyls. This result was confirmed by local wortmannin application to the top of zig-1 hypocotyls, which enhanced shoot gravitropism in zig-1 mutants. Live-cell imaging of zig-1 hypocotyl endodermal cells indicated that amyloplasts are trapped between juxtaposed vacuoles and their movement is severely restricted. Wortmannin-induced fusion of vacuoles in zig-1 seedlings increased the formation of transvacuolar strands, enhanced amyloplast sedimentation and partially suppressed the agravitropic phenotype of zig-1 seedlings. Hypergravity conditions at 10 g were not sufficient to displace amyloplasts in zig-1, suggesting the existence of a physical tether between the vacuole and amyloplasts. Our results overall suggest that vacuole membrane remodeling may be involved in regulating the association of vacuoles and amyloplasts during graviperception. PMID:27816929

  12. Tailoring graphene magnetism by zigzag triangular holes: A first-principles thermodynamics study

    SciT

    Khan, Muhammad Ejaz; Zhang, P.; Kim, Yong-Hyun, E-mail: yong.hyun.kim@kaist.ac.kr

    We discuss the thermodynamic stability and magnetic property of zigzag triangular holes (ZTHs) in graphene based on the results of first-principles density functional theory calculations. We find that ZTHs with hydrogen-passivated edges in mixed sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} configurations (z{sub 211}) could be readily available at experimental thermodynamic conditions, but ZTHs with 100% sp{sup 2} hydrogen-passivation (z{sub 1}) could be limitedly available at high temperature and ultra-high vacuum conditions. Graphene magnetization near the ZTHs strongly depends on the type and the size of the triangles. While metallic z{sub 1} ZTHs exhibit characteristic edge magnetism due to the same-sublattice engineering, semiconducting z{submore » 211} ZTHs do show characteristic corner magnetism when the size is small <2 nm. Our findings could be useful for experimentally tailoring metal-free carbon magnetism by simply fabricating triangular holes in graphene.« less

  13. Origin of spin polarization in an edge boron doped zigzag graphene nanoribbon: a potential spin filter.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Soubhik; Wasey, A H M Abdul; Thapa, Ranjit; Das, G P

    2018-08-24

    To realize a graphene based spintronic device, the prime challenge is to control the electronic structure of edges. In this work we find the origin of the spin filtering property in edge boron doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) and provide a guide to preparing a graphene based next-generation spin filter based device. Here, we unveil the role of orbitals (p-electron) to tune the electronic, magnetic and transport properties of edge B doped ZGNRs. When all the edge carbon atoms at one of the edges of ZGNRs are replaced by B (100% edge B doping), the system undergoes a semiconductor to metal transition. The role of passivation of the edge with single/double atomic hydrogen on the electronic properties and its relation with the p-electron is correlated in-depth. 50% edge B doped ZGNRs (50% of the edge C atoms at one of the edges are replaced by B) also show half-metallicity when the doped edge is left unpassivated. The half-metallic systems show 100% spin filtering efficiency for a wide range of bias voltages. Zero-bias transmission function of the other configurations shows asymmetric behavior for the up and down spin channels, thereby indicating their possible application potential in nano-spintronics.

  14. Zig-zag tape influence in NREL Phase VI wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Iradi, Sugoi; Munduate, Xabier

    2014-06-01

    Two bladed 10 metre diameter wind turbine was tested in the 24.4m × 36.6m NASA-Ames wind tunnel (Phase VI). These experiments have been extensively used for validation purposes for CFD and other engineering tools. The free transition case (S), has been, and is, the most employed one for validation purposes, and consist in a 3° pitch case with a rotational speed of 72rpm upwind configuration with and without yaw misalignment. However, there is another less visited case (M) where identical configuration was tested but with the inclusion of a zig-zag tape. This was called transition fixed sequence. This paper shows the differences between the free and the fix transition cases, that should be more appropriate for comparison with fully turbulent simulations. Steady k-ω SST fully turbulent computations performed with WMB CFD method are compared with the experiments showing, better predictions in the attached flow region when it is compared with the transition fixed experiments. This work wants to prove the utility of M case (transition fixed) and show its differences respect the S case (free transition) for validation purposes.

  15. Zigzag nanoribbons of two-dimensional silicene-like crystals: magnetic, topological and thermoelectric properties.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, Michał; Barnaś, Józef; Swirkowicz, Renata

    2015-12-09

    The effects of electron-electron and spin-orbit interactions on the ground-state magnetic configuration and on the corresponding thermoelectric and spin thermoelectric properties in zigzag nanoribbons of two-dimensional hexagonal crystals are analysed theoretically. The thermoelectric properties of quasi-stable magnetic states are also considered. Of particular interest is the influence of Coulomb and spin-orbit interactions on the topological edge states and on the transition between the topological insulator and conventional gap insulator states. It is shown that the interplay of both interactions also has a significant impact on the transport and thermoelectric characteristics of the nanoribbons. The spin-orbit interaction also determines the in-plane magnetic easy axis. The thermoelectric properties of nanoribbons with in-plane magnetic moments are compared to those of nanoribbons with edge magnetic moments oriented perpendicularly to their plane. Nanoribbons with ferromagnetic alignment of the edge moments are shown to reveal spin thermoelectricity in addition to the conventional one.

  16. Electrical controllable spin pump based on a zigzag silicene nanoribbon junction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Tong, Peiqing

    2017-12-13

    We propose a possible electrical controllable spin pump based on a zigzag silicene nanoribbon ferromagnetic junction by applying two time-dependent perpendicular electric fields. By using the Keldysh Green's function method, we derive the analytic expression of the spin-resolved current at the adiabatic approximation and demonstrate that two asymmetric spin up and spin down currents can be pumped out in the device without an external bias. The pumped currents mainly come from the interplay between the photon-assisted spin pump effect and the electrically-modulated energy band structure of the tunneling junction. The spin valve phenomena are not only related to the energy gap opened by two perpendicular staggered potentials, but also dependent on the system parameters such as the pumping frequency, the pumping phase difference, the spin-orbit coupling and the Fermi level, which can be tuned by the electrical methods. The proposed device can also be used to produce a pure spin current and a 100% polarized spin current through the photon-assisted pumping process. Our investigations may provide an electrical manipulation of spin-polarized electrons in graphene-like pumping devices.

  17. Controllable spin polarization and spin filtering in a zigzag silicene nanoribbon

    SciT

    Farokhnezhad, Mohsen, E-mail: Mohsen-farokhnezhad@physics.iust.ac.ir; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi@iust.ac.ir; Pournaghavi, Nezhat

    2015-05-07

    Using non-equilibrium Green's function, we study the spin-dependent electron transport properties in a zigzag silicene nanoribbon. To produce and control spin polarization, it is assumed that two ferromagnetic strips are deposited on the both edges of the silicene nanoribbon and an electric field is perpendicularly applied to the nanoribbon plane. The spin polarization is studied for both parallel and anti-parallel configurations of exchange magnetic fields induced by the ferromagnetic strips. We find that complete spin polarization can take place in the presence of perpendicular electric field for anti-parallel configuration and the nanoribbon can work as a perfect spin filter. Themore » spin direction of transmitted electrons can be easily changed from up to down and vice versa by reversing the electric field direction. For parallel configuration, perfect spin filtering can occur even in the absence of electric field. In this case, the spin direction can be changed by changing the electron energy. Finally, we investigate the effects of nonmagnetic Anderson disorder on spin dependent conductance and find that the perfect spin filtering properties of nanoribbon are destroyed by strong disorder, but the nanoribbon retains these properties in the presence of weak disorder.« less

  18. Dual-channel current valve in a three terminal zigzag graphene nanoribbon junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically propose a dual-channel current valve based on a three terminal zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) junction driven by three asymmetric time-dependent pumping potentials. By means of the Keldysh Green’s function method, we show that two asymmetric charge currents can be pumped in the different left-right terminals of the device at a zero bias, which mainly stems from the single photon-assisted pumping approximation and the valley valve effect in a ZGNR p-n junction. The ON and OFF states of pumped charge currents are crucially dependent on the even-odd chain widths of the three electrodes, the pumping frequency, the lattice potential and the Fermi level. Two-tunneling spin valves are also considered to spatially separate and detect 100% polarized spin currents owing to the combined spin pump effect and the valley selective transport in a three terminal ZGNR ferromagnetic junction. Our investigations might be helpful to control the spatial and spin degrees of freedom of electrons in graphene pumping devices.

  19. Phonon stiffen and soften at zigzag- and armchair-dominated edges of exfoliated bilayer graphene ribbon presented by Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Minggang; Zhou, Xiaohua; Xin, Duqiang; Xu, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    The Raman spectra at the edge of the exfoliated bilayer graphene ribbon (GR) were investigated in detail. Results show that both G and 2D phonons stiffen (wave number increases) at zigzag-dominated edge, while they soften at armchair-dominated edge compared with those at the middle position in the GR. Furthermore, the full widths at half maximum intensity of both G and 2D Raman peaks narrow at the zigzag-dominated edge, while they broaden at the armchair-dominated edge. The stiffness and softness are attributed to the C-C bonds at the edge. For zigzag-dominated edge, the stiffness may originate in the increase of the force constant induced by the shrinking of C-C bond. For armchair-dominated edge, the softness may be due to the decrease of the force constant induced by the unsaturated hanging bonds at edge, which is different from Kohn anomaly and charge doping. The analysis is in agreement well with others calculation results about C-C bonds and the edge energy. These results may be useful to understand physical properties at the bilayer graphene edge and for applications in the device by taking advantage of the edge states in bilayer graphene.

  20. An Implementation of RC4+ Algorithm and Zig-zag Algorithm in a Super Encryption Scheme for Text Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiman, M. A.; Amalia; Chayanie, N. I.

    2018-03-01

    Cryptography is the art and science of using mathematical methods to preserve message security. There are two types of cryptography, namely classical and modern cryptography. Nowadays, most people would rather use modern cryptography than classical cryptography because it is harder to break than the classical one. One of classical algorithm is the Zig-zag algorithm that uses the transposition technique: the original message is unreadable unless the person has the key to decrypt the message. To improve the security, the Zig-zag Cipher is combined with RC4+ Cipher which is one of the symmetric key algorithms in the form of stream cipher. The two algorithms are combined to make a super-encryption. By combining these two algorithms, the message will be harder to break by a cryptanalyst. The result showed that complexity of the combined algorithm is θ(n2 ), while the complexity of Zig-zag Cipher and RC4+ Cipher are θ(n2 ) and θ(n), respectively.

  1. First principles study on the electronic structures and transport properties of armchair/zigzag edge hybridized graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiuying; Long, Mengqiu; Liu, Anhua; Li, Mingjun; Xu, Hui

    2018-05-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) can be mainly classified into armchair graphene nanoribbons (aGNRs) and zigzag graphene nanoribbons (zGNRs) by different edge chiral directions. In this work, by introducing Stone-Wales defects on the edges of the V-shaped aGNRs, we propose a kind of armchair/zigzag edge hybridized GNRs (a/zHGNRs) and using the density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function method, the band structures and electronic transport properties of the a/zHGNRs have been calculated. Our results show that an indirect bandgap appears in the band structures of the a/zHGNRs, which is very different from the direct bandgap of aGNRs and gapless of zGNRs. We also find that the valance band is mainly derived from the armchair partial atoms on the hybridized edge, while the conduction band comes mainly from the zigzag partial atoms of the hybridized edge. Meanwhile, the bandgap also oscillates with a period of three when the ribbon width increases. In addition, our quantum transport calculations show that there is a remarkable transition between the semiconductor and the metal with different ribbon widths in the a/zHGNRs devices, and the corresponding physical analysis is given.

  2. Anisotropic thermoelectric behavior in armchair and zigzag mono- and fewlayer MoS2 in thermoelectric generator applications

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Abbas; Li, Qiliang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have studied thermoelectric properties of monolayer and fewlayer MoS2 in both armchair and zigzag orientations. Density functional theory (DFT) using non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) method has been implemented to calculate the transmission spectra of mono- and fewlayer MoS2 in armchair and zigzag directions. Phonon transmission spectra are calculated based on parameterization of Stillinger-Weber potential. Thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, is calculated using these electronic and phonon transmission spectra. In general, a thermoelectric generator is composed of thermocouples made of both n-type and p-type legs. Based on our calculations, monolayer MoS2 in armchair orientation is found to have the highest ZT value for both p-type and n-type legs compared to all other armchair and zigzag structures. We have proposed a thermoelectric generator based on monolayer MoS2 in armchair orientation. Moreover, we have studied the effect of various dopant species on thermoelectric current of our proposed generator. Further, we have compared output current of our proposed generator with those of Silicon thin films. Results indicate that thermoelectric current of MoS2 armchair monolayer is several orders of magnitude higher than that of Silicon thin films. PMID:26333948

  3. Anisotropic thermoelectric behavior in armchair and zigzag mono- and fewlayer MoS2 in thermoelectric generator applications.

    PubMed

    Arab, Abbas; Li, Qiliang

    2015-09-03

    In this work, we have studied thermoelectric properties of monolayer and fewlayer MoS2 in both armchair and zigzag orientations. Density functional theory (DFT) using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method has been implemented to calculate the transmission spectra of mono- and fewlayer MoS2 in armchair and zigzag directions. Phonon transmission spectra are calculated based on parameterization of Stillinger-Weber potential. Thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, is calculated using these electronic and phonon transmission spectra. In general, a thermoelectric generator is composed of thermocouples made of both n-type and p-type legs. Based on our calculations, monolayer MoS2 in armchair orientation is found to have the highest ZT value for both p-type and n-type legs compared to all other armchair and zigzag structures. We have proposed a thermoelectric generator based on monolayer MoS2 in armchair orientation. Moreover, we have studied the effect of various dopant species on thermoelectric current of our proposed generator. Further, we have compared output current of our proposed generator with those of Silicon thin films. Results indicate that thermoelectric current of MoS2 armchair monolayer is several orders of magnitude higher than that of Silicon thin films.

