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Sample records for zinc induces dimerization

  1. Intracellular formation of "undisruptable" dimers of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejski, Pawel J; Rashid, Mohammad B; Eissa, N Tony

    2003-11-25

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases. iNOS is active only as a homodimer. Dimerization of iNOS represents a potentially critical target for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we show that intracellular iNOS forms dimers that are "undisruptable" by boiling, denaturants, or reducing agents. Undisruptable (UD) dimers are clearly distinguishable from the easily dissociated dimers formed by iNOS in vitro. UD dimers do not form in Escherichia coli-expressed iNOS and could not be assembled in vitro, which suggests that an in vivo cellular process is required for their formation. iNOS UD dimers are not affected by intracellular depletion of H4B. However, the mutation of Cys-115 (critical for zinc binding) greatly affects the formation of UD dimers. This study reveals insight into the mechanisms of in vivo iNOS dimer formation. UD dimers represent a class of iNOS dimers that had not been suspected. This unanticipated finding revises our understanding of the mechanisms of iNOS dimerization and lays the groundwork for future studies aimed at modulating iNOS activity in vivo.

  2. Intracellular formation of ”undisruptable” dimers of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziejski, Pawel J.; Rashid, Mohammad B.; Eissa, N. Tony

    2003-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases. iNOS is active only as a homodimer. Dimerization of iNOS represents a potentially critical target for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we show that intracellular iNOS forms dimers that are ”undisruptable” by boiling, denaturants, or reducing agents. Undisruptable (UD) dimers are clearly distinguishable from the easily dissociated dimers formed by iNOS in vitro. UD dimers do not form in Escherichia coli-expressed iNOS and could not be assembled in vitro, which suggests that an in vivo cellular process is required for their formation. iNOS UD dimers are not affected by intracellular depletion of H4B. However, the mutation of Cys-115 (critical for zinc binding) greatly affects the formation of UD dimers. This study reveals insight into the mechanisms of in vivo iNOS dimer formation. UD dimers represent a class of iNOS dimers that had not been suspected. This unanticipated finding revises our understanding of the mechanisms of iNOS dimerization and lays the groundwork for future studies aimed at modulating iNOS activity in vivo. PMID:14614131

  3. Coordination-Driven Dimerization of Zinc Chlorophyll Derivatives Possessing a Dialkylamino Group.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroaki; Kamatani, Yusuke; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2017-04-04

    Zinc chlorophyll derivatives Zn-1-3 possessing a tertiary amino group at the C3 1 position have been synthesized through reductive amination of methyl pyropheophorbide-d obtained from naturally occurring chlorophyll-a. In a dilute CH 2 Cl 2 solution as well as in a dilute 10 %(v/v) CH 2 Cl 2 /hexane solution, Zn-1 possessing a dimethylamino group at the C3 1 position showed red-shifted UV/Vis absorption and intensified exciton-coupling circular dichroism (CD) spectra at room temperature owing to its dimer formation via coordination to the central zinc by the 3 1 -N atom of the dimethylamino group. However, Zn-2/3 bearing 3 1 -ethylmethylamino/diethylamino groups did not. The difference was dependent on the steric factor of the substituents in the tertiary amino group, where an increase of the carbon numbers on the N atom reduced the intermolecular N⋅⋅⋅Zn coordination. UV/Vis, CD, and 1 H NMR spectroscopic analyses including DOSY measurements revealed that Zn-1 formed closed-type dimers via an opened dimer by single-to-double axial coordination with an increase in concentration and a temperature decrease in CH 2 Cl 2 , while Zn-2/3 gave open and flexible dimers in a concentrated CH 2 Cl 2 solution at low temperature. The supramolecular closed dimer structures of Zn-1 were estimated by molecular modelling calculations, which showed these structures were promising models for the chlorophyll dimer in a photosynthetic reaction center. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Zinc starvation induces autophagy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, Tomoko; Horie, Tetsuro; Matsunami, Miou; Sasaki, Michiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2017-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient for all forms of life. Within cells, most zinc is bound to protein. Because zinc serves as a catalytic or structural cofactor for many proteins, cells must maintain zinc homeostasis under severely zinc-deficient conditions. In yeast, the transcription factor Zap1 controls the expression of genes required for uptake and mobilization of zinc, but to date the fate of existing zinc-binding proteins under zinc starvation remains poorly understood. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular degradation/recycling process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. In this study, we investigated how autophagy functions under zinc starvation. Zinc depletion induced non-selective autophagy, which is important for zinc-limited growth. Induction of autophagy by zinc starvation was not directly related to transcriptional activation of Zap1. Instead, TORC1 inactivation directed zinc starvation-induced autophagy. Abundant zinc proteins, such as Adh1, Fba1, and ribosomal protein Rpl37, were degraded in an autophagy-dependent manner. But the targets of autophagy were not restricted to zinc-binding proteins. When cellular zinc is severely depleted, this non-selective autophagy plays a role in releasing zinc from the degraded proteins and recycling zinc for other essential purposes. PMID:28264932

  5. Zinc starvation induces autophagy in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Tomoko; Horie, Tetsuro; Matsunami, Miou; Sasaki, Michiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2017-05-19

    Zinc is an essential nutrient for all forms of life. Within cells, most zinc is bound to protein. Because zinc serves as a catalytic or structural cofactor for many proteins, cells must maintain zinc homeostasis under severely zinc-deficient conditions. In yeast, the transcription factor Zap1 controls the expression of genes required for uptake and mobilization of zinc, but to date the fate of existing zinc-binding proteins under zinc starvation remains poorly understood. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular degradation/recycling process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. In this study, we investigated how autophagy functions under zinc starvation. Zinc depletion induced non-selective autophagy, which is important for zinc-limited growth. Induction of autophagy by zinc starvation was not directly related to transcriptional activation of Zap1. Instead, TORC1 inactivation directed zinc starvation-induced autophagy. Abundant zinc proteins, such as Adh1, Fba1, and ribosomal protein Rpl37, were degraded in an autophagy-dependent manner. But the targets of autophagy were not restricted to zinc-binding proteins. When cellular zinc is severely depleted, this non-selective autophagy plays a role in releasing zinc from the degraded proteins and recycling zinc for other essential purposes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Preferential recognition of undisruptable dimers of inducible nitric oxide synthase by a monoclonal antibody directed against an N-terminal epitope.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Tuhina; Eissa, N Tony

    2005-02-15

    Overproduction of NO by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases. iNOS is active only as a homodimer in which the subunits align in a head-to-head manner, with the N-terminal oxygenase domains forming the dimer interface and a zinc metal center stabilizing the dimer. Thus, dimerization represents a critical locus for therapeutic interventions for regulation of NO synthesis. We have recently shown that intracellular iNOS forms dimers that are "undisruptable (UD)" by heat, SDS, strong denaturants, and/or reducing agents. Our data further suggest that the zinc metal center plays a role in forming and/or stabilizing iNOS undisruptable dimers (UD-dimers). In this study, we show that a mAb directed against a unique epitope at the oxygenase domain of human iNOS preferentially recognizes UD-dimers. This observation has implications for the mechanism of formation and regulation of dimer formation of iNOS. Our data suggest that UD-dimers of iNOS, in spite of SDS-PAGE denaturation, still maintain features of the quaternary structure of iNOS particularly at its N-terminal end and including head-to-head contact of the oxygenase domains.

  7. Collagen induces activation of DDR1 through lateral dimer association and phosphorylation between dimers

    PubMed Central

    Juskaite, Victoria; Corcoran, David S; Leitinger, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    The collagen-binding receptor tyrosine kinase DDR1 (discoidin domain receptor 1) is a drug target for a wide range of human diseases, but the molecular mechanism of DDR1 activation is poorly defined. Here we co-expressed different types of signalling-incompetent DDR1 mutants (‘receiver’) with functional DDR1 (‘donor’) and demonstrate phosphorylation of receiver DDR1 by donor DDR1 in response to collagen. Making use of enforced covalent DDR1 dimerisation, which does not affect receptor function, we show that receiver dimers are phosphorylated in trans by the donor; this process requires the kinase activity of the donor but not that of the receiver. The receiver ectodomain is not required, but phosphorylation in trans is abolished by mutation of the transmembrane domain. Finally, we show that mutant DDR1 that cannot bind collagen is recruited into DDR1 signalling clusters. Our results support an activation mechanism whereby collagen induces lateral association of DDR1 dimers and phosphorylation between dimers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25716.001 PMID:28590245

  8. Actin-induced dimerization of palladin promotes actin-bundling

    PubMed Central

    Vattepu, Ravi; Yadav, Rahul; Beck, Moriah R

    2015-01-01

    A subset of actin binding proteins is able to form crosslinks between two or more actin filaments, thus producing structures of parallel or networked bundles. These actin crosslinking proteins interact with actin through either bivalent binding or dimerization. We recently identified two binding sites within the actin binding domain of palladin, an actin crosslinking protein that plays an important role in normal cell adhesion and motility during wound healing and embryonic development. In this study, we show that actin induces dimerization of palladin. Furthermore, the extent of dimerization reflects earlier comparisons of actin binding and bundling between different domains of palladin. On the basis of these results we hypothesized that actin binding may promote a conformational change that results in dimerization of palladin, which in turn may drive the crosslinking of actin filaments. The proximal distance between two actin binding sites on crosslinking proteins determines the ultrastructural properties of the filament network, therefore we also explored interdomain interactions using a combination of chemical crosslinking experiments and actin cosedimentation assays. Limited proteolysis data reveals that palladin is less susceptible to enzyme digestion after actin binding. Our results suggest that domain movements in palladin are necessary for interactions with actin and are induced by interactions with actin filaments. Accordingly, we put forth a model linking the structural changes to functional dynamics. PMID:25307943

  9. Metal-coupled folding as the driving force for the extreme stability of Rad50 zinc hook dimer assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Nowakowski, Michał; Wojewska, Dominika; Kocyła, Anna; Ejchart, Andrzej; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Krężel, Artur

    2016-11-01

    The binding of metal ions at the interface of protein complexes presents a unique and poorly understood mechanism of molecular assembly. A remarkable example is the Rad50 zinc hook domain, which is highly conserved and facilitates the Zn2+-mediated homodimerization of Rad50 proteins. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the structural and thermodynamic effects governing the formation and stability (logK12 = 20.74) of this evolutionarily conserved protein assembly. We have dissected the determinants of the stability contributed by the small β-hairpin of the domain surrounding the zinc binding motif and the coiled-coiled regions using peptides of various lengths from 4 to 45 amino acid residues, alanine substitutions and peptide bond-to-ester perturbations. In the studied series of peptides, an >650 000-fold increase of the formation constant of the dimeric complex arises from favorable enthalpy because of the increased acidity of the cysteine thiols in metal-free form and the structural properties of the dimer. The dependence of the enthalpy on the domain fragment length is partially compensated by the entropic penalty of domain folding, indicating enthalpy-entropy compensation. This study facilitates understanding of the metal-mediated protein-protein interactions in which the metal ion is critical for the tight association of protein subunits.

  10. Metal-coupled folding as the driving force for the extreme stability of Rad50 zinc hook dimer assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Nowakowski, Michał; Wojewska, Dominika; Kocyła, Anna; Ejchart, Andrzej; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Krężel, Artur

    2016-01-01

    The binding of metal ions at the interface of protein complexes presents a unique and poorly understood mechanism of molecular assembly. A remarkable example is the Rad50 zinc hook domain, which is highly conserved and facilitates the Zn2+-mediated homodimerization of Rad50 proteins. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the structural and thermodynamic effects governing the formation and stability (logK12 = 20.74) of this evolutionarily conserved protein assembly. We have dissected the determinants of the stability contributed by the small β-hairpin of the domain surrounding the zinc binding motif and the coiled-coiled regions using peptides of various lengths from 4 to 45 amino acid residues, alanine substitutions and peptide bond-to-ester perturbations. In the studied series of peptides, an >650 000-fold increase of the formation constant of the dimeric complex arises from favorable enthalpy because of the increased acidity of the cysteine thiols in metal-free form and the structural properties of the dimer. The dependence of the enthalpy on the domain fragment length is partially compensated by the entropic penalty of domain folding, indicating enthalpy-entropy compensation. This study facilitates understanding of the metal-mediated protein-protein interactions in which the metal ion is critical for the tight association of protein subunits. PMID:27808280

  11. Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Homogenous 2-Hydroxypyridine Dimer Electron Induced Proton Transfer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlk, Alexandra; Stokes, Sarah; Wang, Yi; Hicks, Zachary; Zhang, Xinxing; Blando, Nicolas; Frock, Andrew; Marquez, Sara; Bowen, Kit; Bowen Lab JHU Team

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopic (PES) and density functional theory (DFT) studies on the dimer anion of (2-hydroxypyridine)2-are reported. The experimentally measured vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 1.21eV compares well with the theoretically predicted values. The 2-hydroxypyridine anionic dimer system was investigated because of its resemblance to the nitrogenous heterocyclic pyrimidine nucleobases. Experimental and theoretical results show electron induced proton transfer (EIPT) in both the lactim and lactam homogeneous dimers. Upon electron attachment, the anion can serve as the intermediate between the two neutral dimers. A possible double proton transfer process can occur from the neutral (2-hydroxypyridine)2 to (2-pyridone)2 through the dimer anion. This potentially suggests an electron catalyzed double proton transfer mechanism of tautomerization. Research supported by the NSF Grant No. CHE-1360692.

  12. Non-Ligand-Induced Dimerization is Sufficient to Initiate the Signalling and Endocytosis of EGF Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kourouniotis, George; Wang, Yi; Pennock, Steven; Chen, Xinmei; Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-07-25

    The binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to EGF receptor (EGFR) stimulates cell mitogenesis and survival through various signalling cascades. EGF also stimulates rapid EGFR endocytosis and its eventual degradation in lysosomes. The immediate events induced by ligand binding include receptor dimerization, activation of intrinsic tyrosine kinase and autophosphorylation. However, in spite of intensified efforts, the results regarding the roles of these events in EGFR signalling and internalization is still very controversial. In this study, we constructed a chimeric EGFR by replacing its extracellular domain with leucine zipper (LZ) and tagged a green fluorescent protein (GFP) at its C-terminus. We showed that the chimeric LZ-EGFR-GFP was constitutively dimerized. The LZ-EGFR-GFP dimer autophosphorylated each of its five well-defined C-terminal tyrosine residues as the ligand-induced EGFR dimer does. Phosphorylated LZ-EGFR-GFP was localized to both the plasma membrane and endosomes, suggesting it is capable of endocytosis. We also showed that LZ-EGFR-GFP activated major signalling proteins including Src homology collagen-like (Shc), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt. Moreover, LZ-EGFR-GFP was able to stimulate cell proliferation. These results indicate that non-ligand induced dimerization is sufficient to activate EGFR and initiate cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis. We conclude that receptor dimerization is a critical event in EGF-induced cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis.

  13. Novel pathways to erythropoiesis induced by dimerization of intracellular C-Mpl in human hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Chintan; Sahaghian, Arineh; Kim, William; Scholes, Jessica; Ge, Shundi; Zhu, Yuhua; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Hollis, Roger; Kohn, Donald; Ji, Lingyun; Malvar, Jemily; Wang, Xiaoyan; Crooks, Gay

    2012-04-01

    The cytokine thrombopoietin (Tpo) plays a critical role in hematopoiesis by binding to the extracellular domain and inducing homodimerization of the intracellular signaling domain of its receptor, c-Mpl. Mpl homodimerization can also be accomplished by binding of a synthetic ligand to a constitutively expressed fusion protein F36VMpl consisting of a ligand binding domain (F36V) and the intracellular signaling domain of Mpl. Unexpectedly, in contrast to Tpo stimulation, robust erythropoiesis is induced after dimerization of F36VMpl in human CD34+ progenitor cells. The goal of this study was to define the hematopoietic progenitor stages at which dimerization of intracellular Mpl induces erythropoiesis and the downstream molecular events that mediate this unanticipated effect. Dimerization (in the absence of erythropoietin and other cytokines) in human common myeloid progenitors and megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors caused a significant increase in CD34+ cells (p < .01) and induced all stages of erythropoiesis including production of enucleated red blood cells. In contrast, erythropoiesis was not seen with Tpo stimulation. CD34+ cell expansion was the result of increased cell cycling and survival (p < .05). Microarray profiling of CD34+ cells demonstrated that a unique transcriptional pattern is activated in progenitors by F36VMpl dimerization. Ligand-inducible dimerization of intracellular Mpl in human myeloerythroid progenitors induces progenitor expansion and erythropoiesis through molecular mechanisms that are not shared by Tpo stimulation of endogenous Mpl. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Mechanism of Inducible Nitric-oxide Synthase Dimerization Inhibition by Novel Pyrimidine Imidazoles*

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Latika; Haque, Mohammad M.; Saha, Amit; Mukherjee, Nirmalya; Ghosh, Arnab; Ranu, Brindaban C.; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Panda, Koustubh

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) has been etiologically linked to several inflammatory, immunological, and neurodegenerative diseases. As dimerization of NOS is required for its activity, several dimerization inhibitors, including pyrimidine imidazoles, are being evaluated for therapeutic inhibition of iNOS. However, the precise mechanism of their action is still unclear. Here, we examined the mechanism of iNOS inhibition by a pyrimidine imidazole core compound and its derivative (PID), having low cellular toxicity and high affinity for iNOS, using rapid stopped-flow kinetic, gel filtration, and spectrophotometric analysis. PID bound to iNOS heme to generate an irreversible PID-iNOS monomer complex that could not be converted to active dimers by tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B) and l-arginine (Arg). We utilized the iNOS oxygenase domain (iNOSoxy) and two monomeric mutants whose dimerization could be induced (K82AiNOSoxy) or not induced (D92AiNOSoxy) with H4B to elucidate the kinetics of PID binding to the iNOS monomer and dimer. We observed that the apparent PID affinity for the monomer was 11 times higher than the dimer. PID binding rate was also sensitive to H4B and Arg site occupancy. PID could also interact with nascent iNOS monomers in iNOS-synthesizing RAW cells, to prevent their post-translational dimerization, and it also caused irreversible monomerization of active iNOS dimers thereby accomplishing complete physiological inhibition of iNOS. Thus, our study establishes PID as a versatile iNOS inhibitor and therefore a potential in vivo tool for examining the causal role of iNOS in diseases associated with its overexpression as well as therapeutic control of such diseases. PMID:23696643

  15. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor

    SciT

    Goffinont, S.; Davidkova, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M., E-mail: spotheim@cnrs-orleans.fr

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro {gamma}-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucinemore » residues of the tetramerization domain.« less

  16. Zinc release contributes to hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sang Won; Garnier, Philippe; Aoyama, Koji; Chen, Yongmei; Swanson, Raymond A

    2004-08-01

    Neurons exposed to zinc exhibit activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), an enzyme that normally participates in DNA repair but promotes cell death when extensively activated. Endogenous, vesicular zinc in brain is released to the extracellular space under conditions causing neuronal depolarization. Here, we used a rat model of insulin-induced hypoglycemia to assess the role of zinc release in PARP-1 activation and neuronal death after severe hypoglycemia. Zinc staining with N-(6-methoxy-8-quinolyl)-para-toluenesulfonamide (TSQ) showed depletion of presynaptic vesicular zinc from hippocampal mossy fiber terminals and accumulation of weakly bound zinc in hippocampal CA1 cell bodies after severe hypoglycemia. Intracerebroventricular injection of the zinc chelator calcium ethylene-diamine tetraacetic acid (CaEDTA) blocked the zinc accumulation and significantly reduced hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death. CaEDTA also attenuated the accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose), the enzymatic product of PARP-1, in hippocampal neurons. These results suggest that zinc translocation is an intermediary step linking hypoglycemia to PARP-1 activation and neuronal death.

  17. Zinc stress induces copper depletion in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Karl A; Pederick, Victoria G; Elbourne, Liam D H; Paulsen, Ian T; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A; Eijkelkamp, Bart A

    2017-03-11

    The first row transition metal ions zinc and copper are essential to the survival of many organisms, although in excess these ions are associated with significant toxicity. Here, we examined the impact of zinc and copper stress on Acinetobacter baumannii, a common opportunistic pathogen. We show that extracellular zinc stress induces a copper-specific depletion phenotype in A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Supplementation with copper not only fails to rescue this phenotype, but further exacerbates the copper depletion. Extensive analysis of the A. baumannii ATCC 17978 genome identified 13 putative zinc/copper resistance efflux pumps. Transcriptional analyses show that four of these transporters are responsive to zinc stress, five to copper stress and seven to the combination of zinc and copper stress, thereby revealing a likely foundation for the zinc-induced copper starvation in A. baumannii. In addition, we show that zinc and copper play crucial roles in management of oxidative stress and the membrane composition of A. baumannii. Further, we reveal that zinc and copper play distinct roles in macrophage-mediated killing of this pathogen. Collectively, this study supports the targeting of metal ion homeostatic mechanisms as an effective antimicrobial strategy against multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens.

  18. Vibrationally induced flip motion of a hydroxyl dimer on Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsuka, Yasuhiro; Frederiksen, Thomas; Ueba, Hiromu; Paulsson, Magnus

    2011-11-01

    Recent low-temperature scanning-tunneling microscopy experiments [T. Kumagai , Phys. Rev. BPLRBAQ0556-280510.1103/PhysRevB.79.035423 79, 035423 (2009)] observed the vibrationally induced flip motion of a hydroxyl dimer (OD)2 on Cu(110). We propose a model to describe two-level fluctuations and current-voltage characteristics of nanoscale systems that undergo vibrationally induced switching. The parameters of the model are based on comprehensive density functional calculations of the system’s vibrational properties. For the dimer (OD)2, the calculated population of the high- and low-conductance states, the I-V, dI/dV, and d2I/dV2 curves are in good agreement with the experimental results and underline the different roles played by the free and shared OD stretch modes of the dimer.

  19. Zinc-induced protection against cadmium

    SciT

    Early, J.L.; Schnell, R.C.

    Pretreatment of male rats with cadmium acetate potentiates the duration of hexobarbital hypnosis and inhibits the rate of hepatic microsomal drug metabolism. Pretreatment of rats with zinc acetate protects against these alterations in drug action elicited by cadmium.

  20. Vibrational analysis of carbonyl modes in different stages of light-induced cyclopyrimidine dimer repair reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Tavan, Paul; Nonella, Marco

    2001-11-01

    The formation of cyclopyrimidine dimers is a DNA defect, which is repaired by the enzyme DNA photolyase in a light-induced reaction. Radical anions of the dimers have been suggested to occur as short-lived intermediates during repair. For their identification time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy will be a method of choice. To support and guide such spectroscopic studies we have calculated the vibrational spectra of various pyrimidine compounds using density functional methods. Our results suggest that the carbonyl vibrations of these molecules can serve as marker modes to identify and distinguish intermediates of the repair reaction.

  1. Ligand-induced perturbation of the HIF-2α:ARNT dimer dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are transcription factors belonging to the basic helix−loop−helix PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH-PAS) protein family with a role in sensing oxygen levels in the cell. Under hypoxia, the HIF-α degradation pathway is blocked and dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) makes HIF-α transcriptionally active. Due to the common hypoxic environment of tumors, inhibition of this mechanism by destabilization of HIF-α:ARNT dimerization has been proposed as a promising therapeutic strategy. Following the discovery of a druggable cavity within the PAS-B domain of HIF-2α, research efforts have been directed to identify artificial ligands that can impair heterodimerization. Although the crystallographic structures of the HIF-2α:ARNT complex have elucidated the dimer architecture and the 0X3-inhibitor placement within the HIF-2α PAS-B, unveiling the inhibition mechanism requires investigation of how ligand-induced perturbations could dynamically propagate through the structure and affect dimerization. To this end, we compared evolutionary features, intrinsic dynamics and energetic properties of the dimerization interfaces of HIF-2α:ARNT in both the apo and holo forms. Residue conservation analysis highlighted inter-domain connecting elements that have a role in dimerization. Analysis of domain contributions to the dimerization energy demonstrated the importance of bHLH and PAS-A of both partners and of HIF-2α PAS-B domain in dimer stabilization. Among quaternary structure oscillations revealed by Molecular Dynamics simulations, the hinge-bending motion of the ARNT PAS-B domain around the flexible PAS-A/PAS-B linker supports a general model for ARNT dimerization in different heterodimers. Comparison of the HIF-2α:ARNT dynamics in the apo and 0X3-bound forms indicated a model of inhibition where the HIF-2α-PAS-B interfaces are destabilised as a result of water-bridged ligand-protein interactions and these local

  2. Ion Mobility Measurements of Multianionic Metalloporphyrin Dimers: Structural Changes Induced by Countercation Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Erik; Brendle, Katrina; Jäger, Patrick; Weis, Patrick; Kappes, Manfred M.

    2018-04-01

    We present gas-phase structures of dimers of MnIII and FeIII meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin multianions with various amounts of sodium and hydrogen counterions. The structural assignments are achieved by combining mass spectrometry, ion mobility measurements, quantum chemical calculations, and trajectory method collision cross section calculations. For a common charge state, we observe significant topological variations in the dimer structures of [(MTPPS)2+nX](6-n)- (M=MnIII, FeIII; X=H, Na; n = 1-3) induced by replacing hydrogen counterions by sodium. For sodium, the dimer structures are much more compact, a finding that can be rationalized by the stronger interactions of the sodium cations with the anionic sulfonic acid groups of the porphyrins as compared to hydrogen. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Zinc

    MedlinePlus

    ... Using toothpastes containing zinc, with or without an antibacterial agent, appears to prevent plaque and gingivitis. Some ... is some evidence that zinc has some antiviral activity against the herpes virus. Low zinc levels can ...

  4. Dimerization-induced corepressor binding and relaxed DNA-binding specificity are critical for PML/RARA-induced immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Pérès, Laurent; Honoré, Nicole; Nasr, Rihab; Zhu, Jun; de Thé, Hugues

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia involves the transcriptional repression of master genes of myeloid differentiation by the promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor α (PML/RARA) oncogene. PML-enforced RARA homodimerization allows the tighter binding of corepressors, silencing RARA target genes. In addition, homodimerization dramatically extends the spectrum of DNA-binding sites of the fusion protein compared with those of normal RARA. Yet, any contribution of these two properties of PML/RARA to differentiation arrest and immortalization of primary mouse hematopoietic progenitors was unknown. We demonstrate that dimerization-induced silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors (SMRT)-enhanced binding and relaxed DNA-binding site specificity are both required for efficient immortalization. Thus, enforced RARA dimerization is critical not only for triggering transcriptional repression but also for extending the repertoire of target genes. Our studies exemplify how dimerization-induced gain of functions converts an unessential transcription factor into a dominant oncogenic protein. PMID:16757557

  5. Dimerization of glycoprotein Ibα is not sufficient to induce platelet clearance.

    PubMed

    Liang, X; Syed, A K; Russell, S R; Ware, J; Li, R

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Many anti-glycoprotein (GP)Ibα antibodies induce platelet clearance in a dimer-dependent manner. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies that bind the mechanosensitive domain (MSD) of GPIbα. An anti-MSD antibody binds two copies of GPIbα in platelets but does not induce platelet clearance. The prevailing clustering model of GPIbα signaling is incorrect or needs revision. The mechanism of platelet clearance is not clear. Many antibodies binding the membrane-distal ligand-binding domain of glycoprotein (GP)Ibα induce rapid clearance of platelets and acute thrombocytopenia, which requires the bifurcated antibody structure. It was thought that binding of these antibodies induced lateral dimerization or clustering of GPIbα in the plasma membrane, which leads to downstream signaling and platelet clearance. However, many antibodies targeting GPIbβ and GPIX, which are associated with GPIbα in the GPIb-IX complex, do not induce platelet clearance, which is in contradiction to the clustering model. To test whether dimerization or clustering of GPIbα is sufficient to transmit the signal that leads to platelet clearance. We have recently raised several mAbs targeting the mechanosensitive domain (MSD) of GPIbα. Binding of these anti-MSD antibodies was characterized with biochemical methods. Their ability to stimulate platelets and induce platelet clearance in mice was assessed. Infusion of anti-MSD antibodies does not cause thrombocytopenia in mice. These antibodies show no detectable effects on platelet activation and aggregation in vitro. Further biochemical investigation showed that the anti-MSD antibody 3D1 binds two copies of GPIbα on the platelet surface. Therefore, lateral dimerization of GPIbα induced by antibody binding is not sufficient to initiate GPIb-IX signaling and induce platelet clearance. Our results suggest that a factor other than or in addition to clustering of GPIbα is required to induce platelet clearance. © 2015 International

  6. X-ray induced dimerization of cinnamic acid: Time-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkinen, Juho; Niskanen, Johannes; Talka, Tuomas; Sahle, Christoph J.; Müller, Harald; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Hashemi, Javad; Akbari, Ali; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2015-11-01

    A classic example of solid-state topochemical reactions is the ultraviolet-light induced photodimerization of α-trans-cinnamic acid (CA). Here, we report the first observation of an X-ray-induced dimerization of CA and monitor it in situ using nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (NRIXS). The time-evolution of the carbon core-electron excitation spectra shows the effects of two X-ray induced reactions: dimerization on a short time-scale and disintegration on a long time-scale. We used spectrum simulations of CA and its dimerization product, α-truxillic acid (TA), to gain insight into the dimerization effects. From the time-resolved spectra, we extracted component spectra and time-dependent weights corresponding to CA and TA. The results suggest that the X-ray induced dimerization proceeds homogeneously in contrast to the dimerization induced by ultraviolet light. We also utilized the ability of NRIXS for direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast to image the spatial progress of the reactions in the sample crystal. Our work paves the way for other time-resolved studies on chemical reactions using inelastic X-ray scattering.

  7. X-ray induced dimerization of cinnamic acid: Time-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Inkinen, Juho; Niskanen, Johannes; Talka, Tuomas; Sahle, Christoph J.; Müller, Harald; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Hashemi, Javad; Akbari, Ali; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2015-01-01

    A classic example of solid-state topochemical reactions is the ultraviolet-light induced photodimerization of α-trans-cinnamic acid (CA). Here, we report the first observation of an X-ray-induced dimerization of CA and monitor it in situ using nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (NRIXS). The time-evolution of the carbon core-electron excitation spectra shows the effects of two X-ray induced reactions: dimerization on a short time-scale and disintegration on a long time-scale. We used spectrum simulations of CA and its dimerization product, α-truxillic acid (TA), to gain insight into the dimerization effects. From the time-resolved spectra, we extracted component spectra and time-dependent weights corresponding to CA and TA. The results suggest that the X-ray induced dimerization proceeds homogeneously in contrast to the dimerization induced by ultraviolet light. We also utilized the ability of NRIXS for direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast to image the spatial progress of the reactions in the sample crystal. Our work paves the way for other time-resolved studies on chemical reactions using inelastic X-ray scattering. PMID:26568420

  8. Ligand-induced type II interleukin-4 receptor dimers are sustained by rapid re-association within plasma membrane microcompartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, David; Moraga, Ignacio; Winkelmann, Hauke; Birkholz, Oliver; Wilmes, Stephan; Schulte, Markos; Kraich, Michael; Kenneweg, Hella; Beutel, Oliver; Selenschik, Philipp; Paterok, Dirk; Gavutis, Martynas; Schmidt, Thomas; Garcia, K. Christopher; Müller, Thomas D.; Piehler, Jacob

    2017-07-01

    The spatiotemporal organization of cytokine receptors in the plasma membrane is still debated with models ranging from ligand-independent receptor pre-dimerization to ligand-induced receptor dimerization occurring only after receptor uptake into endosomes. Here, we explore the molecular and cellular determinants governing the assembly of the type II interleukin-4 receptor, taking advantage of various agonists binding the receptor subunits with different affinities and rate constants. Quantitative kinetic studies using artificial membranes confirm that receptor dimerization is governed by the two-dimensional ligand-receptor interactions and identify a critical role of the transmembrane domain in receptor dimerization. Single molecule localization microscopy at physiological cell surface expression levels, however, reveals efficient ligand-induced receptor dimerization by all ligands, largely independent of receptor binding affinities, in line with the similar STAT6 activation potencies observed for all IL-4 variants. Detailed spatiotemporal analyses suggest that kinetic trapping of receptor dimers in actin-dependent microcompartments sustains robust receptor dimerization and signalling.

  9. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  10. Pressure-induced subunit dissociation and unfolding of dimeric beta-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Valente-Mesquita, V L; Botelho, M M; Ferreira, S T

    1998-01-01

    Effects of hydrostatic pressure on dimeric beta-lactoglobulin A (beta-Lg) were investigated. Application of pressures of up to 3.5 kbar induced a significant red shift ( approximately 11 nm) and a 60% increase in intrinsic fluorescence emission of beta-Lg. These changes were very similar to those induced by guanidine hydrochloride, which caused subunit dissociation and unfolding of beta-Lg. A large hysteresis in the recovery of fluorescence parameters was observed upon decompression of beta-Lg. Pressure-induced dissociation and unfolding were not fully reversible, because of the formation of a nonnative intersubunit disulfide bond that hampered correct refolding of the dimer. Comparison between pressure dissociation/unfolding at 3 degrees C and 23 degrees C revealed a marked destabilization of beta-Lg at low temperature. The stability of beta-Lg toward pressure was significantly enhanced by 1 M NaCl, but not by glycerol (up to 20% v/v). These observations suggest that salt stabilization was not related to a general cosolvent effect, but may reflect charge screening. Interestingly, pressure-induced dissociation/unfolding was completely independent of beta-Lg concentration, in apparent violation of the law of mass action. Possible causes for this anomalous behavior are discussed. PMID:9649408

  11. A Photoluminescence Study of the Changes Induced in the Zinc White Pigment by Formation of Zinc Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Artesani, Alessia; Gherardi, Francesca; Nevin, Austin; Valentini, Gianluca; Comelli, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    It is known that oil paintings containing zinc white are subject to rapid degradation. This is caused by the interaction between the active groups of binder and the metal ions of the pigment, which gives rise to the formation of new zinc complexes (metal soaps). Ongoing studies on zinc white paints have been limited to the chemical mechanisms that lead to the formation of zinc complexes. On the contrary, little is known of the photo-physical changes induced in the zinc oxide crystal structure following this interaction. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy has been applied to follow modifications in the luminescent zinc white pigment when mixed with binder. Significant changes in trap state photoluminescence emissions have been detected: the enhancement of a blue emission combined with a change of the decay kinetic of the well-known green emission. Complementary data from molecular analysis of paints using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the formation of zinc carboxylates and corroborates the mechanism for zinc complexes formation. We support the hypothesis that zinc ions migrate into binder creating novel vacancies, affecting the photoluminescence intensity and lifetime properties of zinc oxide. Here, we further demonstrate the advantages of a time-resolved photoluminescence approach for studying defects in semiconductor pigments. PMID:28772700

  12. Quantitative mapping of zinc fluxes in the mammalian egg reveals the origin of fertilization-induced zinc sparks

    PubMed Central

    Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Duncan, Francesca E.; Kong, Betty Y.; Gleber, Sophie C.; Vogt, Stefan; Chen, Si; Garwin, Seth A.; Bayer, Amanda R.; Dravid, Vinayak; Woodruff, Teresa K.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilization of a mammalian egg induces a series of ‘zinc sparks’ that are necessary for inducing the egg-to-embryo transition. Despite the importance of these zinc efflux events little is known about their origin. To understand the molecular mechanism of the zinc spark we combined four physical approaches to resolve zinc distributions in single cells: a chemical probe for dynamic live-cell fluorescence imaging and a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microscopy, and 3D elemental tomography for high resolution elemental mapping. We show that the zinc spark arises from a system of thousands of zinc-loaded vesicles, each of which contains, on average, 106 zinc atoms. These vesicles undergo dynamic movement during oocyte maturation and exocytosis at the time of fertilization. The discovery of these vesicles and the demonstration that zinc sparks originate from them provides a quantitative framework for understanding how zinc fluxes regulate cellular processes. PMID:25615666

  13. Quantitative mapping of zinc fluxes in the mammalian egg reveals the origin of fertilization-induced zinc sparks

    DOE PAGES

    Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Duncan, Francesca E.; ...

    2014-12-15

    Fertilization of a mammalian egg induces a series of ‘zinc sparks’ that are necessary for inducing the egg-to-embryo transition. Despite the importance of these zinc efflux events little is known about their origin. To understand the molecular mechanism of the zinc spark we combined four physical approaches to resolve zinc distributions in single cells: a chemical probe for dynamic live-cell fluorescence imaging and a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microscopy, and 3D elemental tomography for high resolution elemental mapping. Here we show that the zinc spark arises from a system of thousands ofmore » zinc-loaded vesicles, each of which contains, on average, 106 zinc atoms. These vesicles undergo dynamic movement during oocyte maturation and exocytosis at the time of fertilization. We conclude that the discovery of these vesicles and the demonstration that zinc sparks originate from them provides a quantitative framework for understanding how zinc fluxes regulate cellular processes.« less

  14. Structural insight into arginine methylation by the mouse protein arginine methyltransferase 7: a zinc finger freezes the mimic of the dimeric state into a single active site.

    PubMed

    Cura, Vincent; Troffer-Charlier, Nathalie; Wurtz, Jean Marie; Bonnefond, Luc; Cavarelli, Jean

    2014-09-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) is a type III arginine methyltransferase which has been implicated in several biological processes such as transcriptional regulation, DNA damage repair, RNA splicing, cell differentiation and metastasis. PRMT7 is a unique but less characterized member of the family of PRMTs. The crystal structure of full-length PRMT7 from Mus musculus refined at 1.7 Å resolution is described. The PRMT7 structure is composed of two catalytic modules in tandem forming a pseudo-dimer and contains only one AdoHcy molecule bound to the N-terminal module. The high-resolution crystal structure presented here revealed several structural features showing that the second active site is frozen in an inactive state by a conserved zinc finger located at the junction between the two PRMT modules and by the collapse of two degenerated AdoMet-binding loops.

  15. Flavonols Protect Against UV Radiation-Induced Thymine Dimer Formation in an Artificial Skin Mimic.

    PubMed

    Maini, Sabia; Fahlman, Brian M; Krol, Ed S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet light has been shown to have a number of deleterious effects including photoaging, photoimmunosuppression and photoinduced DNA damage which can lead to the development of skin cancer. In this paper we present a study on the ability of three flavonols to protect EpiDerm™, an artificial skin mimic, against UV-induced damage. EpiDerm™ samples were treated with flavonol in acetone and exposed to UVA (100 kJ/m(2) at 365 nm) and UVB (9000 J/m(2) at 310 nm) radiation. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a) were determined by ELISA, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were quantified using LC-APCI-MS. EpiDerm™ treated topically with quercetin significantly decreased MMP-1 secretion induced by UVA (100 µM) or UVB (200 µM) and TNF-a secretion was significantly reduced at 100 µM quercetin for both UVA and UVB radiation. In addition, topically applied quercetin was found to be photostable over the duration of the experiment. EpiDerm™ samples were treated topically with quercetin, kaempferol or galangin (52 µM) immediately prior to UVA or UVB exposure, and the cyclobutane thymine dimers (T-T (CPD)) were quantified using an HPLC-APCI MS/MS method. All three flavonols significantly decreased T-T (CPD) formation in UVB irradiated EpiDerm™, however no effect could be observed for the UVA irradiation experiments as thymine dimer formation was below the limit of quantitation. Our results suggest that flavonols can provide protection against UV radiation-induced skin damage through both antioxidant activity and direct photo-absorption. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  16. pH-Responsive Dimeric Zinc(II) Phthalocyanine in Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as an Activatable Nanophotosensitizing System for Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Roy C H; Chow, Sun Y S; Zhao, Shirui; Fong, Wing-Ping; Ng, Dennis K P; Lo, Pui-Chi

    2017-07-19

    An acid-cleavable acetal-linked zinc(II) phthalocyanine dimer with an azido terminal group (cPc) was prepared and conjugated to alkyne-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles via copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction. For comparison, an amine-linked analogue (nPc) was also prepared as a non-acid-cleavable counterpart. These dimeric phthalocyanines were significantly self-quenched due to the close proximity of the phthalocyanine units inside the mesopores, resulting in much weaker fluorescence emission and singlet oxygen generation, both in N,N-dimethylformamide and in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), compared with the free molecular counterparts. Under acidic conditions in PBS, the cPc-encapsulated nanosystem was activated in terms of fluorescence emission and singlet oxygen production. After internalization into human colon adenocarcinoma HT29 cells, it exhibited much higher intracellular fluorescence and photocytotoxicity compared to the nanosystem entrapped with nPc. The activation of this nanosystem was also demonstrated in tumor-bearing nude mice. The intratumoral fluorescence intensity increased gradually over 24 h, while for the nPc counterpart the fluorescence remained very weak. The results suggest that this nanosystem serves as a promising activatable nanophotosensitizing agent for photodynamic therapy.

  17. Zinc Binding and Dimerization of Streptococcus pyogenes Pyrogenic Exotoxin C Are Not Essential for T-Cell Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-14

    streptococcal superantigen binding to MHCII on the surface of cells (7–9), suggesting an essential role in both MHCII molecular recognition and TCR-mediated...extent, mutations of side chains found in a second conserved MHCII alpha-chain-binding site consisting of a hydrophobic surface loop decreased T-cell...fraction of dimer is present at T-cell stimulatory concentrations of Spe-C following mutation of the unpaired side chain of cys- teine at residue 27 to

  18. Far-UV-induced dimeric photoproducts in short oligonucleotides: sequence effects.

    PubMed

    Douki, T; Zalizniak, T; Cadet, J

    1997-08-01

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone adducts represent the two major classes of far-UV-induced DNA photoproducts. Because of the lack of appropriate detection methods for each individual photoproduct, little is known about the effect of the sequence on their formation. In the present work, the photoproduct distribution obtained upon exposure of a series of dinucleoside monophosphates to 254 nm light was determined. In the latter model compounds, the presence of a cytosine, located at either the 5'- or the 3'-side of a thymine moiety, led to the preferential formation of (6-4) adducts, whereas the cis-syn cyclobutane dimer was the main thymine-thymine photoproduct. In contrast, the yield of dimeric photoproducts, and particularly of (6-4) photoadducts, was very low upon irradiation of the cytosine-cytosine dinucleoside monophosphate. However, substitution of cytosine by uracil led to an increase in the yield of (6-4) photoproduct. It was also shown that the presence of a phosphate group at the 5'- end of a thymine-thymine dinucleoside monophosphate does not modify the photoproduct distribution. As an extension of the studies on dinucleoside monophosphates, the trinucleotide TpdCpT was used as a more relevant DNA model. The yields of formation of the thymine-cytosine and cytosine-thymine (6-4) photoproducts were in a 5:1 ratio, very close to the value obtained upon photolysis of the related dinucleoside monophosphates. The characterization of the two TpdCpT (6-4) adducts was based on 1H NMR, UV and mass spectroscopy analyses. Additional evidence for the structures was inferred from the analysis of the enzymatic digestion products of the (6-4) adducts of TpdCpT with phosphodiesterases. The latter enzymes were shown to induce the quantitative release of the photoproduct as a modified dinucleoside monophosphate in a highly sequence-specific manner.

  19. Quantitative mapping of zinc fluxes in the mammalian egg reveals the origin of fertilization-induced zinc sparks

    SciT

    Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Duncan, Francesca E.

    2014-12-15

    Fertilization of a mammalian egg initiates a series of 'zinc sparks' that are necessary to induce the egg-to-embryo transition. Despite the importance of these zinc-efflux events little is known about their origin. To understand the molecular mechanism of the zinc spark we combined four physical approaches that resolve zinc distributions in single cells: a chemical probe for dynamic live-cell fluorescence imaging and a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microscopy and three-dimensional elemental tomography for high-resolution elemental mapping. We show that the zinc spark arises from a system of thousands of zinc-loaded vesicles, each ofmore » which contains, on average, 10(6) zinc atoms. These vesicles undergo dynamic movement during oocyte maturation and exocytosis at the time of fertilization. The discovery of these vesicles and the demonstration that zinc sparks originate from them provides a quantitative framework for understanding how zinc fluxes regulate cellular processes« less

  20. Quantitative mapping of zinc fluxes in the mammalian egg reveals the origin of fertilization-induced zinc sparks.

    PubMed

    Que, Emily L; Bleher, Reiner; Duncan, Francesca E; Kong, Betty Y; Gleber, Sophie C; Vogt, Stefan; Chen, Si; Garwin, Seth A; Bayer, Amanda R; Dravid, Vinayak P; Woodruff, Teresa K; O'Halloran, Thomas V

    2015-02-01

    Fertilization of a mammalian egg initiates a series of 'zinc sparks' that are necessary to induce the egg-to-embryo transition. Despite the importance of these zinc-efflux events little is known about their origin. To understand the molecular mechanism of the zinc spark we combined four physical approaches that resolve zinc distributions in single cells: a chemical probe for dynamic live-cell fluorescence imaging and a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microscopy and three-dimensional elemental tomography for high-resolution elemental mapping. We show that the zinc spark arises from a system of thousands of zinc-loaded vesicles, each of which contains, on average, 10(6) zinc atoms. These vesicles undergo dynamic movement during oocyte maturation and exocytosis at the time of fertilization. The discovery of these vesicles and the demonstration that zinc sparks originate from them provides a quantitative framework for understanding how zinc fluxes regulate cellular processes.

  1. Conditionally controlling nuclear trafficking in yeast by chemical-induced protein dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Johnson, Cole A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    We present here a protocol to conditionally control the nuclear trafficking of target proteins in yeast. In this system, rapamycin is used to heterodimerize two chimeric proteins. one chimera consists of a FK506-binding protein (FKBp12) fused to a cellular ‘address’ (nuclear localization signal or nuclear export sequence). the second chimera consists of a target protein fused to a fluorescent protein and the FKBp12-rapamycin-binding (FrB) domain from FKBp-12-rapamycin associated protein 1 (Frap1, also known as mtor). rapamycin induces dimerization of the FKBp12- and FrB-containing chimeras; these interactions selectively place the target protein under control of the cell address, thereby directing the protein into or out of the nucleus. By chemical-induced dimerization, protein mislocalization is reversible and enables the identification of conditional loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes, in contrast to other systems that require permanent modification of the targeted protein. Yeast strains for this analysis can be constructed in 1 week, and the technique allows protein mislocalization within 15 min after drug treatment. PMID:21030958

  2. Improving analytical methods for protein-protein interaction through implementation of chemically inducible dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Tonni Grube; Nintemann, Sebastian J.; Marek, Magdalena; Halkier, Barbara A.; Schulz, Alexander; Burow, Meike

    2016-01-01

    When investigating interactions between two proteins with complementary reporter tags in yeast two-hybrid or split GFP assays, it remains troublesome to discriminate true- from false-negative results and challenging to compare the level of interaction across experiments. This leads to decreased sensitivity and renders analysis of weak or transient interactions difficult to perform. In this work, we describe the development of reporters that can be chemically induced to dimerize independently of the investigated interactions and thus alleviate these issues. We incorporated our reporters into the widely used split ubiquitin-, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC)- and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)- based methods and investigated different protein-protein interactions in yeast and plants. We demonstrate the functionality of this concept by the analysis of weakly interacting proteins from specialized metabolism in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results illustrate that chemically induced dimerization can function as a built-in control for split-based systems that is easily implemented and allows for direct evaluation of functionality. PMID:27282591

  3. Conditionally controlling nuclear trafficking in yeast by chemical-induced protein dimerization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Johnson, Cole A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kumar, Anuj

    2010-11-01

    We present here a protocol to conditionally control the nuclear trafficking of target proteins in yeast. In this system, rapamycin is used to heterodimerize two chimeric proteins. One chimera consists of a FK506-binding protein (FKBP12) fused to a cellular 'address' (nuclear localization signal or nuclear export sequence). The second chimera consists of a target protein fused to a fluorescent protein and the FKBP12-rapamycin-binding (FRB) domain from FKBP-12-rapamycin associated protein 1 (FRAP1, also known as mTor). Rapamycin induces dimerization of the FKBP12- and FRB-containing chimeras; these interactions selectively place the target protein under control of the cell address, thereby directing the protein into or out of the nucleus. By chemical-induced dimerization, protein mislocalization is reversible and enables the identification of conditional loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes, in contrast to other systems that require permanent modification of the targeted protein. Yeast strains for this analysis can be constructed in 1 week, and the technique allows protein mislocalization within 15 min after drug treatment.

  4. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Released from Tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) Dimer (CORM-2) in Gastroprotection against Experimental Ethanol-Induced Gastric Damage.

    PubMed

    Magierowska, Katarzyna; Magierowski, Marcin; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Adamski, Juliusz; Surmiak, Marcin; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The physiological gaseous molecule, carbon monoxide (CO) becomes a subject of extensive investigation due to its vasoactive activity throughout the body but its role in gastroprotection has been little investigated. We determined the mechanism of CO released from its donor tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2) in protection of gastric mucosa against 75% ethanol-induced injury. Rats were pretreated with CORM-2 30 min prior to 75% ethanol with or without 1) non-selective (indomethacin) or selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 (SC-560) and COX-2 (celecoxib) inhibitors, 2) nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor L-NNA, 3) ODQ, a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, hemin, a heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inductor or zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), an inhibitor of HO-1 activity. The CO content in gastric mucosa and carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level in blood was analyzed by gas chromatography. The gastric mucosal mRNA expression for HO-1, COX-1, COX-2, iNOS, IL-4, IL-1β was analyzed by real-time PCR while HO-1, HO-2 and Nrf2 protein expression was determined by Western Blot. Pretreatment with CORM-2 (0.5-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced lesions and raised gastric blood flow (GBF) but large dose of 100 mg/kg was ineffective. CORM-2 (5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg i.g.) significantly increased gastric mucosal CO content and whole blood COHb level. CORM-2-induced protection was reversed by indomethacin, SC-560 and significantly attenuated by celecoxib, ODQ and L-NNA. Hemin significantly reduced ethanol damage and raised GBF while ZnPPIX which exacerbated ethanol-induced injury inhibited CORM-2- and hemin-induced gastroprotection and the accompanying rise in GBF. CORM-2 significantly increased gastric mucosal HO-1 mRNA expression and decreased mRNA expression for iNOS, IL-1β, COX-1 and COX-2 but failed to affect HO-1 and Nrf2 protein expression decreased by ethanol. We conclude that CORM-2 released CO exerts gastroprotection against ethanol-induced gastric lesions

  5. Zinc

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guidelines for Americans and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPlate . Where can I find out more about ... on food sources of zinc: U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA’s) National Nutrient Database Nutrient List for zinc ( ...

  6. Zinc

    Zinc was recognized as an essential trace metal for humans during the studies of Iranian adolescent dwarfs in the early 1960s. Zinc metal existing as Zn2+ is a strong electron acceptor in biological systems without risks of oxidant damage to cells. Zn2+ functions in the structure of proteins and is ...

  7. Apigenin prevents ultraviolet-B radiation induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers formation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Britto, S Mary; Shanthakumari, D; Agilan, B; Radhiga, T; Kanimozhi, G; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation leads to the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). We investigated the protective effect of apigenin against UVB-induced CPDs formation in human dermal fibroblasts cells (HDFa). For this purpose, HDFa cells were treated with apigenin (15μM) prior to UVB irradiation (20mJ/cm 2 ); DNA damage and subsequent molecular end points were observed. Exposure to UVB radiation increased significant CPDs formation in HDFa cells and the frequencies of CPDs were reduced by treatment with apigenin (15μM). UVB-induced CPDs downregulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes such as xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C, B, G and F (XPC, XPB, XPG and XPF), transcription factor II human (TFIIH) and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) in HDFa cells. Conversely, apigenin treatment restored UVB-induced loss of NER proteins in HDFa cells, which indicates its preventive effect against CPDs formation. Besides, single low dose UVB-exposure induced nuclear fragmentation, apoptotic frequency and apoptotic proteins expression (Bax and Caspase-3) have been prevented by the apigenin pretreatment. Furthermore, apigenin exhibits strong UV absorbance property and showed 10.08 SPF value. Thus, apigenin can protect skin cells against UVB-induced CPDs formation probably through its sunscreen effect. Hence, apigenin can be considered as an effective protective agent against UV induced skin damages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Photodynamic therapy does not induce cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the presence of melanin.

    PubMed

    Mudambi, Shaila; Pera, Paula; Washington, Deschana; Remenyik, Eva; Fidrus, Eszter; Shafirstein, Gal; Bellnier, David; Paragh, Gyorgy

    2018-04-24

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an office-based treatment for precancerous and early cancerous skin changes. PDT induces cell death through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are the most important DNA changes responsible for ultraviolet (UV) carcinogenesis. Recently ROS induced by UVA were shown to generate CPDs via activating melanin. This raised the possibility that PDT induced ROS may also induce CPDs and mutagenesis in melanin containing cells. Previously the effect of PDT on CPDs in melanin containing cells has not been assessed. Our current work aimed to compare the generation of CPDs in melanin containing cells subjected to UVA treatment and porfimer sodium red light PDT. We used ELISA to detect CPDs. After UVA we found a dose dependent increase in CPDs in melanoma cells (B16-F10, MNT-1) with CPD levels peaking hours after discontinuation of UVA treatment. This indicated the generation of UVA induced dark-CPDs in the model. Nevertheless, PDT in biologically relevant doses was unable to induce CPDs. Our work provides evidence for the lack of CPD generation by PDT in melanin containing cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    SciT

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects ofmore » arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of

  10. Subchronic inhalation of zinc sulfate induces cardiac changes in healthy rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc is a common metal in most ambient particulate matter (PM), and has been proposed to be a causative component in PM-induced adverse cardiovascular health effects. Zinc is also an essential metal and has the potential to induce many physiological and nonphysiological changes. ...

  11. Effects of cadmium and zinc on solar-simulated light-irradiated cells: potential role of zinc-metallothionein in zinc-induced genoprotection.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Eric; Emonet-Piccardi, Nathalie; Didier, Christine; Beani, Jean-Claude; Favier, Alain; Richard, Marie-Jeanne

    2002-09-15

    Zinc is an essential oligoelement for cell growth and cell survival and has been demonstrated to protect cells from oxidative stress induced by UVA or from genotoxic stress due to UVB. In a recent work we demonstrated that the antioxidant role of zinc could be related to its ability to induce metallothioneins (MTs). In this study we identified the mechanism of zinc protection against solar-simulated light (SSL) injury. Cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were used to examine MTs expression and localization in response to solar-simulated radiation. We found translocation to the nucleus, with overexpression of MTs in irradiated cells, a novel observation. The genoprotective effect of zinc was dependent on time and protein synthesis. DNA damage was significantly decreased after 48 h of ZnCl(2) (100 microM) treatment and is inhibited by actinomycin D. ZnCl(2) treatment (100 microM) led to an intense induction, redistribution, and accumulation of MT in the nucleus of irradiated cells. MT expression correlated with the time period of ZnCl(2) treatment. CdCl(2), a potent MT inducer, did not show any genoprotection, although the MTs were expressed in the nucleus. Overall our findings demonstrate that MTs could be a good candidate for explaining the genoprotection mediated by zinc on irradiated cells.

  12. Long-range doublon transfer in a dimer chain induced by topology and ac fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, M.; Creffield, C. E.; Platero, G.

    2016-03-01

    The controlled transfer of particles from one site of a spatial lattice to another is essential for many tasks in quantum information processing and quantum communication. In this work we study how to induce long-range transfer between the two ends of a dimer chain, by coupling states that are localized just on the chain’s end-points. This has the appealing feature that the transfer occurs only between the end-points - the particle does not pass through the intermediate sites-making the transfer less susceptible to decoherence. We first show how a repulsively bound-pair of fermions, known as a doublon, can be transferred from one end of the chain to the other via topological edge states. We then show how non-topological surface states of the familiar Shockley or Tamm type can be used to produce a similar form of transfer under the action of a periodic driving potential. Finally we show that combining these effects can produce transfer by means of more exotic topological effects, in which the driving field can be used to switch the topological character of the edge states, as measured by the Zak phase. Our results demonstrate how to induce long range transfer of strongly correlated particles by tuning both topology and driving.

  13. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Exaggerates Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice: Involvement of Intrahepatic and Extrahepatic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J.; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency. PMID:24155903

  14. Ligand-independent Dimer Formation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Is a Step Separable from Ligand-induced EGFR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaochun; Sharma, Kailash D.; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Iwamoto, Ryo; Mekada, Eisuke

    2002-01-01

    Dimerization and phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) are the initial and essential events of EGF-induced signal transduction. However, the mechanism by which EGFR ligands induce dimerization and phosphorylation is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that EGFRs can form dimers on the cell surface independent of ligand binding. However, a chimeric receptor, comprising the extracellular and transmembrane domains of EGFR and the cytoplasmic domain of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR), did not form a dimer in the absence of ligands, suggesting that the cytoplasmic domain of EGFR is important for predimer formation. Analysis of deletion mutants of EGFR showed that the region between 835Ala and 918Asp of the EGFR cytoplasmic domain is required for EGFR predimer formation. In contrast to wild-type EGFR ligands, a mutant form of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB2) did not induce dimerization of the EGFR-EpoR chimeric receptor and therefore failed to activate the chimeric receptor. However, when the dimerization was induced by a monoclonal antibody to EGFR, HB2 could activate the chimeric receptor. These results indicate that EGFR can form a ligand-independent inactive dimer and that receptor dimerization and activation are mechanistically distinct and separable events. PMID:12134089

  15. A Reduced Zinc Diet or Zinc Transporter 3 Knockout Attenuate Light Induced Zinc Accumulation and Retinal Degeneration△

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shi; Sheline, Carolyn R.; Zhou, Yongdong; Sheline, Christian T.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study on retinal light exposure suggests the involvement of zinc (Zn2+) toxicity in the death of RPE and photoreceptors (LD) which could be attenuated by pyruvate and nicotinamide, perhaps through restoration of NAD+ levels. In the present study, we examined Zn2+ toxicity, and the effects of NAD+ restoration in primary retinal cultures. We then reduced Zn2+ levels in rodents by reducing Zn2+ levels in the diet, or by genetics and measured LD. Sprague Dawley albino rats were fed 2, or 61 mg Zn2+/kg of diet for 3 weeks, and exposed to 18 kLux of white light for 4h. We light exposed (70 kLux of white light for 50h) Zn2+ transporter 3 knockout (ZnT3-KO, no synaptic Zn2+), or RPE65 knockout mice (RPE65-KO, lack rhodopsin cycling), or C57/BI6/J controls and determined light damage and Zn2+ staining. Retinal Zn2+ staining was examined at 1h and 4h after light exposure. Retinas were examined after 7d by optical coherence tomography and histology. After LD, rats fed the reduced Zn2+ diet showed less photoreceptor Zn2+ staining and degeneration compared to a normal Zn2+ diet. Similarly, ZnT3-KO and RPE65-KO mice showed less Zn2+ staining, NAD+ loss, and RPE or photoreceptor death than C57/BI6/J control mice. Dietary or ZnT3-dependent Zn2+ stores, and intracellular Zn2+ release from rhodopsin recycling are suggested to be involved in light-induced retinal degeneration. These results implicate novel rhodopsin-mediated mechanisms and therapeutic targets for LD. Our companion manuscript demonstrates that pharmacologic, circadian, or genetic manipulations which maintain NAD+ levels reduce LD. PMID:23274584

  16. Number and brightness image analysis reveals ATF-induced dimerization kinetics of uPAR in the cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hellriegel, Christian; Caiolfa, Valeria R.; Corti, Valeria; Sidenius, Nicolai; Zamai, Moreno

    2011-01-01

    We studied the molecular forms of the GPI-anchored urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR-mEGFP) in the human embryo kidney (HEK293) cell membrane and demonstrated that the binding of the amino-terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase plasminogen activator is sufficient to induce the dimerization of the receptor. We followed the association kinetics and determined precisely the dimeric stoichiometry of uPAR-mEGFP complexes by applying number and brightness (N&B) image analysis. N&B is a novel fluctuation-based approach for measuring the molecular brightness of fluorophores in an image time sequence in live cells. Because N&B is very sensitive to long-term temporal fluctuations and photobleaching, we have introduced a filtering protocol that corrects for these important sources of error. Critical experimental parameters in N&B analysis are illustrated and analyzed by simulation studies. Control experiments are based on mEGFP-GPI, mEGFP-mEGFP-GPI, and mCherry-GPI, expressed in HEK293. This work provides a first direct demonstration of the dimerization of uPAR in live cells. We also provide the first methodological guide on N&B to discern minor changes in molecular composition such as those due to dimerization events, which are involved in fundamental cell signaling mechanisms.—Hellriegel, C., Caiolfa, V. R., Corti, V., Sidenius, N., Zamai, M. Number and brightness image analysis reveals ATF-induced dimerization kinetics of uPAR in the cell membrane. PMID:21602447

  17. Zinc sparks induce physiochemical changes in the egg zona pellucida that prevent polyspermy

    DOE PAGES

    Que, Emily L.; Duncan, Francesca E.; Bayer, Amanda R.; ...

    2017-01-19

    During fertilization or chemically-induced egg activation, the mouse egg releases billions of zinc atoms in brief bursts known as ‘zinc sparks.’ The zona pellucida (ZP), a glycoprotein matrix surrounding the egg, is the first structure zinc ions encounter as they diffuse away from the plasma membrane. Following fertilization, the ZP undergoes changes described as ‘hardening’, which prevent multiple sperm from fertilizing the egg and thereby establish a block to polyspermy. A major event in zona hardening is cleavage of ZP2 proteins by ovastacin; however, the overall physiochemical changes contributing to zona hardening are not well understood. Using x-ray fluorescence microscopy,more » transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and biological function assays, we tested the hypothesis that zinc release contributes to ZP hardening. We found that the zinc content in the ZP increases by 300% following activation and that zinc exposure modulates the architecture of the ZP matrix. Importantly, zinc-induced structural changes of the ZP have a direct biological consequence; namely, they reduce the ability of sperm to bind to the ZP. These results provide a paradigm-shifting model in which fertilization-induced zinc sparks contribute to the polyspermy block by altering conformations of the ZP matrix. Finally, this adds a previously unrecognized factor, namely zinc, to the process of ZP hardening.« less

  18. Zinc sparks induce physiochemical changes in the egg zona pellucida that prevent polyspermy

    SciT

    Que, Emily L.; Duncan, Francesca E.; Bayer, Amanda R.

    During fertilization or chemically-induced egg activation, the mouse egg releases billions of zinc atoms in brief bursts known as ‘zinc sparks.’ The zona pellucida (ZP), a glycoprotein matrix surrounding the egg, is the first structure zinc ions encounter as they diffuse away from the plasma membrane. Following fertilization, the ZP undergoes changes described as ‘hardening’, which prevent multiple sperm from fertilizing the egg and thereby establish a block to polyspermy. A major event in zona hardening is cleavage of ZP2 proteins by ovastacin; however, the overall physiochemical changes contributing to zona hardening are not well understood. Using x-ray fluorescence microscopy,more » transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and biological function assays, we tested the hypothesis that zinc release contributes to ZP hardening. We found that the zinc content in the ZP increases by 300% following activation and that zinc exposure modulates the architecture of the ZP matrix. Importantly, zinc-induced structural changes of the ZP have a direct biological consequence; namely, they reduce the ability of sperm to bind to the ZP. These results provide a paradigm-shifting model in which fertilization-induced zinc sparks contribute to the polyspermy block by altering conformations of the ZP matrix. Finally, this adds a previously unrecognized factor, namely zinc, to the process of ZP hardening.« less

  19. Alterations in protein kinase C activity and processing during zinc-deficiency-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Chou, Susan S; Clegg, Michael S; Momma, Tony Y; Niles, Brad J; Duffy, Jodie Y; Daston, George P; Keen, Carl L

    2004-10-01

    Protein kinases C (PKCs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are critical for signal transduction pathways involved in growth, differentiation and cell death. All PKC isoforms have four conserved domains, C1-C4. The C1 domain contains cysteine-rich finger-like motifs, which bind two zinc atoms. The zinc-finger motifs modulate diacylglycerol binding; thus, intracellular zinc concentrations could influence the activity and localization of PKC family members. 3T3 cells were cultured in zinc-deficient or zinc-supplemented medium for up to 32 h. Cells cultured in zinc-deficient medium had decreased zinc content, lowered cytosolic classical PKC activity, increased caspase-3 processing and activity, and reduced cell number. Zinc-deficient cytosols had decreased activity and expression levels of PKC-alpha, whereas PKC-alpha phosphorylation was not altered. Inhibition of PKC-alpha with Gö6976 had no effect on cell number in the zinc-deficient group. Proteolysis of the novel PKC family member, PKC-delta, to its 40-kDa catalytic fragment occurred in cells cultured in the zinc-deficient medium. Occurrence of the PKC-delta fragment in mitochondria was co-incident with caspase-3 activation. Addition of the PKC-delta inhibitor, rottlerin, or zinc to deficient medium reduced or eliminated proteolysis of PKC-delta, activated caspase-3 and restored cell number. Inhibition of caspase-3 processing by Z-DQMD-FMK (Z-Asp-Gln-Met-Asp-fluoromethylketone) did not restore cell number in the zinc-deficient group, but resulted in processing of full-length PKC-delta to a 56-kDa fragment. These results support the concept that intracellular zinc concentrations influence PKC activity and processing, and that zinc-deficiency-induced apoptosis occurs in part through PKC-dependent pathways.

  20. A competent catalytic active site is necessary for substrate induced dimer assembly in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sandoval, Pedro; Vique-Sanchez, Jose Luis; Hidalgo, Marisol López; Velazquez-Juarez, Gilberto; Diaz-Quezada, Corina; Arroyo-Navarro, Luis Fernando; Moran, Gabriela Montero; Fattori, Juliana; Jessica Diaz-Salazar, A; Rudiño-Pinera, Enrique; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio; Figueira, Ana Carolina Migliorini; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Brieba, Luis G

    2017-11-01

    The protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis contains two nearly identical triosephosphate isomerases (TvTIMs) that dissociate into stable monomers and dimerize upon substrate binding. Herein, we compare the role of the "ball and socket" and loop 3 interactions in substrate assisted dimer assembly in both TvTIMs. We found that point mutants at the "ball" are only 39 and 29-fold less catalytically active than their corresponding wild-type counterparts, whereas Δloop 3 deletions are 1502 and 9400-fold less active. Point and deletion mutants dissociate into stable monomers. However, point mutants assemble as catalytic competent dimers upon binding of the transition state substrate analog PGH, whereas loop 3 deletions remain monomeric. A comparison between crystal structures of point and loop 3 deletion monomeric mutants illustrates that the catalytic residues in point mutants and wild-type TvTIMs are maintained in the same orientation, whereas the catalytic residues in deletion mutants show an increase in thermal mobility and present structural disorder that may hamper their catalytic role. The high enzymatic activity present in monomeric point mutants correlates with the formation of dimeric TvTIMs upon substrate binding. In contrast, the low activity and lack of dimer assembly in deletion mutants suggests a role of loop 3 in promoting the formation of the active site as well as dimer assembly. Our results suggest that in TvTIMs the active site is assembled during dimerization and that the integrity of loop 3 and ball and socket residues is crucial to stabilize the dimer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Distance within colloidal dimers probed by rotation-induced oscillations of scattered light.

    PubMed

    van Vliembergen, Roland W L; van IJzendoorn, Leo J; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-01-25

    Aggregation processes of colloidal particles are of broad scientific and technological relevance. The earliest stage of aggregation, when dimers appear in an ensemble of single particles, is very important to characterize because it opens routes for further aggregation processes. Furthermore, it represents the most sensitive phase of diagnostic aggregation assays. Here, we characterize dimers by rotating them in a magnetic field and by recording the angle dependence of light scattering. At small scattering angles, the scattering cross section can be approximated by the total cross-sectional area of the dimer. In contrast, at scattering angles around 90 degrees, we reveal that the dependence of the scattering cross section on the dimer angle shows a series of peaks per single 2π rotation of the dimers. These characteristics originate from optical interactions between the two particles, as we have verified with two-particle Mie scattering simulations. We have studied in detail the angular positions of the peaks. It appears from simulations that the influence of particle size polydispersity, Brownian rotation and refractive index on the angular positions of the peaks is relatively small. However, the angular positions of the peaks strongly depend on the distance between the particles. We find a good correspondence between measured data and calculations for a gap of 180 nm between particles having a diameter of 1 micrometer. The experiment and simulations pave the way for extracting distance-specific data from ensembles of dimerizing colloidal particles, with application for sensitive diagnostic aggregation assays.