  4. Software Geometry in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alion, Tyler; Viren, Brett; Junk, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) involves many detectors. The experiment's near detector (ND) facility, may ultimately involve several detectors. The far detector (FD) will be significantly larger than any other Liquid Argon (LAr) detector yet constructed; many prototype detectors are being constructed and studied to motivate a plethora of proposed FD designs. Whether it be a constructed prototype or a proposed ND/FD design, every design must be simulated and analyzed. This presents a considerable challenge to LBNE software experts; each detector geometry must be described to the simulation software in an efficient way which allows for multiple authors to easily collaborate. Furthermore, different geometry versions must be tracked throughout their use. We present a framework called General Geometry Description (GGD), written and developed by LBNE software collaborators for managing software to generate geometries. Though GGD is flexible enough to be used by any experiment working with detectors, we present it's first use in generating Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) files to interface with LArSoft, a framework of detector simulations, event reconstruction, and data analyses written for all LAr technology users at Fermilab. Brett is the other of the framework discussed here, the General Geometry Description (GGD).

  5. Analysis and design of composite slab by varying different parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambe, Kedar; Siddh, Sharda

    2018-03-01

    Composite deck slabs are in demand because of its faster, lighter and economical construction work. Composite slab consists of cold formed deck profiled sheet and concrete either lightweight or normal. Investigation of shear behaviour of the composite slab is very complex. Shear bond strength depends on the various parameter such as a shape of sheeting, a thickness of the sheet, type of embossment and its frequency of use, shear stiffener or intermediate stiffener, type of load, an arrangement of load, length of shear span, the thickness of concrete and support friction etc. In present study finite element analysis is carried out with ABAQUS 6.13, a simply supported composite slab is considered for the investigation of the shear bond behaviour of the composite slab by considering variation in three different parameters, the shape of a sheet, thickness of sheet and shear span. Different shear spans of two different shape of cold formed deck profiled sheet i.e. with intermediate stiffeners and without intermediate stiffeners are considered with two different thicknesses (0.8 mm and 1.2 mm) for simulation. In present work, simulation of models has done for static loading with 20 mm mesh size is considered.

  6. Systematic variation in the depths of slabs beneath arc volcanoes

    England, P.; Engdahl, R.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    The depths to the tops of the zones of intermediate-depth seismicity beneath arc volcanoes are determined using the hypocentral locations of Engdahl et al. These depths are constant, to within a few kilometres, within individual arc segments, but differ by tens of kilometres from one arc segment to another. The range in depths is from 65 km to 130 km, inconsistent with the common belief that the volcanoes directly overlie the places where the slabs reach a critical depth that is roughly constant for all arcs. The depth to the top of the intermediate-depth seismicity beneath volcanoes correlates neither with age of the descending ocean floor nor with the thermal parameter of the slab. This depth does, however, exhibit an inverse correlation with the descent speed of the subducting plate, which is the controlling factor both for the thermal structure of the wedge of mantle above the slab and for the temperature at the top of the slab. We interpret this result as indicating that the location of arc volcanoes is controlled by a process that depends critically upon the temperature at the top of the slab, or in the wedge of mantle, immediately below the volcanic arc.

  7. Fossil slabs attached to unsubducted fragments of the Farallon plate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Forsyth, Donald W; Rau, Christina J; Carriero, Nina; Schmandt, Brandon; Gaherty, James B; Savage, Brian

    2013-04-02

    As the Pacific-Farallon spreading center approached North America, the Farallon plate fragmented into a number of small plates. Some of the microplate fragments ceased subducting before the spreading center reached the trench. Most tectonic models have assumed that the subducting oceanic slab detached from these microplates close to the trench, but recent seismic tomography studies have revealed a high-velocity anomaly beneath Baja California that appears to be a fossil slab still attached to the Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates. Here, using surface wave tomography, we establish the lateral extent of this fossil slab and show that it is correlated with the distribution of high-Mg andesites thought to derive from partial melting of the subducted oceanic crust. We also reinterpret the high seismic velocity anomaly beneath the southern central valley of California as another fossil slab extending to a depth of 200 km or more that is attached to the former Monterey microplate. The existence of these fossil slabs may force a reexamination of models of the tectonic evolution of western North America over the last 30 My.

  8. Mega-thrust and Intra-slab Earthquakes Beneath Tokyo Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, N.; Sato, H.; Koketsu, K.; Hagiwara, H.; Wu, F.; Okaya, D.; Iwasaki, T.; Kasahara, K.

    2006-12-01

    In central Japan the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) subducts beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan area, the Kanto region, where it causes mega-thrust earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (M8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9) which had 105,000 fatalities. The vertical proximity of this down going lithospheric plate is of concern because the greater Tokyo urban region has a population of 42 million and is the center of approximately 40% of the nation's economic activities. A M7+ earthquake in this region at present has high potential to produce devastating loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions. The M7+ earthquake is evaluated to occur with a probability of 70% in 30 years by the Earthquake Research Committee of Japan. In 2002, a consortium of universities and government agencies in Japan started the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Urban Areas, a project to improve information needed for seismic hazards analyses of the largest urban centers. Assessment in Kanto of the seismic hazard produced by the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) mega-thrust earthquakes requires identification of all significant faults and possible earthquake scenarios and rupture behavior, regional characterizations of PSP geometry and the overlying Honshu arc physical properties (e.g., seismic wave velocities, densities, attenuation), and local near-surface seism ic site effects. Our study addresses (1) improved regional characterization of the PSP geometry based on new deep seismic reflection profiles (Sato etal.,2005), reprocessed off-shore profiles (Kimura et al.,2005), and a dense seismic array in the Boso peninsular (Hagiwara et al., 2006) and (2) identification of asperities of the mega-thrust at the top of the PSP. We qualitatively examine the relationship between seismic reflections and asperities inferred by reflection physical properties. We also discuss the relation between deformation of PSP and intra-slab M7+ earthquakes: the

  9. Photonic crystal slab waveguides in moderate index contrast media: Generalized transverse Bragg waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, David Bruce

    One of the anticipated advantages of photonic crystal waveguides is the ability to tune waveguide dispersion and propagation characteristics to achieve desired properties. The majority of research into photonic crystal waveguides centers around high index contrast photonic crystal waveguides with complete in-plane bandgaps in the photonic crystal cladding. This work focuses on linear photonic crystal waveguides in moderate index materials, with insufficient index contrast to guarantee a complete in-plane bandgap. Using a technique called Interferometric Lithography (IL) as well as standard semiconductor processing steps, a process flow for creating large area (˜cm 2), linear photonic crystal waveguides in a spin-deposited photocurable polymer is outlined. The study of such low index contrast photonic crystal waveguides offers a unique opportunity to explore the mechanisms governing waveguide confinement and photonic crystal behavior in general. Results from two optical characterization experiments are provided. In the first set of experiments, rhodamine 590 organic laser dye was incorporated into the polymer prior to fabrication of the photonic crystal slab. Emission spectra from waveguide core modes exhibit no obvious spectral selectivity owing to variation in the periodicity or geometry of the photonic crystal. In addition, grating coupled waveguides were fabricated, and a single frequency diode laser was coupled into the waveguide in order to study the transverse mode structure. To this author's knowledge, the optical mode profile images are the first taken of photonic crystal slab waveguides, exhibiting both simple low order mode structure as well as complex high order mode structure inconsistent with effective index theory. However, no obvious correlation between the mode structure and photonic crystal period or geometry was evident. Furthermore, in both the laser dye-doped and grating coupled waveguides, low loss waveguiding was observed regardless of

  10. Tracing Geophysical Indicators of Fluid-Induced Serpentinization in the Pampean Flat Slab Subduction Region of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, J. R.; Nikulin, A.; Park, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    An activity gap in the Andean volcanic arc in the Pampean section of the subduction zone in Chile ( 28°-33°S) marks a section of flat-slab subduction. Past studies connected this change in geometry to the collision and subduction of the Juan Fernandez Ridge and the resulting migration of both the thrust front and magmatism eastward to the Sierras Pampeanas. The fate of fluids released from the subducting Nazca slab remains uncertain and the degree of their interaction with the basal layer of the continental lithosphere is poorly understood. We present initial results of a receiver-function investigation and forward-modeling effort at station GO03 operated by the Chilean National Seismic Network. Receiver function analysis of 75 well-recorded teleseismic earthquake events recorded at GO03 allow us to constrain the position of the subducting Nazca slab and to address the physical properties of the interplate contact zone. Critically, our analysis indicates presence of a highly-anisotropic zone of low velocities directly above the subucting Nazca slab. We point out a remarkable similarity in geophysical characteristics between the observed seismic anomaly at GO03 and a volume of proposed serpentinization in an area of sub-horizontal subduction above the Juan de Fuca slab in Cascadia. This interpretation is further supported by forward-modeling receiver functions at GO03 relying on a velocity model that incorporates a serpentinized interplate region. The newly-identified low-velocity highly-anisotropic layer may extend beyond the GO03 area and act as a mineral reservoir that captures and, possibly, transports fluids derived from the dehydrating Nazca Plate as it subducts below South America. It is likely that there is a relationship between this feature and the lack of volcanic activity in the Pampean flat slab region. Figure Caption: A) Backazimuth sweep of receiver functions recorded at station GO03 with predicted phase arrivals plotted for 55 km, 65 km, 75 km and

  11. ­­New Finite-Frequency Teleseismic P-wave Tomography of the Anatolian Sub-continent and the Fate of the Subducted Cyprean Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, D. E.; Biryol, C. B.; Delph, J. R.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Özacar, A.; Sandvol, E. A.; Turkelli, N.

    2016-12-01

    The eastern Mediterranean region is characterized by active subduction of Tethyan lithosphere beneath the Anatolian sub-continent at the Aegean and Cyprean trenches. The subduction system is historically characterized by slab roll-back, detachment, and slab settling in the mantle transition zone. Prior mantle tomography studies reveal segmentation of the subducted Tethyan lithosphere, which is thought to have a strong control on surface volcanism and uplift across Anatolia. However, tomographic resolution, particularly in central Anatolia, has been limited, thus making detailed delineations of the subducted slab segments difficult. To improve resolution, we combine two years of seismic data from the recent Continental Dynamics - Central Anatolia Tectonics (CD-CAT) seismic deployment and Turkey's national seismic network ( 33,000 residuals) to 33,000 travel time residuals from Biryol et al. (2011, GJI) in a new finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomographic inversion. Our new images reveal with detail a complicated geometry of fast velocity anomalies associated with subducted Tethyan lithosphere. At shallow depths, slow velocities separate the fast anomalies connected to the Aegean and Cyprean trenches. The fast anomaly connected to the Cyprean trench has an arcuate shape in map view, following the trace of the Central Taurus Mountains. This anomaly is separated from a high-amplitude block to the north that appears to dip sub-vertically throughout the upper mantle (200-660 km depth). Other blocks of fast material that may represent subducted Tethyan lithosphere appear down-dip of the vertical block. Additionally, our images indicate that some of the fast velocity anomalies previously seen to flatten in the mantle transition zone may continue into the lower mantle. Thus, our new images provide a more detailed picture of the fate of the Cyprean slab and suggest that some of the fast anomalies associated with the slab continue into the lower mantle, bringing to

  12. Improved Nazca slab structure from teleseismic P-wave tomography along the Andean margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, D. E.; Beck, S. L.; Scire, A. C.; Zandt, G.

    2017-12-01

    South America marks the longest continuous ocean-continent subduction zone. As such, there is significant along-strike variability in the subducting Nazca slab structure and the tectonics of the South American margin. Most notably two gaps in the otherwise continuous volcanic arc are correlated with regions of flat slab subduction, indicating that the structure of the Nazca slab plays a controlling role in South American tectonics. Traditionally in subduction zones, our knowledge of slab structure is defined by Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes. While this method allows for the determination of large-scale variations in Nazca slab structure such as regions of flat slab subduction, a scarcity of intermediate-depth earthquakes hinders our ability to observe the smaller-scale structural variations in the slab that may be critical to our understanding of the geologic record. We use an updated, larger dataset for finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomography including relative arrival times from >700 seismic stations along the Andean margin to image the detailed Nazca slab structure throughout the upper mantle and uppermost lower mantle between latitudes 5°S and 45°S. Our results show prominent variations in slab character along the margin. Slab dip varies significantly, from sub-vertical inboard of the Peruvian flat slab segment to 30° dip south of the Pampean flat slab, while the slab's velocity anomaly amplitude changes dramatically near the Pampean flat slab region. High slab velocities north of the Pampean region relative to the south indicate variable slab thermal structures that correspond roughly with the locations of deep (>500 km depth) earthquakes that also occur exclusively north of the Pampean region. Additionally, a wider regional footprint increases our sampling of the upper-lower mantle boundary, improving constraints on the slab's interaction with the 660 km discontinuity along strike. We see that the Nazca slab appears to penetrate into the lower

  13. Thermal State, Slab Metamorphism, and Interface Seismicity in the Cascadia Subduction Zone Based On 3-D Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yingfeng; Yoshioka, Shoichi; Banay, Yuval A.

    2017-09-01

    Giant earthquakes have repeatedly ruptured the Cascadia subduction zone, and similar earthquakes will likely also occur there in the near future. We employ a 3-D time-dependent thermomechanical model that incorporates an up-to-date description of the slab geometry to study the Cascadia subduction thrust. Results show a distinct band of 3-D slab dehydration that extends from Vancouver Island to the Seattle Basin and farther southward to the Klamath Mountains in northern California, where episodic tremors cluster. This distribution appears to include a region of increased dehydration in northern Cascadia. The phenomenon of heterogeneous megathrust seismicity associated with oblique subduction suggests that the presence of fluid-rich interfaces generated by slab dehydration favors megathrust seismogenesis in the northern part of this zone. The thin, relatively weakly metamorphosed Explorer, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda Plates are associated with an anomalous lack of thrust earthquakes, and metamorphism that occurs at temperatures of 500-700°C near the Moho discontinuity may represent a key factor in explaining the presence of the associated episodic tremor and slip (ETS), which requires a young oceanic plate to subduct at a small dip angle, as is the case in Cascadia and southwestern Japan. The 3-D intraslab dehydration distribution suggests that the metamorphosed plate environment is more complex than had previously been believed, despite the existence of channeling vein networks. Slab amphibolization and eclogitization near the continental Moho depth is thus inferred to account for the resultant overpressurization at the interface, facilitating the generation of ETS and the occurrence of small to medium thrust earthquakes beneath Cascadia.

  14. Exceptional points of resonant states on a periodic slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrabou, Amgad; Lu, Ya Yan

    2018-06-01

    A special kind of degeneracy, known as exceptional points (EPs), for resonant states on a dielectric periodic slab are investigated. Due to their unique properties, EPs have found important applications in lasing, sensing, unidirectional operations, etc. In general, EPs may appear in non-Hermitian eigenvalue problems, including those related to -parity-time-symmetric systems and those for open dielectric structures (due to the existence of radiation loss). In this paper, we study EPs on a simple periodic structure: a slab with a periodic array of gaps. By using an efficient numerical method, we calculate the EPs and study their dependence on geometric parameters. Analytic results are obtained for the limit as the periodic slab approaches a uniform one. Our work provides a simple platform for further studies concerning EPs on dielectric periodic structures, their unusual properties, and applications.

  15. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage

    PubMed Central

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-01-01

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound. PMID:25605890

  16. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-02-03

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound.

  17. Dynamic triggering of deep earthquakes within a fossil slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chen; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2016-09-01

    The 9 November 2009 Mw 7.3 Fiji deep earthquake is the largest event in a region west of the Tonga slab defined by scattered seismicity and velocity anomalies. The main shock rupture was compact, but the aftershocks were distributed along a linear feature at distances of up to 126 km. The aftershocks and some background seismicity define a sharp northern boundary to the zone of outboard earthquakes, extending westward toward the Vitiaz deep earthquake cluster. The northern earthquake lineament is geometrically similar to tectonic reconstructions of the relict Vitiaz subduction zone at 8-10 Ma, suggesting the earthquakes are occurring in the final portion of the slab subducted at the now inactive Vitiaz trench. A Coulomb stress change calculation suggests many of the aftershocks were dynamically triggered. We propose that fossil slabs contain material that is too warm for earthquake nucleation but may be near the critical stress susceptible to dynamic triggering.

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in accelerated elastic-solid slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piriz, S. A.; Piriz, A. R.; Tahir, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    We develop the linear theory for the asymptotic growth of the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an accelerated solid slab of density ρ2, shear modulus G , and thickness h , placed over a semi-infinite ideal fluid of density ρ1<ρ2 . It extends previous results for Atwood number AT=1 [B. J. Plohr and D. H. Sharp, Z. Angew. Math. Phys. 49, 786 (1998), 10.1007/s000330050121] to arbitrary values of AT and unveil the singular feature of an instability threshold below which the slab is stable for any perturbation wavelength. As a consequence, an accelerated elastic-solid slab is stable if ρ2g h /G ≤2 (1 -AT) /AT .

  19. Cost Effectiveness of Precast Reinforced Concrete Roof Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parskiy, N. D.; Molodtsov, M. V.; Molodtsova, V. E.

    2017-11-01

    Engineers always seek to free interior space from intermediate supporting elements. Nowadays plants, being at the forefront of technology, produce a new generation of exclusive patented prefabricated reinforced concrete elements with a high load-bearing capacity, excellent heat resistance characteristics combined with the aesthetics and beauty. It is a system of Seagull Gabbiano prestressed roof slabs for the spans of 12m - 40m. The article shows the advantages of the Seagull slabs over conventional precast reinforced concrete and metal roof trusses. It also gives the analysis of the technical and economic indices of design and construction of a building with the Seagull slabs depending on the size of spans to cover. The use of structural systems with increased spans allows for the modern buildings and structures of prefabricated reinforced concrete with enhanced functionality and aesthetics alongside with a wide range of planning solutions.

  20. Using the level set method in slab detachment modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, B.; Geenen, T.; Spakman, W.; van den Berg, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    Slab detachment plays an important role in the dynamics of several regions in the world such as the Mediterranean-Carpathian region and the Anatolia-Aegean Region. It is therefore important to gain better insights in the various aspects of this process by further modeling of this phenomenon. In this study we model slab detachment using a visco-plastic composite rheology consisting of diffusion, dislocation and Peierls creep. In order to gain more control over this visco-plastic composite rheology, as well as some deterministic advantages, the models presented in this study make use of the level set method (Osher and Sethian J. Comp. Phys., 1988). The level set method is a computational method to track interfaces. It works by creating a signed distance function which is zero at the interface of interest which is then advected by the flow field. This does not only allow one to track the interface but also to determine on which side of the interface a certain point is located since the level set function is determined in the entire domain and not just on the interface. The level set method is used in a wide variety of scientific fields including geophysics. In this study we use the level set method to keep track of the interface between the slab and the mantle. This allows us to determine more precisely the moment and depth of slab detachment. It also allows us to clearly distinguish the mantle from the slab and have therefore more control over their different rheologies. We focus on the role of Peierls creep in the slab detachment process and on the use of the level set method in modeling this process.

  1. Why and Where do Large Shallow Slab Earthquakes Occur?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2001-12-01

    Within a shallow portion (20-60 km depth) of subducting slabs, it has been believed that large earthquakes seldom occur because the differential stress is generally expected to be low between bending at the trench-outer rise and unbending at the intermediate-depth. However, there are several regions in which large ( M>=7.0 ) earthquakes, including three events early in this year, have occurred in this portion. Searching such events from published individual studies and Harvard University centroid moment tensor catalogue, we find nineteen events in eastern Hokkaido, Kyushu-SW Japan, Mariana, Manila, Sumatra, Vanuatu, Chile, Peru, El Salvador, Mexico, and Cascadia. Slab stresses revealed from the mechanism solutions of those large events and smaller events are tensional in a slab dip direction. However, ages of the subducting oceanic plates are generally young, which denies a possibility that the slab pull works as a cause. Except for Manila and Sumatra, the stresses in the overriding plates are characterized by the change in {σ }Hmax direction from arc-parallel in the back-arc to arc-perpendicular in the fore-arc, which implies that a horizontal stress gradient exists in the across-arc direction. Peru and Chile, where the back-arc is compressional, can be categorized into this type, because a horizontal stress gradient exists over the continent from tension in east to compression in the west. In these regions, it is expected that mantle drag forces are operating beneath the upper plates, which drive the upper plates to the trenchward overriding the subducting oceanic plates. Assuming that the mantle drag forces beneath the upper plates originate from the mantle convection currents or upwelling plumes, we infer that the upper plates driven by the convection suck the oceanic plates, making the shallow portion of the slabs in extra-tension, thus resulting in the large shallow slab earthquakes in this tectonic regime.

  2. Resonance-enhanced optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Victor; Povinelli, Michelle; Fan, Shanhui

    2009-11-23

    The behaviors of lateral and normal optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs are analyzed. We show that the optical force is periodic with displacement, resulting in stable and unstable equilibrium positions. Moreover, the forces are strongly enhanced by guided resonances of the coupled slabs. Such enhancement is particularly prominent near dark states of the system, and the enhancement effect is strongly dependent on the types of guided resonances involved. These structures lead to enhancement of light-induced pressure over larger areas, in a configuration that is directly accessible to externally incident, free-space optical beams.

  3. Expansion of a cold non-neutral plasma slab

    SciT

    Karimov, A. R.; Department of Electrophysical Facilities, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoye shosse 31, Moscow 115409; Yu, M. Y., E-mail: myyu@zju.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    Expansion of the ion and electron fronts of a cold non-neutral plasma slab with a quasi-neutral core bounded by layers containing only ions is investigated analytically and exact solutions are obtained. It is found that on average, the plasma expansion time scales linearly with the initial inverse ion plasma frequency as well as the degree of charge imbalance, and no expansion occurs if the cold plasma slab is stationary and overall neutral. However, in both cases, there can exist prominent oscillations on the electron front.

  4. Links between fluid circulation, temperature, and metamorphism in subducting slabs

    Spinelli, G.A.; Wang, K.

    2009-01-01

    The location and timing of metamorphic reactions in subducting lithosph??re are influenced by thermal effects of fluid circulation in the ocean crust aquifer. Fluid circulation in subducting crust extracts heat from the Nankai subduction zone, causing the crust to pass through cooler metamorphic faci??s than if no fluid circulation occurs. This fluid circulation shifts the basalt-to-eclogite transition and the associated slab dehydration 14 km deeper (35 km farther landward) than would be predicted with no fluid flow. For most subduction zones, hydrothermal cooling of the subducting slab will delay eclogitization relative to estimates made without considering fluid circulation. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Innovative discharge geometries for diffusion-cooled gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapucci, Antonio

    2004-09-01

    Large area, narrow discharge gap, diffusion cooled gas lasers are nowadays a well established technology for the construction of industrial laser sources. Successful examples exist both with the slab (Rofin-Sinar) or coaxial (Trumpf) geometry. The main physical properties and the associated technical problems of the transverse large area RF discharge, adopted for the excitation of high power diffusion cooled gas lasers, are reviewed here. The main problems of this technology are related to the maintenance of a uniform and stable plasma excitation between closely spaced large-area electrodes at high power-density loading. Some practical solutions such as distributed resonance of the discharge channel proved successful in the case of square or rectangular cross-sections but hardly applicable to geometries such as that of coaxial electrodes. In this paper we present some solutions, adopted by our group, for the development of slab and annular CO2 lasers and for CO2 laser arrays with linear or circular symmetry. We will also briefly mention the difficulties encountered in the extraction of a good quality beam from an active medium with such a cross section. A problem that has also seen some interesting solutions.

  6. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  7. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  8. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  9. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water and glycol-water mixture in multi-port serpentine microchannel slab heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md Mesbah-ul Ghani

    Microchannels have several advantages over traditional large tubes. Heat transfer using microchannels recently have attracted significant research and industrial design interests. Open literatures leave with question on the applicability of classical macroscale theory in microchannels. Better understanding of heat transfer in various microchannel geometries and building experimental database are continuously urged. The purpose of this study is to contribute the findings and data to this emerging area through carefully designed and well controlled experimental works. The commercially important glycol-water mixture heat transfer fluid and multiport slab serpentine heat exchangers are encountered in heating and cooling areas, e.g. in automotive, aircraft, and HVAC industries. For a given heat duty, the large diameter tubes experience turbulent flow whereas the narrow channels face laminar flow and often developing flow. Study of low Reynolds number developing glycol-water mixture laminar flow in serpentine microchannel heat exchanger with parallel multi-port slab is not available in the open literature. Current research therefore experimentally investigates glycol-water mixture and water in simultaneously developing laminar flows. Three multiport microchannel heat exchangers; straight and serpentine slabs, are used for each fluid. Friction factors of glycol-water mixture and water flows in straight slabs are higher than conventional fully developed laminar flow. If a comprehensive pressure balance is introduced, the results are well compared with conventional Poiseuille theory. Similar results are found in serpentine slab. The pressure drop for the straight core is the highest, manifolds are the intermediate, and serpentine is the least; which are beneficial for heat exchangers. The heat transfer results in serpentine slab for glycol-water mixture and water are higher and could not be compared with conventional fully developed and developing flow correlations. New

  10. Five dimensional microstate geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Wei

    In this thesis, we discuss the possibility of exploring the statistical mechanics description of a black hole from the point view of supergravity. Specifically, we study five dimensional microstate geometries of a black hole or black ring. At first, we review the method to find the general three-charge BPS supergravity solutions proposed by Bena and Warner. By applying this method, we show the classical merger of a black ring and black hole on [Special characters omitted.] base space in general are irreversible. On the other hand, we review the solutions on ambi-polar Gibbons-Hawking (GH) base which are bubbled geometries. There are many possible microstate geometries among the bubbled geometries. Particularly, we show that a generic blob of GH points that satisfy certain conditions can be either microstate geometry of a black hole or black ring without horizon. Furthermore, using the result of the entropy analysis in classical merger as a guide, we show that one can have a merger of a black-hole blob and a black-ring blob or two black-ring blobs that corresponds to a classical irreversible merger. From the irreversible mergers, we find the scaling solutions and deep microstates which are microstate geometries of a black hole/ring with macroscopic horizon. These solutions have the same AdS throats as classical black holes/rings but instead of having infinite throats, the throat is smoothly capped off at a very large depth with some local structure at the bottom. For solutions that produced from U (1) × U (1) invariant merger, the depth of the throat is limited by flux quantization. The mass gap is related with the depth of this throat and we show the mass gap of these solutions roughly match with the mass gap of the typical conformal-field-theory (CFT) states. Therefore, based on AdS/CFT correspondence, they can be dual geometries of the typical CFT states that contribute to the entropy of a black hole/ring. On the other hand, we show that for the solutions

  11. Seismic structure of southern margin of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake aftershocks area: slab-slab contact zone beneath northeastern Kanto, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashimo, E.; Sato, H.; Abe, S.; Mizohata, S.; Hirata, N.