  2. Colchicine induced intraneuronal free zinc accumulation and dentate granule cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bo Young; Lee, Bo Eun; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Min; Song, Hong Ki; Chung, Tae Nyoung; Suh, Sang Won

    2014-08-01

    Colchicine has been discovered to inhibit many inflammatory processes such as gout, familial Mediterranean fever, pericarditis and Behcet disease. Other than these beneficial anti-inflammatory effects, colchicine blocks microtubule-assisted axonal transport, which results in the selective loss of dentate granule cells of the hippocampus. The mechanism of the colchicine-induced dentate granule cell death and depletion of mossy fiber terminals still remains unclear. In the present study, we hypothesized that colchicine-induced dentate granule cell death may be caused by accumulation of labile intracellular zinc. 10 μg kg(-1) of colchicine was injected into the adult rat hippocampus and then brain sections were evaluated at 1 day or 1 week later. Neuronal cell death was evaluated by H&E staining or Fluoro-Jade B. Zinc accumulation and vesicular zinc were detected by N-(6-methoxy-8-quinolyl)-para-toluene sulfonamide (TSQ) staining. To test whether an extracellular zinc chelator can prevent this process, CaEDTA was injected into the hippocampus over a 5 min period with colchicine. To test whether other microtubule toxins also produce similar effects as colchicine, vincristine was injected into the hippocampus. The present study found that colchicine injection induced intracellular zinc accumulation in the dentate granule cells and depleted vesicular zinc from mossy fiber terminals. Injection of a zinc chelator, CaEDTA, did not block the zinc accumulation and neuronal death. Vincristine also produced intracellular zinc accumulation and neuronal death. These results suggest that colchicine-induced dentate granule cell death is caused by blocking axonal zinc flow and accumulation of intracellular labile zinc.

  3. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Zinc Modulates Nanosilver-Induced Toxicity in Primary Neuronal Cultures.

    PubMed

    Ziemińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NAg) have recently become one of the most commonly used nanomaterials. Since the ability of nanosilver to enter the brain has been confirmed, there has been a need to investigate mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. We previously showed that primary neuronal cultures treated with nanosilver undergo destabilization of calcium homeostasis via a mechanism involving glutamatergic NMDA receptors. Considering the fact that zinc interacts with these receptors, the aim of the present study was to examine the role of zinc in mechanisms of neuronal cell death in primary cultures. In cells treated with nanosilver, we noted an imbalance between extracellular and intracellular zinc levels. Thus, the influence of zinc deficiency and supplementation on nanosilver-evoked cytotoxicity was investigated by treatment with TPEN (a chelator of zinc ions), or ZnCl(2), respectively. Elimination of zinc leads to complete death of nanosilver-treated CGCs. In contrast, supplementation with ZnCl(2) increases viability of CGCs in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of zinc provided protection against the extra/intracellular calcium imbalance in a manner similar to MK-801, an antagonist of NMDA receptors. Zinc chelation by TPEN decreases the mitochondrial potential and dramatically increases the rate of production of reactive oxygen species. Our results indicate that zinc supplementation positively influences nanosilver-evoked changes in CGCs. This is presumed to be due to an inhibitory effect on NMDA-sensitive calcium channels.

  5. Zinc ion-induced domain organization in metallo-beta-lactamases: a flexible "zinc arm" for rapid metal ion transfer?

    PubMed

    Selevsek, Nathalie; Rival, Sandrine; Tholey, Andreas; Heinzle, Elmar; Heinz, Uwe; Hemmingsen, Lars; Adolph, Hans W

    2009-06-12

    The reversible unfolding of metallo-beta-lactamase from Chryseobacterium meningosepticum (BlaB) by guanidinium hydrochloride is best described by a three-state model including folded, intermediate, and unfolded states. The transformation of the folded apoenzyme into the intermediate state requires only very low denaturant concentrations, in contrast to the Zn2-enzyme. Similarly, circular dichroism spectra of both BlaB and metallo-beta-lactamase from Bacillus cereus 569/H/9 (BcII) display distinct differences between metal-free and Zn2-enzymes, indicating that the zinc ions affect the folding of the proteins, giving a larger alpha-helix content. To identify the regions of the protein involved in this zinc ion-induced change, a hydrogen deuterium exchange study with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time of flight mass spectrometry on metal-free and Zn1- and Zn2-BcII was carried out. The region spanning the metal binding metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL) superfamily consensus sequence His-X-His-X-Asp motif and the loop connecting the N- and C-terminal domains of the protein undergoes a zinc ion-dependent structural change between intrinsically disordered and ordered states. The inherent flexibility even appears to allow for the formation of metal ion-bridged protein-protein complexes which may account for both electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy results obtained upon variation of the zinc/protein ratio and stoichiometry-dependent variations of 199mHg-perturbed angular correlation of gamma-rays spectroscopic data. We suggest that this flexible "zinc arm" motif, present in all the MBL subclasses, is disordered in metal-free MBLs and may be involved in metal ion acquisition from zinc-carrying molecules different from MBL in an "activation on demand" regulation of enzyme activity.

  6. Zinc-mediated attenuation of hippocampal mossy fiber long-term potentiation induced by forskolin.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masaki; Oku, Naoto; Takeda, Atsushi

    2010-11-01

    The rise in presynaptic calcium induced by high-frequency stimulation activates the calcium-calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (AC) 1 followed by the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) at the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapse. Zinc is released with glutamate from mossy fiber terminals. However, the role of the zinc in mossy fiber LTP is controversial. In the present study, the mechanism of zinc-mediated attenuation of mossy fiber LTP was examined in that induced by forskolin, an AC activator. Mossy fiber LTP induced by tetanic stimulation (100 Hz for 1 s) was attenuated in the presence of 5 microM ZnCl(2), whereas that induced by forskolin under test stimulation (0.1 Hz) was not attenuated. Forskolin-induced mossy fiber LTP was attenuated by perfusion with 100 microM ZnCl(2) prior to the induction. However, the zinc (100 microM) pre-perfusion did not attenuate mossy fiber LTP induced by Sp-cAMPS, an activator of protein kinase A, under test stimulation. Zinc is necessary to be taken up into mossy fiber boutons for effectively inhibiting AC activity. In hippocampal slices labeled with ZnAF-2 DA, a membrane-permeable zinc indicator, intracellular ZnAF-2 signal was increased during tetanic stimulation in the presence of 5 microM ZnCl(2), but not under test stimulation. Intracellular ZnAF-2 signal was increased under test stimulation in the presence of 100 microM ZnCl(2). These results suggest that zinc taken up into mossy fibers attenuates forskolin-induced mossy fiber LTP via inhibition of AC activity. The significance of endogenous zinc uptake by mossy fibers is discussed focused on tetanus-induced mossy fiber LTP. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Zinc deficiency enhanced inflammatory response by increasing immune cell activation and inducing IL6 promoter demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen P.; Rinaldi, Nicole A.; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope Zinc deficiency results in immune dysfunction and promotes systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zinc deficiency on cellular immune activation and epigenetic mechanisms that promote inflammation. This work is potentially relevant to the aging population given that age-related immune defects, including chronic inflammation, coincide with declining zinc status. Methods and results An in vitro cell culture system and the aged mouse model were used to characterize immune activation and DNA methylation profiles that may contribute to the enhanced proinflammatory response mediated by zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency up-regulated cell activation markers ICAM1, MHC class II, and CD86 in THP1 cells, that coincided with increased IL1β and IL6 responses following LPS stimulation. A decreased zinc status in aged mice was similarly associated with increased ICAM1 and IL6 gene expression. Reduced IL6 promoter methylation was observed in zinc deficient THP1 cells, as well as in aged mice and human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from aged individuals. Conclusion Zinc deficiency induced inflammatory response in part by eliciting aberrant immune cell activation and altered promoter methylation. Our results suggested potential interactions between zinc status, epigenetics, and immune function, and how their dysregulation could contribute to chronic inflammation. PMID:25656040

  8. Zinc-induced Self-association of Complement C3b and Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Ruodan; Tetchner, Stuart; Rodriguez, Elizabeth; Pao, Po-Jung; Gor, Jayesh; Lengyel, Imre; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The sub-retinal pigment epithelial deposits that are a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration contain both C3b and millimolar levels of zinc. C3 is the central protein of complement, whereas C3u is formed by the spontaneous hydrolysis of the thioester bridge in C3. During activation, C3 is cleaved to form active C3b, then C3b is inactivated by Factor I and Factor H to form the C3c and C3d fragments. The interaction of zinc with C3 was quantified using analytical ultracentrifugation and x-ray scattering. C3, C3u, and C3b associated strongly in >100 μm zinc, whereas C3c and C3d showed weak association. With zinc, C3 forms soluble oligomers, whereas C3u and C3b precipitate. We conclude that the C3, C3u, and C3b association with zinc depended on the relative positions of C3d and C3c in each protein. Computational predictions showed that putative weak zinc binding sites with different capacities exist in all five proteins, in agreement with experiments. Factor H forms large oligomers in >10 μm zinc. In contrast to C3b or Factor H alone, the solubility of the central C3b-Factor H complex was much reduced at 60 μm zinc and even more so at >100 μm zinc. The removal of the C3b-Factor H complex by zinc explains the reduced C3u/C3b inactivation rates by zinc. Zinc-induced precipitation may contribute to the initial development of sub-retinal pigment epithelial deposits in the retina as well as reducing the progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration in higher risk patients. PMID:23661701

  9. Inducing Propulsion of Colloidal Dimers by Breaking the Symmetry in Electrohydrodynamic Flow.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fuduo; Yang, Xingfu; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Ning

    2015-11-13

    We show that dielectric colloidal dimers with broken symmetry in geometry, composition, or interfacial charges can all propel in directions that are perpendicular to the applied ac electric field. The asymmetry in particle properties ultimately results in an unbalanced electrohydrodynamic flow on two sides of the particles. Consistent with scaling laws, the propulsion direction, speed, and orientation of dimers can be conveniently tuned by frequency. The new propulsion mechanism revealed here is important for building colloidal motors and studying collective behavior of active matter.

  10. Dietary zinc modifies diabetic-induced renal pathology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Elsaed, Wael M.; Mohamed, Hazem Abdelhamid

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to investigate how far dietary zinc (Zn) modifies the histomorphological alterations induced by diabetes in rat kidneys. The animals were divided into negative control group (10 rats). Diabetes was induced in thirty animals by streptozotocin. After confirming diabetes, the animals were divided into three groups (n = 10). Group II served as the positive control group (fed on standard diet), group III was fed on Zn deficient diet, and group IV was fed on Zn supplemented diet. Caspase-3 immune staining was used to estimate the caspase activity. Stereological procedures were used to measure the quantity of the immune stain and the surface area of the Bowman’s space. The renal cortices of group II rats revealed apparent widening of Bowman’s spaces with few apoptotic figures. The filtration barrier showed thickening of the basement membrane. The proximal convoluted tubules showed patchy loss of the apical microvilli with swollen mitochondria. The distal convoluted tubules revealed area of irregular basal enfolding. The picture was aggravated by Zn deficiency in group III besides areas of cortical interstitial fibrosis. The histopathological alterations were minimal in the cortices of group IV. A significant increase of the Bowman’s space surface area in group II and IV while decrease in group III compared with group I. The expression of Caspase-3 density was significantly increased in group II and III compared with group I while in group IV was non significant. In conclusion, dietary Zn modulated renal cortical changes caused by diabetes in rats. PMID:27882813

  11. Taurine zinc solid dispersions attenuate doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity in rats

    SciT

    Wang, Yu; Mei, Xueting; Yuan, Jingquan

    2015-11-15

    The clinical efficacy of anthracycline anti-neoplastic agents is limited by cardiac and hepatic toxicities. The aim of this study was to assess the hepatoprotective and cardioprotective effects of taurine zinc solid dispersions, which is a newly-synthesized taurine zinc compound, against doxorubicin-induced toxicity in Sprague–Dawley rats intraperitoneally injected with doxorubicin hydrochloride (3 mg/kg) three times a week (seven injections) over 28 days. Hemodynamic parameters, levels of liver toxicity markers and oxidative stress were assessed. Taurine zinc significantly attenuated the reductions in blood pressure, left ventricular pressure and ± dp/dtmax, increases in serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, and reductions inmore » serum Zn{sup 2+} and albumin levels (P < 0.05 or 0.01) induced by doxorubicin. In rats treated with doxorubicin, taurine zinc dose-dependently increased liver superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione concentration, and decreased malondialdehyde level (P < 0.01). qBase{sup +} was used to evaluate the stability of eight candidate reference genes for real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Taurine zinc dose-dependently increased liver heme oxygenase-1 and UDP-glucuronyl transferase mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.01). Western blotting demonstrated that taurine zinc inhibited c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation by upregulating dual-specificity phosphoprotein phosphatase-1. Additionally, taurine zinc inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis as there was decreased TUNEL/DAPI positivity and protein expression of caspase-3. These results indicate that taurine zinc solid dispersions prevent the side-effects of anthracycline-based anticancer therapy. The mechanisms might be associated with the enhancement of antioxidant defense system partly through activating transcription to synthesize endogenous phase II medicine enzymes and anti-apoptosis through inhibiting JNK phosphorylation

  12. Interatomic relaxation processes induced in neon dimers by electron-impact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, S.; Zhang, P.; Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; Zhang, X. C.; Xu, S.; Li, B.; Shen, L. L.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhao, D. M.; Ma, X.

    2018-01-01

    We report an experimental observation of the interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) and radiative charge-transfer (RCT) processes in a Ne dimer (e ,2 e ) following a 380-eV electron impact. By detecting the N e+-N e+ cation pair and one of the emitted electrons in coincidence, the fingerprint of the ICD process initiated by the inner-valence ionization of Ne is obtained. Furthermore, the experimental results and ab initio calculations together unambiguously confirm the occurrence of the RCT process, and we show that most of the low-energy electrons produced in ionization of the Ne dimers are due to the ICD, which strongly suggests the importance of the ICD in causing radiation damage in a biological medium.

  13. Hydrodynamic interactions induce movement against an external load in a ratchet dimer Brownian motor.

    PubMed

    Fornés, José A

    2010-01-15

    We use the Brownian dynamics with hydrodynamic interactions simulation in order to describe the movement of a elastically coupled dimer Brownian motor in a ratchet potential. The only external forces considered in our system were the load, the random thermal noise and an unbiased thermal fluctuation. For a given set of parameters we observe direct movement against the load force if hydrodynamic interactions were considered.

  14. Nucleotide-induced conformations in the neck region of dimeric kinesin

    PubMed Central

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Surrey, Thomas; Altmann, Stephan; Gross, Heinz; Song, Young-Hwa; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Hoenger, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    The neck region of kinesin constitutes a key component in the enzyme’s walking mechanism. Here we applied cryoelectron microscopy and image reconstruction to investigate the location of the kinesin neck in dimeric and monomeric constructs complexed to microtubules. To this end we enhanced the visibility of this region by engineering an SH3 domain into the transition between neck linker and neck coiled coil. The resulting chimeric kinesin constructs remained functional as verified by physiology assays. In the presence of AMP–PNP the SH3 domains allowed us to identify the position of the neck in a well defined conformation and revealed its high flexibility in the absence of nucleotide. We show here the double-headed binding of dimeric kinesin along the same protofilament, which is characterized by the opposite directionality of neck linkers. In this configuration the neck coiled coil appears fully zipped. The position of the neck region in dimeric constructs is not affected by the presence of the tubulin C-termini as confirmed by subtilisin treatment of microtubules prior to motor decoration. PMID:12660159

  15. Hsa-miR-1587 G-quadruplex formation and dimerization induced by NH4+, molecular crowding environment and jatrorrhizine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Yi, Long; Zhu, Zhentao; Zhang, Lulu; Zhou, Jiang; Yuan, Gu

    2018-03-01

    A guanine-rich human mature microRNA, miR-1587, was discovered to form stable intramolecular G-quadruplexes in the presence of K + , Na + and low concentration of NH 4 + (25mM) by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Furthermore, under high concentration of NH 4 + (100mM) or molecular crowding environments, miR-1587 formed a dimeric G-quadruplex through 3'-to-3' stacking of two monomeric G-quadruplex subunits with one ammonium ion sandwiched between the interfaces. Specifically, two synthesized jatrorrhizine derivatives with terminal amine groups could also induce the dimerization of miR-1587 G-quadruplex and formed 1:1 and 2:1 complexes with the dimeric G-quadruplex. In contrast, jatrorrhizine could bind with the dimeric miR-1587 G-quadruplex, but could not induce dimerization of miR-1587 G-quadruplex. These results provide a new strategy to regulate the functions of miR-1587 through induction of G-quadruplex formation and dimerization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Relativity-Induced Bonding Pattern Change in Coinage Metal Dimers M2 (M = Cu, Ag, Au, Rg).

    PubMed

    Li, Wan-Lu; Lu, Jun-Bo; Wang, Zhen-Ling; Hu, Han-Shi; Li, Jun

    2018-05-07

    The periodic table provides a fundamental protocol for qualitatively classifying and predicting chemical properties based on periodicity. While the periodic law of chemical elements had already been rationalized within the framework of the nonrelativistic description of chemistry with quantum mechanics, this law was later known to be affected significantly by relativity. We here report a systematic theoretical study on the chemical bonding pattern change in the coinage metal dimers (Cu 2 , Ag 2 , Au 2 , Rg 2 ) due to the relativistic effect on the superheavy elements. Unlike the lighter congeners basically demonstrating ns- ns bonding character and a 0 g + ground state, Rg 2 shows unique 6d-6d bonding induced by strong relativity. Because of relativistic spin-orbit (SO) coupling effect in Rg 2 , two nearly degenerate SO states, 0 g + and 2 u , exist as candidate of the ground state. This relativity-induced change of bonding mechanism gives rise to various unique alteration of chemical properties compared with the lighter dimers, including higher intrinsic bond energy, force constant, and nuclear shielding. Our work thus provides a rather simple but clear-cut example, where the chemical bonding picture is significantly changed by relativistic effect, demonstrating the modified periodic law in heavy-element chemistry.

  17. Zinc blocks SOS-induced antibiotic resistance via inhibition of RecA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, Bryan E; Escobar, Jillian F; Bair, Kirsten L; Sutton, Mark D; Crane, John K

    2017-01-01

    Zinc inhibits the virulence of diarrheagenic E. coli by inducing the envelope stress response and inhibiting the SOS response. The SOS response is triggered by damage to bacterial DNA. In Shiga-toxigenic E. coli, the SOS response strongly induces the production of Shiga toxins (Stx) and of the bacteriophages that encode the Stx genes. In E. coli, induction of the SOS response is accompanied by a higher mutation rate, called the mutator response, caused by a shift to error-prone DNA polymerases when DNA damage is too severe to be repaired by canonical DNA polymerases. Since zinc inhibited the other aspects of the SOS response, we hypothesized that zinc would also inhibit the mutator response, also known as hypermutation. We explored various different experimental paradigms to induce hypermutation triggered by the SOS response, and found that hypermutation was induced not just by classical inducers such as mitomycin C and the quinolone antibiotics, but also by antiviral drugs such as zidovudine and anti-cancer drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, and azacytidine. Zinc salts inhibited the SOS response and the hypermutator phenomenon in E. coli as well as in Klebsiella pneumoniae, and was more effective in inhibiting the SOS response than other metals. We then attempted to determine the mechanism by which zinc, applied externally in the medium, inhibits hypermutation. Our results show that zinc interferes with the actions of RecA, and protects LexA from RecA-mediated cleavage, an early step in initiation of the SOS response. The SOS response may play a role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the effect of zinc suggests ways to prevent it.

  18. Zinc Chromate Induces Chromosome Instability and DNA Double Strand Breaks in Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hong; Holmes, Amie L.; Young, Jamie L.; Qin, Qin; Joyce, Kellie; Pelsue, Stephen C.; Peng, Cheng; Wise, Sandra S.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Wallace, William T.; Hammond, Dianne; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a respiratory toxicant and carcinogen, with solubility playing an important role in its carcinogenic potential. Zinc chromate, a water insoluble or ‘particulate’ Cr(VI) compound, has been shown to be carcinogenic in epidemiology studies and to induce tumors in experimental animals, but its genotoxicity is poorly understood. Our study shows that zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, chromosome damage and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells. In response to zinc chromate-induced breaks, MRE11 expression was increased and ATM and ATR were phosphorylated, indicating that the DNA double strand break repair system was initiated in the cells. In addition, our data show that zinc chromate-induced double strand breaks were only observed in the G2/M phase population, with no significant amount of double strand breaks observed in G1 and S phase cells. These data will aid in understanding the mechanisms of zinc chromate toxicity and carcinogenesis. PMID:19027772

  19. Zinc deficiency induces vascular pro-inflammatory parameters associated with NF-kappaB and PPAR signaling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huiyun; Oesterling, Elizabeth; Stromberg, Arnold; Toborek, Michal; MacDonald, Ruth; Hennig, Bernhard

    2008-10-01

    Marginal intake of dietary zinc can be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. In the current study we hypothesized that vascular dysfunction and associated inflammatory events are activated during a zinc deficient state. We tested this hypothesis using both vascular endothelial cells and mice lacking the functional LDL-receptor gene. Zinc deficiency increased oxidative stress and NF-kappaB DNA binding activity, and induced COX-2 and E-selectin gene expression, as well as monocyte adhesion in cultured endothelial cells. The NF-kappaB inhibitor CAPE significantly reduced the zinc deficiency-induced COX-2 expression, suggesting regulation through NF-kappaB signaling. PPAR can inhibit NF-kappaB signaling, and our previous data have shown that PPAR transactivation activity requires adequate zinc. Zinc deficiency down-regulated PPARalpha expression in cultured endothelial cells. Furthermore, the PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone was unable to inhibit the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells during zinc deficiency, an event which could be reversed by zinc supplementation. Our in vivo data support the importance of PPAR dysregulation during zinc deficiency. For example, rosiglitazone induced inflammatory genes (e.g., MCP-1) only during zinc deficiency, and adequate zinc was required for rosiglitazone to down-regulate pro-inflammatory markers such as iNOS. In addition, rosiglitazone increased IkappaBalpha protein expression only in zinc adequate mice. Finally, plasma data from LDL-R-deficient mice suggest an overall pro-inflammatory environment during zinc deficiency and support the concept that zinc is required for proper anti-inflammatory or protective functions of PPAR. These studies suggest that zinc nutrition can markedly modulate mechanisms of the pathology of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis.

  20. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. PMID:23523584

  1. Taurine zinc solid dispersions attenuate doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Mei, Xueting; Yuan, Jingquan; Lu, Wenping; Li, Binglong; Xu, Donghui

    2015-11-15

    The clinical efficacy of anthracycline anti-neoplastic agents is limited by cardiac and hepatic toxicities. The aim of this study was to assess the hepatoprotective and cardioprotective effects of taurine zinc solid dispersions, which is a newly-synthesized taurine zinc compound, against doxorubicin-induced toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats intraperitoneally injected with doxorubicin hydrochloride (3mg/kg) three times a week (seven injections) over 28 days. Hemodynamic parameters, levels of liver toxicity markers and oxidative stress were assessed. Taurine zinc significantly attenuated the reductions in blood pressure, left ventricular pressure and ± dp/dtmax, increases in serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, and reductions in serum Zn(2+) and albumin levels (P<0.05 or 0.01) induced by doxorubicin. In rats treated with doxorubicin, taurine zinc dose-dependently increased liver superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione concentration, and decreased malondialdehyde level (P<0.01). qBase(+) was used to evaluate the stability of eight candidate reference genes for real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Taurine zinc dose-dependently increased liver heme oxygenase-1 and UDP-glucuronyl transferase mRNA and protein expression (P<0.01). Western blotting demonstrated that taurine zinc inhibited c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation by upregulating dual-specificity phosphoprotein phosphatase-1. Additionally, taurine zinc inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis as there was decreased TUNEL/DAPI positivity and protein expression of caspase-3. These results indicate that taurine zinc solid dispersions prevent the side-effects of anthracycline-based anticancer therapy. The mechanisms might be associated with the enhancement of antioxidant defense system partly through activating transcription to synthesize endogenous phase II medicine enzymes and anti-apoptosis through inhibiting JNK phosphorylation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc

  2. Surface damage in cystine, an amino acid dimer, induced by keV ions.

    PubMed

    Salles, R C M; Coutinho, L H; da Veiga, A G; Sant'Anna, M M; de Souza, G G B

    2018-01-28

    We have studied the interaction of an ion beam (17.6 keV F - ) with cystine, a dimer formed by the binding of two cysteine residues. Cystine can be considered as an ideal prototype for the study of the relevance of the disulfide (-S-S-) chemical bond in biomolecules. For the sake of comparison, the amino acid cysteine has also been subjected to the same experimental conditions. Characterization of the samples by XPS and NEXAFS shows that both pristine cystine and pristine cysteine are found as a dipolar ion (zwitterion). Following irradiation, the dimer and the amino acid show a tendency to change from the dipole ion form to the normal uncharged form. The largest spectral modification was observed in the high resolution XPS spectra obtained at around the N 1s core level for the two biomolecules. The 2p sulfur edge spectra of cysteine and cystine were much less sensitive to radiation effects. We suggest that the disulfide bond (-S-S-) remains stable before and after irradiation, contributing to the larger radiation stability of cystine as compared to the amino acid cysteine.

  3. Dimeric Arrangement of the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and a Structural Mechanism for Ligand-induced Dissociation

    SciT

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G.; Parker, Naomi R.

    2010-06-25

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP). Little is known about the oligomeric state of the receptor and its regulation by hormone. The crystal structure of the ligand-free PTH1R extracellular domain (ECD) reveals an unexpected dimer in which the C-terminal segment of both ECD protomers forms an {alpha}-helix that mimics PTH/PTHrP by occupying the peptide binding groove of the opposing protomer. ECD-mediated oligomerization of intact PTH1R was confirmed in living cells by bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. As predicted by the structure,more » PTH binding disrupted receptor oligomerization. A receptor rendered monomeric by mutations in the ECD retained wild-type PTH binding and cAMP signaling ability. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that PTH1R forms constitutive dimers that are dissociated by ligand binding and that monomeric PTH1R is capable of activating G protein.« less

  4. Extracellular chelation of zinc does not affect hippocampal excitability and seizure-induced cell death in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Nathalie; Peralta, Modesto R; Chiasson, Marilou; Lafortune, Kathleen; Pellegrini, Luca; Seress, László; Tóth, Katalin

    2007-01-01

    In the nervous system, zinc can influence synaptic responses and at extreme concentrations contributes to epileptic and ischaemic neuronal injury. Zinc can originate from synaptic vesicles, the extracellular space and from intracellular stores. In this study, we aimed to determine which of these zinc pools is responsible for the increased hippocampal excitability observed in zinc-depleted animals or following zinc chelation. Also, we investigated the source of intracellularly accumulating zinc in vulnerable neurons. Our data show that membrane-permeable and membrane-impermeable zinc chelators had little or no effect on seizure activity in the CA3 region. Furthermore, extracellular zinc chelation could not prevent the accumulation of lethal concentrations of zinc in dying neurons following epileptic seizures. At the electron microscopic level, zinc staining significantly increased at the presynaptic membrane of mossy fibre terminals in kainic acid-treated animals. These data indicate that intracellular but not extracellular zinc chelators could influence neuronal excitability and seizure-induced zinc accumulation observed in the cytosol of vulnerable neurons. PMID:17095563

  5. Characterization of the zinc-induced Shank3 interactome of mouse synaptosome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeunkum; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Yoonhee; Kim, Shinhyun; Zhang, Yinhua; Jin, Chunmei; Cho, Hyo Min; Kim, Won-Ki; Sun, Woong; Han, Kihoon

    2017-12-16

    Variants of the SHANK3 gene, which encodes a core scaffold protein of the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses, have been causally associated with numerous brain disorders. Shank3 proteins directly bind zinc ions through their C-terminal sterile α motif domain, which enhances the multimerization and synaptic localization of Shank3, to regulate excitatory synaptic strength. However, no studies have explored whether zinc affects the protein interactions of Shank3, which might contribute to the synaptic changes observed after zinc application. To examine this, we first purified Shank3 protein complexes from mouse brain synaptosomal lysates that were incubated with different concentrations of ZnCl 2 , and analyzed them with mass spectrometry. We used strict criteria to identify 71 proteins that specifically interacted with Shank3 when extra ZnCl 2 was added to the lysate. To characterize the zinc-induced Shank3 interactome, we performed various bioinformatic analyses that revealed significant associations of the interactome with subcellular compartments, including mitochondria, and brain disorders, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Together, our results showing that zinc affected the Shank3 protein interactions of in vitro mouse synaptosomes provided an additional link between zinc and core synaptic proteins that have been implicated in multiple brain disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Zinc supplementation suppresses the progression of bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fang; Sheng, Qin; Xu, Xinhua; Huang, Wenli; Kang, Y James

    2015-09-01

    Metallothionein (MT) gene therapy leads to resolution of liver fibrosis in mouse model, in which the activation of collagenases is involved in the regression of liver fibrosis. MT plays a critical role in zinc sequestration in the liver suggesting its therapeutic effect would be mediated by zinc. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that zinc supplementation suppresses liver fibrosis. Male Kunming mice subjected to bile duct ligation (BDL) resulted in liver fibrosis as assessed by increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen I production/deposition in the liver. Zinc supplementation was introduced 4 weeks after BDL surgery via intragastric administration once daily for 2 weeks resulting in a significant reduction in the collagen deposition in the liver and an increase in the survival rate. Furthermore, zinc suppressed gene expression of α-SMA and collagen I and enhanced the capacity of collagen degradation, as determined by the increased activity of total collagenases and elevated mRNA and protein levels of MMP13. Therefore, the results demonstrate that zinc supplementation suppresses BDL-induced liver fibrosis through both inhibiting collagen production and enhancing collagen degradation. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  7. Zinc deficiency exacerbates while zinc supplement attenuates cardiac hypertrophy in high-fat diet-induced obese mice through modulating p38 MAPK-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shudong; Luo, Manyu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Gu, Junlian; Chen, Jing; Payne, Kristen McClung; Tan, Yi; Wang, Yuehui; Yin, Xia; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Gilbert C; Wintergerst, Kupper; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2016-09-06

    Childhood obesity often leads to cardiovascular diseases, such as obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy (ORCH), in adulthood, due to chronic cardiac inflammation. Zinc is structurally and functionally essential for many transcription factors; however, its role in ORCH and underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear and were explored here in mice with obesity induced with high-fat diet (HFD). Four week old mice were fed on either HFD (60%kcal fat) or normal diet (ND, 10% kcal fat) for 3 or 6 months, respectively. Either diet contained one of three different zinc quantities: deficiency (ZD, 10mg zinc per 4057kcal), normal (ZN, 30mg zinc per 4057kcal) or supplement (ZS, 90mg zinc per 4057kcal). HFD induced a time-dependent obesity and ORCH, which was accompanied by increased cardiac inflammation and p38 MAPK activation. These effects were worsened by ZD in HFD/ZD mice and attenuated by ZS in HFD/ZS group, respectively. Also, administration of a p38 MAPK specific inhibitor in HFD mice for 3 months did not affect HFD-induced obesity, but completely abolished HFD-induced, and zinc deficiency-worsened, ORCH and cardiac inflammation. In vitro exposure of adult cardiomyocytes to palmitate induced cell hypertrophy accompanied by increased p38 MAPK activation, which was heightened by zinc depletion with its chelator TPEN. Inhibition of p38 MAPK with its specific siRNA also prevented the effects of palmitate on cardiomyocytes. These findings demonstrate that ZS alleviates but ZD heightens cardiac hypertrophy in HFD-induced obese mice through suppressing p38 MAPK-dependent cardiac inflammatory and hypertrophic pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Zinc Improves Cognitive and Neuronal Dysfunction During Aluminium-Induced Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2017-01-01

    Metals are considered as important components of a physiologically active cell, and imbalance in their levels can lead to various diseased conditions. Aluminium (Al) is an environmental neurotoxicant, which is etiologically related to several neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's, whereas zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element that regulates a large number of metabolic processes in the brain. The objective of the present study was to understand whether Zn provides any physiological protection during Al-induced neurodegeneration. Male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 140-160 g received either aluminium chloride (AlCl 3 ) orally (100 mg/kg b.wt./day), zinc sulphate (ZnSO 4 ) in drinking water (227 mg/L) or combined treatment of aluminium and zinc for 8 weeks. Al treatment resulted in a significant decline in the cognitive behaviour of rats, whereas zinc supplementation caused an improvement in various neurobehavior parameters. Further, Al exposure decreased (p ≤ 0.001) the levels of neurotransmitters, acetylcholinesterase activity, but increased (p ≤ 0.001) the levels of L-citrulline as well as activities of nitric oxide and monoamine oxidase in the brain. However, zinc administration to Al-treated animals increased the levels of neurotransmitters and regulated the altered activities of brain markers. Western blot of tau, amyloid precursor protein (APP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ubiquitin, α-synuclein and Hsp 70 were also found to be elevated after Al exposure, which however were reversed following Zn treatment. Al treatment also revealed alterations in neurohistoarchitecture in the form of loss of pyramidal and Purkinje cells, which were improved upon zinc co-administration. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that zinc improves cognitive functions by regulating α-synuclein and APP-mediated molecular pathways during aluminium-induced neurodegeneration.

  9. Chronic Exposure to Zinc Chromate Induces Centrosome Amplification and Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Bypass in Human Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Amie L.; Wise, Sandra S.; Pelsue, Stephen C.; Aboueissa, AbouEl-Makarim; Lingle, Wilma; Salisbury, Jeffery; Gallagher, Jamie; Wise, John Pierce

    2010-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) compounds are known human lung carcinogens. Solubility plays an important role in its carcinogenicity with the particulate or insoluble form being the most potent. Of the particulate Cr(VI) compounds, zinc chromate appears to be the most potent carcinogen, however, very few studies have investigated its carcinogenic mechanism. In this study, we investigated the ability of chronic exposure to zinc chromate to induce numerical chromosome instability. We found no increase in aneuploidy after a 24 hour exposure to zinc chromate, but with more chronic exposures, zinc chromate induced concentration- and time-dependent increases in aneuploidy in the form of hypodiploidy, hyperdiploidy and tetraploidy. Zinc chromate also induced centrosome amplification in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in both interphase and mitotic cells after chronic exposure, producing cells with centriolar defects. Further, chronic exposure to zinc chromate induced concentration- and time-dependent increases in spindle assembly checkpoint bypass with increases in centromere spreading, premature centromere division and premature anaphase. Lastly, we found that chronic exposure to zinc chromate induced a G2 arrest. All together, these data indicate that zinc chromate can induce chromosome instability after prolonged exposures. PMID:20030412

  10. The effect of dietary zinc - and polyphenols intake on DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with zinc and polyphenol compounds, i.e. resveratrol and genistein, on the effectiveness of chemically induced mammary cancer and the changes in the content of selected elements (Zn, Cu, Mg, Fe, Ca) in tumors as compared with normal tissue of the mammary gland. Methods Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into study groups which, apart from the standard diet and DMBA (7,12-dimethyl-1,2- benz[a]anthracene), were treated with zinc ions (Zn) or zinc ions + resveratrol (Zn + resveratrol) or zinc ions + genistein (Zn + genistein) via gavage for a period from 40 days until 20 weeks of age. The ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) technique was used to analyze the following elements: magnesium, iron, zinc and calcium. Copper content in samples was estimated in an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results Regardless of the diet (standard; Zn; Zn + resveratrol; Zn + genistein), DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was not inhibited. On the contrary, in the Zn + resveratrol supplemented group, tumorigenesis developed at a considerably faster rate. On the basis of quantitative analysis of selected elements we found - irrespectively of the diet applied - great accumulation of copper and iron, which are strongly prooxidative, with a simultaneous considerable decrease of the magnesium content in DMBA-induced mammary tumors. The combination of zinc supplementation with resveratrol resulted in particularly large differences in the amount of the investigated elements in tumors as compared with their content in normal tissue. Conclusions Diet supplementation with zinc and polyphenol compounds, i.e. resveratrol and genistein had no effect on the decreased copper level in tumor tissue and inhibited mammary carcinogenesis in the rat. Irrespectively of the applied diet, the development of the neoplastic process in rats resulted in changes of the iron and magnesium

  11. Effects of cadmium and zinc on ozone-induced phytotoxicity in cress and lettuce

    SciT

    Czuba, M.; Ormrod, D.P.

    1973-01-01

    Cadmium or zinc solutions were applied to the foliage or roots of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids) and cress (Lepidium sativum L. cv. Fine Curled) at concentrations of 100 parts per million (ppm) every four days for several weeks. Four weeks after sowing, plants were fumigated with 35 parts per hundred million (pphm) ozone, for 6 hours. Cress plants which had received root application of cadmium showed markedly increased ozone-induced phytotoxicity in terms of visible leaf damage and pigment degradation; in lettuce only pigment degradation was evident. There was less effect of zinc or foliar-applied cadmium on ozonemore » phytotoxicity.« less

  12. Rapid dimerization of quercetin through an oxidative mechanism in the presence of serum albumin decreases its ability to induce cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231 cells

    SciT

    Pham, Anh; Bortolazzo, Anthony; White, J. Brandon, E-mail: Brandon.White@sjsu.edu

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin cannot be detected intracellularly despite killing MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin forms a heterodimer through oxidation in media with serum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quercetin heterodimer does not kill MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascorbic acid stabilizes quercetin increasing cell death in quercetin treated cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin, and not a modified form, is responsible for apoptosis and cell death. -- Abstract: Quercetin is a member of the flavonoid family and has been previously shown to have a variety of anti-cancer activities. We and others have reported anti-proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis of cancer cells after treatment with quercetin. Quercetinmore » has also been shown to undergo oxidation. However, it is unclear if quercetin or one of its oxidized forms is responsible for cell death. Here we report that quercetin rapidly oxidized in cell culture media to form a dimer. The quercetin dimer is identical to a dimer that is naturally produced by onions. The quercetin dimer and quercetin-3-O-glucopyranoside are unable to cross the cell membrane and do not kill MDA-MB-231 cells. Finally, supplementing the media with ascorbic acid increases quercetin's ability to induce cell death probably by reduction oxidative dimerization. Our results suggest that an unmodified quercetin is the compound that elicits cell death.« less

  13. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the Ca dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/xenon clusters

    SciT

    Gaveau, Marc-André; Pothier, Christophe; Briant, Marc

    2014-12-09

    We study how the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on pure helium clusters is modified by the addition of xenon atoms. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence at 422.7nm. One of these electronic states of Ca{sub 2} is a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s4p{sup 3}P(+Ca(4s3d{sup 3}D), the other one is a repulsive state correlating to the Ca(4s4p1P)+Ca(4s21S) asymptote, accountingmore » for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence exhibits the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S←{sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup −1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. When adding xenon atoms to the helium clusters, the intensity of these two features decreases and a new spectral band appears on the red side of calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the xenon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small xenon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.« less

  14. Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Reversed Zinc Chloride-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment via Increasing Cholinergic Marker Expression.

    PubMed

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Azami, Kian; Belaran, Maryam; Soodi, Maliheh; Abdi, Khosrou; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sanati, Mehdi; Mottaghi Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Zinc, an essential micronutrient and biochemical element of the human body, plays structural, catalytic, and regulatory roles in numerous physiological functions. In the current study, the effects of a pretraining oral administration of zinc chloride (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days and post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (10, 50, and 100 μM/side), alone and in combination, on the spatial memory retention in Morris water maze (MWM) were investigated. Animals were trained for 4 days and tested 48 h after completion of training. Also, the molecular effects of these compounds on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), as a cholinergic marker in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA), were evaluated. Behavioral and molecular findings of this study showed that a 2-week oral administration of zinc chloride (50 mg/kg) impaired spatial memory retention in MWM and decreased ChAT expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W revealed a significant increase in ChAT immunoreactivity. Furthermore, post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W into the CA1 region of the hippocampus reversed zinc chloride-induced spatial memory impairment in MWM and significantly increased ChAT expression in comparison with zinc chloride-treated animals. Taken together, these results emphasize the role of selective iNOS inhibitors in reversing zinc chloride-induced spatial memory deficits via modulation of cholinergic marker expression.

  15. Zinc-induced Dnmt1 expression involves antagonism between MTF-1 and nuclear receptor SHP

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxia; Andrews, Glen K.; Wang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Dnmt1 is frequently overexpressed in cancers, which contributes significantly to cancer-associated epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes. However, the mechanism of Dnmt1 overexpression remains elusive. Herein, we elucidate a pathway through which nuclear receptor SHP inhibits zinc-dependent induction of Dnmt1 by antagonizing metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1). Zinc treatment induces Dnmt1 transcription by increasing the occupancy of MTF-1 on the Dnmt1 promoter while decreasing SHP expression. SHP in turn represses MTF-1 expression and abolishes zinc-mediated changes in the chromatin configuration of the Dnmt1 promoter. Dnmt1 expression is increased in SHP-knockout (sko) mice but decreased in SHP-transgenic (stg) mice. In human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), increased DNMT1 expression is negatively correlated with SHP levels. Our study provides a molecular explanation for increased Dnmt1 expression in HCC and highlights SHP as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22362755

  16. Zinc induces long-term upregulation of T-type calcium current in hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ekstein, Dana; Benninger, Felix; Daninos, Moshe; Pitsch, Julika; van Loo, Karen M J; Becker, Albert J; Yaari, Yoel

    2012-11-15

    Extracellular zinc can induce numerous acute and persistent physiological and toxic effects in neurons by acting at their plasma membrane or intracellularly following permeation or uptake into them. Zinc acutely and reversibly blocks T-type voltage-gated calcium current (I(CaT)), but the long-term effect of zinc on this current has not been studied. Because chemically induced status epilepticus (SE) results in the release of zinc into the extracellular space, as well as in a long-lasting increase in I(CaT) in CA1 pyramidal cells, we hypothesized that zinc may play a causative role in I(CaT) upregulation. We tested this hypothesis by monitoring for 18 days the effects of zinc and ibotenic acid (a neurotoxic agent serving as control for zinc), injected into the right lateral ventricle, on I(CaT) in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. Both zinc and ibotenic acid caused marked hippocampal lesions on the side of injection, but only minor damage to contralateral hippocampi. Zinc, but not ibotenic acid, caused upregulation of a nickel-sensitive I(CaT) in a subset of contralateral CA1 pyramidal cells, appearing 2 days after injection and lasting for about 2 weeks thereafter. In contrast, acute application of zinc to CA1 pyramidal cells promptly blocked I(CaT). These data indicate that extracellular zinc has a dual effect on I(CaT), blocking it acutely while causing its long-term upregulation. Through the latter effect, zinc may regulate the intrinsic excitability of principal neurons, particularly in pathological conditions associated with enhanced release of zinc, such as SE.

  17. The beneficial effects of zinc on diabetes-induced kidney damage in murine rodent model of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Li, Bing; Dong, Xiaoming; Cui, Wenpeng; Luo, Ping

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic multi-factorial metabolic disorder resulting from impaired glucose homeostasis. Zinc is a key co-factor for the correct functioning of anti-oxidant enzymes. Zinc deficiency therefore, impairs their synthesis, leading to increased oxidative stress within cells. Zinc deficiency occurs commonly in diabetic patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of varying concentrations of zinc on diabetic nephropathy (DN) and the underlying mechanisms involved. FVB male mice aged 8 weeks were injected intraperitoneally with multiple low-dose streptozotocin at a concentration of 50mg/kg body weight daily for 5 days. Diabetic and age-matched control mice were treated with special diets supplemented with zinc at varying concentrations (0.85mg/kg, 30mg/kg, 150mg/kg) for 3 months. The mice were fed with zinc diets to mimic the process of oral administration of zinc in human. Zinc deficiency to some extent aggravated the damage of diabetic kidney. Feeding with normal (30mg/kg zinc/kg diet) and especially high (150mg/kg zinc/kg diet) concentration zinc could protect the kidney against diabetes-induced damage. The beneficial effects of zinc on DN are achieved most likely due to the upregulation of Nrf2 and its downstream factors NQO1, SOD1, SOD2. Zinc upregulated the expression of Akt phosphorylation and GSK-3β phosphorylation, resulting in a reduction in Fyn nuclear translocation and export of Nrf2 to the cytosol. Thus, regular monitoring and maintaining of adequate levels of zinc are recommended in diabetic individuals in order to delay the development of DN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. D-dimer test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein thrombosis - D-dimer; Pulmonary embolism - D-dimer; Blood clot to the lungs - D-dimer ... dimer test if you are showing symptoms of blood clots, such as: Swelling, pain, warmth, and changes in ...

  19. Structure of Urtica dioica agglutinin isolectin I: dimer formation mediated by two zinc ions bound at the sugar-binding site.

    PubMed

    Harata, K; Schubert, W D; Muraki, M

    2001-11-01

    Ultica dioica agglutinin, a plant lectin from the stinging nettle, consists of a total of seven individual isolectins. One of these structures, isolectin I, was determined at 1.9 A resolution by the X-ray method. The crystals belong to the space group P2(1) and the asymmetric unit contains two molecules related by local twofold symmetry. The molecule consists of two hevein-like chitin-binding domains lacking distinct secondary structure, but four disulfide bonds in each domain maintain the tertiary structure. The backbone structure of the two independent molecules is essentially identical and this is similarly true of the sugar-binding sites. In the crystal, the C-terminal domains bind Zn(2+) ions at the sugar-binding site. Owing to their location near a pseudo-twofold axis, the two zinc ions link the two independent molecules in a tail-to-tail arrangement: thus, His47 of molecule 1 and His67 of molecule 2 coordinate the first zinc ion, while the second zinc ion links Asp75 of molecule 1 and His47 of molecule 2.

  20. Studies on the Dissociation and Urea-Induced Unfolding of FtsZ Support the Dimer Nucleus Polymerization Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Montecinos-Franjola, Felipe; Ross, Justin A.; Sánchez, Susana A.; Brunet, Juan E.; Lagos, Rosalba; Jameson, David M.; Monasterio, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    FtsZ is a major protein in bacterial cytokinesis that polymerizes into single filaments. A dimer has been proposed to be the nucleating species in FtsZ polymerization. To investigate the influence of the self-assembly of FtsZ on its unfolding pathway, we characterized its oligomerization and unfolding thermodynamics. We studied the assembly using size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the unfolding using circular dichroism and two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The chromatographic analysis demonstrated the presence of monomers, dimers, and tetramers with populations dependent on protein concentration. Dilution experiments using fluorescent conjugates revealed dimer-to-monomer and tetramer-to-dimer dissociation constants in the micromolar range. Measurements of fluorescence lifetimes and rotational correlation times of the conjugates supported the presence of tetramers at high protein concentrations and monomers at low protein concentrations. The unfolding study demonstrated that the three-state unfolding of FtsZ was due to the mainly dimeric state of the protein, and that the monomer unfolds through a two-state mechanism. The monomer-to-dimer equilibrium characterized here (Kd = 9 μM) indicates a significant fraction (∼10%) of stable dimers at the critical concentration for polymerization, supporting a role of the dimeric species in the first steps of FtsZ polymerization. PMID:22824282

  1. Zinc Deprivation Mediates Alcohol-Induced Hepatocyte IL-8 Analog Expression in Rodents via an Epigenetic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yantao; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Xiuhua; Song, Zhenyuan; Clemens, Dahn L.; Kang, Y. James; McClain, Craig J.; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophil infiltration caused by IL-8 production is a central mechanism in alcohol-induced hepatitis. This study was performed to examine if an epigenetic mechanism is involved in alcohol-induced IL-8 production. Mice were pair-fed an alcohol-containing liquid diet for 4 weeks. Alcohol exposure induced hepatitis as indicated by increased expression of keratinocyte-derived cytokine (mouse IL-8) and neutrophil infiltration. Alcohol exposure induced histone 3 hyperacetylation owing to inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) in association with NF-κB activation. Cell culture studies showed that alcohol exposure induced IL-8 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1, rat IL-8) production in human VL-17A cells and rat H4IIEC3 cells, respectively, dependent on acetaldehyde production, oxidative stress, and zinc release. Zinc deprivation alone induced CINC-1 production and acted synergistically with lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor-α on CINC-1 production. Zinc deprivation induced histone 3 hyperacetylation at lysine 9 through suppression of HDAC activity. Zinc deprivation caused nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and reduced HDAC binding to NF-κB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed that zinc deprivation caused histone 3 hyperacetylation as well as increased NF-κB binding to the CINC-1 promoter. In conclusion, inactivation of HDAC caused by zinc deprivation is a novel mechanism underlying IL-8 up-regulation in alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:21708112

  2. Zinc deprivation mediates alcohol-induced hepatocyte IL-8 analog expression in rodents via an epigenetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yantao; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Xiuhua; Song, Zhenyuan; Clemens, Dahn L; Kang, Y James; McClain, Craig J; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2011-08-01

    Neutrophil infiltration caused by IL-8 production is a central mechanism in alcohol-induced hepatitis. This study was performed to examine if an epigenetic mechanism is involved in alcohol-induced IL-8 production. Mice were pair-fed an alcohol-containing liquid diet for 4 weeks. Alcohol exposure induced hepatitis as indicated by increased expression of keratinocyte-derived cytokine (mouse IL-8) and neutrophil infiltration. Alcohol exposure induced histone 3 hyperacetylation owing to inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) in association with NF-κB activation. Cell culture studies showed that alcohol exposure induced IL-8 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1, rat IL-8) production in human VL-17A cells and rat H4IIEC3 cells, respectively, dependent on acetaldehyde production, oxidative stress, and zinc release. Zinc deprivation alone induced CINC-1 production and acted synergistically with lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor-α on CINC-1 production. Zinc deprivation induced histone 3 hyperacetylation at lysine 9 through suppression of HDAC activity. Zinc deprivation caused nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and reduced HDAC binding to NF-κB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed that zinc deprivation caused histone 3 hyperacetylation as well as increased NF-κB binding to the CINC-1 promoter. In conclusion, inactivation of HDAC caused by zinc deprivation is a novel mechanism underlying IL-8 up-regulation in alcoholic hepatitis. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Low concentrations of zinc in gastric mucosa are associated with increased severity of Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sempértegui, Fernando; Díaz, Myriam; Mejía, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Mora, Oswaldo G; Rentería, Edgar; Guarderas, Carlos; Estrella, Bertha; Recalde, Ramiro; Hamer, Davidson H; Reeves, Philip G

    2007-02-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is the most common cause of gastric cancer. H. pylori induces oxidative stress while zinc deficiency results in increased sensitivity to it. In Ecuador, the prevalence of gastric cancer and zinc deficiency are high. We hypothesized that zinc deficiency in Ecuadorian people would cause increased H. pylori-induced inflammation in the gastric mucosa associated with lower tissue zinc concentrations. Three hundred and fifty-two patients with dyspepsia underwent endoscopy to obtain gastric mucosa biopsies. Diagnosis of H. pylori infection and its severity, histopathology, mucosal zinc concentration, and inflammation intensity were determined. H. pylori-infected patients with non-atrophic chronic gastritis had lower concentrations of zinc in gastric mucosa than uninfected patients with the same type of gastritis (251.3 +/- 225.3 vs. 426.2 +/- 279.9 ng/mg of protein; p = .016). Considering all patients, the more severe the H. pylori infection, the higher the percentage of subjects with infiltration by polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells (p = .0001). Patients with high PMN infiltration had lower mucosal zinc concentrations than patients with low PMN infiltration (35.2 +/- 20.7 vs. 242.9 +/- 191.8 ng/mg of protein; p = .021). The degree of inflammation in H. pylori-induced gastritis appears to be modulated by gastric tissue zinc concentrations.

  4. Zinc protects HepG2 cells against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by ochratoxin A

    SciT

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao, E-mail: xuwentaoboy@sina.com

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are the most studied mechanisms by which ochratoxin A (OTA) induces its toxic effects, which include nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Zinc, which is an essential trace element, is considered a potential antioxidant. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplement could inhibit OTA-induced oxidative damage and DNA damage in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of inhibition. The results indicated that that exposure of OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration; zinc supplement significantly reduced the OTA-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity but did notmore » affect the OTA-induced decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}). Meanwhile, the addition of the zinc chelator N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) strongly aggravated the OTA-induced oxidative damage. This study also demonstrated that zinc helped to maintain the integrity of DNA through the reduction of OTA-induced DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation and DNA hypomethylation. OTA increased the mRNA expression of metallothionein1-A (MT1A), metallothionein2-A (MT2A) and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Zinc supplement further enhanced the mRNA expression of MT1A and MT2A, but it had no effect on the mRNA expression of SOD1 and catalase (CAT). Zinc was for the first time proven to reduce the cytotoxicity of OTA through inhibiting the oxidative damage and DNA damage, and regulating the expression of zinc-associated genes. Thus, the addition of zinc can potentially be used to reduce the OTA toxicity of contaminated feeds. - Highlights: ► OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration. ► OTA induced the formation of 8-OHdG in HepG2 cells. ► It was testified for the first time that OTA induced DNA hypomethylation. ► Zinc protects against the oxidative damage and DNA damage

  5. Activation of MTK1/MEKK4 by GADD45 through induced N-C dissociation and dimerization-mediated trans autophosphorylation of the MTK1 kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Zenshi; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Ge, Qingyuan; Saito, Haruo

    2007-04-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) module, composed of a MAPK, a MAPK kinase (MAPKK), and a MAPKK kinase (MAPKKK), is a cellular signaling device that is conserved throughout the eukaryotic world. In mammalian cells, various extracellular stresses activate two major subfamilies of MAPKs, namely, the Jun N-terminal kinases and the p38/stress-activated MAPK (SAPK). MTK1 (also called MEKK4) is a stress-responsive MAPKKK that is bound to and activated by the stress-inducible GADD45 family of proteins (GADD45alpha/beta/gamma). Here, we dissected the molecular mechanism of MTK1 activation by GADD45 proteins. The MTK1 N terminus bound to its C-terminal segment, thereby inhibiting the C-terminal kinase domain. This N-C interaction was disrupted by the binding of GADD45 to the MTK1 N-terminal GADD45-binding site. GADD45 binding also induced MTK1 dimerization via a dimerization domain containing a coiled-coil motif, which is essential for the trans autophosphorylation of MTK1 at Thr-1493 in the kinase activation loop. An MTK1 alanine substitution mutant at Thr-1493 has a severely reduced activity. Thus, we conclude that GADD45 binding induces MTK1 N-C dissociation, dimerization, and autophosphorylation at Thr-1493, leading to the activation of the kinase catalytic domain. Constitutively active MTK1 mutants induced the same events, but in the absence of GADD45.

  6. Activation of MTK1/MEKK4 by GADD45 through Induced N-C Dissociation and Dimerization-Mediated trans Autophosphorylation of the MTK1 Kinase Domain▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Zenshi; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Ge, Qingyuan; Saito, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) module, composed of a MAPK, a MAPK kinase (MAPKK), and a MAPKK kinase (MAPKKK), is a cellular signaling device that is conserved throughout the eukaryotic world. In mammalian cells, various extracellular stresses activate two major subfamilies of MAPKs, namely, the Jun N-terminal kinases and the p38/stress-activated MAPK (SAPK). MTK1 (also called MEKK4) is a stress-responsive MAPKKK that is bound to and activated by the stress-inducible GADD45 family of proteins (GADD45α/β/γ). Here, we dissected the molecular mechanism of MTK1 activation by GADD45 proteins. The MTK1 N terminus bound to its C-terminal segment, thereby inhibiting the C-terminal kinase domain. This N-C interaction was disrupted by the binding of GADD45 to the MTK1 N-terminal GADD45-binding site. GADD45 binding also induced MTK1 dimerization via a dimerization domain containing a coiled-coil motif, which is essential for the trans autophosphorylation of MTK1 at Thr-1493 in the kinase activation loop. An MTK1 alanine substitution mutant at Thr-1493 has a severely reduced activity. Thus, we conclude that GADD45 binding induces MTK1 N-C dissociation, dimerization, and autophosphorylation at Thr-1493, leading to the activation of the kinase catalytic domain. Constitutively active MTK1 mutants induced the same events, but in the absence of GADD45. PMID:17242196

  7. Observation of fast and slow interatomic Coulombic decay in argon dimers induced by electron-impact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xueguang; Miteva, Tsveta; Kolorenč, Přemysl; Gokhberg, Kirill; Kuleff, Alexander I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Dorn, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) in argon dimers induced by electron-impact ionization (E0=90 eV ) using a multiparticle coincidence experiment in which the momentum vectors and, consequently, the kinetic energies for electrons and fragment ions are determined. The signature of the ICD process is obtained from a correlation map between ejected electron energy and kinetic energy release (KER) for Ar++Ar+ fragment ions where low-energy ICD electrons can be identified. Furthermore, two types of ICD processes, termed fast and slow interatomic decay, are separated by the ICD initial-state energies and projectile energy losses. The dependence of the energies of emitted low-energy ICD electrons on the initial-state energy is studied. ICD electron energy spectra and KER spectra are obtained separately for fast and slow decay processes where the KER spectra for the slow decay channel are strongly influenced by nuclear motion. The KER and ICD electron energy spectra are well reproduced by ab initio calculations.

  8. Zinc supplementation during pregnancy protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced fetal growth restriction and demise through its anti-inflammatory effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Hua; Zhao, Mei; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Hua; Huang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang

    2012-07-01

    LPS is associated with adverse developmental outcomes, including preterm delivery, fetal death, teratogenicity, and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Previous reports showed that zinc protected against LPS-induced teratogenicity. In the current study, we investigated the effects of zinc supplementation during pregnancy on LPS-induced preterm delivery, fetal death and IUGR. All pregnant mice except controls were i.p. injected with LPS (75 μg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD) 15 to GD17. Some pregnant mice were administered zinc sulfate through drinking water (75 mg elemental Zn per liter) throughout the pregnancy. As expected, an i.p. injection with LPS daily from GD15 to GD17 resulted in 36.4% (4/11) of dams delivered before GD18. In dams that completed the pregnancy, 63.2% of fetuses were dead. Moreover, LPS significantly reduced fetal weight and crown-rump length. Of interest, zinc supplementation during pregnancy protected mice from LPS-induced preterm delivery and fetal death. In addition, zinc supplementation significantly alleviated LPS-induced IUGR and skeletal development retardation. Further experiments showed that zinc supplementation significantly attenuated LPS-induced expression of placental inflammatory cytokines and cyclooxygenase-2. Zinc supplementation also significantly attenuated LPS-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling in mononuclear sinusoidal trophoblast giant cells of the labyrinth zone. It inhibited LPS-induced placental AKT phosphorylation as well. In conclusion, zinc supplementation during pregnancy protects against LPS-induced fetal growth restriction and demise through its anti-inflammatory effect.

  9. Engineering an improved light-induced dimer (iLID) for controlling the localization and activity of signaling proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Guntas, Gurkan; Hallett, Ryan A.; Zimmerman, Seth P.; ...

    2014-12-22

    The discovery of light-inducible protein–protein interactions has allowed for the spatial and temporal control of a variety of biological processes. To be effective, a photodimerizer should have several characteristics: it should show a large change in binding affinity upon light stimulation, it should not cross-react with other molecules in the cell, and it should be easily used in a variety of organisms to recruit proteins of interest to each other. In this study, to create a switch that meets these criteria we have embedded the bacterial SsrA peptide in the C-terminal helix of a naturally occurring photoswitch, the light-oxygen-voltage 2more » (LOV2) domain from Avena sativa. In the dark the SsrA peptide is sterically blocked from binding its natural binding partner, SspB. When activated with blue light, the C-terminal helix of the LOV2 domain undocks from the protein, allowing the SsrA peptide to bind SspB. Without optimization, the switch exhibited a twofold change in binding affinity for SspB with light stimulation. Here, we describe the use of computational protein design, phage display, and high-throughput binding assays to create an improved light inducible dimer (iLID) that changes its affinity for SspB by over 50-fold with light stimulation. A crystal structure of iLID shows a critical interaction between the surface of the LOV2 domain and a phenylalanine engineered to more tightly pin the SsrA peptide against the LOV2 domain in the dark. Finally, we demonstrate the functional utility of the switch through light-mediated subcellular localization in mammalian cell culture and reversible control of small GTPase signaling.« less

  10. Suppressive effect of zinc ion on iNOS expression induced by interferon-gamma or tumor necrosis factor-alpha in murine keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, J; Kume, T; Akaike, A; Miyachi, Y

    2000-05-01

    Zinc, an essential metal, is a critical component of zinc binding proteins such as zinc fingers, zinc enzymes and metallothioneins. Recently, evidence for its anti-inflammatory property in skin has been accumulating, as shown in the treatment of acne, alopecia and zinc deficiency. In cutaneous inflammations, a large amount of nitric oxide (NO) is produced through induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) under the influence of proinflammatory cytokines, resulting in tissue damages in skin, as clarified in other organs. Therefore, we asked if the effect of zinc on NO production and/or on iNOS expression in keratinocytes may explain the anti-inflammatory property of zinc in skin. Accordingly, we sought to determine in this study whether zinc ion may have effect on IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha induced NO production and iNOS expression in cultured murine keratinocytes. Ten microM of zinc ion remarkably suppressed cytokine-induced NO production in keratinocytes. Furthermore, zinc ion also suppressed cytokine-induced iNOS expression in the protein level as well as in the messenger RNA level. These results suggest the possibility that the suppressive effect of zinc ion on cytokine-induced NO production in keratinocytes may be in part implicated in the anti-inflammatory property of zinc in some of skin disorders.

  11. Anemia induced by high zinc intake in chicks: Mechanisms

    SciT

    Pimentel, J.L.; Greger, J.L.; Cook, M.E.

    1991-03-15

    The mechanisms by which excess Zn induced anemia in chickens was assessed in 8 studies in which chicks were randomly assigned to a 2 {times} 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with 60 or 2,000 {mu}g Zn and 10 or 250 {mu}g Cu/g diet. Less Fe-59 appeared in the plasma 1 hour after a labeled meal when chicks were fed excess Zn in 1 of 2 studies but less Fe-59 appeared in livers of chicks fed excess Zn in both studies. The decrease of Fe-59 uptake into tissues paralleled a decrease in Fe concentrations in livers and tibiotarsi. These differences inmore » tissue Fe did not reflect differences in Fe excretion because excretion and incorporation into tissues of injected Fe-59 was not affected by high Zn intake. Although excess Zn decreased tissue Cu concentrations, excess Zn, per se, did not affect cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity, the in vivo t 1/2 of erythrocytes, or erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. The decrease in body weight of chicks fed excess Zn indicated that protein synthesis and/or degradation could be affected. Increased incorporation of C-14 tyrosine into liver and bone marrow of chicks fed excess Zn suggested increased protoporphyrin synthesis or metallothionein synthesis. These results indicated that decreased Fe absorption was the primary mechanism by which excess Zn induced anemia.« less

  12. Preventive effects of supplemental dietary zinc on heat-induced damage in the epididymis of boars.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaojian; Li, Yansen; Zhou, Xin; Cao, Yun; Li, Chunmei

    2017-02-01

    Hyperthermia in boars reduces growth performance and sperm production. Zinc is an essential trace element in animal nutrition. Here we investigate the effects of dietary zinc on epididymal structure and function in Bama miniature pigs treated with heat exposure and investigate approaches to improve the reproductive performance in summer. Male Bama miniature pigs (n=18; aged 6 months; bodyweight=10.79±0.06kg) were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control group (Control), heat treatment group (HT), and the diet-supplemented and heat treatment group (H+Zn). The Control and HT groups were fed with basal diet and the H+Zn group were fed with basal diet plus 1500mg/kg zinc daily. After being fed with these 2 different diets for 30 days, pigs in the HT and H+Zn groups were exposed to 5h of 40°C heat treatment for 8 days. Rectal temperature and jugular venous blood were collected 3h after onset of heat exposure on days 1, 4 and 8. Pigs were sacrificed after the termination of heat exposure. Heat treatment increased serum testosterone concentration on day 1 and 4 (P<0.01). In addition, the HT group displayed an increase in the clear cell count and a decrease in epithelium thickness in the caput epithelium (P<0.01, P<0.05), and dietary zinc protected the boars from these impairments (P<0.01, P=0.29). Evaluation of oxidative states showed that heat exposure increased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) in the epididymis (P<0.01, P<0.05), while dietary zinc reduced this elevation (P<0.01, P<0.01). Heat exposure enhanced the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in the nuclei of principal and basal cells (P<0.01, P<0.01) while dietary zinc attenuated the GR immunoreactivity intensity (P<0.01, P<0.01). These results demonstrate that dietary zinc protects the epididymis from high temperature-induced impairment, alleviates oxidative stress, restores the integrity of the caput epithelium and decreases the stress response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  13. Shiga toxin-induced apoptosis is more efficiently inhibited by dimeric recombinant hybrid-IgG/IgA immunoglobulins than by the parental IgG monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kurohane, Kohta; Nagano, Kyoko; Nakanishi, Katsuhiro; Iwata, Koki; Miyake, Masaki; Imai, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) is a virulence factor of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains such as O157:H7 and Shigella dysenteriae. To prevent entry of Stx1 from the mucosal surface, an immunoglobulin A (IgA) specific for Stx1 would be useful. Due to the difficulty of producing IgA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against the binding subunit of Stx1 (Stx1B) in mice, we took advantage of recombinant technology that combines the heavy chain variable region from Stx1B-specific IgG1 mAb and the Fc region from IgA. The resulting hybrid IgG/IgA was stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells as a dimeric hybrid IgG/IgA. We separated the dimeric hybrid IgG/IgA from the monomeric one by size-exclusion chromatography. The dimer fraction, confirmed by immunoblot analyses, was used for toxin neutralization assays. The dimeric IgG/IgA was shown to neutralize Stx1 toxicity toward Vero cells by assaying their viability. To compare the relative effectiveness of the dimeric hybrid IgG/IgA and parental IgG1 mAb, Stx1-induced apoptosis was examined using 2 different cell lines, Ramos and Vero cells. The hybrid IgG/IgA inhibited apoptosis more efficiently than the parental IgG1 mAb in both cases. The results indicated that the use of high affinity binding sites as variable regions of IgA would increase the utility of IgA specific for virulence factors.

  14. A novel mechanism for the pyruvate protection against zinc-induced cytotoxicity: mediation by the chelating effect of citrate and isocitrate.

    PubMed

    Sul, Jee-Won; Kim, Tae-Youn; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jean; Suh, Young-Ah; Hwang, Jung Jin; Koh, Jae-Young

    2016-08-01

    Intracellular accumulation of free zinc contributes to neuronal death in brain injuries such as ischemia and epilepsy. Pyruvate, a glucose metabolite, has been shown to block zinc neurotoxicity. However, it is largely unknown how pyruvate shows such a selective and remarkable protective effect. In this study, we sought to find a plausible mechanism of pyruvate protection against zinc toxicity. Pyruvate almost completely blocked cortical neuronal death induced by zinc, yet showed no protective effects against death induced by calcium (ionomycin, NMDA) or ferrous iron. Of the TCA cycle intermediates, citrate, isocitrate, and to a lesser extent oxaloacetate, protected against zinc toxicity. We then noted with LC-MS/MS assay that exposure to pyruvate, and to a lesser degree oxaloacetate, increased levels of citrate and isocitrate, which are known zinc chelators. While pyruvate added only during zinc exposure did not reduce zinc toxicity, citrate and isocitrate added only during zinc exposure, as did extracellular zinc chelator CaEDTA, completely blocked it. Furthermore, addition of pyruvate after zinc exposure substantially reduced intracellular zinc levels. Our results suggest that the remarkable protective effect of pyruvate against zinc cytotoxicity may be mediated indirectly by the accumulation of intracellular citrate and isocitrate, which act as intracellular zinc chelators.

  15. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer.