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake (Mw9.0) occurred on the Japan Trench off the eastern shore of northern Honshu, Japan. The southward expansion of the afterslip area has reached the Kanto region, central Japan (Ozawa et al., 2011). The Philippine Sea Plate (PHS) subducts beneath the Kanto region. The bottom of the PHS is in contact with the upper surface of the Pacific Plate (PAC) beneath northeastern Kanto. Detailed structure of the PHS-PAC contact zone is important to constrain the southward rupture process of the Tohoku-Oki Earthquake and provide new insight into the process of future earthquake occurrence beneath the Kanto region. Active and passive seismic experiments were conducted to obtain a structural image beneath northeastern Kanto in 2010 (Sato et al., 2010). The geometry of upper surface of the PHS has been revealed by seismic reflection profiling (Sato et al., 2010). Passive seismic data set is useful to obtain a deep structural image. Two passive seismic array observations were conducted to obtain a detailed structure image of the PHS-PAC contact zone beneath northeastern Kanto. One was carried out along a 50-km-long seismic line trending NE-SW (KT-line) and the other was carried out along a 65-km-long seismic line trending NW-SE (TM-line). Sixty-five 3-component portable seismographs were deployed on KT-line with 500 to 700 m interval and waveforms were continuously recorded during a four-month period from June, 2010. Forty-five 3-component portable seismographs were deployed on TM-line with about 1-2 km spacing and waveforms were continuously recorded during the seven-month period from June, 2010. Arrival times of earthquakes were used in a joint inversion for earthquake locations and velocity structure, using the iterative damped least-squares algorithm, simul2000 (Thurber and Eberhart-Phillips, 1999). The relocated hypocenter distribution shows that the seismicity along the upper surface of the PAC is located at depths of 45-75 km beneath

  12. Determination of interaction between bridge concrete approach slab and embankment settlement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-07-01

    The main objective of this research is to correlate the deformation and internal force of the approach slab with the approach embankment settlements and the approach slab parameters such as length and thickness. Finite element analysis was carried ou...

  13. Investigation of approach slab and its settlement for roads and bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-01-01

    Approach slabs serve as a transitional system between an approach road and a bridge. Settlement of bridge approach slabs and their : supporting backfill has been experienced by more than ten Departments of Transportation throughout the United States....

  14. Geoff Giles and Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielker, David

    2007-01-01

    Geoff Giles died suddenly in 2005. He was a highly original thinker in the field of geometry teaching. As early as 1964, when teaching at Strathallen School in Perth, he was writing in "MT27" about constructing tessellations by modifying the sides of triangles and (irregular) quadrilaterals to produce what he called "trisides" and "quadrisides".…

  15. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  16. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  17. Origami, Geometry and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan; Elstak, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the mathematics that emanates from the construction of an origami box. We first construct a simple origami box from a rectangular sheet and then discuss some of the mathematical questions that arise in the context of geometry and algebra. The activity can be used as a context for illustrating how algebra…

  18. Spacetime and Euclidean geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Dieter; Jacobson, Ted

    2006-04-01

    Using only the principle of relativity and Euclidean geometry we show in this pedagogical article that the square of proper time or length in a two-dimensional spacetime diagram is proportional to the Euclidean area of the corresponding causal domain. We use this relation to derive the Minkowski line element by two geometric proofs of the spacetime Pythagoras theorem.

  19. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS…

  20. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  1. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  2. Exploring & Writing Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Cathleen V.

    2009-01-01

    When given opportunities to explore mathematics, make conjectures, and write about what they have discovered, students gain a deeper understanding of this fascinating subject. In this article, the author describes her successful Geometry Portfolio class. In addition to traditional student work, the author frequently added short essay questions or…

  3. Fractal geometry of music.

    PubMed Central

    Hsü, K J; Hsü, A J

    1990-01-01

    Music critics have compared Bach's music to the precision of mathematics. What "mathematics" and what "precision" are the questions for a curious scientist. The purpose of this short note is to suggest that the mathematics is, at least in part, Mandelbrot's fractal geometry and the precision is the deviation from a log-log linear plot. PMID:11607061

  4. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  5. 18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH BLOCKS AND PULLEYS OVERHEAD LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  6. Slab flattening and exhumation of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siravo, G.; Faccenna, C.; Fellin, M. G.; Herman, F.; Becker, T. W.; Molin, P.

    2017-12-01

    Mountain belt topography is shaped by processes acting at different time scales and depths, from the surface down to the crust and mantle. In particular, subduction dynamics is expected to strongly affect upper plate topography. Here, we present the case of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) in Colombia as a case history for dynamic mantle forcing from a subduction zone on the upper plate topography. The EC is an active double-vergent fold and thrust belt formed during the Cenozoic by the inversion of a Mesozoic rift, and topography there has grown up to 5000 m (Cocuy Sierra). The EC is located far ( 500 km) from the trench where the Nazca slab subducts below the South American plate. Tomography and seismicity show the presence of a flat slab subduction north of 5° N (Chiarabba et al., 2016). Slab flattening may have occurred transitionally from 10 to 5 Ma shutting down the arc volcanism (Wagner et al., 2017). We reconstruct the exhumation of the EC based on previously published and new thermochronologic data collected in the area of the Cocuy Sierra. Results of this analysis show notably fast exhumation rates since Late Miocene. We also analyze the likely contributions to topography and show that neither the present-day crustal thickness nor the cumulative shortening in the Cenozoic as extracted form balanced cross section can isostatically explain the present day topography. We conclude that fast EC exhumation and uplift are driven by mantle dynamics and likely occurred during the recent episode of slab flattening.

  7. Emplacement of the Kodiak batholith and slab-window migration

    Farris, David W.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Friedman, Richard; Paterson, Scott R.; Saltus, R.W.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    The Kodiak batholith is one of the largest, most elongate intrusive bodies in the forearc Sanak-Baranof plutonic belt located in southern Alaska. This belt is interpreted to have formed during the subduction of an oceanic spreading center and the associated migration of a slab window. Individual plutons of the Kodiak batholith track the location and evolution of the underlying slab window. Six U/Pb zircon ages from the axis of the batholith exhibit a northeastward-decreasing age progression of 59.2 ± 0.2 Ma at the southwest end to 58.4 ± 0.2 Ma at the northeast tip. The trench-parallel rate of age progression is within error of the average slab-window migration rate for the entire Sanak-Baranof belt (~19 cm/yr). Structural relationships, U/Pb ages, and a model of new gravity data indicate that magma from the Kodiak batholith ascended 5-10 km as a northeastward-younging series of 1-8-km-diameter viscoelastic diapirs. Individual plutons ascended by multiple emplacement mechanisms including downward flow, collapse of wall rock, stoping, and diking. Stokes flow xenolith calculations suggest ascent rates of 5-100 m/yr and an effective magmatic viscosity of 107-108 Pa s. Pre-existing structural or lithologic heterogeneities did not dominantly control the location of the main batholith. Instead, its location was determined by migration of the slab window at depth. 

  8. 30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE PROJECTILE LOADING CAR AND LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO THE PROJECTILE LOADING DECK AND LAUNCHER BRIDGE. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 63. VIEW LOOKING DOWN VAL LAUNCHING SLAB SHOWING DRIVE GEARS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW LOOKING DOWN VAL LAUNCHING SLAB SHOWING DRIVE GEARS, CABLES, LAUNCHER RAILS, PROJECTILE CAR AND SUPPORT CARRIAGE, April 8, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER DRAINAGE AREA IN THE DISTANCE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  11. 6. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, CONNECTING TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, CONNECTING TUNNEL VISIBLE AT CENTER RIGHT AND FAR RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. Toward improving the performance of highway bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the amount of rotation that could develop between an approach slab, after base settlement, and a bridge abutment. A better approach-bridge transition could then be developed by using a ductile concrete to d...

  13. Alternative and cost-effective bridge approach slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-01

    The primary objectives of the proposed project are to investigate the causes for any bumps at the end of the bridge approach slab : and to develop remedial measures or alternative designs for a replacement. It is clear that the problem stems from geo...

  14. Use of fiber reinforced concrete for concrete pavement slab replacement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-03-01

    Unlike ordinary concrete pavement, replacement concrete slabs need to be open to traffic within 24 hours (sooner in : some cases). Thus, high early-strength concrete is used; however, it frequently cracks prematurely as a result of high : heat of hyd...

  15. Vibration Prediction Model for Floating-Slab Rail Transit Track

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-08-01

    This report presents the theoretical development of a model to predict the vibration reduction by floating-slab tracks in subway tunnels. Data from a field study in New York City are also presented. The report is one of three reports dealing with noi...

  16. Puzzling features of western Mediterranean tectonics explained by slab dragging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakman, Wim; Chertova, Maria V.; van den Berg, Arie.; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2018-03-01

    The recent tectonic evolution of the western Mediterranean region is enigmatic. The causes for the closure of the Moroccan marine gateway prior to the Messinian salinity crisis, for the ongoing shortening of the Moroccan Rif and for the origin of the seismogenic Trans-Alboran shear zone and eastern Betics extension are unclear. These puzzling tectonic features cannot be fully explained by subduction of the east-dipping Gibraltar slab in the context of the regional relative plate motion frame. Here we use a combination of geological and geodetic data, as well as three-dimensional numerical modelling of subduction, to show that these unusual tectonic features could be the consequence of slab dragging—the north to north-eastward dragging of the Gibraltar slab by the absolute motion of the African Plate. Comparison of our model results to patterns of deformation in the western Mediterranean constrained by geological and geodetic data confirm that slab dragging provides a plausible mechanism for the observed deformation. Our results imply that the impact of absolute plate motion on subduction is identifiable from crustal observations. Identifying such signatures elsewhere may improve the mantle reference frame and provide insights on subduction evolution and associated crustal deformation.

  17. Square cants from round bolts without slabs or sawdust

    Peter Koch

    1960-01-01

    For maximum efficiency a headrig for converting bark-free bolts into cants must (1) have a fast cycle time, (2) require minimum handling of bolts and refuse, and (3) convert the volume represented by slabs and kerf into a salable byproduct.

  18. Structure of the Flat Slab in Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Clayton, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the detailed structure of the flat-subduction portion of the subduction zone in Southern Peru using converted phases recorded by the PeruSE seismic array. The migrated image along a profile above the flat subduction is shown in the figure, overlain by the receiver functions of one well-recorded event. We see that the slab descends to 100 km depth at a distance of about 100 km inland from the coast, and then it rises to 90 km depth and remains flat for the next 300 km distance before diving into the mantle. The Moho itself has about 10 km relief above the flat slab, which is anti-correlated with the surface topography indicating Airy compensation. Interestingly, the flat slab image is missing under this part of Moho. The mid-crust structure is also evident. In the west, it coincides with the Andean Low Velocity Zone (ALVZ) mapped in this region (Ma and Clayton, 2014). In the east, it is related with the underthrusting Brazilian Shield (Phillips and Clayton, 2014). In this paper, we further investigate the causes of the missing or weak flat slab signal, possibly due to anomalous attenuation of S waves in the mantle wedge (but not P wave, since Moho is well imaged). We will also extend our study to the flat-normal transition area beneath the array.

  19. Applications of acoustics in the measurement of coal slab thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J., Jr.; Mills, J. M.; Pierce, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the possibility of employing acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies for measurements of thicknesses of slabs of coal backed by shale is investigated. Fundamental information concerning the acoustical properties of coal, and the relationship between these properties and the structural and compositional parameters used to characterize coal samples was also sought. The testing device, which utilizes two matched transducers, is described.

  20. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE WESTERN EDGE, ACCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE WESTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS AT LEFT AND RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  1. 52. SLABBING AND BLOOMING MILLS AND FOUNDRY (IN FOREGROUND), AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. SLABBING AND BLOOMING MILLS AND FOUNDRY (IN FOREGROUND), AS SEEN FROM THE CLARK AVENUE BRIDGE. AT RIGHT, REAR, IS THE BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE. VIEW LOOKING NORTH. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. Enhancement of polarizabilities of cylinders with cylinder-slab resonances

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Meng; Huang, Xueqin; Liu, H.; Chan, C. T.

    2015-01-01

    If an object is very small in size compared with the wavelength of light, it does not scatter light efficiently. It is hence difficult to detect a very small object with light. We show using analytic theory as well as full wave numerical calculation that the effective polarizability of a small cylinder can be greatly enhanced by coupling it with a superlens type metamaterial slab. This kind of enhancement is not due to the individual resonance effect of the metamaterial slab, nor due to that of the object, but is caused by a collective resonant mode between the cylinder and the slab. We show that this type of particle-slab resonance which makes a small two-dimensional object much “brighter” is actually closely related to the reverse effect known in the literature as “cloaking by anomalous resonance” which can make a small cylinder undetectable. We also show that the enhancement of polarizability can lead to strongly enhanced electromagnetic forces that can be attractive or repulsive, depending on the material properties of the cylinder. PMID:25641391

  3. Slab melting and magma formation beneath the southern Cascade arc

    Walowski, Kristina J.; Wallace, Paul J.; Clynne, Michael A.; Rasmussen, D.J.; Weis, D.