    PubMed

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav; Jensen, Hans Jorgen Aagaard; Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    Relativistic effects on the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and (131)Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe(2) system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular interaction-induced binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Deltasigma, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis chi( parallel) are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full leading-order one-electron Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) is applied using a common gauge origin. Electron correlation effects are studied at the nonrelativistic (NR) coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbational triples [CCSD(T)] level of theory. The fully relativistic second-order Moller-Plesset many-body perturbation (DMP2) theory is used to examine the cross coupling between correlation and relativity on NQC. The same is investigated for delta and Deltasigma by BPPT with a density functional theory model. A semiquantitative agreement between the BPPT and DHF binary property curves is obtained for delta and Deltasigma in Xe(2). For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other hand, for the BPPT-based cross coupling of relativity and correlation. For chi( parallel), the fully relativistic DMP2 results obtain a correction for NR correlation effects beyond MP2. The computed temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient of the (129)Xe nuclear shielding is compared to experiment in Xe gas. Our best results, obtained with the piecewise approximation for the binary chemical shift combined with the

  16. Dose dependence of the excision of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers from nuclear deoxyribonucleic acids of haploid and diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, R; Moustacchi, E

    1975-01-01

    The yield of ultraviolet-induced dimers is similar for a fixed dose in both haploid and diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The excision of these photo-products from the nuclear deoxyribonucleic acids of cells of both ploidies after ultraviolet incident doses of 2 times 10-3 to 4 times 10-3 ergs/mm2 decreased with the corresponding increasing dose. Postirradiation incubation in saline followed by a further incubation in nutrient medium increases the excision as compared to that seen in either nutrient medium or saline alone. Previous data regarding both pyrimidine dimer removal and the survival of haploid and diploid cells after ultraviolet irradiation and either immediate or delayed plating are discussed. PMID:1090608

  17. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen, Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC50 value of 13.8 μM, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC50 5.3 μM). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells. PMID:18501397

  18. Prevention by zinc of cadmium-induced alterations in pancreatic and hepatic functions.

    PubMed Central

    Merali, Z; Singhal, R L

    1976-01-01

    Subacute cadmium treatment (CdCl2, 1 mg/kg twice daily for 7 days) in rats disturbs glucose homeostasis as shown by hyperglycemia and decreased glucose tolerance associated with suppression of insulin release, enhancement of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes and decrease in hepatic glycogen content. 2 Exposure to cadmium increases hepatic cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and this is accompanied by stimulation of basal, adrenaline- as well as glucagon-stimulated form(s) of adenylate cyclase. 3 In contrast to cadmium, subacute administration of zinc (ZnCl2, 2 mg/kg twice daily for 7 days) fails to alter the activities of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes, cyclic AMP synthesis, as well as glucose clearance and insulin release in response to a glucose load. 4 Zinc, when administered at the same time as cadmium, prevents the cadmium-induced lesions in both hepatic and pancreatic functions. 5 The results are discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms of cadmium toxicity and to the role of sulphydryl groups in the protection exercised by zinc. PMID:183849

  19. Analysis of indium zinc oxide thin films by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, A. C.; Beldjilali, S.; Socol, G.; Craciun, V.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Hermann, J.

    2011-10-01

    We have performed spectroscopic analysis of the plasma generated by Nd:YAG (λ = 266 nm) laser irradiation of thin indium zinc oxide films with variable In content deposited by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition on glass substrates. The samples were irradiated in 5 × 104 Pa argon using laser pulses of 5 ns duration and 10 mJ energy. The plasma emission spectra were recorded with an Echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector with different delays with respect to the laser pulse. The relative concentrations of indium and zinc were evaluated by comparing the measured spectra to the spectral radiance computed for a plasma in local thermal equilibrium. Plasma temperature and electron density were deduced from the relative intensities and Stark broadening of spectral lines of atomic zinc. Analyses at different locations on the deposited thin films revealed that the In/(In + Zn) concentration ratio significantly varies over the sample surface, from 0.4 at the borders to about 0.5 in the center of the film. The results demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy allows for precise and fast characterization of thin films with variable composition.

  20. Zinc finger protein 598 inhibits cell survival by promoting UV-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiaohong; Gupta, Romi

    2018-01-19

    UV is one of the major causes of DNA damage induced apoptosis. However, cancer cells adopt alternative mechanisms to evade UV-induced apoptosis. To identify factors that protect cancer cells from UV-induced apoptosis, we performed a genome wide short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen, which identified Zinc finger protein 598 (ZNF598) as a key regulator of UV-induced apoptosis. Here, we show that UV irradiation transcriptionally upregulates ZNF598 expression. Additionally, ZNF598 knockdown in cancer cells inhibited UV-induced apoptosis. In our study, we observe that ELK1 mRNA level as well as phosphorylated ELK1 levels was up regulated upon UV irradiation, which was necessary for UV irradiation induced upregulation of ZNF598. Cells expressing ELK1 shRNA were also resistant to UV-induced apoptosis, and phenocopy ZNF598 knockdown. Upon further investigation, we found that ZNF598 knockdown inhibits UV-induced apoptotic gene expression, which matches with decrease in percentage of annexin V positive cell. Similarly, ectopic expression of ZNF598 promoted apoptotic gene expression and also increased annexin V positive cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ZNF598 is a UV irradiation regulated gene and its loss results in resistance to UV-induced apoptosis.

  1. Effect of red maca (Lepidium meyenii) on prostate zinc levels in rats with testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, C; Leiva-Revilla, J; Rubio, J; Gasco, M; Gonzales, G F

    2012-05-01

    Lepidium meyenii (maca) is a plant that grows exclusively above 4000 m in the Peruvian central Andes. Red maca (RM) extract significantly reduced prostate size in rats with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) induced by testosterone enanthate (TE). Zinc is an important regulator of prostate function. This study aimed to determine the effect of RM on prostate zinc levels in rats with BPH induced by TE. Also, the study attempted to determine the best marker for the effect of RM on sex accessory glands. Rats treated with RM extract from day 1 to day 14 reversed the effect of TE administration on prostate weight and zinc levels. However, RM administered from day 7 to day 14 did not reduce the effect of TE on all studied variables. Finasteride (FN) reduced prostate, seminal vesicle and preputial gland weights in rats treated with TE. Although RM and FN reduced prostate zinc levels, the greatest effect was observed in TE-treated rats with RM from day 1 to day 14. In addition, prostate weight and zinc levels showed the higher diagnosis values than preputial and seminal vesicle weights. In conclusion, RM administered from day 1 to day 14 reduced prostate size and zinc levels in rats where prostatic hyperplasia was induced with TE. Also, this experimental model could be used as accurately assay to determine the effect of maca obtained under different conditions and/or the effect of different products based on maca. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Identification of autophagy genes participating in zinc-induced necrotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Slawomir A; Caplan, Allan B

    2011-05-01

    Eukaryotes use a common set of genes to perform two mechanistically similar autophagic processes. Bulk autophagy harvests proteins nonselectively and reuses their constitutents when nutrients are scarce. In contrast, different forms of selective autophagy target protein aggregates or damaged organelles that threaten to interfere with growth. Yeast uses one form of selective autophagy, called cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt), to engulf two vacuolar enzymes in Cvt vesicles ("CVT-somes") within which they are transported to vacuoles for maturation. While both are dispensable normally, bulk and selective autophagy help sustain life under stressful conditions. Consistent with this view, knocking out several genes participating in Cvt and specialized autophagic pathways heightened the sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inhibitory levels of Zn(2+). The loss of other autophagic genes, and genes responsible for apoptotic cell death, had no such effect. Unexpectedly, the loss of members of a third set of autophagy genes heightened cellular resistance to zinc as if they encoded proteins that actively contributed to zinc-induced cell death. Further studies showed that both sensitive and resistant strains accumulated similar amounts of H2O2 during zinc treatments, but that more sensitive strains showed signs of necrosis sooner. Although zinc lethality depended on autophagic proteins, studies with several reporter genes failed to reveal increased autophagic activity. In fact, microscopy analysis indicated that Zn(2+) partially inhibited fusion of Cvt vesicles with vacuoles. Further studies into how the loss of autophagic processes suppressed necrosis in yeast might reveal whether a similar process could occur in plants and animals.

  3. Carbodiimide EDC induces cross-links that stabilize RNase A C-dimer against dissociation: EDC adducts can affect protein net charge, conformation, and activity.

    PubMed

    López-Alonso, Jorge P; Diez-García, Fernando; Font, Josep; Ribó, Marc; Vilanova, Maria; Scholtz, J Martin; González, Carlos; Vottariello, Francesca; Gotte, Giovanni; Libonati, Massimo; Laurents, Douglas V

    2009-08-19

    RNase A self-associates under certain conditions to form a series of domain-swapped oligomers. These oligomers show high catalytic activity against double-stranded RNA and striking antitumor actions that are lacking in the monomer. However, the dissociation of these metastable oligomers limits their therapeutic potential. Here, a widely used conjugating agent, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminoisopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), has been used to induce the formation of amide bonds between carboxylate and amine groups of different subunits of the RNase A C-dimer. A cross-linked C-dimer which does not dissociate was isolated and was found have augmented enzymatic activity toward double-stranded RNA relative to the unmodified C-dimer. Characterization using chromatography, electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy revealed that the EDC-treated C-dimer retains its structure and contains one to three novel amide bonds. Moreover, both the EDC-treated C-dimer and EDC-treated RNase A monomer were found to carry an increased number of positive charges (about 6 ± 2 charges per subunit). These additional positive charges are presumably due to adduct formation with EDC, which neutralizes a negatively charged carboxylate group and couples it to a positively charged tertiary amine. The increased net positive charge endowed by EDC adducts likely contributes to the heightened cleavage of double-stranded RNA of the EDC-treated monomer and EDC-treated C-dimer. Further evidence for EDC adduct formation is provided by the reaction of EDC with a dipeptide Ac-Asp-Ala-NH(2) monitored by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. To determine if EDC adduct formation with proteins is common and how this affects protein net charge, conformation, and activity, four well-characterized proteins, ribonuclease Sa, hen lysozyme, carbonic anhydrase, and hemoglobin, were incubated with EDC and the products were characterized. EDC formed adducts with all these proteins, as judged by mass

  4. Prenatal zinc prevents communication impairments and BDNF disturbance in a rat model of autism induced by prenatal lipopolysaccharide exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Thiago B; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, Nicolle; Bernardi, Maria M; Felicio, Luciano F

    2015-06-01

    Aims: Previous investigations by our group have shown that prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS),which mimics infections by Gram-negative bacteria, induced autistic-like behavior. No effective treatment yet exists for autism. Therefore, we used our rat model to test a possible treatment for autism.We selected zinc as the prenatal treatment to prevent or ease the impairments induced by LPS because LPS induces hypozincaemia.Materials and methods:We evaluated the effects of LPS and zinc on female reproductive performance. Communication,which is impaired in autism,was tested in pups by ultrasonic vocalizations. Plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were determined because it has been considered an autism important biomarker.Key findings: Prenatal LPS exposure reduced offspring number and treatment with zinc prevented this reduction.Moreover, pups that were prenatally exposed to LPS spent longer periods without calling their mothers, and posttreatment with zinc prevented this impairment induced by LPS to the same levels as controls. Prenatal LPS also increased BDNF levels in adult offspring, and posttreatment with zinc reduced the elevation of BDNF to the same levels as controls.Significance: BDNF hyperactivity was also found in several studies of autistic patients. Together with our previous studies, our model of prenatal LPS induced autistic-like behavioral, brain, and immune disturbances. This suggests that it is a valid rat model of autism. Prenatal zinc prevented reproductive, communication, and BDNF impairments.The present study revealed a potential beneficial effect of prenatal zinc administration for the prevention of autism with regard to the BDNF pathway.

  5. The permissive effect of zinc deficiency on uroguanylin and inducible nitric oxide synthase gene upregulation in rat intestine induced by interleukin 1alpha is rapidly reversed by zinc repletion.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Blanchard, Raymond K; Cousins, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Deficient intake of zinc from the diet upregulates both uroguanylin (UG) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in rats. Because these changes influence intestinal fluid secretion and intestinal cell pathophysiology, they relate to the incidence of diarrheal disease and its reversal by zinc as well as intestinal inflammation in general. A model of moderate zinc deficiency in rats, which changes molecular indices of zinc deficiency, was used to further explore the effects of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1alpha and zinc repletion on these changes. IL-1alpha has been shown to have a role in the intestinal inflammation that occurs with bacterial infection. Our results showed a permissive effect of zinc deficiency on both UG and iNOS expression. Specifically, UG expression was responsive to zinc deficiency and IL-1alpha challenge, which were additive when combined, whereas iNOS expression was upregulated by IL-1alpha only during the deficiency. Immunohistochemistry showed that the increase in UG was limited to enterocytes of the upper villus but, in contrast, the increase in iNOS was principally in cells of the lamina propria of IL-1alpha-treated rats. Cells exhibiting UG upregulation did not co-express serotonin. Repletion with zinc reversed upregulation of the iNOS gene within 1 d, whereas UG upregulation required 3-4 d to return to normal. This differential response to repletion suggests that mechanisms of UG and iNOS dysregulation are different. Dysregulation of both genes may contribute to the severity of zinc-responsive diarrheal disease and intestinal inflammatory disease.

  6. Zinc deficiency-induced iron accumulation, a consequence of alterations in iron regulatory protein-binding activity, iron transporters, and iron storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Niles, Brad J; Clegg, Michael S; Hanna, Lynn A; Chou, Susan S; Momma, Tony Y; Hong, Heeok; Keen, Carl L

    2008-02-22

    One consequence of zinc deficiency is an elevation in cell and tissue iron concentrations. To examine the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon, Swiss 3T3 cells were cultured in zinc-deficient (D, 0.5 microM zinc), zinc-supplemented (S, 50 microM zinc), or control (C, 4 microM zinc) media. After 24 h of culture, cells in the D group were characterized by a 50% decrease in intracellular zinc and a 35% increase in intracellular iron relative to cells in the S and C groups. The increase in cellular iron was associated with increased transferrin receptor 1 protein and mRNA levels and increased ferritin light chain expression. The divalent metal transporter 1(+)iron-responsive element isoform mRNA was decreased during zinc deficiency-induced iron accumulation. Examination of zinc-deficient cells revealed increased binding of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) and decreased binding of IRP1 to a consensus iron-responsive element. The increased IRP2-binding activity in zinc-deficient cells coincided with an increased level of IRP2 protein. The accumulation of IRP2 protein was independent of zinc deficiency-induced intracellular nitric oxide production but was attenuated by the addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or ascorbate to the D medium. These data support the concept that zinc deficiency can result in alterations in iron transporter, storage, and regulatory proteins, which facilitate iron accumulation.

  7. Beneficial effect of zinc chloride and zinc ionophore pyrithione on attenuated cardioprotective potential of preconditioning phenomenon in STZ-induced diabetic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Sumit; Kumar, Kushal; Reddy, B V Krishna

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is well demonstrated to produce cardioprotection by phosphorylation and subsequent inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSk-3β) in the normal rat heart, but its effect is attenuated in the diabetic rat heart. This study was designed to investigate the effect of zinc chloride and zinc ionophore pyrithione (ZIP) on the attenuated cardioprotective potential of IPC in the diabetic rat heart. Diabetes mellitus (DM) was induced by a single intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg; i.p). The isolated perfused rat heart was subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia followed by 120 minutes of reperfusion. Myocardial infarct size was estimated by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and cardiac injury was measured by estimating lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) in the coronary effluent. Also, GSK-3β was measured and neutrophil accumulation was measured by estimating myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels. IPC significantly decreased the myocardial infarct size, the release of LDH and CK-MB, the GSK-3β levels and the MPO levels in the normal rat heart. Pre- and post-ischemic treatment with zinc chloride and zinc ionophore pyrithione (ZIP) in the normal and diabetic rat hearts significantly decreased the myocardial infarct size, the level of CK-MB and LDH in the coronary effluent and GSK-3β and MPO levels. Our results suggest that pharmacological preconditioning with zinc chloride and ZIP significantly restored the attenuated cardioprotective potential of IPC in the diabetic rat heart. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Angiotensin II potentiates zinc-induced cortical neuronal death by acting on angiotensin II type 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Ha; Kim, Ha Na; Lim, Joon Seo; Ahn, Jae-Sung; Koh, Jae-Young

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin system has several non-vascular functions in the central nervous system. For instance, inhibition of the brain angiotensin system results in a reduction in neuronal death following acute brain injury such as ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage, even under conditions of constant blood pressure. Since endogenous zinc has been implicated as a key mediator of ischemic neuronal death, we investigated the possibility that the angiotensin system affects the outcome of zinc-triggered neuronal death in cortical cell cultures. Exposure of cortical cultures containing neurons and astrocytes to 300 μM zinc for 15 min induced submaximal death in both types of cells. Interestingly, addition of angiotensin II significantly enhanced the zinc-triggered neuronal death, while leaving astrocytic cell death relatively unchanged. Both type 1 and 2 angiotensin II receptors (AT1R and AT2R, respectively) were expressed in neurons as well as astrocytes. Zinc neurotoxicity was substantially attenuated by PD123319, a specific inhibitor of AT2R, and augmented by CGP42112, a selective activator of AT2R, indicating a critical role for this receptor subtype in the augmentation of neuronal cell death.Because zinc toxicity occurs largely through oxidative stress, the levels of superoxides in zinc-treated neurons were assessed by DCF fluorescence microscopy. Combined treatment with zinc and angiotensin II substantially increased the levels of superoxides in neurons compared to those induced by zinc alone. This increase in oxidative stress by angiotensin II was completely blocked by the addition of PD123319. Finally, since zinc-induced oxidative stress may be caused by induction and/or activation of NADPH oxidase, the activation status of Rac and the level of the NADPH oxidase subunit p67phox were measured. Angiotensin II markedly increased Rac activity and the levels of p67phox in zinc-treated neurons and astrocytes in a PD123319-dependent manner. The present study shows that the

  9. Minocycline Rescues from Zinc-Induced Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration: Biochemical and Molecular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Chauhan, Amit Kumar; Singh, Deepali; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Chetna

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of zinc (Zn) in dopaminergic neurons is implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD), and microglial activation plays a critical role in toxin-induced Parkinsonism. Oxidative stress is accused in Zn-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration; however, its connection with microglial activation is still not known. This study was undertaken to elucidate the role and underlying mechanism of microglial activation in Zn-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Male Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally with/without zinc sulphate (20 mg/kg) in the presence/absence of minocycline (30 mg/kg), a microglial activation inhibitor, for 2-12 weeks. While neurobehavioral and biochemical indexes of PD and number of dopaminergic neurons were reduced, the number of microglial cells was increased in the substantia nigra of the Zn-exposed animals. Similarly, Zn elevated lipid peroxidation (LPO) and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase; however, catalase activity was reduced. Besides, Zn increased an association of NADPH oxidase subunit p67(phox) with membrane, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and cleavage of pro-caspase 3. Zn attenuated the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) while augmented the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Minocycline alleviated Zn-induced behavioural impairments, loss of TH-positive neurons, activated microglial cells and biochemical indexes and modulated the expression of studied genes/proteins towards normalcy. The results demonstrate that minocycline reduces the number of activated microglial cells and oxidative stress, which rescue from Zn-induced changes in the expression of monoamine transporter and nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  10. Chitin-induced activation of immune signaling by the rice receptor CEBiP relies on a unique sandwich-type dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hayafune, Masahiro; Berisio, Rita; Marchetti, Roberta; Silipo, Alba; Kayama, Miyu; Desaki, Yoshitake; Arima, Sakiko; Squeglia, Flavia; Ruggiero, Alessia; Tokuyasu, Ken; Molinaro, Antonio; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) triggers various defense responses in plants. This MAMP-triggered immunity plays a major role in the plant resistance against various pathogens. To clarify the molecular basis of the specific recognition of chitin oligosaccharides by the rice PRR, CEBiP (chitin-elicitor binding protein), as well as the formation and activation of the receptor complex, biochemical, NMR spectroscopic, and computational studies were performed. Deletion and domain-swapping experiments showed that the central lysine motif in the ectodomain of CEBiP is essential for the binding of chitin oligosaccharides. Epitope mapping by NMR spectroscopy indicated the preferential binding of longer-chain chitin oligosaccharides, such as heptamer-octamer, to CEBiP, and also the importance of N-acetyl groups for the binding. Molecular modeling/docking studies clarified the molecular interaction between CEBiP and chitin oligosaccharides and indicated the importance of Ile122 in the central lysine motif region for ligand binding, a notion supported by site-directed mutagenesis. Based on these results, it was indicated that two CEBiP molecules simultaneously bind to one chitin oligosaccharide from the opposite side, resulting in the dimerization of CEBiP. The model was further supported by the observations that the addition of (GlcNAc)8 induced dimerization of the ectodomain of CEBiP in vitro, and the dimerization and (GlcNAc)8-induced reactive oxygen generation were also inhibited by a unique oligosaccharide, (GlcNβ1,4GlcNAc)4, which is supposed to have N-acetyl groups only on one side of the molecule. Based on these observations, we proposed a hypothetical model for the ligand-induced activation of a receptor complex, involving both CEBiP and Oryza sativa chitin-elicitor receptor kinase-1. PMID:24395781

  11. Salmonella employs multiple mechanisms to subvert the TLR-inducible zinc-mediated antimicrobial response of human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kapetanovic, Ronan; Bokil, Nilesh J; Achard, Maud E S; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y; Peters, Kate M; Stocks, Claudia J; Phan, Minh-Duy; Monteleone, Mercedes; Schroder, Kate; Irvine, Katharine M; Saunders, Bernadette M; Walker, Mark J; Stacey, Katryn J; McEwan, Alastair G; Schembri, Mark A; Sweet, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to characterize antimicrobial zinc trafficking within macrophages and to determine whether the professional intramacrophage pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S Typhimurium) subverts this pathway. Using both Escherichia coli and S Typhimurium, we show that TLR signaling promotes the accumulation of vesicular zinc within primary human macrophages. Vesicular zinc is delivered to E. coli to promote microbial clearance, whereas S. Typhimurium evades this response via Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-1. Even in the absence of SPI-1 and the zinc exporter ZntA, S Typhimurium resists the innate immune zinc stress response, implying the existence of additional host subversion mechanisms. We also demonstrate the combinatorial antimicrobial effects of zinc and copper, a pathway that S. Typhimurium again evades. Our use of complementary tools and approaches, including confocal microscopy, direct assessment of intramacrophage bacterial zinc stress responses, specific E. coli and S Typhimurium mutants, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, has enabled carefully controlled characterization of this novel innate immune antimicrobial pathway. In summary, our study provides new insights at the cellular level into the well-documented effects of zinc in promoting host defense against infectious disease, as well as the complex host subversion strategies employed by S Typhimurium to combat this pathway.-Kapetanovic, R., Bokil, N. J., Achard, M. E. S., Ong, C.-L. Y., Peters, K. M., Stocks, C. J., Phan, M.-D., Monteleone, M., Schroder, K., Irvine, K. M., Saunders, B. M., Walker, M. J., Stacey, K. J., McEwan, A. G., Schembri, M. A., Sweet, M. J. Salmonella employs multiple mechanisms to subvert the TLR-inducible zinc-mediated antimicrobial response of human macrophages. © FASEB.

  12. Protective effects of apomorphine against zinc-induced neurotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hirokazu; Maeda, Asuka; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that excessive zinc (Zn(2+)) release from presynaptic terminals following brain injuries such as ischemia and severe epileptic seizures induces neuronal cell death. Apomorphine (Apo), a dopamine receptor agonist, has been shown to have pleiotropic biological functions. In this study, we investigated whether Apo protects cultured cortical neurons from neurotoxicity provoked by excessive Zn(2+) exposure. Pretreatment with Apo dose- and time-dependently ameliorated Zn(2+) neurotoxicity. In addition, pretreatment with Apo prevented intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and ATP depletion caused by Zn(2+) exposure. Dopamine receptor antagonists did not influence Apo protection against Zn(2+) neurotoxicity. Apo is shown to be autoxidized to produce oxidized products such as reactive oxygen species and quinones. N-Acetylcysteine, a thiol compound, partially reduced Apo protection. Entry of Zn(2+) into neurons is thought to be a critical step of Zn(2+) neurotoxicity. Interestingly, we found that pretreatment with Apo decreased elevation of intracellular Zn(2+) levels after Zn(2+) exposure and induced mRNA expression of the zinc transporter ZnT1, which transports intracellular Zn(2+) out of cells, and metallothionein. Taken together, these results suggest that the protective effects of Apo are regulated, at least in part, by its oxidized products, and preventing intracellular accumulation of Zn(2+) contributes to Apo protection against Zn(2+) neurotoxicity.

  13. Aflatoxin B1 Induced Systemic Toxicity in Poultry and Rescue Effects of Selenium and Zinc.

    PubMed

    Mughal, Muhammad Jameel; Peng, Xi; Kamboh, Asghar Ali; Zhou, Yi; Fang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Among many challenges, exposure to aflatoxins, particularly aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1 ), is one of the major concerns in poultry industry. AFB 1 intoxication results in decreased meat/egg production, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, disturbance in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and reproduction, immune suppression, and increased disease susceptibility. Selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn), in dietary supplementation, offer easy, cost-effective, and efficient ways to neutralize the toxic effect of AFB 1 . In the current review, we discussed the impact of AFB 1 on poultry industry, its biotransformation, and organ-specific noxious effects, along with the action mechanism of AFB 1 -induced toxicity. Moreover, we explained the biological and detoxifying roles of Se and Zn in avian species as well as the protection mechanism of these two trace elements. Ultimately, we discussed the use of Se and Zn supplementation against AFB 1 -induced toxicity in poultry birds.

  14. Artificial and Solar UV Radiation Induces Strand Breaks and Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers in Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA

    PubMed Central

    Slieman, Tony A.; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2000-01-01

    The loss of stratospheric ozone and the accompanying increase in solar UV flux have led to concerns regarding decreases in global microbial productivity. Central to understanding this process is determining the types and amounts of DNA damage in microbes caused by solar UV irradiation. While UV irradiation of dormant Bacillus subtilis endospores results mainly in formation of the “spore photoproduct” 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, genetic evidence indicates that an additional DNA photoproduct(s) may be formed in spores exposed to solar UV-B and UV-A radiation (Y. Xue and W. L. Nicholson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:2221–2227, 1996). We examined the occurrence of double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in spore DNA under several UV irradiation conditions by using enzymatic probes and neutral or alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA from spores irradiated with artificial 254-nm UV-C radiation accumulated single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, while DNA from spores exposed to artificial UV-B radiation (wavelengths, 290 to 310 nm) accumulated only cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. DNA from spores exposed to full-spectrum sunlight (UV-B and UV-A radiation) accumulated single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, whereas DNA from spores exposed to sunlight from which the UV-B component had been removed with a filter (“UV-A sunlight”) accumulated only single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks. Apurinic-apyrimidinic sites were not detected in spore DNA under any of the irradiation conditions used. Our data indicate that there is a complex spectrum of UV photoproducts in DNA of bacterial spores exposed to solar UV irradiation in the environment. PMID:10618224

  15. Oxidation-induced spin reorientation in Co adatoms and CoPd dimers on Ni/Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Beeck, T.; Fiedler, S.; Baev, I.; Wurth, W.; Martins, M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasmall magnetic clusters and adatoms are of strong current interest because of their possible use in future technological applications. Here, we demonstrate that the magnetic coupling between the adsorbates and the substrate can be significantly changed through oxidation. The magnetic properties of Co adatoms and CoPd dimers deposited on a remanently magnetized Ni/Cu(100) substrate have been investigated by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy at the Co L2 ,3 edges. Using spectral differences, pure and oxidized components are distinguished, and their respective magnetic moments are determined. The Co adatoms and the CoPd dimers are coupled ferromagnetically to the substrate, while their oxides, Co-O and CoPd-O, are coupled antiferromagnetically to the substrate. Along with the spin reorientation from the pure to the oxidized state, the magnetic moment of the adatom is highly reduced from Co to Co-O. In contrast, the magnetic moment of the dimer is of similar order for CoPd and CoPd-O.

  16. Comparative Study of Antidiabetic Activity and Oxidative Stress Induced by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Zinc Sulfate in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Nazarizadeh, Ali; Asri-Rezaie, Siamak

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, antidiabetic activity and toxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO) were investigated in diabetic rats compared to zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) with particular emphasis on oxidative stress parameters. One hundred and twenty male Wistar rats were divided into two healthy and diabetic groups, randomly. Each major group was further subdivided into five subgroups and then orally supplemented with various doses of ZnO (1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) and ZnSO4 (30 mg/kg) for 56 consecutive days. ZnO showed greater antidiabetic activity compared to ZnSO4 evidenced by improved glucose disposal, insulin levels, and zinc status. The altered activities of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes as well as raised levels of lipid peroxidation and a marked reduction of total antioxidant capacity were observed in rats receiving ZnO. ZnO nanoparticles acted as a potent antidiabetic agent, however, severely elicited oxidative stress particularly at higher doses.

  17. Organ-specific effects of low-dose zinc pre-exposure on high-dose zinc induced mitochondrial dysfunction in large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Lang; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Shen, Bin; Wu, Chang-Wen

    2017-04-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the effects of low-dose zinc (Zn) pre-exposure on survival rate, new Zn accumulation, and mitochondrial bioenergetics in the liver and spleen of large yellow croaker exposed to high-dose Zn. To the end, fish were pre-exposed to 0 and 2 mg L -1 Zn for 48 h and post-exposed to 0 and 12 mg L -1 Zn for 48 h. Twelve milligrams Zn per liter exposure alone reduced survival rate, but the effect did not appear in the 2 mg L -1 Zn pre-exposure groups. Two milligrams per liter Zn pre-exposure also ameliorated 12 mg Zn L -1 induced new Zn accumulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and mitochondrial swelling in the liver. However, these effects did not appear in the spleen. In the liver, 2 mg L -1 Zn pre-exposure apparently relieved 12 mg L -1 Zn induced down-regulation of activities of ATP synthase (F-ATPase), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH). The mRNA levels of these genes remained relatively stable in fish exposed to 12 mg L -1 Zn alone, but increased in fish exposed to 12 mg L -1 Zn with 2 mg L -1 Zn pre-treatment. In the spleen, 2 mg Zn L -1 pre-exposure did not mitigate the down-regulation of mRNA levels of genes and activities of relative enzymes induced by 12 mg L -1 Zn. In conclusion, our study demonstrated low-dose zinc pre-exposure ameliorated high-dose zinc induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver but not in the spleen of large yellow croaker, indicating an organ-specific effect.

  18. Zinc-induced differential oxidative stress and antioxidant responses in Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus acuminatus.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Seham M; Zinta, Gaurav; Klöck, Gerd; Asard, Han; Selim, Samy; AbdElgawad, Hamada

    2017-06-01

    Algae are frequently exposed to toxic metals, and zinc (Zn) is one of the major toxicants present. We exposed two green microalgae, Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus acuminatus, to sub-lethal concentrations (1.0 and 0.6mM) of Zn for seven days. Algal responses were analysed at the level of growth, oxidative stress, and antioxidants. Growth parameters such as cell culture yield and pigment content were less affected by Zn in C. sorokiniana, despite the fact that this alga accumulated more zinc than S. acuminatus. Also, C. sorokiniana, but not S. acuminatus, was able to acclimatize during long-term exposure to toxic concentrations of the test metals (specific growth rate (µ) was 0.041/day and total chlorophyll was 14.6mg/mL). Although, Zn induced oxidative stress in both species, C. sorokiniana experienced less stress than S. acuminatus. This could be explained by a higher accumulation of antioxidants in C. sorokiniana, where flavonoids, polyphenols, tocopherols, glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (ASC) content increased. Moreover, antioxidant enzymes glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), showed increased activities in C. sorokiniana. In addition to, and probably also underlying, the higher Zn tolerance in C. sorokiniana, this alga also showed higher Zn biosorption capacity. Use of C. sorokiniana as a bio-remediator, could be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tubulin Dimer Reversible Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Peter; Sackett, Dan L.

    2016-01-01

    Tubulins are evolutionarily conserved proteins that reversibly polymerize and direct intracellular traffic. Of the tubulin family only αβ-tubulin forms stable dimers. We investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium of rat brain αβ-tubulin using analytical ultracentrifugation and fluorescence anisotropy, observing tubulin in virtually fully monomeric and dimeric states. Monomeric tubulin was stable for a few hours and exchanged into preformed dimers, demonstrating reversibility of dimer dissociation. Global analysis combining sedimentation velocity and fluorescence anisotropy yielded Kd = 84 (54–123) nm. Dimer dissociation kinetics were measured by analyzing the shape of the sedimentation boundary and by the relaxation of fluorescence anisotropy following rapid dilution of labeled tubulin, yielding koff in the range 10−3–10−2 s−1. Thus, tubulin dimers reversibly dissociate with moderately fast kinetics. Monomer-monomer association is much less sensitive than dimer-dimer association to solution changes (GTP/GDP, urea, and trimethylamine oxide). PMID:26934918

  20. Role of quercetin and arginine in ameliorating nano zinc oxide-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Faddah, Laila M; Abdel Baky, Nayira A; Al-Rasheed, Nouf M; Al-Rasheed, Nawal M; Fatani, Amal J; Atteya, Muhammad

    2012-05-02

    Nanoparticles are small-scale substances (<100 nm) with unique properties. Therefore, nanoparticles pose complex health risk implications. The objective of this study was to detect whether treatment with quercetin (Qur) and/or arginine (Arg) ameliorated nephrotoxicity induced by two different doses of nano zinc oxide (n-ZnO) particles. ZnO nanoparticles were administered orally in two doses (either 600 mg or 1 g/Kg body weight/day for 5 conscutive days) to Wister albino rats. In order to detect the protective effects of the studied antioxidants against n-ZnO induced nepherotoxicity, different biochemical parameters were investigated. Moreover, histopathological examination of kidney tissue was performed. Nano zinc oxide-induced nephrotoxicity was confirmed by the elevation in serum inflammatory markers including: tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6); and C-reactive protein (CRP). Moreover, immunoglobulin (IGg), vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF), and nitric oxide (NO) were significantly increased in rat serum. Serum urea and creatinine levels were also significantly increased in rats intoxicated with n-ZnO particles compared with the control group. Additionally, a significant decrease in the non-enzymatic antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) was shown in kidney tissues and serum glucose levels were increased. These biochemical findings were supported by a histopathological examination of kidney tissues, which showed that in the animals that received a high dose of n-ZnO, numerous kidney glomeruli underwent atrophy and fragmentation. Moreover, the renal tubules showed epithelial desquamation, degeneration and necrosis. Some renal tubules showed casts in their lumina. Severe congestion was also observed in renal interstitium. These effects were dose dependent. Cotreatment of rats with Qur and/or Arg along with n-ZnO significantly improved most of the deviated tested parameters. The data show that Qur has a beneficial effect against

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations and modelling of the residue interaction networks in the BRAF kinase complexes with small molecule inhibitors: probing the allosteric effects of ligand-induced kinase dimerization and paradoxical activation.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, G M

    2016-10-20

    Protein kinases are central to proper functioning of cellular networks and are an integral part of many signal transduction pathways. The family of protein kinases represents by far the largest and most important class of therapeutic targets in oncology. Dimerization-induced activation has emerged as a common mechanism of allosteric regulation in BRAF kinases, which play an important role in growth factor signalling and human diseases. Recent studies have revealed that most of the BRAF inhibitors can induce dimerization and paradoxically stimulate enzyme transactivation by conferring an active conformation in the second monomer of the kinase dimer. The emerging connections between inhibitor binding and BRAF kinase domain dimerization have suggested a molecular basis of the activation mechanism in which BRAF inhibitors may allosterically modulate the stability of the dimerization interface and affect the organization of residue interaction networks in BRAF kinase dimers. In this work, we integrated structural bioinformatics analysis, molecular dynamics and binding free energy simulations with the protein structure network analysis of the BRAF crystal structures to determine dynamic signatures of BRAF conformations in complexes with different types of inhibitors and probe the mechanisms of the inhibitor-induced dimerization and paradoxical activation. The results of this study highlight previously unexplored relationships between types of BRAF inhibitors, inhibitor-induced changes in the residue interaction networks and allosteric modulation of the kinase activity. This study suggests a mechanism by which BRAF inhibitors could promote or interfere with the paradoxical activation of BRAF kinases, which may be useful in informing discovery efforts to minimize the unanticipated adverse biological consequences of these therapeutic agents.

  2. Zinc or copper deficiency-induced impaired inflammatory response to brain trauma may be caused by the concomitant metallothionein changes.

    PubMed

    Penkowa, M; Giralt, M; Thomsen, P S; Carrasco, J; Hidalgo, J

    2001-04-01

    The role of zinc- and copper-deficient diets on the inflammatory response to traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been evaluated in adult rats. As expected, zinc deficiency decreased food intake and body weight gain, and the latter effect was higher than that observed in pair-fed rats. In noninjured brains, zinc deficiency only affected significantly lectin (increasing) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) (decreasing) immunoreactivities (irs). In injured brains, a profound gliosis was observed in the area surrounding the lesion, along with severe damage to neurons as indicated by neuron specific enolase (NSE) ir, and the number of cells undergoing apoptosis (measured by TUNEL) was dramatically increased. Zinc deficiency significantly altered brain response to TBI, potentiating the microgliosis and reducing the astrogliosis, while increasing the number of apoptotic cells. Metallothioneins (MTs) are important zinc- and copper-binding proteins in the CNS, which could influence significantly the brain response to TBI because of their putative roles in metal homeostasis and antioxidant defenses. MT-I+II expression was dramatically increased by TBI, and this response was significantly blunted by zinc deficiency. The MT-III isoform was moderately increased by both TBI and zinc deficiency. TBI strongly increased oxidative stress levels, as demonstrated by malondialdehyde (MDA), protein tyrosine nitration (NITT), and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) levels irs, all of which were potentiated by zinc deficiency. Further analysis revealed unbalanced expression of prooxidant and antioxidant proteins besides MT, since the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and Cu,Zn-SOD were increased and decreased, respectively, by zinc deficiency. All these effects were attributable to zinc deficiency, since pair-fed rats did not differ from normally fed rats. In general, copper deficiency caused a similar pattern of responses

  3. Zinc Ameliorate Oxidative Stress and Hormonal Disturbance Induced by Methomyl, Abamectin, and Their Mixture in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Sameeh A.; Abbassy, Mostafa A.; Shaldam, Hassan A.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to mixtures of toxicants (e.g., pesticides) is common in real life and a subject of current concern. The present investigation was undertaken to assess some toxicological effects in male rats following exposure to methomyl (MET), abamectin (ABM), and their combination (MET+ABM), and to evaluate the ameliorative effect of zinc co-administration. Three groups of rats were designated for MET, ABM, and the mixture treatments. Three other groups were designated for zinc in conjunction with the pesticides. Additionally, one group received water only (control), and the other represented a positive zinc treatment. The obtained results revealed that MET was acutely more toxic than ABM. The tested pesticides induced significant elevation in lipid peroxidation and catalase levels, while declined the levels of the other tested parameters e.g., Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Glutathione reductase (GR), Cytochrome P450 (CYP450), testosterone, and thyroxine). Biochemical alterations induced by the mixture were greater than those recorded for each of the individual insecticides. The joint action analysis, based on the obtained biochemical data, revealed the dominance of antagonistic action among MET and ABM. Zinc supplementation achieved noticeable ameliorative effects. It was concluded that zinc may act as a powerful antioxidant, especially in individuals who are occupationally exposed daily to low doses of such pesticides. PMID:29207507

  4. Preventive effects of zinc against psychological stress-induced iron dyshomeostasis, erythropoiesis inhibition, and oxidative stress status in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Qian, Jianxin; Chen, Xinmin; Shen, Zhilei; Tao, Liping; Li, Hongxia; Qin, Haihong; Li, Min; Shen, Hui

    2012-06-01

    Psychological stress (PS) could cause decreased iron absorption and iron redistribution in body resulting in low iron concentration in the bone marrow and inhibition of erythropoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of zinc supplementation on the iron metabolism, erythropoiesis, and oxidative stress status in PS-induced rats. Thirty-two rats were divided into two groups randomly: control group and zinc supplementation group. Each group was subdivided into two subgroups: control group and PS group. Rats received zinc supplementation before PS exposure established by a communication box. We investigated the serum corticosterone (CORT) level; iron apparent absorption; iron contents in liver, spleen, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and serum; hematological parameters; malondialdehyde (MDA); reduced glutathione (GSH); and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Compared to PS-treated rats with normal diet, the PS-treated rats with zinc supplementation showed increased iron apparent absorption, serum iron, hemoglobin, red blood cell, GSH, and SOD activities; while the serum CORT; iron contents in liver, spleen, and regional brain; and MDA decreased. These results indicated that dietary zinc supplementation had preventive effects against PS-induced iron dyshomeostasis, erythropoiesis inhibition, and oxidative stress status in rats.

  5. Zinc-finger Nuclease-induced Gene Repair With Oligodeoxynucleotides: Wanted and Unwanted Target Locus Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Radecke, Sarah; Radecke, Frank; Cathomen, Toni; Schwarz, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Correcting a mutated gene directly at its endogenous locus represents an alternative to gene therapy protocols based on viral vectors with their risk of insertional mutagenesis. When solely a single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ssODN) is used as a repair matrix, the efficiency of the targeted gene correction is low. However, as shown with the homing endonuclease I-SceI, ssODN-mediated gene correction can be enhanced by concomitantly inducing a DNA double-strand break (DSB) close to the mutation. Because I-SceI is hardly adjustable to cut at any desired position in the human genome, here, customizable zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) were used to stimulate ssODN-mediated repair of a mutated single-copy reporter locus stably integrated into human embryonic kidney-293 cells. The ZFNs induced faithful gene repair at a frequency of 0.16%. Six times more often, ZFN-induced DSBs were found to be modified by unfaithful addition of ssODN between the termini and about 60 times more often by nonhomologous end joining-related deletions and insertions. Additionally, ZFN off-target activity based on binding mismatch sites at the locus of interest was detected in in vitro cleavage assays and also in chromosomal DNA isolated from treated cells. Therefore, the specificity of ZFN-induced ssODN-mediated gene repair needs to be improved, especially regarding clinical applications. PMID:20068556

  6. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Demoted MDM2 Expression to Suppress TSLP-Induced Mast Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-03-01

    Activation of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) through thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)-induced signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT6) phosphorylation plays a critical role in proliferation and survival of mast cells. Previously, we reported that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NP) effectively decrease the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reactions. Here, we evaluated the effect of ZnO-NP on TSLP-induced proliferation of mast cells. ZnO-NP significantly reduced the number of BrdU-incorporating mast cells increased by TSLP. ZnO-NP decreased the expression of MDM2 through the blockade of STAT6 phosphorylation. TSLP increased the production and mRNA expression of interleukin-13 (a growth factor of mast cells), its increase was significantly decreased by ZnO-NP (10 μg/mL). ZnO-NP induced the down-regulation of Bcl2 (an anti-apoptotic factor) and up-regulation of Bax (an apoptotic factor) through the stabilization of p53 protein. However, ZnO-NP has no effect on caspase-3 activation, cytochrome c release into cytosol, and apoptosis-inducing factor translocation into nucleus in TSLP-stimulated cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that ZnO-NP inhibited the proliferation of mast cells through the regulation of MDM2 and p53 protein levels. These finding suggest that ZnO-NP could be improved mast cell-mediated various diseases.

  7. ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES SRC-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES Src-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)
    Weidong Wu1, Lee M. Graves2, Gordon N. Gill3 and James M. Samet4 1Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology; 2Department of Pharmacology, University o...

  8. Zinc deficiency mediates alcohol-induced apoptotic cell death in the liver of rats through activating ER and mitochondrial cell death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qian; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Wenliang; Li, Qiong; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Dong, Daoyin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic zinc deficiency has been well documented in alcoholic patients, but the mechanisms by which zinc deficiency mediates cell death have not been well defined. The objectives of this study were to determine whether alcohol perturbs subcellular zinc homeostasis and how organelle zinc depletion may link with cell death pathways. Wistar rats were pair-fed with the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol diet for 5 mo. Chronic alcohol exposure significantly reduced zinc level in isolated hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. Among the detected zinc transporters, ER Zrt/Irt-like protein (ZIP)13 and mitochondrial ZIP8, which transport zinc from ER and mitochondria to cytosol, were significantly increased. Mitochondrial zinc transporter (ZnT) 4, which transports zinc from cytosol to mitochondria, was also increased. ER phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, activating transcription factor 4, and C/EBP homologous protein were significantly upregulated, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release and Bax insertion were detected in association with caspase-3 activation and apoptotic cell death. To define the role of zinc deficiency in ER and mitochondrial stress, H4IIEC3 cells were treated with 3 μM N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine for 6 h with or without supplementation with zinc or N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The results demonstrated that zinc deprivation induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in association with ER and mitochondria dysfunction, which were inhibited by zinc as low as 10 μM but not by 2 mM NAC. These results suggest that chronic ethanol exposure induced in ER and mitochondrial zinc deficiency might activate intrinsic cell death signaling pathway, which could not be effectively rescued by antioxidant treatment. PMID:25767260

  9. Template Dimerization Promotes an Acceptor Invasion-Induced Transfer Mechanism during Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Minus-Strand Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Roques, Bernard P.; Fay, Philip J.; Bambara, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The biochemical mechanism of template switching by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase and the role of template dimerization were examined. Homologous donor-acceptor template pairs derived from the HIV-1 untranslated leader region and containing the wild-type and mutant dimerization initiation sequences (DIS) were used to examine the efficiency and distribution of transfers. Inhibiting donor-acceptor interaction was sufficient to reduce transfers in DIS-containing template pairs, indicating that template dimerization, and not the mere presence of the DIS, promotes efficient transfers. Additionally, we show evidence that the overall transfer process spans an extended region of the template and proceeds through a two-step mechanism. Transfer is initiated through an RNase H-facilitated acceptor invasion step, while synthesis continues on the donor template. The invasion then propagates towards the primer terminus by branch migration. Transfer is completed with the translocation of the primer terminus at a site distant from the invasion point. In our system, most invasions initiated before synthesis reached the DIS. However, transfer of the primer terminus predominantly occurred after synthesis through the DIS. The two steps were separated by 60 to 80 nucleotides. Sequence markers revealed the position of primer terminus switch, whereas DNA oligomers designed to block acceptor-cDNA interactions defined sites of invasion. Within the region of homology, certain positions on the template were inherently more favorable for invasion than others. In templates with DIS, the proximity of the acceptor facilitates invasion, thereby enhancing transfer efficiency. Nucleocapsid protein enhanced the overall efficiency of transfers but did not alter the mechanism. PMID:12663778

  10. Thioredoxin-albumin fusion protein prevents copper enhanced zinc-induced neurotoxicity via its antioxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Shimoda, Mikako; Chuang, Victor T G; Nishida, Kento; Kawahara, Masahiro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru; Ishima, Yu

    2018-01-15

    Zinc (Zn) is a co-factor for a vast number of enzymes, and functions as a regulator for immune mechanism and protein synthesis. However, excessive Zn release induced in pathological situations such as stroke or transient global ischemia is toxic. Previously, we demonstrated that the interaction of Zn and copper (Cu) is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Furthermore, oxidative stress has been shown to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of various metal ions induced neuronal death. Thioredoxin-Albumin fusion (HSA-Trx) is a derivative of thioredoxin (Trx), an antioxidative protein, with improved plasma retention and stability of Trx. In this study, we examined the effect of HSA-Trx on Cu 2+ /Zn 2+ -induced neurotoxicity. Firstly, HSA-Trx was found to clearly suppress Cu 2+ /Zn 2+ -induced neuronal cell death in mouse hypothalamic neuronal cells (GT1-7 cells). Moreover, HSA-Trx markedly suppressed Cu 2+ /Zn 2+ -induced ROS production and the expression of oxidative stress related genes, such as heme oxygenase-1. In contrast, HSA-Trx did not affect the intracellular levels of both Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ after Cu 2+ /Zn 2+ treatment. Finally, HSA-Trx was found to significantly suppress endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response induced by Cu 2+ /Zn 2+ treatment in a dose dependent manner. These results suggest that HSA-Trx counteracted Cu 2+ /Zn 2+ -induced neurotoxicity by suppressing the production of ROS via interfering the related gene expressions, in addition to the highly possible radical scavenging activity of the fusion protein. Based on these findings, HSA-Trx has great potential as a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of refractory neurological diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dimer covering and percolation frustration.

    PubMed

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Haji-Akbari, Nasim; Ziff, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Covering a graph or a lattice with nonoverlapping dimers is a problem that has received considerable interest in areas, such as discrete mathematics, statistical physics, chemistry, and materials science. Yet, the problem of percolation on dimer-covered lattices has received little attention. In particular, percolation on lattices that are fully covered by nonoverlapping dimers has not evidently been considered. Here, we propose a procedure for generating random dimer coverings of a given lattice. We then compute the bond percolation threshold on random and ordered coverings of the square and the triangular lattices on the remaining bonds connecting the dimers. We obtain p_{c}=0.367713(2) and p_{c}=0.235340(1) for random coverings of the square and the triangular lattices, respectively. We observe that the percolation frustration induced as a result of dimer covering is larger in the low-coordination-number square lattice. There is also no relationship between the existence of long-range order in a covering of the square lattice and its percolation threshold. In particular, an ordered covering of the square lattice, denoted by shifted covering in this paper, has an unusually low percolation threshold and is topologically identical to the triangular lattice. This is in contrast to the other ordered dimer coverings considered in this paper, which have higher percolation thresholds than the random covering. In the case of the triangular lattice, the percolation thresholds of the ordered and random coverings are very close, suggesting the lack of sensitivity of the percolation threshold to microscopic details of the covering in highly coordinated networks.

  12. Zinc regulates Nox1 expression through a NF-κB and mitochondrial ROS dependent mechanism to induce senescence of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, G; Huang, J; Feresin, R G; Zhao, Y; Griendling, K K

    2017-07-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammation in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is well established. Increases in oxidative stress can further exacerbate the inflammatory response and lead to cellular senescence. We previously reported that angiotensin II (Ang II) and zinc increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause senescence of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and that senescence induced by Ang II is a zinc-dependent process. Zinc stimulated NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity; however, the role of Nox isoforms in zinc effects was not determined. Here, we show that downregulation of Nox1, but not Nox4, by siRNA prevented both Ang II- and zinc-induced senescence in VSMCs. On the other hand, overexpression of Nox1 induced senescence, which was associated with reduced proliferation, reduced expression of telomerase and increased DNA damage. Zinc increased Nox1 protein expression, which was inhibited by chelation of zinc with TPEN and by overexpression of the zinc exporters ZnT3 and ZnT10. These transporters work to reduce cytosolic zinc, suggesting that increased cytosolic zinc mediates Nox1 upregulation. Other metals including copper, iron, cobalt and manganese failed to upregulate Nox1, suggesting that this pathway is zinc specific. Nox1 upregulation was inhibited by actinomycin D (ACD), an inhibitor of transcription, by inhibition of NF-κB, a known Nox1 transcriptional regulator and by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and MitoTEMPO, suggesting that NF-κB and mitochondrial ROS mediate zinc effects. Supporting this idea, we found that zinc increased NF-κB activation in the cytosol, stimulated the translocation of the p65 subunit to the nucleus, and that zinc accumulated in mitochondria increasing mitochondrial ROS, measured using MitoSox. Further, zinc-induced senescence was reduced by inhibition of NF-κB or reduction of mitochondrial ROS with MitoTEMPO. NF-κB activity was also reduced by MitoTEMPO, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS

  13. Ligand regulation of a constitutively dimeric EGF receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Alvarado, Diego; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization has traditionally been viewed as the key event in transmembrane signalling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans EGFR orthologue LET-23 is constitutively dimeric, yet responds to its ligand LIN-3 without changing oligomerization state. SAXS and mutational analyses further reveal that the preformed dimer of the LET-23 extracellular region is mediated by its domain II dimerization arm and resembles other EGFR extracellular dimers seen in structural studies. Binding of LIN-3 induces only minor structural rearrangements in the LET-23 dimer to promote signalling. Our results therefore argue that EGFR can be regulated by allosteric changes within an existing receptor dimer--resembling signalling by insulin receptor family members, which share similar extracellular domain compositions but form covalent dimers.

  14. Blue light-induced LOV domain dimerization enhances the affinity of Aureochrome 1a for its target DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Heintz, Udo; Schlichting, Ilme

    2016-01-01

    The design of synthetic optogenetic tools that allow precise spatiotemporal control of biological processes previously inaccessible to optogenetic control has developed rapidly over the last years. Rational design of such tools requires detailed knowledge of allosteric light signaling in natural photoreceptors. To understand allosteric communication between sensor and effector domains, characterization of all relevant signaling states is required. Here, we describe the mechanism of light-dependent DNA binding of the light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) transcription factor Aureochrome 1a from Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PtAu1a) and present crystal structures of a dark state LOV monomer and a fully light-adapted LOV dimer. In combination with hydrogen/deuterium-exchange, solution scattering data and DNA-binding experiments, our studies reveal a light-sensitive interaction between the LOV and basic region leucine zipper DNA-binding domain that together with LOV dimerization results in modulation of the DNA affinity of PtAu1a. We discuss the implications of these results for the design of synthetic LOV-based photosensors with application in optogenetics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11860.001 PMID:26754770

  15. Disparate roles of zinc in chemical hypoxia-induced neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sujeong; Seo, Jung-Woo; Oh, Shin Bi; Kim, So Hee; Kim, Inki; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has provided a causative role of zinc (Zn2+) in neuronal death following ischemic brain injury. Using a hypoxia model of primary cultured cortical neurons with hypoxia-inducing chemicals, cobalt chloride (1 mM CoCl2), deferoxamine (3 mM DFX), and sodium azide (2 mM NaN3), we evaluated whether Zn2+ is involved in hypoxic neuronal death. The hypoxic chemicals rapidly elicited intracellular Zn2+ release/accumulation in viable neurons. The immediate addition of the Zn2+ chelator, CaEDTA or N,N,N’N’-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), prevented the intracellular Zn2+ load and CoCl2-induced neuronal death, but neither 3 hour later Zn2+ chelation nor a non-Zn2+ chelator ZnEDTA (1 mM) demonstrated any effects. However, neither CaEDTA nor TPEN rescued neurons from cell death following DFX- or NaN3-induced hypoxia, whereas ZnEDTA rendered them resistant to the hypoxic injury. Instead, the immediate supplementation of Zn2+ rescued DFX- and NaN3-induced neuronal death. The iron supplementation also afforded neuroprotection against DFX-induced hypoxic injury. Thus, although intracellular Zn2+ release/accumulation is common during chemical hypoxia, Zn2+ might differently influence the subsequent fate of neurons; it appears to play a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role depending on the hypoxic chemical used. These results also suggest that different hypoxic chemicals may induce neuronal death via distinct mechanisms. PMID:25667569

  16. Disparate roles of zinc in chemical hypoxia-induced neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujeong; Seo, Jung-Woo; Oh, Shin Bi; Kim, So Hee; Kim, Inki; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has provided a causative role of zinc (Zn(2+)) in neuronal death following ischemic brain injury. Using a hypoxia model of primary cultured cortical neurons with hypoxia-inducing chemicals, cobalt chloride (1 mM CoCl2), deferoxamine (3 mM DFX), and sodium azide (2 mM NaN3), we evaluated whether Zn(2+) is involved in hypoxic neuronal death. The hypoxic chemicals rapidly elicited intracellular Zn(2+) release/accumulation in viable neurons. The immediate addition of the Zn(2+) chelator, CaEDTA or N,N,N'N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), prevented the intracellular Zn(2+) load and CoCl2-induced neuronal death, but neither 3 hour later Zn(2+) chelation nor a non-Zn(2+) chelator ZnEDTA (1 mM) demonstrated any effects. However, neither CaEDTA nor TPEN rescued neurons from cell death following DFX- or NaN3-induced hypoxia, whereas ZnEDTA rendered them resistant to the hypoxic injury. Instead, the immediate supplementation of Zn(2+) rescued DFX- and NaN3-induced neuronal death. The iron supplementation also afforded neuroprotection against DFX-induced hypoxic injury. Thus, although intracellular Zn(2+) release/accumulation is common during chemical hypoxia, Zn(2+) might differently influence the subsequent fate of neurons; it appears to play a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role depending on the hypoxic chemical used. These results also suggest that different hypoxic chemicals may induce neuronal death via distinct mechanisms.

  17. Tunicate cytostatic factor TC14-3 induces a polycomb group gene and histone modification through Ca2+ binding and protein dimerization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As many invertebrate species have multipotent cells that undergo cell growth and differentiation during regeneration and budding, many unique and interesting homeostatic factors are expected to exist in those animals. However, our understanding of such factors and global mechanisms remains very poor. Single zooids of the tunicate, Polyandrocarpa misakiensis, can give off as many as 40 buds during the life span. Bud development proceeds by means of transdifferentiation of very limited number of cells and tissues. TC14-3 is one of several different but closely related polypeptides isolated from P. misakiensis. It acts as a cytostatic factor that regulates proliferation, adhesion, and differentiation of multipotent cells, although the molecular mechanism remains uncertain. The Polycomb group (PcG) genes are involved in epigenetic control of genomic activity in mammals. In invertebrates except Drosophila, PcG and histone methylation have not been studied so extensively, and genome-wide gene regulation is poorly understood. Results When Phe65 of TC14-3 was mutated to an acidic amino acid, the resultant mutant protein failed to dimerize. The replacement of Thr69 with Arg69 made dimers unstable. When Glu106 was changed to Gly106, the resultant mutant protein completely lost Ca2+ binding. All these mutant proteins lacked cytostatic activity, indicating the requirement of protein dimerization and calcium for the activity. Polyandrocarpa Eed, a component of PcG, is highly expressed during budding, like TC14-3. When wild-type and mutant TC14-3s were applied in vivo and in vitro to Polyandrocarpa cells, only wild-type TC14-3 could induce Eed without affecting histone methyltransferase gene expression. Eed-expressing cells underwent trimethylation of histone H3 lysine27. PmEed knockdown by RNA interference rescued cultured cells from the growth-inhibitory effects of TC14-3. Conclusion These results show that in P. misakiensis, the cytostatic activity of TC14-3 is

  18. Crystal structure of human S100A8 in complex with zinc and calcium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haili; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Yatime, Laure

    2016-06-01

    S100 proteins are a large family of calcium binding proteins present only in vertebrates. They function intra- and extracellularly both as regulators of homeostatic processes and as potent effectors during inflammation. Among these, S100A8 and S100A9 are two major constituents of neutrophils that can assemble into homodimers, heterodimers and higher oligomeric species, including fibrillary structures found in the ageing prostate. Each of these forms assumes specific functions and their formation is dependent on divalent cations, notably calcium and zinc. In particular, zinc appears as a major regulator of S100 protein function in a disease context. Despite this central role, no structural information on how zinc bind to S100A8/S100A9 and regulates their quaternary structure is yet available. Here we report two crystallographic structures of calcium and zinc-loaded human S100A8. S100A8 binds two zinc ions per homodimer, through two symmetrical, all-His tetracoordination sites, revealing a classical His-Zn binding mode for the protein. Furthermore, the presence of a (Zn)2-cacodylate complex in our second crystal form induces ligand swapping within the canonical His4 zinc binding motif, thereby creating two new Zn-sites, one of which involves residues from symmetry-related molecules. Finally, we describe the calcium-induced S100A8 tetramer and reveal how zinc stabilizes this tetramer by tightening the dimer-dimer interface. Our structures of Zn(2+)/Ca(2+)-bound hS100A8 demonstrate that S100A8 is a genuine His-Zn S100 protein. Furthermore, they show how zinc stabilizes S100A8 tetramerization and potentially mediates the formation of novel interdimer interactions. We propose that these zinc-mediated interactions may serve as a basis for the generation of larger oligomers in vivo.

  19. Metalloproteins and phytochelatin synthase may confer protection against zinc oxide nanoparticle induced toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Polak, Natasa; Read, Daniel S; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Matzke, Marianne; Kelly, Frank J; Spurgeon, David J; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R

    2014-03-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are used in large quantities by the cosmetic, food and textile industries. Here we exposed Caenorhabditis elegans wild-type and a metal sensitive triple knockout mutant (mtl-1;mtl-2;pcs-1) to ZnONPs (0-50mg/L) to study strain and exposure specific effects on transcription, reactive oxygen species generation, the biomolecular phenotype (measured by Raman microspectroscopy) and key endpoints of the nematode life cycle (growth, reproduction and lifespan). A significant dissolution effect was observed, where dissolved ZnO constituted over 50% of total Zn within a two day exposure to the test medium, suggesting that the nominal exposure to pure ZnONPs represents in vivo, at best, a mixture exposure of ionic zinc and nanoparticles. Nevertheless, the analyses provided evidence that the metallothioneins (mtl-1 and mtl-2), the phytochelatin synthase (pcs-1) and an apoptotic marker (cep-1) were transcriptionally activated. In addition, the DCFH-DA assay provided in vitro evidence of the oxidative potential of ZnONPs in the metal exposure sensitive triple mutant. Raman spectroscopy highlighted that the biomolecular phenotype changes significantly in the mtl-1;mtl-2;pcs-1 triple knockout worm upon ZnONP exposure, suggesting that these metalloproteins are instrumental in the protection against cytotoxic damage. Finally, ZnONP exposure was shown to decrease growth and development, reproductive capacity and lifespan, effects which were amplified in the triple knockout. By combining diverse toxicological strategies, we identified that individuals (genotypes) housing mutations in key metalloproteins and phytochelatin synthase are more susceptible to ZnONP exposure, which underlines their importance to minimize ZnONP induced toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Zinc promotes the death of hypoxic astrocytes by upregulating hypoxia-induced hypoxiainducible factor-1alpha expression via Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Rong; Chen, Chen; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Ke Jian

    2013-01-01

    Aim Pathological release of excess zinc ions has been implicated in ischemic brain cell death. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In stroke, ischemia-induced zinc release and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) accumulation concurrently occur in the ischemic tissue. The present study testes the hypothesis that the presence of high intracellular zinc concentration is a major cause of modifications to PARP-1 and HIF-1α during hypoxia, which significantly contributes to cell death during ischemia. Methods Primary cortical astrocytes and C8-D1A cells were exposed to different concentrations of zinc chloride. Cell death rate and protein expression of HIF-1 and Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 were examined after 3-hour hypoxic treatment. Results Although 3-hr hypoxia or 100 μM of zinc alone did not induce noticeable cytotoxicity, their combination led to a dramatic increase in astrocytic cell death in a zinc concentration dependent manner. Exposure of astrocytes to hypoxia for 3-hr remarkably increased the levels of intracellular zinc and HIF-1α protein, which was further augmented by added exogenous zinc. Notably HIF-1α knockdown blocked zinc-induced astrocyte death. Moreover, knockdown of PARP-1, another important protein in the response of hypoxia, attenuated the overexpression of HIF-1α and reduced the cell death rate. Conclusions Our studies show that zinc promotes hypoxic cell death through overexpression of the hypoxia response factor HIF-1α via the cell fate determine factor PARP-1 modification, which provides a novel mechanism for zinc-mediated ischemic brain injury. PMID:23582235

  1. An elevated level of copper zinc superoxide dismutase fails to prevent oxygen induced retinopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Klaeger, C; de Sa, L; Klaeger, A J; Carlson, E J; Good, W V; Epstein, C J

    1996-05-01

    To determine whether a higher level of copper zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) can reduce the severity of oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR) in a mouse model. CuZnSOD transgenic mice with a threefold increase in CuZnSOD activity and control non-transgenic mice were exposed to 90% oxygen for 12 hours a day during the first 5 days of life. After oxygen treatment, all mice were reared in room air for 10 days. Another group of transgenic and non-transgenic mice were kept in room air for 15 days and served as control groups for the oxygen effect. At day 15, all mice were killed and perfused with India ink. The retinas were flat mounted on slides and examined with a light microscope. There was a statistically significant increase in the incidence of OIR in mice exposed to high levels of oxygen, whether or not they were transgenic. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the severity of OIR between oxygen treated transgenic and non-transgenic mice. A threefold higher CuZnSOD activity does not protect against OIR in mice. This is an unexpected finding, since oxygen radicals are considered a major factor causing OIR, and increased CuZnSOD activity has reduced oxygen radical induced damage in several neuronal and non-neuronal systems. The possibility of a damaging role for other radicals not affected by CuZnSOD cannot be excluded.

  2. Nonlinear absorption dynamics using field-induced surface hopping: zinc porphyrin in water.

    PubMed

    Röhr, Merle I S; Petersen, Jens; Wohlgemuth, Matthias; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Mitrić, Roland

    2013-05-10

    We wish to present the application of our field-induced surface-hopping (FISH) method to simulate nonlinear absorption dynamics induced by strong nonresonant laser fields. We provide a systematic comparison of the FISH approach with exact quantum dynamics simulations on a multistate model system and demonstrate that FISH allows for accurate simulations of nonlinear excitation processes including multiphoton electronic transitions. In particular, two different approaches for simulating two-photon transitions are compared. The first approach is essentially exact and involves the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in an extended manifold of excited states, while in the second one only transiently populated nonessential states are replaced by an effective quadratic coupling term, and dynamics is performed in a considerably smaller manifold of states. We illustrate the applicability of our method to complex molecular systems by simulating the linear and nonlinear laser-driven dynamics in zinc (Zn) porphyrin in the gas phase and in water. For this purpose, the FISH approach is connected with the quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical approach (QM/MM) which is generally applicable to large classes of complex systems. Our findings that multiphoton absorption and dynamics increase the population of higher excited states of Zn porphyrin in the nonlinear regime, in particular in solution, provides a means for manipulating excited-state properties, such as transient absorption dynamics and electronic relaxation. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The protective effects of zinc in lead-induced testicular and epididymal toxicity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Anjum, M Reshma; Madhu, P; Reddy, K Pratap; Reddy, P Sreenivasula

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of zinc (Zn) in preventing lead (Pb)-induced reproductive toxicity in Wistar rats. The rats were divided into four groups, namely, control group, Pb group, Zn group, and Pb + Zn group. Animals were exposed to Pb (819 mg of Pb/L) or Zn (71 mg of Zn/L) or both through drinking water for 65 days. Rats exposed to Pb showed decreased weights of testes and accessory sex organs. Significant decrease in the testicular daily sperm production, epididymal sperm count, motility, viability, and number of hypoosmotic tail coiled sperm was observed in Pb-exposed rats. Testicular 3β- and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity levels and circulatory testosterone levels were also decreased significantly in Pb-exposed rats. A significant increase in the lipid peroxidation products with a significant decrease in the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase were observed in the testes and epididymis of Pb-exposed rats. Moreover, the testicular architecture showed lumens devoid of sperm in Pb-exposed rats. Supplementation of Zn mitigated Pb-induced oxidative stress and restored the spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in Pb-exposed rats. In conclusion, cotreatment of Zn is effective for recovering suppressed spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis, elevated oxidative status, and histological damage in the testis of rats treated with Pb.

  4. Peripheral nerve metabolism and zinc levels in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Effect of diets high in fish and corn oil

    SciT

    Burke, J.P.; Fenton, M.R.

    1991-03-15

    This study was designed to assess the effects of diets high in fish and corn oil on peripheral nerve metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. A type I diabetic state was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats by injection of STZ. Animals were divided into three dietary groups; normal rat chow, high corn oil diet and high fish oil diet. After 4 weeks animals were analyzed for nerve conduction velocity, bled and then sacrificed. Sciatic nerves were removed, processed and several biochemical parameters determined. Plasma zinc levels were elevated in the STZ normal chow group compared to non-diabetic controls. Bothmore » corn oil and fish oil diets tended to eliminate the rise in plasma zinc. Differences in subcellular distribution of zinc in sciatic nerves were also observed. Normal chow STZ animals displayed a 20% decrease in nerve conduction velocity compared to control. Dietary supplementation with either fish or corn oil seemed to ameliorate these effects. Biochemical analysis of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase and protein kinase C revealed a decrease in activity in normal chow animals compared to control groups. Again, dietary intervention with either fish or corn oil seemed to return these activities back to normal. The results suggest a link between zinc metabolism and peripheral nerve metabolism which can be modified by dietary intervention.« less

  5. Effect of a zinc L-carnosine compound on acid-induced injury in canine gastric mucosa ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Hill, Tracy L; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2012-05-01

    To examine whether a zinc L-carnosine compound used for treatment of suspected gastric ulcers in dogs ameliorates acid-induced injury in canine gastric mucosa. Gastric mucosa from 6 healthy dogs. Mucosa from the gastric antrum was harvested from 6 unadoptable shelter dogs immediately after euthanasia and mounted on Ussing chambers. The tissues were equilibrated for 30 minutes in neutral Ringer's solution prior to incubation with acidic Ringer's solution (HCl plus Ringer's solution [final pH, 1.5 to 2.5]), acidic Ringer's solution plus zinc L-carnosine compound, or zinc L-carnosine compound alone. Tissues were maintained for 180 minutes in Ussing chambers, during which permeability was assessed by measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance. After the 180-minute treatment period, tissues were removed from Ussing chambers and labeled with immunofluorescent anti-active caspase-3 antibody as an indicator of apoptosis. Permeability of the gastric mucosa was significantly increased in a time-dependent manner by addition of HCl, whereas control tissues maintained viability for the study period. Change in permeability was detected within the first 15 minutes after acid application and progressed over the subsequent 150 minutes. The zinc L-carnosine compound had no significant effect on this increase in permeability. Apoptosis was evident in acid-treated tissues but not in control tissues. The zinc L-carnosine compound did not protect against development of apoptosis. Addition of HCl caused a dose-dependent increase in gastric permeability over time and apparent induction of apoptosis as determined on the basis of immunofluorescence. However, there was no significant protective effect of a zinc L-carnosine compound. Nonetheless, results suggested the utility of this method for further studies of canine gastric injury.

  6. Zinc salt enhances gastroprotective activity of risperidone in indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Oluwole, F S; Onwuchekwa, C

    2016-09-01

    Zinc has been reported to mediate cellular responses to injury by producing cytoprotection via the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Anti-stress medications are generally anti-psychotic drugs and anti- depressants. Some Anti-psychotic drugs such as risperidone have been reported to possess anti-ulcer activity. Risperidone as an antipsychotic drug blocks several neurotransmitter systems including dopaminergic, adrenergic, histaminergic and serotonergic pathways. The study investigated the antiulcer activity of Zinc Chloride (ZnCl(2)) in combination with risperidone in male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into two groups of twenty animals each for ZnCl(2) and risperidone groups. Each group was further divided into four subgroups. ZnCl(2) was administered orally at 20mg/kg, 40mg/kg and 80mg/kg to a subgroup, while 80mg/kg of ZnCl(2) was administered in combination with risperidone (0.1mg/kg, 0.3mg/kg and 0.5mg/kg) orally once daily for 21 days. The controls were treated with distilled water. Ulcer was induced using indomethacin. Histology of the stomach tissues was prepared with PAS and H& E stains. Ulcer score and ulcer area were assessed using standard methods. Data were analysed using student t-test and Graphpad Prism 5. There were decreases in ulcer scores using the different doses of ZnCl, (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg and 80mg/kg). Also using the highest dose ZnCl(2) (80mg/ kg) and different doses of risperidone there were decreases in ulcer scores compared to the control. This effect of the risperidone showed a significant dose- dependent reduction. The effect ZnCl(2), and risperidone were also reflected in the ulcer area and in the histology. These findings suggest that ZnCl(2), enhances the gastroprotective activity ofrisperidone in indomethacin- induced gastric ulcer. However, more detailed studies are necessary to confirm the relevance of this finding and its implications in clinical settings.

  7. Expression of human inducible nitric oxide synthase in a tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B)-deficient cell line: H4B promotes assembly of enzyme subunits into an active dimer.

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, E; Billiar, T R; Robbins, P D; Loftus, M; Stuehr, D J

    1995-01-01

    Murine inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) is catalytically active only in dimeric form. Assembly of its purified subunits into a dimer requires H4B. To understand the structure-activity relationships of human iNOS, we constitutively expressed recombinant human iNOS in NIH 3T3 cells by using a retroviral vector. These cells are deficient in de novo H4B biosynthesis and the role of H4B in the expression and assembly of active iNOS in an intact cell system could be studied. In the absence of added H4B, NO synthesis by the cells was minimal, whereas cells grown with supplemental H4B or the H4B precursor sepiapterin generated NO (74.1 and 63.3 nmol of nitrite per 10(6) cells per 24 h, respectively). NO synthesis correlated with an increase in intracellular H4B but no increase in iNOS protein. Instead, an increased percentage of dimeric iNOS was observed, rising from 20% in cytosols from unsupplemented cells to 66% in H4B-supplemented cell cytosols. In all cases, only dimeric iNOS displayed catalytic activity. Cytosols prepared from H4B-deficient cells exhibited little iNOS activity but acquired activity during a 60- to 120-min incubation with H4B, reaching final activities of 60-72 pmol of citrulline per mg of protein per min. Reconstitution of cytosolic NO synthesis activity was associated with conversion of monomers into dimeric iNOS during the incubation. Thus, human iNOS subunits dimerize to form an active enzyme, and H4B plays a critical role in promoting dimerization in intact cells. This reveals a post-translational mechanism by which intracellular H4B can regulate iNOS expression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8524846

  8. Faster DNA Repair of Ultraviolet-Induced Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers and Lower Sensitivity to Apoptosis in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells than in Epidermal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Justin D.; Bastien, Nathalie; Gendron, Sébastien P.; Rochette, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of UV rays by DNA generates the formation of mutagenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6–4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PP). These damages are the major cause of skin cancer because in turn, they can lead to signature UV mutations. The eye is exposed to UV light, but the cornea is orders of magnitude less prone to UV-induced cancer. In an attempt to shed light on this paradox, we compared cells of the corneal epithelium and the epidermis for UVB-induced DNA damage frequency, repair and cell death sensitivity. We found similar CPD levels but a 4-time faster UVB-induced CPD, but not 6-4PP, repair and lower UV-induced apoptosis sensitivity in corneal epithelial cells than epidermal. We then investigated levels of DDB2, a UV-induced DNA damage recognition protein mostly impacting CPD repair, XPC, essential for the repair of both CPD and 6-4PP and p53 a protein upstream of the genotoxic stress response. We found more DDB2, XPC and p53 in corneal epithelial cells than in epidermal cells. According to our results analyzing the protein stability of DDB2 and XPC, the higher level of DDB2 and XPC in corneal epithelial cells is most likely due to an increased stability of the protein. Taken together, our results show that corneal epithelial cells have a better efficiency to repair UV-induced mutagenic CPD. On the other hand, they are less prone to UV-induced apoptosis, which could be related to the fact that since the repair is more efficient in the HCEC, the need to eliminate highly damaged cells by apoptosis is reduced. PMID:27611318

  9. Stilbene Induced Inhibition of Androgen Receptor Dimerization: Implications for AR and ARΔLBD-Signalling in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, Wolfgang; Luedeke, Manuel; Azoitei, Anca; Zengerling, Friedemann; Herweg, Alexander; Genze, Felicitas; Schrader, Mark G.; Schrader, Andres J.; Cronauer, Marcus V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is often characterized by an increase of C-terminally truncated, constitutively active androgen receptor (AR) variants. Due to the absence of a ligand binding domain located in the AR-C-terminus, these receptor variants (also termed ARΔLBD) are unable to respond to all classical forms of endocrine treatments like surgical/chemical castration and/or application of anti-androgens. Methodology In this study we tested the effects of the naturally occurring stilbene resveratrol (RSV) and (E)-4-(2, 6-Difluorostyryl)-N, N-dimethylaniline, a fluorinated dialkylaminostilbene (FIDAS) on AR- and ARΔLBD in prostate cancer cells. The ability of the compounds to modulate transcriptional activity of AR and the ARΔLBD-variant Q640X was shown by reporter gene assays. Expression of endogenous AR and ARΔLBD mRNA and protein levels were determined by qRT-PCR and Western Blot. Nuclear translocation of AR-molecules was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. AR and ARΔLBD/Q640X homo-/heterodimer formation was assessed by mammalian two hybrid assays. Biological activity of both compounds in vivo was demonstrated using a chick chorioallantoic membrane xenograft assay. Results The stilbenes RSV and FIDAS were able to significantly diminish AR and Q640X-signalling. Successful inhibition of the Q640X suggests that RSV and FIDAS are not interfering with the AR-ligand binding domain like all currently available anti-hormonal drugs. Repression of AR and Q640X-signalling by RSV and FIDAS in prostate cancer cells was caused by an inhibition of the AR and/or Q640X-dimerization. Although systemic bioavailability of both stilbenes is very low, both compounds were also able to downregulate tumor growth and AR-signalling in vivo. Conclusion RSV and FIDAS are able to inhibit the dimerization of AR and ARΔLBD molecules suggesting that stilbenes might serve as lead compounds for a novel generation of AR-inhibitors. PMID:24887556

  10. Generation and genetic engineering of human induced pluripotent stem cells using designed zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Sivaprakash; London, Viktoriya; Kandavelou, Karthikeyan; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Guggino, William; Civin, Curt; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan

    2013-02-15

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have become powerful tools to deliver a targeted double-strand break at a pre-determined chromosomal locus in order to insert an exogenous transgene by homology-directed repair. ZFN-mediated gene targeting was used to generate both single-allele chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5)-modified human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and biallele CCR5-modified hiPSCs from human lung fibroblasts (IMR90 cells) and human primary cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMNCs) by site-specific insertion of stem cell transcription factor genes flanked by LoxP sites into the endogenous CCR5 locus. The Oct4 and Sox2 reprogramming factors, in combination with valproic acid, induced reprogramming of human lung fibroblasts to form CCR5-modified hiPSCs, while 5 factors, Oct4/Sox2/Klf4/Lin28/Nanog, induced reprogramming of CBMNCs. Subsequent Cre recombinase treatment of the CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs resulted in the removal of the Oct4 and Sox2 transgenes. Further genetic engineering of the single-allele CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs was achieved by site-specific addition of the large CFTR transcription unit to the remaining CCR5 wild-type allele, using CCR5-specific ZFNs and a donor construct containing tdTomato and CFTR transgenes flanked by CCR5 homology arms. CFTR was expressed efficiently from the endogenous CCR5 locus of the CCR5-modified tdTomato/CFTR hiPSCs. These results suggest that it might be feasible to use ZFN-evoked strategies to (1) generate precisely targeted genetically well-defined patient-specific hiPSCs, and (2) then to reshape their function by targeted addition and expression of therapeutic genes from the CCR5 chromosomal locus for autologous cell-based transgene-correction therapy to treat various recessive monogenic human diseases in the future.

  11. Calcium, zinc and vitamin E ameliorate cadmium-induced renal oxidative damage in albino Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Adi, Pradeepkiran Jangampalli; Burra, Siva Prasad; Vataparti, Amardev Rajesh; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the protective effects of supplementation with calcium + zinc (Ca + Zn) or vitamin E (Vit-E) on Cd-induced renal oxidative damage. Young albino Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g) (n = 6) control rats, Cd, Cd + Ca + Zn, and Cd + Vit-E experimental groups and the experimental period was 30 days. Rats were exposed to Cd (20 mg/kg body weight) alone treated as Cd treated group and the absence or presence of Ca + Zn (2 mg/kg each) or Vit-E (20 mg/kg body weight) supplementation treated as two separate groups. The activities of the stress marker enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidase (LPx) were determined in renal mitochondrial fractions of experimental rats. We observed quantitative changes in SOD isoenzymatic patterns by non-denaturing PAGE analysis, and quantified band densities. These results showed that Cd exposure leads to decreases in SOD, CAT, GR, and GPx activities and a concomitant increase in LPx and GST activities. Ca + Zn and Vit-E administration with Cd significantly reversed Cd-induced perturbations in oxidative stress marker enzymes. However, Vit-E showed more inhibitory activity against Cd than did Ca + Zn, and it protected against Cd-induced nephrotoxicity.

  12. HEPARIN-BINDING EGF CLEAVAGE MEDIATES ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that exposure to zinc ions can activate epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signaling in murine fibroblasts and A431 cells through a mechanism involving Src kinase. While studying the effects of zinc ions in normal human bronchial epithelial cel...

  13. Mitochondrial inhibitor models of Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease induce zinc accumulation and are attenuated by inhibition of zinc neurotoxicity in vitro or in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sheline, Christian T; Zhu, Julia; Zhang, Wendy; Shi, Chunxiao; Cai, Ai-Li

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of mitochondrial function occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases, and inhibitors of mitochondrial complexes I and II are used to model them. The complex II inhibitor, 3-nitroproprionic acid (3-NPA), kills the striatal neurons susceptible in Huntington's disease. The complex I inhibitor N-methyl-4-phenylpyridium (MPP(+)) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) are used to model Parkinson's disease. Zinc (Zn(2+)) accumulates after 3-NPA, 6-OHDA and MPP(+) in situ or in vivo. We will investigate the role of Zn(2+) neurotoxicity in 3-NPA, 6-OHDA and MPP(+). Murine striatal/midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase positive, or near-pure cortical neuronal cultures, or animals were exposed to 3-NPA or MPP(+) and 6-OHDA with or without neuroprotective compounds. Intracellular zinc ([Zn(2+)](i)), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), NADH, glycolytic intermediates and neurotoxicity were measured. We showed that compounds or genetics which restore NAD(+) and attenuate Zn(2+) neurotoxicity (pyruvate, nicotinamide, NAD(+), increased NAD(+) synthesis, sirtuin inhibition or Zn(2+) chelation) attenuated the neuronal death induced by these toxins. The increase in [Zn(2+)](i) preceded a reduction in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio that caused a reversible glycolytic inhibition. Pyruvate, nicotinamide and NAD(+) reversed the reductions in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, glycolysis and neuronal death after challenge with 3-NPA, 6-OHDA or MPP(+), as was previously shown for exogenous Zn(2+). To test efficacy in vivo, we injected 3-NPA into the striatum of rats and systemically into mice, with or without pyruvate. We observed early striatal Zn(2+) fluorescence, and pyruvate significantly attenuated the 3-NPA-induced lesion and restored behavioral scores. Together, these studies suggest that Zn(2+) accumulation caused by MPP(+) and 3-NPA is a novel preventable mechanism of the resultant neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Spontaneous polarization induced electric field in zinc oxide nanowires and nanostars

    SciT

    Farid, S., E-mail: sfarid3@uic.edu; Choi, M.; Datta, D.

    We report on the detection mechanism of spontaneous polarization using electrostatic force microscopy in zinc oxide nanowires and nanostars grown by vapor-liquid-solid technique. Optical and structural properties are investigated in detail to understand the complex ZnO nanostructures comprehensively. Calculations are carried out to estimate the electric field from the change in interleave amplitude induced by the electrostatic force due to the spontaneous polarization effects. Attraction of the probe between the tip and the sample varies for different structures with a stronger attraction for nanostars as compared to nanowires. Strength of electric field is dependent on the orientation of nanowires andmore » nanostars c-axis with measured magnitude of electric field to be ∼10{sup 7 }V/m and 10{sup 8 }V/m respectively. This technique presents a unique detection mechanism of built-in spontaneous polarization and electric field from polar ZnO nanowires with applications in voltage gated ion channels, nano-bio interfaces, optoelectronic and photonic devices.« less

  15. Localized normalization for improved calibration curves of manganese and zinc in laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, Nursalwanie Mohd; Haider, Zuhaib; Tufail, Kashif; Imran, Muhammad; Ali, Jalil

    2017-03-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy is performed to determine the elemental compositions of manganese and zinc in potassium bromide (KBr) matrix. This work has utilized Q-switched Nd:YAG laser installed in LIBS2500plus system at fundamental wavelength. The pelletized sample were ablated in air with maximum laser energy of 650 mJ for different gate delays ranging from 0-18 µs. The spectra of samples are obtained for five different compositions containing preferred spectral lines. The intensity of spectral line is observed at its maximum at a gate-delay 0.83 µs and subsequently decayed exponentially with the increasing of gate delay. Maximum signal-to-background ratio of Mn and Zn were found at gate delays of 7.92 and 7.50 µs, respectively. Initial calibration curves show bad data fitting, whereas the locally normalized intensity for both spectral lines shows enhancement since it is more linearly regressed. This study will give a better understanding in studying the plasma emission and the spectra analysis. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 24 May 2017.

  16. Disorder induced semiconductor to metal transition and modifications of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline zinc oxide thin film

    SciT

    Singh, Fouran; Kumar, Vinod; Chaudhary, Babloo

    2012-10-01

    This paper report on the disorder induced semiconductor to metal transition (SMT) and modifications of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline zinc oxide thin film. Disorder is induced using energetic ion irradiation. It eliminates the possibility of impurities induced transition. However, it is revealed that some critical concentration of defects is needed for inducing such kind of SMT at certain critical temperature. Above room temperature, the current-voltage characteristics in reverse bias attributes some interesting phenomenon, such as electric field induced charge transfer, charge trapping, and diffusion of defects. The transition is explained by the defects induced disorder and strain in ZnO crystallitesmore » created by high density of electronic excitations.« less

  17. Protective effect of zinc on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and testosterone-induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in the dorsolateral prostate of Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Banudevi, Sivanantham; Elumalai, Perumal; Sharmila, Govindaraj; Arunkumar, Ramachandran; Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Arunakaran, Jagadeesan

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that zinc exerts anticarcinogenic and antiproliferative effects against prostate cancer both in vitro and in rat ventral prostate. Zinc accumulation diminishes early in the course of prostate malignancy and it inhibits the growth of several carcinoma cells through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In this study, we have investigated the influence of zinc on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and testosterone (T)-induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in the dorsolateral prostate of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The results indicate that zinc plays an important role in prostate carcinogenesis. Increased tumor incidence was accompanied by a decrease in prostatic acid phosphatase activity, citrate, zinc, glutathione-S-transferase, reduced glutathione, p53, B-cell lymphoma protein (Bcl-2)-associated X protein and caspase-3 levels in MNU + T-treated rats. On the contrary, significantly increased phase I drug metabolizing enzyme activities, lipid peroxide, hydrogen peroxide, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L) protein levels were observed in the dorsolateral prostate of MNU + T-treated rats. Simultaneous zinc supplementation significantly reversed these effects in MNU + T-treated rats. Signs of dysplasia, a characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, were evident in the dorsolateral prostatic tissue sections by MNU + T administration. However, zinc supplementation has reversed these effects in the dorsolateral prostatic histoarchitecture. These results suggest that zinc may act as an essential trace element against MNU and testosterone-induced prostatic preneoplastic progression in SD rats.

  18. The downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is associated with zinc deficiency-induced proliferative deficit of C17.2 neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianya; Han, Jingling; Jiang, Junkang; Shi, Shangshi; Ma, Xia; Liu, Xinhang; Wang, Cheng; Nie, Xiaoke; He, Yunhua; Jiang, Shengyang; Wan, Chunhua

    2015-07-30

    Zinc is an essential nutrient that is important for normal brain development. Zinc deficiency has been linked to aberrant neurological development and functioning. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Zinc deficiency-induced neurological disorders remain largely elusive. In the present study, we showed that the proliferation of C17.2 neural stem cells (NSCs) was evidently impaired after exposed to low levels of Zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethy) ethylenediamine (TPEN). In addition, we found that TPEN-induced proliferative deficit of NSCs was related with significant downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Zinc deficiency impaired the proliferation of neural stem cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. Western blot revealed that the levels of p-Ser9-glycogensynthase kinase-3β (p-GSK-3β) and β-catenin were remarkably downregulated during TPEN-induced C17.2 proliferative impairment. Moreover, immunofluorescent analysis indicated that the level of nuclear β-catenin was apparently decreased following TPEN exposure. Furthermore, application with GSK-3β inhibitor lithium chloride (LiCl) reversed TPEN-induced downregulation of β-catenin and impairment of cell proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis also showed that TPEN-induced impairment of NSC proliferation could be reversed by LiCl. Taken together, these findings suggested that the disturbance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway partially accounted for Zinc deficiency-induced proliferative impairment of NSCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer translocations in human cells induced by zinc finger and TALE nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Piganeau, Marion; Ghezraoui, Hind; De Cian, Anne; Guittat, Lionel; Tomishima, Mark; Perrouault, Loic; René, Oliver; Katibah, George E.; Zhang, Lei; Holmes, Michael C.; Doyon, Yannick; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Giovannangeli, Carine; Jasin, Maria; Brunet, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are signatures of numerous cancers and lead to expression of fusion genes that act as oncogenes. The wealth of genomic aberrations found in cancer, however, makes it challenging to assign a specific phenotypic change to a specific aberration. In this study, we set out to use genome editing with zinc finger (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector (TALEN) nucleases to engineer, de novo, translocation-associated oncogenes at cognate endogenous loci in human cells. Using ZFNs and TALENs designed to cut precisely at relevant translocation breakpoints, we induced cancer-relevant t(11;22)(q24;q12) and t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocations found in Ewing sarcoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), respectively. We recovered both translocations with high efficiency, resulting in the expression of the EWSR1–FLI1 and NPM1–ALK fusions. Breakpoint junctions recovered after ZFN cleavage in human embryonic stem (ES) cell–derived mesenchymal precursor cells fully recapitulated the genomic characteristics found in tumor cells from Ewing sarcoma patients. This approach with tailored nucleases demonstrates that expression of fusion genes found in cancer cells can be induced from the native promoter, allowing interrogation of both the underlying mechanisms and oncogenic consequences of tumor-related translocations in human cells. With an analogous strategy, the ALCL translocation was reverted in a patient cell line to restore the integrity of the two participating chromosomes, further expanding the repertoire of genomic rearrangements that can be engineered by tailored nucleases. PMID:23568838

  20. Zinc supplementation alleviates the progression of diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting the overexpression of oxidative-stress-mediated molecular markers in streptozotocin-induced experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Barman, Susmita; Pradeep, Seetur R; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2018-04-01

    Zinc deficiency during diabetes projects a role for zinc nutrition in the management of diabetic nephropathy. The current study explored whether zinc supplementation protects against diabetic nephropathy through modulation of kidney oxidative stress and stress-induced expression related to the inflammatory process in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Groups of hyperglycemic rats were exposed to dietary interventions for 6 weeks with zinc supplementation (5 times and 10 times the normal level). Supplemental-zinc-fed diabetic groups showed a significant reversal of increased kidney weight and creatinine clearance. There was a significant reduction in hyperlipidemic condition along with improved PUFA:SFA ratio in the renal tissue. Expression of the lipid oxidative marker and expression of inflammatory markers, cytokines, fibrosis factors and apoptotic regulatory proteins observed in diabetic kidney were beneficially modulated by zinc supplementation, the ameliorative effect being concomitant with elevated antiapoptosis. There was a significant reduction in advanced glycation, expression of the receptor of the glycated products and oxidative stress markers. Zinc supplementation countered the higher activity and expression of polyol pathway enzymes in the kidney. Overexpression of the glucose transporters, as an adaptation to the increased need for glucose transport in diabetic condition, was minimized by zinc treatment. The pathological abnormalities in the renal architecture of diabetic animals were corrected by zinc intervention. Thus, dietary zinc supplementation has a significant beneficial effect in the control of diabetic nephropathy. This was exerted through a protective influence on oxidative-stress-induced cytokines, inflammatory proliferation and consequent renal injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Zinc Chloride and Lead Acetate-Induced Passive Avoidance Memory Retention Deficits Reversed by Nicotine and Bucladesine in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Yazdani, Abdolmajid; Baheri, Behnam; Payandemehr, Borna; Sanati, Mehdi; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Miri, Abdolhossein; Zandkarimi, Majid; Belaran, Maryam; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    It is very important to investigate the neurotoxic effects of metals on learning and memory processes. In this study, we tried to investigate the effects and time course properties of oral administration of zinc chloride (25, 50, and 75 mg/kg, for 2 weeks), lead acetate (250, 750, 1,500, and 2,500 ppm for 4, 6 and 8 weeks), and their possible mechanisms on a model of memory function. For this matter, we examined the intra-peritoneal injections of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mg/kg) and bucladesine (50, 100, 300, and 600 nM/mouse) for 4 days alone and in combination with mentioned metals in the step-through passive avoidance task. Control animals received saline, drinking water, saline, and DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide)/deionized water (1:9), respectively. At the end of each part of studies, animals were trained for 1 day in step-through task. The avoidance memory retention alterations were evaluated 24 and 48 h later in singular and combinational studies. Zinc chloride (75 mg/kg) oral gavage for 2 weeks decreased latency times compared to control animals. Also, lead acetate (750 ppm oral administrations for 8 weeks) caused significant lead blood levels and induced avoidance memory retention impairments. Four-days intra-peritoneal injection of nicotine (1 mg/kg) increased latency time compared to control animals. Finally, findings of this research showed that treatment with intra-peritoneal injections of nicotine (1 mg/kg) and/or bucladesine (600 nM/mouse) reversed zinc chloride- and lead acetate-induced avoidance memory retention impairments. Taken together, these results showed the probable role of cholinergic system and protein kinase A pathways in zinc chloride- and lead acetate-induced avoidance memory alterations.

  2. Zinc rescues obesity-induced cardiac hypertrophy via stimulating metallothionein to suppress oxidative stress-activated BCL10/CARD9/p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shudong; Gu, Junlian; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiguo; Bai, Tao; Xu, Jianxiang; Cai, Jun; Barnes, Gregory; Liu, Qiu-Ju; Freedman, Jonathan H; Wang, Yonggang; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2017-06-01

    Obesity often leads to obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy (ORCH), which is suppressed by zinc-induced inactivation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which zinc inactivates p38 MAPK to prevent ORCH. Mice (4-week old) were fed either high fat diet (HFD, 60% kcal fat) or normal diet (ND, 10% kcal fat) containing variable amounts of zinc (deficiency, normal and supplement) for 3 and 6 months. P38 MAPK siRNA and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 were used to suppress p38 MAPK activity in vitro and in vivo, respectively. HFD activated p38 MAPK and increased expression of B-cell lymphoma/CLL 10 (BCL10) and caspase recruitment domain family member 9 (CARD9). These responses were enhanced by zinc deficiency and attenuated by zinc supplement. Administration of SB203580 to HFD mice or specific siRNA in palmitate-treated cardiomyocytes eliminated the HFD and zinc deficiency activation of p38 MAPK, but did not significantly impact the expression of BCL10 and CARD9. In cultured cardiomyocytes, inhibition of BCL10 expression by siRNA prevented palmitate-induced increased p38 MAPK activation and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression. In contrast, inhibition of p38 MAPK prevented ANP expression, but did not affect BCL10 expression. Deletion of metallothionein abolished the protective effect of zinc on palmitate-induced up-regulation of BCL10 and phospho-p38 MAPK. HFD and zinc deficiency synergistically induce ORCH by increasing oxidative stress-mediated activation of BCL10/CARD9/p38 MAPK signalling. Zinc supplement ameliorates ORCH through activation of metallothionein to repress oxidative stress-activated BCL10 expression and p38 MAPK activation. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  3. Actinomycin D Inhibition of the Zinc-induced Formation of Cytochrome c in Ustilago1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. H.; Cappellini, R. A.; Price, C. A.

    1966-01-01

    As reported earlier by Grimm & Allen, the addition of zinc to the sporidia of the smut fungus, Ustilago sphaerogena, evokes the formation of large amounts of cytochrome c. This occurs under conditions where the rates of increase of dry weight, RNA, and DNA remain unaffected. Actinomycin D added with zinc specifically abolishes the formation of cytochrome c. The system behaves as if cytochrome c were formed de novo. PMID:5956845

  4. Preservation of nitric oxide-induced relaxation of porcine coronary artery: roles of the dimers of soluble guanylyl cyclase, phosphodiesterase type 5, and cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Chen, Zhengju; Ye, Liping; Liu, Huixia; Dou, Dou; Liu, Limei; Yu, Xiaoxing; Gao, Yuansheng

    2014-10-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) are all dimeric. The present study was to determine the role of their dimeric status in nitric oxide-induced vasodilatation. In isolated porcine coronary arteries, after 20 h incubation with serum-free medium, serum-containing medium, or phosphate-buffered saline solution, the protein levels of the dimers of sGC, PDE5, and PKG were diminished while the monomer levels remained unchanged, associated with reduced cGMP elevation in response to DETA NONOate and decreased PDE5 activity; the activity of PKG was not significantly altered. DETA NONOate caused a greater relaxation in arteries incubated for 20 vs. 2 h. The relaxant response was largely abolished by 1H-[1, 2, 4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, an sGC inhibitor. Zaprinast, a PDE5 inhibitor, had no effect on relaxation caused by DETA NONOate of arteries incubated for 20 h but augmented the response incubated for 2 h. A greater relaxation to 8-bromo-guanosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate occurred in arteries incubated for 20 than for 2 h. The protein level of the dimers but not monomers of PDE5 was reduced by dithiothreitol and unaffected by hydrogen peroxide, accompanied with decreased PDE5 activity and reduced response to DETA NONOate. These results demonstrate that the dimeric but not monomeric status of sGC and PDE5 of coronary arteries are closely related to their activities. The preserved vasodilator response after 20 h incubation may result in part from a synchronous reduction of the dimer levels of sGC and PDE5 as well as an augmented response to cGMP.

  5. Simultaneous determination of thorium, niobium, lead, and zinc by photon-induced x-ray fluorescence of lateritic material

    SciT

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Adames, D.; Parker, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    A rapid method is presented for the simultaneous determinations of thorium, niobium, lead, and zinc in lateritic material from Cerro Impacto, Estado Bolivar, Venezuela. This technique uses a PDP - 11/05 processor - based photon induced x-ray fluorescence system. The total variations of approximately 5% for concentrations of approximately 1 and 10% for concentrations of approximately 0.1% were obtained with only 500 s of fluorescent time. The values obtained by this method were in agreement with values measured by conventional flame atomic absorption spectroscopy for lead and zinc. The values for thorium measured were in agreement with the reported valuesmore » for the reference materials supplied by NBL.« less

  6. Photochemical dimerization of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.; Muedas, Cesar A.; Ferguson, Richard R.

    1992-01-01

    At least one of selectivity and reaction rate of photosensitized vapor phase dimerizations, including dehydrodimerizations, hydrodimerizations and cross-dimerizations of saturated and unsaturated organic compounds is improved by conducting the dimerization in the presence of hydrogen or nitrous oxide.

  7. The lack of effects of zinc and nitric oxide in initial state of pilocarpine-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Noyan, Behzat; Jensen, Morten Skovgaard; Danscher, Gorm

    2007-07-01

    In this study we investigated whether intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of L-NAME (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) or CaEDTA (an extracellular zinc chelator) or the combination of the two could affect the initial phase of pilocarpine induced (2 h) seizures. Two groups of rats were used. Animals from both groups were given with i.c.v. injections of either saline (10 microl), L-NAME (150 microg/10 microl), CaEDTA (100 mM/10 microl) or L-NAME and CaEDTA. One group received pilocarpine HCl (380 mg/kg i.p.) the other served as control. Pilocarpine HCl was injected intraperitoneally 10 min later. The behavior of the animals was observed for 2h and the intensity of their seizures was scored. The rats were then sacrificed and their brains were removed and analyzed for zinc ions by using the immersion autometallography and the TSQ fluorescence staining. All the animals which received pilocarpine HCl developed seizures. Despite treatment with L-NAME and/or CaEDTA we found that the latency and the intensity of seizures were similar in both groups investigated. The distribution of stainable zinc ions and the intensity of staining in hippocampus were not affected by pilocarpine and found unchanged after L-NAME and/or CaEDTA injections in both the control animals and the pilocarpine treated animals. The data suggest that the nitric oxide system and zinc ions do not affect pilocarpine-induced seizures in their initial state.

  8. Marginal dietary zinc deprivation augments sepsis-induced alterations in skeletal muscle TNF-α but not protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Kristen T; Kelleher, Shannon L; Soybel, David I; Lang, Charles H

    2016-11-01

    Severe zinc deficiency is associated with an increased systemic inflammatory response and mortality after sepsis. However, the impact of mild zinc deficiency, which is more common in populations with chronic illnesses and sepsis, is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that marginal dietary Zn deprivation (ZM) would amplify tissue inflammation and exacerbate the sepsis-induced decrease in muscle protein synthesis. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were fed a zinc-adequate (ZA) or ZM diet (30 or 10 mg Zn/kg, respectively) over 4 weeks, peritonitis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and mice were examined at either 24 h (acute) or 5 days (chronic) post-CLP Acute sepsis decreased the in vivo rate of skeletal muscle protein synthesis and the phosphorylation of the mTOR substrate 4E-BP1. Acutely, sepsis increased TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA in muscle, and the increase in TNF-α was significantly greater in ZM mice. However, muscle protein synthesis and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation returned to baseline 5 days post-CLP in both ZA and ZM mice. Protein degradation via markers of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway was increased in acute sepsis, yet only MuRF1 mRNA was increased in chronic sepsis and ZM amplified this elevation. Our data suggest that mild zinc deficiency increases TNF-α in muscle acutely after sepsis but does not significantly modulate the rate of muscle protein synthesis. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  9. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce apoptosis and autophagy in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ding-Ping; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Zhang, Guo-Liang; Huang, Yi-Fan; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are frequently used in industrial products such as paint, surface coating, and cosmetics, and recently, they have been explored in biologic and biomedical applications. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ZnO NPs on cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and autophagy in human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3). ZnO NPs with a crystalline size of 20 nm were characterized with various analytical techniques, including ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and autophagy were examined using a series of cellular assays. Exposure of cells to ZnO NPs resulted in a dose-dependent loss of cell viability, and the characteristic apoptotic features such as rounding and loss of adherence, enhanced reactive oxygen species generation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed in the ZnO NP-treated cells. Furthermore, the cells treated with ZnO NPs showed significant double-strand DNA breaks, which are gained evidences from significant number of γ-H 2 AX and Rad51 expressed cells. ZnO NP-treated cells showed upregulation of p53 and LC3, indicating that ZnO NPs are able to upregulate apoptosis and autophagy. Finally, the Western blot analysis revealed upregulation of Bax, caspase-9, Rad51, γ-H 2 AX, p53, and LC3 and downregulation of Bcl-2. The study findings demonstrated that the ZnO NPs are able to induce significant cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and autophagy in human ovarian cells through reactive oxygen species generation and oxidative stress. Therefore, this study suggests that ZnO NPs are suitable and inherent anticancer agents due to their several favorable characteristic features including favorable band gap, electrostatic charge, surface chemistry, and potentiation of redox cycling cascades.

  10. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce apoptosis and autophagy in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Liang; Huang, Yi-Fan; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-01-01

    Background Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are frequently used in industrial products such as paint, surface coating, and cosmetics, and recently, they have been explored in biologic and biomedical applications. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ZnO NPs on cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and autophagy in human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3). Methods ZnO NPs with a crystalline size of 20 nm were characterized with various analytical techniques, including ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and autophagy were examined using a series of cellular assays. Results Exposure of cells to ZnO NPs resulted in a dose-dependent loss of cell viability, and the characteristic apoptotic features such as rounding and loss of adherence, enhanced reactive oxygen species generation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed in the ZnO NP-treated cells. Furthermore, the cells treated with ZnO NPs showed significant double-strand DNA breaks, which are gained evidences from significant number of γ-H2AX and Rad51 expressed cells. ZnO NP-treated cells showed upregulation of p53 and LC3, indicating that ZnO NPs are able to upregulate apoptosis and autophagy. Finally, the Western blot analysis revealed upregulation of Bax, caspase-9, Rad51, γ-H2AX, p53, and LC3 and downregulation of Bcl-2. Conclusion The study findings demonstrated that the ZnO NPs are able to induce significant cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and autophagy in human ovarian cells through reactive oxygen species generation and oxidative stress. Therefore, this study suggests that ZnO NPs are suitable and inherent anticancer agents due to their several favorable characteristic features including favorable band gap, electrostatic charge, surface chemistry, and potentiation of redox cycling cascades. PMID:28919752

  11. Zinc, a neuroprotective agent against aluminum-induced oxidative DNA injury.

    PubMed

    Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2013-08-01

    Aluminum (Al) has been considered as one of the most abundant elements and comprises nearly 8 % of the Earth's crust. Despite of its immense presence, studies regarding the molecular basis of its interaction with the physiological system are rather sparse. On the other hand, zinc (Zn), an essential micronutrient, has been regarded as the second most important metal for brain functioning. The objective of the present study was to investigate the protective potential of Zn, if any, during Al-induced detrimental effects on DNA, tritiated thymidine uptake as well as expression of stress marker genes and proteins in rat brain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 140-160 g were divided into four different groups viz.: normal control, Al treated (100 mg/kg b wt/day via oral gavage), Zn treated (227 mg/l in drinking water), and combined Al and Zn treated. All the treatments were carried out for a total duration of 8 weeks. Agarose gel electrophoresis revealed DNA laddering pattern and comets in the rat brain following Al treatment, which however, were attenuated upon Zn treatment. Further, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells, number of apoptotic brain cells, and uptake of tritiated thymidine were increased after Al treatment but were decreased upon Zn supplementation. Western blot and mRNA expressions of p53 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) were also found to be significantly elevated after Al treatment, which however, were reversed following Zn treatment. Hence, Zn shall prove to be an effective agent in mitigating the detrimental effects caused by Al in the rat brain.

  12. Singlet fission in pentacene dimers

    PubMed Central

    Zirzlmeier, Johannes; Lehnherr, Dan; Coto, Pedro B.; Chernick, Erin T.; Casillas, Rubén; Basel, Bettina S.; Thoss, Michael; Tykwinski, Rik R.; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Singlet fission (SF) has the potential to supersede the traditional solar energy conversion scheme by means of boosting the photon-to-current conversion efficiencies beyond the 30% Shockley–Queisser limit. Here, we show unambiguous and compelling evidence for unprecedented intramolecular SF within regioisomeric pentacene dimers in room-temperature solutions, with observed triplet quantum yields reaching as high as 156 ± 5%. Whereas previous studies have shown that the collision of a photoexcited chromophore with a ground-state chromophore can give rise to SF, here we demonstrate that the proximity and sufficient coupling through bond or space in pentacene dimers is enough to induce intramolecular SF where two triplets are generated on one molecule. PMID:25858954

  13. Resolution of concerted versus sequential mechanisms in photo-induced double-proton transfer reaction in 7-azaindole H-bonded dimer

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Javier; del Valle, Juan Carlos; Kasha, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical bases for a synchronous or concerted double-proton transfer in centro-symmetric H-bonded electronically excited molecular dimers are presented. The prototype model is the 7-azaindole dimer. New research offers confirmation of a concerted mechanism for excited-state biprotonic transfer. Recent femtosecond photoionization and coulombic explosion techniques have given rise to time-of-flight MS observations suggesting sequential two-step biprotonic transfer for the same dimer. We interpret the overall species observed in the time-of-flight experiments as explicable without conflict with the concerted mechanism of proton transfer. PMID:10411876

  14. A Zinc Morpholine Complex Prevents HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcers in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Suzy M.; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; AlRashdi, Ahmed S.; Khalifa, Shaden A. M.; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Ali, Hapipah M.; El-Seedi, Hesham R.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is a naturally occurring element with roles in wound healing and rescuing tissue integrity, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, where it can be detected in the mucosal and submucosal layers. Zinc chelates are known to have beneficial effects on the gastrointestinal mucosa and in cases of gastric ulcer. We synthesized complexes of zinc featuring a heterocyclic amine binding amino acids then investigated their ability to enhance the gastric self-repair. Zinc-morpholine complex, Zn(L)SCN, namely showed strong free-radical scavenging, promotion of the DNA and RNA polymerases reconstruction and suppression of cell damage. The complex’s mode of action is proposed to involve hydrogen bond formation via its bis(thiocyanato-k)zinc moiety. Zn(L)SCN complex had potent effects on gastric enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo. The complex disrupted the ulcerative process as demonstrated by changes in the intermediate metabolites of the oxidative pathway – specifically, reduction in the MDA levels and elevation of reduced glutathione together with an attenuation of oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, Zn(L)SCN restored the gastric mucosa, inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF and the caspases), and preserved the gastric mucous balance. Zn(L)SCN thus exhibited anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities, all of which have cytoprotective effects on the gastric lining. PMID:27460157

  15. Localized frustration and binding-induced conformational change in recognition of 5S RNA by TFIIIA zinc finger.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng; Li, Wenfei; Wang, Wei

    2013-12-19

    Protein TFIIIA is composed of nine tandemly arranged Cys2His2 zinc fingers. It can bind either to the 5S RNA gene as a transcription factor or to the 5S RNA transcript as a chaperone. Although structural and biochemical data provided valuable information on the recognition between the TFIIIIA and the 5S DNA/RNA, the involved conformational motions and energetic factors contributing to the binding affinity and specificity remain unclear. In this work, we conducted MD simulations and MM/GBSA calculations to investigate the binding-induced conformational changes in the recognition of the 5S RNA by the central three zinc fingers of TFIIIA and the energetic factors that influence the binding affinity and specificity at an atomistic level. Our results revealed drastic interdomain conformational changes between these three zinc fingers, involving the exposure/burial of several crucial DNA/RNA binding residues, which can be related to the competition between DNA and RNA for the binding of TFIIIA. We also showed that the specific recognition between finger 4/finger 6 and the 5S RNA introduces frustrations to the nonspecific interactions between finger 5 and the 5S RNA, which may be important to achieve optimal binding affinity and specificity.

  16. Effect of zinc supplementation on lipid peroxidation and lactate levels in rats with diabetes induced by streptozotocin and subjected to acute swimming exercise.

    PubMed

    Bicer, M; Gunay, M; Baltaci, A K; Uney, K; Mogulkoc, R; Akil, M

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to explore the effect of zinc supplementation on lipid peroxidation and lactate levels in rats having diabetes induced by streptozotocin and subjected to acute swimming exercise. A total of 80 adult male rats of Sprague-Dawley type were equally allocated to 8 groups: Group 1, general control. Group 2, zinc-supplemented group. Group 3, zinc-supplemented, diabetic group. Group 4, swimming control group. Group 5, zinc-supplemented swimming group. Group 6, zinc-supplemented diabetic swimming group. Group 7, diabetic swimming group. Group 8, diabetic group. At the end of the 4-week study, blood samples were collected to determine MDA, GSH, GPx, SOD, lactate and zinc levels. The highest MDA values were found in group 7 and 8 (p<0.001). GSH values in groups 5 and 6 were higher (p<0.001). The highest GPx values were established in groups 2, 5 and 6 (p<0.001). SOD values were the highest in groups 5 and 6 (p<0.001) and lowest in groups 2, 3 and 8 (p<0.001). The highest plasma lactate levels were found in group 7 (p<0.001). The highest zinc levels were obtained in groups 1, 2 and 5 (p<0.001), and the lowest zinc levels were found in groups 7 and 8 (p<0.001). Results of the study reveal that zinc supplementation prevents the increase of free radical formation, suppression of antioxidant activity and muscle exhaustion, all of which result from diabetes and acute exercise. Zinc supplementation may contribute to health performance in diabetes and acute exercise (Tab. 2, Fig. 1 Ref. 47). Full Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  17. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciT

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage.more » Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.« less

  18. Formula for the Transition Probability Induced by Long-range Potential Terms Varying as R-8 and R-10 for Atom-dimer Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, N. F.; Robson, D.; Grant, M. A.

    1990-12-01

    An explicit formula is derived for the transition probability between two different states of the atom-dimer collisional system governed by second-order long-range interaction potential terms varying as R-8 and R-10.

  19. Involvement of the cytokine-IDO1-AhR loop in zinc oxide nanoparticle-induced acute pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Chi; Lee, Hui-Ling; Chen, Chao-Yu; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Tsai, Hui-Ti; Lin, Pinpin

    2017-04-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are widely used in our daily life, such as in sunscreens and electronic nanodevices. However, pulmonary exposure to ZnONPs causes acute pulmonary inflammation, which is considered as an initial event for various respiratory diseases. Thus, elucidation of the underlying cellular mechanisms of ZnONPs can help us in predicting their potential effects in respiratory diseases. In this study, we observed that ZnONPs increased proinflammatory cytokines, accompanied with an increased expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and its downstream target cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) in macrophages in vitro and in mouse lung epithelia in vivo. Moreover, zinc nitrate, but not silica or titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NPs), had similar effects on macrophages, indicating that the zinc element or ion released from ZnONPs is likely responsible for the activation of the AhR pathway. Cotreatment with an AhR antagonist or AhR knockout reduced ZnONPs-induced cytokine secretion in macrophages or mice, respectively. Furthermore, kynurenine (KYN), an endogenous AhR agonist and a tryptophan metabolite catalyzed by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), was increased in the serums of mice that aspirated ZnONPs. Consistently, ZnONPs increased IDO1 expression in lung cells in vitro and in vivo. Finally, AhR knockout reduced ZnONPs-induced pulmonary inflammation, cytokine secretion and KYN production in mice, suggesting that AhR activation is involved in ZnONPs-induced cytokine secretion and pulmonary inflammation. In summary, we demonstrated that the pulmonary exposure of ZnONPs stimulated the cytokine-IDO1-AhR loop in the lungs, which has been implied to play roles in immune dysfunctions.

  20. The fate of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the nuclear and mitochondrial DNAs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on various postirradiation treatments and its influence on survival and cytoplasmic "petite" induction.

    PubMed

    Waters, R; Moustacchi, E

    1975-01-01

    The photoreactivability of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the nuclear and mitochondrial DNAs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been investigated in conjunction with the fate of these photoproducts following postirradiation dark incubation in saline and nutrient media. In all instances, survival and "petite" induction were measured. An attempt has been made to relate these results to present ideas on the repair of UV damages in DNA.

  1. Preventing Gut Leakiness and Endotoxemia Contributes to the Protective Effect of Zinc on Alcohol-Induced Steatohepatitis in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Wenliang; Zhang, Jiayang; Sun, Xinguo; Yin, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Zinc deficiency has been well documented in alcoholic liver disease. Objective: This study was undertaken to determine whether dietary zinc supplementation provides beneficial effects in treating alcohol-induced gut leakiness and endotoxemia. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups and pair-fed (PF) Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 8 wk: 1) control (PF); 2) alcohol-fed (AF; 5.00–5.42% wt:vol ethanol); and 3) AF with zinc supplementation (AF/Zn) at 220 ppm zinc sulfate heptahydrate. The PF and AF/Zn groups were pair-fed with the AF group. Hepatic inflammation and endotoxin signaling were determined by immunofluorescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Alterations in intestinal tight junctions and aldehyde dehydrogenases were assessed by qPCR and Western blot analysis. Results: The AF rats had greater macrophage activation and cytokine production (P < 0.05) in the liver compared with the PF rats, whereas the AF/Zn rats showed no significant differences (P > 0.05). Plasma endotoxin concentrations of the AF rats were 136% greater than those of the PF rats, whereas the AF/Zn rats did not differ from the PF rats. Ileal permeability was 255% greater in the AF rats and 19% greater in the AF/Zn rats than in the PF rats. The AF group had reduced intestinal claudin-1, occludin, and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) expression, and the AF/Zn group had upregulated claudin-1 and ZO-1 expression (P < 0.05) compared with the PF group. The intestinal epithelial expression and activity of aldehyde dehydrogenases were elevated (P < 0.05) in the AF/Zn rats compared with those of the AF rats. Furthermore, the ileal expression and function of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, which was impaired in the AF group, was significantly elevated in the AF/Zn group compared with the PF group. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that attenuating hepatic endotoxin signaling by preserving the intestinal barrier contributes to the protective effect of zinc on

  2. Changes in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) dynamics induced by complexation with pharmacological inhibitors of Src homology 2 (SH2) domain dimerization.

    PubMed

    Resetca, Diana; Haftchenary, Sina; Gunning, Patrick T; Wilson, Derek J

    2014-11-21

    The activity of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is dysregulated in a number of hematological and solid malignancies. Development of pharmacological STAT3 Src homology 2 (SH2) domain interaction inhibitors holds great promise for cancer therapy, and a novel class of salicylic acid-based STAT3 dimerization inhibitors that includes orally bioavailable drug candidates has been recently developed. The compounds SF-1-066 and BP-1-102 are predicted to bind to the STAT3 SH2 domain. However, given the highly unstructured and dynamic nature of the SH2 domain, experimental confirmation of this prediction was elusive. We have interrogated the protein-ligand interaction of STAT3 with these small molecule inhibitors by means of time-resolved electrospray ionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Analysis of site-specific evolution of deuterium uptake induced by the complexation of STAT3 with SF-1-066 or BP-1-102 under physiological conditions enabled the mapping of the in silico predicted inhibitor binding site to the STAT3 SH2 domain. The binding of both inhibitors to the SH2 domain resulted in significant local decreases in dynamics, consistent with solvent exclusion at the inhibitor binding site and increased rigidity of the inhibitor-complexed SH2 domain. Interestingly, inhibitor binding induced hot spots of allosteric perturbations outside of the SH2 domain, manifesting mainly as increased deuterium uptake, in regions of STAT3 important for DNA binding and nuclear localization. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) alleviate heavy metal-induced toxicity in Leucaena leucocephala seedlings: A physiochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, P; Jayaraj, M; Manikandan, R; Geetha, N; Rene, Eldon R; Sharma, N C; Sahi, S V

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes the role of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) in reversing oxidative stress symptoms induced by heavy metal (Cd and Pb) exposure in Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Seedling growth was significantly enhanced with the augmentation of ZnONPs following Cd and Pb exposure. Heavy metal accumulations were recorded as 1253.1 mg Cd per kg DW and 1026.8 mg Pb per kg DW for the respective treatments. Results demonstrated that ZnONPs augmentation caused an increase in photosynthetic pigment and total soluble protein contents while a significant decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA-lipid peroxidation) content in leaves. Antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) were, in turn, elevated in heavy metal-exposed leaves amended with ZnONPs. The ameliorating effect of ZnO nanoparticles on oxidative stress induced toxicity was also confirmed by the reduced MDA content and the elevated level of antioxidative enzyme activities in leaf tissues of L. leucocephala seedlings. Further, addition of ZnONPs in combination with Cd and Pb metals induced distinct genomic alterations such as presence of new DNA bands and/or absence of normal bands in the RAPD pattern of the exposed plants. This study uniquely suggests a potential role of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated media. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  5. Zinc-Dependent Protection of Tobacco and Rice Cells From Aluminum-Induced Superoxide-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cun; Hara, Ayaka; Comparini, Diego; Bouteau, François; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Al3+ toxicity in growing plants is considered as one of the major factors limiting the production of crops on acidic soils worldwide. In the last 15 years, it has been proposed that Al3+ toxicity are mediated with distortion of the cellular signaling mechanisms such as calcium signaling pathways, and production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) causing oxidative damages. On the other hand, zinc is normally present in plants at high concentrations and its deficiency is one of the most widespread micronutrient deficiencies in plants. Earlier studies suggested that lack of zinc often results in ROS-mediated oxidative damage to plant cells. Previously, inhibitory action of Zn2+ against lanthanide-induced superoxide generation in tobacco cells have been reported, suggesting that Zn2+ interferes with the cation-induced ROS production via stimulation of NADPH oxidase. In the present study, the effect of Zn2+ on Al3+-induced superoxide generation in the cell suspension cultures of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell-line, BY-2) and rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Nipponbare), was examined. The Zn2+-dependent inhibition of the Al3+-induced oxidative burst was observed in both model cells selected from the monocots and dicots (rice and tobacco), suggesting that this phenomenon (Al3+/Zn2+ interaction) can be preserved in higher plants. Subsequently induced cell death in tobacco cells was analyzed by lethal cell staining with Evans blue. Obtained results indicated that presence of Zn2+ at physiological concentrations can protect the cells by preventing the Al3+-induced superoxide generation and cell death. Furthermore, the regulation of the Ca2+ signaling, i.e., change in the cytosolic Ca2+ ion concentration, and the cross-talks among the elements which participate in the pathway were further explored. PMID:26648960

  6. Electron-induced origins of prebiotic building blocks of sugars: mechanism of self-reactions of a methanol anion dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsili, Tolga N. V.; Fennimore, Mark A.; Matsika, Spiridoula

    The elementary synthesis of prebiotic molecules has attracted vast attention in recent years. Due to their rich surface chemistry and lack of suitable atmosphere, comets represent an important host for such synthesis, especially since they are routinely irradiated with short wavelength electromagnetic radiation and energetic cosmological electrons. Using high-level electronic structure theory, we present the details of the reactivity associated with the electron-impact induced prebiotic synthesis of ethylene glycol (a carbohydrate building block) from elementary methanol. The results suggest that the experimentally observed intermediates and fragment products can be viably formed by both neutral excited-state chemistry and by dissociative electron attachment - highlighting the importance of a theoretical mapping of the relevant potential energy surfaces that ultimately act as an important guide to the experimental results.

  7. Overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in rat zinc-deficient lung: Involvement of a NF-kappaB dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Nidia N; Davicino, Roberto C; Biaggio, Veronica S; Bianco, German A; Alvarez, Silvina M; Fischer, Patricia; Masnatta, Lucas; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Gimenez, María S

    2006-02-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases. The goal of this study was to measure the response of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 enzymes (COX-2) in lung with moderate zinc deficiency. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into two groups receiving (1) a zinc-deficient diet (ZD) or (2) a zinc-adequate control diet. After 2 months of treatment, the zinc-deficient group showed a significant pulmonary edema. This was associated to a reduction of protein thiols and to a significant increase of metallothionein and glutathione disulfide levels. In addition, a higher serum and lung NO production in ZD group was positively related to the higher activity and expression of iNOS and COX-2 found in lungs. Western blot analysis revealed increased IkappaBalpha degradation, an indicator of NF-kappaB activation in ZD lungs. Anatomopathologic analysis of ZD lungs showed an increase of connective tissue fibers with an influx of polymorphonuclear cells. These cells and type II cells from the alveoli showed specific immunohistochemical signals for iNOS. The conclusion is that, during the development of zinc-deficiency, iNOS activity increases in lung and contributes to lung injury. Zinc deficiency implications must be taken into account to design therapies and public health interventions involving targeted zinc supplementation for high-risk subjects or certain diseases, such as asthma.

  8. The Bradford Hill criteria and zinc-induced anosmia: a causality analysis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Terence M; Smith, Wendy M

    2010-07-01

    To apply the Bradford Hill criteria, which are widely used to establish causality between an environmental agent and disease, to evaluate the relationship between over-the-counter intranasal zinc gluconate therapy and anosmia. Patient and literature review applying the Bradford Hill criteria on causation. University of California, San Diego, Nasal Dysfunction Clinic. The study included 25 patients who presented to the University of California, San Diego, Nasal Dysfunction Clinic complaining of acute-onset anosmia after intranasal application of homeopathic zinc gluconate gel. Each of the 9 Bradford Hill criteria--strength of association, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient (dose-response), biological plausibility, biological coherence, experimental evidence, and analogy--was applied to intranasal zinc gluconate therapy and olfactory dysfunction using published, peer-reviewed medical literature and reported clinical experiences. Clinical, biological, and experimental data support the Bradford Hill criteria to demonstrate that intranasal zinc gluconate therapy causes hyposmia and anosmia. The Bradford Hill criteria represent an important tool for scientifically determining cause between environmental exposure and disease. Increased Food and Drug Administration oversight of homeopathic medications is needed to monitor the safety of these popular remedies.

  9. Skin changes induced by a zinc oxide dressing compared with a hydrocolloid dressing in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lene Feldskov; Blume, Niels; Romme, Tina; Samuelsen, Peter; Everland, Hanne; Ifversen, Peter; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2005-05-01

    Incidence of skin complications in ostomy patients constitutes a well-known and well-described problem. The reasons are, however, very difficult to describe because of the many factors contributing to the problem. This article describes the skin changes derived exclusively from the adhesives used in a carefully controlled, long-term study using two fundamentally different types of adhesives: a hydrocolloid adhesive and a zinc oxide adhesive. The adhesives were changed daily on the volar forearm of 11 volunteers for a 4-week period. Once a week, transepidermal water-loss (TEWL), water content of the skin, erythema and the peel force applied for removal of the adhesives were measured. On the last day of the study, a replica of the skin surface was obtained to determine changes in the skin topography, and a biopsy was taken to study changes at the cellular level. We found increased TEWL and decreased water content in skin treated with the zinc oxide adhesive, but increased water-loss and water content when the hydrocolloid adhesive was used. In addition, the area treated with zinc oxide adhesive showed significant increase of epidermal thickness, scaly appearance and parakeratosis with similarities to pathological dry skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, changes that were not found when using the hydrocolloid adhesive. The skin response seems to be the result of the content of zinc oxide and the mechanical interaction of the zinc oxide adhesive. We conclude that the nature of the adhesive plays an important role in the skin response to repeated application of adhesives, as seen in peristomal skin.

  10. Zinc triggers microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Kauppinen, Tiina M.; Higashi, Youichirou; Suh, Sang Won; Escartin, Carole; Nagasawa, Kazuki; Swanson, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    Microglia are resident immune cells of the central nervous system. When stimulated by infection, tissue injury, or other signals, microglia assume an activated, “amoeboid” morphology and release matrix metalloproteinases, reactive oxygen species, and other pro-inflammatory factors. This innate immune response augments host defenses, but it can also contribute to neuronal death. Zinc is released by neurons under several conditions in which microglial activation occurs, and zinc chelators can reduce neuronal death in animal models of cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Here we show that zinc directly triggers microglial activation. Microglia transfected with an NF-kB reporter gene showed a several-fold increase in NF-kB activity in response to 30 μM zinc. Cultured mouse microglia exposed to 15 – 30 μM zinc increased nitric oxide production, increased F4/80 expression, altered cytokine expression, and assumed the activated morphology. Zinc-induced microglial activation was blocked by inhibiting NADPH oxidase, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), or NF-κB activation. Zinc injected directly into mouse brain induced microglial activation in wild-type mice, but not in mice genetically lacking PARP-1 or NADPH oxidase activity. Endogenous zinc release, induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, likewise induced a robust microglial reaction, and this reaction was suppressed by the zinc chelator CaEDTA. Together, these results suggest that extracellular zinc triggers microglial activation through the sequential activation of NADPH oxidase, PARP-1, and NF-κB. These findings identify a novel trigger for microglial activation and a previously unrecognized mechanism by which zinc may contribute to neurological disorders. PMID:18509044

  11. Zinc triggers microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Tiina M; Higashi, Youichirou; Suh, Sang Won; Escartin, Carole; Nagasawa, Kazuki; Swanson, Raymond A

    2008-05-28

    Microglia are resident immune cells of the CNS. When stimulated by infection, tissue injury, or other signals, microglia assume an activated, "ameboid" morphology and release matrix metalloproteinases, reactive oxygen species, and other proinflammatory factors. This innate immune response augments host defenses, but it can also contribute to neuronal death. Zinc is released by neurons under several conditions in which microglial activation occurs, and zinc chelators can reduce neuronal death in animal models of cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we show that zinc directly triggers microglial activation. Microglia transfected with a nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) reporter gene showed a severalfold increase in NF-kappaB activity in response to 30 microm zinc. Cultured mouse microglia exposed to 15-30 microm zinc increased nitric oxide production, increased F4/80 expression, altered cytokine expression, and assumed the activated morphology. Zinc-induced microglial activation was blocked by inhibiting NADPH oxidase, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), or NF-kappaB activation. Zinc injected directly into mouse brain induced microglial activation in wild-type mice, but not in mice genetically lacking PARP-1 or NADPH oxidase activity. Endogenous zinc release, induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, likewise induced a robust microglial reaction, and this reaction was suppressed by the zinc chelator CaEDTA. Together, these results suggest that extracellular zinc triggers microglial activation through the sequential activation of NADPH oxidase, PARP-1, and NF-kappaB. These findings identify a novel trigger for microglial activation and a previously unrecognized mechanism by which zinc may contribute to neurological disorders.

  12. Structural and Functional Studies of the Protamine 2-Zinc Complex from Syrian Gold Hamster (Mesocricetus Auratus) Spermatids and Sperm

    SciT

    Dolan, Cheryl E.

    The research described in this dissertation consists of four major areas: (1) sequence analysis of protamine 2 from Muroid rodents to identify potential zinc-binding domain(s) of protamine 2; (2) structural studies of the protamine 2-zinc complex from Syrian Gold hamster sperm and spermatids to elucidate the role of zinc during spermiogenesis; (3) structural studies of an unique protamine 2-zinc complex from chinchilla sperm; and (4) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of soluble complexes of hairpin oligonucleotides with synthetic arginine-rich peptides or protamine 1 isolated from bull sperm. First, zinc was quantitated in spermatids and sperm by Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE)more » to determine whether zinc is present in the early stages of spermiogenesis. The PIXE results revealed the zinc content varies proportionately with the amount of protamine 2 in both spermatid and sperm nuclei. An exception was chinchilla sperm containing twice the amount of protamine 2 than zinc. Further analyses by PIXE and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of zinc bound to protamines isolated from hamster sperm confirmed the majority of the zinc is bound to protamine and identified the zinc ligands of protamine 2 in hamster spermatids and sperm in vivo. These studies established that zinc is bound to the protamine 2 precursor in hamster spermatids and the coordination of zinc by protamine 2 changes during spermiogenesis. Finally, the sequence analysis combined with the XAS results suggest that the zinc-binding domain in protamine 2 resides in the amino-terminus. Similar analyses of chinchilla sperm by XAS were performed to clarify the unusual PIXE results and revealed that chinchilla has an atypical protamine 2-zinc structure. Two protamine 2 molecules coordinate one zinc atom, forming homodimers that facilitate the binding of protamine 2 to DNA and provide an organizational scheme that would accommodate the observed species-specific protamine stoichiometry in

  13. The membrane-stabilizing action of zinc carnosine (Z-103) in stress-induced gastric ulceration in rats

    SciT

    Cho, C.H.; Luk, C.T.; Ogle, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    Zinc compounds have been shown to antagonize various types of gastric ulceration in rats. Zinc carnosine (Z-103), a newly developed agent was, therefore, examined for its antiulcer effect in stress-induced ulceration and also its membrane stabilizing action in rat stomachs. Cold-restraint stress induced severe hemorrhagic lesions together with increased mast cell degranulation and {beta}-glucuronidase release in the gastric glandular mucosa. A-103 pretreatment with a single oral dose reversed these actions in a dose-dependent manner. When the compound was incubated in concentrations of 10{sup {minus}7}, 10{sup {minus}6}, 10{sup {minus}5} or 10{sup {minus}4} M, with isolated hepatic lysosomes, it significantly reduced themore » spontaneous release of {beta}-glucuronidase in the medium. The present study not only demonstrates the antiulcer effect of Z-103 but also indicates that the protective action is likely to be mediated by its membrane-stabilizing action on mast cells and lysosomes in the gastric glandular mucosa.« less

  14. Modulations of anisotropic optical transmission on alumina-doped zinc oxide surface by femtosecond laser induced ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanhui; Jiang, Lan; Sun, Jingya; Cao, Qiang; Wang, Qingsong; Han, Weina; Lu, Yongfeng

    2018-04-01

    This study demonstrated that femtosecond-laser-induced ripples on an alumina-doped zinc oxide (AZO) film with space intervals of approximately 340 and 660 nm exhibit modulations of anisotropic optical transmission. At low laser fluence, ripples can not affect the original absorption peak of AZO film, but at higher laser fluence, the absorption peak of AZO film is disappeared due to the modulation by femtosecond laser induced ripples. Moreover, the relationship between the anisotropic optical transmission and the features of nanostructures is discussed. Ripples with a space interval of approximately 660 nm have a higher ability to block light than nanostructures with a space interval of approximately 340 nm. These observations indicate that anisotropic optical transmission has potential applications in the field of optoelectronics.

  15. Induced superhydrophobic and antimicrobial character of zinc metal modified ceramic wall tile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Selçuk; Açıkbaş, Gökhan; Çalış Açıkbaş, Nurcan

    2018-04-01

    Hydrophobic surfaces are also known to have antimicrobial effect by restricting the adherence of microorganisms. However, ceramic products are produced by high temperature processes resulting in a hydrophilic surface. In this study, an industrial ceramic wall tile glaze composition was modified by the inclusion of metallic zinc powder in the glaze suspension applied on the pre-sintered wall tile bodies by spraying. The glazed tiles were gloss fired at industrially applicable peak temperatures ranging from 980 °C to 1100 °C. The fired tile surfaces were coated with a commercial fluoropolymer avoiding water absorption. The surfaces were characterized with SEM, EDS, XRD techniques, roughness, sessile water drop contact angle, surface energy measurements, and standard antimicrobial tests. The surface hydrophobicity and the antimicrobial activity results were compared with that of unmodified, uncoated gloss fired wall tiles. A superhydrophobic contact angle of 150° was achieved at 1000 °C peak temperature due to the formation of micro-structured nanocrystalline zinc oxide granules providing a specific surface topography. At higher peak temperatures the hydrophobicity was lost as the specific granular surface topography deteriorated with the conversion of zinc oxide granules to the ubiquitous willemite crystals embedded in the glassy matrix. The antimicrobial efficacy also correlated with the hydrophobic character.

  16. Apoptosis induced by microtubule disrupting drugs in cultured human lymphoma cells. Inhibitory effects of phorbol ester and zinc sulphate.

    PubMed

    Takano, Y; Okudaira, M; Harmon, B V

    1993-03-01

    The effects of the microtubule disrupting drugs (MDD) vinblastine, vincristine and colchicine on a human lymphoma cell line, BM 13674, were investigated. Twelve hours after administration of vinblastine (10(-3) mg/ml), vincristine (10(-2) mg/ml) or colchicine (10(-2) mg/ml), cell death with the characteristic morphology of apoptosis was observed in 71.6%, 82.2% and 76.9% of the cells respectively. The mode of death was confirmed as apoptotic by the occurrence of internucleosomal DNA cleavage, which was demonstrated by agarose gel electrophoresis. For the purpose of casting light on the mechanism involved, inhibition tests were performed on apoptosis induced by one of these drugs, vinblastine, using a phorbol ester (PDBu), zinc sulphate and cycloheximide. PDBu, an activator of protein kinase C, and zinc sulphate, a putative inhibitor of the endonuclease were thought to be responsible for internucleosomal DNA cleavage; both markedly reduced the induction of apoptosis. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, on the other hand, had no inhibitory effect. Moreover, cycloheximide treatment per se enhanced apoptosis. This suggests that new protein synthesis is not required for the execution of vinblastine-induced apoptosis. Such a finding is in accord with recent reports suggesting that the "death program" within many cell types may be primed but unable to proceed due to concomitant production of specific "apoptotic inhibitors". It is suggested that phorbol esters prevent vinblastine-induced apoptosis in the BM 13674 cells by activating one or more of these specific "apoptotic inhibitors", possibly by means of PKC-mediated phosphorylation.

  17. Crystal Structure of PKG I:cGMP Complex Reveals a cGMP-Mediated Dimeric Interface that Facilitates cGMP-Induced Activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Joo; Lorenz, Robin; Arold, Stefan T; Reger, Albert S; Sankaran, Banumathi; Casteel, Darren E; Herberg, Friedrich W; Kim, Choel

    2016-05-03

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is a key regulator of smooth muscle and vascular tone and represents an important drug target for treating hypertensive diseases and erectile dysfunction. Despite its importance, its activation mechanism is not fully understood. To understand the activation mechanism, we determined a 2.5 Å crystal structure of the PKG I regulatory (R) domain bound with cGMP, which represents the activated state. Although we used a monomeric domain for crystallization, the structure reveals that two R domains form a symmetric dimer where the cGMP bound at high-affinity pockets provide critical dimeric contacts. Small-angle X-ray scattering and mutagenesis support this dimer model, suggesting that the dimer interface modulates kinase activation. Finally, structural comparison with the homologous cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase reveals that PKG is drastically different from protein kinase A in its active conformation, suggesting a novel activation mechanism for PKG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystal Structure of PKG I:cGMP Complex Reveals a cGMP-Mediated Dimeric Interface that Facilitates cGMP-Induced Activation

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Jeong Joo; Lorenz, Robin; Arold, Stefan T.; ...