    2016-01-01

    The processes that drive magma formation beneath the Cascade arc and other warm-slab subduction zones have been debated because young oceanic crust is predicted to largely dehydrate beneath the forearc during subduction. In addition, geochemical variability along strike in the Cascades has led to contrasting interpretations about the role of volatiles in magma generation. Here, we focus on the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc, where previous work has demonstrated across-arc geochemical variations related to subduction enrichment, and H-isotope data suggest that H2O in basaltic magmas is derived from the final breakdown of chlorite in the mantle portion of the slab. We use naturally glassy, olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) from the tephra deposits of eight primitive (MgO>7 wt%) basaltic cinder cones to quantify the pre-eruptive volatile contents of mantle-derived melts in this region. The melt inclusions have B concentrations and isotope ratios that are similar to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), suggesting extensive dehydration of the downgoing plate prior to reaching sub-arc depths and little input of slab-derived B into the mantle wedge. However, correlations of volatile and trace element ratios (H2O/Ce, Cl/Nb, Sr/Nd) in the melt inclusions demonstrate that geochemical variability is the result of variable addition of a hydrous subduction component to the mantle wedge. Furthermore, correlations between subduction component tracers and radiogenic isotope ratios show that the subduction component has less radiogenic Sr and Pb than the Lassen sub-arc mantle, which can be explained by melting of subducted Gorda MORB beneath the arc. Agreement between pMELTS melting models and melt inclusion volatile, major, and trace element data suggests that hydrous slab melt addition to the mantle wedge can produce the range in primitive compositions erupted in the Lassen region. Our results provide further evidence that chlorite-derived fluids from the mantle portion of the

  4. Equilibrium Slab Models of Lyman-Alpha Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.; Salpeter, Edwin E.; Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    We model the L(sub y(alpha)) clouds as slabs of hydrogen with an ionizing extragalactic radiation field incident from both sides. In general, the equilibrium configuration of a slab at redshift z approx. less than 5 is determined by a balance of the gas pressure, gravity (including the effects of a dark matter halo), and the pressure exerted by the inter-galactic medium, P(sub ext). These models have been used to make predictions of the number of slabs as a function of the neutral hydrogen column density, N(sub H). A break in the curve is predicted at the transition between regimes where gravity and pressure are the dominant confining forces, with a less rapid decrease at larger N(sub H). The transition from optically thin to optically thick slabs leads to a gap in the distribution, whose location is governed largely by the spectrum of ionizing radiation. There are certain parallels between lines of sight through the outer HI disk of spiral galaxy with increasing radius, and the progression from damped, to Lyman limit, to forest clouds. We discuss briefly the possibility that at least some of the observed low z forest clouds may be a separate population, associated with galaxies, as suggested by the observations of Bahcall et al. This population could dominate the forest at present if the dark matter attached to galaxies should lead to gravity confinement for this disk population, while the isolated clouds remain pressure confined. The formalism developed in this paper will allow a more detailed study. We also discuss a more general parameter study of the equilibrium configuration of slabs, including mock gravity and L(sub y(alpha)) photon trapping.

  5. Seismicity Structure of the Downgoing Nazca Slab in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, C.; Schurr, B.

    2017-12-01

    We applied an automatized earthquake detection and location algorithm to 8 years of continuous seismic data from the IPOC network in Northern Chile, located in the forearc between about 18.5°S and 24°S. The resulting seismicity catalog contains more than 113k double-difference relocated earthquake hypocenters and features a completeness magnitude around 2.8. Despite the occurrence of two megathrust earthquakes with vigorous aftershock seismicity in the studied time period (the 2007 Tocopilla and the 2014 Iquique earthquakes), >60% of the retrieved seismicity is located in a highly active band of intermediate-depth earthquakes (80-120 km deep) within the downgoing Nazca slab.We obtain a triple seismic zone in the updip part of the slab, with the three parallel dipping planes corresponding to the plate interface, the oceanic Moho (ca. 8 km below the interface) and a third band in the mantle lithosphere 26-28 km beneath the slab top. The plate interface seismicity terminates abruptly at a depth of 55 km. At about 80-90 km depth, the remaining two planes of seismicity then merge into the single, 20 km thick cluster of vigorous seismicity mentioned above, which terminates at 120 km depth. This cluster is located directly beneath the volcanic arc and shows a pronounced kink in the slab dipping angle. Intra-slab seismicity is most likely related to metamorphic dehydration reactions, hence our high-resolution earthquake distribution can be considered a map of metamorphic reactions (although a possibly incomplete one, since not all reactions necessarily invoke seismicity). By correlating this distribution with isotherms from thermal models as well as geophysical imaging results from previous studies, we attempt to get a glimpse at the processes that produce the different patches of intraslab seismicity at intermediate depths.

  6. Field demonstration of new bridge approach slab designs and performance : [research project capsule].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-10-01

    A normal bridge approach slab in Louisiana is a reinforced concrete slab. It connects : the bridge deck to the adjacent paved roadway. Its intended functions are: : 1. To span the void that may develop below the slab due to soil erosion or : embankme...

  7. Afocal three-mirror anastigmat with zigzag optical axis for widened field of view and enlarged aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Han, Lin; Jin, Yangming; Shen, Weimin

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the detection accuracy and range of new generation of Forward Looking Infra-Red (FLIR) system for distant targets, its optical system, which usually consists of a fore afocal telescope and rear imaging lenses, is required to has wide spectral range, large entrance pupil aperture, and wide field of view (FOV). In this paper, a new afocal Three-Mirror Anastigmat (TMA) with widened field of view and high demagnification is suggested. Its mechanical structure remains coaxial, but it has zigzag optical axis through properly and slightly decentering and tilting of the three mirrors to avoid its secondary obscuration due to the third mirror as FOV increase. Compared with conventional off-axis TMA, the suggested zigzag-axis TMA is compact, easy-alignment and low-cost. The design method and optimum result of the suggested afocal TMA is presented. Its initial structural parameters are determined with its first-order relationship and primary aberration theory. Slight and proper decentration and tilt of each mirror is leaded in optimization so that its coaxial mechanical structure is held but attainable FOV and demagnification are respectively as wide and as high as possible. As an example, a 5.5-demagnification zigzag-axis afocal TMA with a wavelength range, an entrance pupil diameter, and FOV respectively from 3μm to 12μm, of 320mm, and 2×3.2 degrees and with a real exit pupil, is designed. Its imaging quality is diffraction limited. It is suitable for fore afocal telescope of the so-called third generation FLIR.

  8. Co-assembly of Zn(SPh){sub 2} and organic linkers into helical and zig-zag polymer chains

    SciT

    Liu Yi; Yu Lingmin; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2012-07-15

    Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers, single helicate [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(TPyTA)(EG)]{sub n} (EG=ethylene glycol) (1) and zig-zag structure [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(BPyVB)]{sub n} (2), were synthesized under solvothermal conditions at 150 Degree-Sign C or room temperature by the co-assembly of Zn(SPh){sub 2} and organic linkers such as 2,4,6-tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPyTA) and 1,3-bis(trans-4-pyridylvinyl)benzene (BPyVB). X-ray crystallography study reveals that both polymers 1 and 2 crystallize in space group P2{sub 1}/c of the monoclinic system. The solid-state UV-vis absorption spectra show that 1 and 2 have maxium absorption onsets at 400 nm and 420 nm, respectively. TGA analysis indicates that 1 and 2 are stable up tomore » 110 Degree-Sign C and 210 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers, single helicate [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(TPyTA)(EG)]{sub n} (1) and zig-zag structure [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(BPyVB)]{sub n} (2), were synthesized. Solid-state UV-vis absorptions show that 1 and 2 have maxium absorption onsets at 400 nm and 420 nm, respectively. TGA analysis indicates that 1 and 2 are stable up to 110 Degree-Sign C and 210 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers have been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TPyTA results in helical structures in 1 while BPyVB leads to zig-zag chains in 2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid-state UV-vis absorption spectra and TGA analysis of the title polymers were studied.« less

  9. Communication: electronic band gaps of semiconducting zig-zag carbon nanotubes from many-body perturbation theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Umari, P; Petrenko, O; Taioli, S; De Souza, M M

    2012-05-14

    Electronic band gaps for optically allowed transitions are calculated for a series of semiconducting single-walled zig-zag carbon nanotubes of increasing diameter within the many-body perturbation theory GW method. The dependence of the evaluated gaps with respect to tube diameters is then compared with those found from previous experimental data for optical gaps combined with theoretical estimations of exciton binding energies. We find that our GW gaps confirm the behavior inferred from experiment. The relationship between the electronic gap and the diameter extrapolated from the GW values is also in excellent agreement with a direct measurement recently performed through scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

  10. Idiosyncratic Findings in Trichoscopy of Tinea Capitis: Comma, Zigzag Hairs, Corkscrew, and Morse Code-like Hair

    PubMed Central

    Elghblawi, Ebtisam

    2016-01-01

    Dermoscopy is a method of growing significance in the diagnoses of dermatological pigmented skin diseases. However, in my case, mycology culture was negative and successful treatment was given on the basis of trichoscopy and wood lamp examination. I hereby describe a young boy with tinea capitis, multiple “comma hairs” and “zigzag hair” and a subtle additional feature “Morse code-like hair” when intensification was applied. Dermatoscopic aspects found skin Type 2 in a child of as a distinctive dermoscopic finding. PMID:28442876

  11. Monoclinic crystal structure of α - RuCl 3 and the zigzag antiferromagnetic ground state

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, R. D.; Williams, S. C.; Haghighirad, A. A.; ...

    2015-12-10

    We have proposed the layered honeycomb magnet α - RuCl 3 as a candidate to realize a Kitaev spin model with strongly frustrated, bond-dependent, anisotropic interactions between spin-orbit entangled j eff = 1/2 Ru 3 + magnetic moments. We report a detailed study of the three-dimensional crystal structure using x-ray diffraction on untwinned crystals combined with structural relaxation calculations. We consider several models for the stacking of honeycomb layers and find evidence for a parent crystal structure with a monoclinic unit cell corresponding to a stacking of layers with a unidirectional in-plane offset, with occasional in-plane sliding stacking faults, inmore » contrast with the currently assumed trigonal three-layer stacking periodicity. We also report electronic band-structure calculations for the monoclinic structure, which find support for the applicability of the j eff = 1/2 picture once spin-orbit coupling and electron correlations are included. Of the three nearest-neighbor Ru-Ru bonds that comprise the honeycomb lattice, the monoclinic structure makes the bond parallel to the b axis nonequivalent to the other two, and we propose that the resulting differences in the magnitude of the anisotropic exchange along these bonds could provide a natural mechanism to explain the previously reported spin gap in powder inelastic neutron scattering measurements, in contrast to spin models based on the three-fold symmetric trigonal structure, which predict a gapless spectrum within linear spin wave theory. Our susceptibility measurements on both powders and stacked crystals, as well as magnetic neutron powder diffraction, show a single magnetic transition upon cooling below T N ≈ 13 K. Our analysis of our neutron powder diffraction data provides evidence for zigzag magnetic order in the honeycomb layers with an antiferromagnetic stacking between layers. Magnetization measurements on stacked single crystals in pulsed field up to 60 T show a single transition

  12. Effects of subduction and slab gaps on mantle flow beneath the Lesser Antilles based on observations of seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaphorst, David; Kendall, J.-Michael; Baptie, Brian; Latchman, Joan L.; Bouin, Marie-Paule

    2016-04-01

    Subduction is a key process in the formation of continental crust. However, the interaction of the mantle with the subducting slab is not fully understood and varies between subduction zones. The flow geometry and stress patterns influence seismic anisotropy; since anisotropic layers lead to variations in the speed of seismic waves as a function of the direction of wave propagation, mantle flow can be constrained by investigating the structure of these anisotropic layers. In this study we investigate seismic anisotropy in the eastern Greater and the Lesser Antilles along a subduction environment, including the crust and the upper mantle as regions of interest. We use a combination of teleseismic and local events recorded at three-component broadband seismic stations on every major island in the area to observe and distinguish between anisotropy in the crust, the mantle wedge and the sub-slab mantle. Local event delay times (0.21±0.12s) do not increase with depth, indicating a crustal origin and an isotropic mantle wedge. Teleseismic delay times are larger (1.34±0.47s), indicating sub-slab anisotropy. The results suggest trench-parallel mantle flow, with the exception of trench-perpendicular alignment in narrow regions east of Puerto Rico and south of Martinique, suggesting mantle flow through gaps in the slab. This agrees with the continuous northward mantle flow that is caused by the subducting slab proposed by previous studies of that region. We were able to identify a pattern previously unseen by other studies; on St. Lucia a trench-perpendicular trend also indicated by the stations around can be observed. This pattern can be explained by a mantle flow through a gap induced by the subduction of the boundary zone between the North and South American plates. This feature has been proposed for that area using tomographic modelling (van Benthem et al., 2013). It is based on previous results by Wadge & Shepherd (1984), who observed a vertical gap in the Wadati

  13. Spinorial Geometry and Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillard, Joe

    2006-08-01

    In the main part of this thesis, we present the foundations and initial results of the Spinorial Geometry formalism for solving Killing spinor equations. This method can be used for any supergravity theory, although we largely focus on D=11 supergravity. The D=5 case is investigated in an appendix. The exposition provides a comprehensive introduction to the formalism, and contains background material on the complex spin representations which, it is hoped, will provide a useful bridge between the mathematical literature and our methods. Many solutions to the D=11 Killing spinor equations are presented, and the consequences for the spacetime geometry are explored in each case. Also in this thesis, we consider another class of supergravity solutions, namely heterotic string backgrounds with (2,0) world-sheet supersymmetry. We investigate the consequences of taking alpha-prime corrections into account in the field equations, in order to remain consistent with anomaly cancellation, while requiring that spacetime supersymmetry is preserved.