    2016-04-07

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is a key regulator of smooth muscle and vascular tone and represents an important drug target for treating hypertensive diseases and erectile dysfunction. Despite its importance, its activation mechanism is not fully understood. To understand the activation mechanism, we determined a 2.5 Å crystal structure of the PKG I regulatory (R) domain bound with cGMP, which represents the activated state. Here, although we used a monomeric domain for crystallization, the structure reveals that two R domains form a symmetric dimer where the cGMP bound at high-affinity pockets provide critical dimeric contacts. Small-angle X-raymore » scattering and mutagenesis support this dimer model, suggesting that the dimer interface modulates kinase activation. Finally, structural comparison with the homologous cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase reveals that PKG is drastically different from protein kinase A in its active conformation, suggesting a novel activation mechanism for PKG.« less

  19. Loss of ErbB2-PI3K/Akt signaling prevents zinc pyrithione-induced cardioprotection during ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Thokala, Sandhya; Inapurapu, Santhipriya; Bodiga, Vijaya Lakshmi; Vemuri, Praveen Kumar; Bodiga, Sreedhar

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if zinc homeostasis is affected during ischemia/reperfusion, if so, whether zinc pyrithione limits myocardial cell death and improves hemodynamics when administered as an adjunct to reperfusion and if ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases that are important for the long-term structural integrity of the heart are indispensable for reperfusion salvage. Isolated perfused rat hearts were subjected to 35min of global ischemia and reperfused for 120min to determine the relative intracellular zinc levels by TSQ staining. The hearts were reperfused in the presence of incremental concentrations of zinc pyrithione for the first 10min during reperfusion. Silencing or blockade of ErbB2 using a monoclonal antibody, ErbB2 kinase inhibition and PI3kinase inhibition was used to study their critical role in zinc pyrithione-induced cardioprotection. We found that there was a profound decrease in intracellular zinc after ischemia/reperfusion resulting in increased apoptosis, caspase-3 activation, and infarct size. A dose-dependent reduction of infarct size with zinc pyrithione in the range of 5-20μmol/l (optimal protection was seen at 10μmol/l with infarct size of 16±2% vs. I/R vehicle, 33±2%, p<0.01). Increased TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activity observed after ischemia/reperfusion were attenuated by zinc pyrithione administration during the reperfusion. Moreover, this protection was sensitive to silencing and blockade of ErbB2, inhibition of ErbB2 kinase activity or PI3-kinase activity. Western blot analysis revealed that zinc pyrithione resulted in decreased caspase-3 activation, rapid stabilization of ErbB2/ErbB1 heterodimers, and increased activation of PI3K/Akt signaling cascade. Zinc pyrithione attenuates lethal perfusion-induced injury in a manner that is reliant on ErbB2/PI3K/Akt activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of zinc and phytoestrogen supplementation on the changes in mineral content of the femur of rats with chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Skrajnowska, Dorota; Korczak, Barbara Bobrowska-; Tokarz, Andrzej; Kazimierczuk, Agata; Klepacz, Marta; Makowska, Justyna; Gadzinski, Blazej

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess skeletal effects of zinc or zinc with phytoestrogen (resveratrol or genistein) supplementation in an animal model of rats with DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis. The changes in bone parameters such as the length and mass were examined, as well as the changes in concentrations of selected minerals: calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron and phosphorus. Moreover, the investigations focused on finding the differences between the levels of iron and zinc in other tissues: the liver, spleen and serum of the examined rats. Fifty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats, 40 days old, were divided into four groups, regardless of the diets: standard (77mg Zn kg/food), zinc (4.6mg/mL via gavage), zinc (4.6mg/mL) plus resveratrol (0.2mg/kgbw), and zinc (4.6mg/mL) plus genistein (0.2mg/kgbw) for a period from 40 days until 20 weeks of age. The study rats were also treated with 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce mammary carcinogenesis. The applied diet and the advanced mammary cancer did not affect macrometric parameters of the rats' bones, but they strongly affected their mineral content. It was found that mammary cancer, irrespectively of the applied diet, significantly modified the iron level in the femur, liver, spleen and serum of the examined rats. In addition, zinc supplementation significantly lowered the levels of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus in the femur of rats with mammary cancer as compared with respective levels in the control group. So, it was found that additional supplementation with zinc, which is generally considered to be an antioxidant, with the co-existing mammary carcinoma, increased the unfavorable changes as concerns the stability of bone tissue. The appropriate combination of zinc and phytoestrogens (resveratrol or genistein) could help prevent or slow bone loss associated with a range of skeletal disorders in breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide-induced overproduction of nitric oxide and overexpression of iNOS and interleukin-1β proteins in zinc-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Inoue, Tsutomu; Sato, Makiko; Miyajima, Yuka; Nodera, Makoto; Hanyu, Mayuko; Ohno, Yoichi; Shibazaki, Satomi; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2012-03-01

    Zinc deficiency leads to decreased cellular immune responses. The overproduction of nitrogen species derived from inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), its enzyme, and interleukine-1 beta (IL-1β), and inflammatory cytokine have been implicated in immune responses. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in NO metabolites, iNOS, and IL-1β protein expression in the lungs of zinc-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (body weight, 100 g) were divided into two groups and were fed either a zinc-deficient diet (ZnD) or a zinc-containing diet (Cont). After 4 weeks on these diets, rats received a 10-mg/kg dose of LPS injected via the tail vein and were then maintained for an additional 72 h. To determine total NO concentrations in the blood, serum zinc concentration, iNOS protein expression, IL-1β, and iNOS immunohistochemistry, blood and lung samples were obtained at pre-LPS injection, 5, 24, and 72 h after injection. Total NO levels were significantly increased at 5, at 24, and at 72 h after LPS injection compared with pre-LPS injection level in ZnD group; significant changes in total NO levels was elevated at 5 h from at pre-LPS level but not significant changes from basal level at 24 and 72 h in the control group. Based on western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry, clear bands indicating iNOS and IL-1β protein expression and iNOS antibody-stained inflammatory cells were detected at 5 and 24 h in the ZnD group and 5 h in the Cont group, not observed at 24 and 72 h in the control group. These results suggest that zinc deficiency induces overexpression of iNOS and IL-1β proteins from inflammatory cells around the alveolar blood vessels, resulting in overproduction of total NO and persisted inflammatory response in the zinc-deficient rat lung. Taken together, overexpression of LPS-induced iNOS, overproduction of iNOS-derived NO, and overexpression of IL-1β may induce nitrosative and oxidative

  2. SRC-DEPENDENT PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 IS REQUIRED FOR ZINC-INDUCED RAS ACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Src-dependent Phosphorylation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor on Tyrosine 845 Is Required for Zinc-induced Ras Activation
    Weidong Wu 1 , Lee M. Graves 2 , Gordon N. Gill 3 , Sarah J. Parsons 4 , and James M. Samet 5
    1 Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biolo...

  3. Supplementing zinc oxide nanoparticles to cryopreservation medium minimizes the freeze-thaw-induced damage to spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Ann V; Kumari, Sandhya; Nair, Ramya; Urs, Deepak Raj; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar; Manikkath, Jyothsna; Mutalik, Srinivas; Sachdev, Divya; Pasricha, Renu

    2017-12-16

    The sperm DNA integrity post cryopreservation of human semen samples is one of the serious concerns in human infertility treatment. In the present study, the beneficial effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles in preserving the functional ability of spermatozoa was explored. Ejaculates of normozoospermic men cryopreserved along with Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) exhibited non-significantly higher percentage of total and progressive motility in frozen-thawed samples compared to control. The sperm chromatin damage and malondialdehyde (MDA) level was significantly lower in ZnONPs group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 respectively) and the spermatozoa's ability to undergo acrosome reaction was also unaltered. Fluorescence microscopy and High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the ZnONPs do not penetrate the membrane of spermatozoa but stay around the spermatozoa. In conclusion, the presence of ZnONPs during cryopreservation appears to be beneficial to the spermatozoa as they withstand freeze-thaw process competently better than control, without any adverse effect shown. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Zinc and Copper Differentially Modulate Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing by γ-Secretase and Amyloid-β Peptide Production.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Hermeto; Wu, Fang; Dimitrov, Mitko; Garcia Osuna, Guillermo M; Fraering, Patrick C

    2017-03-03

    Recent evidence suggests involvement of biometal homeostasis in the pathological mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, increased intracellular copper or zinc has been linked to a reduction in secreted levels of the AD-causing amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). However, little is known about whether these biometals modulate the generation of Aβ. In the present study we demonstrate in both cell-free and cell-based assays that zinc and copper regulate Aβ production by distinct molecular mechanisms affecting the processing by γ-secretase of its Aβ precursor protein substrate APP-C99. We found that Zn 2+ induces APP-C99 dimerization, which prevents its cleavage by γ-secretase and Aβ production, with an IC 50 value of 15 μm Importantly, at this concentration, Zn 2+ also drastically raised the production of the aggregation-prone Aβ43 found in the senile plaques of AD brains and elevated the Aβ43:Aβ40 ratio, a promising biomarker for neurotoxicity and AD. We further demonstrate that the APP-C99 histidine residues His-6, His-13, and His-14 control the Zn 2+ -dependent APP-C99 dimerization and inhibition of Aβ production, whereas the increased Aβ43:Aβ40 ratio is substrate dimerization-independent and involves the known Zn 2+ binding lysine Lys-28 residue that orientates the APP-C99 transmembrane domain within the lipid bilayer. Unlike zinc, copper inhibited Aβ production by directly targeting the subunits presenilin and nicastrin in the γ-secretase complex. Altogether, our data demonstrate that zinc and copper differentially modulate Aβ production. They further suggest that dimerization of APP-C99 or the specific targeting of individual residues regulating the production of the long, toxic Aβ species, may offer two therapeutic strategies for preventing AD. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Metal-induced crystallization of amorphous zinc tin oxide semiconductors for high mobility thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ah Young; Kim, Sang Tae; Ji, Hyuk; Shin, Yeonwoo; Jeong, Jae Kyeong

    2016-04-01

    Transition tantalum induced crystallization of amorphous zinc tin oxide (a-ZTO) was observed at low temperature annealing of 300 °C. Thin-film transistors (TFTs) with an a-ZTO channel layer exhibited a reasonable field-effect mobility of 12.4 cm2/V s, subthreshold swing (SS) of 0.39 V/decade, threshold voltage (VTH) of 1.5 V, and ION/OFF ratio of ˜107. A significant improvement in the field-effect mobility (up to ˜33.5 cm2/V s) was achieved for crystallized ZTO TFTs: this improvement was accomplished without compromising the SS, VTH, or ION/OFF ratio due to the presence of a highly ordered microstructure.

  6. Metal-induced crystallization of amorphous zinc tin oxide semiconductors for high mobility thin-film transistors

    SciT

    Hwang, Ah Young; Ji, Hyuk; Kim, Sang Tae

    2016-04-11

    Transition tantalum induced crystallization of amorphous zinc tin oxide (a-ZTO) was observed at low temperature annealing of 300 °C. Thin-film transistors (TFTs) with an a-ZTO channel layer exhibited a reasonable field-effect mobility of 12.4 cm{sup 2}/V s, subthreshold swing (SS) of 0.39 V/decade, threshold voltage (V{sub TH}) of 1.5 V, and I{sub ON/OFF} ratio of ∼10{sup 7}. A significant improvement in the field-effect mobility (up to ∼33.5 cm{sup 2}/V s) was achieved for crystallized ZTO TFTs: this improvement was accomplished without compromising the SS, V{sub TH}, or I{sub ON/OFF} ratio due to the presence of a highly ordered microstructure.

  7. D-dimer Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... http://www.beckmancoulter.com . Began, T. (2002 October). Elisa D-Dimer: How Accurate For PE Diagnosis? PulmonaryReviews. ... at http://www.pulmonaryreviews.com/oct02/pr_oct02_ELISA.html through http://www.pulmonaryreviews.com . Cortese Hassett, ...

  8. Zinc and linoleic acid pre-treatment attenuates biochemical and histological changes in the midbrain of rats with rotenone-induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Mbiydzenyuy, Ngala Elvis; Ninsiima, Herbert Izo; Valladares, Miriela Betancourt; Pieme, Constant Anatole

    2018-05-09

    Studies have suggested the supplementation of Zinc and Linoleic acid in the management of neurodegenerative disorders but none has investigated the combined effects. Little is known about the neuroprotective effects of either Zinc or Linoleic acid or their combination against development of Parkinsonism. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Zinc and Linoleic acid in rotenone-induced Parkinsonism in rats. Thirty-six young adult female rats weighing 100-150 g divided into six groups were used. Rats were induced with Parkinsonism by subcutaneous administration of rotenone (2.5 mg/kg) once a day for seven consecutive days. The rats received dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/Olive oil or rotenone dissolved in DMSO/Olive oil. Groups III and IV received Zinc (30 mg/kg) or Linoleic acid (150 µl/kg) while group V received a combination of both, 2 weeks prior to rotenone injection. Groups II and VI served as negative (rotenone group) and positive (Levodopa groups) controls respectively. Oxidative stress levels were assessed by estimating Lipid peroxidation (MDA), total antioxidant capacity, Superoxide dismutase, reduced Glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase and catalase in the midbrain. Histological examination was done to assess structural changes in the midbrain. There was a significant prevention in lipid peroxidation and decrease in the antioxidant status in intervention-treated groups as compared to the rotenone treated group. In addition, histological examination revealed that Parkinsonian rat brains exhibited neuronal damage. Cell death and reduction in neuron size induced by rotenone was prevented by treatment with zinc, linoleic acid and their combination. These results suggest that zinc and linoleic acid and their combination showed significant neuroprotective activity most likely due to the antioxidant effect.

  9. Light induced instabilities in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Migliorato, Piero; Jang, Jin

    2010-10-01

    The effect of exposure to ultraviolet radiation on the characteristics of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) fabricated by sputtering is investigated. After illumination with 1.5 mW cm-2 of 365 nm radiation, in the absence of any bias stress, a persistent negative shift in the characteristics is observed in the dark. The magnitude of the shift increases with exposure time, saturating after about 10 min. Under these conditions the subthreshold exhibits a rigid shift of around 3.6 V and 7.5 V for TFTs with an active layer thickness of 20 nm and 50 nm, respectively. The shift in the dark increases (decreases) when a negative (positive) bias stress is applied under illumination. The instability behavior caused by exposure to light, in the absence of any bias stress, can be explained on the basis of ionization of neutral oxygen vacancies.

  10. Anticoccidial and antioxidant activities of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Eimeria papillata-induced infection in the jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Dkhil, Mohamed A; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Wahab, Rizwan

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has recently emerged as a better option for the treatment of various diseases. Here, we investigated the in vivo anticoccidial properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZNPs). ZNPs were crystalline in nature, with a smooth and spherical surface and a diameter in the range of ~10–15 nm. The X-ray diffraction pattern was utilized to identify the crystalline property of the grown ZNPs, whereas field emission scanning electron microscopy was employed to check the size and morphology of the ZNPs. The data showed that mice infected with Eimeria papillata produced 29.7×103±1,500 oocysts/g feces on day 5 postinfection. This output was significantly decreased, to 12.5×103±1,000 oocysts, in mice treated with ZNPs. Infection also induced inflammation and injury of the jejunum. This was evidenced (1) through an increase in the inflammatory histological score, (2) through increased production of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, and (3) through a decrease in both the glutathione level and goblet cell number in mice jejuna. All these infection-induced parameters were significantly altered during treatment with ZNPs. Our results indicate, therefore, that ZNPs have protective effects against E. papillata-induced coccidiosis. PMID:25792829

  11. A novel cold-inducible zinc finger protein from soybean, SCOF-1, enhances cold tolerance in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Lee, S H; Cheong, Y H; Yoo, C M; Lee, S I; Chun, H J; Yun, D J; Hong, J C; Lee, S Y; Lim, C O; Cho, M J

    2001-02-01

    Cold stress on plants induces changes in the transcription of cold response genes. A cDNA clone encoding C2H2-type zinc finger protein, SCOF-1, was isolated from soybean. The transcription of SCOF-1 is specifically induced by low temperature and abscisic acid (ABA) but not by dehydration or high salinity. Constitutive overexpression of SCOF-1 induced cold-regulated (COR) gene expression and enhanced cold tolerance of non-acclimated transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. SCOF-1 localized to the nucleus but did not bind directly to either C-repeat/dehydration (CRT/DRE) or ABA responsive element (ABRE), cis-acting DNA regulatory elements present in COR gene promoters. However, SCOF-1 greatly enhanced the DNA binding activity of SGBF-1, a soybean G-box binding bZIP transcription factor, to ABRE in vitro. SCOF-1 also interacted with SGBF-1 in a yeast two-hybrid system. The SGBF-1 transactivated the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene driven by the ABRE element in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts. Furthermore, the SCOF-1 enhanced ABRE-dependent gene expression mediated by SGBF-1. These results suggest that SCOF-1 may function as a positive regulator of COR gene expression mediated by ABRE via protein-protein interaction, which in turn enhances cold tolerance of plants.

  12. Environmentally induced chemical and morphological heterogeneity of zinc oxide thin films

    SciT

    Jiang, Hua; Chou, Kang Wei; Petrash, Stanislas

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been reported to suffer from degradation in electrical properties, when exposed to elevated heat and humidity, often leading to failures of electronic devices containing ZnO films. This degradation appears to be linked to water and oxygen penetration into the ZnO film. However, a direct observation in the ZnO film morphological evolution detailing structural and chemical changes has been lacking. Here, we systematically investigated the chemical and morphological heterogeneities of ZnO thin films caused by elevated heat and humidity, simulating an environmental aging. X-ray fluorescence microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, grazing incidence small angle and widemore » angle X-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra-high-resolution SEM, and optical microscopy were carried out to examine ZnO and Al-doped ZnO thin films on two different substrates—silicon wafers and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. In the un-doped ZnO thin film, the simulated environmental aging is resulting in pin-holes. In the Al-doped ZnO thin films, significant morphological changes occurred after the treatment, with an appearance of platelet-shaped structures that are 100–200 nm wide by 1 μm long. Synchrotron x-ray characterization further confirmed the heterogeneity in the aged Al-doped ZnO, showing the formation of anisotropic structures and disordering. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated the formation of a zinc hydroxide in the aged Al-doped films. Utilizing advanced characterization methods, our studies provided information with an unprecedented level of details and revealed the chemical and morphologically heterogeneous nature of the degradation in ZnO thin films.« less

  13. Environmentally induced chemical and morphological heterogeneity of zinc oxide thin films

    SciT

    Jiang, Hua; Chou, Kang Wei; Petrash, Stanislas

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been reported to suffer from degradation in electrical properties, when exposed to elevated heat and humidity, often leading to failures of electronic devices containing ZnO films. This degradation appears to be linked to water and oxygen penetration into the ZnO film. However, a direct observation in the ZnO film morphological evolution detailing structural and chemical changes has been lacking. Here, we systematically investigated the chemical and morphological heterogeneities of ZnO thin films caused by elevated heat and humidity, simulating an environmental aging. X-ray fluorescence microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, grazing incidence small angle and widemore » angle X-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra-high-resolution SEM, and optical microscopy were carried out to examine ZnO and Al-doped ZnO thin films on two different substrates—silicon wafers and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. In the un-doped ZnO thin film, the simulated environmental aging is resulting in pin-holes. In the Al-doped ZnO thin films, significant morphological changes occurred after the treatment, with an appearance of platelet-shaped structures that are 100–200 nm wide by 1μm long. Synchrotron x-ray characterization further confirmed the heterogeneity in the aged Al-doped ZnO, showing the formation of anisotropic structures and disordering. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated the formation of a zinc hydroxide in the aged Al-doped films. In conclusion, utilizing advanced characterization methods, our studies provided information with an unprecedented level of details and revealed the chemical and morphologically heterogeneous nature of the degradation in ZnO thin films.« less

  14. Environmentally induced chemical and morphological heterogeneity of zinc oxide thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Hua; Chou, Kang Wei; Petrash, Stanislas; ...

    2016-09-02

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been reported to suffer from degradation in electrical properties, when exposed to elevated heat and humidity, often leading to failures of electronic devices containing ZnO films. This degradation appears to be linked to water and oxygen penetration into the ZnO film. However, a direct observation in the ZnO film morphological evolution detailing structural and chemical changes has been lacking. Here, we systematically investigated the chemical and morphological heterogeneities of ZnO thin films caused by elevated heat and humidity, simulating an environmental aging. X-ray fluorescence microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, grazing incidence small angle and widemore » angle X-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra-high-resolution SEM, and optical microscopy were carried out to examine ZnO and Al-doped ZnO thin films on two different substrates—silicon wafers and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. In the un-doped ZnO thin film, the simulated environmental aging is resulting in pin-holes. In the Al-doped ZnO thin films, significant morphological changes occurred after the treatment, with an appearance of platelet-shaped structures that are 100–200 nm wide by 1μm long. Synchrotron x-ray characterization further confirmed the heterogeneity in the aged Al-doped ZnO, showing the formation of anisotropic structures and disordering. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated the formation of a zinc hydroxide in the aged Al-doped films. In conclusion, utilizing advanced characterization methods, our studies provided information with an unprecedented level of details and revealed the chemical and morphologically heterogeneous nature of the degradation in ZnO thin films.« less

  15. Peroxynitrite induces destruction of the tetrahydrobiopterin and heme in endothelial nitric oxide synthase: transition from reversible to irreversible enzyme inhibition†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiguo; Druhan, Lawrence J.; Chen, Chun-An; Hemann, Craig; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Berka, Vladimir; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Zweier, Jay L.

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important regulator of vascular and cardiac function. Peroxynitrite (ONOO−) inactivates eNOS, but questions remain regarding the mechanisms of this process. It has been reported that inactivation is due to oxidation of the eNOS zinc-thiolate cluster, rather than the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4); however, this remains highly controversial. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms of ONOO−-induced eNOS dysfunction and their dose-dependence. Exposure of human eNOS to ONOO− resulted in a dose-dependent loss of activity with a marked destabilization of the eNOS dimer. HPLC analysis indicated that both free and eNOS-bound BH4 were oxidized during exposure to ONOO−; however, full oxidation of protein bound biopterin required higher ONOO− levels. Additionally, ONOO− triggered changes in UV/Visible spectrum and heme content of the enzyme. Pre-incubation of eNOS with BH4 decreased dimer destabilization and heme alteration. Addition of BH4 to the ONOO−-destabilized eNOS dimer only partially rescued enzyme function. In contrast to ONOO− treatment, incubation with the zinc chelator TPEN with removal of enzyme-bound zinc did not change the eNOS activity or stability of the SDS-resistant eNOS dimer, demonstrating that the dimer stabilization induced by BH4 does not require zinc occupancy of the zinc-thiolate cluster. While ONOO− treatment was observed to induce loss of Zn-binding this can not account for the loss of enzyme activity. Therefore, ONOO−-induced eNOS inactivation is primarily due to oxidation of BH4 and irreversible destruction of the heme/heme-center. PMID:20184376

  16. Communication: Protonation process of formic acid from the ionization and fragmentation of dimers induced by synchrotron radiation in the valence region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arruda, Manuela S.; Medina, Aline; Sousa, Josenilton N.; Mendes, Luiz A. V.; Marinho, Ricardo R. T.; Prudente, Frederico V.

    2016-04-01

    The ionization and fragmentation of monomers of organic molecules have been extensively studied in the gas phase using mass spectroscopy. In the spectra of these molecules it is possible to identify the presence of protonated cations, which have a mass-to-charge ratio one unit larger than the parent ion. In this work, we investigate this protonation process as a result of dimers photofragmentation. Experimental photoionization and photofragmentation results of doubly deuterated formic acid (DCOOD) in the gas phase by photons in the vacuum ultraviolet region are presented. The experiment was performed by using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer installed at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory and spectra for different pressure values in the experimental chamber were obtained. The coupled cluster approach with single and double substitutions was employed to assist the experimental analysis. Results indicate that protonated formic acid ions are originated from dimer dissociation, and the threshold photoionization of (DCOOD)ṡD+ is also determined.

  17. Competitive Energy and Electron Transfer in β-Functionalized Free-Base Porphyrin-Zinc Porphyrin Dimer Axially Coordinated to C60 : Synthesis, Supramolecular Formation and Excited-State Processes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Thomas, Michael B; Jinadasa, R G Waruna; Wang, Hong; D'Souza, Francis

    2017-09-18

    Simultaneous occurrence of energy and electron transfer events involving different acceptor sites in a newly assembled supramolecular triad comprised of covalently linked free-base porphyrin-zinc porphyrin dyad, H 2 P-ZnP axially coordinated to electron acceptor fullerene, has been successfully demonstrated. The dyad was connected through the β-pyrrole positions of the porphyrin macrocycle instead of the traditionally used meso-positions for better electronic communication. Interestingly, the β-pyrrole functionalization modulated the optical properties to such an extent that it was possible to almost exclusively excite the zinc porphyrin entity in the supramolecular triad. The measured binding constant for the complex with 1:1 molecular stoichiometry was in the order of 10 4  m -1 revealing moderately stable complex formation. An energy level diagram constructed using optical, electrochemical and computational results suggested that both the anticipated energy and electron events are thermodynamically feasible in the triad. Consequently, it was possible to demonstrate occurrence of excited state energy transfer to the covalently linked H 2 P, and electron transfer to the coordinated ImC 60 from studies involving steady-state and time-resolved emission, and femto- and nanosecond transient absorption studies. The estimated energy transfer was around 67 % in the dyad with a rate constant of 1.1×10 9  s -1 . In the supramolecular triad, the charge separated state was rather long-lived although it was difficult to arrive the exact lifetime of charge separated state from nanosecond transient spectral studies due to overlap of strong triplet excited signals of porphyrin in the monitoring wavelength window. Nevertheless, simultaneous occurrence of energy and electron transfer in the appropriately positioned energy and electron acceptor entities in a supramolecular triad was possible to demonstrate in the present study, a step forward to unraveling the complex

  18. Zinc induces exposure of hydrophobic sites in the C-terminal domain of gC1q-R/p33.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2002-09-01

    Endothelial cells and platelets are known to express gC1q-R on their surface. In addition to C1q, endothelial cell gC1q-R has been shown to bind high molecular weight kininogen (HK) and factor XII (FXII). However, unlike C1q, whose interaction with gC1q-R does not require divalent ions, the binding of HK to gC1q-R is absolutely dependent on the presence of zinc. However, the mechanism by which zinc modulates this interaction is not fully understood. To investigate the role of zinc, binding studies were done using the hydrophobic dye, bis-ANS. The fluorescence intensity of bis-ANS, greatly increases and the emission maximum is blue-shifted from 525 to 485nm upon binding to hydrophobic sites on proteins. In this report, we show that a blue-shift in emission maximum is also observed when bis-ANS binds to gC1q-R in the presence but not in the absence of zinc suggesting that zinc induces exposure of hydrophobic sites in the molecule. The binding of bis-ANS to gC1q-R is specific, dose-dependent, and reversible. In the presence of zinc, this binding is abrogated by monoclonal antibody 74.5.2 directed against gC1q-R residues 204-218. This segment of gC1q-R, which corresponds to the beta6 strand in the crystal structure, has been shown previously to be the binding site for HK. A similar trend in zinc-induced gC1q-R binding was also observed using the hydrophobic matrix octyl-Sepharose. Taken together, our data suggest that zinc can induce the exposure of hydrophobic sites in the C-terminal domain of gC1q-R involved in binding to HK/FXII.

  19. Oxidative stress-induced increase of intracellular zinc in astrocytes decreases their functional expression of P2X7 receptors and engulfing activity.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Takahiro; Mukai, Ayumi; Ohishi, Akihiro; Nishida, Kentaro; Nagasawa, Kazuki

    2017-12-01

    Neuron-glia communication mediated by neuro- and glio-transmitters such as ATP and zinc is crucial for the maintenance of brain homeostasis, and its dysregulation is found under pathological conditions. It is reported that under oxidative stress-loaded conditions, astrocytes exhibit increased intra- and extra-cellular labile zinc, the latter triggering microglial M1 activation, while the pathophysiological role of the former remains unrevealed. In this study, we examined whether the oxidative stress-induced increase of intracellular labile zinc is involved in the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R)-mediated regulation of astrocytic engulfing activity. The exposure of cultured astrocytes to sub-lethal oxidative stress through their treatment with 400 μM H 2 O 2 increased intracellular labile zinc, of which the concentration reached a peak level of approximately 2 μM at 2 h after the treatment. In astrocytes under sub-lethal oxidative stress, the uptake of YO-PRO-1 and latex beads as markers for P2X7R channel/pore activity and astrocytic engulfing activity, respectively, was decreased, and these decreased activities were accompanied by decreased expression of P2X7R at the plasma membrane via intracellular labile zinc-mediated translocation of it. With the oxidative stress, the expression level of full length P2X7R relative to that of its splice variants in astrocytes was decreased, leading to a decrease of the relative expression of the trimer consisting of full length P2X7R. Collectively, sub-lethal oxidative stress induces an astrocytic modal shift from the normal resting engulfing mode to the activated astrogliosis mode via an intracellular labile zinc-mediated decrease of the functional expression of P2X7R.

  20. The N-Terminal CCHC Zinc Finger Motif Mediates Homodimerization of Transcription Factor BCL11B.

    PubMed

    Grabarczyk, Piotr; Winkler, Passorn; Delin, Martin; Sappa, Praveen K; Bekeschus, Sander; Hildebrandt, Petra; Przybylski, Grzegorz K; Völker, Uwe; Hammer, Elke; Schmidt, Christian A

    2018-03-01

    The BCL11B gene encodes a Krüppel-like, sequence-specific zinc finger (ZF) transcription factor that acts as either a repressor or an activator, depending on its posttranslational modifications. The importance of BCL11B in numerous biological processes in multiple organs has been well established in mouse knockout models. The phenotype of the first de novo monoallelic germ line missense mutation in the BCL11B gene (encoding N441K) strongly implies that the mutant protein acts in a dominant-negative manner by neutralizing the unaffected protein through the formation of a nonfunctional dimer. Using a Förster resonance energy transfer-assisted fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS-FRET) assay and affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP-MS), we show that the N-terminal CCHC zinc finger motif is necessary and sufficient for the formation of the BCL11B dimer. Mutation of the CCHC ZF in BCL11B abolishes its transcription-regulatory activity. In addition, unlike wild-type BCL11B, this mutant is incapable of inducing cell cycle arrest and protecting against DNA damage-driven apoptosis. Our results confirm the BCL11B dimerization hypothesis and prove its importance for BCL11B function. By mapping the relevant regions to the CCHC domain, we describe a previously unidentified mechanism of transcription factor homodimerization. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Zinc Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Eye Conditions Clinical Digest: Hepatitis C and Dietary Supplements Related Resources From Other Agencies Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) ( NEI ) Can Zinc Be Harmful? ( ODS ) Zinc ( ODS ) Follow NCCIH: Read our disclaimer ...

  2. Investigation on the negative bias illumination stress-induced instability of amorphous indium-tin-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jaeman; Kim, Dae Geun; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Lim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Je-Hun; Kim, Yong-Sung; Ahn, Byung Du; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2014-10-01

    The quantitative analysis of mechanism on negative bias illumination stress (NBIS)-induced instability of amorphous indium-tin-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor (TFT) was suggested along with the effect of equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) of gate insulator. The analysis was implemented through combining the experimentally extracted density of subgap states and the device simulation. During NBIS, it was observed that the thicker EOT causes increase in both the shift of threshold voltage and the variation of subthreshold swing as well as the hump-like feature in a transfer curve. We found that the EOT-dependence of NBIS instability can be clearly explicated with the donor creation model, in which a larger amount of valence band tail states is transformed into either the ionized oxygen vacancy VO2+ or peroxide O22- with the increase of EOT. It was also found that the VO2+-related extrinsic factor accounts for 80%-92% of the total donor creation taking place in the valence band tail states while the rest is taken by the O22- related intrinsic factor. The ratio of extrinsic factor compared to the total donor creation also increased with the increase of EOT, which could be explained by more prominent oxygen deficiency. The key founding of our work certainly represents that the established model should be considered very effective for analyzing the instability of the post-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) ZnO-based compound semiconductor TFTs with the mobility, which is much higher than those of a-IGZO TFTs.

  3. Zinc Mesoporphyrin Induces Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Hepatitis C Nonstructural 5A Protein in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Weihong; Tian, Qing; Zheng, Jianyu; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims The nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV), plays a critical role in HCV replication and is an attractive target for the therapy of HCV infection. So far, little is known about the post-translational regulation of NS5A protein and its precise role in HCV RNA replication. Our objectives were to elucidate the down-regulation of NS5A protein and HCV RNA replication by zinc mesoporphyrin (ZnMP), and the mechanism by which this process occurs. Methods Human hepatoma cells expressing HCV proteins were used to investigate the post-translational regulation of ZnMP on NS5A protein by Western blots (WB) and immunoprecipitation (IP). Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to determine the effects of ZnMP on HCV RNA replication. Results ZnMP selectively and markedly down-regulated NS5A protein levels by increasing degradation of NS5A protein [half life fell from 18.7 h to 2.7 h]. The proteasome inhibitors, epoxomicin and MG132, significantly abrogated degradation of NS5A protein by ZnMP without affecting levels of NS5A in the absence of ZnMP. Analysis of immunoprecipitates with an anti-ubiquitin antibody revealed polyubiquitination of NS5A, suggesting that ZnMP induces ubiquitination of NS5A protein. In addition, 10 μM of ZnMP reduced HCV replication by ~63% in the Con1 replicon cells, ~70% in J6/JFH1 HCV transfected cells, and ~90% in J6/JFH1 HCV infected cells without affecting cell viability. Conclusions ZnMP produces a rapid and profound down-regulation of the NS5A protein by enhancing its polyubiquitination and proteasome-dependent catabolism. Zinc mesoporphyrin may hold promise as a novel agent to treat HCV infection. PMID:19909748

  4. Pyruvate and oxaloacetate limit zinc-induced oxidative HT-22 neuronal cell injury.

    PubMed

    Berry, Elizabeth V; Toms, Nick J

    2006-12-01

    During CNS ischaemia, accumulating evidence suggests that raised intracellular Zn(2+) levels may play a significant role in inducing neuronal cell death. Several mechanisms mediating Zn(2+)-induced cell death have been suggested, however the precise molecular mechanisms remain uncertain. Employing the HT-22 murine hippocampal neuronal cell line, we have evaluated possible mechanisms of cytotoxic extracellular Zn(2+) insults. Increased extracellular Zn(2+) levels was found to induce concentration-dependent cytotoxicity. When tested at 200muM, Zn(2+) increased intracellular Zn(2+) levels (determined via FluoZin-3 fluorescence) and rapidly induced cell death. However, neither L-type (nimodipine) nor T-type (mibefradil) voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel inhibitors limited Zn(2+)-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, and in contrast with staurosporine, Zn(2+) cytotoxic insults failed to induce significant caspase-3 activation and were insensitive to the poly-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk. Antioxidant co-application (Trolox and N,N'-diphenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (DPPD)) was neuroprotective versus 6h Zn(2+) insults. Additionally, despite inducing significant mitochondrial membrane potential loss, Zn(2+) failed to induce detectable increased superoxide production. However, both pyruvate and oxaloacetate were found to afford significant neuroprotection versus Zn(2+) cytotoxic insults, without significantly influencing intracellular Zn(2+) accumulation. We conclude that cultured HT-22 neurones are vulnerable to Zn(2+) cytotoxic insults via a non-caspase-3 mediated mechanism, which involves glycolytic inhibition.

  5. Regulation of zinc homeostasis by inducible NO synthase-derived NO: nuclear metallothionein translocation and intranuclear Zn2+ release.

    PubMed

    Spahl, Daniela U; Berendji-Grün, Denise; Suschek, Christoph V; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria; Kröncke, Klaus-D

    2003-11-25

    Zn2+ is critical for the functional and structural integrity of cells and contributes to a number of important processes including gene expression. It has been shown that NO exogenously applied via NO donors resulting in nitrosative stress leads to cytoplasmic Zn2+ release from the zinc storing protein metallothionein (MT) and probably other proteins that complex Zn2+ via cysteine thiols. We show here that, in cytokine-activated murine aortic endothelial cells, NO derived from the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) induces a transient nuclear release of Zn2+. This nuclear Zn2+ release depends on the presence of MT as shown by the lack of this effect in activated endothelial cells from MT-deficient mice and temporally correlates with nuclear MT translocation. Data also show that NO is an essential but not sufficient signal for MT-mediated Zn2+ trafficking from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. In addition, we found that, endogenously via iNOS, synthesized NO increases the constitutive mRNA expression of both MT-1 and MT-2 genes and that nitrosative stress exogenously applied via an NO donor increases constitutive MT mRNA expression via intracellular Zn2+ release. In conclusion, we here provide evidence for a signaling mechanism based on iNOS-derived NO through the regulation of intracellular Zn2+ trafficking and homeostasis.

  6. Regulation of zinc homeostasis by inducible NO synthase-derived NO: Nuclear metallothionein translocation and intranuclear Zn2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Spahl, Daniela U.; Berendji-Grün, Denise; Suschek, Christoph V.; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria; Kröncke, Klaus-D.

    2003-01-01

    Zn2+ is critical for the functional and structural integrity of cells and contributes to a number of important processes including gene expression. It has been shown that NO exogenously applied via NO donors resulting in nitrosative stress leads to cytoplasmic Zn2+ release from the zinc storing protein metallothionein (MT) and probably other proteins that complex Zn2+ via cysteine thiols. We show here that, in cytokine-activated murine aortic endothelial cells, NO derived from the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) induces a transient nuclear release of Zn2+. This nuclear Zn2+ release depends on the presence of MT as shown by the lack of this effect in activated endothelial cells from MT-deficient mice and temporally correlates with nuclear MT translocation. Data also show that NO is an essential but not sufficient signal for MT-mediated Zn2+ trafficking from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. In addition, we found that, endogenously via iNOS, synthesized NO increases the constitutive mRNA expression of both MT-1 and MT-2 genes and that nitrosative stress exogenously applied via an NO donor increases constitutive MT mRNA expression via intracellular Zn2+ release. In conclusion, we here provide evidence for a signaling mechanism based on iNOS-derived NO through the regulation of intracellular Zn2+ trafficking and homeostasis. PMID:14617770

  7. Protective effect of quercetin and/or l-arginine against nano-zinc oxide-induced cardiotoxicity in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faddah, L. M.; Baky, Nayira A. Abdel; Mohamed, Azza M.; Al-Rasheed, Nouf M.; Al-Rasheed, Nawal M.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective role of quercetin and/or l-arginine against the cardiotoxic potency of zinc oxide nanoparticle (ZnO-NP)-induced cardiac infarction. ZnO-NPs (50 nm) were administered orally at either 600 mg or 1 g/kg body weight for 5 consecutive days. The results revealed that co-administration of quercetin and/or l-arginine (each 200 mg/kg body weight) daily for 3 weeks to rats intoxicated by either of the two doses markedly ameliorated increases in serum markers of cardiac infarction, including troponin T, creatine kinase-MB, and myoglobin, as well as increases in proinflammatory biomarkers, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and C-reactive protein, compared with intoxicated, untreated rats. Each agent alone or in combination also successfully modulated the alterations in serum vascular endothelial growth factor, cardiac calcium concentration, and oxidative DNA damage as well as the increase in the apoptosis marker caspase 3 of cardiac tissue in response to ZnO-NP toxicity. In conclusion, early treatment with quercetin and l-arginine may protect cardiac tissue from infarction induced by the toxic effects of ZnO-NPs.

  8. The sigma-1 receptor-Zinc finger protein 179 pathway protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tzu-Chieh; Lin, Shu-Hui; Lee, Pin-Tse; Yeh, Shiu-Hwa; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Chou, Szu-Yi; Su, Tsung-Ping; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Chuang, Jian-Ying

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have implicated the pathogenesis of several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, hence protecting neurons against ROS is very important. In this study, we focused on sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), a chaperone at endoplasmic reticulum, and investigated its protective functions. Using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced ROS accumulation model, we verified that apoptosis-signaling pathways were elicited by H2O2 treatment. However, the Sig-1R agonists, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), reduced the activation of apoptotic pathways significantly. By performing protein-protein interaction assays and shRNA knockdown of Sig-1R, we identified the brain Zinc finger protein 179 (Znf179) as a downstream target of Sig-1R regulation. The neuroprotective effect of Znf179 overexpression was similar to that of DHEAS treatment, and likely mediated by affecting the levels of antioxidant enzymes. We also quantified the levels of peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the hippocampi of wild-type and Znf179 knockout mice, and found both enzymes to be reduced in the knockout versus the wild-type mice. In summary, these results reveal that Znf179 plays a novel role in neuroprotection, and Sig-1R agonists may be therapeutic candidates to prevent ROS-induced damage in neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic diseases. PMID:26792191

  9. Mobilization of tissue cadmium in mice and calves and reversal of cadmium induced tissue damage in calves by zinc

    SciT

    Reddy, C.S.; Mohammad, F.K.; Ganjam, V.K.

    1987-08-01

    Earlier studies demonstrated that simultaneous dietary Zn supplementation to calves fed Cd, significantly decreased the accumulation of Cd in liver, kidney and muscle. However, studies are lacking in evaluating the effectiveness of zinc in reducing Cd-burden in animals with pre-existing tissue Cd-load, a situation encountered in chronic Cd intoxication. This study examined the effects of oral Zn (AnO) on tissue Cd levels in mice. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and sodium sulfate (SS) were also used to evaluate the effects of providing organic and inorganic sources of sulfur on tissue Cd levels. Following demonstration of reduced Cd levels in tissues of mice receivingmore » antidotal Zn, subsequent investigation was aimed at studying the reversal of Cd-induced changes by Zn. The authors also examined whether Cd-induced reduction in epididymal 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity could explain previously reported low levels of circulating dihydrotestosterone (DHT) following Cd treatment. The ability of Zn to reverse the inhibition of 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity by Cd was also examined.« less

  10. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce rat retinal ganglion cell damage through bcl-2, caspase-9 and caspase-12 pathways.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dadong; Bi, Hongsheng; Wu, Qiuxin; Wang, Daoguang; Cui, Yan

    2013-06-01

    Nanomaterials, including zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, are being developed for a variety of commercial products. Recent reports showed that cells exposed to ZnO nanoparticles produced severe cytotoxicity accompanied by oxidative stress and genotoxicity. To understand the possible mechanism underlying oxidative stress of ZnO nanoparticles, the present investigation focused on the direct bioactivity of ZnO nanoparticles using a rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC-5) culture. At concentrations relevant to those used in vitro exposure of RGC-5 cells to ZnO nanoparticles, it was found that ZnO nanoparticles could inhibit cell proliferation in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Meanwhile, cell cycle arrest of S and G2/M phases occurred in RGC-5 cells induced by ZnO nanoparticles. Moreover, our results also demonstrated that the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elevated level of caspase-12 as well as decreased levels of bcl-2 and caspase-9 occurred after treatment with different concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles when compared to those in untreated cells. In summary, our findings suggest that ZnO nanoparticles could lead to the over generations of ROS and caspase-12 as well as decreased levels of bcl-2 and caspase-9. These results indicate that bcl-2, caspase-9 and caspase-12 may play significant roles in ZnO nanoparticle-induced RGC-5 cell damage.

  11. Nanosized zinc oxide particles do not promote DHPN-induced lung carcinogenesis but cause reversible epithelial hyperplasia of terminal bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiegou; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Alexander, David B; Fukamachi, Katsumi; Numano, Takamasa; Suzui, Masumi; Shimizu, Hideo; Omori, Toyonori; Kanno, Jun; Hirose, Akihiko; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is known to induce lung toxicity, including terminal bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia, which gives rise to concerns that nanosized ZnO (nZnO) might lead to lung carcinogenesis. We studied the tumor promoting activity of nZnO by an initiation-promotion protocol using human c-Ha-ras proto-oncogene transgenic rats (Hras128 rats). The rats were given 0.2 % N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (DHPN) in the drinking water for 2 weeks and then treated with 0.5 ml of 250 or 500 μg/ml nZnO suspension by intra-pulmonary spraying once every 2 weeks for a total of 7 times. Treatment with nZnO particles did not promote DHPN-induced lung carcinogenesis. However, nZnO dose-dependently caused epithelial hyperplasia of terminal bronchioles (EHTB) and fibrosis-associated interstitial pneumonitis (FAIP) that were independent of DHPN treatment. Tracing the fate of EHTB lesions in wild-type rats indicated that the hyperplastic lesions almost completely disappeared within 12 weeks after the last nZnO treatment. Since nZnO particles were not found in the lung and ZnCl2 solution induced similar lung lesions and gene expression profiles, the observed lesions were most likely caused by dissolved Zn(2+). In summary, nZnO did not promote carcinogenesis in the lung and induced EHTB and FAIP lesions that regressed rapidly, probably due to clearance of surplus Zn(2+) from the lung.

  12. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Induces Microglial Death by NADPH-Oxidase-Independent Reactive Oxygen Species as well as Energy Depletion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anuj Kumar; Singh, Vikas; Gera, Ruchi; Purohit, Mahaveer Prasad; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2017-10-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticle (ZnO-NP) is one of the most widely used engineered nanoparticles. Upon exposure, nanoparticle can eventually reach the brain through various routes, interact with different brain cells, and alter their activity. Microglia is the fastest glial cell to respond to any toxic insult. Nanoparticle exposure can activate microglia and induce neuroinflammation. Simultaneous to activation, microglial death can exacerbate the scenario. Therefore, we focused on studying the effect of ZnO-NP on microglia and finding out the pathway involved in the microglial death. The present study showed that the 24 h inhibitory concentration 50 (IC 50 ) of ZnO-NP for microglia is 6.6 μg/ml. Early events following ZnO-NP exposure involved increase in intracellular calcium level as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Neither of NADPH oxidase inhibitors, apocynin, (APO) and diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPIC) were able to reduce the ROS level and rescue microglia from ZnO-NP toxicity. In contrary, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) showed opposite effect. Exogenous supplementation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduced ROS significantly even beyond control level but partially rescued microglial viability. Interestingly, pyruvate supplementation rescued microglia near to control level. Following 10 h of ZnO-NP exposure, intracellular ATP level was measured to be almost 50 % to the control. ZnO-NP-induced ROS as well as ATP depletion both disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently triggered the apoptotic pathway. The level of apoptosis-inducing proteins was measured by western blot analysis and found to be upregulated. Taken together, we have deciphered that ZnO-NP induced microglial apoptosis by NADPH oxidase-independent ROS as well as ATP depletion.

  13. Thermally induced anchoring of a zinc-carboxyphenylporphyrin on rutile TiO2 (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jöhr, Res; Hinaut, Antoine; Pawlak, Rémy; Zajac, Łukasz; Olszowski, Piotr; Such, Bartosz; Glatzel, Thilo; Zhang, Jun; Muntwiler, Matthias; Bergkamp, Jesse J.; Mateo, Luis-Manuel; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-05-01

    Functionalization of surfaces has become of high interest for a wealth of applications such as sensors, hybrid photovoltaics, catalysis, and molecular electronics. Thereby molecule-surface interactions are of crucial importance for the understanding of interface properties. An especially relevant point is the anchoring of molecules to surfaces. In this work, we analyze this process for a zinc-porphyrin equipped with carboxylic acid anchoring groups on rutile TiO2 (110) using scanning probe microscopy. After evaporation, the porphyrins are not covalently bound to the surface. Upon annealing, the carboxylic acid anchors undergo deprotonation and bind to surface titanium atoms. The formation of covalent bonds is evident from the changed stability of the molecule on the surface as well as the adsorption configuration. Annealed porphyrins are rotated by 45° and adopt another adsorption site. The influence of binding on electronic coupling with the surface is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy. The observed shifts of Zn 2p and N 1s levels to higher binding energies indicate charging of the porphyrin core, which is accompanied by a deformation of the macrocycle due to a strong interaction with the surface.

  14. Silicon induced stability and mobility of indium zinc oxide based bilayer thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Ram Narayan; Tiwari, Nidhi; Liu, Po-Tsun; Shieh, Han-Ping D.; Kumar, Jitendra

    2016-11-01

    Indium zinc oxide (IZO), silicon containing IZO, and IZO/IZO:Si bilayer thin films have been prepared by dual radio frequency magnetron sputtering on glass and SiO2/Si substrates for studying their chemical compositions and electrical characteristics in order to ascertain reliability for thin film transistor (TFT) applications. An attempt is therefore made here to fabricate single IZO and IZO/IZO:Si bilayer TFTs to study the effect of film thickness, silicon incorporation, and bilayer active channel on device performance and negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) stability. TFTs with increasing single active IZO layer thickness exhibit decrease in carrier mobility but steady improvement in NBIS; the best values being μFE ˜ 27.0, 22.0 cm2/Vs and ΔVth ˜ -13.00, -6.75 V for a channel thickness of 7 and 27 nm, respectively. While silicon incorporation is shown to reduce the mobility somewhat, it raises the stability markedly (ΔVth ˜ -1.20 V). Further, IZO (7 nm)/IZO:Si (27 nm) bilayer based TFTs display useful characteristics (field effect mobility, μFE = 15.3 cm2/Vs and NBIS value, ΔVth =-0.75 V) for their application in transparent electronics.

  15. γ-irradiation induced zinc ferrites and their enhanced room-temperature ammonia gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, S. D.; Awasarmol, V. V.; Ghule, B. G.; Shaikh, S. F.; Gore, S. K.; Sharma, R. P.; Pawar, P. P.; Mane, R. S.

    2018-03-01

    Zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs), synthesized using a facile and cost-effective sol-gel auto-combustion method, were irradiated with 2 and 5 kGy γ-doses using 60Co as a radioactive source. Effect of γ-irradiation on the structure, morphology, pore-size and pore-volume and room-temperature (300 K) gas sensor performance has been measured and reported. Both as-synthesized and γ-irradiated ZnFe2O4 NPs reveal remarkable gas sensor activity to ammonia in contrast to methanol, ethanol, acetone and toluene volatile organic gases. The responses of pristine, 2 and 5 kGy γ-irradiated ZnFe2O4 NPs are respectively 55%, 66% and 81% @100 ppm concentration of ammonia, signifying an importance of γ-irradiation for enhancing the sensitivity, selectivity and stability of ZnFe2O4 NPs as ammonia gas sensors. Thereby, due to increase in surface area and crystallinity on γ-doses, the γ-irradiation improves the room-temperature ammonia gas sensing performance of ZnFe2O4.

  16. Defect-induced instability mechanisms of sputtered amorphous indium tin zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhee; Rim, You Seung; Li, Chao; Wu, Jiechen; Goorsky, Mark; Streit, Dwight

    2018-04-01

    We report the device performance and stability of sputtered amorphous indium-tin-zinc-oxide (ITZO) thin-film transistors as a function of oxygen ratio [O2/(Ar + O2)] during growth. Increasing the oxygen ratio enhanced the incorporation of oxygen during ITZO film growth and reduced the concentration of deep-level defects associated with oxygen vacancies. Under illumination with no bias stress, device stability and persistent photocurrent were improved with increased oxygen ratio. Bias stress tests of the devices were also performed with and without illumination. While high oxygen ratio growth conditions resulted in decreased deep-level oxygen vacancies in the ITZO material, the same conditions resulted in degradation of the interfacial layer between the ITZO channel and dielectric due to the migration of energetic oxygen ions to the interface. Therefore, when bias stress was applied, increased carrier trap density at the interface led to a decrease in device stability that offsets any improvement in the material itself. In order to take advantage of the improved ITZO material growth at a high oxygen ratio, the interface-related problems must be solved.

  17. Biophysical Characterization of the Dimer and Tetramer Interface Interactions of the Human Cytosolic Malic Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Sujithkumar; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2012-01-01

    The cytosolic NADP+-dependent malic enzyme (c-NADP-ME) has a dimer-dimer quaternary structure in which the dimer interface associates more tightly than the tetramer interface. In this study, the urea-induced unfolding process of the c-NADP-ME interface mutants was monitored using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation and enzyme activities. Here, we demonstrate the differential protein stability between dimer and tetramer interface interactions of human c-NADP-ME. Our data clearly demonstrate that the protein stability of c-NADP-ME is affected predominantly by disruptions at the dimer interface rather than at the tetramer interface. First, during thermal stability experiments, the melting temperatures of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are 8–10°C higher than those of the dimer interface mutants. Second, during urea denaturation experiments, the thermodynamic parameters of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are almost identical. However, for the dimer interface mutants, the first transition of the urea unfolding curves shift towards a lower urea concentration, and the unfolding intermediate exist at a lower urea concentration. Third, for tetrameric WT c-NADP-ME, the enzyme is first dissociated from a tetramer to dimers before the 2 M urea treatment, and the dimers then dissociated into monomers before the 2.5 M urea treatment. With a dimeric tetramer interface mutant (H142A/D568A), the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 2.5 M urea treatment, while for a dimeric dimer interface mutant (H51A/D90A), the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 1.5 M urea treatment, indicating that the interactions of c-NADP-ME at the dimer interface are truly stronger than at the tetramer interface. Thus, this study provides a reasonable explanation for why malic enzymes need to assemble as a dimer of dimers. PMID:23284632

  18. Serendipitous discovery of light-induced (In Situ) formation of an Azo-bridged dimeric sulfonated naphthol as a potent PTP1B inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bongard, Robert D; Lepley, Michael; Thakur, Khushabu; Talipov, Marat R; Nayak, Jaladhi; Lipinski, Rachel A Jones; Bohl, Chris; Sweeney, Noreena; Ramchandran, Ramani; Rathore, Rajendra; Sem, Daniel S

    2017-05-31

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) like dual specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5) and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) are drug targets for diseases that include cancer, diabetes, and vascular disorders such as hemangiomas. The PTPs are also known to be notoriously difficult targets for designing inihibitors that become viable drug leads. Therefore, the pipeline for approved drugs in this class is minimal. Furthermore, drug screening for targets like PTPs often produce false positive and false negative results. Studies presented herein provide important insights into: (a) how to detect such artifacts, (b) the importance of compound re-synthesis and verification, and (c) how in situ chemical reactivity of compounds, when diagnosed and characterized, can actually lead to serendipitous discovery of valuable new lead molecules. Initial docking of compounds from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), followed by experimental testing in enzyme inhibition assays, identified an inhibitor of DUSP5. Subsequent control experiments revealed that this compound demonstrated time-dependent inhibition, and also a time-dependent change in color of the inhibitor that correlated with potency of inhibition. In addition, the compound activity varied depending on vendor source. We hypothesized, and then confirmed by synthesis of the compound, that the actual inhibitor of DUSP5 was a dimeric form of the original inhibitor compound, formed upon exposure to light and oxygen. This compound has an IC 50 of 36 μM for DUSP5, and is a competitive inhibitor. Testing against PTP1B, for selectivity, demonstrated the dimeric compound was actually a more potent inhibitor of PTP1B, with an IC 50 of 2.1 μM. The compound, an azo-bridged dimer of sulfonated naphthol rings, resembles previously reported PTP inhibitors, but with 18-fold selectivity for PTP1B versus DUSP5. We report the identification of a potent PTP1B inhibitor that was initially identified in a screen for DUSP5, implying common

  19. Zinc in innate and adaptive tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Zinc is important. It is the second most abundant trace metal with 2-4 grams in humans. It is an essential trace element, critical for cell growth, development and differentiation, DNA synthesis, RNA transcription, cell division, and cell activation. Zinc deficiency has adverse consequences during embryogenesis and early childhood development, particularly on immune functioning. It is essential in members of all enzyme classes, including over 300 signaling molecules and transcription factors. Free zinc in immune and tumor cells is regulated by 14 distinct zinc importers (ZIP) and transporters (ZNT1-8). Zinc depletion induces cell death via apoptosis (or necrosis if apoptotic pathways are blocked) while sufficient zinc levels allows maintenance of autophagy. Cancer cells have upregulated zinc importers, and frequently increased zinc levels, which allow them to survive. Based on this novel synthesis, approaches which locally regulate zinc levels to promote survival of immune cells and/or induce tumor apoptosis are in order. PMID:21087493

  20. Serum thymulin in human zinc deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, A S; Meftah, S; Abdallah, J; Kaplan, J; Brewer, G J; Bach, J F; Dardenne, M

    1988-01-01

    The activity of thymulin (a thymic hormone) is dependent on the presence of zinc in the molecule. We assayed serum thymulin activity in three models of mildly zinc-deficient (ZD) human subjects before and after zinc supplementation: (a) two human volunteers in whom a specific and mild zinc deficiency was induced by dietary means; (b) six mildly ZD adult sickle cell anemia (SCA) subjects; and (c) six mildly ZD adult non-SCA subjects. Their plasma zinc levels were normal and they showed no overt clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency. The diagnosis of mild zinc deficiency was based on the assay of zinc in lymphocytes, granulocytes, and platelets. Serum thymulin activity was decreased as a result of mild zinc deficiency and was corrected by in vivo and in vitro zinc supplementation, suggesting that this parameter was a sensitive indicator of zinc deficiency in humans. An increase in T101-, sIg-cells, decrease in T4+/T8+ ratio, and decreased IL 2 activity were observed in the experimental human model during the zinc depletion phase, all of which were corrected after repletion with zinc. Similar changes in lymphocyte subpopulation, correctable with zinc supplementation, were also observed in mildly ZD SCA subjects. Inasmuch as thymulin is known to induce intra- and extrathymic T cell differentiation, our studies provide a possible mechanism for the role of zinc on T cell functions. Images PMID:3262625

  1. Diabetes-induced hepatic pathogenic damage, inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance was exacerbated in zinc deficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Lu, Xuemian; Tan, Yi; Li, Bing; Miao, Xiao; Jin, Litai; Shi, Xue; Zhang, Xiang; Miao, Lining; Li, Xiaokun; Cai, Lu

    2012-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency often occurs in the patients with diabetes. Effects of Zn deficiency on diabetes-induced hepatic injury were investigated. Type 1 diabetes was induced in FVB mice with multiple low-dose streptozotocin. Hyperglycemic and age-matched control mice were treated with and without Zn chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylemethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), at 5 mg/kg body-weight daily for 4 months. Hepatic injury was examined by serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level and liver histopathological and biochemical changes. Hepatic Zn deficiency (lower than control level, p<0.05) was seen in the mice with either diabetes or TPEN treatment and more evident in the mice with both diabetes and TPEN. Zn deficiency exacerbated hepatic injuries, shown by further increased serum ALT, hepatic lipid accumulation, inflammation, oxidative damage, and endoplasmic reticulum stress-related cell death in Diabetes/TPEN group compared to Diabetes alone. Diabetes/TPEN group also showed a significant decrease in nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression and transcription action along with significant increases in Akt negative regulators, decrease in Akt and GSK-3β phosphorylation, and increase in nuclear accumulation of Fyn (a Nrf2 negative regulator). In vitro study with HepG2 cells showed that apoptotic effect of TPEN at 0.5-1.0 µM could be completely prevented by simultaneous Zn supplementation at the dose range of 30-50 µM. Zn is required for maintaining Akt activation by inhibiting the expression of Akt negative regulators; Akt activation can inhibit Fyn nuclear translocation to export nuclear Nrf2 to cytoplasm for degradation. Zn deficiency significantly enhanced diabetes-induced hepatic injury likely through down-regulation of Nrf2 function.

  2. Zinc Deficiency Induces Apoptosis via Mitochondrial p53- and Caspase-Dependent Pathways in Human Neuronal Precursor Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S.; Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Morgan, Thomas J., Jr.; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent…

  3. NbCZF1, a Novel C2H2-Type Zinc Finger Protein, as a New Regulator of SsCut-Induced Plant Immunity in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huajian; Zhao, Tongyao; Zhuang, Peitong; Song, Zhiqiang; Du, Hui; Tang, Zhaozhao; Gao, Zhimou

    2016-12-01

    SsCut, which functions as an elicitor, can induce plant immunity. In this study, we utilized Nicotiana benthamiana and virus-induced gene silencing to decrease the expression of > 2,500 genes individually. Using this forward genetics approach, several genes were identified that, when silenced, compromised SsCut-triggered cell death based on a cell death assay. A C 2 H 2 -type zinc finger gene was isolated from N. benthamiana Sequence analysis indicated that the gene encodes a 27 kDa protein with 253 amino acids containing two typical C 2 H 2 -type zinc finger domains; this gene was named NbCZF1 We found that SsCut-induced cell death could be inhibited by virus-induced gene silencing of NbCZF1 in N. benthamiana In addition, SsCut induces stomatal closure, accompanied by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by NADPH oxidases and nitric oxide (NO) production. NbCZF1-silenced plants showed impaired SsCut-induced stomatal closure, decreased SsCut-induced production of ROS and NO in guard cells and reduced SsCut-induced resistance against Phytophthora nicotianae Taken together, these results demonstrate that the NbCZF1-ROS-NO pathway mediates multiple SsCut-triggered responses, including stomatal closure, hypersensitive responses and defense-related gene expression. This is the first report describing the function of a C 2 H 2 -type zinc finger protein in N. benthamiana. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Study of zinc-induced changes in lymphocyte membranes using atomic force microscopy, luminescence, and light scattering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonenko, D. S.; Khairullina, A. Ya.; Yasinskii, V. M.; Kozlova, N. M.; Zubritskaja, G. P.; Slobozhanina, E. I.

    2011-07-01

    Changes in the surface structure of lymphocyte membranes exposed to various concentrations of zinc ions are studied. It is found by atomic force microscopy that increasing the concentration of zinc ions leads to a reduction in the correlation length of the autocorrelation function of the roughness profile of a lymphocyte compared to control samples; this may indicate the existence of fine structure in the membrane surface. Fluorescence markers are used to observe a reduction in the microviscosity of the lipids in the outer monolayer of the lipid bilayer after lymphocytes are exposed to Zn ions, as well as the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the surface membrane, and the oxidation of HS-groups of membrane proteins. Calculations of the absorption coefficients of lymphocytes modified with zinc reveal the existence of absorption bands owing to the formation of metal-protein complexes and zinc oxide nanoparticles. These results indicate significant changes in the structural and functional state of lymphocyte membranes exposed to zinc ions.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Exposure Induces Maternal Hypozincemia, and Prenatal Zinc Treatment Prevents Autistic-Like Behaviors and Disturbances in the Striatal Dopaminergic and mTOR Systems of Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Kirsten, Thiago Berti; Chaves-Kirsten, Gabriela P.; Bernardes, Suene; Scavone, Cristoforo; Sarkis, Jorge E.; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Felicio, Luciano F.

    2015-01-01

    Autism is characterized by social deficits, repetitive behaviors, and cognitive inflexibility. The risk factors appear to include genetic and environmental conditions, such as prenatal infections and maternal dietary factors. Previous investigations by our group have demonstrated that prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mimics infection by gram-negative bacteria, induces autistic-like behaviors. To understand the causes of autistic-like behaviors, we evaluated maternal serum metal concentrations, which are involved in intrauterine development and infection/inflammation. We identified reduced maternal levels of zinc, magnesium, selenium and manganese after LPS exposure. Because LPS induced maternal hypozincemia, we treated dams with zinc in an attempt to prevent or ease the impairments in the offspring. We evaluated the social and cognitive autistic-like behaviors and brain tissues of the offspring to identify the central mechanism that triggers the development of autism. Prenatal LPS exposure impaired play behaviors and T-maze spontaneous alternations, i.e., it induced autistic-like behaviors. Prenatal LPS also decreased tyrosine hydroxylase levels and increased the levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the striatum. Thus, striatal dopaminergic impairments may be related to autism. Moreover, excessive signaling through the mTOR pathway has been considered a biomarker of autism, corroborating our rat model of autism. Prenatal zinc treatment prevented these autistic-like behaviors and striatal dopaminergic and mTOR disturbances in the offspring induced by LPS exposure. The present findings revealed a possible relation between maternal hypozincemia during gestation and the onset of autism. Furthermore, prenatal zinc administration appears to have a beneficial effect on the prevention of autism. PMID:26218250

  6. Lipopolysaccharide Exposure Induces Maternal Hypozincemia, and Prenatal Zinc Treatment Prevents Autistic-Like Behaviors and Disturbances in the Striatal Dopaminergic and mTOR Systems of Offspring.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Thiago Berti; Chaves-Kirsten, Gabriela P; Bernardes, Suene; Scavone, Cristoforo; Sarkis, Jorge E; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Felicio, Luciano F

    2015-01-01

    Autism is characterized by social deficits, repetitive behaviors, and cognitive inflexibility. The risk factors appear to include genetic and environmental conditions, such as prenatal infections and maternal dietary factors. Previous investigations by our group have demonstrated that prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mimics infection by gram-negative bacteria, induces autistic-like behaviors. To understand the causes of autistic-like behaviors, we evaluated maternal serum metal concentrations, which are involved in intrauterine development and infection/inflammation. We identified reduced maternal levels of zinc, magnesium, selenium and manganese after LPS exposure. Because LPS induced maternal hypozincemia, we treated dams with zinc in an attempt to prevent or ease the impairments in the offspring. We evaluated the social and cognitive autistic-like behaviors and brain tissues of the offspring to identify the central mechanism that triggers the development of autism. Prenatal LPS exposure impaired play behaviors and T-maze spontaneous alternations, i.e., it induced autistic-like behaviors. Prenatal LPS also decreased tyrosine hydroxylase levels and increased the levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the striatum. Thus, striatal dopaminergic impairments may be related to autism. Moreover, excessive signaling through the mTOR pathway has been considered a biomarker of autism, corroborating our rat model of autism. Prenatal zinc treatment prevented these autistic-like behaviors and striatal dopaminergic and mTOR disturbances in the offspring induced by LPS exposure. The present findings revealed a possible relation between maternal hypozincemia during gestation and the onset of autism. Furthermore, prenatal zinc administration appears to have a beneficial effect on the prevention of autism.

  7. Dimerization of human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) RNA: stimulation by cations and possible mechanism.

    PubMed

    Marquet, R; Baudin, F; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L; Mougel, M; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B

    1991-05-11

    The retroviral genome consists of two identical RNA molecules joined close to their 5' ends by the dimer linkage structure. Recent findings indicated that retroviral RNA dimerization and encapsidation are probably related events during virion assembly. We studied the cation-induced dimerization of HIV-1 RNA and results indicate that all in vitro generated HIV-1 RNAs containing a 100 nucleotide domain downstream from the 5' splice site are able to dimerize. RNA dimerization depends on the concentration of RNA, mono- and multivalent cations, the size of the monovalent cation, temperature, and pH. Up to 75% of HIV-1 RNA is dimeric in the presence of spermidine. HIV-1 RNA dimer is fairly resistant to denaturing agents and unaffected by intercalating drugs. Antisense HIV-1 RNA does not dimerize but heterodimers can be formed between HIV-1 RNA and either MoMuLV or RSV RNA. Therefore retroviral RNA dimerization probably does not simply proceed through mechanisms involving Watson-Crick base-pairing. Neither adenine and cytosine protonation, nor quartets containing only guanines appear to determine the stability of the HIV-1 RNA dimer, while quartets involving both adenine(s) and guanine(s) could account for our results. A consensus sequence PuGGAPuA found in the putative dimerization-encapsidation region of all retroviral genomes examined may participate in the dimerization process.

  8. Dimerization of human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) RNA: stimulation by cations and possible mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Marquet, R; Baudin, F; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L; Mougel, M; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B

    1991-01-01

    The retroviral genome consists of two identical RNA molecules joined close to their 5' ends by the dimer linkage structure. Recent findings indicated that retroviral RNA dimerization and encapsidation are probably related events during virion assembly. We studied the cation-induced dimerization of HIV-1 RNA and results indicate that all in vitro generated HIV-1 RNAs containing a 100 nucleotide domain downstream from the 5' splice site are able to dimerize. RNA dimerization depends on the concentration of RNA, mono- and multivalent cations, the size of the monovalent cation, temperature, and pH. Up to 75% of HIV-1 RNA is dimeric in the presence of spermidine. HIV-1 RNA dimer is fairly resistant to denaturing agents and unaffected by intercalating drugs. Antisense HIV-1 RNA does not dimerize but heterodimers can be formed between HIV-1 RNA and either MoMuLV or RSV RNA. Therefore retroviral RNA dimerization probably does not simply proceed through mechanisms involving Watson-Crick base-pairing. Neither adenine and cytosine protonation, nor quartets containing only guanines appear to determine the stability of the HIV-1 RNA dimer, while quartets involving both adenine(s) and guanine(s) could account for our results. A consensus sequence PuGGAPuA found in the putative dimerization-encapsidation region of all retroviral genomes examined may participate in the dimerization process. Images PMID:1645868

  9. Laser-Induced Thermal-Mechanical Damage Characteristics of Cleartran Multispectral Zinc Sulfide with Temperature-Dependent Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yajing; Jiang, Yanxue; Yang, Yanqiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced thermal-mechanical damage characteristics of window materials are the focus problems in laser weapon and anti-radiation reinforcement technology. Thermal-mechanical effects and damage characteristics are investigated for cleartran multispectral zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin film window materials irradiated by continuous laser using three-dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical model. Some temperature-dependent parameters are introduced into the model. The temporal-spatial distributions of temperature and thermal stress are exhibited. The damage mechanism is analyzed. The influences of temperature effect of material parameters and laser intensity on the development of thermal stress and the damage characteristics are examined. The results show, the von Mises equivalent stress along the thickness direction is fluctuant, which originates from the transformation of principal stresses from compressive stress to tensile stress with the increase of depth from irradiated surface. The damage originates from the thermal stress but not the melting. The thermal stress is increased and the damage is accelerated by introducing the temperature effect of parameters or the increasing laser intensity.

  10. Mutant Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) Induces Protein Secretion Pathway Alterations and Exosome Release in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Manuela; Pozzi, Silvia; Tortarolo, Massimo; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Bisighini, Cinzia; Pasetto, Laura; Spaltro, Gabriella; Lidonnici, Dario; Gensano, Francesco; Battaglia, Elisa; Bendotti, Caterina; Bonetto, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most common motor neuron disease and is still incurable. The mechanisms leading to the selective motor neuron vulnerability are still not known. The interplay between motor neurons and astrocytes is crucial in the outcome of the disease. We show that mutant copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) overexpression in primary astrocyte cultures is associated with decreased levels of proteins involved in secretory pathways. This is linked to a general reduction of total secreted proteins, except for specific enrichment in a number of proteins in the media, such as mutant SOD1 and valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97. Because there was also an increase in exosome release, we can deduce that astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 activate unconventional secretory pathways, possibly as a protective mechanism. This may help limit the formation of intracellular aggregates and overcome mutant SOD1 toxicity. We also found that astrocyte-derived exosomes efficiently transfer mutant SOD1 to spinal neurons and induce selective motor neuron death. We conclude that the expression of mutant SOD1 has a substantial impact on astrocyte protein secretion pathways, contributing to motor neuron pathology and disease spread. PMID:23592792

  11. Fast light-induced reversible wettability of a zinc oxide nanorod array coated with a thin gold layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuefan; Du, Hejun; Kong, Junhua; Tran, Van-Thai; Koh, Jia Kai; Zhao, Chenyang; He, Chaobin

    2017-11-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has gained much attention recently due to its excellent physical and chemical properties, and has been extensively studied in energy harvesting applications such as photovoltaic and piezoelectric devices. In recent years, its reversible wettability has also attracted increasing interest. The wettability of ZnO nanostructures with various morphologies has been studied. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is still a lack of investigations on further modifications on ZnO to provide more benefits than pristine ZnO. Comprehensive studies on the reversible wettability are still needed. In this study, a ZnO nanorod array was prepared via a hydrothermal process and subsequently coated with thin gold layers with varied thickness. The morphologies and structures, optical properties and wettability were investigated. It is revealed that the ZnO-Au system possesses recoverable wettability upon switching between visible-ultraviolet light and a dark environment, which is verified by the contact angle change. The introduction of the thin gold layer to the ZnO nanorod array effectively increases the recovery rate of the wettability. The improvements are attributed to the hierarchical structures, which are formed by depositing thin gold layers onto the ZnO nanorod array, the visible light sensitivity due to the plasmonic effect of the deposited gold, as well as the fast charge-induced surface status change upon light illumination or dark storage. The improvement is beneficial to applications in environmental purification, energy harvesting, micro-lenses, and smart devices.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle-Induced Genotoxicity Short Running Title: Genotoxicity of ZnO NPs

    PubMed Central

    Scherzad, Agmal; Meyer, Till; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Background: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most frequently applied nanomaterials in consumer products. Evidence exists regarding the cytotoxic effects of ZnO NPs in mammalian cells; however, knowledge about the potential genotoxicity of ZnO NPs is rare, and results presented in the current literature are inconsistent. Objectives: The aim of this review is to summarize the existing data regarding the DNA damage that ZnO NPs induce, and focus on the possible molecular mechanisms underlying genotoxic events. Methods: Electronic literature databases were systematically searched for studies that report on the genotoxicity of ZnO NPs. Results: Several methods and different endpoints demonstrate the genotoxic potential of ZnO NPs. Most publications describe in vitro assessments of the oxidative DNA damage triggered by dissoluted Zn2+ ions. Most genotoxicological investigations of ZnO NPs address acute exposure situations. Conclusion: Existing evidence indicates that ZnO NPs possibly have the potential to damage DNA. However, there is a lack of long-term exposure experiments that clarify the intracellular bioaccumulation of ZnO NPs and the possible mechanisms of DNA repair and cell survival. PMID:29240707

  13. Laser-induced periodic surface structures on zinc oxide crystals upon two-colour femtosecond double-pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2017-03-01

    In order to study the temporally distributed energy deposition in the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO), two-colour double-fs-pulse experiments were performed. Parallel or cross-polarised double-pulse sequences at 400 and 800 nm wavelength were generated by a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, exhibiting inter-pulse delays up to a few picoseconds between the sub-ablation 50-fs-pulses. Twenty two-colour double-pulse sequences were collinearly focused by a spherical mirror to the sample surface. The resulting LIPSS periods and areas were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The delay-dependence of these LIPSS characteristics shows a dissimilar behaviour when compared to the semiconductor silicon, the dielectric fused silica, or the metal titanium. A wavelength-dependent plasmonic mechanism is proposed to explain the delay-dependence of the LIPSS on ZnO when considering multi-photon excitation processes. Our results support the involvement of nonlinear processes for temporally overlapping pulses. These experiments extend previous two-colour studies on the indirect semiconductor silicon towards the direct wide band-gap semiconductor ZnO and further manifest the relevance of the ultrafast energy deposition for LIPSS formation.

  14. Zinc supplementation induces CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ antigen-specific regulatory T cells and suppresses IFN-γ production by upregulation of Foxp3 and KLF-10 and downregulation of IRF-1.

    PubMed

    Maywald, Martina; Rink, Lothar

    2017-08-01

    The essential trace element zinc plays a fundamental role in immune function and regulation since its deficiency is associated with autoimmunity, allergies, and transplant rejection. Thus, we investigated the influence of zinc supplementation on the Th1-driven alloreaction in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), on generation of antigen-specific T cells, and analyzed underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production were monitored by [ 3 H]-thymidine proliferation assay and ELISA, respectively. Analysis of surface and intracellular T cell marker was performed by flow cytometry. Western blotting and mRNA analysis were used for Foxp3, KLF-10, and IRF-1 expression. Zinc supplementation on antigen-specific T cells in physiological doses (50 µM) provokes a significant amelioration of cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production after reactivation compared to untreated controls. Zinc administration on MLC results in an increased induction and stabilization of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + and CD4 + CD25 + CTLA-4 + T cells (p < 0.05). The effect is based on zinc-induced upregulation of Foxp3 and KLF-10 and downregulation of IRF-1. However, in resting lymphocytes zinc increases IRF-1. In summary, zinc is capable of ameliorating the allogeneic immune reaction by enhancement of antigen-specific iTreg cells due to modulation of essential molecular targets: Foxp3, KLF-10, and IRF-1. Thus, zinc can be seen as an auspicious tool for inducing tolerance in adverse immune reactions.

  15. Dysregulation of miR-31 and miR-21 induced by zinc deficiency promotes esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Croce, Carlo M; Fong, Louise Y.Y

    2012-01-01

    Zinc deficiency (ZD) increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In a rat model, chronic ZD induces an inflammatory gene signature that fuels ESCC development. microRNAs regulate gene expression and are aberrantly expressed in cancers. Here we investigated whether chronic ZD (23 weeks) also induces a protumorigenic microRNA signature. Using the nanoString technology, we evaluated microRNA profiles in ZD esophagus and six additional tissues (skin, lung, pancreas, liver, prostate and peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMC]). ZD caused overexpression of inflammation genes and altered microRNA expression across all tissues analyzed, predictive of disease development. Importantly, the inflammatory ZD esophagus had a distinct microRNA signature resembling human ESCC or tongue SCC miRNAomes with miR-31 and miR-21 as the top-up-regulated species. Circulating miR-31 was also the top-up-regulated species in PBMCs. In ZD esophagus and tongue, oncogenic miR-31 and miR-21 overexpression was accompanied by down-regulation of their respective tumor-suppressor targets PPP2R2A and PDCD4. Importantly, esophageal miR-31 and miR-21 levels were directly associated with the appearance of ESCC in ZD rats, as compared with their cancer-free Zn-sufficient or Zn-replenished counterparts. In situ hybridization analysis in rat and human tongue SCCs localized miR-31 to tumor cells and miR-21 to stromal cells. In regressing tongue SCCs from Zn-supplemented rats, miR-31 and miR-21 expression was concomitantly reduced, establishing their responsiveness to Zn therapy. A search for putative microRNA targets revealed a bias toward genes in inflammatory pathways. Our finding that ZD causes miR-31 and miR-21 dysregulation associated with inflammation provides insight into mechanisms whereby ZD promotes ESCC. PMID:22689922

  16. Potential Role of L-Arginine and Vitamin E Against Bone Loss Induced by Nano-Zinc Oxide in Rats.

    PubMed

    Abdelkarem, Hala M; Fadda, Laila H; El-Sayed, Eman M; Radwan, Omyma K

    2018-05-04

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) administration on bone turnover and bone resorbing agents in rats and how L-arginine (L-arg) or vitamin E (vit E) co-administrations might affect them. Fasting rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10): G1-normal healthy animals; G2-ZnO-NPs-exposed rats (600 mg/kg - 1/day -1 ); G3-ZnO-NPs-exposed rats co-administrated L-arg (200 mg/kg - 1/day -1 ); G4-ZnO-NPs-exposed rats co-administrated vit E (200 mg/kg - 1/day -1 ). The ingredients were orally administered daily. The body weight and food consumption of rats were recorded during the administration period and the experiment continued for three consecutive weeks. The results demonstrated that ZnO-NPs administration induced bone loss in rats as manifested by reduced activity of bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) and increased level of C-terminal peptide type I collagen (CTx). The increase of inflammatory markers, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by ZnO-NPs suggests that deleterious effects of ZnO-NPs on bone turnover were, in part, due to inflammation. Confirming to this suggestion, both L-arg and vit E reduced TNF-α and IL-6 levels and consequently decreased bone resorption as indicated by reduced serum CTx level. This study proved that ZnO-NPs can induce bone turnover, which may be reduced by L-arg or vit.E co-administration, partly by anti-inflammatory mechanism.

  17. Combined effect of demagnetizing field and induced magnetic anisotropy on the magnetic properties of manganese-zinc ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, V.; Kazantseva, N. E.; Moučka, R.; Sapurina, I.; Spivak, Yu. M.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of factors responsible for the high-frequency shift of the complex permeability (μ*) dispersion region in polymer composites of manganese-zinc (MnZn) ferrite, as well as to the increase in their thermomagnetic stability. The magnetic spectra of the ferrite and its composites with polyurethane (MnZn-PU) and polyaniline (MnZn-PANI) are measured in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 3 GHz in a longitudinal magnetization field of up to 700 Ое and in the temperature interval from -20 °С to +150 °С. The approximation of the magnetic spectra by a model, which takes into account the role of domain wall motion and magnetization rotation, allows one to determine the specific contribution of resonance processes associated with domain wall motion and the natural ferromagnetic resonance to the μ*. It is established that, at high frequencies, the μ* of the MnZn ferrite is determined solely by magnetization rotation, which occurs in the region of natural ferromagnetic resonance when the ferrite is in the “single domain” state. In the polymer composites of the MnZn ferrite, the high-frequency permeability is also determined mainly by the magnetization rotation; however, up to high values of magnetizing fields, there is a contribution of domain wall motion, thus the “single domain” state in ferrite is not reached. The frequency and temperature dependence of μ* in polymer composites are governed by demagnetizing field and the induced magnetic anisotropy. The contribution of the induced magnetic anisotropy is crucial for MnZn-PANI. It is attributed to the elastic stresses that arise due to the domain wall pinning by a polyaniline film adsorbed on the surface of the ferrite during in-situ polymerization.

  18. Zinc oxide nanoparticles-induced epigenetic change and G2/M arrest are associated with apoptosis in human epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Ma, Ningjie; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Pu; Hou, Haoli; Wen, Huan; Li, Lijia

    2016-01-01

    As an engineered nanomaterial, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are used frequently in biological applications and can make contact with human skin. Here, we systematically investigated the effects of ZnO NPs on non-tumorigenic human epidermal keratinocytes, which were used as a test model for this in vitro study, at the epigenetic and molecular levels. Our results showed that ZnO NPs induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M checkpoint before the viability of human epidermal keratinocytes was reduced, which was associated with the chromatin changes at the epigenetic level, including increased methylation of histone H3K9 and decreased acetylation of histone H4K5 accompanied by chromatin condensation at 24 hours. The mRNA expression of the methyltransferase genes G9a and GLP was also increased upon treatment with ZnO NPs, and the acetyltransferase genes GCN5, P300, and CBP were downregulated. Reactive oxygen species were found to be more abundant after treatment with ZnO NPs for 6 hours, and DNA damage was observed at 24 hours. Transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry confirmed that ZnO NPs were absorbed into the cell when they were added to the medium. Apoptotic human epidermal keratinocytes were detected, and the expression of the proapoptotic genes Bax, Noxa, and Puma increased significantly, while the expression of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-xl decreased 24 hours after exposure to ZnO NPs. These findings suggest that the ZnO NPs induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M, which was associated with epigenetic changes and accompanied by p53-Bax mitochondrial pathway-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27570453

  19. Zinc oxide nanoparticles-induced epigenetic change and G2/M arrest are associated with apoptosis in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Ma, Ningjie; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Pu; Hou, Haoli; Wen, Huan; Li, Lijia

    2016-01-01

    As an engineered nanomaterial, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are used frequently in biological applications and can make contact with human skin. Here, we systematically investigated the effects of ZnO NPs on non-tumorigenic human epidermal keratinocytes, which were used as a test model for this in vitro study, at the epigenetic and molecular levels. Our results showed that ZnO NPs induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M checkpoint before the viability of human epidermal keratinocytes was reduced, which was associated with the chromatin changes at the epigenetic level, including increased methylation of histone H3K9 and decreased acetylation of histone H4K5 accompanied by chromatin condensation at 24 hours. The mRNA expression of the methyltransferase genes G9a and GLP was also increased upon treatment with ZnO NPs, and the acetyltransferase genes GCN5, P300, and CBP were downregulated. Reactive oxygen species were found to be more abundant after treatment with ZnO NPs for 6 hours, and DNA damage was observed at 24 hours. Transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry confirmed that ZnO NPs were absorbed into the cell when they were added to the medium. Apoptotic human epidermal keratinocytes were detected, and the expression of the proapoptotic genes Bax, Noxa, and Puma increased significantly, while the expression of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-xl decreased 24 hours after exposure to ZnO NPs. These findings suggest that the ZnO NPs induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M, which was associated with epigenetic changes and accompanied by p53-Bax mitochondrial pathway-mediated apoptosis.

  20. Moniliophthora perniciosa Necrosis- and Ethylene-Inducing Protein 2 (MpNep2) as a Metastable Dimer in Solution: Structural and Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Pereira, Elen G.; Dias, Cristiano V.; Souza, Theo L. F.; Ferretti, Giulia D. S.; Cordeiro, Yraima; Camillo, Luciana R.; Almeida, Fabio C.; Valente, Ana Paula; Silva, Jerson L.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how Nep-like proteins (NLPs) behave during the cell cycle and disease progression of plant pathogenic oomycetes, fungi and bacteria is crucial in light of compelling evidence that these proteins play a role in Witches` Broom Disease (WBD) of Theobroma cacao, one of the most important phytopathological problems to afflict the Southern Hemisphere. The crystal structure of MpNep2, a member of the NLP family and the causal agent of WBD, revealed the key elements for its activity. This protein has the ability to refold after heating and was believed to act as a monomer in solution, in contrast to the related homologs MpNep1 and NPP from the oomyceteous fungus Phytophthora parasitica. Here, we identify and characterize a metastable MpNep2 dimer upon over-expression in Escherichia coli using different biochemical and structural approaches. We found using ultra-fast liquid chromatography that the MpNep2 dimer can be dissociated by heating but not by dilution, oxidation or high ionic strength. Small-angle X-ray scattering revealed a possible tail-to-tail interaction between monomers, and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements identified perturbed residues involved in the putative interface of interaction. We also explored the ability of the MpNep2 monomer to refold after heating or chemical denaturation. We observed that MpNep2 has a low stability and cooperative fold that could be an explanation for its structure and activity recovery after stress. These results can provide new insights into the mechanism for MpNep2′s action in dicot plants during the progression of WBD and may open new avenues for the involvement of NLP- oligomeric species in phytopathological disorders. PMID:23029140

  1. Moniliophthora perniciosa necrosis- and ethylene-inducing protein 2 (MpNep2) as a metastable dimer in solution: structural and functional implications.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Pereira, Elen G; Dias, Cristiano V; Souza, Theo L F; Ferretti, Giulia D S; Cordeiro, Yraima; Camillo, Luciana R; Cascardo, Júlio; Almeida, Fabio C; Valente, Ana Paula; Silva, Jerson L

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how Nep-like proteins (NLPs) behave during the cell cycle and disease progression of plant pathogenic oomycetes, fungi and bacteria is crucial in light of compelling evidence that these proteins play a role in Witches` Broom Disease (WBD) of Theobroma cacao, one of the most important phytopathological problems to afflict the Southern Hemisphere. The crystal structure of MpNep2, a member of the NLP family and the causal agent of WBD, revealed the key elements for its activity. This protein has the ability to refold after heating and was believed to act as a monomer in solution, in contrast to the related homologs MpNep1 and NPP from the oomyceteous fungus Phytophthora parasitica. Here, we identify and characterize a metastable MpNep2 dimer upon over-expression in Escherichia coli using different biochemical and structural approaches. We found using ultra-fast liquid chromatography that the MpNep2 dimer can be dissociated by heating but not by dilution, oxidation or high ionic strength. Small-angle X-ray scattering revealed a possible tail-to-tail interaction between monomers, and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements identified perturbed residues involved in the putative interface of interaction. We also explored the ability of the MpNep2 monomer to refold after heating or chemical denaturation. We observed that MpNep2 has a low stability and cooperative fold that could be an explanation for its structure and activity recovery after stress. These results can provide new insights into the mechanism for MpNep2's action in dicot plants during the progression of WBD and may open new avenues for the involvement of NLP- oligomeric species in phytopathological disorders.

  2. Large Fluorescence Response by Alcohol from a Bis(benzoxazole)-Zinc(II) Complex: The Role of Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Chu, Qinghui; Liu, Xiumin; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2013-01-01

    The formation of a bis(HBO) anion is known to turn-on the fluorescence to give red emission, via controlling the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The poor stability of the formed anion, however, hampered its application. The anion stability is found to be greatly improved by attaching the anion to Zn2+ cation (i.e. forming zinc complex), whose emission is at λem ≈ 550 and 760 nm. Interestingly, addition of methanol to the zinc complex induces a remarkable red fluorescence (λem ≈ 630 nm, ϕfl ≈ 0.8). With the aid of spectroscopic studies (1H NMR, UV-vis, fluorescence, and mass spectra), the structures of the zinc complexes are characterized. The emission species is identified as a dimer-like structure. The study thus reveals an effective fluorescence switching mechanism that could further advance the application of ESIPT-based sensors. PMID:23514312

  3. Characterizing early molecular biomarkers of zinc-induced adaptive and adverseoxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining mechanism-based biomarkers that distinguish adaptive and adverse cellular processes is critical to understanding the health effects of environmental exposures. Here, we examined cellular responses of the tracheobronchial airway to zinc (Zn) exposure. A pharmacokinetic...

  4. Zinc-induced embrittlement in nickel-base superalloys by simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Richard; Waje, Mahesh; Lindwall, Greta; Jefferson, Tiffany; Lange, Jeremy; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2017-09-01

    The high cost of Re has driven interest in processes for recovering Re from scrap superalloy parts. In this work thermodynamic modelling is used to study Zn-induced embrittlement of a superalloy and to direct experiments. Treating superalloy powder with Zn vapour reduces the average particle size after milling from approximately ?m to 0.5-10 ?m, vs. ?m for untreated powder. Simulations predict the required treatment time to increase with temperature. Agreement between predictions and experiments suggests that an embrittling liquid forms in less than an hour of Zn vapour treatment between 950-1000 ?C and partial pressures of Zn between 14-34 kPa (2-5 psi).

  5. Calcium and zinc dyshomeostasis during isoproterenol-induced acute stressor state

    PubMed Central

    Shahbaz, Atta U.; Zhao, Tieqiang; Zhao, Wenyuan; Johnson, Patti L.; Ahokas, Robert A.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Sun, Yao; Gerling, Ivan C.

    2011-01-01

    Acute hyperadrenergic stressor states are accompanied by cation dyshomeostasis, together with the release of cardiac troponins predictive of necrosis. The signal-transducer-effector pathway accounting for this pathophysiological scenario remains unclear. We hypothesized that a dyshomeostasis of extra- and intracellular Ca2+ and Zn2+ occurs in rats in response to isoproterenol (Isop) including excessive intracellular Ca2+ accumulation (EICA) and mitochondrial [Ca2+]m-induced oxidative stress. Contemporaneously, the selective translocation of Ca2+ and Zn2+ to tissues contributes to their fallen plasma levels. Rats received a single subcutaneous injection of Isop (1 mg/kg body wt). Other groups of rats received pretreatment for 10 days with either carvedilol (C), a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist with mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter-inhibiting properties, or quercetin (Q), a flavonoid with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant properties, before Isop. We monitored temporal responses in the following: [Ca2+] and [Zn2+] in plasma, left ventricular (LV) apex, equator and base, skeletal muscle, liver, spleen, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), indices of oxidative stress and antioxidant defenses, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, and myocardial fibrosis. We found ionized hypocalcemia and hypozincemia attributable to their tissue translocation and also a heterogeneous distribution of these cations among tissues with a preferential Ca2+ accumulation in the LV apex, muscle, and PBMC, whereas Zn2+ declined except in liver, where it increased corresponding with upregulation of metallothionein, a Zn2+-binding protein. EICA was associated with a simultaneous increase in tissue 8-isoprostane and increased [Ca2+]m accompanied by a rise in H2O2 generation, mPTP opening, and scarring, each of which were prevented by either C or Q. Thus excessive [Ca2+]m, coupled with the induction of oxidative stress and increased mPTP opening, suggests that this

  6. Regulation of biokinetics of (65)Zn by curcumin and zinc in experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kinnri; Dhawan, Devinder K

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of curcumin and zinc on the biokinetics and biodistribution of (65)Zn during colon carcinogenesis. Male wistar rats were divided into five groups, namely normal control, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) treated, DMH + curcumin treated, DMH + zinc treated, and DMH + curcumin + zinc treated. Weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks initiated colon carcinogenesis. Curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight orally) and ZnSO4 (227 mg/L in drinking water) were supplemented for 16 weeks. This study revealed a significant depression in the fast (Tb1) and slow component (Tb2) of biological half-life of (65)Zn in the whole body of DMH-treated rats, whereas liver showed a significant elevation in these components. Further, DMH treatment showed a significant increase in the uptake values of (65)Zn in colon, small intestine, and kidneys. Subcellular distribution depicted a significant increase in (65)Zn uptake values in mitochondrial, microsomal, and postmicrosomal fractions of colon. However, curcumin and zinc supplementation when given separately or in combination reversed the trends and restored the uptake values close to normal range. Our study concludes that curcumin and zinc supplementation during colon carcinogenesis shall prove to be efficacious in regulating the altered zinc metabolism.

  7. Dimer-based model for heptaspanning membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antonio; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2005-07-01

    The existence of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions for heptaspanning membrane receptors is now fully accepted, but a model considering dimers as the basic unit that binds to two ligand molecules is lacking. Here, we propose a two-state-dimer model in which the ligand-induced conformational changes from one component of the dimer are communicated to the other. Our model predicts cooperativity in binding, which is relevant because the other current models fail to address this phenomenon satisfactorily. Our two-state-dimer model also predicts the variety of responses elicited by full or partial agonists, neutral antagonists and inverse agonists. This model can aid our understanding of the operation of heptaspanning receptors and receptor channels, and, potentially, be important for improving the treatment of cardiovascular, neurological and neuropsychyatric diseases.

  8. Identifying the Assembly Configuration and Fluorescence Spectra of Nanoscale Zinc-Tetraphenylporphyrin Aggregates with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Jiang, Jian-Wei; Liu, Yi-Ting; Lou, Shi-Tao; Gao, Chun-Lei; Jin, Qing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    ZnTPP (Zinc-Tetraphenylporphyrin) is one of the most common nanostructured materials, having high stability and excellent optoelectronic properties. In this paper, the fluorescence features of self-assembled ZnTPP monomers and aggregates on Au(111) surface are investigated in detail on the nanometer scale with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The formation of ZnTPP dimers is found in thick layers of a layer-by-layer molecular assembly on Au substrate with its specific molecular arrangement well characterized. Tip-induced luminescence shows a red shift from tilted dimers comparing with the behavior from monomers, which can be attributed to the change of vibrational states due to the intermolecular interaction and the increasing dielectric effect. The nanoscale configuration dependence of electroluminescence is demonstrated to provide a powerful tool aiding the design of functional molecular photoelectric devices. PMID:26948654

  9. Dimerization of the SP1 Region of HIV-1 Gag Induces a Helical Conformation and Association into Helical Bundles: Implications for Particle Assembly.

    PubMed

    Datta, Siddhartha A K; Clark, Patrick K; Fan, Lixin; Ma, Buyong; Harvin, Demetria P; Sowder, Raymond C; Nussinov, Ruth; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2016-02-15

    HIV-1 immature particle (virus-like particle [VLP]) assembly is mediated largely by interactions between the capsid (CA) domains of Gag molecules but is facilitated by binding of the nucleocapsid (NC) domain to nucleic acid. We previously investigated the role of SP1, a "spacer" between CA and NC, in VLP assembly. We found that small changes in SP1 drastically disrupt assembly and that a peptide representing the sequence around the CA-SP1 junction is helical at high but not low concentrations. We suggested that by virtue of such a concentration-dependent change, this region could act as a molecular switch to activate HIV-1 Gag for VLP assembly. A leucine zipper domain can replace NC in Gag and still lead to the efficient assembly of VLPs. We find that SP1 mutants also disrupt assembly by these Gag-Zip proteins and have now studied a small fragment of this Gag-Zip protein, i.e., the CA-SP1 junction region fused to a leucine zipper. Dimerization of the zipper places SP1 at a high local concentration, even at low total concentrations. In this context, the CA-SP1 junction region spontaneously adopts a helical conformation, and the proteins associate into tetramers. Tetramerization requires residues from both CA and SP1. The data suggest that once this region becomes helical, its propensity to self-associate could contribute to Gag-Gag interactions and thus to particle assembly. There is complete congruence between CA/SP1 sequences that promote tetramerization when fused to zippers and those that permit the proper assembly of full-length Gag; thus, equivalent interactions apparently participate in VLP assembly and in SP1-Zip tetramerization. Assembly of HIV-1 Gag into virus-like particles (VLPs) appears to require an interaction with nucleic acid, but replacement of its principal nucleic acid-binding domain with a dimerizing leucine zipper domain leads to the assembly of RNA-free VLPs. It has not been clear how dimerization triggers assembly. Results here show that the

  10. Dimerization of the SP1 Region of HIV-1 Gag Induces a Helical Conformation and Association into Helical Bundles: Implications for Particle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Patrick K.; Fan, Lixin; Ma, Buyong; Harvin, Demetria P.; Sowder, Raymond C.; Nussinov, Ruth; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 immature particle (virus-like particle [VLP]) assembly is mediated largely by interactions between the capsid (CA) domains of Gag molecules but is facilitated by binding of the nucleocapsid (NC) domain to nucleic acid. We previously investigated the role of SP1, a “spacer” between CA and NC, in VLP assembly. We found that small changes in SP1 drastically disrupt assembly and that a peptide representing the sequence around the CA-SP1 junction is helical at high but not low concentrations. We suggested that by virtue of such a concentration-dependent change, this region could act as a molecular switch to activate HIV-1 Gag for VLP assembly. A leucine zipper domain can replace NC in Gag and still lead to the efficient assembly of VLPs. We find that SP1 mutants also disrupt assembly by these Gag-Zip proteins and have now studied a small fragment of this Gag-Zip protein, i.e., the CA-SP1 junction region fused to a leucine zipper. Dimerization of the zipper places SP1 at a high local concentration, even at low total concentrations. In this context, the CA-SP1 junction region spontaneously adopts a helical conformation, and the proteins associate into tetramers. Tetramerization requires residues from both CA and SP1. The data suggest that once this region becomes helical, its propensity to self-associate could contribute to Gag-Gag interactions and thus to particle assembly. There is complete congruence between CA/SP1 sequences that promote tetramerization when fused to zippers and those that permit the proper assembly of full-length Gag; thus, equivalent interactions apparently participate in VLP assembly and in SP1-Zip tetramerization. IMPORTANCE Assembly of HIV-1 Gag into virus-like particles (VLPs) appears to require an interaction with nucleic acid, but replacement of its principal nucleic acid-binding domain with a dimerizing leucine zipper domain leads to the assembly of RNA-free VLPs. It has not been clear how dimerization triggers assembly

  11. Membrane lipid profiles of coral responded to zinc oxide nanoparticle-induced perturbations on the cellular membrane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuan-Ho; Lin, Ching-Yu; Lee, Shu-Hui; Wang, Wei-Hsien

    2017-06-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnOs) released from popular sunscreens used during marine recreation apparently endanger corals; however, the known biological effects are very limited. Membrane lipids constitute the basic structural element to create cell a dynamic structure according to the circumstance. Nano-specific effects have been shown to mechanically perturb the physical state of the lipid membrane, and the cells accommodating the actions of nZnOs can be involved in the alteration of the membrane lipid composition. To gain insight into the effects of nanoparticles on coral, glycerophosphocholine (GPC) profiling of the coral Seriatopora caliendrum exposed to nZnOs was performed in this study. Increasing lyso-GPCs, docosapentaenoic acid-possessing GPCs and docosahexaenoic acid-possessing GPCs and decreasing arachidonic acid-possessing GPCs were the predominant changes responded to nZnO exposure in the coral. A backfilling of polyunsaturated plasmanylcholines was observed in the coral exposed to nZnO levels over a threshold. These changes can be logically interpreted as an accommodation to nZnOs-induced mechanical disturbances in the cellular membrane based on the biophysical properties of the lipids. Moreover, the coral demonstrated a difference in the changes in lipid profiles between intra-colonial functionally differentiated polyps, indicating an initial membrane composition-dependent response. Based on the physicochemical properties and physiological functions of these changed lipids, some chronic biological effects can be incubated once the coral receives long-term exposure to nZnOs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Zinc Induces Dendritic Cell Tolerogenic Phenotype and Skews Regulatory T cell – Th17 Balance

    PubMed Central

    George, Mariam Mathew; Vignesh, Kavitha Subramanian; Landero Figueroa, Julio A.; Caruso, Joseph A.; Deepe, George S.

    2016-01-01

    Zn is an essential metal for development and maintenance of both the innate and adaptive compartments of the immune system. Zn homeostasis impacts maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) that are important in shaping T cell responses. The mechanism by which Zn regulates the tolerogenic phenotype of DCs remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of Zn on DC phenotype and the generation of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) using a model of Histoplasma capsulatum fungal infection. Exposure of bone marrow derived DCs to Zn in vitro induced a tolerogenic phenotype by diminishing surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC)II and promoting the tolerogenic markers, programmed death-ligand (PD-L)1, PD-L2 and the tryptophan degrading enzyme, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Zn triggered tryptophan degradation by IDO and kynurenine production by DCs and strongly suppressed the proinflammatory response to stimulation by toll like receptor (TLR) ligands. In vivo, Zn supplementation and subsequent H. capsulatum infection supressed MHCII on DCs, enhanced PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression on MHCIIlo DCs and skewed the Treg - Th17 balance in favour of FoxP3+ Tregs while decreasing Th17 cells. Thus, Zn shapes the tolerogenic potential of DCs in vitro and in vivo and promotes Tregs during fungal infection. PMID:27465530

  13. The TRPC6 channel activator hyperforin induces the release of zinc and calcium from mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tu, Peng; Gibon, Julien; Bouron, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Hyperforin, an extract of the medicinal plant hypericum perforatum (also named St John's wort), possesses antidepressant properties. Recent data showed that it elevates the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) by activating diacylglycerol-sensitive C-class of transient receptor potential (TRPC6) channels without activating the other isoforms (TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, and TRPC7). This study was undertaken to further characterize the cellular neuronal responses induced by hyperforin. Experiments conducted on cortical neurons in primary culture and loaded with fluorescent probes for Ca(2+) (Fluo-4) and Zn(2+) (FluoZin-3) showed that it not only controls the activity of plasma membrane channels but it also mobilizes these two cations from internal pools. Experiments conducted on isolated brain mitochondria indicated that hyperforin, like the inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP), collapses the mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, it promotes the release of Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) from these organelles via a ruthenium red-sensitive transporter. In fact, hyperforin exerts complex actions on CNS neurons. This antidepressant not only triggers the entry of cations via plasma membrane TRPC6 channels but it displays protonophore-like properties. As hyperforin is now use to probe the functions of native TRPC6 channels, our data indicate that caution is required when interpreting results obtained with this antidepressant.

  14. Buckminsterfullerene hybridized zinc oxide tetrapods: defects and charge transfer induced optical and electrical response.

    PubMed

    Smazna, Daria; Rodrigues, Joana; Shree, Sindu; Postica, Vasile; Neubüser, Gero; Martins, A F; Ben Sedrine, N; Jena, Naresh K; Siebert, Leonard; Schütt, Fabian; Lupan, Oleg; Ahuja, Rajeev; Correia, M R; Monteiro, Teresa; Kienle, Lorenz; Yang, Ya; Adelung, Rainer; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar

    2018-05-21

    Buckminster fullerene (C60) based hybrid metal oxide materials are receiving considerable attention because of their excellent fundamental and applied aspects, like semiconducting, electron transfer, luminescent behaviors, etc. and this work briefly discusses the successful fabrication of C60 decorated ZnO tetrapod materials and their detailed structure-property relationships including device sensing applications. The electron microscopy investigations indicate that a quite dense surface coverage of ZnO tetrapods with C60 clusters is achieved. The spectroscopy studies confirmed the identification of the C60 vibrational modes and the C60 induced changes in the absorption and luminescence properties of the ZnO tetrapods. An increased C60 concentration on ZnO results in steeper ZnO bandgap absorption followed by well-defined free exciton and 3.31 eV line emissions. As expected, higher amounts of C60 increase the intensity of C60-related visible absorption bands. Pumping the samples with photons with an energy corresponding to these absorption band maxima leads to additional emission from ZnO showing an effective charge transfer phenomenon from C60 to the ZnO host. The density of states model obtained from DFT studies for pure and C60 coated ZnO surfaces confirms the experimental observations. The fabricated C60-ZnO hybrid tetrapod based micro- and nanodevices showed interesting ethanol gas sensing characteristics.

  15. EDEM1 targets misfolded HLA-B27 dimers for endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Guiliano, David B.; Fussell, Helen; Lenart, Izabela; Tsao, Edward; Nesbeth, Darren; Fletcher, Adam J.; Campbell, Elaine C.; Yousaf, Nasim; Williams, Sarah; Santos, Susana; Cameron, Amy; Towers, Greg J.; Kellam, Paul; Hebert, Daniel N.; Gould, Keith; Powis, Simon J.; Antoniou, Antony N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HLA-B27 forms misfolded heavy chain dimers, which may predispose individuals to inflammatory arthritis by inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). We wanted to define the role of the UPR induced ER associated degradation (ERAD) pathway in the disposal of HLA-B27 dimeric conformers. Methods HeLa cell lines expressing only two copies of a carboxy terminally Sv5 tagged HLA-B27 were generated. The ER stress induced EDEM1 protein was over expressed by transfection and dimer levels monitored by immunoblotting. EDEM1, the UPR associated transcription factor XBP-1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, the degradation associated derlin 1 and 2 proteins were inhibited by either short hairpin RNA or dominant negative mutants. The UPR associated ERAD of HLA-B27 was confirmed using ER stress inducing pharamacological agents in kinetic and pulse chase assays. Results We demonstrate that UPR induced machinery can target HLA-B27 dimers, and that dimer formation can be controlled by alterations to expression levels of components of the UPR induced ERAD pathway. HLA-B27 dimers and misfolded MHC class I monomeric molecules were detected bound to EDEM1, with overexpression of EDEM1 inhibiting HLA-B27 dimer formation. EDEM1 inhibition resulted in upregulation of HLA-B27 dimers, whilst UPR induced ERAD of dimers was prevented in the absence of EDEM1. HLA-B27 dimer formation was also enhanced in the absence of XBP-1, HRD1 and derlin1/2. Conclusion The UPR ERAD pathway as described here can dispose of HLA-B27 dimers and presents a potential novel therapeutic target for the modulation of HLA-B27 associated inflammatory disease. PMID:25132672

  16. Absence of local fluctuating dimers in superconducting Ir1 -x(Pt,Rh ) xTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Runze; Banerjee, S.; Lei, H. C.; Sinclair, Ryan; Abeykoon, M.; Zhou, H. D.; Petrovic, C.; Guguchia, Z.; Bozin, E. S.

    2018-05-01

    The compound IrTe2 is known to exhibit a transition to a modulated state featuring Ir-Ir dimers, with large associated atomic displacements. Partial substitution of Pt or Rh for Ir destabilizes the modulated structure and induces superconductivity. It has been proposed that quantum critical dimer fluctuations might be associated with the superconductivity. Here we test for such local dimer correlations and demonstrate their absence. X-ray pair distribution function approach reveals that the local structure of Ir0 :95Pt0 :05Te2 and Ir0 :8Rh0 :2Te2 dichalcogenide superconductors with compositions just past the dimer/superconductor boundary is explained well by a dimer-free model down to 10 K, ruling out the possibility of there being nanoscale dimer fluctuations in this regime. This is inconsistent with the proposed quantum-critical-point-like interplay of the dimer state and superconductivity, and precludes scenarios for dimer fluctuations mediated superconducting pairing.

  17. Insights into Strand Exchange in BTB Domain Dimers from the Crystal Structures of FAZF and Miz1

    SciT

    Stogios, Peter J.; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Chen, Lu

    2010-09-22

    The BTB domain is a widely distributed protein-protein interaction motif that is often found at the N-terminus of zinc finger transcription factors. Previous crystal structures of BTB domains have revealed tightly interwound homodimers, with the N-terminus from one chain forming a two-stranded anti-parallel {beta}-sheet with a strand from the other chain. We have solved the crystal structures of the BTB domains from Fanconi anemia zinc finger (FAZF) and Miz1 (Myc-interacting zinc finger 1) to resolutions of 2.0 {angstrom} and 2.6 {angstrom}, respectively. Unlike previous examples of BTB domain structures, the FAZF BTB domain is a nonswapped dimer, with each N-terminalmore » {beta}-strand associated with its own chain. As a result, the dimerization interface in the FAZF BTB domain is about half as large as in the domain-swapped dimers. The Miz1 BTB domain resembles a typical swapped BTB dimer, although it has a shorter N-terminus that is not able to form the interchain sheet. Using cysteine cross-linking, we confirmed that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) BTB dimer is strand exchanged in solution, while the FAZF BTB dimer is not. A phylogenic tree of the BTB fold based on both sequence and structural features shows that the common ancestor of the BTB domain in BTB-ZF (bric a brac, tramtrack, broad-complex zinc finger) proteins was a domain-swapped dimer. The differences in the N-termini seen in the FAZF and Miz1 BTB domains appear to be more recent developments in the structural evolution of the domain.« less

  18. Hydrodynamic Torques and Rotations of Superparamagnetic Bead Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Christopher; Etheridge, J.; Wijesinghe, H. S.; Pierce, C. J.; Prikockis, M. V.; Sooryakumar, R.

    Chains of micro-magnetic particles are often rotated with external magnetic fields for many lab-on-a-chip technologies such as transporting beads or mixing fluids. These applications benefit from faster responses of the actuated particles. In a rotating magnetic field, the magnetization of superparamagnetic beads, created from embedded magnetic nano-particles within a polymer matrix, is largely characterized by induced dipoles mip along the direction of the field. In addition there is often a weak dipole mop that orients out-of-phase with the external rotating field. On a two-bead dimer, the simplest chain of beads, mop contributes a torque Γm in addition to the torque from mip. For dimers with beads unbound to each other, mop rotates individual beads which generate an additional hydrodynamic torque on the dimer. Whereas, mop directly torques bound dimers. Our results show that Γm significantly alters the average frequency-dependent dimer rotation rate for both bound and unbound monomers and, when mop exceeds a critical value, increases the maximum dimer rotation frequency. Models that include magnetic and hydrodynamics torques provide good agreement with the experimental findings over a range of field frequencies.

  19. Influence of grape seed extract and zinc containing multivitamin-mineral nutritional food supplement on lipid profile in normal and diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Satyam, Shakta Mani; Bairy, Laxminarayana Kurady; Pirasanthan, Rajadurai

    2014-12-01

    Zincovit tablet is combination of grape seed extract and zinc containing multivitamin-mineral nutritional food supplement. To investigate the influence of single combined formulation of grape seed extract and zinc containing multivitamin-mineral nutritional food supplement tablets (Zincovit) on lipid profile in normal and diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats. Anti-hyperlipidemic activity of combined formulation of grape seed extract and Zincovit tablets doses ranged from 40 to 160 mg/kg, p.o. was evaluated in normal and diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats. Hypercholesterolemic animals treated with combined formulation of grape seed extract and Zincovit tablets (nutritional food supplement) at 40, 80 and 160 mg/kg exhibited drastic decrease in serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-C, VLDL-C and rise of HDL-C in comparison to hypercholesterolemic control group animals. The anti-hyperlipidemic effect of single combined formulation of grape seed extract and Zincovit tablet was comparable with the standard drug atorvastatin treated animals and the variations were statistically non-significant. There was no significant impact of combined formulation of grape seed extract and Zincovit tablets on lipid profile among normal animals in comparison with normal control group. The present study demonstrated that the single combined formulation of grape seed extract and Zincovit tablet is the potential functional nutritional food supplements that could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity against diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in Wistar rats.

  20. Green Synthesized Zinc Oxide (ZnO) Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in Lathyrus sativus L. Root Bioassay System

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Kamal K.; Golari, Dambaru; Venugopal, A.; Achary, V. Mohan M.; Phaomei, Ganngam; Parinandi, Narasimham L.; Sahu, Hrushi K.; Panda, Brahma B.

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP-GS) were synthesised from the precursor zinc acetate (Zn(CH3COO)2) through the green route using the milky latex from milk weed (Calotropis gigantea L. R. Br) by alkaline precipitation. Formation of the ZnONP-GS was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy followed by characterization and confirmation by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both the ZnONP-GS and the commercially available ZnONP-S (Sigma-Aldrich) and cationic Zn2+ from Zn(CH3COO)2 were tested in a dose range of 0–100 mg·L−1 for their potency (i) to induce oxidative stress as measured by the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS: O2•−, H2O2 and •OH), cell death, and lipid peroxidation; (ii) to modulate the activities of antioxidant enzymes: catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX); and (iii) to cause DNA damage as determined by Comet assay in Lathyrus sativus L. root bioassay system. Antioxidants such as Tiron and dimethylthiourea significantly attenuated the ZnONP-induced oxidative and DNA damage, suggesting the involvement of ROS therein. Our study demonstrated that both ZnONP-GS and ZnONP-S induced oxidative stress and DNA damage to a similar extent but were significantly less potent than Zn2+ alone. PMID:28524089

  1. Green Synthesized Zinc Oxide (ZnO) Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in Lathyrus sativus L. Root Bioassay System.

    PubMed

    Panda, Kamal K; Golari, Dambaru; Venugopal, A; Achary, V Mohan M; Phaomei, Ganngam; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Sahu, Hrushi K; Panda, Brahma B

    2017-05-18

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP-GS) were synthesised from the precursor zinc acetate (Zn(CH₃COO)₂) through the green route using the milky latex from milk weed ( Calotropis gigantea L. R. Br) by alkaline precipitation. Formation of the ZnONP-GS was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy followed by characterization and confirmation by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both the ZnONP-GS and the commercially available ZnONP-S (Sigma-Aldrich) and cationic Zn 2+ from Zn(CH₃COO)₂ were tested in a dose range of 0-100 mg·L -1 for their potency (i) to induce oxidative stress as measured by the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS: O₂ •- , H₂O₂ and • OH), cell death, and lipid peroxidation; (ii) to modulate the activities of antioxidant enzymes: catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX); and (iii) to cause DNA damage as determined by Comet assay in Lathyrus sativus L. root bioassay system. Antioxidants such as Tiron and dimethylthiourea significantly attenuated the ZnONP-induced oxidative and DNA damage, suggesting the involvement of ROS therein. Our study demonstrated that both ZnONP-GS and ZnONP-S induced oxidative stress and DNA damage to a similar extent but were significantly less potent than Zn 2+ alone.

  2. History of Zinc in Agriculture12

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Forrest H.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc was established as essential for green plants in 1926 and for mammals in 1934. However, >20 y would pass before the first descriptions of zinc deficiencies in farm animals appeared. In 1955, it was reported that zinc supplementation would cure parakeratosis in swine. In 1958, it was reported that zinc deficiency induced poor growth, leg abnormalities, poor feathering, and parakeratosis in chicks. In the 1960s, zinc supplementation was found to alleviate parakeratosis in grazing cattle and sheep. Within 35 y, it was established that nearly one half of the soils in the world may be zinc deficient, causing decreased plant zinc content and production that can be prevented by zinc fertilization. In many of these areas, zinc deficiency is prevented in grazing livestock by zinc fertilization of pastures or by providing salt licks. For livestock under more defined conditions, such as poultry, swine, and dairy and finishing cattle, feeds are easily supplemented with zinc salts to prevent deficiency. Today, the causes and consequences of zinc deficiency and methods and effects of overcoming the deficiency are well established for agriculture. The history of zinc in agriculture is an outstanding demonstration of the translation of research into practical application. PMID:23153732

  3. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce oxidative DNA damage and ROS-triggered mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ren, Xin; Zhu, Rong; Luo, Zhouying; Ren, Baixiang

    2016-11-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) are one of the most important nanoparticles in the industry. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the effects of nano-ZnO on oxidative damage to DNA and on apoptosis in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, and (2) to identify the underlying molecular mechanism affecting theapoptotic process. In addition to nano-ZnO, we also investigated the toxic effects of the Zn 2+ ion. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 10, 30, 60, 90, or 120mg/L nano-ZnO for 96h postfertilization. Nano-ZnO (at concentrations between 10 and 120mg/L) significantly reduced the rate of embryo hatching. Embryos/larvae exposed to 120mg/L nano-ZnO had significantly higher heart rates. Increased heart rates could be a physiological mechanism compensating for body hypoxia. Embryos/larvae exposed to nano-ZnO exhibited oxidative stress, due to an excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress was evidenced by increased levels of superoxide dismutase, by increased lipid peroxidation, and by increased expression of genes related to the antioxidant defense system (sod1, cat, gpx1a, and pparα), which were altered at different degrees. Upon exposure to nano-ZnO, the percentage of apoptotic cells increased in a dose-dependent manner (0.41% to 4.21%). In addition, altered transcriptional regulation of pro-apoptotic genes (bax, puma, and apaf-1) and anti-apoptotic genes (bcl-2) provided further evidence of the activation of apoptosis. In this study, exposure of zebrafish embryos to nano-ZnO triggered an excessive production of ROS, which was followed by several phenomena: the up-regulation of p53, a reduction in the bcl-2/bax ratio,a reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential (ψ m ), the release of cytochrome c into the cytosolic fraction, and the activation of caspases 9 and 3. Collectively, our data imply that nano-ZnO induce an excessive production of ROS which then activate the apoptosis pathway mediated by mitochondria and

  4. Hydrogen Dimers in Giant-planet Infrared Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Gustafsson, Magnus; Orton, Glenn S.

    2018-03-01

    Despite being one of the weakest dimers in nature, low-spectral-resolution Voyager/IRIS observations revealed the presence of (H2)2 dimers on Jupiter and Saturn in the 1980s. However, the collision-induced H2–H2 opacity databases widely used in planetary science have thus far only included free-to-free transitions and have neglected the contributions of dimers. Dimer spectra have both fine-scale structure near the S(0) and S(1) quadrupole lines (354 and 587 cm‑1, respectively), and broad continuum absorption contributions up to ±50 cm‑1 from the line centers. We develop a new ab initio model for the free-to-bound, bound-to-free, and bound-to-bound transitions of the hydrogen dimer for a range of temperatures (40–400 K) and para-hydrogen fractions (0.25–1.0). The model is validated against low-temperature laboratory experiments, and used to simulate the spectra of the giant planets. The new collision-induced opacity database permits high-resolution (0.5–1.0 cm‑1) spectral modeling of dimer spectra near S(0) and S(1) in both Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer observations of Jupiter and Saturn, and in Spitzer Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) observations of Uranus and Neptune for the first time. Furthermore, the model reproduces the dimer signatures observed in Voyager/IRIS data near S(0) on Jupiter and Saturn, and generally lowers the amount of para-H2 (and the extent of disequilibrium) required to reproduce IRIS observations.

  5. S-Nitrosation and regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Douglas A; Erwin, Phillip A; Michel, Thomas; Marletta, Michael A

    2005-03-29

    The inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and three zinc tetrathiolate mutants (C104A, C109A, and C104A/C109A) were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The mutants were found by ICP-AES and the zinc-specific PAR colorimetric assay to be zinc free, whereas the wild-type iNOS zinc content was 0.38 +/- 0.01 mol of Zn/mol of iNOS dimer. The cysteine mutants (C104A and C109A) had an activity within error of wild-type iNOS (2.24 +/- 0.12 micromol of NO min(-1) mg(-1)), but the double cysteine mutant had a modestly decreased activity (1.75 +/- 0.14 micromol of NO min(-1) mg(-1)). To determine if NO could stimulate release of zinc and dimer dissociation, wild-type protein was allowed to react with an NO donor, DEA/NO, followed by buffer exchange. ICP-AES of samples treated with 10 microM DEA/NO showed a decrease in zinc content (0.23 +/- 0.01 to 0.09 +/- 0.01 mol of Zn/mol of iNOS dimer) with no loss of heme iron. Gel filtration of wild-type iNOS treated similarly resulted in approximately 20% more monomeric iNOS compared to a DEA-treated sample. Only wild-type iNOS had decreased activity (42 +/- 2%) after reaction with 50 microM DEA/NO compared to a control sample. Using the biotin switch method under the same conditions, only wild-type iNOS had increased levels of S-biotinylation. S-Biotinylation was mapped to C104 and C109 on wild-type iNOS using LysC digestion and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Immunoprecipitation of iNOS from the mouse macrophage cell line, RAW-264.7, and the biotin switch method were used to confirm endogenous S-nitrosation of iNOS. The data show that S-nitrosation of the zinc tetrathiolate cysteine results in zinc release from the dimer interface and formation of inactive monomers, suggesting that this mode of inhibition might occur in vivo.

  6. Zinc in Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gammoh, Nour Zahi; Rink, Lothar

    2017-01-01

    Micronutrient homeostasis is a key factor in maintaining a healthy immune system. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is involved in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. The main cause of zinc deficiency is malnutrition. Zinc deficiency leads to cell-mediated immune dysfunctions among other manifestations. Consequently, such dysfunctions lead to a worse outcome in the response towards bacterial infection and sepsis. For instance, zinc is an essential component of the pathogen-eliminating signal transduction pathways leading to neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) formation, as well as inducing cell-mediated immunity over humoral immunity by regulating specific factors of differentiation. Additionally, zinc deficiency plays a role in inflammation, mainly elevating inflammatory response as well as damage to host tissue. Zinc is involved in the modulation of the proinflammatory response by targeting Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB), a transcription factor that is the master regulator of proinflammatory responses. It is also involved in controlling oxidative stress and regulating inflammatory cytokines. Zinc plays an intricate function during an immune response and its homeostasis is critical for sustaining proper immune function. This review will summarize the latest findings concerning the role of this micronutrient during the course of infections and inflammatory response and how the immune system modulates zinc depending on different stimuli. PMID:28629136

  7. Zinc in Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gammoh, Nour Zahi; Rink, Lothar

    2017-06-17

    Micronutrient homeostasis is a key factor in maintaining a healthy immune system. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is involved in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. The main cause of zinc deficiency is malnutrition. Zinc deficiency leads to cell-mediated immune dysfunctions among other manifestations. Consequently, such dysfunctions lead to a worse outcome in the response towards bacterial infection and sepsis. For instance, zinc is an essential component of the pathogen-eliminating signal transduction pathways leading to neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) formation, as well as inducing cell-mediated immunity over humoral immunity by regulating specific factors of differentiation. Additionally, zinc deficiency plays a role in inflammation, mainly elevating inflammatory response as well as damage to host tissue. Zinc is involved in the modulation of the proinflammatory response by targeting Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB), a transcription factor that is the master regulator of proinflammatory responses. It is also involved in controlling oxidative stress and regulating inflammatory cytokines. Zinc plays an intricate function during an immune response and its homeostasis is critical for sustaining proper immune function. This review will summarize the latest findings concerning the role of this micronutrient during the course of infections and inflammatory response and how the immune system modulates zinc depending on different stimuli.

  8. The Ammonia Dimer Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, Richard; Van Der Avoird, Ad

    2012-06-01

    The conclusion from microwave spectra by Nelson, Fraser, and Klemperer that the ammonia dimer has a nearly cyclic structure led to much debate about the issue of whether (NH_3)_2 is hydrogen bonded. This structure was surprising because most {ab initio} calculations led to a classical, nearly linear, hydrogen-bonded structure. An obvious explanation of the discrepancy between the outcome of these calculations and the microwave data which led Nelson {et al.} to their ``surprising structure'' might be the effect of vibrational averaging: the electronic structure calculations focus on finding the minimum of the intermolecular potential, the experiment gives a vibrationally averaged structure. Isotope substitution studies seemed to indicate, however, that the complex is nearly rigid. Additional data became available from high-resolution molecular beam far-infrared spectroscopy in the Saykally group. These spectra, displaying large tunneling splittings, indicate that the complex is very floppy. The seemingly contradictory experimental data were explained when it became possible to calculate the vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) states of the complex on a six-dimensional intermolecular potential surface. The potential used was a simple model potential, with parameters fitted to the far-infrared data. Now, for the first time, a six-dimensional potential was computed by high level {ab initio} methods and this potential will be used in calculations of the VRT states of (NH_3)_2 and (ND_3)_2. So, we will finally be able to answer the question whether the conclusions from the model calculations are indeed a valid explanation of the experimental data. D. Nelson, G. T. Fraser, and W. Klemperer J. Chem. Phys. 83 6201 (1985) J. G. Loeser, C. A. Schmuttenmaer, R. C. Cohen, M. J. Elrod, D. W. Steyert, R. J. Saykally, R. E. Bumgarner, and G. A. Blake J. Chem. Phys. 97 4727 (1992) E. H. T. Olthof, A. van der Avoird, and P. E. S. Wormer J. Chem. Phys. 101 8430 (1994) E. H. T. Olthof

  9. Changes in fatty acid metabolism induced by varied micro-supplementation with zinc in snails Helix pomatia (Gastropoda Pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk-Pecka, Danuta; Pecka, Stanisław; Kowalczuk-Vasilev, Edyta

    2017-04-01

    We analyzed the changes in the profile of fatty acids (FA) in the foot tissues and hepatopancreas (HP) of snails Helix pomatia exposed to five microdoses of zinc (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, or 1mg/l) administered in the form of a pure salt solution and in the form of EDTA and lysine chelates. Selection from a pool of 56 fatty acids analyzed in snail tissues yielded a set of 12 biomarker acids undergoing significant changes in contact with toxic substances. The selection criteria included the greatest percentage among the FA profile and their significant role in physiological processes. The proposed palette of acids of the biomarker FAs comprised C16:0; C18:0; C23:0; C18:1 n-9; C20:1 n-9; C18:2 n-6; C18:3 n-3; C20:2; C20:4 n-6; C20:5 n-3; C22:4 n-6; and C22:5 n-3, and saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), determined separately in the foot tissues and hepatopancreas. The significant (p=0.01) influence of the dose as well as the source of the zinc on its' concentration in the tissues and on changes in the fatty acid profiles. Among the three zinc forms administered to the snails, the highest bioaccumulation of zinc in both tissues was noted in the group receiving the Zn-EDTA chelate. The content of PUFAs increased as the supplementation with zinc increased up to 0.75mg/l, but at 1mg/l, the share of these FAs began to decrease. This trend was observed in both analyzed tissue types - foot and hepatopancreas. The dose of 1mg Zn/l might be considered as a threshold dose above which the saturation of FAs increases. The results proved that determination of FA profile in snails can be used in ecotoxicological research as a reliable test of the effect of trace doses of stressors. The micro-supplementation of the mollusks diet with zinc is an example of a non-routine approach to issues connected with both diet and toxicology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Protective effect of grape seed and skin extract against high-fat diet-induced liver steatosis and zinc depletion in rat.

    PubMed

    Charradi, Kamel; Elkahoui, Salem; Karkouch, Ines; Limam, Ferid; Ben Hassine, Fethy; El May, Michèle Veronique; Aouani, Ezzedine

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a tremendous public health problem, characterized by ectopic deposition of fat into non-adipose tissues as liver generating an oxidative stress that could lead to steato-hepatitis. Grape seed and skin extract (GSSE) is a complex mixture of polyphenolics exhibiting robust antioxidative properties. We hypothesize that GSSE could protect the liver from fat-induced lipotoxicity and have a beneficial effect on liver function. Hepatoprotective effect of GSSE was measured by using an experimental model of fat-induced rat liver steatosis. Male rats were fed a standard diet or a high-fat diet (HFD) during 6 weeks and treated or not with 500 mg/kg bw GSSE. Lipid deposition into the liver was assessed by triglyceride, cholesterol and phospholipid measurements. Fat-induced lipoperoxidation, carbonylation, depletion of glutathione and of antioxidant enzyme activities were used as oxidative stress markers with a special emphasis on transition metal distribution. HFD induced liver hypertrophy and inflammation as assessed by high liver transaminases. HFD also induced an oxidative stress characterized by increased lipid and protein oxidation, a drop in glutathione and antioxidant enzyme activities as glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase and a drastic depletion in liver zinc. Importantly, GSSE prevented all the deleterious effects of HFD treatment. Data suggest that GSSE could be used as a safe preventive agent against fat-induced liver lipotoxicity which could also have potential applications in other non-alcoholic liver diseases.

  11. Modification of optical and electrical properties of zinc oxide-coated porous silicon nanostructures induced by swift heavy ion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Morphological and optical characteristics of radio frequency-sputtered zinc aluminum oxide over porous silicon (PS) substrates were studied before and after irradiating composite films with 130 MeV of nickel ions at different fluences varying from 1 × 1012 to 3 × 1013 ions/cm2. The effect of irradiation on the composite structure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Current–voltage characteristics of ZnO-PS heterojunctions were also measured. As compared to the granular crystallites of zinc oxide layer, Al-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) layer showed a flaky structure. The PL spectrum of the pristine composite structure consists of the emission from the ZnO layer as well as the near-infrared emission from the PS substrate. Due to an increase in the number of deep-level defects, possibly oxygen vacancies after swift ion irradiation, PS-Al-doped ZnO nanocomposites formed with high-porosity PS are shown to demonstrate a broadening in the PL emission band, leading to the white light emission. The broadening effect is found to increase with an increase in the ion fluence and porosity. XRD study revealed the relative resistance of the film against the irradiation, i.e., the irradiation of the structure failed to completely amorphize the structure, suggesting its possible application in optoelectronics and sensing applications under harsh radiation conditions. PMID:22748164

  12. Cubozoan Venom-Induced Cardiovascular Collapse Is Caused by Hyperkalemia and Prevented by Zinc Gluconate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, Angel A.; Shohet, Ralph V.

    2012-01-01

    Chironex fleckeri (Australian box jellyfish) stings can cause acute cardiovascular collapse and death. We developed methods to recover venom with high specific activity, and evaluated the effects of both total venom and constituent porins at doses equivalent to lethal envenomation. Marked potassium release occurred within 5 min and hemolysis within 20 min in human red blood cells (RBC) exposed to venom or purified venom porin. Electron microscopy revealed abundant ∼12-nm transmembrane pores in RBC exposed to purified venom porins. C57BL/6 mice injected with venom showed rapid decline in ejection fraction with progression to electromechanical dissociation and electrocardiographic findings consistent with acute hyperkalemia. Recognizing that porin assembly can be inhibited by zinc, we found that zinc gluconate inhibited potassium efflux from RBC exposed to total venom or purified porin, and prolonged survival time in mice following venom injection. These findings suggest that hyperkalemia is the critical event following Chironex fleckeri envenomation and that rapid administration of zinc could be life saving in human sting victims. PMID:23251508

  13. Study of DNA Origami Dimerization and Dimer Dissociation Dynamics and of the Factors that Limit Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Liber, Miran; Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Berger, Yaron; Popov, Mary; Khara, Dinesh C; Nir, Eyal

    2018-06-01

    Organizing DNA origami building blocks into higher order structures is essential for fabrication of large structurally and functionally diverse devices and molecular machines. Unfortunately, the yields of origami building block attachment reactions are typically not sufficient to allow programed assembly of DNA devices made from more than a few origami building blocks. To investigate possible reasons for these low yields, a detailed single-molecule fluorescence study of the dynamics of rectangular origami dimerization and origami dimer dissociation reactions is conducted. Reactions kinetics and yields are investigated at different origami and ion concentrations, for different ion types, for different lengths of bridging strands, and for the "sticky end" and "weaving welding" attachment techniques. Dimerization yields are never higher than 86%, which is typical for such systems. Analysis of the dynamic data shows that the low yield cannot be explained by thermodynamic instability or structural imperfections of the origami constructs. Atomic force microscopy and gel electrophoresis evidence reveal self-dimerization of the origami monomers, likely via blunt-end interactions made possible by the presence of bridging strands. It is suggested that this mechanism is the major factor that inhibits correct dimerization and means to overcome it are discussed. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Theoretical investigation on the 2e/12c bond and second hyperpolarizability of azaphenalenyl radical dimers: strength and effect of dimerization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rong-Lin; Xu, Hong-Liang; Sun, Shi-Ling; Qiu, Yong-Qing; Zhao, Liang; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-09-28

    An increasing number of chemists have focused on the investigations of two-electron/multicenter bond (2e/mc) that was first introduced to describe the structure of radical dimers. In this work, the dimerization of two isoelectronic radicals, triazaphenalenyl (TAP) and hexaazaphenalenyl (HAP) has been investigated in theory. Results show TAP2 is a stable dimer with stronger 2e/12c bond and larger interaction energy, while HAP2 is a less stable dimer with larger diradical character. Interestingly, the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra suggest that the dimerization induces a longer wavelength absorption in visible area, which is dependent on the strength of dimerization. Significantly, the amplitude of second hyperpolarizability (γ(yyyy)) of HAP2 is 1.36 × 10(6) a.u. that is larger than 7.79 × 10(4) a.u. of TAP2 because of the larger diradical character of HAP2. Therefore, the results indicate that the strength of radical dimerization can be effectively detected by comparing the magnitude of third order non-linear optical response, which is beneficial for further theoretical and experimental studies on the properties of complexes formed by radical dimerization.

  15. Dimerization controls the lipid raft partitioning of uPAR/CD87 and regulates its biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Orla; Andolfo, Annapaola; Santovito, Maria Lisa; Iuzzolino, Lucia; Blasi, Francesco; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2003-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR/CD87) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein with multiple functions in extracellular proteolysis, cell adhesion, cell migration and proliferation. We now report that cell surface uPAR dimerizes and that dimeric uPAR partitions preferentially to detergent-resistant lipid rafts. Dimerization of uPAR did not require raft partitioning as the lowering of membrane cholesterol failed to reduce dimerization and as a transmembrane uPAR chimera, which does not partition to lipid rafts, also dimerized efficiently. While uPA bound to uPAR independently of its membrane localization and dimerization status, uPA-induced uPAR cleavage was strongly accelerated in lipid rafts. In contrast to uPA, the binding of Vn occurred preferentially to raft- associated dimeric uPAR and was completely blocked by cholesterol depletion. PMID:14609946

  16. Zinc cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Zinc cyanide ; CASRN 557 - 21 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  17. Zinc phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Zinc phoshide ; CASRN 1314 - 84 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  18. Fano resonances in heterogeneous dimers of silicon and gold nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qian; Yang, Zhong-Jian; He, Jun

    2018-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the optical properties of dimers consisting of a gold nanosphere and a silicon nanosphere. The absorption spectrum of the gold sphere in the dimer can be significantly altered and exhibits a pronounced Fano profile. Analytical Mie theory and numerical simulations show that the Fano profile is induced by constructive and destructive interference between the incident electric field and the electric field of the magnetic dipole mode of the silicon sphere in a narrow wavelength range. The effects of the silicon sphere size, distance between the two spheres, and excitation configuration on the optical responses of the dimers are studied. Our study reveals the coherent feature of the electric fields of magnetic dipole modes in dielectric nanostructures and the strong interactions of the coherent fields with other nanophotonic structures.

  19. Arsenite-induced ROS/RNS generation causes zinc loss and inhibits the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Zhou, Xixi; Liu, Wenlan; Sun, Xi; Chen, Chen; Hudson, Laurie G; Jian Liu, Ke

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic enhances the genotoxicity of other carcinogenic agents such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Recent reports suggest that inhibition of DNA repair is an important aspect of arsenic cocarcinogenesis, and DNA repair proteins such as poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 are direct molecular targets of arsenic. Although arsenic has been shown to generate reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), little is known about the role of arsenic-induced ROS/RNS in the mechanism underlying arsenic inhibition of DNA repair. We report herein that arsenite-generated ROS/RNS inhibits PARP-1 activity in cells. Cellular exposure to arsenite, as well as hydrogen peroxide and NONOate (nitric oxide donor), decreased PARP-1 zinc content, enzymatic activity, and PARP-1 DNA binding. Furthermore, the effects of arsenite on PARP-1 activity, DNA binding, and zinc content were partially reversed by the antioxidant ascorbic acid, catalase, and the NOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine. Most importantly, arsenite incubation with purified PARP-1 protein in vitro did not alter PARP-1 activity or DNA-binding ability, whereas hydrogen peroxide or NONOate retained PARP-1 inhibitory activity. These results strongly suggest that cellular generation of ROS/RNS plays an important role in arsenite inhibition of PARP-1 activity, leading to the loss of PARP-1 DNA-binding ability and enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro evaluation of cellular responses induced by ZnO nanoparticles, zinc ions and bulk ZnO in fish cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Dolores; García-Gómez, Concepción; Babín, Mar

    2013-05-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) are inevitably released into the environment and are potentially dangerous for aquatic life. However, the potential mechanisms of cytotoxicity of zinc nanoparticles remain unclear. Studying the toxicity of ZnO-NPs with In vitro systems will help to determine their interactions with cellular biomolecules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic potentials of ZnO-NPs in established fish cell lines (RTG-2, RTH-149 and RTL-W1) and compare them with those of bulk ZnO and Zn(2+) ions. Membrane function (CFDA-AM assay), mitochondrial function (MTT assay), cell growth (KBP assay), cellular stress (β-galactosidase assay), reductase enzyme activity (AB assay), reactive oxygen species (ROS), total glutathione cellular content (tGSH assay) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were assessed for all cell lines. ZnO-NPs cytotoxicity was greater than those of bulk ZnO and Zn(2+). ZnO-NPs induced oxidative stress is dependent on their dose. Low cost tests, such as CFDA-AM, ROS, GST activity and tGSH cell content test that use fish cell lines, may be used to detect oxidative stress and redox status changes. Particle dissolution of the ZnO-NPs did not appear to play an important role in the observed toxicity in this study. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Dimers in Piecewise Temperleyan Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russkikh, Marianna

    2018-03-01

    We study the large-scale behavior of the height function in the dimer model on the square lattice. Richard Kenyon has shown that the fluctuations of the height function on Temperleyan discretizations of a planar domain converge in the scaling limit (as the mesh size tends to zero) to the Gaussian Free Field with Dirichlet boundary conditions. We extend Kenyon's result to a more general class of discretizations. Moreover, we introduce a new factorization of the coupling function of the double-dimer model into two discrete holomorphic functions, which are similar to discrete fermions defined in Smirnov (Proceedings of the international congress of mathematicians (ICM), Madrid, Spain, 2006; Ann Math (2) 172:1435-1467, 2010). For Temperleyan discretizations with appropriate boundary modifications, the results of Kenyon imply that the expectation of the double-dimer height function converges to a harmonic function in the scaling limit. We use the above factorization to extend this result to the class of all polygonal discretizations, that are not necessarily Temperleyan. Furthermore, we show that, quite surprisingly, the expectation of the double-dimer height function in the Temperleyan case is exactly discrete harmonic (for an appropriate choice of Laplacian) even before taking the scaling limit.