  14. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  15. Magnetoencephalography in ellipsoidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassios, George; Kariotou, Fotini

    2003-01-01

    An exact analytic solution for the forward problem in the theory of biomagnetics of the human brain is known only for the (1D) case of a sphere and the (2D) case of a spheroid, where the excitation field is due to an electric dipole within the corresponding homogeneous conductor. In the present work the corresponding problem for the more realistic ellipsoidal brain model is solved and the leading quadrupole approximation for the exterior magnetic field is obtained in a form that exhibits the anisotropic character of the ellipsoidal geometry. The results are obtained in a straightforward manner through the evaluation of the interior electric potential and a subsequent calculation of the surface integral over the ellipsoid, using Lamé functions and ellipsoidal harmonics. The basic formulas are expressed in terms of the standard elliptic integrals that enter the expressions for the exterior Lamé functions. The laborious task of reducing the results to the spherical geometry is also included.

  16. Multilevel geometry optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Jocelyn M.; Fast, Patton L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2000-02-01

    Geometry optimization has been carried out for three test molecules using six multilevel electronic structure methods, in particular Gaussian-2, Gaussian-3, multicoefficient G2, multicoefficient G3, and two multicoefficient correlation methods based on correlation-consistent basis sets. In the Gaussian-2 and Gaussian-3 methods, various levels are added and subtracted with unit coefficients, whereas the multicoefficient Gaussian-x methods involve noninteger parameters as coefficients. The multilevel optimizations drop the average error in the geometry (averaged over the 18 cases) by a factor of about two when compared to the single most expensive component of a given multilevel calculation, and in all 18 cases the accuracy of the atomization energy for the three test molecules improves; with an average improvement of 16.7 kcal/mol.

  17. Tomography of the subducting Cocos plate in central Mexico using data from the installation of a prototype wireless seismic network: Images of a truncated slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husker, Allen Leroy, Jr.

    WiLSoN during the MASE experiment. The MASE data is used to perform a 2D P-wave tomography of the subducting Cocos plate. A seismicity study by Pardo and Suarez (1995) mapped a flat Cocos slab under the North America plate to 190 km inland. Our tomography shows the slab subduction continues from 250 km inland at a much steeper angle of 75°. The slab stops somewhere between 450 km and 550 km depth under the northern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The Farallon plate, from which the Cocos plate presumably broke, is not seen. P-wave travel times are also inverted for a 2D temperature model of the Cocos slab under Mexico. The temperature model from Davies and Stevenson (1992) is found to have unrealistic values in the case of a thin slab, so the diffusion equation is solved with their initial conditions to correct their solution to remove this limitation. The dipping portion of the slab begins 230 km inland, dip at an angle of 74 degrees from the surface, extend to 500 km depth, and have a thickness of 40 km. The model is extended to 21/2D by assuming the slab is infinite along its width. The strike of the slab is then solved for with the full 3D rays found from ray tracing through the iasp91 model. The strike of the dipping slab is found to be 108° clockwise from north, very similar to the strike of the TMVB. A model of the tectonic history is presented that combines those proposed by Ferrari (2004) and Gorbatov and Fukao (2005). At 25 Ma the volcanic arc moved inland marking the beginning of flat-slab subduction. At the same time a tear between the Cocos and Farallon initiated. The torsion from the tear squeezed the Cocos plate causing a flat-slab geometry. At 12.5 Ma another tear propagated along the flat Cocos slab removing the torsion causing uplift. The removal of the uplift caused the upper portion of the Cocos slab to sink and start rolling back until it reached the position where it is imaged in this study. The lack of a Wadati-Benioff zone is due to no deeper

  18. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGES

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; ...

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS 3/CFT 2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length ofmore » any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS 3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  19. Noncommutative geometry and arithmetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, P.

    2009-09-01

    We intend to illustrate how the methods of noncommutative geometry are currently used to tackle problems in class field theory. Noncommutative geometry enables one to think geometrically in situations in which the classical notion of space formed of points is no longer adequate, and thus a “noncommutative space” is needed; a full account of this approach is given in [3] by its main contributor, Alain Connes. The class field theory, i.e., number theory within the realm of Galois theory, is undoubtedly one of the main achievements in arithmetics, leading to an important algebraic machinery; for a modern overview, see [23]. The relationship between noncommutative geometry and number theory is one of the many themes treated in [22, 7-9, 11], a small part of which we will try to put in a more down-to-earth perspective, illustrating through an example what should be called an “application of physics to mathematics,” and our only purpose is to introduce nonspecialists to this beautiful area.

  20. Introducing geometry concept based on history of Islamic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarif, S.; Wahyudin; Raditya, A.; Perbowo, K. S.

    2018-01-01

    Geometry is one of the areas of mathematics interesting to discuss. Geometry also has a long history in mathematical developments. Therefore, it is important integrated historical development of geometry in the classroom to increase’ knowledge of how mathematicians earlier finding and constructing a geometric concept. Introduction geometrical concept can be started by introducing the Muslim mathematician who invented these concepts so that students can understand in detail how a concept of geometry can be found. However, the history of mathematics development, especially history of Islamic geometry today is less popular in the world of education in Indonesia. There are several concepts discovered by Muslim mathematicians that should be appreciated by the students in learning geometry. Great ideas of mathematicians Muslim can be used as study materials to supplement religious character values taught by Muslim mathematicians. Additionally, by integrating the history of geometry in teaching geometry are expected to improve motivation and geometrical understanding concept.

  1. Effect of rheological approximations on slab detachment in 3D numerical simulations of continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2017-04-01

    It is commonly accepted that slab detachment results from the development of extensional stresses within the subducting slab. Subduction slowdown due to arrival of buoyant continental material at the trench is considered to cause such stress build up in the slab. Following slab detachment, slab pull partially or completely loses its strength and hot asthenosphere may flow through the slab window, which can have major consequences for continental collision. The dynamics of slab detachment has been extensively studied in 2D (i.e. analytical and numerical), but 3D models of slab detachment during continental collision remain largely unexplored. Some of the previous 3D models have investigated the role of an asymmetric margin on the propagation of slab detachment (van Hunen and Allen, 2011), the impact of slab detachment on the curvature of orogenic belts (Capitanio and Replumaz, 2013), the role of the collision rate on slab detachment depth (Li et al., 2013) or the effect of along-trench variations on slab detachment (Duretz et al., 2014). However, rheology of mantle and lithosphere is known to have a major influence on the dynamics of subduction. Here, we explore a range of different rheological approximations to understand their sensitivity on the possible scenarios. We employ the code LaMEM (Kaus et al., 2016) to perform 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear, to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow, dominated by viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, dominated by plastic breaking and inducing strong mantle flow in

  2. Anisotropic planar Heisenberg model of the quantum heterobimetallic zigzag chains with bridged ReIV-CuII magnetic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobczak, P.; Barasiński, A.; Kamieniarz, G.; Drzewiński, A.

    2011-12-01

    An anisotropic quantum planar Heisenberg model is proposed and thoroughly analyzed within the numerical density-matrix renormalization group approach. The model takes into account the site-dependent alternating directions of the local coordination system for the ReIV ions and both the axial and the rhombic single-ion anisotropy terms. Thermodynamic properties of a simpler collinear model without the rhombic term and its Ising counterpart as well as some previous approximations for ReIV-ion-containing compounds are discussed to point out the importance of quantum effects and deficiencies of classical approaches. For the noncollinear model with the alternating uniaxial local z axis tilted by the angle θ from the global chain axis formed by copper ions, some symmetries for the single-crystal susceptibilities are found. In the strong-anisotropy limit some striking maxima in the corresponding single-crystal χT products are revealed and their relation to the experimental determination of the anisotropy parameters is emphasized. Some cases to which the collinear model for zigzag chains is fully applicable are indicated. Finally, fitting the reference experimental data for a powder sample of given chloro- and cyanobridged zigzag chains, the weaker magnetic coupling and the uniaxial single-ion anisotropy term parameters have been found. The corrected value of the ferromagnetic interaction parameter implies that for the cyanobridge compound the record of the highest superexchange through cyanide has not been beaten.

  3. Effects of electric and magnetic fields on the electronic properties of zigzag carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh; Ahmadi, Eghbal

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the electronic properties of zigzag CNTs and BNNTs under the external transverse electric field and axial magnetic field, using tight binding approximation. It was found that after switching on the electric and magnetic fields, the band modification such as distortion of the degeneracy, change in energy dispersion, subband spacing and band gap size reduction occurs. The band gap of zigzag BNNTs decreases linearly with increasing the electric field strength but the band gap variation for CNTs increases first and later decreases (Metallic) or first hold constant and then decreases (semiconductor). For type (II) CNTs, at a weak magnetic field, by increasing the electric field strength, the band gap remains constant first and then decreases and in a stronger magnetic field the band gap reduction becomes parabolic. For type (III) CNTs, in any magnetic field, the band gap increases slowly until reaches a maximum value and then decreases linearly. Unlike to CNTs, the magnetic field has less effects on the BNNTs band gap variation.

  4. Negative differential resistance and rectification effects in zigzag graphene nanoribbon heterojunctions: Induced by edge oxidation and symmetry concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazirfakhr, Maryam; Shahhoseini, Ali

    2018-03-01

    By applying non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) in combination with tight-binding (TB) model, we investigate and compare the electronic transport properties of H-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbon (H/ZGNR) and O-terminated ZGNR/H-terminated ZGNR (O/ZGNR-H/ZGNR) heterostructure under finite bias. Moreover, the effect of width and symmetry on the electronic transport properties of both models is also considered. The results reveal that asymmetric H/ZGNRs have linear I-V characteristics in whole bias range, but symmetric H-ZGNRs show negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior which is inversely proportional to the width of the H/ZGNR. It is also shown that the I-V characteristic of O/ZGNR-H/ZGNR heterostructure shows a rectification effect, whether the geometrical structure is symmetric or asymmetric. The fewer the number of zigzag chains, the bigger the rectification ratio. It should be mentioned that, the rectification ratios of symmetric heterostructures are much bigger than asymmetric one. Transmission spectrum, density of states (DOS), molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian (MPSH) and molecular eigenstates are analyzed subsequently to understand the electronic transport properties of these ZGNR devices. Our findings could be used in developing nanoscale rectifiers and NDR devices.

  5. Reversible conformational transition gives rise to 'zig-zag' temperature dependence of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Levitsky VYu; Melik-Nubarov, N S; Siksnis, V A; Grinberg VYa; Burova, T V; Levashov, A V; Mozhaev, V V

    1994-01-15

    We have obtained unusual 'zig-zag' temperature dependencies of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation (k(in)) of enzymes (alpha-chymotrypsin, covalently modified alpha-chymotrypsin, and ribonuclease) in a plot of log k(in) versus reciprocal temperature (Arrhenius plot). These dependencies are characterized by the presence of both ascending and descending linear portions which have positive and negative values of the effective activation energy (Ea), respectively. A kinetic scheme has been suggested that fits best for a description of these zig-zag dependencies. A key element of this scheme is the temperature-dependent reversible conformational transition of enzyme from the 'low-temperature' native state to a 'high-temperature' denatured form; the latter form is significantly more stable against irreversible thermoinactivation than the native enzyme. A possible explanation for a difference in thermal stabilities is that low-temperature and high-temperature forms are inactivated according to different mechanisms. Existence of the suggested conformational transition was proved by the methods of fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The values of delta H and delta S for this transition, determined from calorimetric experiments, are highly positive; this fact underlies a conclusion that this heat-induced transition is caused by an unfolding of the protein molecule. Surprisingly, in the unfolded high-temperature conformation, alpha-chymotrypsin has a pronounced proteolytic activity, although this activity is much smaller than that of the native enzyme.

  6. Production of High Quality Die Steels from Large ESR Slab Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xin; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Li, Hua-bing; Liu, Fu-bin; Li, Xing

    With the rapid development of manufacture industry in China, die steels are in great need of large slab ingot of high quality and large tonnage, such as P20, WSM718R and so on. Solidification structure and size of large slab ingots produced with conventional methods are not satisfied. However, large slab ingots manufactured by ESR process have a good solidification structure and enough section size. In the present research, the new slab ESR process was used to produce the die steels large slab ingots with the maximum size of 980×2000×3200mm. The compact and sound ingot can be manufactured by the slab ESR process. The ultra-heavy plates with the maximum thickness of 410 mm can be obtained after rolling the 49 tons ingots. Due to reducing the cogging and forging process, the ESR for large slab ingots process can increase greatly the yield and production efficiency, and evidently cut off product costs.