  2. Guaiane dimers from Xylopia vielana.

    PubMed

    Kamperdick, Christine; Phuong, Nguyen Minh; Adam, Günter; Van Sung, Tran

    2003-10-01

    From the leaves of Xylopia vielana (Annonaceae) two dimeric guaianes named vielanins D and E were isolated and structurally elucidated by mass and NMR spectroscopy. Vielanin D and E consist of bridged ring systems formally representing the Diels-Alder products from the hypothetical guaiane-type monomers. Due to a hemiketal function at C-8' both compounds occurred as epimeric mixtures.

  3. Kinetics of DNA Tile Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile–tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency. PMID:24794259

  4. Kinetics of DNA tile dimerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-06-24

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile-tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency.

  5. The Zinc Transporter Zip5 (Slc39a5) Regulates Intestinal Zinc Excretion and Protects the Pancreas against Zinc Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Jim; De Lisle, Robert C.; Andrews, Glen K.

    2013-01-01

    Background ZIP5 localizes to the baso-lateral membranes of intestinal enterocytes and pancreatic acinar cells and is internalized and degraded coordinately in these cell-types during periods of dietary zinc deficiency. These cell-types are thought to control zinc excretion from the body. The baso-lateral localization and zinc-regulation of ZIP5 in these cells are unique among the 14 members of the Slc39a family and suggest that ZIP5 plays a role in zinc excretion. Methods/Principal Findings We created mice with floxed Zip5 genes and deleted this gene in the entire mouse or specifically in enterocytes or acinar cells and then examined the effects on zinc homeostasis. We found that ZIP5 is not essential for growth and viability but total knockout of ZIP5 led to increased zinc in the liver in mice fed a zinc-adequate (ZnA) diet but impaired accumulation of pancreatic zinc in mice fed a zinc-excess (ZnE) diet. Loss-of-function of enterocyte ZIP5, in contrast, led to increased pancreatic zinc in mice fed a ZnA diet and increased abundance of intestinal Zip4 mRNA. Finally, loss-of-function of acinar cell ZIP5 modestly reduced pancreatic zinc in mice fed a ZnA diet but did not impair zinc uptake as measured by the rapid accumulation of 67zinc. Retention of pancreatic 67zinc was impaired in these mice but the absence of pancreatic ZIP5 sensitized them to zinc-induced pancreatitis and exacerbated the formation of large cytoplasmic vacuoles containing secretory protein in acinar cells. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that ZIP5 participates in the control of zinc excretion in mice. Specifically, they reveal a paramount function of intestinal ZIP5 in zinc excretion but suggest a role for pancreatic ZIP5 in zinc accumulation/retention in acinar cells. ZIP5 functions in acinar cells to protect against zinc-induced acute pancreatitis and attenuate the process of zymophagy. This suggests that it may play a role in autophagy. PMID:24303081

  6. X-ray-induced fluorescent centers formation in zinc- phosphate glasses doped with Ag and Cu ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyukin, D. A.; Pshenova, A. S.; Sidorov, A. I.; Stolyarchuk, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescent properties of silver and copper doped zinc-phosphate glasses were studied. By X-ray irradiation of silver and copper co-doped glasses we could create and identify new emission centers which do not exist in single-doped samples. Doping of the glass with both silver and copper ions leads to the increase of quantum yield by 2.7 times. The study was complemented by quantum chemical calculations using the time-dependent density functional theory. It was shown that fluorescence may be attributed to the formation of mixed Ag-Cu molecular clusters.

  7. Zinc protoporphyrin inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-, lipoteichoic acid-, and peptidoglycan-induced nitric oxide production through stimulating iNOS protein ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jyh-Ming; Lin, Hui-Yi; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Wu, Ming-Shun; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2009-06-15

    In the present study, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), but not ferric protoporphyrin (FePP), tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), or zinc chloride (ZnCl(2)), at the doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 microM, dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN)-induced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production with an increase in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein in RAW264.7 macrophages in a serum-free condition. NO inhibition and HO-1 induction by ZnPP were blocked by the separate addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A decrease in the iNOS/NO ratio and an increase in HO-1 protein by ZnPP were identified in three different conditions including ZnPP pretreatment, ZnPP co-treatment, and ZnPP post-treatment with LPS and LTA. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) were detected in LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-treated RAW264.7 cells, and iNOS/NO production was blocked by adding the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, but not the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. However, ZnPP addition potentiated ERK and JNK protein phosphorylation stimulated by LPS, LTA, and PGN. Increases in total protein ubiquitination and ubiquitinated iNOS proteins were detected in ZnPP-treated macrophages elicited by LPS according to Western and immunoprecipitation/Western blotting assays, respectively. The decrease in LPS-induced iNOS protein by ZnPP was reversed by adding the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin. The reduction in HO-1 protein induced by ZnPP via transfection of HO-1 small interfering RNA did not affect the inhibitory effect of ZnPP against LPS-induced iNOS/NO production and protein ubiquitination induced by ZnPP in macrophages. Data of the present study provide the first evidence to support ZnPP effectively inhibiting inflammatory iNOS/NO production through activation of protein ubiquitination in a HO-1-independent manner in macrophages.

  8. Zinc protoporphyrin inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-, lipoteichoic acid-, and peptidoglycan-induced nitric oxide production through stimulating iNOS protein ubiquitination

    SciT

    Chow, J.-M.; Lin, H.-Y.; Shen, S.-C.

    2009-06-15

    In the present study, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), but not ferric protoporphyrin (FePP), tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), or zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}), at the doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 {mu}M, dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN)-induced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production with an increase in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein in RAW264.7 macrophages in a serum-free condition. NO inhibition and HO-1 induction by ZnPP were blocked by the separate addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A decrease in the iNOS/NO ratio and an increase in HO-1 protein bymore » ZnPP were identified in three different conditions including ZnPP pretreatment, ZnPP co-treatment, and ZnPP post-treatment with LPS and LTA. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) were detected in LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-treated RAW264.7 cells, and iNOS/NO production was blocked by adding the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, but not the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. However, ZnPP addition potentiated ERK and JNK protein phosphorylation stimulated by LPS, LTA, and PGN. Increases in total protein ubiquitination and ubiquitinated iNOS proteins were detected in ZnPP-treated macrophages elicited by LPS according to Western and immunoprecipitation/Western blotting assays, respectively. The decrease in LPS-induced iNOS protein by ZnPP was reversed by adding the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin. The reduction in HO-1 protein induced by ZnPP via transfection of HO-1 small interfering RNA did not affect the inhibitory effect of ZnPP against LPS-induced iNOS/NO production and protein ubiquitination induced by ZnPP in macrophages. Data of the present study provide the first evidence to support ZnPP effectively inhibiting inflammatory iNOS/NO production through activation of protein ubiquitination in a HO-1-independent manner in macrophages.« less

  9. First-principles prediction of the effects of temperature and solvent selection on the dimerization of benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hieu H; Taylor, Christopher D; Henson, Neil J

    2013-01-24

    We introduce a procedure of quantum chemical calculations (B3P86/6-31G**) to study carboxylic acid dimerization and its correlation with temperature and properties of the solvent. Benzoic acid is chosen as a model system for studying dimerization via hydrogen bonding. Organic solvents are simulated using the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method with the polarized continuum model (PCM). The cyclic dimer is the most stable structure both in gas phase and solution. Dimer mono- and dihydrates could be found in the gas phase if acid molecules are in contact with water vapor. However, the formation of these hydrated conformers is very limited and cyclic dimer is the principal conformer to coexist with monomer acid in solution. Solvation of the cyclic dimer is more favorable compared to other complexes, partially due to the diminishing of hydrogen bonding capability and annihilation of dipole moments. Solvents have a strong effect on inducing dimer dissociation and this dependence is more pronounced at low dielectric constants. By accounting for selected terms in the total free energy of solvation, the solvation entropy could be incorporated to predict the dimer behavior at elevated temperatures. The temperature dependence of benzoic acid dimerization obtained by this technique is in good agreement with available experimental measurements, in which a tendency of dimer to dissociate is observed with increased temperatures. In addition, dimer breakup is more sensitive to temperature in low dielectric environments rather than in solvents with a higher dielectric constant.

  10. Protective effect of ginger and zinc chloride mixture on the liver and kidney alterations induced by malathion toxicity.

    PubMed

    Baiomy, Ahmed A; Attia, Hossam F; Soliman, Mohamed M; Makrum, Omar

    2015-03-01

    This study was carried out on four groups of male Wistar rats, 10 rats per group. Group I got open access to food intake and water with normal balanced diet. Group II was administered 400 mg ginger per kg body weight (BW) and zinc chloride (ZnCl2) (300 mg/L) diluted in tap water for 4 months. Group III was administered malathion at a dose of 50 mg/kg BW/day in 0.2 mL corn oil via gavages for 4 months. This dose equal to 1/50 of the LD50. Group IV was given a mixture of 400 mg ginger per kg BW and ZnCl2 (300 mg/L) diluted in tap water in addition to 100 mg malathion/kg BW for 4 months. The liver showed histopathological changes include congestion, edema, and leucocytic infiltrations which were ameliorated by the addition of ginger and ZnCl2 mixture. The kidney showed cloudy swelling and hydropic degeneration of the renal tubules. These changes were ameliorated by the addition of ginger and ZnCl2 mixture. Ki67 immunoreactivity was localized in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane. Its expression was estimated as the percentage of cells positively stained by the antibody in the different groups. In conclusion, malathion was toxic to the liver and kidney and must be avoided and protected by the addition of ginger and zinc mixture. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. The role of ZFP580, a novel zinc finger protein, in TGF-mediated cytoprotection against chemical hypoxia-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shi-Yun; Meng, Xiang-Yan; Xu, Zhong-Wei; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Jin, Xiao-Han; Chen, Xi; Zhou, Xin; Li, Yu-Ming; Xu, Rui-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Zing finger protein 580 (ZFP580) is a novel Cys2-His2 zinc-finger transcription factor that has an anti-apoptotic role in myocardial cells. It is involved in the endothelial transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signal transduction pathway as a mothers against decapentaplegic homolog (Smad)2 binding partner. The aim of the present study was to determine the involvement of ZFP580 in TGF-β1-mediated cytoprotection against chemical hypoxia-induced apoptosis, using H9c2 cardiac myocytes. Hypoxia was chemically induced in H9c2 myocardial cells by exposure to cobalt chloride (CoCl2). In response to hypoxia, cell viability was decreased, whereas the expression levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and ZFP580 were increased. Pretreatment with TGF-β1 attenuated CoCl2-induced cell apoptosis and upregulated ZFP580 protein expression; however, these effects could be suppressed by SB431542, an inhibitor of TGF-β type I receptor and Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, suppression of ZFP580 expression by RNA interference reduced the anti-apoptotic effects of TGF-β1 and thus increased CoCl2-induced apoptosis. B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein/Bcl-2 ratio, reactive oxygen species generation and caspase-3 activation were also increased following ZFP580 inactivation. In conclusion, these results indicate that ZFP580 is a component of the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway, and is involved in the protective effects of TGF-β1 against chemical hypoxia-induced cell apoptosis, through inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:28259939

  12. Photo-induced Leishmania DNA degradation by silver-doped zinc oxide nanoparticle: an in-vitro approach.

    PubMed

    Nadhman, Akhtar; Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Nazir, Samina; Yasinzai, Masoom

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the authors reported newly synthesised polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated silver (9%)-doped zinc oxide nanoparticle (doped semiconductor nanoparticle (DSN)) which has high potency for killing Leishmania tropica by producing reactive oxygen species on exposure to sunlight. The current report is focused on Leishmania DNA interaction and damage caused by the DSN. Here, we showed that the damage to Leishmania DNA was indirect, as the DSN was unable to interact with the DNA in intact Leishmania cell, indicating the incapability of PEGylated DSN to cross the nucleus barrier. The DNA damage was the result of high production of singlet oxygen on exposure to sunlight. The DNA damage was successfully prevented by singlet oxygen scavenger (sodium azide) confirming involvement of the highly energetic singlet oxygen in the DNA degradation process.

  13. Photodissociation pathways and lifetimes of protonated peptides and their dimers

    SciT

    Aravind, G.; Klaerke, B.; Rajput, J.

    2012-01-07

    Photodissociation lifetimes and fragment channels of gas-phase, protonated YA{sub n} (n = 1,2) peptides and their dimers were measured with 266 nm photons. The protonated monomers were found to have a fast dissociation channel with an exponential lifetime of {approx}200 ns while the protonated dimers show an additional slow dissociation component with a lifetime of {approx}2 {mu}s. Laser power dependence measurements enabled us to ascribe the fast channel in the monomer and the slow channel in the dimer to a one-photon process, whereas the fast dimer channel is from a two-photon process. The slow (1 photon) dissociation channel in themore » dimer was found to result in cleavage of the H-bonds after energy transfer through these H-bonds. In general, the dissociation of these protonated peptides is non-prompt and the decay time was found to increase with the size of the peptides. Quantum RRKM calculations of the microcanonical rate constants also confirmed a statistical nature of the photodissociation processes in the dipeptide monomers and dimers. The classical RRKM expression gives a rate constant as an analytical function of the number of active vibrational modes in the system, estimated separately on the basis of the equipartition theorem. It demonstrates encouraging results in predicting fragmentation lifetimes of protonated peptides. Finally, we present the first experimental evidence for a photo-induced conversion of tyrosine-containing peptides into monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon along with a formamide molecule both found in space.« less

  14. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  15. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  16. Guaiane dimers from Xylopia vielana.

    PubMed

    Kamperdick, C; Phuong, N M; Van Sung, T; Adam, G

    2001-02-01

    From the leaves of Xylopia vielana (Annonaceae) the three dimeric guaianes vielanin A-C were isolated and structurally elucidated by mass and NMR spectroscopy as 1-3. The structure of 1 contains a bridged ring system formed probably via a Diels-Alder reaction of two different guaiane monomers. Compounds 2 and 3 represent symmetric cyclobutanes formally generated from two equal guaiane moieties by [2 + 2] cycloaddition.

  17. Functional identification of a novel 14-3-3 epsilon splicing variant suggests dimerization is not necessary for 14-3-3 epsilon to inhibit UV-induced apoptosis

    SciT

    Han, Dingding; Ye, Guangming; Liu, Tingting

    2010-05-28

    14-3-3 proteins function as a dimer and have been identified to involve in diverse signaling pathways. Here we reported the identification of a novel splicing variant of human 14-3-3 epsilon (14-3-3 epsilon sv), which is derived from a novel exon 1' insertion. The insertion contains a stop codon and leads to a truncated splicing variant of 14-3-3 epsilon. The splicing variant is translated from the exon 2 and results in the deletion of an N-terminal {alpha}-helix which is crucial for the dimerization. Therefore, the 14-3-3 epsilon sv could not form a dimer with 14-3-3 zeta. However, after UV irradiation 14-3-3more » epsilon sv could also support cell survival, suggesting monomer of 14-3-3 epsilon is sufficient to protect cell from apoptosis.« less

  18. Zinc induces distinct changes in the metabolism of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in the roots of two Brassica species with different sensitivity to zinc stress

    PubMed Central

    Feigl, Gábor; Lehotai, Nóra; Molnár, Árpád; Ördög, Attila; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Palma, José M.; Corpas, Francisco J.; Erdei, László; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient naturally present in soils, but anthropogenic activities can lead to accumulation in the environment and resulting damage to plants. Heavy metals such as Zn can induce oxidative stress and the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS), which can reduce growth and yield in crop plants. This study assesses the interplay of these two families of molecules in order to evaluate the responses in roots of two Brassica species under high concentrations of Zn. Methods Nine-day-old hydroponically grown Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and B. napus (oilseed rape) seedlings were treated with ZnSO4 (0, 50, 150 and 300 µm) for 7 d. Stress intensity was assessed through analyses of cell wall damage and cell viability. Biochemical and cellular techniques were used to measure key components of the metabolism of ROS and RNS including lipid peroxidation, enzymatic antioxidants, protein nitration and content of superoxide radical (O2·−), nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Key Results Analysis of morphological root damage and alterations of microelement homeostasis indicate that B. juncea is more tolerant to Zn stress than B. napus. ROS and RNS parameters suggest that the oxidative components are predominant compared with the nitrosative components in the root system of both species. Conclusions The results indicate a clear relationship between ROS and RNS metabolism as a mechanism of response against stress caused by an excess of Zn. The oxidative stress components seem to be more dominant than the elements of the nitrosative stress in the root system of these two Brassica species. PMID:25538112

  19. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  20. Zinc L-carnosine suppresses inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 murine macrophages cell line via activation of Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Chan, Kok Meng; Sharif, Razinah

    2017-10-01

    Zinc L-carnosine (ZnC) is a chelate of Zn and L-carnosine and is used clinically in the treatment of peptic ulcer. In this study, we aim to investigate the involvement of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the anti-inflammatory effects of ZnC in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. We used immunoblotting analysis to evaluate the involvement of HO-1 in the anti-inflammatory effects of ZnC and the signaling pathway involved was measured using Dual luciferase reporter assay. Results from immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that pretreatment of cells with ZnC enhanced the expression of HO-1 in RAW 264.7 cells. Pretreatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin IX dichloride) significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of ZnC on nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NF-κB activation in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting that HO-1 play an important role in the suppression of inflammatory responses induced by ZnC. Furthermore, results from co-immunoprecipitation of Nrf2 and Keap1 and dual luciferase reporter assay showed that pretreatment of ZnC was able to activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway. Treatment of cells with p38 inhibitor (SB203580), c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor (SP600125), and MEK 1/2 inhibitor (U0126) did not significantly suppress the induction of HO-1 by ZnC. Moreover, our present findings suggest that the effects of ZnC on NO production, HO-1 expression, and Nrf2 activation were attributed to its Zn subcomponent, but not l-carnosine. Pretreatment with ZnC was able to activate Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway, thus suppressing the expression of inflammatory mediators, such as NO and iNOS in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells.

  1. Analysis of hepatitis C virus RNA dimerization and core–RNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Kanevsky, Igor; Gabus, Caroline; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Ficheux, Damien; Penin, François; Fossé, Philippe; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2006-01-01

    The core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been shown previously to act as a potent nucleic acid chaperone in vitro, promoting the dimerization of the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of the HCV genomic RNA, a process probably mediated by a small, highly conserved palindromic RNA motif, named DLS (dimer linkage sequence) [G. Cristofari, R. Ivanyi-Nagy, C. Gabus, S. Boulant, J. P. Lavergne, F. Penin and J. L. Darlix (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 2623–2631]. To investigate in depth HCV RNA dimerization, we generated a series of point mutations in the DLS region. We find that both the plus-strand 3′-UTR and the complementary minus-strand RNA can dimerize in the presence of core protein, while mutations in the DLS (among them a single point mutation that abolished RNA replication in a HCV subgenomic replicon system) completely abrogate dimerization. Structural probing of plus- and minus-strand RNAs, in their monomeric and dimeric forms, indicate that the DLS is the major if not the sole determinant of UTR RNA dimerization. Furthermore, the N-terminal basic amino acid clusters of core protein were found to be sufficient to induce dimerization, suggesting that they retain full RNA chaperone activity. These findings may have important consequences for understanding the HCV replicative cycle and the genetic variability of the virus. PMID:16707664

  2. Analysis of hepatitis C virus RNA dimerization and core-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Kanevsky, Igor; Gabus, Caroline; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Ficheux, Damien; Penin, François; Fossé, Philippe; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2006-01-01

    The core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been shown previously to act as a potent nucleic acid chaperone in vitro, promoting the dimerization of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the HCV genomic RNA, a process probably mediated by a small, highly conserved palindromic RNA motif, named DLS (dimer linkage sequence) [G. Cristofari, R. Ivanyi-Nagy, C. Gabus, S. Boulant, J. P. Lavergne, F. Penin and J. L. Darlix (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 2623-2631]. To investigate in depth HCV RNA dimerization, we generated a series of point mutations in the DLS region. We find that both the plus-strand 3'-UTR and the complementary minus-strand RNA can dimerize in the presence of core protein, while mutations in the DLS (among them a single point mutation that abolished RNA replication in a HCV subgenomic replicon system) completely abrogate dimerization. Structural probing of plus- and minus-strand RNAs, in their monomeric and dimeric forms, indicate that the DLS is the major if not the sole determinant of UTR RNA dimerization. Furthermore, the N-terminal basic amino acid clusters of core protein were found to be sufficient to induce dimerization, suggesting that they retain full RNA chaperone activity. These findings may have important consequences for understanding the HCV replicative cycle and the genetic variability of the virus.

  3. Interdependence of free zinc changes and protein complex assembly - insights into zinc signal regulation.

    PubMed

    Kocyła, Anna; Adamczyk, Justyna; Krężel, Artur

    2018-01-24

    Cellular zinc (Zn(ii)) is bound with proteins that are part of the proteomes of all domains of life. It is mostly utilized as a catalytic or structural protein cofactor, which results in a vast number of binding architectures. The Zn(ii) ion is also important for the formation of transient protein complexes with a Zn(ii)-dependent quaternary structure that is formed upon cellular zinc signals. The mechanisms by which proteins associate with and dissociate from Zn(ii) and the connection with cellular Zn(ii) changes remain incompletely understood. In this study, we aimed to examine how zinc protein domains with various Zn(ii)-binding architectures are formed under free Zn(ii) concentration changes and how formation of the Zn(ii)-dependent assemblies is related to the protein concentration and reactivity. To accomplish these goals we chose four zinc domains with different Zn(ii)-to-protein binding stoichiometries: classical zinc finger (ZnP), LIM domain (Zn 2 P), zinc hook (ZnP 2 ) and zinc clasp (ZnP 1 P 2 ) folds. Our research demonstrated a lack of changes in the saturation level of intraprotein zinc binding sites, despite various peptide concentrations, while homo- and heterodimers indicated a concentration-dependent tendency. In other words, at a certain free Zn(ii) concentration, the fraction of a formed dimeric complex increases or decreases with subunit concentration changes. Secondly, even small or local changes in free Zn(ii) may significantly affect protein saturation depending on its architecture, function and subcellular concentration. In our paper, we indicate the importance of interdependence of free Zn(ii) availability and protein subunit concentrations for cellular zinc signal regulation.

  4. Molecular and functional characterization of two drought-induced zinc finger proteins, ZmZnF1 and ZmZnF2 from maize kernels

    We have isolated two cDNA clones encoding Zinc Finger proteins, designated as ZmZnF1 and ZmZnF2, from water-stressed maize kernels. Sequence analyses indicates that ZmZnF1 is homologous to the A20/AN1-type zinc finger protein and contains the zinc finger motif of Cx2–Cx10–CxCx4Cx2Hx5HxC. Whereas ZmZ...

  5. Protective role of zinc against the neurotoxicity induced by exposure to cadmium during gestation and lactation periods on hippocampal volume of pups tested in early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ben Mimouna, Safa; Chemek, Marouane; Boughammoura, Sana; Haouas, Zohra; Messaoudi, Imed

    2018-05-03

    The present study was conducted to assess the possible effect of cadmium (Cd) throughout gestation and lactation on the volume of the subregion of the hippocampus as well as the potential protective role of zinc (Zn) against Cd neurotoxicity. For this purpose, female rats received either tap water, Cd, Zn or Cd + Zn in their drinking water during gestation and lactation. At postnatal day 35 (PND35), the male pups were sacrificed, and their brains were taken for histologic, chemical, and biochemical analysis. Hippocampal volume was measured in histologic brain slices using Cavalieri's principle. Zn depletion was observed in the brains of pups issued from mothers exposed to Cd. Biochemical analysis further revealed that Cd exposure significantly increases the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, as well as the metallothionein (MT) level. During histologic investigation, our results showed that gestational and lactational exposure to Cd significantly altered and decreased the volume of CA1, CA3 pyramidal cell layer and the dentate gyrus. However, there were no marked differences shown in CA2 subfield. Compared to Cd group, co-treatment with Cd and Zn provided correction of the changes induced by the Cd exposure. These results highlight the protective role of Zn against Cd-induced alteration in the hippocampus which is a crucial structure implicated in learning and memory processes.

  6. OsDOG, a gibberellin-induced A20/AN1 zinc-finger protein, negatively regulates gibberellin-mediated cell elongation in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaju; Xu, Yunyuan; Xiao, Jun; Ma, Qibin; Li, Dan; Xue, Zhen; Chong, Kang

    2011-07-01

    The A20/AN1 zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs) play pivotal roles in animal immune responses and plant stress responses. From previous gibberellin (GA) microarray data and A20/AN1 ZFP family member association, we chose Oryza sativa dwarf rice with overexpression of gibberellin-induced gene (OsDOG) to examine its function in the GA pathway. OsDOG was induced by gibberellic acid (GA(3)) and repressed by the GA-synthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol. Different transgenic lines with constitutive expression of OsDOG showed dwarf phenotypes due to deficiency of cell elongation. Additional GA(1) and real-time PCR quantitative assay analyses confirmed that the decrease of GA(1) in the overexpression lines resulted from reduced expression of GA3ox2 and enhanced expression of GA2ox1 and GA2ox3. Adding exogenous GA rescued the constitutive expression phenotypes of the transgenic lines. OsDOG has a novel function in regulating GA homeostasis and in negative maintenance of plant cell elongation in rice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Zinc-induced modulation of SRSF6 activity alters Bim splicing to promote generation of the most potent apoptotic isoform BimS.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hirokazu; Takeda, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Furuya, Keisuke; Hirose, Kazuya; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2013-07-01

    Bim is a member of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family of proteins. Bim gene undergoes alternative splicing to produce three predominant splicing variants (BimEL, BimL and BimS). The smallest variant BimS is the most potent inducer of apoptosis. Zinc (Zn(2+)) has been reported to stimulate apoptosis in various cell types. In this study, we examined whether Zn(2+) affects the expression of Bim in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Zn(2+) triggered alterations in Bim splicing and induced preferential generation of BimS, but not BimEL and BimL, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Other metals (cadmium, cobalt and copper) and stresses (oxidative, endoplasmic reticulum and genotoxic stresses) had little or no effect on the expression of BimS. To address the mechanism of Zn(2+)-induced preferential generation of BimS, which lacks exon 4, we developed a Bim mini-gene construct. Deletion analysis using the Bim mini-gene revealed that predicted binding sites of the SR protein SRSF6, also known as SRp55, are located in the intronic region adjacent to exon 4. We also found that mutations in the predicted SRSF6-binding sites abolished generation of BimS mRNA from the mutated Bim mini-gene. In addition, a UV cross-linking assay followed by Western blotting showed that SRSF6 directly bound to the predicted binding site and Zn(2+) suppressed this binding. Moreover, Zn(2+) stimulated SRSF6 hyper-phosphorylation. TG003, a cdc2-like kinase inhibitor, partially prevented Zn(2+)-induced generation of BimS and SRSF6 hyper-phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that Zn(2+) inhibits the activity of SRSF6 and promotes elimination of exon 4, leading to preferential generation of BimS. © 2013 FEBS.

  8. Gastroprotective and antidepressant effects of a new zinc(II)-curcumin complex in rodent models of gastric ulcer and depression induced by stresses.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xueting; Xu, Donghui; Xu, Sika; Zheng, Yanping; Xu, Shibo

    2011-07-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment found in the rhizome of Curcuma loga, has been used to treat a variety of digestive and neuropsychiatric disorders since ancient times in China. Curcumin can chelate various metal ions to form metallocomplexes of curcumin which show greater effects than curcumin alone. This study investigated the antiulcerogenic and antidepressant effects of a Zn(II)-curcumin complex on cold-restraint stress (CRS)-induced gastric ulcers in rats, and on the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head twitch test in mice. CRS disrupted the rat mucosal barrier and induced gastric ulcers by decreasing the activities of the antioxidant enzymes, and increasing H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Pretreatment with Zn(II)-curcumin (12, 24, and 48mg/kg) dose-dependently reversed these trends, reduced gastric lesions and H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, and increased antioxidant activities compared with control groups. Zn(II)-curcumin significantly increased HSP70 mRNA, and attenuated increased iNOS mRNA in the mucosa. Zn(II)-curcumin (17, 34, and 68mg/kg) also significantly decreased immobility time in the FST and TST, and enhanced 5-HTP-induced head twitches in mice. These results demonstrate that the Zn(II)-curcumin complex showed significant gastroprotective and antidepressant effects compared with curcumin alone via a synergistic effect between curcumin and zinc. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The E2 Domains of APP and APLP1 Share a Conserved Mode of Dimerization

    SciT

    S Lee; Y Xue; J Hulbert

    2011-12-31

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is genetically linked to Alzheimer's disease. APP is a type I membrane protein, and its oligomeric structure is potentially important because this property may play a role in its function or affect the processing of the precursor by the secretases to generate amyloid {beta}-peptide. Several independent studies have shown that APP can form dimers in the cell, but how it dimerizes remains controversial. At least three regions of the precursor, including a centrally located and conserved domain called E2, have been proposed to contribute to dimerization. Here we report two new crystal structures of E2, onemore » from APP and the other from APLP1, a mammalian APP homologue. Comparison with an earlier APP structure, which was determined in a different space group, shows that the E2 domains share a conserved and antiparallel mode of dimerization. Biophysical measurements in solution show that heparin binding induces E2 dimerization. The 2.1 {angstrom} resolution electron density map also reveals phosphate ions that are bound to the protein surface. Mutational analysis shows that protein residues interacting with the phosphate ions are also involved in heparin binding. The locations of two of these residues, Arg-369 and His-433, at the dimeric interface suggest a mechanism for heparin-induced protein dimerization.« less

  10. Single-molecule photobleaching reveals increased MET receptor dimerization upon ligand binding in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human receptor tyrosine kinase MET and its ligand hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor are essential during embryonic development and play an important role during cancer metastasis and tissue regeneration. In addition, it was found that MET is also relevant for infectious diseases and is the target of different bacteria, amongst them Listeria monocytogenes that induces bacterial uptake through the surface protein internalin B. Binding of ligand to the MET receptor is proposed to lead to receptor dimerization. However, it is also discussed whether preformed MET dimers exist on the cell membrane. Results To address these issues we used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques. Our photobleaching experiments show that MET exists in dimers on the membrane of cells in the absence of ligand and that the proportion of MET dimers increases significantly upon ligand binding. Conclusions Our results indicate that partially preformed MET dimers may play a role in ligand binding or MET signaling. The addition of the bacterial ligand internalin B leads to an increase of MET dimers which is in agreement with the model of ligand-induced dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23731667

  11. Zinc Signals and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Maywald, Martina; Wessels, Inga; Rink, Lothar

    2017-10-24

    Zinc homeostasis is crucial for an adequate function of the immune system. Zinc deficiency as well as zinc excess result in severe disturbances in immune cell numbers and activities, which can result in increased susceptibility to infections and development of especially inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on the role of zinc in regulating intracellular signaling pathways in innate as well as adaptive immune cells. Main underlying molecular mechanisms and targets affected by altered zinc homeostasis, including kinases, caspases, phosphatases, and phosphodiesterases, will be highlighted in this article. In addition, the interplay of zinc homeostasis and the redox metabolism in affecting intracellular signaling will be emphasized. Key signaling pathways will be described in detail for the different cell types of the immune system. In this, effects of fast zinc flux, taking place within a few seconds to minutes will be distinguish from slower types of zinc signals, also designated as "zinc waves", and late homeostatic zinc signals regarding prolonged changes in intracellular zinc.

  12. Multiple Mechanisms of Zinc-Mediated Inhibition for the Apoptotic Caspases-3, -6, -7, and -8.

    PubMed

    Eron, Scott J; MacPherson, Derek J; Dagbay, Kevin B; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2018-05-18

    Zinc is emerging as a widely used and important biological regulatory signal. Cellular zinc levels are tightly regulated by a complex array of zinc importers and exporters to control processes such as apoptotic cell death. While caspase inhibition by zinc has been reported previously, the reported inhibition constants were too weak to suggest a critical biological role for zinc-mediated inhibition. In this work, we have adopted a method of assessing available zinc. This allowed assessment of accurate inhibition constants for apoptotic caspases, caspase-3, -6, -7, and -8. Each of these caspases are inhibited by zinc at intracellular levels but with widely differing inhibition constants and different zinc binding stoichiometries. Caspase-3, -6, and -8 appear to be constitutively inhibited by typical zinc levels, and this inhibition must be lifted to allow activation. The inhibition constant for caspase-7 (76 nM) is much weaker than for the other apoptotic caspases (2.6-6.9 nM) suggesting that caspase-7 is not inactivated by normal zinc concentrations but can be inhibited under conditions of zinc stress. Caspase-3, -7, and -8 were found to bind three, one, and two zincs, respectively. In each of these caspases, zinc was present in the active site, in contrast to caspase-6, which binds one zinc allosterically. The most notable new mechanism to emerge from this work is for zinc-mediated inhibition of caspase-8. Zinc binds caspase-8 directly at the active site and at a second site. Zinc binding inhibits formation of the caspase-8 dimer, the activated form of the enzyme. Together these findings suggest that zinc plays a critical role in regulation of apoptosis by direct inactivation of caspases, in a manner that is unique for each caspase.

  13. Zinc and Regulation of Inflammatory Cytokines: Implications for Cardiometabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Meika; Samman, Samir

    2012-01-01

    In atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus, the concomitant presence of low-grade systemic inflammation and mild zinc deficiency highlights a role for zinc nutrition in the management of chronic disease. This review aims to evaluate the literature that reports on the interactions of zinc and cytokines. In humans, inflammatory cytokines have been shown both to up- and down-regulate the expression of specific cellular zinc transporters in response to an increased demand for zinc in inflammatory conditions. The acute phase response includes a rapid decline in the plasma zinc concentration as a result of the redistribution of zinc into cellular compartments. Zinc deficiency influences the generation of cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α, and in response to zinc supplementation plasma cytokines exhibit a dose-dependent response. The mechanism of action may reflect the ability of zinc to either induce or inhibit the activation of NF-κB. Confounders in understanding the zinc-cytokine relationship on the basis of in vitro experimentation include methodological issues such as the cell type and the means of activating cells in culture. Impaired zinc homeostasis and chronic inflammation feature prominently in a number of cardiometabolic diseases. Given the high prevalence of zinc deficiency and chronic disease globally, the interplay of zinc and inflammation warrants further examination. PMID:22852057

  14. Solitary waves in dimer binary collision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan, Zaid; Jayaprakash, K. R.

    2017-01-01

    Solitary wave propagation in nonlinear diatomic (dimer) chains is a very interesting topic of research in the study of nonlinear lattices. Such waves were recently found to be supported by the essentially nonlinear granular lattice and Toda lattice. An interesting aspect of this discovery is attributed to the realization of a spectrum of the mass ratio (the only system parameter governing the dynamics) that supports the propagation of such waves corresponding to the considered interaction potential. The objective of this exposition is to explore solitary wave propagation in the dimer binary collision (BC) model. Interestingly, the dimer BC model supports solitary wave propagation at a discrete spectrum of mass ratios similar to those observed in granular and Toda dimers. Further, we report a qualitative and one-to-one correspondence between the spectrum of the mass ratio corresponding to the dimer BC model and those corresponding to granular and Toda dimer chains.

  15. Alignment and Imaging of the CS2 Dimer Inside Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, James D.; Shepperson, Benjamin; Hübschmann, Bjarke A. K.; Thorning, Frederik; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2018-03-01

    The carbon disulphide (CS2) dimer is formed inside He nanodroplets and identified using fs laser-induced Coulomb explosion, by observing the CS2+ ion recoil velocity. It is then shown that a 160 ps moderately intense laser pulse can align the dimer in advantageous spatial orientations which allow us to determine the cross-shaped structure of the dimer by analysis of the correlations between the emission angles of the nascent CS2+ and S+ ions, following the explosion process. Our method will enable fs time-resolved structural imaging of weakly bound molecular complexes during conformational isomerization, including formation of exciplexes.

  16. Dimer geometry, amoebae and a vortex dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Charles; O'Connor, Denjoe

    2017-09-01

    We present a geometrical approach and introduce a connection for dimer problems on bipartite and non-bipartite graphs. In the bipartite case the connection is flat but has non-trivial {Z}2 holonomy round certain curves. This holonomy has the universality property that it does not change as the number of vertices in the fundamental domain of the graph is increased. It is argued that the K-theory of the torus, with or without punctures, is the appropriate underlying invariant. In the non-bipartite case the connection has non-zero curvature as well as non-zero Chern number. The curvature does not require the introduction of a magnetic field. The phase diagram of these models is captured by what is known as an amoeba. We introduce a dimer model with negative edge weights which correspond to vortices. The amoebae for various models are studied with particular emphasis on the case of negative edge weights. Vortices give rise to new kinds of amoebae with certain singular structures which we investigate. On the amoeba of the vortex full hexagonal lattice we find the partition function corresponds to that of a massless Dirac doublet.

  17. Protective effect of zinc supplementation against cadmium-induced oxidative stress and the RANK/RANKL/OPG system imbalance in the bone tissue of rats

    SciT

    Brzóska, Malgorzata M., E-mail: Malgorzata.Brzoska@umb.edu.pl; Rogalska, Joanna

    It was investigated whether protective influence of zinc (Zn) against cadmium (Cd)-induced disorders in bone metabolism may be related to its antioxidative properties and impact on the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κΒ (RANK)/RANK ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) system. Numerous indices of oxidative/antioxidative status, and Cd and Zn were determined in the distal femur of the rats administered Zn (30 and 60 mg/l) or/and Cd (5 and 50 mg/l) for 6 months. Soluble RANKL (sRANKL) and OPG were measured in the bone and serum. Zn supplementation importantly protected from Cd-induced oxidative stress preventing protein, DNA, and lipid oxidation in the bone.more » Moreover, Zn protected from the Cd-induced increase in sRANKL concentration and the sRANKL/OPG ratio, and decrease in OPG concentration in the bone and serum. Numerous correlations were noted between indices of the oxidative/antioxidative bone status, concentrations of sRANKL and OPG in the bone and serum, as well as the bone concentrations of Zn and Cd, and previously reported by us in these animals (Brzóska et al., 2007) indices of bone turnover and bone mineral density. The results allow us to conclude that the ability of Zn to prevent from oxidative stress and the RANK/RANKL/OPG system imbalance may be implicated in the mechanisms of its protective impact against Cd-induced bone damage. This paper is the first report from an in vivo study providing evidence that beneficial Zn impact on the skeleton under exposure to Cd is related to the improvement of the bone tissue oxidative/antioxidative status and mediating the RANK/RANKL/OPG system. - Highlights: • Cd induces oxidative stress in the bone tissue. • Cd disturbs bone metabolism via disorder of the RANK/RANKL/OPG system balance. • Zn supplementation protects from Cd-induced oxidative stress in the bone tissue. • Zn protects from the RANK/RANKL/OPG system imbalance caused by Cd in the bone tissue. • Enhanced Zn intake protects

  18. Constitutive activation and uncoupling of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor by mutations at the dimer interface. Role of the dimer structure in signalling.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yue; Ogawa, Haruo; Miyagi, Masaru; Misono, Kunio S

    2004-02-13

    The crystal packing of the extracellular hormone binding domain of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor contains two possible dimer pairs, the head-to-head (hh) and tail-to-tail (tt) dimer pairs associated through the membrane-distal and membrane-proximal subdomains, respectively. The tt-dimer structure has been proposed previously (van den Akker, F., Zhang, X., Miyagi, M., Huo, X., Misono, K. S., and Yee, V. C. (2000) Nature 406, 101-104). However, no direct evidence is available to identify the physiological dimer form. Here we report site-directed mutagenesis studies of residues at the two alternative dimer interfaces in the full-length receptor expressed on COS cells. The Trp74 to Arg mutation (W74R) or D71R at the hh-dimer interface caused partial constitutive guanylate cyclase activation, whereas mutation F96D or H99D caused receptor uncoupling. In contrast, mutation Y196D or L225D at the tt-interface had no such effect. His99 modification at the hh-dimer interface by ethoxyformic anhydride abolished ANP binding. These results suggest that the hh-dimer represents the physiological structure. Recently, we determined the crystal structure of ANPR complexed with ANP and proposed a hormone-induced rotation mechanism mediating transmembrane signaling (H. Ogawa, Y. Qiu, C. M. Ogata, and K. S. Misono, submitted for publication). The observed effects of mutations are consistent with the ANP-induced structural change identified from the crystal structures with and without ANP and support the proposed rotation mechanism for ANP receptor signaling.

  19. Roles of zinc and metallothionein-3 in oxidative stress-induced lysosomal dysfunction, cell death, and autophagy in neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Jeong; Koh, Jae-Young

    2010-10-26

    Zinc dyshomeostasis has been recognized as an important mechanism for cell death in acute brain injury. An increase in the level of free or histochemically reactive zinc in astrocytes and neurons is considered one of the major causes of death of these cells in ischemia and trauma. Although zinc dyshomeostasis can lead to cell death via diverse routes, the major pathway appears to involve oxidative stress.Recently, we found that a rise of zinc in autophagic vacuoles, including autolysosomes, is a prerequisite for lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death in cultured brain cells exposed to oxidative stress conditions. The source of zinc in this process is likely redox-sensitive zinc-binding proteins such as metallothioneins, which release zinc under oxidative conditions. Of the metallothioneins, metallothionein-3 is especially enriched in the central nervous system, but its physiologic role in this tissue is not well established. Like other metallothioneins, metallothionein-3 may function as metal detoxicant, but is also known to inhibit neurite outgrowth and, sometimes, promote neuronal death, likely by serving as a source of toxic zinc release. In addition, metallothionein-3 regulates lysosomal functions. In the absence of metallothionein-3, there are changes in lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 and -2, and reductions in certain lysosomal enzymes that result in decreased autophagic flux. This may have dual effects on cell survival. In acute oxidative injury, zinc dyshomeostasis and lysosomal membrane permeabilization are diminished in metallothionein-3 null cells, resulting in less cell death. But over the longer term, diminished lysosomal function may lead to the accumulation of abnormal proteins and cause cytotoxicity.The roles of zinc and metallothionein-3 in autophagy and/or lysosomal function have just begun to be investigated. In light of evidence that autophagy and lysosomes may play significant roles in the pathogenesis of various neurological

  20. Ketamine-induced behavioural and brain oxidative changes in mice: an assessment of possible beneficial effects of zinc as mono- or adjunct therapy.

    PubMed

    Onaolapo, Olakunle James; Ademakinwa, Olayemi Quyyom; Olalekan, Temitayo Opeyemi; Onaolapo, Adejoke Yetunde

    2017-09-01

    We studied the influence of zinc, haloperidol or olanzapine on neurobehaviour (open-field, radial arm maze and elevated plus maze) and brain antioxidant status in vehicle- or ketamine-treated mice, with the aim of ascertaining the potentials of zinc in counteracting ketamine's effects. Experiment 1 assessed the effects of zinc in healthy animals and the relative degrees of modulation of ketamine's effects by zinc, haloperidol or olanzapine, respectively. Experiment 2 assessed the modulation of ketamine's effects following co-administration of zinc with haloperidol or olanzapine. Male mice weighing 18-20 g each were used. Animals were pretreated with ketamine (except vehicle, zinc, haloperidol and olanzapine controls) for 10 days before commencement of 14-day treatment (day 11-24) with vehicle, zinc, haloperidol or olanzapine (alone or in combination). Ketamine injection also continued alongside zinc and/or standard drugs in the ketamine-treated groups. Zinc, haloperidol and olanzapine were administered by gavage. Treatments were given daily and behaviours assessed on days 11 and 24. On day 24, animals were sacrificed and whole brain homogenates used for estimation of glutathione, nitric oxide and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Ketamine increased open-field behaviours, nitric oxide and MDA levels, while it decreased working memory, social interaction and glutathione. Administration of zinc alone or in combination with haloperidol or olanzapine was associated with variable degrees of reversal of these effects. Zinc may have the potential of a possible therapeutic agent and/or adjunct in the reversal of schizophrenia-like changes in behaviour and brain oxidative status.

  1. Formic acid dimers in a nitrogen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Susy; Fausto, Rui; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2018-01-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) dimers are studied by infrared spectroscopy in a nitrogen matrix and by ab initio calculations. We benefit from the use of a nitrogen matrix where the lifetime of the higher-energy (cis) conformer is very long (˜11 h vs. 7 min in an argon matrix). As a result, in a nitrogen matrix, a large proportion of the cis conformer can be produced by vibrational excitation of the lower-energy (trans) conformer. Three trans-trans, four trans-cis, and three cis-cis dimers are found in the experiments. The spectroscopic information on most of these dimers is enriched compared to the previous studies in an argon matrix. The cis-cis dimers of ordinary formic acid (without deuteration) are reported here for the first time. Several conformational processes are obtained using selective excitation by infrared light, some of them also for the first time. In particular, we report on the formation of cis-cis dimers upon vibrational excitation of trans-cis dimers. Tunneling decays of several dimers have been detected in the dark. The tunneling decay of cis-cis dimers of formic acid as well as the stabilization of cis units in cis-cis dimers is also observed for the first time.

  2. Formic acid dimers in a nitrogen matrix.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Susy; Fausto, Rui; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2018-01-21

    Formic acid (HCOOH) dimers are studied by infrared spectroscopy in a nitrogen matrix and by ab initio calculations. We benefit from the use of a nitrogen matrix where the lifetime of the higher-energy (cis) conformer is very long (∼11 h vs. 7 min in an argon matrix). As a result, in a nitrogen matrix, a large proportion of the cis conformer can be produced by vibrational excitation of the lower-energy (trans) conformer. Three trans-trans, four trans-cis, and three cis-cis dimers are found in the experiments. The spectroscopic information on most of these dimers is enriched compared to the previous studies in an argon matrix. The cis-cis dimers of ordinary formic acid (without deuteration) are reported here for the first time. Several conformational processes are obtained using selective excitation by infrared light, some of them also for the first time. In particular, we report on the formation of cis-cis dimers upon vibrational excitation of trans-cis dimers. Tunneling decays of several dimers have been detected in the dark. The tunneling decay of cis-cis dimers of formic acid as well as the stabilization of cis units in cis-cis dimers is also observed for the first time.

  3. Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce oxidative stress, inhibit growth, and attenuate biofilm formation activity of Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Ahmad, Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mitis from the oral cavity causes endocarditis and other systemic infections. Rising resistance against traditional antibiotics amongst oral bacteria further aggravates the problem. Therefore, antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized and characterized during this study against S. mitis ATCC 6249 and Ora-20 were evaluated in search of alternative antimicrobial agents. ZnO and TiO2-NPs exhibited an average size of 35 and 13 nm, respectively. The IC50 values of ZnO and TiO2-NPs against S. mitis ATCC 6249 were 37 and 77 µg ml(-1), respectively, while the IC50 values against S. mitis Ora-20 isolate were 31 and 53 µg ml(-1), respectively. Live and dead staining, biofilm formation on the surface of polystyrene plates, and extracellular polysaccharide production show the same pattern. Exposure to these nanoparticles also shows an increase (26-83 %) in super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Three genes, namely bapA1, sodA, and gtfB like genes from these bacteria were identified and sequenced for quantitative real-time PCR analysis. An increase in sodA gene (1.4- to 2.4-folds) levels and a decrease in gtfB gene (0.5- to 0.9-folds) levels in both bacteria following exposure to ZnO and TiO2-NPs were observed. Results presented in this study verify that ZnO-NPs and TiO2-NPs can control the growth and biofilm formation activities of these strains at very low concentration and hence can be used as alternative antimicrobial agents for oral hygiene.

  4. Comparative analysis of the relative potential of silver, zinc-oxide and titanium-dioxide nanoparticles against UVB-induced DNA damage for the prevention of skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sumit; Omar, Yousef; Ijaz, Zohaib Mohammad; AL-Ghadhban, Ahmed; Deshmukh, Sachin K.; Carter, James E.; Singh, Ajay P.; Singh, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Sunscreen formulations containing UVB filters, such as Zinc-oxide (ZnO) and titanium-dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed to limit the exposure of human skin to UV-radiations. Unfortunately, these UVB protective agents have failed in controlling the skin cancer incidence. We recently demonstrated that silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) could serve as novel protective agents against UVB-radiations. Here our goal was to perform comparative analysis of direct and indirect UVB-protection efficacy of ZnO-, TiO2- and Ag-NPs. Sun-protection-factor calculated based on their UVB-reflective/absorption abilities was the highest for TiO2-NPs followed by Ag- and ZnO-NPs. This was further confirmed by studying indirect protection of UVB radiation-induced death of HaCaT cells. However, only Ag-NPs were active in protecting HaCaT cells against direct UVB-induced DNA-damage by repairing bulky-DNA lesions through nucleotide-excision-repair mechanism. Moreover, Ag-NPs were also effective in protecting HaCaT cells from UVB-induced oxidative DNA damage by enhancing SOD/CAT/GPx activity. In contrast, ZnO- and TiO2-NPs not only failed in providing any direct protection from DNA-damage, but rather enhanced oxidative DNA-damage by increasing ROS production. Together, these findings raise concerns about safety of ZnO- and TiO2-NPs and establish superior protective efficacy of Ag-NPs. PMID:27693632

  5. Comparative analysis of the relative potential of silver, Zinc-oxide and titanium-dioxide nanoparticles against UVB-induced DNA damage for the prevention of skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nikhil; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Arora, Sumit; Omar, Yousef; Ijaz, Zohaib Mohammad; Al-Ghadhban, Ahmed; Deshmukh, Sachin K; Carter, James E; Singh, Ajay P; Singh, Seema

    2016-12-01

    Sunscreen formulations containing UVB filters, such as Zinc-oxide (ZnO) and titanium-dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed to limit the exposure of human skin to UV-radiations. Unfortunately, these UVB protective agents have failed in controlling the skin cancer incidence. We recently demonstrated that silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) could serve as novel protective agents against UVB-radiations. Here our goal was to perform comparative analysis of direct and indirect UVB-protection efficacy of ZnO-, TiO 2 - and Ag-NPs. Sun-protection-factor calculated based on their UVB-reflective/absorption abilities was the highest for TiO 2 -NPs followed by Ag- and ZnO-NPs. This was further confirmed by studying indirect protection of UVB radiation-induced death of HaCaT cells. However, only Ag-NPs were active in protecting HaCaT cells against direct UVB-induced DNA-damage by repairing bulky-DNA lesions through nucleotide-excision-repair mechanism. Moreover, Ag-NPs were also effective in protecting HaCaT cells from UVB-induced oxidative DNA damage by enhancing SOD/CAT/GPx activity. In contrast, ZnO- and TiO 2 -NPs not only failed in providing any direct protection from DNA-damage, but rather enhanced oxidative DNA-damage by increasing ROS production. Together, these findings raise concerns about safety of ZnO- and TiO 2 -NPs and establish superior protective efficacy of Ag-NPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of zinc(II)-phosphonate coordination polymers with different dimensionality (0D, 2D, 3D) and dimensionality change in the solid phase (0D→3D) induced by temperature

    SciT

    Fernández-Zapico, Eva; Montejo-Bernardo, Jose; Fernández-González, Alfonso

    2015-05-15

    Three new zinc(II) coordination polymers, [Zn(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO)(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)] (1), [Zn{sub 3}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})](H{sub 2}O){sub 3.40} (2) and [Zn{sub 5}(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}){sub 4}](H{sub 2}O){sub 0.32} (3), with different structural dimensionality (0D, 2D and 3D, respectively) have been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system (P2{sub 1}/c) forming discrete dimeric units bonded through H-bonds, while compounds 2 and 3 crystallize in the triclinic (P−1) and the monoclinic (C2/c) systems, respectively.more » Compound 3, showing three different coordination numbers (4, 5 and 6) for the zinc atoms, has also been obtained by thermal treatment of 1 (probed by high-temperature XRPD experiments). The crystalline features of these compounds, related to the coordination environments for the zinc atoms in each structure, provoke the increase of the relative fluorescence for 2 and 3, compared to the free phenanthroline. Thermal analysis (TG and DSC) and XPS studies have been also carried out for all compounds. - Graphical abstract: Three new coordination compounds of zinc with 2-carboxyethylphosphonic acid (H{sub 2}PPA) and phenanthroline have been obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. The crystalline structure depends on the different coordination environments of the zinc atoms (see two comparative Zn{sub 6}-moieties). The influence of the different coordination modes of H{sub 2}PPA with the central atom in all structures have been studied, being found new coordination modes for this ligand. Several compounds show a significant increase in relative fluorescence with respect to the free phenanthroline. - Highlights: • Compounds have been obtained modifying the reaction time and the rate

  7. MCP-1 causes cardiomyoblast death via autophagy resulting from ER stress caused by oxidative stress generated by inducing a novel zinc-finger protein, MCPIP.

    PubMed

    Younce, Craig W; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E

    2010-01-27

    MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1) plays a critical role in the development of heart failure that is known to involve apoptosis. How MCP-1 contributes to cell death involved in the development of heart disease is not understood. In the present study we show that MCP-1 causes death in cardiac myoblasts, H9c2 cells, by inducing oxidative stress which causes ER stress leading to autophagy via a novel zinc-finger protein, MCPIP (MCP-1-induced protein). MCPIP expression caused cell death, and knockdown of MCPIP attenuated MCP-1-induced cell death. It caused induction of iNOS (inducible NO synthase), translocation of the NADPH oxidase subunit phox47 from the cytoplasm to the membrane, production of ROS (reactive oxygen species), and induction of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress markers HSP40 (heat-shock protein 40), PDI (protein disulfide-isomerase), GRP78 (guanine-nucleotide-releasing protein 78) and IRE1alpha (inositol-requiring enzyme 1alpha). It also caused autophagy, as indicated by beclin-1 induction, cleavage of LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) and autophagolysosome formation, and apoptosis, as indicated by caspase 3 activation and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling) assay. Inhibitors of oxidative stress, including CeO2 nanoparticles, inhibited ROS formation, ER stress, autophagy and cell death. Specific inhibitors of ER stress inhibited autophagy and cell death as did knockdown of the ER stress signalling protein IRE1. Knockdown of beclin-1 and autophagy inhibitors prevented cell death. This cell death involved caspase 2 and caspase 12, as specific inhibitors of these caspases prevented MCPIP-induced cell death. Microarray analysis showed that MCPIP expression caused induction of a variety of genes known to be involved in cell death. MCPIP caused activation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p38 and induction of p53 and PUMA (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis). Taken together, these

  8. Update on zinc biology.

    PubMed

    Solomons, Noel W

    2013-01-01

    Zinc has become a prominent nutrient of clinical and public health interest in the new millennium. Functions and actions for zinc emerge as increasingly ubiquitous in mammalian anatomy, physiology and metabolism. There is undoubtedly an underpinning in fundamental biology for all of the aspects of zinc in human health (clinical and epidemiological) in pediatric and public health practice. Unfortunately, basic science research may not have achieved a full understanding as yet. As a complement to the applied themes in the companion articles, a selection of recent advances in the domains homeostatic regulation and transport of zinc is presented; they are integrated, in turn, with findings on genetic expression, intracellular signaling, immunity and host defense, and bone growth. The elements include ionic zinc, zinc transporters, metallothioneins, zinc metalloenzymes and zinc finger proteins. In emerging basic research, we find some plausible mechanistic explanations for delayed linear growth with zinc deficiency and increased infectious disease resistance with zinc supplementation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  10. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

  11. Microsomal Glutathione Transferase 1 Protects Against Toxicity Induced by Silica Nanoparticles but Not by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase 1 (MGST1) is an antioxidant enzyme located predominantly in the mitochondrial outer membrane and endoplasmic reticulum and has been shown to protect cells from lipid peroxidation induced by a variety of cytostatic drugs and pro-oxidant stimuli. We hypothesized that MGST1 may also protect against nanomaterial-induced cytotoxicity through a specific effect on lipid peroxidation. We evaluated the induction of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress by TiO2, CeO2, SiO2, and ZnO in the human MCF-7 cell line with or without overexpression of MGST1. SiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles caused dose- and time-dependent toxicity, whereas no obvious cytotoxic effects were induced by nanoparticles of TiO2 and CeO2. We also noted pronounced cytotoxicity for three out of four additional SiO2 nanoparticles tested. Overexpression of MGST1 reversed the cytotoxicity of the main SiO2 nanoparticles tested and for one of the supplementary SiO2 nanoparticles but did not protect cells against ZnO-induced cytotoxic effects. The data point toward a role of lipid peroxidation in SiO2 nanoparticle-induced cell death. For ZnO nanoparticles, rapid dissolution was observed, and the subsequent interaction of Zn2+ with cellular targets is likely to contribute to the cytotoxic effects. A direct inhibition of MGST1 by Zn2+ could provide a possible explanation for the lack of protection against ZnO nanoparticles in this model. Our data also showed that SiO2 nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity is mitigated in the presence of serum, potentially through masking of reactive surface groups by serum proteins, whereas ZnO nanoparticles were cytotoxic both in the presence and in the absence of serum. PMID:22303956

  12. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization

    SciT

    Chakraborty, S.; Asare, B.K.; Biswas, P.K., E-mail: pbiswas@tougaloo.edu

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide “I-box” derived from ER residues 503–518 specifically blocks ER dimerization.more » Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479–485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497–506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511–520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497–506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. - Highlights: • Designer peptide grafts retain core molecular recognition motif during MD simulations. • Designer peptide grafts with Poly-ALA helix form stable

  13. Topical application of zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces bacterial skin infection in mice and exhibits antibacterial activity by inducing oxidative stress response and cell membrane disintegration in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pati, Rashmirekha; Mehta, Ranjit Kumar; Mohanty, Soumitra; Padhi, Avinash; Sengupta, Mitali; Vaseeharan, Baskarlingam; Goswami, Chandan; Sonawane, Avinash

    2014-08-01

    Here we studied immunological and antibacterial mechanisms of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) against human pathogens. ZnO-NPs showed more activity against Staphylococcus aureus and least against Mycobacterium bovis-BCG. However, BCG killing was significantly increased in synergy with antituberculous-drug rifampicin. Antibacterial mechanistic studies showed that ZnO-NPs disrupt bacterial cell membrane integrity, reduce cell surface hydrophobicity and down-regulate the transcription of oxidative stress-resistance genes in bacteria. ZnO-NP treatment also augmented the intracellular bacterial killing by inducing reactive oxygen species production and co-localization with Mycobacterium smegmatis-GFP in macrophages. Moreover, ZnO-NPs disrupted biofilm formation and inhibited hemolysis by hemolysin toxin producing S. aureus. Intradermal administration of ZnO-NPs significantly reduced the skin infection, bacterial load and inflammation in mice, and also improved infected skin architecture. We envision that this study offers novel insights into antimicrobial actions of ZnO-NPs and also demonstrates ZnO-NPs as a novel class of topical anti-infective agent for the treatment of skin infections. This in-depth study demonstrates properties of ZnO nanoparticles in infection prevention and treatment in several skin infection models, dissecting the potential mechanisms of action of these nanoparticles and paving the way to human applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rice Genotype Differences in Tolerance of Zinc-Deficient Soils: Evidence for the Importance of Root-Induced Changes in the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Asako; Kirk, Guy J. D.; Lee, Jae-Sung; Morete, Mark J.; Nanda, Amrit K.; Johnson-Beebout, Sarah E.; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a major constraint to rice production and Zn is also often deficient in humans with rice-based diets. Efforts to breed more Zn-efficient rice are constrained by poor understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance to deficiency. Here we assess the contributions of root growth and root Zn uptake efficiency, and we seek to explain the results in terms of specific mechanisms. We made a field experiment in a highly Zn-deficient rice soil in the Philippines with deficiency-tolerant and -sensitive genotypes, and measured growth, Zn uptake and root development. We also measured the effect of planting density. Tolerant genotypes produced more crown roots per plant and had greater uptake rates per unit root surface area; the latter was at least as important as root number to overall tolerance. Tolerant and sensitive genotypes took up more Zn per plant at greater planting densities. The greater uptake per unit root surface area, and the planting density effect can only be explained by root-induced changes in the rhizosphere, either solubilizing Zn, or neutralizing a toxin that impedes Zn uptake (possibly HCO3− or Fe2+), or both. Traits for these and crown root number are potential breeding targets. PMID:26793198

  15. Rice Genotype Differences in Tolerance of Zinc-Deficient Soils: Evidence for the Importance of Root-Induced Changes in the Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asako; Kirk, Guy J D; Lee, Jae-Sung; Morete, Mark J; Nanda, Amrit K; Johnson-Beebout, Sarah E; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a major constraint to rice production and Zn is also often deficient in humans with rice-based diets. Efforts to breed more Zn-efficient rice are constrained by poor understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance to deficiency. Here we assess the contributions of root growth and root Zn uptake efficiency, and we seek to explain the results in terms of specific mechanisms. We made a field experiment in a highly Zn-deficient rice soil in the Philippines with deficiency-tolerant and -sensitive genotypes, and measured growth, Zn uptake and root development. We also measured the effect of planting density. Tolerant genotypes produced more crown roots per plant and had greater uptake rates per unit root surface area; the latter was at least as important as root number to overall tolerance. Tolerant and sensitive genotypes took up more Zn per plant at greater planting densities. The greater uptake per unit root surface area, and the planting density effect can only be explained by root-induced changes in the rhizosphere, either solubilizing Zn, or neutralizing a toxin that impedes Zn uptake (possibly [Formula: see text] or Fe(2+)), or both. Traits for these and crown root number are potential breeding targets.

  16. Highly improved photo-induced bias stability of sandwiched triple layer structure in sol-gel processed fluorine-doped indium zinc oxide thin film transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongha; Park, Hyungjin; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-03-01

    In order to improve the reliability of TFT, an Al2O3 insulating layer is inserted between active fluorine doped indium zinc oxide (IZO:F) thin films to form a sandwiched triple layer. All the thin films were fabricated via low-cost sol-gel process. Due to its large energy bandgap and high bonding energy with oxygen atoms, the Al2O3 layer acts as a photo-induced positive charge blocking layer that effectively blocks the migration of both holes and V o2+ toward the interface between the gate insulator and the semiconductor. The inserted Al2O3 triple layer exhibits a noticeably low turn on voltage shift of -0.7 V under NBIS as well as the good TFT performance with a mobility of 10.9 cm2/V ṡ s. We anticipate that this approach can be used to solve the stability issues such as NBIS, which is caused by inescapable oxygen vacancies.

  17. In situ reactive compatibilization of polypropylene/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer thermoplastic vulcanizate by zinc dimethacrylate via peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Xu, Chuanhui; Liang, Xingquan; Cao, Liming

    2013-09-12

    This work demonstrates an approach of in situ reactive compatibilization between polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) by using zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA) as a compatibilizer and, simultaneously, as a very strong reinforcing agent. With the incorporation of 7phr ZDMA in the PP/EPDM (30/70, w/w) thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV), the tensile strength, tear strength, elongation at break, and hardness of PP/EPDM/ZDMA TPV were increased from 5.3 MPa, 31.3 kN/m, 222%, and 78 up to 11.2 MPa, 64.2 kN/m, 396%, and 83, respectively. This tremendous reinforcing as well as the compatibilization effect of the ZDMA was understood by polymerization of ZDMA and ZDMA reacted with EPDM and PP during peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization. A peculiar phase structure that rubber particles were surrounded and "bonded" by a thick transition zone that contained numerous of nanoparticles with dimensions of about 20-30 nm was observed from transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy results confirmed that incorporation of ZDMA reduced the size of the cross-linked EPDM particles. Moreover, we found that the compatibilized TPV showed a higher tan δ peak temperature for EPDM phase and a lower tan δ peak temperature for PP phase. The suggested method for in situ reactive compatibilization of PP and EPDM offers routes to the design of new TPV-based technical products for diversified applications.

  18. Synergistic effect of bolus exposure to zinc oxide nanoparticles on bleomycin-induced secretion of pro-fibrotic cytokines without lasting fibrotic changes in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenting; Ichihara, Gaku; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Suzuki, Yuka; Chang, Jie; Kato, Masashi; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Gabazza, Esteban C; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-12-30

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are widely used in various products, and the safety evaluation of this manufactured material is important. The present study investigated the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by constant subcutaneous infusion of bleomycin (BLM). Female C57BL/6Jcl mice were divided into BLM-treated and non-treated groups. In each treatment group, 0, 10, 20 or 30 µg of ZnO nanoparticles were delivered into the lungs through pharyngeal aspiration. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lungs were sampled at Day 10 or 14 after administration. Pulmonary exposure by a single bolus of ZnO nanoparticles resulted in severe, but transient inflammatory infiltration and thickening of the alveolar septa in the lungs, along with the increase of total and differential cell counts in BLAF. The BALF level of interleukin (IL)-1β and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was increased at Day 10 and 14, respectively. At Day 10, the synergistic effect of BLM and ZnO exposure was detected on IL-1β and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in BALF. The present study demonstrated the synergistic effect of pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles and subcutaneous infusion of BLM on the secretion of pro-fibrotic cytokines in the lungs.

  19. Modes of Cell Death Induced by Photodynamic Therapy Using Zinc Phthalocyanine in Lung Cancer Cells Grown as a Monolayer and Three-Dimensional Multicellular Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Manoto, Sello L; Houreld, Nicolette; Hodgkinson, Natasha; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2017-05-16

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves interaction of a photosensitizer, light, and molecular oxygen which produces singlet oxygen and subsequent tumour eradication. The development of second generation photosensitizers, such as phthalocyanines, has improved this technology. Customary monolayer cell culture techniques are, unfortunately, too simple to replicate treatment effects in vivo. Multicellular tumour spheroids may provide a better alternative since they mimic aspects of the human tumour environment. This study aimed to profile 84 genes involved in apoptosis following treatment with PDT on lung cancer cells (A549) grown in a monolayer versus three-dimensional multicellular tumour spheroids (250 and 500 μm). Gene expression profiling was performed 24 h post irradiation (680 nm; 5 J/cm²) with zinc sulfophthalocyanine (ZnPcS mix ) to determine the genes involved in apoptotic cell death. In the monolayer cells, eight pro-apoptotic genes were upregulated, and two were downregulated. In the multicellular tumour spheroids (250 µm) there was upregulation of only 1 gene while there was downregulation of 56 genes. Apoptosis in the monolayer cultured cells was induced via both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. However, in the multicellular tumour spheroids (250 and 500 µm) the apoptotic pathway that was followed was not conclusive.