  7. Negotiating Multicollinearity with Spike-and-Slab Priors

    PubMed Central

    Ročková, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    In multiple regression under the normal linear model, the presence of multicollinearity is well known to lead to unreliable and unstable maximum likelihood estimates. This can be particularly troublesome for the problem of variable selection where it becomes more difficult to distinguish between subset models. Here we show how adding a spike-and-slab prior mitigates this difficulty by filtering the likelihood surface into a posterior distribution that allocates the relevant likelihood information to each of the subset model modes. For identification of promising high posterior models in this setting, we consider three EM algorithms, the fast closed form EMVS version of Rockova and George (2014) and two new versions designed for variants of the spike-and-slab formulation. For a multimodal posterior under multicollinearity, we compare the regions of convergence of these three algorithms. Deterministic annealing versions of the EMVS algorithm are seen to substantially mitigate this multimodality. A single simple running example is used for illustration throughout. PMID:25419004

  8. Negotiating Multicollinearity with Spike-and-Slab Priors.

    PubMed

    Ročková, Veronika; George, Edward I

    2014-08-01

    In multiple regression under the normal linear model, the presence of multicollinearity is well known to lead to unreliable and unstable maximum likelihood estimates. This can be particularly troublesome for the problem of variable selection where it becomes more difficult to distinguish between subset models. Here we show how adding a spike-and-slab prior mitigates this difficulty by filtering the likelihood surface into a posterior distribution that allocates the relevant likelihood information to each of the subset model modes. For identification of promising high posterior models in this setting, we consider three EM algorithms, the fast closed form EMVS version of Rockova and George (2014) and two new versions designed for variants of the spike-and-slab formulation. For a multimodal posterior under multicollinearity, we compare the regions of convergence of these three algorithms. Deterministic annealing versions of the EMVS algorithm are seen to substantially mitigate this multimodality. A single simple running example is used for illustration throughout.

  9. Seismic Behaviour of Masonry Vault-Slab Structures

    SciT

    Chesi, Claudio; Butti, Ferdinando; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-07-08

    Spandrel walls typically play a structural role in masonry buildings, transferring load from a slab to the supporting vault. Some indications are given in the literature on the behaviour of spandrels under the effect of vertical loads, but little attention is given to the effect coming from lateral forces acting on the building. An opportunity to investigate this problem has come from the need of analyzing a monumental building which was damaged by the Nov. 24, 2004 Val Sabbia earthquake in the north of Italy. The finite element model set up for the analysis of the vault-spandrel-slab system is presentedmore » and the structural role resulting for the spandrels is discussed.« less

  10. Slab detachment under the Eastern Alps seen by seismic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Bianchi, Irene; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-01-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian–Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW–NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW–SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW–SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle. PMID:25843968

  11. Slab detachment under the Eastern Alps seen by seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Bianchi, Irene; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-01-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian-Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW-NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW-SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW-SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle.

  12. Characteristics of Recycled Concrete Aggregates from Precast Slab Block Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkrbec, Václav; Nováková, Iveta; Henková, Svatava

    2017-10-01

    Precast slab block buildings (PSBB) typically and frequently occur in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as elsewhere in the world. Some of these buildings are currently used beyond their service life capacity. The utilization of recycled materials from these buildings with regard to applying the principles of sustainable construction and using recycled materials will probably be significant in the following years. Documentation from the manufacturing processes of prefabricated blocks for precast slab block buildings is not available, and also it is difficult to declare technological discipline during the construction of these buildings. Therefore, properties of recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) produced from construction and demolition waste (C&DW) of precast slab block buildings build between 1950s to 1990s are not sufficiently known. The demolition of these buildings is very rare today, but it can be assumed an increase in demolitions of these buildings in the future. The use of RCA in new concrete requires verification/testing of the geometrical and physical properties of RCA according to the EN 12 620+A1 standard. The aim of the contribution is to present a case study of the demolition of slab block building with emphasis on RCA usage. The paper presents the results of the tests according to European standards for determining selected geometrical and physical properties of the RCA. The paper describes and evaluates tests such as determination of particle size distribution - Sieve Analysis, content of fine particles, determination of density and water absorption. The results of the properties testing of RCA are compared with the properties of natural aggregate. The general boundary conditions of RCA particular tests are presented.

  13. Geometrie verstehen: statisch - kinematisch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Ekkehard

    Dem Allgemeinen steht begrifflich das Besondere gegenüber. In diesem Sinne sind allgemeine Überlegungen zum Verstehen von Mathematik zu ergänzen durch Untersuchungen hinsichtlich des Verstehens der einzelnen mathematischen Disziplinen, insbesondere der Geometrie. Hier haben viele Schülerinnen und Schüler Probleme. Diese rühren hauptsächlich daher, dass eine fertige geometrische Konstruktion in ihrer statischen Präsentation auf Papier nicht mehr die einzelnen Konstruktionsschritte erkennen lässt; zum Nachvollzug müssen sie daher ergänzend in einer Konstruktionsbeschreibung festgehalten werden.

  14. The Geometry of Generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui; Jejjala, Vishnu; Matti, Cyril; Nelson, Brent D.; Stillman, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We present an intriguing and precise interplay between algebraic geometry and the phenomenology of generations of particles. Using the electroweak sector of the MSSM as a testing ground, we compute the moduli space of vacua as an algebraic variety for multiple generations of Standard Model matter and Higgs doublets. The space is shown to have Calabi-Yau, Grassmannian, and toric signatures, which sensitively depend on the number of generations of leptons, as well as inclusion of Majorana mass terms for right-handed neutrinos. We speculate as to why three generations is special.

  15. Teaching of Geometry in Bulgaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankov, Kiril

    2013-01-01

    Geometry plays an important role in the school mathematics curriculum all around the world. Teaching of geometry varies a lot (Hoyls, Foxman, & Kuchemann, 2001). Many countries revise the objectives, the content, and the approaches to the geometry in school. Studies of the processes show that there are not common trends of these changes…

  16. Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, J. N. (Compiler); Fulton, R. E. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques in computer-aided geometry modeling and their application are addressed. Mathematical modeling, solid geometry models, management of geometric data, development of geometry standards, and interactive and graphic procedures are discussed. The applications include aeronautical and aerospace structures design, fluid flow modeling, and gas turbine design.

  17. System for loading slab-gel holders for electrophoresis separation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Norman G.; Anderson, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    A slab-gel loading system includes a prismatic chamber for filling a plurality of slab-gel holders simultaneously. Each slab-gel holder comprises a pair of spaced apart plates defining an intermediate volume for gel containment. The holders are vertically positioned in the chamber with their major surfaces parallel to the chamber end walls. A liquid inlet is provided at the corner between the bottom and a side wall of the chamber for distributing a polymerizable monomer solution or a coagulable colloidal solution into each of the holders. The chamber is rotatably supported so that filling can begin with the corner having the liquid inlet directed downwardly such that the solution is gently funneled upwardly, without mixing, along the diverging side and bottom surfaces. As filling proceeds, the chamber is gradually rotated to position the bottom wall in a horizontal mode. The liquid filling means includes a plastic envelope with a septum dividing it into two compartments for intermixing two solutions of different density and thereby providing a liquid flow having a density gradient. The resulting gels have a density gradient between opposite edges for subsequent use in electrophoresis separations.

  18. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciT

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulationmore » at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.« less

  19. Core geometry in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Moira R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on animals, infants, children, and adults provides evidence that distinct cognitive systems underlie navigation and object recognition. Here we examine whether and how these systems interact when children interpret 2D edge-based perspectival line drawings of scenes and objects. Such drawings serve as symbols early in development, and they preserve scene and object geometry from canonical points of view. Young children show limits when using geometry both in non-symbolic tasks and in symbolic map tasks that present 3D contexts from unusual, unfamiliar points of view. When presented with the familiar viewpoints in perspectival line drawings, however, do children engage more integrated geometric representations? In three experiments, children successfully interpreted line drawings with respect to their depicted scene or object. Nevertheless, children recruited distinct processes when navigating based on the information in these drawings, and these processes depended on the context in which the drawings were presented. These results suggest that children are flexible but limited in using geometric information to form integrated representations of scenes and objects, even when interpreting spatial symbols that are highly familiar and faithful renditions of the visual world. PMID:25441089

  20. Tuning conductivity in boron nanowire by edge geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Prabal Dev; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh; Gajjar, P. N.

    2018-04-01

    In present study, we have investigated electronic and temperature dependent transport properties of carbyne like linear chain and ribbon like zigzag structures of Boron (B) nanowire. The linear chain structure showed higher electric and thermal conductivity, as it is sp-hybridized, than its counterpart ribbon (R) structure. However the conductivity of ribbon structure increases with increases in width due to edge geometry effect. The ribbon (3R) structure showed high electric and thermal conductivity of 8.0×1019 1/Ω m s and 0.59×1015 W/ m K respectively. Interestingly we have observed that B linear chain showed higher thermal conductivity of 0.23×1015 W/ m K than its ribbon R and 2R structure above 600K. Because of high Seebeck co-efficient of boron chain and ribbon (R) structures at low temperature, they could find applications in thermoelectric sensors. Our results show that tuning conductivity property of boron nanowire could be of great interest in research for future electric connector in nanodevices.

  1. Design of energy efficient building with radiant slab cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen

    2007-12-01

    Air-conditioning comprises a substantial fraction of commercial building energy use because of compressor-driven refrigeration and fan-driven air circulation. Core regions of large buildings require year-round cooling due to heat gains from people, lights and equipment. Negative environmental impacts include CO2 emissions from electric generation and leakage of ozone-depleting refrigerants. Some argue that radiant cooling simultaneously improves building efficiency and occupant thermal comfort, and that current thermal comfort models fail to reflect occupant experience with radiant thermal control systems. There is little field evidence to test these claims. The University of Calgary's Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Building, is a pioneering radiant slab cooling installation in North America. Thermal comfort and energy performance were evaluated. Measurements included: (1) heating and cooling energy use, (2) electrical energy use for lighting and equipment, and (3) indoor temperatures. Accuracy of a whole building energy simulation model was evaluated with these data. Simulation was then used to compare the radiant slab design with a conventional (variable air volume) system. The radiant system energy performance was found to be poorer mainly due to: (1) simultaneous cooling by the slab and heating by other systems, (2) omission of low-exergy (e.g., groundwater) cooling possible with the high cooling water temperatures possible with radiant slabs and (3) excessive solar gain and conductive heat loss due to the wall and fenestration design. Occupant thermal comfort was evaluated through questionnaires and concurrent measurement of workstation comfort parameters. Analysis of 116 sets of data from 82 occupants showed that occupant assessment was consistent with estimates based on current thermal comfort models. The main thermal comfort improvements were reductions in (1) local discomfort from draft and (2) vertical air temperature stratification. The

  2. Tomography of the subducting Pacific slab and the 2015 Bonin deepest earthquake (Mw 7.9).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dapeng; Fujisawa, Moeto; Toyokuni, Genti

    2017-03-15

    On 30 May 2015 an isolated deep earthquake (~670 km, Mw 7.9) occurred to the west of the Bonin Islands. To clarify its causal mechanism and its relationship to the subducting Pacific slab, we determined a detailed P-wave tomography of the deep earthquake source zone using a large number of arrival-time data. Our results show that this large deep event occurred within the subducting Pacific slab which is penetrating into the lower mantle. In the Izu-Bonin region, the Pacific slab is split at ~28° north latitude, i.e., slightly north of the 2015 deep event hypocenter. In the north the slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone, whereas in the south the slab is directly penetrating into the lower mantle. This deep earthquake was caused by joint effects of several factors, including the Pacific slab's fast deep subduction, slab tearing, slab thermal variation, stress changes and phase transformations in the slab, and complex interactions between the slab and the ambient mantle.

  3. Kinematic geometry of osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erin J; Bryant, J Tim; Ellis, Randy E

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for defining an osteotomy that can be used to represent all types of osteotomy procedures. In essence, we model an osteotomy as a lower-pair mechanical joint to derive the kinematic geometry of the osteotomy. This method was implemented using a commercially available animation software suite in order to simulate a variety of osteotomy procedures. Two osteotomy procedures are presented for a femoral malunion in order to demonstrate the advantages of our kinematic model in developing optimal osteotomy plans. The benefits of this kinematic model include the ability to evaluate the effects of various kinds of osteotomy and the elimination of potentially error-prone radiographic assessment of deformities.

  4. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  5. Magnetism in curved geometries

    DOE PAGES

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; ...

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. Asmore » a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.« less

  6. Magnetism in curved geometries

    SciT

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. Asmore » a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.« less

  7. Catalyst-free growth of Al-doped SnO2 zigzag-nanobelts for low ppm detection of organic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sudip Kumar; Ghosh, Saptarshi

    2016-10-01

    In this effort, we report on development of specific sensors dedicated for detection of two of these volatiles, namely ethanol and acetone, below the prescribed statutory limits. Single crystalline Al-doped SnO2 zigzag nanobelt structures were deposited on Si substrate by a catalyst-free thermal evaporation method. The Al-doped SnO2 zigzag nanostructures exhibit high sensitivity and repeatability together with coveted features like fast response and excellent stability. Structural attributes involving the crystal quality and morphology of Al-doped SnO2 zigzag nanobelts were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The microscopic images revealed formation of randomly oriented 'zigzag-like' nanobelts with characteristic width between 60 nm and 200 nm and length of 50-300 μm. The Al-doping was observed to have a discerning effect in enhancing the sensitivity in comparison to the pristine nanowires by creating excess oxygen vacancies in the crystal lattice, confirmed through XPS and PL spectra.

  8. Unique Zigzag-Shaped Buckling Zn2C Monolayer with Strain-Tunable Band Gap and Negative Poisson Ratio.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingbiao; Zhang, Yingjuan; Zhou, Minjie; Zhang, Jicheng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Ni, Shuang; Wu, Weidong

    2018-02-19

    Designing new materials with reduced dimensionality and distinguished properties has continuously attracted intense interest for materials innovation. Here we report a novel two-dimensional (2D) Zn 2 C monolayer nanomaterial with exceptional structure and properties by means of first-principles calculations. This new Zn 2 C monolayer is composed of quasi-tetrahedral tetracoordinate carbon and quasi-linear bicoordinate zinc, featuring a peculiar zigzag-shaped buckling configuration. The unique coordinate topology endows this natural 2D semiconducting monolayer with strongly strain tunable band gap and unusual negative Poisson ratios. The monolayer has good dynamic and thermal stabilities and is also the lowest-energy structure of 2D space indicated by the particle-swarm optimization (PSO) method, implying its synthetic feasibility. With these intriguing properties the material may find applications in nanoelectronics and micromechanics.

  9. Modulational Instability and Quantum Discrete Breather States of Cold Bosonic Atoms in a Zig-Zag Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xia; Xie, Jiayu; Wu, Tianle; Tang, Bing

    2018-07-01

    A theoretical study on modulational instability and quantum discrete breather states in a system of cold bosonic atoms in zig-zag optical lattices is presented in this work. The time-dependent Hartree approximation is employed to deal with the multiple body problem. By means of a linear stability analysis, we analytically study the modulational instability, and estimate existence conditions of the bright stationary localized solutions for different values of the second-neighbor hopping constant. On the other hand, we get analytical bright stationary localized solutions, and analyze the influence of the second-neighbor hopping on their existence conditions. The predictions of the modulational instability analysis are shown to be reliable. Using these stationary localized single-boson wave functions, the quantum breather states corresponding to the system with different types of nonlinearities are constructed.

  10. Time-dependent density-functional theory simulation of local currents in pristine and single-defect zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    SciT

    He, Shenglai, E-mail: shenglai.he@vanderbilt.edu; Russakoff, Arthur; Li, Yonghui

    2016-07-21

    The spatial current distribution in H-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) under electrical bias is investigated using time-dependent density-functional theory solved on a real-space grid. A projected complex absorbing potential is used to minimize the effect of reflection at simulation cell boundary. The calculations show that the current flows mainly along the edge atoms in the hydrogen terminated pristine ZGNRs. When a vacancy is introduced to the ZGNRs, loop currents emerge at the ribbon edge due to electrons hopping between carbon atoms of the same sublattice. The loop currents hinder the flow of the edge current, explaining the poor electric conductancemore » observed in recent experiments.« less

  11. Spin Transport in Electric-Barrier-Modulated Ferromagnetic/Normal/Ferromagnetic Monolayer Zigzag MoS2 Nanoribbon Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y.-Y.; Yuan, R.-Y.; Yang, Q.-J.; Sun, Q.; Zheng, J.; Guo, Y.

    In this paper, with the three-band tight-binding model and non-equilibrium Green’s function technique, we investigate spin transport in electric-barrier-modulated Ferromagnetic/Normal/Ferromagnetic (F/N/F) monolayer (ML) zigzag MoS2 nanoribbon junction. The results demonstrate that once the double electric barriers structure emerges, the oscillations of spin conductances become violent, especially for spin-down conductance, the numbers of resonant peaks increase obviously, thus we can obtain 100% spin polarization in the low energy region. It is also found that with the intensity of the exchange field enhancement, the resonant peaks of spin-up and spin-down conductances move in the opposite direction in a certain energy region. As a consequence, the spin-down conductance can be filtered out completely. The findings here indicate that the present structure may be considered as a good candidate for spin filter.

  12. Two-dimensional radiative transfer. I - Planar geometry. [in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalas, D.; Auer, L. H.; Mihalas, B. R.

    1978-01-01

    Differential-equation methods for solving the transfer equation in two-dimensional planar geometries are developed. One method, which uses a Hermitian integration formula on ray segments through grid points, proves to be extremely well suited to velocity-dependent problems. An efficient elimination scheme is developed for which the computing time scales linearly with the number of angles and frequencies; problems with large velocity amplitudes can thus be treated accurately. A very accurate and efficient method for performing a formal solution is also presented. A discussion is given of several examples of periodic media and free-standing slabs, both in static cases and with velocity fields. For the free-standing slabs, two-dimensional transport effects are significant near boundaries, but no important effects were found in any of the periodic cases studied.

  13. Coupling of small, low-loss hexapole mode with photonic crystal slab waveguide mode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Guk-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Hee; Shinya, Akihiko; Notomi, Masaya

    2004-12-27

    Coupling characteristics between the single-cell hexapole mode and the triangular-lattice photonic crystal slab waveguide mode is studied by the finite-difference time-domain method. The single-cell hexapole mode has a high quality factor (Q) of 3.3Chi106 and a small modal volume of 1.18(lambda/n)3. Based on the symmetry, three representative types of coupling geometries (shoulder-couple, butt-couple and side-couple structures) are selected and tested. The coupling efficiency shows strong dependence on the transverse overlap of the cavity mode and the waveguide mode over the region of the waveguide. The shoulder-couple structure shows best coupling characteristics among three tested structures. For example, two shouldercouple waveguides and a hexapole cavity result in a high performance resonant-tunneling-filter with Q of 9.7Chi105 and transmittance of 0.48. In the side-couple structure, the coupling strength is much weaker than that of the shoulder-couple structure because of the poor spatial overlap between the mode profiles. In the direct-couple structure, the energy transfer from the cavity to the waveguide is prohibited because of the symmetry mismatch and no coupling is observed.

  14. Too much slab waving in South America? Wet plumes as an alternative to flat slab steepening as the cause of back arc large volcanic provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, J. R.; Burd, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    A widely held view is that the Nazca Slab under western S. America acts like a tattered flag waving in the wind: It is segmented and the dip angle of segments flap up and down with time. There are presently two flat segments - one under Peru and the other, the "Pampean" flat slab (centered around 31S) under central Chile and Argentina. Both are correlated with subduction of buoyant crust of oceanic aseismic ridges, complete cessation of Andean arc volcanism and very thick crust. It has been argued that the waxing and waning of flat subduction is responsible for much of the time variations in tectonics and volcanism up to 800 km east of the S. American coast for at least 100 MA. For instance, the back arc Payenia igneous plateau (35-38S) and the Somuncura igneous plateau (40.5-43S) are both thought to follow from the steepening of flat slabs at about 2 and 27 MA. Each flat slab existed for more than 5 MA. However, the case for the existence of these flat slabs rests heavily on volcanism with "arc signature" hundreds of km east of the modern volcanic arc at a time when an asthenospheric wedge would be in its final stages of being squeezed out of the space between the slab and the lithosphere. Arc signature can be summarized as the geochemical consequence of mantle melting in the presence of water. If there is a source of water in the mantle other than a shallow slab, the strongest argument for a flat slab dissolves. We have found two electrically conductive plumes rising from below 350 km near the top of the Mantle Transition Zone (MTZ). One passes through a window in the Pampean flat slab but does not penetrate the lithosphere. The other rises under Payenia. The maximum resistivity at the core of these plumes is less than 10 Ohm-m. Partial melt can explain such low resistivity, but will not be buoyant and rise from below 350 km. We propose that the low resistivity is more likely due to water and that we are seeing "wet plumes" that have been proposed to explain

  15. Cenozoic tectonics of western North America controlled by evolving width of Farallon slab.

    PubMed

    Schellart, W P; Stegman, D R; Farrington, R J; Freeman, J; Moresi, L

    2010-07-16

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere occurs through two modes: subducting plate motion and trench migration. Using a global subduction zone data set and three-dimensional numerical subduction models, we show that slab width (W) controls these modes and the partitioning of subduction between them. Subducting plate velocity scales with W(2/3), whereas trench velocity scales with 1/W. These findings explain the Cenozoic slowdown of the Farallon plate and the decrease in subduction partitioning by its decreasing slab width. The change from Sevier-Laramide orogenesis to Basin and Range extension in North America is also explained by slab width; shortening occurred during wide-slab subduction and overriding-plate-driven trench retreat, whereas extension occurred during intermediate to narrow-slab subduction and slab-driven trench retreat.

  16. Flexural strength and behaviour of SFRSCC ribbed slab under four point bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Hazrina; Hashim, Mohd Hisbany Mohd; Bakar, Afidah Abu; Hamzah, Siti Hawa; Rahman, Fadhillah Abdul

    2017-11-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to study the ultimate strength and behaviour of SFRSCC ribbed slab under four point bending. Comparison was been made between ribbed slab that was fully reinforced with steel fibres (SFWS) with conventionally reinforced concrete ribbed slab (CS and CRC). The volume fraction of the 35 mm hooked end steel fibres used in the mix was 1% (80 kg/m3) with the aspect ratio of 65. Three full scale slab samples with the dimension of 2.8 x 1.2 m with 0.2 m thickness was constructed for the purpose of this study. The slab samples was loaded until failure in a four point bending test. As a whole, based on the results, it can be concluded that the performance of the steel fiber reinforced samples (SFWS) was found to be almost equivalent to the conventionally reinforced concrete ribbed slab sample (CRC).

  17. Image transfer properties by photonic crystal slab with negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongbo; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Zhou, Renlong; Lu, Wei

    2008-04-01

    We have studied the properties of image transferred by photonic crystal (PhC) slab with negative refractive index n=-1 and confirmed the negative refractive phonomenon, but not found the saturated image properties as expected. It is found that real images will not be formed when the source distance larger than the thickness of PhC, and the transferred images are virtual images. Furthermore, comparing the quality of images transferred by a PhC slab and a cascaded stack of photonic crystal slab (CSPS), we found that the transferred images are distorted in both situations. The image resolution is good along the direction parallel to the slab interface, but bad along the direction normal to the slab interface. Simulation results show that the image formed by a CSPS is no better than a PhC slab.

  18. Influence of Initial Geometry and Boundary Conditions on Flat Subduction Models and Resulting Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P.; Moucha, R.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical investigations of surface deformation in response to flat slab subduction began with seminal papers by Bird (1988) and Mitrovica et al. (1989). Recently, a number of numerical studies have begun to explore the complexity in the dynamics of flat-slab subduction initiation and continuation, but did not address the corresponding surface deformation (English et al., 2003; Pérez-Campos et al., 2008; Liu et al., 2010; Jones et al., 2011; Arrial and Billen, 2013; Vogt and Gerya, 2014). Herein, we explore the conditions that lead to flat-slab subduction and characterize the resulting surface deformation using a 2D finite-difference marker-in-cell method. We specifically explore how initial model geometry and boundary conditions affect the evolution of the angle at which a slab subducts in the presence/absence of a buoyant oceanic plateau and the resulting surface topography. In our simulations, the surface is tracked through time as an internal erosion/sedimentation surface. The top boundary of the crust is overlaid by a "sticky" (viscous 10^17 Pa.s) water/air layer with correspondingly stratified densities. We apply a coupled surface processes model that solves the sediment transport/diffusion erosion equation at each time step to account for the corresponding crustal mass flux and its effect on crustal deformation. Model results show the initial angle of subduction has a substantial impact on the subduction angle of the slab and hence the evolution of topography. The results also indicate plate velocity and the presence of an oceanic plateau in a forced subduction only have a moderate effect on the angle of subduction.

  19. Surface expression of Eastern Mediterranean slab dynamics: Uplift at the SW margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildgen, T. F.; Cosentino, D.; Caruso, A.; Yildirim, C.; Echtler, H.; Strecker, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    that these phenomena may have been linked with a change in the tectonic stress field associated with the process(es) causing post-7 Ma surface uplift. The complex geometry of lithospheric slabs beneath the southern plateau margin, early Pliocene to recent alkaline volcanism, and the localized uplift pattern with accompanying tensional/transtensional stresses point toward slab tearing and localized heating at the base of the lithosphere as a probable mechanism for post-7 Ma uplift of the SW margin. Considering previous work in the region, slab break-off is more likely responsible for non-contractional uplift along the S and SE margins. Overall there appears to be an important link between slab dynamics and surface uplift across the whole southern margin of the Central Anatolian plateau.

  20. The influence of high viscosity slabs on post-glacial sea-level change: the case of Barbados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austermann, Jacqueline; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Latychev, Konstantin

    2013-04-01

    The coral record at Barbados is one of the best available measures of relative sea level during the last glacial cycle and has been widely used to reconstruct ice volume (or, equivalently, eustatic sea-level, ESL) changes during the last deglaciation phase of the ice age. However, to estimate ESL variations from the local relative sea level (RSL) history at Barbados, one has to account for the contaminating effect of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). In previous work, the GIA signal at this site has been corrected for by assuming a spherically symmetric (i.e., 1-D) viscoelastic Earth. Since Barbados is located at the margin of the South American - Caribbean subduction zone, this assumption may introduce a significant error in inferences of ice volumes. To address this issue, we use a finite-volume numerical code to model GIA in the Caribbean region including the effects of a lithosphere with variable elastic thickness, plate boundaries, lateral variations in lower mantle viscosity, and a high viscosity slab within the upper mantle. The geometry of the subducted slab is inferred from local seismicity. We find that predictions of relative sea-level change since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the Caribbean region are diminished by ~10 m, relative to 1-D calculations, which suggests that previous studies have underestimated post-LGM ESL change by the same amount. This perturbation, which largely reflects the impact of the high viscosity slab, is nearly twice the total GIA-induced departure from eustasy predicted at Barbados using the 1-D Earth model. Our calculations imply an excess ice-volume equivalent to ~130 m ESL at the LGM, which brings the Barbados-based estimate into agreement with inferences based on other far-field RSL histories, such as at Bonaparte Gulf. This inference, together with recent studies that have substantially lowered estimates of Antarctic Ice Sheet mass at LGM, suggest that a significant amount of ice remains unaccounted for in sea