  20. Highly improved photo-induced bias stability of sandwiched triple layer structure in sol-gel processed fluorine-doped indium zinc oxide thin film transistor

    SciT

    Kim, Dongha; Park, Hyungjin; Bae, Byeong-Soo, E-mail: bsbae@kaist.ac.kr

    In order to improve the reliability of TFT, an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} insulating layer is inserted between active fluorine doped indium zinc oxide (IZO:F) thin films to form a sandwiched triple layer. All the thin films were fabricated via low-cost sol-gel process. Due to its large energy bandgap and high bonding energy with oxygen atoms, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer acts as a photo-induced positive charge blocking layer that effectively blocks the migration of both holes and V {sub o}{sup 2+} toward the interface between the gate insulator and the semiconductor. The inserted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} triple layer exhibits amore » noticeably low turn on voltage shift of −0.7 V under NBIS as well as the good TFT performance with a mobility of 10.9 cm{sup 2}/V ⋅ s. We anticipate that this approach can be used to solve the stability issues such as NBIS, which is caused by inescapable oxygen vacancies.« less

  1. Synergistic Effect of Bolus Exposure to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Bleomycin-Induced Secretion of Pro-Fibrotic Cytokines without Lasting Fibrotic Changes in Murine Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenting; Ichihara, Gaku; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Suzuki, Yuka; Chang, Jie; Kato, Masashi; D’Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N.; Gabazza, Esteban C.; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are widely used in various products, and the safety evaluation of this manufactured material is important. The present study investigated the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by constant subcutaneous infusion of bleomycin (BLM). Female C57BL/6Jcl mice were divided into BLM-treated and non-treated groups. In each treatment group, 0, 10, 20 or 30 µg of ZnO nanoparticles were delivered into the lungs through pharyngeal aspiration. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lungs were sampled at Day 10 or 14 after administration. Pulmonary exposure by a single bolus of ZnO nanoparticles resulted in severe, but transient inflammatory infiltration and thickening of the alveolar septa in the lungs, along with the increase of total and differential cell counts in BLAF. The BALF level of interleukin (IL)-1β and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was increased at Day 10 and 14, respectively. At Day 10, the synergistic effect of BLM and ZnO exposure was detected on IL-1β and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in BALF. The present study demonstrated the synergistic effect of pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles and subcutaneous infusion of BLM on the secretion of pro-fibrotic cytokines in the lungs. PMID:25561223

  2. A role for the Drosophila zinc transporter Zip88E in protecting against dietary zinc toxicity.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher D; Warr, Coral G; Burke, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Zinc absorption in animals is thought to be regulated in a local, cell autonomous manner with intestinal cells responding to dietary zinc content. The Drosophila zinc transporter Zip88E shows strong sequence similarity to Zips 42C.1, 42C.2 and 89B as well as mammalian Zips 1, 2 and 3, suggesting that it may act in concert with the apically-localised Drosophila zinc uptake transporters to facilitate dietary zinc absorption by importing ions into the midgut enterocytes. However, the functional characterisation of Zip88E presented here indicates that Zip88E may instead play a role in detecting and responding to zinc toxicity. Larvae homozygous for a null Zip88E allele are viable yet display heightened sensitivity to elevated levels of dietary zinc. This decreased zinc tolerance is accompanied by an overall decrease in Metallothionein B transcription throughout the larval midgut. A Zip88E reporter gene is expressed only in the salivary glands, a handful of enteroendocrine cells at the boundary between the anterior and middle midgut regions, and in two parallel strips of sensory cell projections connecting to the larval ventral ganglion. Zip88E expression solely in this restricted subset of cells is sufficient to rescue the Zip88E mutant phenotype. Together, our data suggest that Zip88E may be functioning in a small subset of cells to detect excessive zinc levels and induce a systemic response to reduce dietary zinc absorption and hence protect against toxicity.

  3. Effect of zinc gluconate, sage oil on inflammatory patterns and hyperglycemia in zinc deficient diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Elseweidy, Mohamed M; Ali, Abdel-Moniem A; Elabidine, Nabila Zein; Mursey, Nada M

    2017-11-01

    The relationship between zinc homeostasis and pancreatic function had been established. In this study we aimed firstly to configure the inflammatory pattern and hyperglycemia in zinc deficient diabetic rats. Secondly to illustrate the effect of two selected agents namely Zinc gluconate and sage oil (Salvia Officinalis, family Lamiaceae). Rats were fed on Zinc deficient diet, deionized water for 28days along with Zinc level check up at intervals to achieve zinc deficient state then rats were rendered diabetic through receiving one dose of alloxan monohydrate (120mg/kg) body weight, classified later into 5 subgroups. Treatment with sage oil (0.042mg/kg IP) and Zinc gluconate orally (150mg/kg) body weight daily for 8 weeks significantly reduced serum glucose, C-reactive protein (CRP), Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- α), interleukins-6 1 β, inflammatory8 (IFN ȣ), pancreatic 1L1-β along with an increase in serum Zinc and pancreatic Zinc transporter 8 (ZNT8). Histopathological results of pancreatic tissues showed a good correlation with the biochemical findings. Both sage oil and zinc gluconate induced an improvement in the glycemic and inflammatory states. This may be of value like the therapeutic agent for diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Chloroplast Preproteins Bind to the Dimer Interface of the Toc159 Receptor during Import1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lih-Jen; Yeh, Yi-Hung; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    2017-01-01

    Most chloroplast proteins are synthesized in the cytosol as higher molecular weight preproteins and imported via the translocons in the outer (TOC) and inner (TIC) envelope membranes of chloroplasts. Toc159 functions as a primary receptor and directly binds preproteins through its dimeric GTPase domain. As a first step toward a molecular understanding of how Toc159 mediates preprotein import, we mapped the preprotein-binding regions on the Toc159 GTPase domain (Toc159G) of pea (Pisum sativum) using cleavage by bound preproteins conjugated with the artificial protease FeBABE and cysteine-cysteine cross-linking. Our results show that residues at the dimer interface and the switch II region of Toc159G are in close proximity to preproteins. The mature portion of preproteins was observed preferentially at the dimer interface, whereas the transit peptide was found at both regions equally. Chloroplasts from transgenic plants expressing engineered Toc159 with a cysteine placed at the dimer interface showed increased cross-linking to bound preproteins. Our data suggest that, during preprotein import, the Toc159G dimer disengages and the dimer interface contacts translocating preproteins, which is consistent with a model in which conformational changes induced by dimer-monomer conversion in Toc159 play a direct role in facilitating preprotein import. PMID:28250068

  5. Structural Basis for a Reciprocating Mechanism of Negative Cooperativity in Dimeric Phosphagen Kinase Activity

    SciT

    Wu, X.; Ye, S; Guo, S

    Phosphagen kinase (PK) family members catalyze the reversible phosphoryl transfer between phosphagen and ADP to reserve or release energy in cell energy metabolism. The structures of classic quaternary complexes of dimeric creatine kinase (CK) revealed asymmetric ligand binding states of two protomers, but the significance and mechanism remain unclear. To understand this negative cooperativity further, we determined the first structure of dimeric arginine kinase (dAK), another PK family member, at 1.75 {angstrom}, as well as the structure of its ternary complex with AMPPNP and arginine. Further structural analysis shows that the ligand-free protomer in a ligand-bound dimer opens more widelymore » than the protomers in a ligand-free dimer, which leads to three different states of a dAK protomer. The unexpected allostery of the ligand-free protomer in a ligand-bound dimer should be relayed from the ligand-binding-induced allostery of its adjacent protomer. Mutations that weaken the interprotomer connections dramatically reduced the catalytic activities of dAK, indicating the importance of the allosteric propagation mediated by the homodimer interface. These results suggest a reciprocating mechanism of dimeric PK, which is shared by other ATP related oligomeric enzymes, e.g., ATP synthase. - Wu, X., Ye, S., Guo, S., Yan, W., Bartlam, M., Rao, Z. Structural basis for a reciprocating mechanism of negative cooperativity in dimeric phosphagen kinase activity.« less

  6. Receptor signaling: when dimerization is not enough.

    PubMed

    Jiang, G; Hunter, T

    Activation of receptors that signal via tyrosine kinase domains has been thought to involve receptor dimerization and transphosphorylation of juxtaposed catalytic domains. Recent results suggest things might be more complex - specific intersubunit conformational changes within a dimer can also be important.

  7. Dietary phytate, zinc and hidden zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sandstead, Harold H; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological data suggest at least one in five humans are at risk of zinc deficiency. This is in large part because the phytate in cereals and legumes has not been removed during food preparation. Phytate, a potent indigestible ligand for zinc prevents it's absorption. Without knowledge of the frequency of consumption of foods rich in phytate, and foods rich in bioavailable zinc, the recognition of zinc deficiency early in the illness may be difficult. Plasma zinc is insensitive to early zinc deficiency. Serum ferritin concentration≤20μg/L is a potential indirect biomarker. Early effects of zinc deficiency are chemical, functional and may be "hidden". The clinical problem is illustrated by 2 studies that involved US Mexican-American children, and US premenopausal women. The children were consuming home diets that included traditional foods high in phytate. The premenopausal women were not eating red meat on a regular basis, and their consumption of phytate was mainly from bran breakfast cereals. In both studies the presence of zinc deficiency was proven by functional responses to controlled zinc treatment. In the children lean-mass, reasoning, and immunity were significantly affected. In the women memory, reasoning, and eye-hand coordination were significantly affected. A screening self-administered food frequency questionnaire for office might help caregiver's identify patients at risk of zinc deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Zinc chelation decreases IFN-β-induced STAT1 upregulation and iNOS expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Reiber, Cathleen; Brieger, Anne; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2017-12-01

    One consequence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced stimulation of macrophages is the release of Interferon (IFN)-β, and subsequently the activation of the JAK-STAT1 pathway, resulting in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Free intracellular zinc ions (Zn 2+ ) have a profound impact as a second messenger in LPS-dependent gene expression. Previous work had indicated a Zn 2+ -dependent upregulation of STAT1 mRNA in response to LPS and IFN-β, potentially affecting STAT1-dependent downstream signaling upon pre-incubation with these agents. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long-term influence of Zn 2+ chelation on cellular STAT1 levels and their effect on protein levels and activity of iNOS. The LPS- and IFN-β-mediated increase of STAT1 mRNA and protein levels was abrogated by chelation of Zn 2+ with the membrane permeable chelator N,N,N',N'-Tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) in RAW 264.7 macrophages. After 48h pre-incubation together with IFN-β, TPEN also led to reduced nitric monoxide formation in response to a second stimulation with LPS. Nonetheless, the latter was observed regardless of any pre-incubation with IFN-β, suggesting that the effect of treatment with TPEN negatively affects iNOS induction independently from cellular STAT1 levels. In conclusion, long term Zn 2+ chelation does affect STAT1 protein expression, but interferes with NO production by a different, yet unknown pathway not involving STAT1. However, as there are many additional STAT1-dependent genes, there might still be effects on targets other than iNOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. In situ genetic correction of the sickle cell anemia mutation in human induced pluripotent stem cells using engineered zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sebastiano, Vittorio; Maeder, Morgan L; Angstman, James F; Haddad, Bahareh; Khayter, Cyd; Yeo, Dana T; Goodwin, Mathew J; Hawkins, John S; Ramirez, Cherie L; Batista, Luis F Z; Artandi, Steven E; Wernig, Marius; Joung, J Keith

    2011-11-01

    The combination of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and targeted gene modification by homologous recombination (HR) represents a promising new approach to generate genetically corrected, patient-derived cells that could be used for autologous transplantation therapies. This strategy has several potential advantages over conventional gene therapy including eliminating the need for immunosuppression, avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis by therapeutic vectors, and maintaining expression of the corrected gene by endogenous control elements rather than a constitutive promoter. However, gene targeting in human pluripotent cells has remained challenging and inefficient. Recently, engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been shown to substantially increase HR frequencies in human iPSCs, raising the prospect of using this technology to correct disease causing mutations. Here, we describe the generation of iPSC lines from sickle cell anemia patients and in situ correction of the disease causing mutation using three ZFN pairs made by the publicly available oligomerized pool engineering method (OPEN). Gene-corrected cells retained full pluripotency and a normal karyotype following removal of reprogramming factor and drug-resistance genes. By testing various conditions, we also demonstrated that HR events in human iPSCs can occur as far as 82 bps from a ZFN-induced break. Our approach delineates a roadmap for using ZFNs made by an open-source method to achieve efficient, transgene-free correction of monogenic disease mutations in patient-derived iPSCs. Our results provide an important proof of principle that ZFNs can be used to produce gene-corrected human iPSCs that could be used for therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Inhibitory effect of a mixture containing vitamin C, lysine, proline, epigallocatechin gallate, zinc and alpha-1-antitrypsin on lung carcinogenesis induced by benzo(a) pyrene in mice.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ahmed Mohamed; Borai, Ibrahim Hassan; Ali, Mamdouh Moawad; Ghanem, Hala Mostafa; Hegazi, Azza El-Sayed Ahmed; Mousa, Amria Mamdouh

    2013-05-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate protective and therapeutic effects of a specific mixture, containing vitamin C, lysine, proline, epigallocatechin gallate and zinc, as well as alpha-1-antitrypsin protein on lung tumorigenesis induced by benzo(a) pyrene [B(a)P] in mice. Swiss albino mice were divided into two main experiments, experiment (1) the mice were injected with 100 mg/kg B(a)P and lasted for 28 weeks, while experiment (2) the mice were injected with 8 doses each of 50 mg/kg B(a)P and lasted for 16 weeks. Each experiment (1 and 2) divided into five groups, group (I) received vehicle, group (II) received the protector mixture, group (III) received the carcinogen B(a)P, group (IV) received the protector together with the carcinogen (simultaneously) and group (V) received the carcinogen then the protector (consecutively). Total sialic acid, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, vascular epithelial growth factor, hydroxyproline levels, as well as elastase and gelatinase activities showed significant elevation in group (III) in the two experiments comparing to control group (P < 0.001). These biochemical alterations were associated with histopathological changes. Administration of the protector in group IV and group V causes significant decrease in such parameters with improvement in histopathological alterations with improvement in histopathological alterations when compared with group III in the two experiments (P < 0.001). The present protector mixture has the ability to suppress neoplastic alteration and restore the biochemical and histopathological parameters towards normal on lung carcinogenesis induced by benzo(a) pyrene in mice. Furthermore, the present mixture have more protective rather than therapeutic action.

  11. Statistical transmutation in doped quantum dimer models.

    PubMed

    Lamas, C A; Ralko, A; Cabra, D C; Poilblanc, D; Pujol, P

    2012-07-06

    We prove a "statistical transmutation" symmetry of doped quantum dimer models on the square, triangular, and kagome lattices: the energy spectrum is invariant under a simultaneous change of statistics (i.e., bosonic into fermionic or vice versa) of the holes and of the signs of all the dimer resonance loops. This exact transformation enables us to define the duality equivalence between doped quantum dimer Hamiltonians and provides the analytic framework to analyze dynamical statistical transmutations. We investigate numerically the doping of the triangular quantum dimer model with special focus on the topological Z(2) dimer liquid. Doping leads to four (instead of two for the square lattice) inequivalent families of Hamiltonians. Competition between phase separation, superfluidity, supersolidity, and fermionic phases is investigated in the four families.

  12. Remifentanil Induces Cardio Protection Against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Through the Maintenance of Zinc Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Mingwei; Zhang, Ge; Wang, Jiannan; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Huanhuan; Cheng, Xinxin; Xu, Zhelong

    2018-05-15

    Although it is well known that remifentanil (Rem) elicits cardiac protection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study tested if Rem can protect the heart from I/R injury by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through the maintenance of zinc (Zn) homeostasis. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of regional ischemia followed by 2 hours of reperfusion. Rem was given by 3 consecutive 5-minute infusions, and each infusion was followed by a 5-minute drug-free perfusion before ischemia. Total Zn concentrations in cardiac tissue, cardiac function, infarct size, and apoptosis were assessed. H9c2 cells were subjected to 6 hours of hypoxia and 2 hours of reoxygenation (hypoxia/reoxygenation [H/R]), and Rem was given for 30 minutes before hypoxia. Metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF1) overexpression plasmids were transfected into H9c2 cells 48 hours before hypoxia. Intracellular Zn level, cell viability, and mitochondrial injury parameters were evaluated. A Zn chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN) or an ER stress activator thapsigargin was administrated during in vitro and ex vivo studies. The regulatory molecules related to Zn homeostasis and ER stress in cardiac tissue, and cardiomyocytes were analyzed by Western blotting. Rem caused significant reversion of Zn loss from the heart (Rem + I/R versus I/R, 9.43 ± 0.55 vs 7.53 ± 1.18; P < .05) by suppressing the expression of MTF1 and Zn transporter 1 (ZnT1). The inhibited expression of ER stress markers after Rem preconditioning was abolished by TPEN. Rem preconditioning improved the cardiac function accompanied by the reduction of infarct size (Rem + I/R versus I/R, 21% ± 4% vs 40% ± 6%; P < .05). The protective effects of Rem could be reserved by TPEN and thapsigargin. Similar effects were observed in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R. In addition, MTF1 overexpression blocked the inhibitory effects of Rem on ZnT1

  13. Role of nutritional zinc in the prevention of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2010-05-01

    Zinc is known as an essential nutritional factor in the growth of the human and animals. Bone growth retardation is a common finding in various conditions associated with dietary zinc deficiency. Bone zinc content has been shown to decrease in aging, skeletal unloading, and postmenopausal conditions, suggesting its role in bone disorder. Zinc has been demonstrated to have a stimulatory effect on osteoblastic bone formation and mineralization; the metal directly activates aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, a rate-limiting enzyme at translational process of protein synthesis, in the cells, and it stimulates cellular protein synthesis. Zinc has been shown to stimulate gene expression of the transcription factors runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) that is related to differentiation into osteoblastic cells. Moreover, zinc has been shown to inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption due to inhibiting osteoclast-like cell formation from bone marrow cells and stimulating apoptotic cell death of mature osteoclasts. Zinc has a suppressive effect on the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. Zinc transporter has been shown to express in osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. Zinc protein is involved in transcription. The intake of dietary zinc causes an increase in bone mass. beta-Alanyl-L: -histidinato zinc (AHZ) is a zinc compound, in which zinc is chelated to beta-alanyl-L: -histidine. The stimulatory effect of AHZ on bone formation is more intensive than that of zinc sulfate. Zinc acexamate has also been shown to have a potent-anabolic effect on bone. The oral administration of AHZ or zinc acexamate has the restorative effect on bone loss under various pathophysiologic conditions including aging, skeletal unloading, aluminum bone toxicity, calcium- and vitamin D-deficiency, adjuvant arthritis, estrogen deficiency, diabetes, and fracture healing. Zinc compounds may be designed as new supplementation factor in the prevention and

  14. Method of capturing or trapping zinc using zinc getter materials

    SciT

    Hunyadi Murph, Simona E.; Korinko, Paul S.

    2017-07-11

    A method of trapping or capturing zinc is disclosed. In particular, the method comprises a step of contacting a zinc vapor with a zinc getter material. The zinc getter material comprises nanoparticles and a metal substrate.

  15. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    SciT

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocytemore » chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.« less

  16. Elevation of serum CA 125 and D-dimer levels associated with rupture of ovarian endometrioma.

    PubMed

    Uharcek, P; Mlyncek, M; Ravinger, J

    2007-01-01

    Patients with endometriosis rarely have a serum CA 125 concentration >100 IU/mL. A raised plasma level of D-dimer indicates active fibrinolysis, either secondary to clot formation or primarily activated. This condition is seldom diagnosed in patients with endometriosis. A 53-year-old woman was referred to our institution for acute abdominal pain. Laparoscopic surgery revealed a large ovarian cyst with rupture on the left side. Preoperative laboratory tests detected high serum CA 125 and D-dimer levels. Adnexectomy was performed, resulting in a sharp decrease in serum CA 125 and D-dimer concentration. We describe the clinical course of the patient. Rupture of a large ovarian endometrioma can lead to a high serum concentration of CA 125, a condition which, in addition to the detected pelvic mass, may mimic a malignant process. The increased D-dimer plasma level indicated that a ruptured endometriotic cyst can induce coagulation reactions.

  17. Excessive zinc ingestion: A reversible cause of sideroblastic anemia and bone marrow depression

    SciT

    Broun, E.R.; Greist, A.; Tricot, G.

    1990-09-19

    Two patients with sideroblastic anemia secondary to zinc-induced copper deficiency absorbed excess zinc secondary to oral ingestion. The source of excess zinc was a zinc supplement in one case; in the other, ingested coins. In each case, the sideroblastic anemia was corrected promptly after removal of the source of excess zinc. These two cases emphasize the importance of recognizing this clinical entity, since the myelodysplastic features are completely reversible.

  18. UV-A induced oxidative stress is more prominent in naturally pigmented aged human RPE cells compared to non-pigmented human RPE cells independent of zinc treatment.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, Antje; Kokkinou, Despina; Julien, Sylvie; Heiduschka, Peter; Berneburg, Mark; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2008-02-27

    To investigate the effects of zinc supplementation on human amelanotic (ARPE-19) and native pigmented retinal pigment epithelial cells (hRPE) under normal light conditions and after ultraviolet A light exposure. hRPE cells, containing both melanin and lipofuscin granules, were prepared from human donor eyes of 60-70 year old patients. Cells of the amelanotic ARPE-19 cell line and pigmented hRPE cells were treated with zinc chloride and subjected to oxidative stress by UV-A irradiation. Intracellular H(2)O(2) formation was measured using a fluorescence oxidation assay. Additionally, apoptosis and viability assays were performed. Control cells were treated identically except for irradiation and zinc supplementation. Under normal light conditions, zinc treated hRPE cells produced less H(2)O(2) than unsupplemented hRPE cells. Viability and apoptosis events did not change. After UV-A irradiation, ARPE and hRPE cells were greatly impaired in all tests performed compared to the non-irradiated controls. No differences were found after zinc supplementation. hRPE cells showed a higher apoptosis and mortality rate than non-pigmented cells when stressed by UV-A light. ARPE cells never showed any zinc related effects. In contrast, without irradiation, zinc supplementation reduced H(2)O(2) production in pigmented hRPE cells slightly. We did not find any zinc effect in irradiated hRPE cells. After UV light exposure, pigmented cells showed a higher apoptosis and mortality than cells lacking any pigmentation. We conclude that cells with pigmentation consisting of melanin and lipofuscin granules have more prooxidative than antioxidative capacity when stressed by UV light exposure compared to cells lacking any pigmentation.

  19. Zinc at glutamatergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, P; Vergnano, A M; Barbour, B; Casado, M

    2009-01-12

    It has long been known that the mammalian forebrain contains a subset of glutamatergic neurons that sequester zinc in their synaptic vesicles. This zinc may be released into the synaptic cleft upon neuronal activity. Extracellular zinc has the potential to interact with and modulate many different synaptic targets, including glutamate receptors and transporters. Among these targets, NMDA receptors appear particularly interesting because certain NMDA receptor subtypes (those containing the NR2A subunit) contain allosteric sites exquisitely sensitive to extracellular zinc. The existence of these high-affinity zinc binding sites raises the possibility that zinc may act both in a phasic and tonic mode. Changes in zinc concentration and subcellular zinc distribution have also been described in several pathological conditions linked to glutamatergic transmission dysfunctions. However, despite intense investigation, the functional significance of vesicular zinc remains largely a mystery. In this review, we present the anatomy and the physiology of the glutamatergic zinc-containing synapse. Particular emphasis is put on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the putative roles of zinc as a messenger involved in excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. We also highlight the many controversial issues and unanswered questions. Finally, we present and compare two widely used zinc chelators, CaEDTA and tricine, and show why tricine should be preferred to CaEDTA when studying fast transient zinc elevations as may occur during synaptic activity.

  20. Quantum dimer model for the pseudogap metal

    PubMed Central

    Punk, Matthias; Allais, Andrea; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantum dimer model for the metallic state of the hole-doped cuprates at low hole density, p. The Hilbert space is spanned by spinless, neutral, bosonic dimers and spin S=1/2, charge +e fermionic dimers. The model realizes a “fractionalized Fermi liquid” with no symmetry breaking and small hole pocket Fermi surfaces enclosing a total area determined by p. Exact diagonalization, on lattices of sizes up to 8×8, shows anisotropic quasiparticle residue around the pocket Fermi surfaces. We discuss the relationship to experiments. PMID:26195771

  1. Zinc oxide overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used ... prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of ...

  2. Developmental and Wound-, Cold-, Desiccation-, Ultraviolet-B-Stress-Induced Modulations in the Expression of the Petunia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Gene ZPT2-21

    PubMed Central

    van der Krol, Alexander R.; van Poecke, Remco M.P.; Vorst, Oscar F.J.; Voogt, Charlotte; van Leeuwen, Wessel; Borst-Vrensen, Tanja W.M.; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; van der Plas, Linus H.W.

    1999-01-01

    The ZPT2-2 gene belongs to the EPF gene family in petunia (Petunia hybrida), which encodes proteins with TFIIIA-type zinc-finger DNA-binding motifs. To elucidate a possible function for ZPT2-2, we analyzed its pattern of expression in relation to different developmental and physiological stress signals. The activity of the ZPT2-2 promoter was analyzed using a firefly luciferase (LUC) reporter gene, allowing for continuous measurements of transgene activity in planta. We show that ZPT2-2::LUC is active in all plant tissues, but is strongly modulated in cotyledons upon germination, in leaves in response to desiccation, cold treatment, wounding, or ultraviolet-B light, and in petal tissue in response to pollination of the stigma. Analysis of mRNA levels indicated that the modulations in ZPT2-2::LUC expression reflect modulations in endogenous ZPT2-2 gene expression. The change in ZPT2-2::LUC activity by cold treatment, wounding, desiccation, and ultraviolet-B light suggest that the phytohormones ethylene and jasmonic acid are involved in regulating the expression of ZPT2-2. Although up-regulation of expression of ZPT2-2 can be blocked by inhibitors of ethylene perception, expression in plants is not induced by exogenously applied ethylene. The application of jasmonic acid does result in an up-regulation of gene activity and, thus, ZPT2-2 may play a role in the realization of the jasmonic acid hormonal responses in petunia. PMID:10594102

  3. Zinc Sulfate and/or Growth Hormone Administration for the Prevention of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis: a Placebo-Controlled Rat Model Study.

    PubMed

    Kandaz, Mustafa; Ertekin, Mustafa Vecdi; Karslıoğlu, İhsan; Erdoğan, Fazlı; Sezen, Orhan; Gepdiremen, Akçahan; Gündoğdu, Cemal

    2017-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and zinc (Zn) were evaluated for their potential to prevent radiation injury using a rat model of radiation-induced skin injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: a control group not receiving Zn, GH, or irradiation: a radiation (RT) group receiving a single 30 Gy dose of gamma irradiation to the right hind legs; a radiation + GH group (RT + GH) receiving a single 30 Gy dose of gamma irradiation plus the subcutaneous administration of 0.01 IU kg d -1 GH; a radiation + Zn group (RT + Zn) receiving a single 30 Gy dose plus 5 mg kg d -1 Zn po; and a radiation + GH + Zn group (RT + GH + Zn) group receiving a single 30 Gy dose plus subcutaneous 0.01 IU kg d -1 GH and 5 mg kg d -1 Zn po. Acute skin reactions were assessed every 3 days by two radiation oncologists grouping. Light microscopic findings were assessed blindly by two pathologists. Groups receiving irradiation were associated with dermatitis as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). The severity of radiodermatitis in the RT + GH, RT + Zn, and RT + GH + Zn groups was significantly lower than that in the RT group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, radiodermatitis was observed earlier in the RT group than in the other treatment groups (P < 0.05). GH and Zn effectively prevented epidermal atrophy, dermal degeneration, and hair follicle atrophy. The highest level of protection against radiation dermatitis was observed in the combination group.

  4. Over-expression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase in the median preoptic nucleus attenuates chronic angiotensin II-induced hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Collister, John P; Bellrichard, Mitch; Drebes, Donna; Nahey, David; Tian, Jun; Zimmerman, Matthew C

    2014-12-02

    The brain senses circulating levels of angiotensin II (AngII) via circumventricular organs, such as the subfornical organ (SFO), and is thought to adjust sympathetic nervous system output accordingly via this neuro-hormonal communication. However, the cellular signaling mechanisms involved in these communications remain to be fully understood. Previous lesion studies of either the SFO, or the downstream median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) have shown a diminution of the hypertensive effects of chronic AngII, without providing a clear explanation as to the intracellular signaling pathway(s) involved. Additional studies have reported that over-expressing copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), an intracellular superoxide (O2·-) scavenging enzyme, in the SFO attenuates chronic AngII-induced hypertension. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that overproduction of O2·- in the MnPO is an underlying mechanism in the long-term hypertensive effects of chronic AngII. Adenoviral vectors encoding human CuZnSOD (AdCuZnSOD) or control vector (AdEmpty) were injected directly into the MnPO of rats implanted with aortic telemetric transmitters for recording of arterial pressure. After a 3 day control period of saline infusion, rats were intravenously infused with AngII (10 ng/kg/min) for ten days. Rats over-expressing CuZnSOD (n = 7) in the MnPO had a blood pressure increase of only 6 ± 2 mmHg after ten days of AngII infusion while blood pressure increased 21 ± 4 mmHg in AdEmpty-infected rats (n = 9). These results support the hypothesis that production of O2·- in the MnPO contributes to the development of chronic AngII-dependent hypertension.

  5. Plasma zinc's alter ego is a low-molecular-weight humoral factor.

    PubMed

    Ou, Ou; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Urgast, Dagmar; Gordon, Margaret-Jane; Campbell, Gill; Feldmann, Jörg; Nixon, Graeme F; Mayer, Claus-Dieter; Kwun, In-Sook; Beattie, John H

    2013-09-01

    Mild dietary zinc deprivation in humans and rodents has little effect on blood plasma zinc levels, and yet cellular consequences of zinc depletion can be detected in vascular and other tissues. We proposed that a zinc-regulated humoral factor might mediate the effects of zinc deprivation. Using a novel approach, primary rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were treated with plasma from zinc-deficient (<1 mg Zn/kg) or zinc-adequate (35 mg Zn/kg, pair-fed) adult male rats, and zinc levels were manipulated to distinguish direct and indirect effects of plasma zinc. Gene expression changes were analyzed by microarray and qPCR, and incubation of VSMCs with blood plasma from zinc-deficient rats strongly changed the expression of >2500 genes, compared to incubation of cells with zinc-adequate rat plasma. We demonstrated that this effect was caused by a low-molecular-weight (∼2-kDa) zinc-regulated humoral factor but that changes in gene expression were mostly reversed by adding zinc back to zinc-deficient plasma. Strongly regulated genes were overrepresented in pathways associated with immune function and development. We conclude that zinc deficiency induces the production of a low-molecular-weight humoral factor whose influence on VSMC gene expression is blocked by plasma zinc. This factor is therefore under dual control by zinc.

  6. The cognitive impairment induced by zinc deficiency in rats aged 0∼2 months related to BDNF DNA methylation changes in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-Dan; Pang, Wei; He, Cong-Cong; Lu, Hao; Liu, Wei; Wang, Zi-Yu; Liu, Yan-Qiang; Huang, Cheng-Yu; Jiang, Yu-Gang

    2017-11-01

    This study was carried out to understand the effects of zinc deficiency in rats aged 0∼2 months on learning and memory, and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene methylation status in the hippocampus. The lactating mother rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 12): zinc-adequate group (ZA: zinc 30 mg/kg diet), zinc-deprived group (ZD: zinc 1 mg/kg diet), and a pair-fed group (PF: zinc 30 mg/kg diet), in which the rats were pair-fed to those in the ZD group. After weaning (on day 23), offspring were fed the same diets as their mothers. After 37 days, the zinc concentrations in the plasma and hippocampus were measured, and the behavioral function of the offspring rats was measured using the passive avoidance performance test. We then assessed the DNA methylation patterns of the exon IX of BDNF by methylation-specific quantitative real-time PCR and the mRNA expression of BDNF in the hippocampus by RT-PCR. Compared with the ZA and PF groups, rats in the ZD group had shorter latency period, lower zinc concentrations in the plasma and hippocampus (P < 0.05). Interestingly, the DNA methylation of the BDNF exon IX was significantly increased in the ZD group, compared with the ZA and PF groups, whereas the expression of the BDNF mRNA was decreased. In addition, the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly upregulated and DNMT3A was downregulated in the ZD group, but not in the ZA and PF groups. The learning and memory damage in offspring may be a result of the epigenetic changes of the BDNF genes in response to the zinc-deficient diet during 0∼2 month period. Furthermore, this work supports the speculative notion that altered DNA methylation of BDNF in the hippocampus is one of the main causes of cognitive impairment by zinc deficiency.

  7. EGFR oligomerization organizes kinase-active dimers into competent signalling platforms

    PubMed Central

    Needham, Sarah R.; Roberts, Selene K.; Arkhipov, Anton; Mysore, Venkatesh P.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C.; Kim, Eric T.; Losasso, Valeria; Korovesis, Dimitrios; Hirsch, Michael; Rolfe, Daniel J.; Clarke, David T.; Winn, Martyn D.; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Clayton, Andrew H. A.; Pike, Linda J.; Perani, Michela; Parker, Peter J.; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L.

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling is activated by ligand-induced receptor dimerization. Notably, ligand binding also induces EGFR oligomerization, but the structures and functions of the oligomers are poorly understood. Here, we use fluorophore localization imaging with photobleaching to probe the structure of EGFR oligomers. We find that at physiological epidermal growth factor (EGF) concentrations, EGFR assembles into oligomers, as indicated by pairwise distances of receptor-bound fluorophore-conjugated EGF ligands. The pairwise ligand distances correspond well with the predictions of our structural model of the oligomers constructed from molecular dynamics simulations. The model suggests that oligomerization is mediated extracellularly by unoccupied ligand-binding sites and that oligomerization organizes kinase-active dimers in ways optimal for auto-phosphorylation in trans between neighbouring dimers. We argue that ligand-induced oligomerization is essential to the regulation of EGFR signalling. PMID:27796308

  8. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  9. Effect of short-term zinc supplementation on zinc and selenium tissue distribution and serum antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Skalny, Andrey A; Tinkov, Alexey A; Medvedeva, Yulia S; Alchinova, Irina B; Karganov, Mikhail Y; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-01-01

    A significant association between Zn and Se homeostasis exists. At the same time, data on the influence of zinc supplementation on selenium distribution in organs and tissues seem to be absent. Therefore, the primary objective of the current study is to investigate the influence of zinc asparaginate supplementation on zinc and selenium distribution and serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in Wistar rats. 36 rats were used in the experiment. The duration of the experiment was 7 and 14 days in the first and second series, respectively. The rats in Group I were used as the control ones. Animals in Groups II and III daily obtained zinc asparaginate (ZnA) in the doses of 5 and 15 mg/kg weight, respectively. Zinc and selenium content in liver, kidneys, heart, muscle, serum and hair was assessed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Serum SOD and GPx activity was analysed spectrophotometrically using Randox kits. Intragastric administration of zinc asparaginate significantly increased liver, kidney, and serum zinc content without affecting skeletal and cardiac muscle levels. Zinc supplementation also stimulated selenium retention in the rats' organs. Moreover, a significant positive correlation between zinc and selenium content was observed. Finally, zinc asparaginate treatment has been shown to modulate serum GPx but not SOD activity. The obtained data indicate that zinc-induced increase in GPx activity may be mediated through modulation of selenium status. However, future studies are required to estimate the exact mechanisms of zinc and selenium interplay.

  10. Vacuolar zinc transporter Zrc1 is required for detoxification of excess intracellular zinc in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Cho, Minsu; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Horianopoulos, Linda C; Kronstad, James W; Jung, Won Hee

    2018-01-01

    Zinc is an important transition metal in all living organisms and is required for numerous biological processes. However, excess zinc can also be toxic to cells and cause cellular stress. In the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a vacuolar zinc transporter, Zrc1, plays important roles in the storage and detoxification of excess intracellular zinc to protect the cell. In this study, we identified an ortholog of the S. cerevisiae ZRC1 gene in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Zrc1 was localized in the vacuolar membrane in C. neoformans, and a mutant lacking ZRC1 showed significant growth defects under high-zinc conditions. These results suggested a role for Zrc1 in zinc detoxification. However, contrary to our expectation, the expression of Zrc1 was induced in cells grown in zinc-limited conditions and decreased upon the addition of zinc. These expression patterns were similar to those of Zip1, the high-affinity zinc transporter in the plasma membrane of C. neoformans. Furthermore, we used the zrc1 mutant in a murine model of cryptococcosis to examine whether a mammalian host could inhibit the survival of C. neoformans using zinc toxicity. We found that the mutant showed no difference in virulence compared with the wildtype strain. This result suggests that Zrc1-mediated zinc detoxification is not required for the virulence of C. neoformans, and imply that zinc toxicity may not be an important aspect of the host immune response to the fungus.

  11. Correlative SEM SERS for quantitative analysis of dimer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, F J; Lenferink, A T M; van Wolferen, H A G M; Otto, C

    2016-11-14

    A Raman microscope integrated with a scanning electron microscope was used to investigate plasmonic structures by correlative SEM-SERS analysis. The integrated Raman-SEM microscope combines high-resolution electron microscopy information with SERS signal enhancement from selected nanostructures with adsorbed Raman reporter molecules. Correlative analysis is performed for dimers of two gold nanospheres. Dimers were selected on the basis of SEM images from multi aggregate samples. The effect of the orientation of the dimer with respect to the polarization state of the laser light and the effect of the particle gap size on the Raman signal intensity is observed. Additionally, calculations are performed to simulate the electric near field enhancement. These simulations are based on the morphologies observed by electron microscopy. In this way the experiments are compared with the enhancement factor calculated with near field simulations and are subsequently used to quantify the SERS enhancement factor. Large differences between experimentally observed and calculated enhancement factors are regularly detected, a phenomenon caused by nanoscale differences between the real and 'simplified' simulated structures. Quantitative SERS experiments reveal the structure induced enhancement factor, ranging from ∼200 to ∼20 000, averaged over the full nanostructure surface. The results demonstrate correlative Raman-SEM microscopy for the quantitative analysis of plasmonic particles and structures, thus enabling a new analytical method in the field of SERS and plasmonics.

  12. Acoustic Mode Hybridization in a Single Dimer of Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Girard, Adrien; Gehan, Hélène; Mermet, Alain; Bonnet, Christophe; Lermé, Jean; Berthelot, Alice; Cottancin, Emmanuel; Crut, Aurélien; Margueritat, Jérémie

    2018-06-13

    The acoustic vibrations of single monomers and dimers of gold nanoparticles were investigated by measuring for the first time their ultralow-frequency micro-Raman scattering. This experiment provides access not only to the frequency of the detected vibrational modes but also to their damping rate, which is obscured by inhomogeneous effects in measurements on ensembles of nano-objects. This allows a detailed analysis of the mechanical coupling occurring between two close nanoparticles (mediated by the polymer surrounding them) in the dimer case. Such coupling induces the hybridization of the vibrational modes of each nanoparticle, leading to the appearance in the Raman spectra of two ultralow-frequency modes corresponding to the out-of-phase longitudinal and transverse (with respect to the dimer axis) quasi-translations of the nanoparticles. Additionally, it is also shown to shift the frequency of the quadrupolar modes of the nanoparticles. Experimental results are interpreted using finite-element simulations, which enable the unambiguous identification of the detected modes and despite the simplifications made lead to a reasonable reproduction of their measured frequencies and quality factors. The demonstrated feasibility of low-frequency Raman scattering experiments on single nano-objects opens up new possibilities to improve the understanding of nanoscale vibrations with this technique being complementary with single nano-object time-resolved spectroscopy as it gives access to different vibrational modes.

  13. Stable dimeric magnesium(I) compounds: from chemical landmarks to versatile reagents.

    PubMed

    Stasch, Andreas; Jones, Cameron

    2011-06-07

    The chemistry of the s-block metals is dominated by the +1 oxidation state for the Alkali metals (group 1) and the +2 oxidation state for the Alkaline Earth metals (group 2). In recent years, a series of stable dimeric magnesium(I) compounds has been prepared and their chemistry has started to develop. These complexes feature "deformable" Mg-Mg single bonds and are stabilised by sterically demanding and chelating anionic N-ligands that prevent their disproportionation. They have rapidly proven useful in organic and organometallic/inorganic reduction reactions as hydrocarbon soluble, stoichiometric, selective and safe reducing agents. The scope of this perspective focuses on stable molecular compounds of the general type LMgMgL and describes their synthesis, structures, theoretical and spectroscopic studies as well as their further chemistry. Also, comparisons are drawn with related complexes including magnesium(II) hydrides and dimeric zinc(I) compounds.

  14. Cytoprotection by Endogenous Zinc in the Vertebrate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Anastassov, Ivan; Ripps, Harris; Chappell, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Our recent studies have shown that endogenous zinc, co-released with glutamate from the synaptic terminals of vertebrate retinal photoreceptors, provides a feedback mechanism that reduces calcium entry and the concomitant vesicular release of glutamate. We hypothesized that zinc feedback may serve to protect the retina from glutamate excitotoxicity, and conducted in vivo experiments on the retina of the skate (Raja erinacea) to determine the effects of removing endogenous zinc by chelation. These studies showed that removal of zinc by injecting the zinc chelator histidine results in inner retinal damage similar to that induced by the glutamate receptor agonist kainic acid. In contrast, when an equimolar quantity of zinc followed the injection of histidine, the retinal cells were unaffected. Our results are a good indication that zinc, co-released with glutamate by photoreceptors, provides an auto-feedback system that plays an important cytoprotective role in the retina. PMID:24286124

  15. Unexpected methyl migrations of ethanol dimer under synchrotron VUV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Weizhan; Hu, Yongjun; Li, Weixing; Guan, Jiwen; Liu, Fuyi; Shan, Xiaobin; Sheng, Liusi

    2015-01-01

    While methyl transfer is well known to occur in the enzyme- and metal-catalyzed reactions, the methyl transfer in the metal-free organic molecules induced by the photon ionization has been less concerned. Herein, vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization and dissociation of ethanol dimer are investigated with synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectroscopy and theoretical methods. Besides the protonated clusters cation (C2H5OH) ṡ H+ (m/z = 47) and the β-carbon-carbon bond cleavage fragment CH2O ṡ (C2H5OH)H+ (m/z = 77), the measured mass spectra revealed that a new fragment (C2H5OH) ṡ (CH3)+ (m/z = 61) appeared at the photon energy of 12.1 and 15.0 eV, where the neutral dimer could be vertically ionized to higher ionic state. Thereafter, the generated carbonium ions are followed by a Wagner-Meerwein rearrangement and then dissociate to produce this new fragment, which is considered to generate after surmounting a few barriers including intra- and inter-molecular methyl migrations by the aid of theoretical calculations. The appearance energy of this new fragment is measured as 11.55 ± 0.05 eV by scanning photoionization efficiency curve. While the signal intensity of fragment m/z = 61 starts to increase, the fragments m/z = 47 and 77 tend to slowly incline around 11.55 eV photon energy. This suggests that the additional fragment channels other than (C2H5OH) ṡ H+ and CH2O ṡ (C2H5OH)H+ have also been opened, which consume some dimer cations. The present report provides a clear description of the photoionization and dissociation processes of the ethanol dimer in the range of the photon energy 12-15 eV.

  16. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  17. The water dimer II: Theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Anamika; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2018-05-01

    As the archetype of aqueous hydrogen bonding, the water dimer has been extensively studied by both theory and experiment for nearly seven decades. In this article, we present a detailed chronological review of the theoretical advances made using electronic structure methods to address the structure, hydrogen bonding and vibrational spectroscopy of the water dimer, as well as the role of its potential energy surface in the development of classical force fields to describe intermolecular interactions in clusters and the condensed phases of water.

  18. Absence of Local Fluctuating Dimers in Superconducting Ir 1-x(Pt,Rh) xTe 2

    SciT

    Yu, Runze; Banerjee, S.; Lei, H. C.

    The compound IrTe2 is known to exhibit a transition to a modulated state featuring Ir-Ir dimers, with large associated atomic displacements. Partial substitution of Pt or Rh for Ir destabilizes the modulated structure and induces superconductivity. It has been proposed that quantum critical dimer fluctuations might be associated with the superconductivity. Here we test for such local dimer correlations and demonstrate their absence. X-ray pair distribution function approach reveals that the local structure of Ir 0.95Pt 0.05Te 2 and Ir 0.8Rh 0.2Te 2 dichalcogenide superconductors with compositions just past the dimer/superconductor boundary is explained well by a dimer-free model downmore » to 10 K, ruling out the possibility of there being nanoscale dimer fluctuations in this regime. This is inconsistent with the proposed quantum-critical-point-like interplay of the dimer state and superconductivity, and precludes scenarios for dimer fluctuations mediated superconducting pairing.« less

  19. Absence of Local Fluctuating Dimers in Superconducting Ir 1-x(Pt,Rh) xTe 2

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Runze; Banerjee, S.; Lei, H. C.; ...

    2018-06-01

    The compound IrTe2 is known to exhibit a transition to a modulated state featuring Ir-Ir dimers, with large associated atomic displacements. Partial substitution of Pt or Rh for Ir destabilizes the modulated structure and induces superconductivity. It has been proposed that quantum critical dimer fluctuations might be associated with the superconductivity. Here we test for such local dimer correlations and demonstrate their absence. X-ray pair distribution function approach reveals that the local structure of Ir 0.95Pt 0.05Te 2 and Ir 0.8Rh 0.2Te 2 dichalcogenide superconductors with compositions just past the dimer/superconductor boundary is explained well by a dimer-free model downmore » to 10 K, ruling out the possibility of there being nanoscale dimer fluctuations in this regime. This is inconsistent with the proposed quantum-critical-point-like interplay of the dimer state and superconductivity, and precludes scenarios for dimer fluctuations mediated superconducting pairing.« less

  20. Fano-like resonance in symmetry-broken gold nanotube dimer.

    PubMed

    Wu, DaJian; Jiang, ShuMin; Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun

    2012-11-19

    The influences of the symmetry-breaking on the plasmon resonance couplings in the isolated gold nanotube and the gold nanotube dimer have been investigated by means of the finite element method. It is found that the core offset of gold nanotubes leads to the red-shifts of the low energy modes and the enhanced near-field on the thin shell side of the symmetry-broken gold nanotube (SBGNT). In the weak coupling model of the SBGNT dimer, the interference of the bonding octupole mode of the dimer with the dipole modes causes a strong Fano-like resonance in scattering spectrum. The Fano dip shows a red-shift and becomes deep with the increase of the offset-value. In the strong coupling model of the SBGNT dimer, the coupling between two SBGNTs induces giant electric field enhancement at the gap of the dimer, which is much larger than that in the symmetry gold nanotube dimer. The SBGNT with larger offset-value exhibits stronger near-field at the "hot spot".

  1. Spectrin tetramer-dimer equilibrium and the stability of erythrocyte membrane skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shih-Chun; Palek, Jiri

    1980-06-01

    The inner side of the red-cell membrane is laminated by a two-dimensional network of membrane proteins which include spectrin, actin and some other components1-4. After extraction of lipids and integral proteins from the membrane, this membrane skeleton can be visualized as a ball-shaped network consisting of twisted fibres1-4 and globular protrusions4; however, the assembly of the individual proteins in the membrane skeleton is not well understood. Spectrin can be eluted from the membrane in the form of dimers and tetramers5-8. Electron microscopic study with low-angle shadowing technique shows that spectrin dimers are two parallel strands of twisted fibres presumably representing bands 1 and 2 of spectrin9. Spectrin tetramers presumably formed by head-to-head associations of two dimers are twice as long9. In solution, the spectrin dimer-tetramer equilibrium depends on temperature and salt concentration7,8; however, it is not known whether the same equilibrium exists in the membrane and whether it affects the physical properties of the membrane, such as its structural stability and deformability. We now demonstrate that spectrin dimers and tetramers are in a reversible equilibrium in the membrane and that in physiological conditions this equilibrium favours spectrin tetramers. Furthermore, we show that transformation of spectrin tetramers to dimers, as induced by ghost incubation in hypotonic conditions, diminishes the structural stability of the Triton-insoluble membrane skeletons.

  2. Convergent evolution involving dimeric and trimeric dUTPases in pathogenicity island mobilization.

    PubMed

    Donderis, Jorge; Bowring, Janine; Maiques, Elisa; Ciges-Tomas, J Rafael; Alite, Christian; Mehmedov, Iltyar; Tormo-Mas, María Angeles; Penadés, José R; Marina, Alberto

    2017-09-01

    The dUTPase (Dut) enzymes, encoded by almost all free-living organisms and some viruses, prevent the misincorporation of uracil into DNA. We previously proposed that trimeric Duts are regulatory proteins involved in different cellular processes; including the phage-mediated transfer of the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island SaPIbov1. Recently, it has been shown that the structurally unrelated dimeric Dut encoded by phage ϕNM1 is similarly able to mobilize SaPIbov1, suggesting dimeric Duts could also be regulatory proteins. How this is accomplished remains unsolved. Here, using in vivo, biochemical and structural approaches, we provide insights into the signaling mechanism used by the dimeric Duts to induce the SaPIbov1 cycle. As reported for the trimeric Duts, dimeric Duts contain an extremely variable region, here named domain VI, which is involved in the regulatory capacity of these enzymes. Remarkably, our results also show that the dimeric Dut signaling mechanism is modulated by dUTP, as with the trimeric Duts. Overall, our results demonstrate that although unrelated both in sequence and structure, dimeric and trimeric Duts control SaPI transfer by analogous mechanisms, representing a fascinating example of convergent evolution. This conserved mode of action highlights the biological significance of Duts as regulatory molecules.

  3. Convergent evolution involving dimeric and trimeric dUTPases in pathogenicity island mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Ciges-Tomas, J. Rafael; Mehmedov, Iltyar; Tormo-Mas, María Angeles; Penadés, José R.

    2017-01-01

    The dUTPase (Dut) enzymes, encoded by almost all free-living organisms and some viruses, prevent the misincorporation of uracil into DNA. We previously proposed that trimeric Duts are regulatory proteins involved in different cellular processes; including the phage-mediated transfer of the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island SaPIbov1. Recently, it has been shown that the structurally unrelated dimeric Dut encoded by phage ϕNM1 is similarly able to mobilize SaPIbov1, suggesting dimeric Duts could also be regulatory proteins. How this is accomplished remains unsolved. Here, using in vivo, biochemical and structural approaches, we provide insights into the signaling mechanism used by the dimeric Duts to induce the SaPIbov1 cycle. As reported for the trimeric Duts, dimeric Duts contain an extremely variable region, here named domain VI, which is involved in the regulatory capacity of these enzymes. Remarkably, our results also show that the dimeric Dut signaling mechanism is modulated by dUTP, as with the trimeric Duts. Overall, our results demonstrate that although unrelated both in sequence and structure, dimeric and trimeric Duts control SaPI transfer by analogous mechanisms, representing a fascinating example of convergent evolution. This conserved mode of action highlights the biological significance of Duts as regulatory molecules. PMID:28892519

  4. Light activation of the LOV protein vivid generates a rapidly exchanging dimer.

    PubMed

    Zoltowski, Brian D; Crane, Brian R

    2008-07-08

    The fungal photoreceptor Vivid (VVD) plays an important role in the adaptation of blue-light responses in Neurospora crassa. VVD, an FAD-binding LOV (light, oxygen, voltage) protein, couples light-induced cysteinyl adduct formation at the flavin ring to conformational changes in the N-terminal cap (Ncap) of the VVD PAS domain. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and static and dynamic light scattering show that these conformational changes generate a rapidly exchanging VVD dimer, with an expanded hydrodynamic radius. A three-residue N-terminal beta-turn that assumes two different conformations in a crystal structure of a VVD C71V variant is essential for light-state dimerization. Residue substitutions at a critical hinge between the Ncap and PAS core can inhibit or enhance dimerization, whereas a Tyr to Trp substitution at the Ncap-PAS interface stabilizes the light-state dimer. Cross-linking through engineered disulfides indicates that the light-state dimer differs considerably from the dark-state dimer found in VVD crystal structures. These results verify the role of Ncap conformational changes in gating the photic response of N. crassa and indicate that LOV-LOV homo- or heterodimerization may be a mechanism for regulating light-activated gene expression.

  5. Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.

    1991-02-05

    Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400.degree. C. to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings.

  6. Zinc Signals and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Maywald, Martina; Wessels, Inga; Rink, Lothar

    2017-01-01

    Zinc homeostasis is crucial for an adequate function of the immune system. Zinc deficiency as well as zinc excess result in severe disturbances in immune cell numbers and activities, which can result in increased susceptibility to infections and development of especially inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on the role of zinc in regulating intracellular signaling pathways in innate as well as adaptive immune cells. Main underlying molecular mechanisms and targets affected by altered zinc homeostasis, including kinases, caspases, phosphatases, and phosphodiesterases, will be highlighted in this article. In addition, the interplay of zinc homeostasis and the redox metabolism in affecting intracellular signaling will be emphasized. Key signaling pathways will be described in detail for the different cell types of the immune system. In this, effects of fast zinc flux, taking place within a few seconds to minutes will be distinguish from slower types of zinc signals, also designated as “zinc waves”, and late homeostatic zinc signals regarding prolonged changes in intracellular zinc. PMID:29064429

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Trent and zinc homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Corey B; Harrison, Mark D; Huygens, Flavia

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative pathogen and the major cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. The mechanisms that P. aeruginosa strains use to regulate intracellular zinc have an effect on infection, antibiotic resistance and the propensity to form biofilms. However, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa strains of variable infectivity has not been compared. In this study, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa Trent, a highly infectious clinical strain, was compared to that of a laboratory P. aeruginosa strain, ATCC27853. Trent was able to tolerate higher concentrations of additional zinc in rich media than ATCC27853. Further, pre-adaptation to additional zinc enhanced the growth of Trent at non-inhibitory concentrations but the impact of pre-adaption on the growth of ATCC27853 under the same conditions was minimal. The results establish clear differences in zinc-induced responses in Trent and ATCC27853, and how zinc homeostasis can be a promising target for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies for P. aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-06-07

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.

  9. Possible role of zinc in diminishing lead-related occupational stress-a zinc nutrition concern.

    PubMed

    Wani, Ab Latif; Ahmad, Ajaz; Shadab, G G H A; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    Lead and zinc are mostly present at the same occupational source and usually found as co-contaminants. Lead is known to associate with detrimental effects to humans. Zinc however is an essential nutrient and its deficiency causes debilitating effects on growth and development. Besides, it acts as core ion of important enzymes and proteins. The purpose of this study was to examine if zinc concentrations are associated with blood lead levels and if zinc may prevent lead-induced DNA damage. Blood samples were collected from 92 workers as participants occupationally exposed to lead or lead and zinc and 38 comparison participants having no history of such exposure. Lead and zinc levels were determined from blood by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and genetic damage was assessed by comet assay. Correlation was calculated by Spearman's rho. Lead concentrations were observed to increase among workers with increase in years of exposure. There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) in blood lead levels between workers and controls. In addition, significant difference (p < 0.001) in the genetic damage was observed among workers and controls. A clear effect of increased occupational exposure was visible among workers. Multiple regression analysis further reveals the positive effect of lead, while as the inverse effect of zinc on DNA damage. The results suggest that zinc may influence body lead absorption and may have a role in preventing the genetic damage caused by lead.

  10. D-dimers (DD) in CVST.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui Fang; Pu, Chuan Qiang; Yin, Xi; Tian, Cheng Lin; Chen, Ting; Guo, Jun Hong; Shi, Qiang

    2017-06-01

    We were interested in further confirming whether D-dimers (DD) are indeed elevated in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) as reported in those studies. CVST patients who had a plasma D-dimer test (139 cases) were included and divided into two groups: elevated D-dimer group (EDG) (>0.5 μg/mL; 65 cases) and normal D-dimer group (NDG) (≤0.5 μg/mL; 74 cases). The two groups were compared in terms of demographic data, clinical manifestation, laboratory and imaging data, using inferential statistical methods. The chi-squared and Fisher exact test showed that, compared to the NDG (74 cases), patients with elevated D-dimer levels were more likely to have a shorter symptom duration (SD) (30 ± 83.9 versus 90 ± 58.9 d, p = 0.003), more risk factors (75.4% versus 52.7%, p = 0.006), higher multiple venous sinus involvement (75.4% versus 59.5%, p = 0.037), increased fibrinogen (43.1% versus 18.9%, p = 0.037) and higher levels of blood glucose (18.3% versus 11%, p = 0.037). According to correlation analyses, D-dimer levels were positively correlated with number of venous sinuses involvement (NVS) (r = 0.321, p = 0.009) in the EDG. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that SD (OR, 0.025; 95% CI, 1.324-6.043; p = 0.000), NVS (OR, 1.573; 95% CI, 1.15-2.151; p = 0.005) and risk factors (OR, 3.321; 95% CI, 1.451-7.564; p = 0.004) were significantly different between the two groups. D-dimer is elevated in patients with acute/subacute CVST.

  11. Zinc Nucleation and Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, B. Patrick; Nuth, J. A., III; Lilleleht, L. U.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report our experiences with zinc nucleation in a microgravity environment aboard NASA's Reduced Gravity Research Facility. Zinc vapor is produced by a heater in a vacuum chamber containing argon gas. Nucleation is induced by cooling and its onset is easily detected visually by the appearance of a cloud of solid, at least partially crystalline zinc particles. Size distribution of these particles is monitored in situ by photon correlation spectroscopy. Samples of particles are also extracted for later analysis by SEM. The initially rapid increase in particle size is followed by a slower period of growth. We apply Scaled Nucleation Theory to our data and find that the derived critical temperature of zinc, the critical cluster size at nucleation, and the surface tension values are all in reasonably good agreement with their accepted literature values.

  12. Structural and Mechanistic Basis of Zinc Regulation Across the E. coli Zur Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Gilston, Benjamin A.; Wang, Suning; Marcus, Mason D.; Canalizo-Hernández, Mónica A.; Swindell, Elden P.; Xue, Yi; Mondragón, Alfonso; O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microbes, whether they are beneficial or pathogenic, are sensitive to host processes that starve or swamp the prokaryote with large fluctuations in local zinc concentration. To understand how microorganisms coordinate a dynamic response to changes in zinc availability at the molecular level, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of the zinc-sensing zinc uptake regulator (Zur) protein at each of the known Zur-regulated genes in Escherichia coli. We solved the structure of zinc-loaded Zur bound to the PznuABC promoter and show that this metalloregulatory protein represses gene expression by a highly cooperative binding of two adjacent dimers to essentially encircle the core element of each of the Zur-regulated promoters. Cooperativity in these protein-DNA interactions requires a pair of asymmetric salt bridges between Arg52 and Asp49′ that connect otherwise independent dimers. Analysis of the protein-DNA interface led to the discovery of a new member of the Zur-regulon: pliG. We demonstrate this gene is directly regulated by Zur in a zinc responsive manner. The pliG promoter forms stable complexes with either one or two Zur dimers with significantly less protein-DNA cooperativity than observed at other Zur regulon promoters. Comparison of the in vitro Zur-DNA binding affinity at each of four Zur-regulon promoters reveals ca. 10,000-fold variation Zur-DNA binding constants. The degree of Zur repression observed in vivo by comparison of transcript copy number in wild-type and Δzur strains parallels this trend spanning a 100-fold difference. We conclude that the number of ferric uptake regulator (Fur)-family dimers that bind within any given promoter varies significantly and that the thermodynamic profile of the Zur-DNA interactions directly correlates with the physiological response at different promoters. PMID:25369000

  13. Zinc and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Juan P.; Guo, Liang; Yoo, Changwon; Stewart, Tiffanie S

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradative process through which cells overcome stressful conditions. Inasmuch as faulty autophagy has been associated with aging, neuronal degeneration disorders, diabetes, and fatty liver, autophagy is regarded as a potential therapeutic target. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge concerning the role of zinc in the regulation of autophagy, the role of autophagy in zinc metabolism, and the potential role of autophagy as a mediator of the protective effects of zinc. Data from in vitro studies consistently support the notion that zinc is critical for early and late autophagy. Studies have shown inhibition of early and late autophagy in cells cultured in medium treated with zinc chelators. Conversely, excess zinc added to the medium has shown to potentiate the stimulation of autophagy by tamoxifen, H2O2, ethanol and dopamine. The potential role of autophagy in zinc homeostasis has just begun to be investigated.Increasing evidence indicates that autophagy dysregulation causes significant changes in cellular zinc homeostasis. Autophagy may mediate the protective effect of zinc against lipid accumulation, apoptosis and inflammation by promoting degradation of lipid droplets, inflammasomes, p62/SQSTM1 and damaged mitochondria.Studies with humans and animal models are necessary to determine whether autophagy is influenced by zinc intake. PMID:25012760

  14. Rising intracellular zinc by membrane depolarization and glucose in insulin-secreting clonal HIT-T15 beta cells.

    PubMed

    Slepchenko, Kira G; Li, Yang V

    2012-01-01

    Zinc (Zn(2+)) appears to be intimately involved in insulin metabolism since insulin secretion is correlated with zinc secretion in response to glucose stimulation, but little is known about the regulation of zinc homeostasis in pancreatic beta-cells. This study set out to identify the intracellular zinc transient by imaging free cytosolic zinc in HIT-T15 beta-cells with fluorescent zinc indicators. We observed that membrane depolarization by KCl (30-60 mM) was able to induce a rapid increase in cytosolic concentration of zinc. Multiple zinc transients of similar magnitude were elicited during repeated stimulations. The amplitude of zinc responses was not affected by the removal of extracellular calcium or zinc. However, the half-time of the rising slope was significantly slower after removing extracellular zinc with zinc chelator CaEDTA, suggesting that extracellular zinc affect the initial rising phase of zinc response. Glucose (10 mM) induced substantial and progressive increases in intracellular zinc concentration in a similar way as KCl, with variation in the onset and the duration of zinc mobilization. It is known that the depolarization of beta-cell membrane is coupled with the secretion of insulin. Rising intracellular zinc concentration may act as a critical signaling factor in insulin metabolism of pancreatic beta-cells.

  15. Rising Intracellular Zinc by Membrane Depolarization and Glucose in Insulin-Secreting Clonal HIT-T15 Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Slepchenko, Kira G.; Li, Yang V.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc (Zn2+) appears to be intimately involved in insulin metabolism since insulin secretion is correlated with zinc secretion in response to glucose stimulation, but little is known about the regulation of zinc homeostasis in pancreatic beta-cells. This study set out to identify the intracellular zinc transient by imaging free cytosolic zinc in HIT-T15 beta-cells with fluorescent zinc indicators. We observed that membrane depolarization by KCl (30–60 mM) was able to induce a rapid increase in cytosolic concentration of zinc. Multiple zinc transients of similar magnitude were elicited during repeated stimulations. The amplitude of zinc responses was not affected by the removal of extracellular calcium or zinc. However, the half-time of the rising slope was significantly slower after removing extracellular zinc with zinc chelator CaEDTA, suggesting that extracellular zinc affect the initial rising phase of zinc response. Glucose (10 mM) induced substantial and progressive increases in intracellular zinc concentration in a similar way as KCl, with variation in the onset and the duration of zinc mobilization. It is known that the depolarization of beta-cell membrane is coupled with the secretion of insulin. Rising intracellular zinc concentration may act as a critical signaling factor in insulin metabolism of pancreatic beta-cells. PMID:22536213

  16. Nucleostemin inhibits TRF1 dimerization and shortens its dynamic association with the telomere

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingjun; Hsu, Joseph K.; Zhu, Qubo; Lin, Tao; Tsai, Robert Y. L.

    2011-01-01

    TRF1 is a key component of the telomere-capping complex and binds double-strand telomeric DNA as homodimers. So far, it is not clear whether TRF1 dimerization coincides with its telomere binding or is actively controlled before it binds the telomere, and in the latter case, how this event might affect its telomere association. We previously found that TRF1 dimerization and its telomere binding can be increased by GNL3L, which is the vertebrate paralogue of nucleostemin (NS). Here, we show that NS and GNL3L bind TRF1 directly but competitively through two separate domains of TRF1. In contrast to GNL3L, NS prevents TRF1 dimerization through a mechanism not determined by its ability to displace TRF1-bound GNL3L. Furthermore, NS is capable of shortening the dynamic association of TRF1 with the telomere in normal and TRF2ΔBΔM-induced telomere-damaged cells without affecting the amount of telomere-bound TRF1 proteins in vivo. Importantly, NS displays a protective function against the formation of telomere-dysfunction-induced foci. This work demonstrates that TRF1 dimerization is actively and oppositely regulated by NS and GNL3L extrachromosomally. Changing the relative amount of TRF1 monomers versus dimers in the nucleoplasm might affect the dynamic association of TRF1 with the telomere and the repair of damaged telomeres. PMID:22045740

  17. A Uranyl Peroxide Dimer in the Gas Phase

    DOE PAGES

    Dau, Phuong D.; Dau, Phuong V.; Rao, Linfeng; ...

    2017-03-14

    For this study, the gas-phase uranyl peroxide dimer, [(UO 2) 2(O2)(L) 2] 2+ where L = 2,2'-trifluoroethylazanediyl)bis(N,N'-dimethylacetamide), was synthesized by electrospray ionization of a solution of UO 2 2+ and L. Collision-induced dissociation of this dimer resulted in endothermic O atom elimination to give [(UO 2) 2(O)(L) 2] 2+, which was found to spontaneously react with water via exothermic hydrolytic chemisorption to yield [(UO 2) 2(OH) 2(L) 2] 2+. Density functional theory computations of the energies for the gas-phase reactions are in accord with observations. The structures of the observed uranyl dimer were computed, with that of the peroxide ofmore » particular interest, as a basis to evaluate the formation of condensed phase uranyl peroxides with bent structures. The computed dihedral angle in [(UO 2) 2(O 2)(L) 2] 2+ is 145°, indicating a substantial deviation from the planar structure with a dihedral angle of 180°. Energies needed to induce bending in the most elementary gas-phase uranyl peroxide complex, [(UO 2) 2(O 2)] 2+, were computed. It was found that bending from the lowest-energy planar structure to dihedral angles up to 140° required energies of <10 kJ/mol. The gas-phase results demonstrate the inherent stability of the uranyl peroxide moiety and support the notion that the uranyl-peroxide-uranyl structural unit is intrinsically planar, with only minor energy perturbations needed to form the bent structures found in studtite and uranyl peroxide nanostructures.« less

  18. Improvement of Aptamer Affinity by Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Taira, Ken-ichi; Sode, Koji; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2008-01-01

    To increase the affinities of aptamers for their targets, we designed an aptamer dimer for thrombin and VEGF. This design is based on the avidity of the antibody, which enables the aptamer to connect easily since it is a single-strand nucleic acid. In this study, we connected a 15-mer thrombin-binding aptamer with a 29-mer thrombin-binding aptamer. Each aptamer recognizes a different part of the thrombin molecule, and the aptamer dimer has a Kd value which is 1/10 of that of the monomers from which it is composed. Also, the designed aptamer dimer has higher inhibitory activity than the reported (15-mer) thrombin-inhibiting aptamer. Additionally, we connected together two identical aptamers against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165), which is a homodimeric protein. As in the case of the anti-thrombin aptamer, the dimeric anti-VEGF aptamer had a much lower Kd value than that of the monomer. This study demonstrated that the dimerization of aptamers effectively improves the affinities of those aptamers for their targets. PMID:27879754

  19. Dimerization of tetracationic porphyrins: ionic strength dependence.

    PubMed

    Dixon, D W; Steullet, V

    1998-02-01

    Cationic porphyrins are under study in a number of contexts including their interaction with biological targets, as possible therapeutic agents and as building blocks for molecular devices such as molecular photodiodes and solar cells. Many cationic porphyrins dimerize readily in aqueous solution. Dimerization in turn can control the properties of the porphyrin as well as its binding to its target. The propensity of a porphyrin to dimerize in aqueous solution can be estimated by recording the optical spectrum of the solution as a function of the concentration of added salt. Analysis of the data in terms of the Debye-Hückel formalism gives an estimate of the extent of dimerization as a function of ionic strength. Data for TMPyP4 [meso-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridinium)porphyrin] and its butyl and octyl homologs; TMAP [meso-tetrakis(4-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium)porphyrin]; T theta PP [meso-tetrakis[4-N-[(3-(trimethyl-ammonio)propyl)oxy]phenyl]porphyrin] and the ferrocenyl porphyrin P3Fc are discussed. Dimerization may affect binding of the cationic porphyrins to their targets, e.g., DNA.

  20. Water Dimer Concentrations in The Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saykally, R. J.

    2000-03-01

    The water dimer concentration present in water vapor under equilibrium conditions is rigorously determined as a function of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity via explicit calculations of partition functions on the VRT (ASP-W) potential surface using the SWPS method. Dimer vapor fractions as large as 4.6x10*3 are calculated under tropospheric conditions, and should have observable consequences on chemistry and physical properties of the atmosphere. There has been much recent interest and speculation regarding possible effects of water clusters on the chemistry and radiation balance of the atmosphere. For example, it has been proposed that vibrational overtones of the water dimer absorb solar radiation and account for a significant part of the *anomalous absorption* of the atmosphere, although recent measurements do not support this claim. Similarly, the presence of water dimers has been predicted to accelerate the formation of acid rain, and homogeneous nucleation of raindrops. In all of these contexts, the crucial unknown is the concentration of water dimers present under the specified conditions of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity.