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Sample records for zircaloy-2 clad uranium

  1. Chemical and microstructural characterization of a 9 cycle Zircaloy-2 cladding using EPMA and FIB tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baris, A.; Restani, R.; Grabherr, R.; Chiu, Y.-L.; Evans, H. E.; Ammon, K.; Limbäck, M.; Abolhassani, S.

    2018-06-01

    A high burn-up Zircaloy-2 cladding is characterised in order to correlate its microstructure and composition to the change of oxidation and hydrogen uptake behaviour during long term service in the reactor. After 9 cycle of service, the chemical analysis of the cladding segment shows that most secondary phase particles (SPPs) have dissolved into the matrix. Fe and Ni are distributed homogenously in the metal matrix. Cr-containing clusters, remnants of the original Zr(Fe, Cr)2 type precipitates, are still present. Hydrides are observed abundantly in the metal side close to the metal-oxide interface. These hydrides have lower Fe and Ni concentration than that in the metal matrix. The three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the oxide and the metal-oxide interface obtained by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) tomography shows how the oxide microstructure has evolved with the number of cycles. The composition and microstructural changes in the oxide and the metal can be correlated to the oxidation kinetics and the H-uptake. It is observed that there is an increase in the oxidation kinetics and in the H-uptake between the third and the fifth cycles, as well as during the last two cycles. At the same time the volume fraction of cracks in the oxide significantly increased. Many fine cracks and pores exist in the oxide formed in the last cycle. Furthermore, the EPMA results confirm that this oxide formed at the last cycle reflects the composition of the metal at the metal-oxide interface after the long residence time in the reactor.

  2. Hydride reorientation and its impact on ambient temperature mechanical properties of high burn-up irradiated and unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 nuclear fuel cladding with an inner liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzoux, Q.; Bouffioux, P.; Machiels, A.; Yagnik, S.; Bourdiliau, B.; Mallet, C.; Mozzani, N.; Colas, K.

    2017-10-01

    Precipitation of radial hydrides in zirconium-based alloy cladding concomitant with the cooling of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage can potentially compromise cladding integrity during its subsequent handling and transportation. This paper investigates hydride reorientation and its impact on ductility in unirradiated and irradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 cladding with an inner liner (cladding for boiling water reactors) subjected to hydride reorientation treatments. Cooling from 400 °C, hydride reorientation occurs in recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner at a lower effective stress in irradiated samples (below 40 MPa) than in unirradiated specimens (between 40 and 80 MPa). Despite significant hydride reorientation, unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼200 wppm hydrogen shows a high diametral strain at fracture (>15%) during burst tests at ambient temperature. This ductile behavior is due to (1) the lower yield stress of the recrystallized cladding materials in comparison to hydride fracture strength (corrected by the compression stress arising from the precipitation) and (2) the hydride or hydrogen-depleted zone as a result of segregation of hydrogen into the liner layer. In irradiated Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼340 wppm hydrogen, the conservation of some ductility during ring tensile tests at ambient temperature after reorientation treatment at 400 °C with cooling rates of ∼60 °C/h is also attributed to the existence of a hydride-depleted zone. Treatments at lower cooling rates (∼6 °C/h and 0.6 °C/h) promote greater levels of hydrogen segregation into the liner and allow for increased irradiation defect annealing, both of which result in a significant increase in ductility. Based on this investigation, given the very low cooling rates typical of dry storage systems, it can be concluded that the thermal transients associated with dry storage should not degrade, and more likely should actually

  3. Performance evaluation and post-irradiation examination of a novel LWR fuel composed of U0.17ZrH1.6 fuel pellets bonded to Zircaloy-2 cladding by lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balooch, Mehdi; Olander, Donald R.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Hosemann, Peter; Casella, Andrew M.; Senor, David J.; Buck, Edgar C.

    2017-04-01

    A novel light water reactor fuel has been designed and fabricated at the University of California, Berkeley; irradiated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor; and examined within the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This fuel consists of U0.17ZrH1.6 fuel pellets core-drilled from TRIGA reactor fuel elements that are clad in Zircaloy-2 and bonded with lead-bismuth eutectic. The performance evaluation and post irradiation examination of this fuel are presented here.

  4. Testing of uranium nitride fuel in T-111 cladding at 1200 K cladding temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohal, R. G.; Tambling, T. N.; Smith, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Two groups of six fuel pins each were assembled, encapsulated, and irradiated in the Plum Brook Reactor. The fuel pins employed uranium mononitride (UN) in a tantalum alloy clad. The first group of fuel pins was irradiated for 1500 hours to a maximum burnup of 0.7-atom-percent uranium. The second group of fuel pins was irradiated for about 3000 hours to a maximum burnup of 1.0-atom-percent uranium. The average clad surface temperature during irradiation of both groups of fuel pins was approximately 1200 K. The postirradiation examination revealed the following: no clad failures or fuel swelling occurred; less than 1 percent of the fission gases escaped from the fuel; and the clad of the first group of fuel pins experienced clad embrittlement whereas the second group, which had modified assembly and fabrication procedures to minimize contamination, had a ductile clad after irradiation.

  5. ELECTROLYTIC CLADDING OF ZIRCONIUM ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Wick, J.J.

    1959-09-22

    A method is presented for coating uranium with zircoalum by rendering the uranium surface smooth and oxidefree, immersing it in a molten electrolytic bath in NaCI, K/sub 2/ZrF/sub 6/, KF, and ZrO/sub 2/, and before the article reaches temperature equilibrium with the bath, applying an electrolyzing current of 60 amperes per square dectmeter at approximately 3 volts to form a layer of zirconium metal on the uranium.

  6. Investigation of Zircaloy-2 oxidation model for SFP accident analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Chihiro; Kondo, Keietsu; Nakashima, Kazuo; Kanazawa, Toru; Tojo, Masayuki

    2017-05-01

    The authors previously conducted thermogravimetric analyses on Zircaloy-2 in air. By using the thermogravimetric data, an oxidation model was constructed in this study so that it can be applied for the modeling of cladding degradation in spent fuel pool (SFP) severe accident condition. For its validation, oxidation tests of long cladding tube were conducted, and computational fluid dynamics analyses using the constructed oxidation model were proceeded to simulate the experiments. In the oxidation tests, high temperature thermal gradient along the cladding axis was applied and air flow rates in testing chamber were controlled to simulate hypothetical SFP accidents. The analytical outputs successfully reproduced the growth of oxide film and porous oxide layer on the claddings in oxidation tests, and validity of the oxidation model was proved. Influence of air flow rate for the oxidation behavior was thought negligible in the conditions investigated in this study.

  7. Fuel Retention Improvement at High Temperatures in Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide Dispersion Fuel Elements by Plasma-Spray Cladding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Caves, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of depositing integrally bonded plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings onto 80-volume-percent tungsten - 20-volume-percent uranium dioxide composites. These composites were face clad with thin tungsten foil to inhibit uranium dioxide loss at elevated temperatures, but loss at the unclad edges was still significant. By preheating the composite substrates to approximately 3700 degrees F in a nitrogen environment, metallurgically bonded tungsten coatings could be obtained directly by plasma spraying. Furthermore, even though these coatings were thin and somewhat porous, they greatly inhibited the loss of uranium dioxide. For example, a specimen that was face clad but had no edge cladding lost 5.8 percent uranium dioxide after 2 hours at 4750 dgrees F in flowing hydrogen. A similar specimen with plasma-spray-coated edges, however, lost only 0.75 percent uranium dioxide under the same testing conditions.

  8. Irradiation of three T-111 clad uranium nitride fuel pins for 8070 hours at 990 C (1815 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.; Siegel, B. L.; Gedeon, L.; Galbo, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The design and successful operation of three tantalum alloy (Ta-8W-2Hf) clad uranium mononitride (UN) fuel pins irradiated for 8070 hr at 990 C (1815 F) is described. Two pin diameters having measured burnups of 0.47 and 0.90 uranium atom percent were tested. No clad failures or swelling was detected; however, postirradiation clad samples tested failed with 1 percent strain. The fuel density decrease was 2 percent, and the fission gas release was less than 0.05 percent. Isotropic fuel swelling, which averaged about 0.5 percent, was less than fuel pin assembly clearances. Thus the clad was not strained. Thermocouples with a modified hot zone operated at average temperatures to 1100 C (2012 F) without failure. Factors that influence the ability to maintain uniform clad temperature as well as the results of the heat transfer calculations are discussed.

  9. Examination of T-111 clad uranium nitride fuel pins irradiated up to 13,000 hours at a clad temperature of 990 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.; Siegel, B. L.

    1973-01-01

    The examination of 27 fuel pins irradiated for up to 13,000 hours at 990 C is described. The fuel pin clad was a tantalum alloy with uranium nitride as the nuclear fuel. Two nominal fuel pin diameters were tested with a maximum burnup of 2.34 atom percent. Twenty-two fuel pins were tested for fission gas leaks; thirteen pins leaked. Clad ductility tests indicated clad embrittlement. The embrittlement is attributed to hydrogen from an n,p reaction in the fuel. Fuel swelling was burnup dependent, and the amount of fission gas release was low, generally less than 0.5 percent. No incompatibilities between fuel, liner, and clad were in evidence.

  10. Evaluation of refractory-metal-clad uranium nitride and uranium dioxide fuel pins after irradiation for times up to 10 450 hours at 990 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of some materials variables on the irradiation performance of fuel pins for a lithium-cooled space power reactor design concept were examined. The variables studied were UN fuel density, fuel composition, and cladding alloy. All pins were irradiated at about 990 C in a thermal neutron environment to the design fuel burnup. An 85-percent dense UN fuel gave the best overall results in meeting the operational goals. The T-111 cladding on all specimens was embrittled, possibly by hydrogen in the case of the UN fuel and by uranium and oxygen in the case of the UO2 fuel. Tests with Cb-1Zr cladding indicate potential use of this cladding material. The UO2 fueled specimens met the operational goals of less than 1 percent cladding strain, but other factors make UO2 less attractive than low-density UN for the contemplated space power reactor use.

  11. Irradiation test of tungsten clad uranium carbide-zirconium carbide ((U,Zr)C) specimens for thermionic reactor application at conditions conductive to long-term performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, J. W. R.; Smith, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Uranium carbide fueled, thermionic emitter configurations were encapsulated and irradiated. One capsule contained a specimen clad with fluoride derived chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. The other capsule used a duplex clad specimen consisting of chloride derived on floride derived CVD tungsten. Both fuel pins were 16 millimeters in diameter and contained a 45.7-millimeter length of fuel.

  12. Evaluation of tantalum-alloy-clad uranium mononitride fuel specimens from 7500-hour, 1040 C pumped-lithium-loop test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. K.

    1974-01-01

    Simulated nuclear fuel element specimens, consisting of uranium mononitride (UN) fuel cylinders clad with tungsten-lined T-111, were exposed for up to 7500 hr at 1040 C (1900 F) in a pumped-lithium loop. The lithium flow velocity was 1.5 m/sec (5 ft/sec) in the specimen test section. No evidence of any compatibility problems between the specimens and the flowing lithium was found based on appearance, weight change, chemistry, and metallography. Direct exposure of the UN to the lithium through a simulated cladding crack resulted in some erosion of the UN in the area of the defect. The T-111 cladding was ductile after lithium exposure, but it was sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement during post-test handling.

  13. Ratcheting fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpurohit, R. S.; Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear core components of zirconium alloys experience asymmetric stress or strain cycling during service which leads to plastic strain accumulation and drastic reduction in fatigue life as well as dimensional instability of the component. Variables like loading rate, mean stress, and stress amplitude affect the influence of asymmetric loading. In the present investigation asymmetric stress controlled fatigue tests were conducted with mean stress from 80 to 150 MPa, stress amplitude from 270 to 340 MPa and stress rate from 30 to 750 MPa/s to study the process of plastic strain accumulation and its effect on fatigue life of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature. It was observed that with increase in mean stress and stress amplitude accumulation of ratcheting strain was increased and fatigue life was reduced. However, increase in stress rate led to improvement in fatigue life due to less accumulation of ratcheting strain.

  14. Crystal plasticity modeling of irradiation growth in Zircaloy-2

    DOE PAGES

    Patra, Anirban; Tome, Carlos; Golubov, Stanislav I.

    2017-05-10

    A reaction-diffusion based mean field rate theory model is implemented in the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) crystal plasticity framework to simulate irradiation growth in hcp Zr and its alloys. A novel scheme is proposed to model the evolution (both number density and radius) of irradiation-induced dislocation loops that can be informed directly from experimental data of dislocation density evolution during irradiation. This framework is used to predict the irradiation growth behavior of cold-worked Zircaloy-2 and trends compared to available experimental data. The role of internal stresses in inducing irradiation creep is discussed. Effects of grain size, texture, and external stress onmore » the coupled irradiation growth and creep behavior are also studied.« less

  15. Crystal plasticity modeling of irradiation growth in Zircaloy-2

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Anirban; Tome, Carlos; Golubov, Stanislav I.

    A reaction-diffusion based mean field rate theory model is implemented in the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) crystal plasticity framework to simulate irradiation growth in hcp Zr and its alloys. A novel scheme is proposed to model the evolution (both number density and radius) of irradiation-induced dislocation loops that can be informed directly from experimental data of dislocation density evolution during irradiation. This framework is used to predict the irradiation growth behavior of cold-worked Zircaloy-2 and trends compared to available experimental data. The role of internal stresses in inducing irradiation creep is discussed. Effects of grain size, texture, and external stress onmore » the coupled irradiation growth and creep behavior are also studied.« less

  16. Uranium dioxide fuel cladding strain investigation with the use of CYGRO-2 computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Previously irradiated UO2 thermionic fuel pins in which gross fuel-cladding strain occurred were modeled with the use of a computer program to define controlling parameters which may contribute to cladding strain. The computed strain was compared with measured strain, and the computer input data were studied in an attempt to get agreement with measured strain. Because of the limitations of the program and uncertainties in input data, good agreement with measured cladding strain was not attained. A discussion of these limitations is presented.

  17. Crystal plasticity modeling of irradiation growth in Zircaloy-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Anirban; Tomé, Carlos N.; Golubov, Stanislav I.

    2017-08-01

    A physically based reaction-diffusion model is implemented in the visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) crystal plasticity framework to simulate irradiation growth in hcp Zr and its alloys. The reaction-diffusion model accounts for the defects produced by the cascade of displaced atoms, their diffusion to lattice sinks and the contribution to crystallographic strain at the level of single crystals. The VPSC framework accounts for intergranular interactions and irradiation creep, and calculates the strain in the polycrystalline ensemble. A novel scheme is proposed to model the simultaneous evolution of both, number density and radius, of irradiation-induced dislocation loops directly from experimental data of dislocation density evolution during irradiation. This framework is used to predict the irradiation growth behaviour of cold-worked Zircaloy-2 and trends compared to available experimental data. The role of internal stresses in inducing irradiation creep is discussed. Effects of grain size, texture and external stress on the coupled irradiation growth and creep behaviour are also studied and compared with available experimental data.

  18. Theoretical analysis of swelling characteristics of cylindrical uranium dioxide fuel pins with a niobium - 1-percent-zirconium clad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The relations between clad creep strain and fuel volume swelling are shown for cylindrical UO2 fuel pins with a Nb-1Zr clad. These relations were obtained by using the computer code CYGRO-2. These clad-strain - fuel-volume-swelling relations may be used with any fuel-volume-swelling model, provided the fuel volume swelling is isotropic and independent of the clad restraints. The effects of clad temperature (over a range from 118 to 1642 K (2010 to 2960 R)), pin diameter, clad thickness and central hole size in the fuel have been investigated. In all calculations the irradiation time was 500 hours. The burnup rate was varied.

  19. Severe accident modeling of a PWR core with different cladding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S. C.; Henry, R. E.; Paik, C. Y.

    2012-07-01

    The MAAP v.4 software has been used to model two severe accident scenarios in nuclear power reactors with three different materials as fuel cladding. The TMI-2 severe accident was modeled with Zircaloy-2 and SiC as clad material and a SBO accident in a Zion-like, 4-loop, Westinghouse PWR was modeled with Zircaloy-2, SiC, and 304 stainless steel as clad material. TMI-2 modeling results indicate that lower peak core temperatures, less H 2 (g) produced, and a smaller mass of molten material would result if SiC was substituted for Zircaloy-2 as cladding. SBO modeling results indicate that the calculated time to RCSmore » rupture would increase by approximately 20 minutes if SiC was substituted for Zircaloy-2. Additionally, when an extended SBO accident (RCS creep rupture failure disabled) was modeled, significantly lower peak core temperatures, less H 2 (g) produced, and a smaller mass of molten material would be generated by substituting SiC for Zircaloy-2 or stainless steel cladding. Because the rate of SiC oxidation reaction with elevated temperature H{sub 2}O (g) was set to 0 for this work, these results should be considered preliminary. However, the benefits of SiC as a more accident tolerant clad material have been shown and additional investigation of SiC as an LWR core material are warranted, specifically investigations of the oxidation kinetics of SiC in H{sub 2}O (g) over the range of temperatures and pressures relevant to severe accidents in LWR 's. (authors)« less

  20. Fuel cladding behavior under rapid loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, K.; Karlsson, J.; Stjärnsäter, J.; Schrire, D.; Ledergerber, G.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Hallstadius, L.

    2016-02-01

    A modified burst test (MBT) was used in an extensive test program to characterize fuel cladding failure behavior under rapid loading conditions. The MBT differs from a normal burst test with the use of a driver tube to simulate the expansion of a fuel pellet, thereby producing a partial strain driven deformation condition similar to that of a fuel pellet expansion in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA). A piston/cylinder assembly was used to pressurize the driver tube. By controlling the speed and distance the piston travels the loading rate and degree of sample deformation could be controlled. The use of a driver tube with a machined gauge section localizes deformation and allows for continuous monitoring of the test sample diameter change at the location of maximum hoop strain, during each test. Cladding samples from five irradiated fuel rods were tested between 296 and 553 K and loading rates from 1.5 to 3.5/s. The test rods included variations of Zircaloy-2 with different liners and ZIRLO, ranging in burn-up from 41 to 74 GWd/MTU. The test results show cladding ductility is strongly temperature and loading rate dependent. Zircaloy-2 cladding ductility degradation due to operational hydrogen pickup started to recover at approximately 358 K for test condition used in the study. This recovery temperature is strongly loading rate dependent. At 373 K, ductility recovery was small for loading rates less than 8 ms equivalent RIA pulse width, but longer than 8 ms the ductility recovery increased exponentially with increasing pulse width, consistent with literature observations of loading rate dependent brittle-to-ductile (BTD) transition temperature. The cladding ductility was also observed to be strongly loading rate/pulse width dependent for BWR cladding below the BTD temperature and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) cladding at both 296 and 553 K.

  1. Response of Cr and Cr-Al coatings on Zircaloy-2 to high temperature steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weicheng; Mouche, Peter A.; Heuser, Brent J.

    2018-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of chromium (Cr) and chromium-aluminum (CrAl) coatings with various compositions deposited on Zircaloy-2 to 700 °C high-temperature steam (HTS) exposure has been investigated. CrAl coatings with higher Al compositions demonstrate lower oxidation weight gain. A layer of γ-alumina developed on the CrAl coatings with Al composition over 43 at%, while Al2O3 and Cr2O3 developed on CrAl coatings with Al composition below 33 at%. Oxidation of Zircaloy-2 substrate was inhibited by the 1um coatings to 20 h HTS exposure. Coating constituent elements diffused into the substrate and formed intermetallic phases with the Zircaloy substrate. Thicker layers of intermetallic phases developed on the coatings with higher Al composition. The intermetallic phases included Fe and Ni, indicating the dissolution of second phase particles (SPPs) during HTS exposure.

  2. Cyclic softening in annealed Zircaloy-2: Role of edge dislocation dipoles and vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar Rao, G.; Singh, S. R.; Krsjak, Vladimir; Singh, Vakil

    2018-04-01

    The mechanism of cyclic softening in annealed Zircaloy-2 at low strain amplitudes under strain controlled fatigue at room temperature is rationalized. The unusual softening due to continuous decrease in the phenomenological friction stress is found to be associated with decrease in the resistance against movement of dislocations because of the formation and easy glide of pure edge dislocation dipoles and consequent decrease in friction stress from reduction in the shear modulus. Positron annihilation spectroscopy data strongly support the increase in edge dislocation density containing jogs, from increased positron trapping and increase in annihilation lifetime.

  3. Transition joints between Zircaloy-2 and stainless steel by diffusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanumurthy, K.; Krishnan, J.; Kale, G. B.; Banerjee, S.

    1994-11-01

    The diffusion bonding between Zircaloy-2 and stainless steel (AISI 304L) using niobium, nickel and copper as intermediate layers has been investigated in the temperature range of 750 to 900°C. Bonding was carried out in a vacuum hot press, under compressive loading. Electron probe microanalysis and metallographic analysis showed a good metallurgical compatibility and also indicated the absence of discontunities, micropores and intermetallic compounds at various interfaces. The bond strength of the diffusion bonded assembly was found to be about 400 MPa for the couples bonded at 870°C for 2 h. The dimple structure on the fractured surface is indicative of the ductile mode of failure of the bonded assembly.

  4. Effects of anisotropy and irradiation on the deformation behavior of Zircaloy 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pelloux, R.M.; Ballinger, R.; Lucas, G.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program investigated the effects of texture anisotropy and irradiation on the mechanical behavior of Zircaloy-2. Short time and time dependent mechanical behavior were considered. Irradiation effects were simulated through the use of 4.75 MeV protons. The temperature ranges investigated were 298/sup 0/K and 573 to 673/sup 0/K. Both cold worked-stress relieved and annealed material were used in this experimental program. Short time yield behavior of different crystallographic textures was determined by uniaxial and plane strain tests in the temperature range 298/sup 0/K and 573 to 673/sup 0/K. Monotonic flow loci were constructed for each texture. Yield behavior ismore » a strong function of the crystallographic texture number f at all temperatures investigated. The rotation of texture with increasing plastic strain was investigated as a function of initial texture at 298/sup 0/K and 623/sup 0/K. The rate of texture rotation df/epsilon/sub p/ was found to be a unique function of the initial texture for plastic strains less than 0.08. Time dependent mechanical behavior was investigated in the range 573 to 673/sup 0/K using constant load creep and stress relaxation tests. The tensile creep strength is proportional to the resolved fraction of basal poles in the test direction. In variable stress and temperature tests, the time-hardening rule was found to be inapplicable. The strain-hardening rule was applied with success to data obtained at temperatures less than or equal to 648/sup 0/K. Irradiation creep tests were conducted in vacuum at 598/sup 0/K and 102 to 241 MPa on 80..mu..m thick Zircaloy-2 foil specimens in both the recrystallized and cold worked-stress relieved condition. In the irradiation creep tests irradiation hardening and enhanced irradiation creep were observed. Radiation hardening effects were significant in annealed material but were attenuated in cold worked-stress relieved material.« less

  5. The effect of plastic strain on the evolution of crystallographic texture in Zircaloy-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, R. G.; Lucas, G. E.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1984-09-01

    The evolution of crystallographic texture during plastic deformation was investigated in Zircaloy-2 using X-ray and metallographic techniques. Inverse pole figures, the resolved fraction of basal poles, and the volume fraction of twinned material, were determined as a function of plastic strain for several strain paths and initial textures at 298 K and 623 K. Incremental transverse platic strain ratios ( R) were mesured as a function of plastic strain. Texture rotation occurs early in the deformation process, after as little as 1.5% plastic strain. For compressive plastic strains, the resolved fraction of basal poles increases in the direction parallel to the strain axis. For tensile plastic strains, the resolved fraction of basal poles decreases in the direction parallel to the strain axis. The rate of change of the resolved fraction of basal poles with plastic strain is a function of the initial resolved fraction of basal poles. The texture rotation can be explained by considering the operation of the principal tensile twinning systems, {101¯2}<1¯011>.

  6. Cladding burst behavior of Fe-based alloys under LOCA

    DOE PAGES

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Pint, Bruce A.; ...

    2015-12-17

    Burst behavior of austenitic and ferritic Fe-based alloy tubes has been examined under a simulated large break loss of coolant accident. Specifically, type 304 stainless steel (304SS) and oxidation resistant FeCrAl tubes were studied alongside Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 that are considered reference fuel cladding materials. Following the burst test, characterization of the cladding materials was carried out to gain insights regarding the integral burst behavior. Given the widespread availability of a comprehensive set of thermo-mechanical data at elevated temperatures for 304SS, a modeling framework was implemented to simulate the various processes that affect burst behavior in this Fe-based alloy. Themore » most important conclusion is that cladding ballooning due to creep is negligible for Fe-based alloys. Thus, unlike Zr-based alloys, cladding cross-sectional area remains largely unchanged up to the point of burst. Furthermore, for a given rod internal pressure, the temperature onset of burst in Fe-based alloys appears to be simply a function of the alloy's ultimate tensile strength, particularly at high rod internal pressures.« less

  7. Critical cladding radius for hybrid cladding modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyard, Romain; Leduc, Dominique; Lupi, Cyril; Lecieux, Yann

    2018-05-01

    In this article we explore some properties of the cladding modes guided by a step-index optical fiber. We show that the hybrid modes can be grouped by pairs and that it exists a critical cladding radius for which the modes of a pair share the same electromagnetic structure. We propose a robust method to determine the critical cladding radius and use it to perform a statistical study on the influence of the characteristics of the fiber on the critical cladding radius. Finally we show the importance of the critical cladding radius with respect to the coupling coefficient between the core mode and the cladding modes inside a long period grating.

  8. METALLURGY OF ZIRCALOY-2. PART II. THE EFFECTS OF FABRICATION VARIABLES ON THE PREFERRED ORIENTATION AND ANISOTROPY OF STRAIN BEHAVIOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rittenhouse, P.L.; Picklesimer, M.L.

    1961-02-01

    The preferred orientation and anisotropy of strain behavior of Zircaloy- 2 were studied as functions of fabrication variables. An inverse-pole-figure technique was used for the preferred orientation determinations. Evaluation of the effects of the fabrication variables on the anisotropy of strain behavior was accomplished by a contractile strainaxial strain analysis. An analysis of strain behavior in the normal direction was developed on the basis of theory of plastic flow of anisotropic metals. A simple intuitively derivable relation was found to exist between the strainstrain analysis and the preferred orientation data. Correlations of the strain-strain data with true-stress-truestrain diagrams and mechanicalmore » properties were attempted. The preferred orientation of Zircaloy-2 produced by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory-Homogeneous Reactor Project (ORNL- HRP) metallurgy fabrication schedule (ingot breakdown at 1500 to 1900 deg F, major reduction at 1800 to 1900 deg F or 1350 to 1450 deg F, a heat treatment of 30 min at 1800 at 1550 deg F followed by a water quench or rapid air cool to below 1200 deg F, a final reduction of 25 to 40% at 1000 deg F. and a 3O-min anneal at 1400 to 1425 deg F) was weak compared to that of most of the other schedules investigated. Elimination of the beta heat treatment (1800 to 1850 deg F for 30 min) between the major reduction and final reduction steps resulted in a material with a high degree of preferred orienation and with a state of pseudoisotropy in ihe rolling plane. A unique and quite high degree of preferred orientaion was developed when the ORNL-HRP metallurgy fabrication procedure was used, but the ingot axis was in the transverse rather than the rolling direction of the finished plate permitting more contractile sirain to occur in the normal direction than in either the rolling or transverse directions. The strain-strain analyses of the materials were consistent with the conclusions reached by the preferred

  9. Development of new ferritic steels as cladding material for metallic fuel fast breeder reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Horie, Masaaki; Kako, Kenji; Fujiwara, Masayuki

    1993-09-01

    The excellent thermal, chemical and neutronic properties of metallic fuel (U-Pu-Zr alloy) will lead to drastic improvements in fast reactor safety and the related fuel cycle economy. Some new high molybdenum 12Cr ferritic stainless steel candidate cladding alloys have been designed to achieve the mechanical properties required for high performance metallic fuel elements. These candidate claddings were irradiated by ion bombardment and tested to determine their strength and creep rupture properties. A 12Cr-8Mo and a 12Cr-8Mo-0.1Y 2O 3 steel were fabricated into cladding via a powder metallurgy process and by a mechanical alloying process, respectively. These claddings had two and three times the creep rupture strength (pressurized at 650°C for 10000 h) of a conventional 12Cr ferritic steel (HT-9). These two steels also showed no void formation up to 350 dpa by Ni 3+ irradiation. A zircaloy-2 lined steel cladding tube has also been fabricated for the purpose of reducing fuel-cladding interdiffusion and chemical interaction.

  10. TEM/STEM study of Zircaloy-2 with protective FeAl(Cr) layers under simulated BWR environment and high-temperature steam exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Donghee; Mouche, Peter A.; Zhong, Weicheng; Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S.; Heuser, Brent J.

    2018-04-01

    FeAl(Cr) thin-film depositions on Zircaloy-2 were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with respect to oxidation behavior under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions and high-temperature steam. Columnar grains of FeAl with Cr in solid solution were formed on Zircaloy-2 coupons using magnetron sputtering. NiFe2O4 precipitates on the surface of the FeAl(Cr) coatings were observed after the sample was exposed to the simulated BWR environment. High-temperature steam exposure resulted in grain growth and consumption of the FeAl(Cr) layer, but no delamination at the interface. Outward Al diffusion from the FeAl(Cr) layer occurred during high-temperature steam exposure (700 °C for 3.6 h) to form a 100-nm-thick alumina oxide layer, which was effective in mitigating oxidation of the Zircaloy-2 coupons. Zr intermetallic precipitates formed near the FeAl(Cr) layer due to the inward diffusion of Fe and Al. The counterflow of vacancies in response to the Al and Fe diffusion led to porosity within the FeAl(Cr) layer.

  11. Oxide particle size distribution from shearing irradiated and unirradiated LWR fuels in Zircaloy and stainless steel cladding: significance for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr.; West, G.A.; Stacy, R.G.

    1979-03-22

    Sieve fractionation was performed with oxide particles dislodged during shearing of unirradiated or irradiated fuel bundles or single rods of UO/sub 2/ or 96 to 97% ThO/sub 2/--3 to 4% UO/sub 2/. Analyses of these data by nonlinear least-squares techniques demonstrated that the particle size distribution is lognormal. Variables involved in the numerical analyses include lognormal median size, lognormal standard deviation, and shear cut length. Sieve-fractionation data are presented for unirradiated bundles of stainless-steel-clad or Zircaloy-2-clad UO/sub 2/ or ThO/sub 2/--UO/sub 2/ sheared into lengths from 0.5 to 2.0 in. Data are also presented for irradiated single rods (sheared intomore » lengths of 0.25 to 2.0 in.) of Zircaloy-2-clad UO/sub 2/ from BWRs and of Zircaloy-4-clad UO/sub 2/ from PWRs. Median particle sizes of UO/sub 2/ from shearing irradiated stainless-steel-clad fuel ranged from 103 to 182 ..mu..m; particle sizes of ThO/sub 2/--UO/sub 2/, under these same conditions, ranged from 137 to 202 ..mu..m. Similarly, median particle sizes of UO/sub 2/ from shearing unirradiated Zircaloy-2-clad fuel ranged from 230 to 957 ..mu..m. Irradiation levels of fuels from reactors ranged from 9,000 to 28,000 MWd/MTU. In general, particle sizes from shearing these irradiated fuels are larger than those from the unirradiated fuels; however, unirradiated fuel from vendors was not available for performing comparative shearing experiments. In addition, variations in particle size parameters pertaining to samples of a single vendor varied as much as those between different vendors. The fraction of fuel dislodged from the cladding is nearly proportional to the reciprocal of the shear cut length, until the cut length attains some minimum value below which all fuel is dislodged. Particles of fuel are generally elongated with a long-to-short axis ratio usually less than 3. Using parameters of the lognormal distribution estimates can be made of fractions of dislodged fuel

  12. Compatibility studies on Mo-coating systems for nuclear fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Huan Chin; Hosemann, Peter; Glaeser, Andreas M.; Cionea, Cristian

    2017-12-01

    To improve the safety factor of nuclear power plants in accident scenarios, molybdenum (Mo), with its high-temperature strength, is proposed as a potential fuel-cladding candidate. However, Mo undergoes rapid oxidation and sublimation at elevated temperatures in oxygen-rich environments. Thus, it is necessary to coat Mo with a protective layer. The diffusional interactions in two systems, namely, Zircaloy-2 (Zr2) on a Mo tube, and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) on a Mo rod, were studied by aging coated Mo substrates in high vacuum at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 1000° for 1000 h. The specimens were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and nanoindentation. In both systems, pores in the coating increased in size and number with increasing temperature over time, and cracks were also observed; intermetallic phases formed between the Mo and its coatings.

  13. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  14. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, ifmore » sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)« less

  15. Hot Pressing to Form Canned Uranium Slugs

    DOEpatents

    Roboff, S. B.; Kingston, W. E.

    1961-07-25

    A method of making compacts and cladded slugs from powdered uranium is described. The powdered uranium is introduced into a die and subjected to pressures of 30 to 100 tsi while maintaining a temperature within the range of 450 to 660 deg C.

  16. Performance of iron-chromium-aluminum alloy surface coatings on Zircaloy 2 under high-temperature steam and normal BWR operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weicheng; Mouche, Peter A.; Han, Xiaochun; Heuser, Brent J.; Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S.

    2016-03-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) coatings deposited on Zircaloy 2 (Zy2) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by magnetron sputtering have been tested with respect to oxidation weight gain in high-temperature steam. In addition, autoclave testing of FeCrAl-coated Zy2 coupons under pressure-temperature-dissolved oxygen coolant conditions representative of a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment has been performed. Four different FeCrAl compositions have been tested in 700 °C steam; compositions that promote alumina formation inhibited oxidation of the underlying Zy2. Parabolic growth kinetics of alumina on FeCrAl-coated Zy2 is quantified via elemental depth profiling. Autoclave testing under normal BWR operating conditions (288 °C, 9.5 MPa with normal water chemistry) up to 20 days demonstrates observable weight gain over uncoated Zy2 simultaneously exposed to the same environment. However, no FeCrAl film degradation was observed. The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe-Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system.

  17. Fuel clad chemical interactions in fast reactor MOX fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, R.

    2014-01-01

    Clad corrosion being one of the factors limiting the life of a mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel element pin at high burn-up, some aspects known about the key elements (oxygen, cesium, tellurium, iodine) in the clad-attack are discussed and many Fuel-Clad-Chemical-Interaction (FCCI) models available in the literature are also discussed. Based on its relatively superior predictive ability, the HEDL (Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory) relation is recommended: d/μm = ({0.507 ṡ [B/(at.% fission)] ṡ (T/K-705) ṡ [(O/M)i-1.935]} + 20.5) for (O/M)i ⩽ 1.98. A new model is proposed for (O/M)i ⩾ 1.98: d/μm = [B/(at.% fission)] ṡ (T/K-800)0.5 ṡ [(O/M)i-1.94] ṡ [P/(W cm-1)]0.5. Here, d is the maximum depth of clad attack, B is the burn-up, T is the clad inner surface temperature, (O/M)i is the initial oxygen-to-(uranium + plutonium) ratio, and P is the linear power rating. For fuels with [n(Pu)/n(M = U + Pu)] > 0.25, multiplication factors f are recommended to consider the potential increase in the depth of clad-attack.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction investigations on strains in the oxide layer of an irradiated Zircaloy fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chollet, Mélanie; Valance, Stéphane; Abolhassani, Sousan; Stein, Gene; Grolimund, Daniel; Martin, Matthias; Bertsch, Johannes

    2017-05-01

    For the first time the microstructure of the oxide layer of a Zircaloy-2 cladding after 9 cycles of irradiation in a boiling water reactor has been analyzed with synchrotron micro-X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic strains of the monoclinic and to some extent of the tetragonal ZrO2 are depicted through the thick oxide layer. Thin layers of sub-oxide at the oxide-metal interface as found for autoclave-tested samples and described in the literature, have not been observed in this material maybe resulting from irradiation damage. Shifts of selected diffraction peaks of the monoclinic oxide show that the uniform strain produced during oxidation is orientated in the lattice and displays variations along the oxide layer. Diffraction peaks and their shifts from families of diffracting planes could be translated into a virtual tensor. This virtual tensor exhibits changes through the oxide layer passing by tensile or compressive components.

  19. Fuel pin cladding

    DOEpatents

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Adamson, M.G.

    1986-01-28

    Disclosed is an improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, consisting of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel and/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients. 2 figs.

  20. Fuel pin cladding

    DOEpatents

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Adamson, M.G.

    1983-12-16

    An improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, is described which consist of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel an/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients.

  1. Fuel pin cladding

    DOEpatents

    Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Adamson, Martyn G.

    1986-01-01

    An improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, consisting of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel and/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients.

  2. Evaluation of Tritium Content and Release from Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sharon M.; Chattin, Marc Rhea; Giaquinto, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    It is expected that tritium pretreatment will be required in future reprocessing plants to prevent the release of tritium to the environment (except for long-cooled fuels). To design and operate future reprocessing plants in a safe and environmentally compliant manner, the amount and form of tritium in the used nuclear fuel (UNF) must be understood and quantified. Tritium in light water reactor (LWR) fuel is dispersed between the fuel matrix and the fuel cladding, and some tritium may be in the plenum, probably as tritium labelled water (THO) or T 2O. In a standard processing flowsheet, tritium management would bemore » accomplished by treatment of liquid streams within the plant. Pretreating the fuel prior to dissolution to release the tritium into a single off-gas stream could simplify tritium management, so the removal of tritium in the liquid streams throughout the plant may not be required. The fraction of tritium remaining in the cladding may be reduced as a result of tritium pretreatment. Since Zircaloy® cladding makes up roughly 25% by mass of UNF in the United States, processes are being considered to reduce the volume of reprocessing waste for Zircaloy® clad fuel by recovering the zirconium from the cladding for reuse. These recycle processes could release the tritium in the cladding. For Zircaloy-clad fuels from light water reactors, the tritium produced from ternary fission and other sources is expected to be divided between the fuel, where it is generated, and the cladding. It has been previously documented that a fraction of the tritium produced in uranium oxide fuel from LWRs can migrate and become trapped in the cladding. Estimates of the percentage of tritium in the cladding typically range from 0–96%. There is relatively limited data on how the tritium content of the cladding varies with burnup and fuel history (temperature, power, etc.) and how pretreatment impacts its release. To gain a better understanding of how tritium in cladding will

  3. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  4. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  5. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world's highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 °C). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed.

  6. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world’s highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding andmore » Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 oC). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed.« less

  7. Ice-clad volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, Richard B.; Edwards, B.R.; Fountain, Andrew G.; Huggel, C.; Carey, Mark; Clague, John J.; Kääb, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An icy volcano even if called extinct or dormant may be active at depth. Magma creeps up, crystallizes, releases gas. After decades or millennia the pressure from magmatic gas exceeds the resistance of overlying rock and the volcano erupts. Repeated eruptions build a cone that pokes one or two kilometers or more above its surroundings - a point of cool climate supporting glaciers. Ice-clad volcanic peaks ring the northern Pacific and reach south to Chile, New Zealand, and Antarctica. Others punctuate Iceland and Africa (Fig 4.1). To climb is irresistible - if only “because it’s there” in George Mallory’s words. Among the intrepid ascents of icy volcanoes we count Alexander von Humboldt’s attempt on 6270-meter Chimborazo in 1802 and Edward Whymper’s success there 78 years later. By then Cotopaxi steamed to the north.

  8. Standard-less analysis of Zircaloy clad samples by an instrumental neutron activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, R.; Nair, A. G. C.; Reddy, A. V. R.; Goswami, A.

    2004-03-01

    A non-destructive method for analysis of irregular shape and size samples of Zircaloy has been developed using the recently standardized k0-based internal mono standard instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The samples of Zircaloy-2 and -4 tubes, used as fuel cladding in Indian boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR), respectively, have been analyzed. Samples weighing in the range of a few tens of grams were irradiated in the thermal column of Apsara reactor to minimize neutron flux perturbations and high radiation dose. The method utilizes in situ relative detection efficiency using the γ-rays of selected activation products in the sample for overcoming γ-ray self-attenuation. Since the major and minor constituents (Zr, Sn, Fe, Cr and/or Ni) in these samples were amenable to NAA, the absolute concentrations of all the elements were determined using mass balance instead of using the concentration of the internal mono standard. Concentrations were also determined in a smaller size Zircaloy-4 sample by irradiating in the core position of the reactor to validate the present methodology. The results were compared with literature specifications and were found to be satisfactory. Values of sensitivities and detection limits have been evaluated for the elements analyzed.

  9. Multi-clad black display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; Biscardi, Cyrus; Brewster, Calvin

    2002-01-01

    A multi-clad black display panel, and a method of making a multi-clad black display panel, are disclosed, wherein a plurality of waveguides, each of which includes a light-transmissive core placed between an opposing pair of transparent cladding layers and a black layer disposed between transparent cladding layers, are stacked together and sawed at an angle to produce a wedge-shaped optical panel having an inlet face and an outlet face.

  10. Neutronic analysis of candidate accident-tolerant cladding concepts in pressurized water reactors

    DOE PAGES

    George, Nathan Michael; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; ...

    2014-09-29

    A study analyzed the neutronics of alternate cladding materials in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment. Austenitic type 310 (310SS) and 304 stainless steels, ferritic Fe-20Cr-5Al (FeCrAl) and APMT™ alloys, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based materials were considered and compared with Zircaloy-4. SCALE 6.1 was used to analyze the associated neutronics penalty/advantage, changes in reactivity coefficients, and spectral variations once a transition in the cladding was made. In the cases examined, materials containing higher absorbing isotopes invoked a reduction in reactivity due to an increase in neutron absorption in the cladding. Higher absorbing materials produced a harder neutron spectrum in themore » fuel pellet, leading to a slight increase in plutonium production. A parametric study determined the geometric conditions required to match cycle length requirements for each alternate cladding material in a PWR. A method for estimating the end of cycle reactivity was implemented to compare each model to that of standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. By using a thinner cladding of 350 μm and keeping a constant outer diameter, austenitic stainless steels require an increase of no more than 0.5 wt% enriched 235U to match fuel cycle requirements, while the required increase for FeCrAl was about 0.1%. When modeling SiC (with slightly lower thermal absorption properties than that of Zircaloy), a standard cladding thickness could be implemented with marginally less enriched uranium (~0.1%). Moderator temperature and void coefficients were calculated throughout the depletion cycle. Nearly identical reactivity responses were found when coolant temperature and void properties were perturbed for each cladding material. By splitting the pellet into 10 equal areal sections, relative fission power as a function of radius was found to be similar for each cladding material. FeCrAl and 310SS cladding have a slightly higher fission power near the pellet’s periphery due to the

  11. Screening of advanced cladding materials and UN-U3Si5 fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Todosow, Michael; Cuadra, Arantxa

    2015-07-01

    In the aftermath of Fukushima, a focus of the DOE-NE Advanced Fuels Campaign has been the development of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding options with the potential for improved performance in an accident. Uranium dioxide (UO2) fuels with various advanced cladding materials were analyzed to provide a reference for cladding performance impacts. For advanced cladding options with UO2 fuel, most of the cladding materials have some reactivity and discharge burn-up penalty (in GWd/t). Silicon carbide is one exception in that the reactor physics performance is predicted to be very similar to zirconium alloy cladding. Most candidate claddings performed similar to UO2-Zr fuel-cladding in terms of safety coefficients. The clear exception is that Mo-based materials were identified as potentially challenging from a reactor physics perspective due to high resonance absorption. This paper also includes evaluation of UN-U3Si5 fuels with Kanthal AF or APMT cladding. The objective of the U3Si5 phase in the UN-U3Si5 fuel concept is to shield the nitride phase from water. It was shown that UN-U3Si5 fuels with Kanthal AF or APMT cladding have similar reactor physics and fuel management performance over a wide parameter space of phase fractions when compared to UO2-Zr fuel-cladding. There will be a marginal penalty in discharge burn-up (in GWd/t) and the sensitivity to 14N content in UN ceramic composites is high. Analysis of the rim effect due to self-shielding in the fuel shows that the UN-based ceramic fuels are not expected to have significantly different relative burn-up distributions at discharge relative to the UO2 reference fuel. However, the overall harder spectrum in the UN ceramic composite fuels increases transuranic build-up, which will increase long-term activity in a once-thru fuel cycle but is expected to be a significant advantage in a fuel cycle with continuous recycling of transuranic material. It is recognized that the fuel and cladding properties assumed in

  12. ZIRCONIUM-CLADDING OF THORIUM

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.

    1961-11-21

    A method of cladding thorium with zirconium is described. The quality of the bond achieved between thorium and zirconium by hot-rolling is improved by inserting and melting a thorium-zirconium alloy foil between the two materials prior to rolling. (AEC)

  13. Uranium nitride fuel fabrication for SP-100 reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Richard E.; Chidester, Kenneth M.; Hoth, Carl W.; Matthews, Bruce R.

    1987-01-01

    Fuel pins of uranium mononitride clad in Nb-1 percent Zr were fabricated for irradiation tests in EBR-II. Laboratory scale process parameters to synthesize UN powders and fabricate UN pellets were developed. Uranium mononitride was prepared by converting UO2 to UN. Fuel pellets were prepared by communition of UN briquettes, uniaxial pressing, and high temperature sintering. Techniques for machining, cleaning, and welding Nb-1 percent Zr cladding components were developed. End caps were electron beam welded to the tubing. Helium back-fill holes were sealed with a laser weld.

  14. Uranium nitride fuel fabrication for SP-100 reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Richard E.; Chidester, Kenneth M.; Hoth, Carl W.; Matthews, Bruce R.

    Fuel pins of uranium mononitride clad in Nb-1 percent Zr were fabricated for irradiation tests in EBR-II. Laboratory scale process parameters to synthesize UN powders and fabricate UN pellets were developed. Uranium mononitride was prepared by converting UO2 to UN. Fuel pellets were prepared by communition of UN briquettes, uniaxial pressing, and high temperature sintering. Techniques for machining, cleaning, and welding Nb-1 percent Zr cladding components were developed. End caps were electron beam welded to the tubing. Helium back-fill holes were sealed with a laser weld.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR COMPENENT CLADDING MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Draley, J.E.; Ruther, W.E.

    1959-01-27

    Fuel elements and coolant tubes used in nuclear reactors of the heterogeneous, water-cooled type are described, wherein the coolant tubes extend through the moderator and are adapted to contain the fuel elements. The invention comprises forming the coolant tubes and the fuel element cladding material from an alloy of aluminum and nickel, or an alloy of aluminum, nickel, alloys are selected to prevent intergranular corrosion of these components by water at temperatures up to 35O deg C.

  16. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Emmanuel; Keiser, Jr., Dennis D.; Forsmann, Bryan

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or betweenmore » the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.« less

  17. Effect of laser power on clad metal in laser-TIG combined metal cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Akihiro; Hino, Takanori; Matsuda, Jun; Tasoda, Takashi; Yoneda, Masafumi; Katsumura, Munehide; Yano, Tetsuo; Araki, Takao

    2003-03-01

    TIG arc welding has been used to date as a method for clad welding of white metal as bearing material. We propose a new clad welding process that combines a CO2 laser and a TIG arc, as a method for cladding at high speed. We hypothesized that this method would permit appropriate control of the melted quantity of base metal by varying the laser power. We carried out cladding while varying the laser power, and investigated the structure near the boundary between the clad layer and the base metal. Using the laser-TIG combined cladding, we found we were able to control appropriately the degree of dilution with the base metal. By applying this result to subsequent cladding, we were able to obtain a clad layer of high quality, which was slightly diluted with the base metal.

  18. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  19. Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, Brent; Stubbins, James; Kozlowski, Tomasz

    The DOE NEUP sponsored IRP on accident tolerant fuel (ATF) entitled Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel involved three academic institutions, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and ATI Materials (ATI). Detailed descriptions of the work at the University of Illinois (UIUC, prime), the University of Florida (UF), the University of Michigan (UMich), and INL are included in this document as separate sections. This summary provides a synopsis of the work performed across the IRP team. Two ATF solution pathways were initially proposed, coatings on monolithic Zr-based LWR cladding material and selfhealing modifications of Zr-based alloys.more » The coating pathway was extensively investigated, both experimentally and in computations. Experimental activities related to ATF coatings were centered at UIUC, UF, and UMich and involved coating development and testing, and ion irradiation. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic aspects of ATF coatings were the focus of computational work at UIUC and UMich, while materials science aspects were the focus of computational work at UF and INL. ATI provided monolithic Zircaloy 2 and 4 material and a binary Zr-Y alloy material. The selfhealing pathway was investigated with advanced computations only. Beryllium was identified as a valid self-healing additive early in this work. However, all attempts to fabricate a Zr-Be alloy failed. Several avenues of fabrication were explored. ATI ultimately declined our fabrication request over health concerns associated with Be (we note that Be was not part of the original work scope and the ATI SOW). Likewise, Ames Laboratory declined our fabrication request, citing known litigation dating to the 1980s and 1990s involving the U.S. Federal government and U.S. National Laboratory employees involving the use of Be. Materion (formerly, Brush Wellman) also declined our fabrication request, citing the difficulty in working with a highly reactive Zr and

  20. Nuclear fuel elements having a composite cladding

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Gerald M.; Cowan, II, Robert L.; Davies, John H.

    1983-09-20

    An improved nuclear fuel element is disclosed for use in the core of nuclear reactors. The improved nuclear fuel element has a composite cladding of an outer portion forming a substrate having on the inside surface a metal layer selected from the group consisting of copper, nickel, iron and alloys of the foregoing with a gap between the composite cladding and the core of nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel element comprises a container of the elongated composite cladding, a central core of a body of nuclear fuel material disposed in and partially filling the container and forming an internal cavity in the container, an enclosure integrally secured and sealed at each end of said container and a nuclear fuel material retaining means positioned in the cavity. The metal layer of the composite cladding prevents perforations or failures in the cladding substrate from stress corrosion cracking or from fuel pellet-cladding interaction or both. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy.

  1. Use of ion beams to simulate reaction of reactor fuels with their cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birtcher, R. C.; Baldo, P.

    2006-01-01

    Processes occurring within reactor cores are not amenable to direct experimental observation. Among major concerns are damage, fission gas accumulation and reaction between the fuel and its cladding all of which lead to swelling. These questions can be investigated through simulation with ion beams. As an example, we discuss the irradiation driven interaction of uranium-molybdenum alloys, intended for use as low-enrichment reactor fuels, with aluminum, which is used as fuel cladding. Uranium-molybdenum coated with a 100 nm thin film of aluminum was irradiated with 3 MeV Kr ions to simulate fission fragment damage. Mixing and diffusion of aluminum was followed as a function of irradiation with RBS and nuclear reaction analysis using the 27Al(p,γ)28Si reaction which occurs at a proton energy of 991.9 keV. During irradiation at 150 °C, aluminum diffused into the uranium alloy at a irradiation driven diffusion rate of 30 nm2/dpa. At a dose of 90 dpa, uranium diffusion into the aluminum layer resulted in formation of an aluminide phase at the initial interface. The thickness of this phase grew until it consumed the aluminum layer. The rapid diffusion of Al into these reactor fuels may offer explanation of the observation that porosity is not observed in the fuel particles but on their periphery.

  2. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Cherubini, J.H.

    1963-05-14

    A process is described for separating uranium from a nuclear fuel element comprising a uranium-containing core and a ferritic stainless steel clad by heating said element in a non-carburizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range 850-1050 un. Concent 85% C, rapidly cooling the heated element through the temperature range 815 un. Concent 85% to 650 EC to avoid annealing said steel, and then contacting the cooled element with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to selectively dissolve the uranium. (AEC)

  3. Measurement of carbon distribution in nuclear fuel pin cladding specimens by means of a secondary ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, Gerhard; Aerne, Ernst Tino; Burri, Martin; Zwicky, Hans-Urs

    1986-11-01

    Cladding carburization during irradiation of advanced mixed uranium plutonium carbide fast breeder reactor fuel is possibly a life limiting fuel pin factor. The quantitative assessment of such clad carbon embrittlement is difficult to perform by electron microprobe analysis because of sample surface contamination, and due to the very low energy of the carbon K α X-ray transition. The work presented here describes a method developed at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR) to use shielded secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) as an accurate tool to determine radial distribution profiles of carbon in radioactive stainless steel fuel pin cladding. Compared with nuclear microprobe analysis (NMA) [1], which is also an accurate method for carbon analysis, the SIMS method distinguishes itself by its versatility for simultaneous determination of additional impurities.

  4. Cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huawei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The conversion efficiency of double-clad Raman fiber laser is limited by the cladding-to-core area ratio. To get high conversion efficiency, the inner-cladding-to-core area ratio has to be less than about 8, which limits the brightness enhancement. To overcome the problem, a cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber laser with multiple-clad fiber as the Raman gain medium is proposed. A theoretical model of Raman fiber amplifier with multiple-clad fiber is developed, and numerical simulation proves that the proposed scheme can improve the conversion efficiency and brightness enhancement of cladding pumped Raman fiber laser.

  5. Irradiation of TZM: Uranium dioxide fuel pin at 1700 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A fuel pin clad with TZM and containing solid pellets of uranium dioxide was fission heated in a static helium-cooled capsule at a maximum surface temperature of 1700 K for approximately 1000 hr and to a total burnup of 2.0 percent of the uranium-235. The results of the postirradiation examination indicated: (1) A transverse, intergranular failure of the fuel pin occurred when the fuel pin reached 2.0-percent burnup. This corresponds to 1330 kW-hr/cu cm, where the volume is the sum of the fuel, clad, and void volumes in the fuel region. (2) The maximum swelling of the fuel pin was less than 1.5 percent on the fuel-pin diameter. (3) There was no visible interaction between the TZM clad and the UO2. (4) Irradiation at 1700 K produced a course-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.02 centimeter and with some of the grains extending one-half of the thickness of the clad. (5) Below approximately 1500 K, the irradiation of the clad produced a moderately fine-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.004 centimeter.

  6. URANIUM COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Allen, N.P.; Grogan, J.D.

    1959-05-12

    This patent relates to high purity uranium alloys characterized by improved stability to thermal cycling and low thermal neutron absorption. The high purity uranium alloy contains less than 0.1 per cent by weight in total amount of any ore or more of the elements such as aluminum, silicon, phosphorous, tin, lead, bismuth, niobium, and zinc.

  7. Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, William H.; Atcheson, Donald B.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan

    1984-01-01

    A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

  8. Accident tolerant fuel cladding development: Promise, status, and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, Kurt A.

    2018-04-01

    The motivation for transitioning away from zirconium-based fuel cladding in light water reactors to significantly more oxidation-resistant materials, thereby enhancing safety margins during severe accidents, is laid out. A review of the development status for three accident tolerant fuel cladding technologies, namely coated zirconium-based cladding, ferritic alumina-forming alloy cladding, and silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite cladding, is offered. Technical challenges and data gaps for each of these cladding technologies are highlighted. Full development towards commercial deployment of these technologies is identified as a high priority for the nuclear industry.

  9. JACKETING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.

    1959-07-14

    The bonding to uranium of sheathing of iron or cobalt, or nickel, or alloys thereof is described. The bonding is accomplished by electro-depositing both surfaces to be joined with a coating of silver and amalgamating or alloying the silver layer with mercury or indium. Then the silver alloy is homogenized by exerting pressure on an assembly of the uranium core and the metal jacket, reducing the area of assembly and heating the assembly to homogenize by diffusion.

  10. Investigation of semiconductor clad optical waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.; Mcwright, G.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of semiconductor-clad optical waveguides based on glass substrates were investigated. Computer modeling studies on four-layer silicon-clad planar dielectric waveguides indicated that the attenuation and mode index should behave as exponentially damped sinusoids as the silicon thickness is decreased below one micrometer. This effect can be explained as a periodic coupling between the guided modes of the lossless structure and the lossy modes supported by the high refractive index silicon. The computer studies also show that both the attenuation and mode index of the propagating mode are significantly altered by conductivity charges in the silicon. Silicon claddings were RF sputtered onto AgNO3-NaNO3 ion exchanged waveguides and preliminary measurements of attenuation were made. An expression was developed which predicts the attenuation of the silicon clad waveguide from the attenuation and phase characteristics of a silicon waveguide. Several applications of these clad waveguides are suggested and methods for increasing the photo response of the RF sputtered silicon films are described.

  11. Capturing reflected cladding modes from a fiber Bragg grating with a double-clad fiber coupler.

    PubMed

    Baiad, Mohamad Diaa; Gagné, Mathieu; Lemire-Renaud, Simon; De Montigny, Etienne; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Godbout, Nicolas; Boudoux, Caroline; Kashyap, Raman

    2013-03-25

    We present a novel measurement scheme using a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) to resolve cladding modes. Direct measurement of the optical spectra and power in the cladding modes is obtained through the use of a specially designed DCFC spliced to a highly reflective FBG written into slightly etched standard photosensitive single mode fiber to match the inner cladding diameter of the DCFC. The DCFC is made by tapering and fusing two double-clad fibers (DCF) together. The device is capable of capturing backward propagating low and high order cladding modes simply and efficiently. Also, we demonstrate the capability of such a device to measure the surrounding refractive index (SRI) with an extremely high sensitivity of 69.769 ± 0.035 μW/RIU and a resolution of 1.433 × 10(-5) ± 8 × 10(-9) RIU between 1.37 and 1.45 RIU. The device provides a large SRI operating range from 1.30 to 1.45 RIU with sufficient discrimination for all individual captured cladding modes. The proposed scheme can be adapted to many different types of bend, temperature, refractive index and other evanescent wave based sensors.

  12. Roll Casting of Aluminum Alloy Clad Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, R.; Tsuge, H.; Haga, T.

    2011-01-17

    Casting of aluminum alloy three layers of clad strip was tried using the two sets of twin roll casters, and effects of the casting parameters on the cladding conditions were investigated. One twin roll caster was mounted on the other twin roll caster. Base strip was 8079 aluminum alloy and overlay strips were 6022 aluminum alloy. Effects of roll-load of upper and lower casters and melt temperature of the lower caster were investigated. When the roll-load of the upper and lower caster was large enough, the overlay strip could be solidified and be connected. The overlay strip could be connectedmore » when the melt of the overlay strip cast by the lower caster was low enough. Sound three layers of clad strip could be cast by proper conditions.« less

  13. Phosphate-core silica-clad Er/Yb-doped optical fiber and cladding pumped laser.

    PubMed

    Egorova, O N; Semjonov, S L; Velmiskin, V V; Yatsenko, Yu P; Sverchkov, S E; Galagan, B I; Denker, B I; Dianov, E M

    2014-04-07

    We present a composite optical fiber with a Er/Yb co-doped phosphate-glass core in a silica glass cladding as well as cladding pumped laser. The fabrication process, optical properties, and lasing parameters are described. The slope efficiency under 980 nm cladding pumping reached 39% with respect to the absorbed pump power and 28% with respect to the coupled pump power. Due to high doping level of the phosphate core optimal length was several times shorter than that of silica core fibers.

  14. Pellet cladding mechanical interactions of ceramic claddings fuels under light water reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo-Shiuan

    Ceramic materials such as silicon carbide (SiC) are promising candidate materials for nuclear fuel cladding and are of interest as part of a potential accident tolerant fuel design due to its high temperature strength, dimensional stability under irradiation, corrosion resistance, and lower neutron absorption cross-section. It also offers drastically lower hydrogen generation in loss of coolant accidents such as that experienced at Fukushima. With the implementation of SiC material properties to the fuel performance code, FRAPCON, performances of the SiC-clad fuel are compared with the conventional Zircaloy-clad fuel. Due to negligible creep and high stiffness, SiC-clad fuel allows gap closure at higher burnup and insignificant cladding dimensional change. However, severe degradation of SiC thermal conductivity with neutron irradiation will lead to higher fuel temperature with larger fission gas release. High stiffness of SiC has a drawback of accumulating large interfacial pressure upon pellet-cladding mechanical interactions (PCMI). This large stress will eventually reach the flexural strength of SiC, causing failure of SiC cladding instantly in a brittle manner instead of the graceful failure of ductile metallic cladding. The large interfacial pressure causes phenomena that were previously of only marginal significance and thus ignored (such as creep of the fuel) to now have an important role in PCMI. Consideration of the fuel pellet creep and elastic deformation in PCMI models in FRAPCON provide for an improved understanding of the magnitude of accumulated interfacial pressure. Outward swelling of the pellet is retarded by the inward irradiation-induced creep, which then reduces the rate of interfacial pressure buildup. Effect of PCMI can also be reduced and by increasing gap width and cladding thickness. However, increasing gap width and cladding thickness also increases the overall thermal resistance which leads to higher fuel temperature and larger fission

  15. Study and Behaviour of Prefabricated Composite Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Avinash, P.; Thiagarajan, N.; Santhi, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The incessant population rise entailed for an expeditious construction at competitive prices that steered the customary path to the light weight structural components. This lead to construction of structural components using ferrocement. The load bearing structural cladding, sizing 3200x900x100 mm, is chosen for the study, which, is analyzed using the software ABAQUS 6.14 in accordance with the IS:875-87 Part1, IS:875-87 Part2, ACI 549R-97, ACI 318R-08 and NZS:3101-06 Part1 standards. The Ferrocement claddings (FCs) are fabricated to a scaled dimension of 400x115x38 mm. The light weight-high strength phenomena are corroborated by incorporating Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer Laminates (GFRPL) of thickness 6mm, engineered with the aid of hand layup (wet layup) technique wielding epoxy resin, followed by curing under room temperature. The epoxy resin is employed for fastening ferrocement cladding with the Glass fiber reinforced polymer laminate, with the contemporary methodology. The compressive load carrying capacity of the amalgamated assembly, both in presence and absence of Glass Fibre Reinforced polymer laminates (GFRPL) on either side of Ferrocement cladding, has been experimented.

  16. Cladding For Transversely-Pumped Laser Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee

    1989-01-01

    Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of transversely-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older transverse-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.

  17. Kr ion irradiation study of the depleted-uranium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Kirk, M. A.; Rest, J.; Allen, T. R.; Wachs, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fuel development for the reduced enrichment research and test reactor (RERTR) program is tasked with the development of new low enrichment uranium nuclear fuels that can be employed to replace existing high enrichment uranium fuels currently used in some research reactors throughout the world. For dispersion type fuels, radiation stability of the fuel-cladding interaction product has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted-uranium alloys are cast for the radiation stability studies of the fuel-cladding interaction product using Kr ion irradiation to investigate radiation damage from fission products. SEM analysis indicates the presence of the phases of interest: U(Al, Si) 3, (U, Mo)(Al, Si) 3, UMo 2Al 20, U 6Mo 4Al 43 and UAl 4. Irradiations of TEM disc samples were conducted with 500 keV Kr ions at 200 °C to ion doses up to 2.5 × 10 19 ions/m 2 (˜10 dpa) with an Kr ion flux of 10 16 ions/m 2/s (˜4.0 × 10 -3 dpa/s). Microstructural evolution of the phases relevant to fuel-cladding interaction products was investigated using transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Evolution of transmission spectra of double cladding fiber during etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Oleg V.; Tian, Fei; Du, Henry

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of optical transmission through a double cladding fiber-optic structure during etching. The structure is formed by a section of SM630 fiber with inner depressed cladding between standard SMF-28 fibers. Its transmission spectrum exhibits two resonance dips at wavelengths where two cladding modes have almost equal propagation constants. We measure transmission spectra with decreasing thickness of the cladding and show that the resonance dips shift to shorter wavelengths, while new dips of lower order modes appear from long wavelength side. We calculate propagation constants of cladding modes and resonance wavelengths, which we compare with the experiment.

  19. Uranium, natural

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , natural ; CASRN 7440 - 61 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  20. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  1. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The term uranium feed or natural uranium feed means natural uranium in the form of UF6 suitable for uranium...

  2. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The term uranium feed or natural uranium feed means natural uranium in the form of UF6 suitable for uranium...

  3. Investigation of semiconductor clad optical waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.; Carson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been proposed for fabricating integrated optical devices using semiconductors, lithium niobate, and glasses as waveguides and substrates. The use of glass waveguides and their interaction with thin semiconductor cladding layers was studied. Though the interactions of these multilayer waveguide structures have been analyzed here using glass, they may be applicable to other types of materials as well. The primary reason for using glass is that it provides a simple, inexpensive way to construct waveguides and devices.

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Clad and Post-cladding Tempered AISI H13 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telasang, Gururaj; Dutta Majumdar, Jyotsna; Wasekar, Nitin; Padmanabham, G.; Manna, Indranil

    2015-05-01

    This study reports a detailed investigation of the microstructure and mechanical properties (wear resistance and tensile strength) of hardened and tempered AISI H13 tool steel substrate following laser cladding with AISI H13 tool steel powder in as-clad and after post-cladding conventional bulk isothermal tempering [at 823 K (550 °C) for 2 hours] heat treatment. Laser cladding was carried out on AISI H13 tool steel substrate using a 6 kW continuous wave diode laser coupled with fiber delivering an energy density of 133 J/mm2 and equipped with a co-axial powder feeding nozzle capable of feeding powder at the rate of 13.3 × 10-3 g/mm2. Laser clad zone comprises martensite, retained austenite, and carbides, and measures an average hardness of 600 to 650 VHN. Subsequent isothermal tempering converted the microstructure into one with tempered martensite and uniform dispersion of carbides with a hardness of 550 to 650 VHN. Interestingly, laser cladding introduced residual compressive stress of 670 ± 15 MPa, which reduces to 580 ± 20 MPa following isothermal tempering. Micro-tensile testing with specimens machined from the clad zone across or transverse to cladding direction showed high strength but failure in brittle mode. On the other hand, similar testing with samples sectioned from the clad zone parallel or longitudinal to the direction of laser cladding prior to and after post-cladding tempering recorded lower strength but ductile failure with 4.7 and 8 pct elongation, respectively. Wear resistance of the laser surface clad and post-cladding tempered samples (evaluated by fretting wear testing) registered superior performance as compared to that of conventional hardened and tempered AISI H13 tool steel.

  5. Ceramic Coatings for Clad (The C 3 Project): Advanced Accident-Tolerant Ceramic Coatings for Zr-Alloy Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, Kurt E.; Wirth, Brian; Miller, Larry

    The goal of this NEUP-IRP project is to develop a fuel concept based on an advanced ceramic coating for Zr-alloy cladding. The coated cladding must exhibit demonstrably improved performance compared to conventional Zr-alloy clad in the following respects: During normal service, the ceramic coating should decrease cladding oxidation and hydrogen pickup (the latter leads to hydriding and embrittlement). During a reactor transient (e.g., a loss of coolant accident), the ceramic coating must minimize or at least significantly delay oxidation of the Zr-alloy cladding, thus reducing the amount of hydrogen generated and the oxygen ingress into the cladding. The specific objectivesmore » of this project are as follows: To produce durable ceramic coatings on Zr-alloy clad using two possible routes: (i) MAX phase ceramic coatings or similar nitride or carbide coatings; and (ii) graded interface architecture (multilayer) ceramic coatings, using, for instance, an oxide such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the outer protective layer. To characterize the structural and physical properties of the coated clad samples produced in 1. above, especially the corrosion properties under simulated normal and transient reactor operating conditions. To perform computational analyses to assess the effects of such coatings on fuel performance and reactor neutronics, and to perform fuel cycle analyses to assess the economic viability of modifying conventional Zr-alloy cladding with ceramic coatings. This project meets a number of the goals outlined in the NEUP-IRP call for proposals, including: Improve the fuel/cladding system through innovative designs (e.g. coatings/liners for zirconium-based cladding) Reduce or eliminate hydrogen generation Increase resistance to bulk steam oxidation Achievement of our goals and objectives, as defined above, will lead to safer light-water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies, due to improved cladding properties and built-in accident resistance, as

  6. Clad fiber capacitor and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Tuncer, Enis

    2012-12-11

    A clad capacitor and method of manufacture includes assembling a preform comprising a ductile, electrically conductive fiber; a ductile, electrically insulating cladding positioned on the fiber; and a ductile, electrically conductive sleeve positioned over the cladding. One or more preforms are then bundled, heated and drawn along a longitudinal axis to decrease the diameter of the ductile components of the preform and fuse the preform into a unitized strand.

  7. Clad fiber capacitor and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Tuncer, Enis

    2013-11-26

    A clad capacitor and method of manufacture includes assembling a preform comprising a ductile, electrically conductive fiber; a ductile, electrically insulating cladding positioned on the fiber; a ductile, electrically conductive sleeve positioned over the cladding. One or more of the preforms are then bundled, heated and drawn along a longitudinal axis to decrease the diameter of the ductile components of the preform and fuse the preform into a unitized strand.

  8. Transversely polarized source cladding for an optical fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An optical fiber comprising a fiber core having a longitudinal symmetry axis is provided. An active cladding surrounds a portion of the fiber core and comprises light-producing sources which emit light in response to chemical or light excitation. The cladding sources are oriented transversely with respect to the longitudinal axis of the fiber core. This polarization results in a superior power efficiency compared to active cladding sources that are randomly polarized or longitudinally polarized parallel with the longitudinal symmetry axis.

  9. Rectangular-cladding silicon slot waveguide with improved nonlinear performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zengzhi; Huang, Qingzhong; Wang, Yi; Xia, Jinsong

    2018-04-01

    Silicon slot waveguides have great potential in hybrid silicon integration to realize nonlinear optical applications. We propose a rectangular-cladding hybrid silicon slot waveguide. Simulation result shows that, with a rectangular-cladding, the slot waveguide can be formed by narrower silicon strips, so the two-photon absorption (TPA) loss in silicon is decreased. When the cladding material is a nonlinear polymer, the calculated TPA figure of merit (FOMTPA) is 4.4, close to the value of bulk nonlinear polymer of 5.0. This value confirms the good nonlinear performance of rectangular-cladding silicon slot waveguides.

  10. Electroslag Strip Cladding of Steam Generators With Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Consonni, M.; Maggioni, F.; Brioschi, F.

    2006-07-01

    The present paper details the results of electroslag cladding and tube-to-tubesheet welding qualification tests conducted by Ansaldo-Camozzi ESC with Alloy 690 (Alloy 52 filler metal) on steel for nuclear power stations' steam generators shell, tubesheet and head; the possibility of submerged arc cladding on first layer was also considered. Test results, in terms of chemical analysis, mechanical properties and microstructure are reproducible and confidently applicable to production cladding and show that electroslag process can be used for Alloy 52 cladding with exceptionally stable and regular operation and high productivity. The application of submerged arc cladding process to the first layermore » leads to a higher base metal dilution, which should be avoided. Moreover, though the heat affected zone is deeper with electroslag cladding, in both cases no coarsened grain zone is found due to recrystallization effect of second cladding layer. Finally, the application of electroslag process to cladding of Alloy 52 with modified chemical composition, was proved to be highly beneficial as it strongly reduces hot cracking sensitivity, which is typical of submerged arc cladded Alloy 52, both during tube-to-tubesheet welding and first re-welding. (authors)« less

  11. Nuclear reactor fuel element with vanadium getter on cladding

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Carl E.; Carroll, Kenneth G.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element is described which has an outer cladding, a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material and a layer of vanadium as an oxygen getter on the inner surface of the cladding. The vanadium reacts with oxygen released by the fissionable material during irradiation of the core to prevent the oxygen from reacting with and corroding the cladding. Also described is a method for coating the inner surface of small diameter tubes of cladding with a layer of vanadium.

  12. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM MONOCARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Powers, R.M.

    1962-07-24

    A method of making essentially stoichiometric uranium monocarbide by pelletizing a mixture of uranium tetrafluoride, silicon, and carbon and reacting the mixture at a temperature of approximately 1500 to 1700 deg C until the reaction goes to completion, forming uranium monocarbide powder and volatile silicon tetrafluoride, is described. The powder is then melted to produce uranium monocarbide in massive form. (AEC)

  13. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, V.P.

    1958-12-16

    A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

  14. All fiber cladding mode stripper with uniform heat distribution and high cladding light loss manufactured by CO2 laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebali, M. A.; Basso, E. T.

    2018-02-01

    Cladding mode strippers are primarily used at the end of a fiber laser cavity to remove high-power excess cladding light without inducing core loss and beam quality degradation. Conventional manufacturing methods of cladding mode strippers include acid etching, abrasive blasting or laser ablation. Manufacturing of cladding mode strippers using laser ablation consist of removing parts of the cladding by fused silica ablation with a controlled penetration and shape. We present and characterize an optimized cladding mode stripper design that increases the cladding light loss with a minimal device length and manufacturing time. This design reduces the localized heat generation by improving the heat distribution along the device. We demonstrate a cladding mode stripper written on a 400um fiber with cladding light loss of 20dB, with less than 0.02dB loss in the core and minimal heating of the fiber and coating. The manufacturing process of the designed component is fully automated and takes less than 3 minutes with a very high throughput yield.

  15. URANIUM EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, C.D.; Opie, J.V.

    1958-07-01

    The recovery of uranium values from uranium ore such as pitchblende is described. The ore is first dissolved in nitric acid, and a water soluble nitrate is added as a salting out agent. The resulting feed solution is then contacted with diethyl ether, whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate and a portion of the impurities are taken up by the ether. This acid ether extract is then separated from the aqueous raffinate, and contacted with water causing back extractioa of the uranyl nitrate and impurities into the water to form a crude liquor. After separation from the ether extract, this crude liquor is heated to about 118 deg C to obtain molten uranyl nitrate hexahydratc. After being slightly cooled the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate is contacted with acid free diethyl ether whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate is dissolved into the ethcr to form a neutral ether solution while most of the impurities remain in the aqueous waste. After separation from the aqueous waste, the resultant ether solution is washed with about l0% of its volume of water to free it of any dissolved impurities and is then contacted with at least one half its volume of water whereby the uranyl nitrate is extracted into the water to form an aqueous product solution.

  16. DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Chellew, N.R.

    1958-02-01

    This patent deals with the separation of rare earth and other fission products from neutron bombarded uranium. This is accomplished by melting the uranium in contact with either thorium oxide, maguesium oxide, alumnum oxide, beryllium oxide, or uranium dioxide. The melting is preferably carried out at from 1150 deg to 1400 deg C in an inert atmosphere, such as argon or helium. During this treatment a scale of uranium dioxide forms on the uranium whtch contains most of the fission products.

  17. Corrosion Evaluation of RERTR Uranium Molybdenum Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    A K Wertsching

    2012-09-01

    As part of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) mandate to replace the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, research into the development of LEU fuel for research reactors has been active since the late 1970’s. Originally referred to as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program the new effort named Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is nearing the goal of replacing the standard aluminum clad dispersion highly enriched uranium aluminide fuel with a new LEU fuel. The five domestic high performance research reactors undergoing this conversion are High Fluxmore » Isotope reactor (HFIR), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reactor, Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor II (MITR-II). The design of these reactors requires a higher neutron flux than other international research reactors, which to this point has posed unique challenges in the design and development of the new mandated LEU fuel. The new design utilizes a monolithic fuel configuration in order to obtain sufficient 235U within the LEU stoichoimetry to maintain the fission reaction within the domestic test reactors. The change from uranium aluminide dispersion fuel type to uranium molybdenum (UMo) monolithic configuration requires examination of possible corrosion issues associated with the new fuel meat. A focused analysis of the UMo fuel under potential corrosion conditions, within the ATR and under aqueous storage indicates a slow and predictable corrosion rate. Additional corrosion testing is recommended for the highest burn-up fuels to confirm observed corrosion rate trends. This corrosion analysis will focus only on the UMo fuel and will address corrosion of ancillary components such as cladding only in terms of how it affects the fuel. The calculations and corrosion scenarios are weighted with a conservative bias

  18. Hot Forging of a Cladded Component by Automated GMAW Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, Muhammad; Langlois, Laurent; Bigot, Régis

    2011-01-01

    Weld cladding is employed to improve the service life of engineering components by increasing corrosion and wear resistance and reducing the cost. The acceptable multi-bead cladding layer depends on single bead geometry. Hence, in first step, the relationship between input process parameters and the single bead geometry is studied and in second step a comprehensive study on multi bead clad layer deposition is carried out. This paper highlights an experimental study carried out to get single layer cladding deposited by automated Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process and to find the possibility of hot forming of the cladded work piece to get the final hot formed improved structure. GMAW is an arc welding process that uses an arc between a consumable electrode and the welding pool with an external shielding gas and the cladding is done by alongside deposition of weld beads. The experiments for single bead were conducted by varying the three main process parameters wire feed rate, arc voltage and welding speed while keeping other parameters like nozzle to work distance, shielding gas and its flow rate and torch angle constant. The effect of bead spacing and torch orientation on the cladding quality of single layer from the results of single bead deposition was studied. Effect of the dilution rate and nominal energy on the cladded layer hot bending quality was also performed at different temperatures.

  19. Metal clad aramid fibers for aerospace wire and cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokarsky, Edward W.; Dunham, Michael G.; Hunt, James E.; Santoleri, E. David; Allen, David B.

    1995-01-01

    High strength light weight metal clad aramid fibers can provide significant weight savings when used to replace conventional metal wire in aerospace cable. An overview of metal clad aramid fiber materials and information on performance and use in braided electrical shielding and signal conductors is provided.

  20. Cladding of Mg alloy with Zr based BMG Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, A. K.; Oh, Y. S.; Faisal, M. K.; Kim, N. J.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, an attempt has been made to clad AZ31 magnesium alloy with Zr-based bulk metallic glassy alloy (Vit-1), by casting method. The interface studies conducted using SEM-EDS line scan indicate that a good bond is formed at the clad interface of Zr and Mg. And the mechanism involved is discussed herein.

  1. Qualification of submerged-arc narrow strip cladding process

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, P.S.; Gottschling, J.D.; Jeffers, G.K.

    1975-08-01

    An unique narrow strip cladding process for use on both plate and forging material for nuclear components was developed. The qualification testing of this low-heat input process for cladding nuclear components, including those of SA508 Class 2 material is described. The theory that explains the acceptable results of these tests is also given. (auth)

  2. Qualification of submerged-arc narrow strip cladding process

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, P.S.; Gottschling, J.D.; Jeffers, G.K.

    1976-03-01

    Babcock and Wilcox has developed an unique narrow strip cladding process for use on both plate and forging material for nuclear components. The qualification testing of this low-heat input process for cladding nuclear components is described, including those of SA508 Class 2 material. The theory that explains the acceptable results of these tests is also given.

  3. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    DOEpatents

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  4. Material selection for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    DOE PAGES

    Pint, B. A.; Terrani, K. A.; Yamamoto, Y.; ...

    2015-09-14

    Alternative cladding materials are being investigated for accident tolerance, which can be defined as >100X improvement (compared to current Zr-based alloys) in oxidation resistance in steam environments at ≥1200°C for short (≤4 h) times. After reviewing a wide range of candidates, current steam oxidation testing is being conducted on Mo, MAX phases and FeCrAl alloys. Recently reported low mass losses for Mo in steam at 800°C could not be reproduced. Both FeCrAl and MAX phase Ti 2AlC form a protective alumina scale in steam. Therefore, commercial Ti 2AlC that is not single phase, formed a much thicker oxide at 1200°Cmore » in steam and significant TiO 2, and therefore may be challenging to use as a cladding or a coating. Alloy development for FeCrAl is seeking to maintain its steam oxidation resistance to 1475°C, while reducing its Cr content to minimize susceptibility to irradiation assisted Cr-rich α’ formation. The composition effects and critical limits to retaining protective scale formation at >1400°C are still being evaluated.« less

  5. Polarization characteristics of double-clad elliptical fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Lit, J W

    1990-12-20

    A scalar variational analysis based on a Gaussian approximation of the fundamental mode of a double-clad elliptical fiber with a depressed inner cladding is studied. The polarization properties and graphic results are presented; they are given in terms of three parameters: the ratio of the major axis to the minor axis of the core, the ratio of the inner cladding major axis to the core major axis, and the difference between the core index and the inner cladding index. The variations of both the spot size and the field intensity with core ellipticity are examined. It is shown that high birefringence and dispersion-free orthogonal polarization modes can be obtained within the single-mode region and that the field intensity distribution may be more confined to the fiber center than in a single-clad elliptical fiber.

  6. Compact cladding-pumped planar waveguide amplifier and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andy J.; Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric; Murray, James E.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2003-10-28

    A low-cost, high performance cladding-pumped planar waveguide amplifier and fabrication method, for deployment in metro and access networks. The waveguide amplifier has a compact monolithic slab architecture preferably formed by first sandwich bonding an erbium-doped core glass slab between two cladding glass slabs to form a multi-layer planar construction, and then slicing the construction into multiple unit constructions. Using lithographic techniques, a silver stripe is deposited and formed at a top or bottom surface of each unit construction and over a cross section of the bonds. By heating the unit construction in an oven and applying an electric field, the silver stripe is then ion diffused to increase the refractive indices of the core and cladding regions, with the diffusion region of the core forming a single mode waveguide, and the silver diffusion cladding region forming a second larger waveguide amenable to cladding pumping with broad area diodes.

  7. Process for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, P.S. Jr.; Agee, W.A.; Bullock, J.S. IV; Condon, J.B.

    1975-07-22

    A process is described for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys wherein molten uranium and uranium alloys are melted in a molten layer of a fluoride slag containing up to about 8 weight percent calcium metal. The calcium metal reduces oxides in the uranium and uranium alloys to provide them with an oxygen content of less than 100 parts per million. (auth)

  8. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

  9. PRODUCTION OF PURIFIED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Burris, L. Jr.; Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

    1960-01-26

    A pyrometallurgical method for processing nuclear reactor fuel elements containing uranium and fission products and for reducing uranium compound; to metallic uranium is reported. If the material proccssed is essentially metallic uranium, it is dissolved in zinc, the sulution is cooled to crystallize UZn/sub 9/ , and the UZn/sub 9/ is distilled to obtain uranium free of fission products. If the material processed is a uranium compound, the sollvent is an alloy of zinc and magnesium and the remaining steps are the same.

  10. Unrestrained swelling of uranium-nitride fuel irradiated at temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1400 K (1980 to 2520 R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohal, R. G.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Six fuel pins were assembled, encapsulated, and irradiated in the Plum Brook Reactor. The fuel pins employed uranium mononitride (UN) in a stainless steel (type 304L) clad. The pins were irradiated for approximately 4000 hours to burnups of about 2.0 atom percent uranium. The average clad surface temperature during irradiation was about 1100 K (1980 deg R). Since stainless steel has a very low creep strength relative to that of UN at this temperature, these tests simulated unrestrained swelling of UN. The tests indicated that at 1 percent uranium atom burnup the unrestrained diametrical swelling of UN is about 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 percent at 1223, 1264, and 1306 K (2200, deg 2273 deg, and 2350 deg R), respectively. The tests also indicated that the irradiation induced swelling of unrestrained UN fuel pellets appears to be isotropic.

  11. Cladding material, tube including such cladding material and methods of forming the same

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    A multi-layered cladding material including a ceramic matrix composite and a metallic material, and a tube formed from the cladding material. The metallic material forms an inner liner of the tube and enables hermetic sealing of thereof. The metallic material at ends of the tube may be exposed and have an increased thickness enabling end cap welding. The metallic material may, optionally, be formed to infiltrate voids in the ceramic matrix composite, the ceramic matrix composite encapsulated by the metallic material. The ceramic matrix composite includes a fiber reinforcement and provides increased mechanical strength, stiffness, thermal shock resistance and highmore » temperature load capacity to the metallic material of the inner liner. The tube may be used as a containment vessel for nuclear fuel used in a nuclear power plant or other reactor. Methods for forming the tube comprising the ceramic matrix composite and the metallic material are also disclosed.« less

  12. Nd3+-doped soft glass double-clad fibers with a hexagonal inner cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longfei; He, Dongbing; Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping

    2015-04-01

    The stack-and-draw technique was used to fabricate Nd3+-doped silicate and phosphate glass double-clad step-index fibers with a non-circular inner cladding. For the silicate fiber, a maximum output power of 7.7 W was obtained from a 94 cm fiber. An output power of 1.25 W was also realized with a short length fiber of 8 cm, confirming the application potential of this fiber in single frequency lasers and pulsed amplifiers where an efficient rare-earth-doped fiber with short length is desirable. For the phosphate fiber, a maximum output power of 2.78 W was obtained from a single-mode fiber with a core diameter of up to 35 μm.

  13. Laser cladding of bioactive glass coatings.

    PubMed

    Comesaña, R; Quintero, F; Lusquiños, F; Pascual, M J; Boutinguiza, M; Durán, A; Pou, J

    2010-03-01

    Laser cladding by powder injection has been used to produce bioactive glass coatings on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates. Bioactive glass compositions alternative to 45S5 Bioglass were demonstrated to exhibit a gradual wetting angle-temperature evolution and therefore a more homogeneous deposition of the coating over the substrate was achieved. Among the different compositions studied, the S520 bioactive glass showed smoother wetting angle-temperature behavior and was successfully used as precursor material to produce bioactive coatings. Coatings processed using a Nd:YAG laser presented calcium silicate crystallization at the surface, with a uniform composition along the coating cross-section, and no significant dilution of the titanium alloy was observed. These coatings maintain similar bioactivity to that of the precursor material as demonstrated by immersion in simulated body fluid. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Accident-tolerant oxide fuel and cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Mariani, Robert D.

    Systems and methods for accident tolerant oxide fuel. One or more disks can be placed between fuel pellets comprising UO.sub.2, wherein such disks possess a higher thermal conductivity material than that of the UO.sub.2 to provide enhanced heat rejection thereof. Additionally, a cladding coating comprising zircaloy coated with a material that provides stability and high melting capability can be provided. The pellets can be configured as annular pellets having an annulus filled with the higher thermal conductivity material. The material coating the zircaloy can be, for example, Zr.sub.5Si.sub.4 or another silicide such as, for example, a Zr-Silicide that limits corrosion.more » The aforementioned higher thermal conductivity material can be, for example, Si, Zr.sub.xSi.sub.y, Zr, or Al.sub.2O.sub.3.« less

  15. Process for producing clad superconductive materials

    DOEpatents

    Cass, Richard B.; Ott, Kevin C.; Peterson, Dean E.

    1992-01-01

    A process for fabricating superconducting composite wire by the steps of placing a superconductive precursor admixture capable of undergoing a self propagating combustion in stoichiometric amounts sufficient to form a superconductive product within a metal tube, sealing one end of said tube, igniting said superconductive precursor admixture whereby said superconductive precursor admixture endburns along the length of the admixture, and cross-section reducing said tube at a rate substantially equal to the rate of burning of said superconductive precursor admixture and at a point substantially planar with the burnfront of the superconductive precursor mixture, whereby a clad superconductive product is formed in situ, the product characterized as superconductive without a subsequent sintering stage, is disclosed.

  16. METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

    1960-04-26

    A process is given for purifying a uranium-base nuclear material. The nuclear material is dissolved in zinc or a zinc-magnesium alloy and the concentration of magnesium is increased until uranium precipitates.

  17. NICKEL COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Nickel coatings on uranium and various methods of obtaining such coatings are described. Specifically disclosed are such nickel or nickel alloy layers as barriers between uranium and aluminum- silicon, chromium, or copper coatings.

  18. Molten uranium dioxide structure and dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Skinner, L. B.; Parise, J. B.; Benmore, C. J.; ...

    2014-11-21

    Uranium dioxide (UO 2) is the major nuclear fuel component of fission power reactors. A key concern during severe accidents is the melting and leakage of radioactive UO 2 as it corrodes through its zirconium cladding and steel containment. Yet, the very high temperatures (>3140 kelvin) and chemical reactivity of molten UO 2 have prevented structural studies. In this work, we combine laser heating, sample levitation, and synchrotron x-rays to obtain pair distribution function measurements of hot solid and molten UO 2. The hot solid shows a substantial increase in oxygen disorder around the lambda transition (2670 K) but negligiblemore » U-O coordination change. On melting, the average U-O coordination drops from 8 to 6.7 ± 0.5. Molecular dynamics models refined to this structure predict higher U-U mobility than 8-coordinated melts.« less

  19. High temperature sensor properties of a specialty double cladding fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ting; Pang, Fufei; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-12-01

    A simple high temperature fiber sensor is proposed and demonstrated. The sensor head is made of a short section of specialty double cladding fiber (DCF). The DCF consists of a depressed inner cladding which is boron (B)-doped silica. Through an evanescent wave, the cladding mode can be excited, and thus the transmission presents a resonant spectral dip. The high temperature sensing properties was studied according to the shift of the transmission spectrum shifts. With increasing the temperature from 28 °C to 850 °C, the resonant spectrum shifts to longer wavelengths. The sensitivity is 0.112 nm / °C.

  20. Oxidation performance of platinum-clad Mo-47Re alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    1994-01-01

    The alloy Mo-47Re has favorable mechanical properties at temperatures above 1400 C, but it undergoes severe oxidation when used in air with no protective coating. To shield the alloy from oxidation, platinum cladding has been evaluated. The unprotected alloy undergoes catastrophic oxidation under static and dynamic oxidation conditions. The platinum cladding provides good protection from static and dynamic oxidation for moderate times at 1260 C. Samples tested for longer times under static oxidation conditions experienced severe oxidation. The data suggest that oxidation results from the transport of oxygen through the grain boundaries and through the pinhole defects of the platinum cladding.

  1. Uranium production in Romania

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This article reviews uranium production in Romania. Geological aspects of the country are discussed, and known uranium deposits are noted. Uranium mining and milling activities are also covered. Utilization of Romania`s uranium production industry will primarily be to supply the country`s nuclear power program, and with the present adequate supplies and the operation of their recently revamped fuel production facility, Romania should be self-reliant in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  2. PREPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1959-10-01

    A process is described for preparing uranium hexafluoride from carbonate- leach uranium ore concentrate. The briquetted, crushed, and screened concentrate is reacted with hydrogen fluoride in a fluidized bed, and the uranium tetrafluoride formed is mixed with a solid diluent, such as calcium fluoride. This mixture is fluorinated with fluorine and an inert diluent gas, also in a fluidized bed, and the uranium hexafluoride obtained is finally purified by fractional distillation.

  3. PROCESS OF PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Orlemann, E.F.; Jensen, L.H.

    1958-12-23

    A method of obtaining substantially pure uranium from a uranium composition contaminated with light element impurities such as sodium, magnesium, beryllium, and the like is described. An acidic aqueous solution containing tetravalent uranium is treated with a soluble molybdate to form insoluble uranous molybdate which is removed. This material after washing is dissolved in concentrated nitric acid to obtaln a uranyl nitrate solution from which highly purified uranium is obtained by extraction with ether.

  4. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, W.E.; Spenceley, R.M.; Teetzel, F.M.

    1959-08-01

    A method is presented for producing uranium tetrafluoride from the gaseous hexafluoride by feeding the hexafluoride into a high temperature zone obtained by the recombination of molecularly dissociated hydrogen. The molal ratio of hydrogen to uranium hexnfluoride is preferably about 3 to 1. Uranium tetrafluoride is obtained in a finely divided, anhydrous state.

  5. The effect of silicon on the interaction between metallic uranium and aluminum: A 50 year long diffusion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaers, A.; Detavernier, C.; Van den Berghe, S.

    2008-11-01

    The core of the BR1 research reactor at SCK•CEN, Mol (Belgium) has a graphite matrix loaded with fuel rods consisting of a natural uranium slug in aluminum cladding. The BR1 reactor has been in operation since 1956 and still contains its original fuel rods. After more than 50 years irradiation at low temperature, some of the fuel rods have been examined. Fabrication reports indicate that a so-called AlSi bonding layer and an U(Al,Si) 3 anti-diffusion layer on the natural uranium fuel slug were applied to limit the interaction between the uranium fuel and aluminum cladding. The microstructure of the fuel, bonding and anti-diffusion layer and cladding were analysed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. It was found that the AlSi bonding layer does provide a tight bond between fuel and cladding but that it is a thin USi layer that acts as effective anti-diffusion layer and not the intended U(Al,Si) 3 layer.

  6. Jet slurry erosion performance of composite clad and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, Lohit R.; Horakeri, Gururaj S.; Bhovi, Prabakhar M.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, development of composite cladding consists of Cr23C6 (chromium carbide) as reinforcement particles 20 wt. % in Ni-based matrix 80 wt. % on austenitic stainless steel through exposure of microwave radiation has been carried out. The jet slurry erosion test was performed on microwave composite clad. The functional performance of composite clad has been evaluated for different parametric conditions like varying impingement velocity and impact angle. The increasing weight loss trend was observed with time for the first 30 min. after that the individual trend decreased; at high impingement velocity and maximum impact angle. SEM micrographs of eroded clad samples at various impact angle and impingement velocity were discussed. The maximum weight loss occurred at 90° angle and velocity of 60 m/s, and minimum at 30° angle and velocity of 20 m/s.

  7. View of building 11050, showing metal clad addition on east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of building 11050, showing metal clad addition on east elevation, looking southwest. - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, China Lake Pilot Plant, Machine Shop, C Street, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  8. Reactor Physics Assessment of Thick Silicon Carbide Clad PWR Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Densities ............................................................................................................ 21 2.3 Fuel Mass (Core Total...70 7.1 Geometry, Material Density, and Mass Summary for All Cores...21 Table 3: Fuel Rod Masses for Different Clads

  9. Semipolar III-nitride laser diodes with zinc oxide cladding.

    PubMed

    Myzaferi, Anisa; Reading, Arthur H; Farrell, Robert M; Cohen, Daniel A; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P

    2017-07-24

    Incorporating transparent conducting oxide (TCO) top cladding layers into III-nitride laser diodes (LDs) improves device design by reducing the growth time and temperature of the p-type layers. We investigate using ZnO instead of ITO as the top cladding TCO of a semipolar (202¯1) III-nitride LD. Numerical modeling indicates that replacing ITO with ZnO reduces the internal loss in a TCO clad LD due to the lower optical absorption in ZnO. Lasing was achieved at 453 nm with a threshold current density of 8.6 kA/cm 2 and a threshold voltage of 10.3 V in a semipolar (202¯1) III-nitride LD with ZnO top cladding.

  10. Composite polymer: Glass edge cladding for laser disks

    DOEpatents

    Powell, H.T.; Wolfe, C.A.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.E.; Riley, M.O.; Lyon, R.E.; Jessop, E.S.

    1987-11-02

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation. 18 figs.

  11. Composite polymer-glass edge cladding for laser disks

    DOEpatents

    Powell, Howard T.; Riley, Michael O.; Wolfe, Charles R.; Lyon, Richard E.; Campbell, John H.; Jessop, Edward S.; Murray, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation.

  12. Integrated double-clad photonic crystal fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Gu, Yanran; Chen, Zilun

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies and fabricates an integrated double-clad photonic crystal fiber amplifier, which overcomes the shortcomings of space application and makes full use of excellent property of double-clad photonic crystal fiber. In the experiment, the (6 + 1) × 1 end-pump coupler with DC-PCF is fabricated. The six pump fibers are fabricated with 105 / 125μm (NA = 0.22) multi-mode fiber. The signal fiber is made of ordinary single-mode fiber SMF-28. Then we spliced the tapered fiber bundle to photonic crystal fiber. At last, we produce double-clad photonic crystal fiber with an end-cap that are able to withstand high average power and protect the system. We have fabricated an integrated Yb-double-clad photonic crystal fiber amplifier.

  13. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Yeager, J.H.

    1958-08-12

    In the prior art processing of uranium ores, the ore is flrst digested with nitric acid and filtered, and the uranium values are then extracted tom the filtrate by contacting with an organic solvent. The insoluble residue has been processed separately in order to recover any uranium which it might contain. The improvement consists in contacting a slurry, composed of both solution and residue, with the organic solvent prior to filtration. Tbe result is that uranium values contained in the residue are extracted along with the uranium values contained th the solution in one step.

  14. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

    1958-04-15

    The production of uranium metal by the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride is described. Massive uranium metal of high purily is produced by reacting uranium tetrafluoride with 2 to 20% stoichiometric excess of magnesium at a temperature sufficient to promote the reaction and then mantaining the reaction mass in a sealed vessel at temperature in the range of 1150 to 2000 d C, under a superatomospheric pressure of magnesium for a period of time sufficient 10 allow separation of liquid uranium and liquid magnesium fluoride into separate layers.

  15. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  16. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

  17. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO2 and/or H2S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  18. Cladding for transverse-pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L. (Inventor); Fan, Tso Y. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a transverse pumped, solid state laser, a nonabsorptive cladding surrounds a gain medium. A single tranverse mode, namely the Transverse Electromagnetic (TEM) sub 00 mode, is provided. The TEM sub 00 model has a cross sectional diameter greater than a transverse dimension of the gain medium but less than a transverse dimension of the cladding. The required size of the gain medium is minimized while a threshold for laser output is lowered.

  19. Double-clad nuclear-fuel safety rod

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, W.H.; Atcheson, D.B.

    1981-12-30

    A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

  20. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    Duerksen, Walter K.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  1. Laser cladding: repairing and manufacturing metal parts and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Leo

    2003-03-01

    Laser cladding is presently used to repair high volume aerospace, automotive, marine, rail or general engineering components where excessive wear has occurred. It can also be used if a one-off high value component is either required or has been accidentally over-machined. The ultimate application of laser cladding is to build components up from nothing, using a laser cladding system and a 3D CAD drawing of the component. It is thus emerging that laser cladding can be classified as a special case of Rapid Prototyping (RP). Up to this point in time RP was seen, and is still seen, as in intermediately step between the design stage of a component and a finished working product. This can now be extended so that laser cladding makes RP a one-stop shop and the finished component is made from tool-steel or some alloy-base material. The marriage of laser cladding with RP is an interesting one and offers an alternative to traditional tool builders, re-manufacturers and injection mould design/repair industries. The aim of this paper is to discuss the emergence of this new technology, along with the transference of the process out of the laboratory and into the industrial workplace and show it is finding its rightful place in the manufacturing/repair sector. It will be shown that it can be used as a cost cutting, strategic material saver and consequently a green technology.

  2. Real-time laser cladding control with variable spot size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, J. L.; Montealegre, M. A.; Vidal, F.; Rodríguez, J.; Mann, S.; Abels, P.; Motmans, F.

    2014-03-01

    Laser cladding processing has been used in different industries to improve the surface properties or to reconstruct damaged pieces. In order to cover areas considerably larger than the diameter of the laser beam, successive partially overlapping tracks are deposited. With no control over the process variables this conduces to an increase of the temperature, which could decrease mechanical properties of the laser cladded material. Commonly, the process is monitored and controlled by a PC using cameras, but this control suffers from a lack of speed caused by the image processing step. The aim of this work is to design and develop a FPGA-based laser cladding control system. This system is intended to modify the laser beam power according to the melt pool width, which is measured using a CMOS camera. All the control and monitoring tasks are carried out by a FPGA, taking advantage of its abundance of resources and speed of operation. The robustness of the image processing algorithm is assessed, as well as the control system performance. Laser power is decreased as substrate temperature increases, thus maintaining a constant clad width. This FPGA-based control system is integrated in an adaptive laser cladding system, which also includes an adaptive optical system that will control the laser focus distance on the fly. The whole system will constitute an efficient instrument for part repair with complex geometries and coating selective surfaces. This will be a significant step forward into the total industrial implementation of an automated industrial laser cladding process.

  3. Analysis of laser-induction hybrid cladding processing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjun; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Hu, Qianwu

    2007-12-01

    A new cladding approach based on laser-induction hybrid technique on flat sheets is presented in this paper. Coating is produced by means of 5kw cw CO II laser equipped with 100kw high frequent inductor, and the experiments set-up, involving a special machining-head, which can provide laser-induction hybrid heat resources simultaneously. The formation of thick NiCrSiB coating on a steel substrate by off-axial powder feeding is studied from an experimental point of view. A substrate melting energy model is developed to describe the energy relationship between laser-induction hybrid cladding and laser cladding alone quantitatively. By comparing the experimental results with the calculational ones, it is shown that the tendency of fusion zone height of theoretical calculation is in agreement with that of tests in laser-induction hybrid cladding. Via analyses and tests, the conclusions can be lead to that the fusion zone height can be increased easily and the good bond of cladding track can be achieved within wide cladding processing window in laser-induction hybrid processing. It shows that the induction heating has an obvious effect on substrate melting and metallurgical bond.

  4. Some observations on uranium carbide alloy/tungsten compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical compatibility between both pure and thoriated tungsten and uranium carbide alloys was studied at 1800 C for up to 3300 hours. Alloying with zirconium carbide appeared to widen the homogeneity range of uranium carbide, making additional carbon available for reaction with the tungsten. Reaction layers were formed both by vapor phase reaction and by physical contact, producing either or both UWC2 and W2C, dependent upon the phases present in the starting fuel alloy. Formation of UWC2 results in slow growth of the reaction layer with time, while W2C reaction layers grow rapidly, allowing equilibrium to be reached in less than 2500 hours at 1800 C. The presence of a thermal gradient had no effect on the reactions observed nor did the presence of thoria in the tungsten clad.

  5. Some observations on uranium carbide alloy/tungsten compatibility.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    Results of chemical compatibility tests between both pure tungsten and thoriated tungsten run at 1800 C for up to 3300 hours with uranium carbide alloys. Alloying with zirconium carbide appeared to widen the homogeneity range of uranium carbide, making additional carbon available for reaction with the tungsten. Reaction layers were formed both by vapor phase reaction and by physical contact, producing either or both UWC2 and W2C, depending upon the phases present in the starting fuel alloy. Formation of UWC2 results in slow growth of the reaction layer with time, while W2C reaction layers grow rapidly, allowing equilibrium to be reached in less than 2500 hours at 1800 C. Neither the presence of a thermal gradient nor the presence of thoria in the tungsten clad affect the reactions observed.

  6. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The...

  7. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The...

  8. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The...

  9. Comparison of fiber lasers based on distributed side-coupled cladding-pumped fibers and double-cladding fibers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhihe; Cao, Jianqiu; Guo, Shaofeng; Chen, Jinbao; Xu, Xiaojun

    2014-04-01

    We compare both analytically and numerically the distributed side-coupled cladding-pumped (DSCCP) fiber lasers and double cladding fiber (DCF) lasers. We show that, through optimization of the coupling and absorbing coefficients, the optical-to-optical efficiency of DSCCP fiber lasers can be made as high as that of DCF lasers. At the same time, DSCCP fiber lasers are better than the DCF lasers in terms of thermal management.

  10. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the systemmore » mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1.What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2.Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3.What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?« less

  11. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the systemmore » mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?« less

  12. Uranium hexafluoride public risk

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.

    1994-08-01

    The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person).more » The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.« less

  13. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  14. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V2C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V2C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  15. Uranium Bioreduction and Biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Wufuer, Rehemanjiang; Wei, Yongyang; Lin, Qinghua; Wang, Huawei; Song, Wenjuan; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2017-01-01

    Following the development of nuclear science and technology, uranium contamination has been an ever increasing concern worldwide because of its potential for migration from the waste repositories and long-term contaminated environments. Physical and chemical techniques for uranium pollution are expensive and challenging. An alternative to these technologies is microbially mediated uranium bioremediation in contaminated water and soil environments due to its reduced cost and environmental friendliness. To date, four basic mechanisms of uranium bioremediation-uranium bioreduction, biosorption, biomineralization, and bioaccumulation-have been established, of which uranium bioreduction and biomineralization have been studied extensively. The objective of this review is to provide an understanding of recent developments in these two fields in relation to relevant microorganisms, mechanisms, influential factors, and obstacles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  17. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  18. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  19. Measurement of thermal diffusivity of depleted uranium metal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humrickhouse-Helmreich, Carissa J.; Corbin, Rob; McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2014-03-01

    The high void space of nuclear fuels composed of homogeneous uranium metal microspheres may allow them to achieve ultra-high burnup by accommodating fuel swelling and reducing fuel/cladding interactions; however, the relatively low thermal conductivity of microsphere nuclear fuels may limit their application. To support the development of microsphere nuclear fuels, an apparatus was designed in a glovebox and used to measure the apparent thermal diffusivity of a packed bed of depleted uranium (DU) microspheres with argon fill in the void spaces. The developed Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA) recorded radial temperature changes due to an initial heat pulse from a central thin-diameter cartridge heater. Using thermocouple positions and time-temperature data, the apparent thermal diffusivity was calculated. The thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was calculated based on the thermal diffusivity from the CHTA, known material densities and specific heat capacities, and an assumed 70% packing density based on prior measurements. Results indicate that DU metal microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer even in a low oxygen environment. At 500 °C, the thermal conductivity of the DU metal microsphere bed was 0.431 ± 0.0560 W/m-K compared to the literature value of approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal.

  20. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Ruehle, A.E.; Stevenson, J.W.

    1957-11-12

    An improved process is described for the magnesium reduction of UF/sub 4/ to produce uranium metal. In the past, there have been undesirable premature reactions between the Mg and the bomb liner or the UF/sub 4/ before the actual ignition of the bomb reaction. Since these premature reactions impair the yield of uranium metal, they have been inhibited by forming a protective film upon the particles of Mg by reacting it with hydrated uranium tetrafluoride, sodium bifluoride, uranyl fluoride, or uranium trioxide. This may be accomplished by adding about 0.5 to 2% of the additive to the bomb charge.

  1. COATING URANIUM FROM CARBONYLS

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Storrs, S.S.

    1959-07-14

    Methods are described for making adherent corrosion resistant coatings on uranium metal. According to the invention, the uranium metal is heated in the presence of an organometallic compound such as the carbonyls of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, niobium, and tungsten at a temperature sufficient to decompose the metal carbonyl and dry plate the resultant free metal on the surface of the uranium metal body. The metal coated body is then further heated at a higher temperature to thermally diffuse the coating metal within the uranium bcdy.

  2. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  3. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, D.

    1958-04-15

    A process of recovering uranium from very low-grade ore residues is described. These low-grade uraniumcontaining hydroxide precipitates, which also contain hydrated silica and iron and aluminum hydroxides, are subjected to multiple leachings with aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate at a pH of at least 9. This leaching serves to selectively extract the uranium from the precipitate, but to leave the greater part of the silica, iron, and aluminum with the residue. The uranium is then separated from the leach liquor by the addition of an acid in sufficient amount to destroy the carbonate followed by the addition of ammonia to precipitate uranium as ammonium diuranate.

  4. Improved synthesis of carbon-clad silica stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Haidar Ahmad, Imad A; Carr, Peter W

    2013-12-17

    Previously, we described a novel method for cladding elemental carbon onto the surface of catalytically activated silica by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using hexane as the carbon source and its use as a substitute for carbon-clad zirconia.1,2 In that method, we showed that very close to exactly one uniform monolayer of Al (III) was deposited on the silica by a process analogous to precipitation from homogeneous solution in order to preclude pore blockage. The purpose of the Al(III) monolayer is to activate the surface for subsequent CVD of carbon. In this work, we present an improved procedure for preparing the carbon-clad silica (denoted CCSi) phases along with a new column packing process. The new method yields CCSi phases having better efficiency, peak symmetry, and higher retentivity compared to carbon-clad zirconia. The enhancements were achieved by modifying the original procedure in three ways: First, the kinetics of the deposition of Al(III) were more stringently controlled. Second, the CVD chamber was flushed with a mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen gas during the carbon cladding process to minimize generation of polar sites by oxygen incorporation. Third, the fine particles generated during the CVD process were exhaustively removed by flotation in an appropriate solvent.

  5. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  6. Downscaling of conventional laser cladding technique to microengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; Quintero, F.; Pou, J.

    To get an adequate response to the high increase of micro-products demand, new techniques have been developed by different types of industries in the last years. One approach is to adapt the laser surface cladding technique to the scale of microengineering. A new experimental configuration has been developed based on a highly stable high power laser with a high beam quality and a micro-feeder adequate to supply submicron particles. This work collects our efforts to extend the operation range of the laser cladding to the laser micro-cladding in order to produce micro-coatings. The viability of this new technique has been demonstrated by depositing coatings with geometrical characteristics in the micrometer range (minimum values obtained: 32 μm of width and 12 μm of height).

  7. Complete Non-Radioactive Operability Tests for Cladding Hull Chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Emory D; Johnson, Jared A.; Hylton, Tom D.

    2016-04-01

    Non-radioactive operability tests were made to test the metal chlorination reactor and condenser and their accessories using batch chlorinations of non-radioactive cladding samples and to identify optimum operating practices and components that need further modifications prior to installation of the equipment into the hot cell for tests on actual used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding. The operability tests included (1) modifications to provide the desired heating and reactor temperature profile; and (2) three batch chlorination tests using, respectively, 100, 250, and 500 g of cladding. During the batch chlorinations, metal corrosion of the equipment was assessed, pressurization of the gas inletmore » was examined and the best method for maintaining solid salt product transfer through the condenser was determined. Also, additional accessing equipment for collection of residual ash and positioning of the unit within the hot cell were identified, designed, and are being fabricated.« less

  8. Clad metals by roll bonding for SOFC interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Jha, B.; Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guang-Guang; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2006-08-01

    High-temperature oxidation-resistant alloys are currently considered as a candidate material for construction of interconnects in intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Among these alloys, however, different groups of alloys demonstrate different advantages and disadvantages, and few, if any, can completely satisfy the stringent requirements for the application. To integrate the advantages and avoid the disadvantages of different groups of alloys, cladding has been proposed as one approach in fabricating metallic layered interconnect structures. To examine the feasibility of this approach, the austenitic Ni-base alloy Haynes 230 and the ferritic stainless steel AL 453 were selected as examples and manufactured into a clad metal. Its suitability as an interconnect construction material was investigated. This paper provides a brief overview of the cladding approach and discusses the viability of this technology to fabricate the metallic layered-structure interconnects.

  9. Clad metals, roll bonding and their applications for SOFC interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lichun; Yang, Zhenguo; Jha, Bijendra; Xia, Guanguang; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    Metallic interconnects have been becoming an increasingly interesting topic in the development in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). High temperature oxidation resistant alloys are currently considered as candidate materials. Among these alloys however, different groups of alloys demonstrate different advantages and disadvantages, and few if any can completely satisfy the stringent requirements for the application. To integrate the advantages and avoid the disadvantages of different groups of alloys, clad metal has been proposed for SOFC interconnect applications and interconnect structures. This paper gives a brief overview of the cladding approach and its applications, and discuss the viability of this technology to fabricate the metallic layered-structure interconnects. To examine the feasibility of this approach, the austenitic Ni-base alloy Haynes 230 and the ferritic stainless steel AL 453 were selected as examples and manufactured into a clad metal. Its suitability as an interconnect construction material was investigated.

  10. Nanoscale light–matter interactions in atomic cladding waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Liron; Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    Alkali vapours, such as rubidium, are being used extensively in several important fields of research such as slow and stored light nonlinear optics quantum computation, atomic clocks and magnetometers. Recently, there is a growing effort towards miniaturizing traditional centimetre-size vapour cells. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, light–matter interactions are greatly enhanced, enabling new functionalities due to the low power threshold needed for nonlinear interactions. Here, taking advantage of the mature platform of silicon photonics, we construct an efficient and flexible platform for tailored light–vapour interactions on a chip. Specifically, we demonstrate light–matter interactions in an atomic cladding waveguide, consisting of a silicon nitride nano-waveguide core with a rubidium vapour cladding. We observe the efficient interaction of the electromagnetic guided mode with the rubidium cladding and show that due to the high confinement of the optical mode, the rubidium absorption saturates at powers in the nanowatt regime. PMID:23462991

  11. In situ synthesis of hydroxyapatite coating by laser cladding.

    PubMed

    Wang, D G; Chen, C Z; Ma, J; Zhang, G

    2008-10-15

    HA bioceramic coatings were synthesized on titanium substrate by laser cladding using cheap calcium carbonate and calcium hydrogen phosphate. The thermodynamic condition for synthesizing HA was calculated by software Matlab 5.0, the microstructure and phase analysis of laser clad HA bioceramic coatings were studied by electron probe microanalyser (EPMA), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The theoretical results show that the Gibbs free enthalpy for the synthesis of HA phase is satisfied, and the presence of HA phase in the clad coatings was then further verified by XRD and the selected area diffraction patterns. When the laser power is 600W and the scanning speed is 3.5mm/s, the compact HA bioceramic coatings were obtained, which have cellular dendritic structure and consist of the phases of HA, alpha-Ca(2)P(2)O(7), CaO and CaTiO(3).

  12. Absorptivity Measurements and Heat Source Modeling to Simulate Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Florian; Eisenbarth, Daniel; Wegener, Konrad

    The laser cladding process gains importance, as it does not only allow the application of surface coatings, but also additive manufacturing of three-dimensional parts. In both cases, process simulation can contribute to process optimization. Heat source modeling is one of the main issues for an accurate model and simulation of the laser cladding process. While the laser beam intensity distribution is readily known, the other two main effects on the process' heat input are non-trivial. Namely the measurement of the absorptivity of the applied materials as well as the powder attenuation. Therefore, calorimetry measurements were carried out. The measurement method and the measurement results for laser cladding of Stellite 6 on structural steel S 235 and for the processing of Inconel 625 are presented both using a CO2 laser as well as a high power diode laser (HPDL). Additionally, a heat source model is deduced.

  13. Fabrication of stainless steel clad tubing. [gas pressure bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of producing stainless steel clad carbon steel tubing by a gas pressure bonding process was evaluated. Such a tube product could provide substantial chromium savings over monolithic stainless tubing in the event of a serious chromium shortage. The process consists of the initial assembly of three component tubesets from conventionally produced tubing, the formation of a strong metallurgical bond between the three components by gas pressure bonding, and conventional cold draw and anneal processing to final size. The quality of the tubes produced was excellent from the standpoint of bond strength, mechanical, and forming properties. The only significant quality problem encountered was carburization of the stainless clad by the carbon steel core which can be overcome by further refinement through at least three different approaches. The estimated cost of clad tubing produced by this process is greater than that for monolithic stainless tubing, but not so high as to make the process impractical as a chromium conservation method.

  14. Characterisation of metallic glass incorporated Zircaloy-2 weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Savalia, R. T.; Bhanumurthy, K.; Dey, G. K.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-01

    In this study the effect of incorporation of Zr based Fe and Ni bearing metallic glass in spot welds in Zircaloy components has been examined. A comparison of strength and microstructure of the welded joint with and without glass has been carried out. The welded joint with metallic glass has been found to be stronger than the one without metallic glass. The microstructure of the welded region with metallic glass has been found to comprise a large region having martensite. This large martensitic region has also been found to have considerable amount of excess solute (Fe, Ni). The higher strength of the weld with metallic glass seems to originate due to solid solution strengthening, small grain size and the presence of martensitic structure over a large region.

  15. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Kunerth, Dennis C.

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used tomore » detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of

  16. 78 FR 9676 - Clad Steel Plate From Japan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... hot-rolling of the cladding metal to ensure efficient welding to the basic metal; any other method of... welding (e.g., electrocladding), in which the cladding metal (nickel, chromium, etc.) is applied to the...

  17. DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.

    1962-05-15

    A process is given for separating fission products from uranium by extracting the former into molten aluminum. Phase isolation can be accomplished by selectively hydriding the uranium at between 200 and 300 deg C and separating the hydride powder from coarse particles of fissionproduct-containing aluminum. (AEC)

  18. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

    1959-03-10

    The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

  19. Uranium: A Dentist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Toor, R. S. S.; Brar, G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in granite and other mineral deposits. In its natural state, it consists of three isotopes (U-234, U-235 and U-238). On an average, 1% – 2% of ingested uranium is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract in adults. The absorbed uranium rapidly enters the bloodstream and forms a diffusible ionic uranyl hydrogen carbonate complex (UO2HCO3+) which is in equilibrium with a nondiffusible uranyl albumin complex. In the skeleton, the uranyl ion replaces calcium in the hydroxyapatite complex of the bone crystal. Although in North India, there is a risk of radiological toxicity from orally ingested natural uranium, the principal health effects are chemical toxicity. The skeleton and kidney are the primary sites of uranium accumulation. Acute high dose of uranyl nitrate delays tooth eruption, and mandibular growth and development, probably due to its effect on target cells. Based on all previous research and recommendations, the role of a dentist is to educate the masses about the adverse effects of uranium on the overall as well as the dental health. The authors recommended that apart from the discontinuation of the addition of uranium to porcelain, the Public community water supplies must also comply with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards of uranium levels being not more than 30 ppb (parts per billion). PMID:24478959

  20. Uranium and Thorium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Warren I.

    1978-01-01

    The results of President Carter's policy on non-proliferation of nuclear weapons are expected to slow the growth rate in energy consumption, put the development of the breeder reactor in question, halt plans to reprocess and recycle uranium and plutonium, and expand facilities to supply enriched uranium. (Author/MA)

  1. Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.; Feld, Sam H.

    1986-01-01

    A welding fixture for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

  2. Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.; Feld, S.H.

    1984-02-22

    A welding fixture is described for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

  3. Method and system for edge cladding of laser gain media

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Caird, John Allyn; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene

    2014-03-25

    A gain medium operable to amplify light at a gain wavelength and having reduced transverse ASE includes an input surface and an output surface opposing the input surface. The gain medium also includes a central region including gain material and extending between the input surface and the output surface along a longitudinal optical axis of the gain medium. The gain medium further includes an edge cladding region surrounding the central region and extending between the input surface and the output surface along the longitudinal optical axis of the gain medium. The edge cladding region includes the gain material and a dopant operable to absorb light at the gain wavelength.

  4. 16. VIEW OF THE ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY SYSTEM. ENRICHED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF THE ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY SYSTEM. ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESSED RELATIVELY PURE MATERIALS AND SOLUTIONS AND SOLID RESIDUES WITH RELATIVELY LOW URANIUM CONTENT. URANIUM RECOVERY INVOLVED BOTH SLOW AND FAST PROCESSES. (4/4/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, J.W.; Segre, E.G.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for obtaining a compound of uranium in an extremely pure state and in such a condition that it can be used in determinations of the isotopic composition of uranium. Uranium deposited in calutron receivers is removed therefrom by washing with cold nitric acid and the resulting solution, coataining uranium and trace amounts of various impurities, such as Fe, Ag, Zn, Pb, and Ni, is then subjected to various analytical manipulations to obtain an impurity-free uranium containing solution. This solution is then evaporated on a platinum disk and the residue is ignited converting it to U2/sub 3//sub 8/. The platinum disk having such a thin film of pure U/sub 2/O/sub 8/ is suitable for use with isotopic determination techaiques.

  6. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  7. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  8. 46 CFR 111.60-23 - Metal-clad (Type MC) cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Metal-clad (Type MC) cable. 111.60-23 Section 111.60-23...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-23 Metal-clad (Type MC) cable. (a) Metal-clad (Type MC) cable permitted on board a vessel must be continuous corrugated metal-clad cable. (b) The...

  9. 46 CFR 111.60-23 - Metal-clad (Type MC) cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Metal-clad (Type MC) cable. 111.60-23 Section 111.60-23...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-23 Metal-clad (Type MC) cable. (a) Metal-clad (Type MC) cable permitted on board a vessel must be continuous corrugated metal-clad cable. (b) The...

  10. Analysis of pellet cladding interaction and creep of U 3SIi2 fuel for use in light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Kathryn E.

    Following the accident at the Fukushima plant, enhancing the accident tolerance of the light water reactor (LWR) fleet became a topic of serious discussion. Under the direction of congress, the DOE office of Nuclear Energy added accident tolerant fuel development as a primary component to the existing Advanced Fuels Program. The DOE defines accident tolerant fuels as fuels that "in comparison with the standard UO2- Zircaloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events." To be economically viable, proposed accident tolerant fuels and claddings should be backward compatible with LWR designs, provide significant operating cost improvements such as power uprates, increased fuel burnup, or increased cycle length. In terms of safety, an alternative fuel pellet must have resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, thermal conductivity equal to or larger than that of UO2, and a melting temperature that allows the material to remain solid under power reactor conditions. Among the candidates, U3Si2 has a number of advantageous thermophysical properties, including; high density, high thermal conductivity at room temperature, and a high melting temperature. These properties support its use as an accident tolerant fuel while its high uranium density is capable of supporting uprates to the LWR fleet. This research characterizes U3Si2 pellets and analyzes U3Si2 under light water reactor conditions using the fuel performance code BISON. While some thermophysical properties for U3Si2 have been found in the literature, the irradiation behavior is sparse and limited to experience with dispersion fuels. Accordingly, the creep behavior for U3Si2 has been unknown, making it

  11. Preliminary investigations on the use of uranium silicide targets for fission Mo-99 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cols, H.; Cristini, P.; Marques, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentine Republic owns and operates an installation for production of molybdenum-99 from fission products since 1985, and, since 1991, covers the whole national demand of this nuclide, carrying out a program of weekly productions, achieving an average activity of 13 terabecquerel per week. At present they are finishing an enlargement of the production plant that will allow an increase in the volume of production to about one hundred of terabecquerel. Irradiation targets are uranium/aluminium alloy with 90% enriched uranium with aluminium cladding. In view of international trends held at present for replacing highmore » enrichment uranium (HEU) for enrichment values lower than 20 % (LEU), since 1990 the authors are in contact with the RERTR program, beginning with tests to adapt their separation process to new irradiation target conditions. Uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) was chosen as the testing material, because it has an uranium mass per volume unit, so that it allows to reduce enrichment to a value of 20%. CNEA has the technology for manufacturing miniplates of uranium silicide for their purposes. In this way, equivalent amounts of Molybdenum-99 could be obtained with no substantial changes in target parameters and irradiation conditions established for the current process with Al/U alloy. This paper shows results achieved on the use of this new target.« less

  12. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-12-29

    A method is presented for separating and recovering uranium from a complex mixure of impurities. The uranium is dissolved to produce an aqueous acidic solution including various impurities. In accordance with one method, with the uranium in the uranyl state, hydrogen cyanide is introduced into the solution to complex the impurities. Subsequently, ammonia is added to the solution to precipitate the uraniunn as ammonium diuranate away from the impurities in the solution. Alternatively, the uranium is precipitated by adding an alkaline metal hydroxide. In accordance with the second method, the uranium is reduced to the uranous state in the solution. The reduced solution is then treated with solid alkali metal cyanide sufficient to render the solution about 0.1 to 1.0 N in cyanide ions whereat cyanide complex ions of the metal impurities are produced and the uranium is simultaneously precipituted as uranous hydroxide. Alternatively, hydrogen cyanide may be added to the reduced solution and the uranium precipitated subsequently by adding ammonium hydroxide or an alkali metal hydroxide. Other refinements of the method are also disclosed.

  13. Comments on ""Contact Diffusion Interaction of Materials with Cladding''

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A Russian paper by A. A. Babad-Zakhryapina contributes much to the understanding of fuel, clad interactions, and thus to nuclear thermionic technology. In that publication the basic diffusion expression is a simple one. A more general but complicated equation for this mass transport results from the present work. With appropriate assumptions, however, the new relation reduces to Babad-Zakhryapina's version.

  14. 78 FR 7451 - Clad Steel Plate From Japan; Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Japan; Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five-year review, the... from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in... USITC Publication 4370 (January 2013), entitled Clad Steel Plate from Japan: Investigation No. 731-TA...

  15. PERSPECTIVE WITH WEST PORTAL. THE BRIDGE IS CLAD IN HORIZONTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE WITH WEST PORTAL. THE BRIDGE IS CLAD IN HORIZONTAL CLAPBOARD SIDING AND HAS A SHEET METAL ROOF. NOTE THE TWO OPENINGS THAT RUN THE LENGTH OF THE BRIDGE; ONE IS AT THE EAVES AND THE OTHER IS ABOUT 4’ ABOVE THE DECK. - Dreibelbis Station Bridge, Spanning Maiden Creek, Balthaser Road (TR 745), Lenhartsville, Berks County, PA

  16. High Temperature Steam Corrosion of Cladding for Nuclear Applications: Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, Kevin M; Garnier, John E; Sergey Rashkeev

    2013-01-01

    Stability of cladding materials under off-normal conditions is an important issue for the safe operation of light water nuclear reactors. Metals, ceramics, and metal/ceramic composites are being investigated as substitutes for traditional zirconium-based cladding. To support down-selection of these advanced materials and designs, a test apparatus was constructed to study the onset and evolution of cladding oxidation, and deformation behavior of cladding materials, under loss-of-coolant accident scenarios. Preliminary oxidation tests were conducted in dry oxygen and in saturated steam/air environments at 1000OC. Tube samples of Zr-702, Zr-702 reinforced with 1 ply of a ß-SiC CMC overbraid, and sintered a-SiC weremore » tested. Samples were induction heated by coupling to a molybdenum susceptor inside the tubes. The deformation behavior of He-pressurized tubes of Zr-702 and SiC CMC-reinforced Zr-702, heated to rupture, was also examined.« less

  17. Multispectral pyrometry for surface temperature measurement of oxidized Zircaloy claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvry, B.; Cheymol, G.; Ramiandrisoa, L.; Javaudin, B.; Gallou, C.; Maskrot, H.; Horny, N.; Duvaut, T.; Destouches, C.; Ferry, L.; Gonnier, C.

    2017-06-01

    Non-contact temperature measurement in a nuclear reactor is still a huge challenge because of the numerous constraints to consider, such as the high temperature, the steam atmosphere, and irradiation. A device is currently developed at CEA to study the nuclear fuel claddings behavior during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident. As a first step of development, we designed and tested an optical pyrometry procedure to measure the surface temperature of nuclear fuel claddings without any contact, under air, in the temperature range 700-850 °C. The temperature of Zircaloy-4 cladding samples was retrieved at various temperature levels. We used Multispectral Radiation Thermometry with the hypothesis of a constant emissivity profile in the spectral ranges 1-1.3 μm and 1.45-1.6 μm. To allow for comparisons, a reference temperature was provided by a thermocouple welded on the cladding surface. Because of thermal losses induced by the presence of the thermocouple, a heat transfer simulation was also performed to estimate the bias. We found a good agreement between the pyrometry measurement and the temperature reference, validating the constant emissivity profile hypothesis used in the MRT estimation. The expanded measurement uncertainty (k = 2) of the temperature obtained by the pyrometry method was ±4 °C, for temperatures between 700 and 850 °C. Emissivity values, between 0.86 and 0.91 were obtained.

  18. LANL Experience Rolling Zr-Clad LEU-10Mo Foils for AFIP-7

    SciTech Connect

    Hammon, Duncan L.; Clarke, Kester D.; Alexander, David J.

    2015-05-29

    The cleaning, canning, rolling and final trimming of Low Enriched Uranium-10 wt. pct. Molybdenum (LEU-10Mo) foils for ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) fuel plates to be used in the AFIP-7 (ATR Full Size Plate In Center Flux Trap Position) experiments are summarized. Six Zr-clad foils were produced from two LEU-10Mo castings supplied to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by Y-12 National Security Complex. Details of cleaning and canning procedures are provided. Hot- and cold-rolling results are presented, including rolling schedules, images of foils in-process, metallography and local compositions of regions of interest, and details of final foil dimensions and process yield.more » This report was compiled from the slides for the presentation of the same name given by Duncan Hammon on May 12, 2011 at the AFIP-7 Lessons Learned meeting in Salt Lake City, UT, with Los Alamos National Laboratory document number LA-UR 11-02898.« less

  19. Recovery of uranium values

    DOEpatents

    Brown, K. B.; Crouse, Jr., D. J.; Moore, J. G.

    1959-03-10

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is presented for recovering uranium values from an aqueous acidic solution by means of certain high molecular weight amine fn the amine classes of primary, secondary, heterocyclic secondary, tertiary, or heterocyclic tertiary. The uranium bearing aqueous acidic solution is contacted with the selected anine dissolved in a nonpolar waterimmiscible organfc solvent such as kerosene. The uranium which is substantially completely extracted by the organic phase may be stripped therefrom by water, and recovered from the aqueous phase by treatment into ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate.

  20. RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Brown, K.B.; Crouse, D.J. Jr.; Moore, J.G.

    1959-03-10

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is presented for recovering uranium values from an aqueous acidic solution by means of certain high molecular weight amine in the amine classes of primary, secondary, heterocyclic secondary, tertiary, or heterocyclic tertiary. The uranium bearing aqueous acidic solution is contacted with the selected amine dissolved in a nonpolar water-immiscible organic solvent such as kerosene. The uranium which is substantially completely exiracted by the organic phase may be stripped therefrom by waters and recovered from the aqueous phase by treatment into ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate.

  1. Orientation-Dependent Displacement Sensor Using an Inner Cladding Fiber Bragg Grating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Bao, Weijia

    2016-09-11

    An orientation-dependent displacement sensor based on grating inscription over a fiber core and inner cladding has been demonstrated. The device comprises a short piece of multi-cladding fiber sandwiched between two standard single-mode fibers (SMFs). The grating structure is fabricated by a femtosecond laser side-illumination technique. Two well-defined resonances are achieved by the downstream both core and cladding fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The cladding resonance presents fiber bending dependence, together with a strong orientation dependence because of asymmetrical distribution of the "cladding" FBG along the fiber cross-section.

  2. Irradiation effects on thermal properties of LWR hydride fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, Kurt; Balooch, Mehdi; Carpenter, David; Kohse, Gordon; Keiser, Dennis; Meyer, Mitchell; Olander, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Three hydride mini-fuel rods were fabricated and irradiated at the MIT nuclear reactor with a maximum burnup of 0.31% FIMA or ∼5 MWd/kgU equivalent oxide fuel burnup. Fuel rods consisted of uranium-zirconium hydride (U (30 wt%)ZrH1.6) pellets clad inside a LWR Zircaloy-2 tubing. The gap between the fuel and the cladding was filled with lead-bismuth eutectic alloy to eliminate the gas gap and the large temperature drop across it. Each mini-fuel rod was instrumented with two thermocouples with tips that are axially located halfway through the fuel centerline and cladding surface. In-pile temperature measurements enabled calculation of thermal conductivity in this fuel as a function of temperature and burnup. In-pile thermal conductivity at the beginning of test agreed well with out-of-pile measurements on unirradiated fuel and decreased rapidly with burnup.

  3. Nuclear-powered pacemaker fuel cladding study. [Difficulty of dissolving cladding and /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ for obtaining materials for acts of terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, R.L.

    1976-07-01

    The fabrication of fuel capsules with refractory metal and alloy clads used in nuclear-powered cardiac pacemakers precludes the expedient dissolution of the clad in inorganic acid solutions. An experiment to measure penetration rates of acids on commonly used fuel pellet clads indicated that it is not impossible, but that it would be very difficult to dissolve the multiple cladding. This work was performed because of a suggestion that a /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-powered pacemaker could be transformed into a terrorism weapon.

  4. Research on Microstructure and Property of TiC-Co Composite Material Made by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei

    The experiment of laser cladding on the surface of 2Cr13 steel was made. Titanium carbide (TiC) powder and Co-base alloy powder were used as cladding material. The microstructure and property of laser cladding layer were tested. The research showed that laser cladding layer had better properties such as minute crystals, deeper layer, higher hardness and good metallurgical bonding with base metal. The structure of cladding was supersaturated solid solution with dispersed titanium carbide. The average hardness of cladding zone was 660HV0.2. 2Cr13 steel was widely used in the field of turbine blades. Using laser cladding, the good wear layer would greatly increase the useful life of turbine blades.

  5. An allowable cladding peak temperature for spent nuclear fuels in interim dry storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Hyun-Jin; Jang, Ki-Nam; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2018-01-01

    Allowable cladding peak temperatures for spent fuel cladding integrity in interim dry storage were investigated, considering hydride reorientation and mechanical property degradation behaviors of unirradiated and neutron irradiated Zr-Nb cladding tubes. Cladding tube specimens were heated up to various temperatures and then cooled down under tensile hoop stresses. Cool-down specimens indicate that higher heat-up temperature and larger tensile hoop stress generated larger radial hydride precipitation and smaller tensile strength and plastic hoop strain. Unirradiated specimens generated relatively larger radial hydride precipitation and plastic strain than did neutron irradiated specimens. Assuming a minimum plastic strain requirement of 5% for cladding integrity maintenance in interim dry storage, it is proposed that a cladding peak temperature during the interim dry storage is to keep below 250 °C if cladding tubes are cooled down to room temperature.

  6. The effect of laser process parameters on microstructure and dilution rate of cladding coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Liu; Heping, Liu; Xingbin, Jing; Yuxin, Li; Peikang, Bai

    2018-02-01

    In order to broaden the range of application of Q235 steel, it is necessary to repair the surface of steel. High performance 316L stainless steel coating was successfully obtained on Q235 steel by laser cladding technology. The effect of laser cladding parameters on the geometrical size and appearance of single cladding layer was investigated. The experimental results show that laser current has an important influence on the surface morphology of single channel cladding. When the current is from 155A to 165A, the cladding coating becomes smooth. The laser current has an effect on the geometric cross section size and dilution rate of single cladding. The results revealed that with the rising of laser current, the width, height and depth of layer increase gradually. With the rising of laser current, the dilution rate of cladding layer is gradually increasing.

  7. PURIFICATION OF URANIUM FUELS

    DOEpatents

    Niedrach, L.W.; Glamm, A.C.

    1959-09-01

    An electrolytic process of refining or decontaminating uranium is presented. The impure uranium is made the anode of an electrolytic cell. The molten salt electrolyte of this cell comprises a uranium halide such as UF/sub 4/ or UCl/sub 3/ and an alkaline earth metal halide such as CaCl/sub 2/, BaF/sub 2/, or BaCl/sub 2/. The cathode of the cell is a metal such as Mn, Cr, Co, Fe, or Ni which forms a low melting eutectic with U. The cell is operated at a temperature below the melting point of U. In operation the electrodeposited uranium becomes alloyed with the metal of the cathode, and the low melting alloy thus formed drips from the cathode.

  8. Depleted Uranium: Technical Brief

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical brief provides accepted data and references to additional sources for radiological and chemical characteristics, health risks and references for both the monitoring and measurement, and applicable treatment techniques for depleted uranium.

  9. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, J.W.; Werkema, R.G.

    1959-07-28

    The recovery of uranium from magnesium fluoride slag obtained as a by- product in the production of uranium metal by the bomb reduction prccess is presented. Generally the recovery is accomplished by finely grinding the slag, roasting ihe ground slag air, and leaching the roasted slag with a hot, aqueous solution containing an excess of the sodium bicarbonate stoichiometrically required to form soluble uranium carbonate complex. The roasting is preferably carried out at between 425 and 485 deg C for about three hours. The leaching is preferably done at 70 to 90 deg C and under pressure. After leaching and filtration the uranium may be recovered from the clear leach liquor by any desired method.

  10. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, Alvin B.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions wherein the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  11. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, A.B.

    1982-10-27

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  12. Covalency in oxidized uranium

    DOE PAGES

    Tobin, J. G.; Yu, S. -W.; Qiao, R.; ...

    2015-07-01

    Here, using x-ray emission spectroscopy and absorption spectroscopy, it has been possible to directly access the states in the unoccupied conduction bands that are involved with 5f and 6d covalency in oxidized uranium. By varying the oxidizing agent, the degree of 5f covalency can be manipulated and monitored, clearly and irrevocably establishing the importance of 5f covalency in the electronic structure of the key nuclear fuel, uranium dioxide.

  13. URANIUM EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, W.H.; Higgins, C.E.

    1958-12-16

    A process is described for recovering uranium values from acidic aqueous solutions containing hexavalent uranium by contacting the solution with an organic solution comprised of a substantially water-immiscible organlc diluent and an organic phosphate to extract the uranlum values into the organic phase. Carbon tetrachloride and a petroleum hydrocarbon fraction, such as kerosene, are sultable diluents to be used in combination with organlc phosphates such as dibutyl butylphosphonate, trlbutyl phosphine oxide, and tributyl phosphate.

  14. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Lyon, W.L.

    1962-04-17

    A method of separating uranium oxides from PuO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and other actinide oxides is described. The oxide mixture is suspended in a fused salt melt and a chlorinating agent such as chlorine gas or phosgene is sparged through the suspension. Uranium oxides are selectively chlorinated and dissolve in the melt, which may then be filtered to remove the unchlorinated oxides of the other actinides. (AEC)

  15. Covalency in oxidized uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, J. G.; Yu, S.-W.; Qiao, R.; Yang, W. L.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; Duffin, A. M.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.

    2015-07-01

    Using x-ray emission spectroscopy and absorption spectroscopy, it has been possible to directly access the states in the unoccupied conduction bands that are involved with 5 f and 6 d covalency in oxidized uranium. By varying the oxidizing agent, the degree of 5 f covalency can be manipulated and monitored, clearly and irrevocably establishing the importance of 5 f covalency in the electronic structure of the key nuclear fuel, uranium dioxide.

  16. ANODIC TREATMENT OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kolodney, M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for effecting eloctrolytic dissolution of a metallic uranium article at a uniform rate. The uranium is made the anode in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution containing nitrate ions furnished by either ammonium nitrate, lithium nitrate, sodium nitrate, or potassium nitrate. A stainless steel cathode is employed and electrolysls carried out at a current density of about 0.1 to 1 ampere per square inch.

  17. Chemical compatibility between UO2 fuel and SiC cladding for LWRs. Application to ATF (Accident-Tolerant Fuels)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, James; Guéneau, Christine; Alpettaz, Thierry; Sauder, Cédric; Brackx, Emmanuelle; Domenger, Renaud; Gossé, Stéphane; Balbaud-Célérier, Fanny

    2017-04-01

    Silicon carbide-silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) composites are considered to replace the current zirconium-based cladding materials thanks to their good behavior under irradiation and their resistance under oxidative environments at high temperature. In the present work, a thermodynamic analysis of the UO2±x/SiC system is performed. Moreover, using two different experimental methods, the chemical compatibility of SiC towards uranium dioxide, with various oxygen contents (UO2±x) is investigated in the 1500-1970 K temperature range. The reaction leads to the formation of mainly uranium silicides and carbides phases along with CO and SiO gas release. Knudsen Cell Mass Spectrometry is used to measure the gas release occurring during the reaction between UO2+x and SiC powders as function of time and temperature. These experimental conditions are representative of an open system. Diffusion couple experiments with pellets are also performed to study the reaction kinetics in closed system conditions. In both cases, a limited chemical reaction is observed below 1700 K, whereas the reaction is enhanced at higher temperature due to the decomposition of SiC leading to Si vaporization. The temperature of formation of the liquid phase is found to lie between 1850 < T < 1950 K.

  18. Processing of irradiated, enriched uranium fuels at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M L; Perkins, W C; Thompson, M C

    Uranium fuels containing /sup 235/U at enrichments from 1.1% to 94% are processed and recovered, along with neptunium and plutonium byproducts. The fuels to be processed are dissolved in nitric acid. Aluminum-clad fuels are disssolved using a mercury catalyst to give a solution rich in aluminum. Fuels clad in more resistant materials are dissolved in an electrolytic dissolver. The resulting solutions are subjected to head-end treatment, including clarification and adjustment of acid and uranium concentration before being fed to solvent extraction. Uranium, neptunium, and plutonium are separated from fission products and from one another by multistage countercurrent solvent extraction withmore » dilute tri-n-butyl phosphate in kerosene. Nitric acid is used as the salting agent in addition to aluminum or other metal nitrates present in the feed solution. Nuclear safety is maintained through conservative process design and the use of monitoring devices as secondary controls. The enriched uranium is recovered as a dilute solution and shipped off-site for further processing. Neptunium is concentrated and sent to HB-Line for recovery from solution. The relatively small quantities of plutonium present are normally discarded in aqueous waste, unless the content of /sup 238/Pu is high enough to make its recovery desirable. Most of the /sup 238/Pu can be recovered by batch extraction of the waste solution, purified by counter-current solvent extraction, and converted to oxide in HB-Line. By modifying the flowsheet, /sup 239/Pu can be recovered from low-enriched uranium in the extraction cycle; neptunium is then not recovered. The solvent is subjected to an alkaline wash before reuse to remove degraded solvent and fission products. The aqueous waste is concentrated and partially deacidified by evaporation before being neutralized and sent to the waste tanks; nitric acid from the overheads is recovered for reuse.« less

  19. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  20. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.

    1989-08-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  1. Retrospective dosimetry analyses of reactor vessel cladding samples

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L. R.; Soderquist, C. Z.; Fero, A. H.

    2011-07-01

    Reactor pressure vessel cladding samples for Ringhals Units 3 and 4 in Sweden were analyzed using retrospective reactor dosimetry techniques. The objective was to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluence for comparison with neutron transport calculations. A total of 51 stainless steel samples consisting of chips weighing approximately 100 to 200 mg were removed from selected locations around the pressure vessel and were sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for analysis. The samples were fully characterized and analyzed for radioactive isotopes, with special interest in the presence of Nb-93m. The RPV cladding retrospective dosimetry results will be combinedmore » with a re-evaluation of the surveillance capsule dosimetry and with ex-vessel neutron dosimetry results to form a comprehensive 3D comparison of measurements to calculations performed with 3D deterministic transport code. (authors)« less

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of Mo tubes for fuel cladding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Beaux, Miles F.; Vodnik, Douglas R.; Peterson, Reuben J.

    In this study, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been evaluated for fabrication of free-standing 0.25 mm thick molybdenum tubes with the end goal of nuclear fuel cladding applications. In order to produce tubes with the wall thickness and microstructures desirable for this application, long deposition durations on the order of 50 h with slow deposition rates were employed. A standard CVD method, involving molybdenum pentachloride reduction by hydrogen, as well as a fluidized-bed CVD (FBCVD) method was applied towards these objectives. Characterization of the tubes produced in this manner revealed regions of material with fine grain microstructure and wallmore » thickness suitable for fuel cladding applications, but lacking necessary uniformity across the length of the tubes. Finally, a path forward for the production of freestanding molybdenum tubes that possess the desired properties across their entire length has been identified and can be accomplished by future optimization of the deposition system.« less

  3. Applications of Laser Cladded WC-Based Wear Resistant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verwimp, Jo; Rombouts, Marleen; Geerinckx, Eric; Motmans, Filip

    Laser cladding is an additive process wherein a laser source is used to melt metal-based powder or wire on to a metal substrate. The technique is frequently used to produce wear resistant coatings consisting of a metal matrix and a ceramic strengthening phase. In this study mixtures of nickel based powders and various amounts of tungsten carbides have been used as feedstock for laser cladding on a range of steel substrates and for different applications. Crack-free low porosity coatings with a thickness of about 1 mm and carbide concentrations up to 50 vol% have been produced. The evaluation of the wear resistance of the different coatings is performed on lab scale or in the application itself.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of Mo tubes for fuel cladding applications

    DOE PAGES

    Beaux, Miles F.; Vodnik, Douglas R.; Peterson, Reuben J.; ...

    2018-01-31

    In this study, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been evaluated for fabrication of free-standing 0.25 mm thick molybdenum tubes with the end goal of nuclear fuel cladding applications. In order to produce tubes with the wall thickness and microstructures desirable for this application, long deposition durations on the order of 50 h with slow deposition rates were employed. A standard CVD method, involving molybdenum pentachloride reduction by hydrogen, as well as a fluidized-bed CVD (FBCVD) method was applied towards these objectives. Characterization of the tubes produced in this manner revealed regions of material with fine grain microstructure and wallmore » thickness suitable for fuel cladding applications, but lacking necessary uniformity across the length of the tubes. Finally, a path forward for the production of freestanding molybdenum tubes that possess the desired properties across their entire length has been identified and can be accomplished by future optimization of the deposition system.« less

  5. Solution-mediated cladding doping of commercial polymer optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stajanca, Pavol; Topolniak, Ievgeniia; Pötschke, Samuel; Krebber, Katerina

    2018-03-01

    Solution doping of commercial polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) is presented as a novel approach for preparation of custom cladding-doped POFs (CD-POFs). The presented method is based on a solution-mediated diffusion of dopant molecules into the fiber cladding upon soaking of POFs in a methanol-dopant solution. The method was tested on three different commercial POFs using Rhodamine B as a fluorescent dopant. The dynamics of the diffusion process was studied in order to optimize the doping procedure in terms of selection of the most suitable POF, doping time and conditions. Using the optimized procedure, longer segment of fluorescent CD-POF was prepared and its performance was characterized. Fiber's potential for sensing and illumination applications was demonstrated and discussed. The proposed method represents a simple and cheap way for fabrication of custom, short to medium length CD-POFs with various dopants.

  6. Graphene-clad tapered fiber: effective nonlinearity and propagation losses.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, A V; Marini, A; Skryabin, D V

    2013-12-15

    We derive a pulse propagation equation for a graphene-clad optical fiber, treating the optical response of the graphene and nonlinearity of the dielectric fiber core as perturbations in asymptotic expansion of Maxwell equations. We analyze the effective nonlinear and attenuation coefficients due to the graphene layer. Based on the recent experimental measurements of the nonlinear graphene conductivity, we predict considerable enhancement of the effective nonlinearity for subwavelength fiber core diameters.

  7. Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.

    Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in irradiated Zircaloy cladding have been investigated by microstructural characterization and analytical modeling, with emphasis on application of the results to understand high-burnup fuel failure under RIA situations. Optical microscopy, SEM, and TEM were conducted on BWR and PWR fuel cladding tubes that were irradiated to fluence levels of 3.3 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} to 5.9 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV) and tested in hot cell at 292--325 C in Ar. The morphology, distribution, and habit planes of macroscopic and microscopic hydrides in as-irradiated and posttest claddingmore » were determined by stereo-TEM. The type and magnitude of the residual stress produced in association with oxide-layer growth and dense hydride precipitation, and several synergistic factors that strongly influence axial-splitting behavior were analyzed. The results of the microstructural characterization and stress analyses were then correlated with axial-splitting behavior of high-burnup PWR cladding reported for simulated-RIA conditions. The effects of key test procedures and their implications for the interpretation of RIA test results are discussed.« less

  8. Testing Method for External Cladding Systems - Incerc Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simion, A.; Dragne, H.

    2017-06-01

    This research presents a new testing method in a natural scale for external cladding systems tested on buildings with minimum than 3 floors [1]. The testing method is unique in Romania and it is similar about many fire testing current methods from European Union states. Also, presents the fire propagation and the effect of fire smoke on the building façade composed of thermal insulation. Laboratory of testing and research for building fire safety from National Institute INCERC Bucharest, provides a test method for determining the fire performance characteristics of non-loadbearing external cladding systems and external wall insulation systems when applied to the face of a building and exposed to an external fire under controlled conditions [2]. The fire exposure is representative of an external fire source or a fully-developed (post-flashover) fire in a room, venting through an opening such as a window aperture that exposes the cladding to the effects of external flames, or an external fire source. On the future, fire tests will be experimented for answer demande a number of high-profile fires where the external facade of tall buildings provided a route for vertical fire spread.

  9. Chemical Dissolution of Simulant FCA Cladding and Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, G.; Pierce, R.; O'Rourke, P.

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has received some fast critical assembly (FCA) fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for disposition. Among the JAEA FCA fuel are approximately 7090 rectangular Stainless Steel clad fuel elements. Each element has an internal Pu-10.6Al alloy metal wafer. The thickness of each element is either 1/16 inch or 1/32 inch. The dimensions of each element ranges from 2 inches x 1 inch to 2 inches x 4 inches. This report discusses the potential chemical dissolution of the FCA clad material or stainless steel. This technology uses nitric acid-potassium fluoride (HNO 3-KF) flowsheets ofmore » H-Canyon to dissolve the FCA elements from a rack of materials. Historically, dissolution flowsheets have aimed to maximize Pu dissolution rates while minimizing stainless steel dissolution (corrosion) rates. Because the FCA cladding is made of stainless steel, this work sought to accelerate stainless steel dissolution.« less

  10. Behavior of polymer cladding materials under extremely high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Timothy E.; Chang, Selee; Kwak, SeungJo; Oh, Jung Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Polymer claddings with low refractive indices for silica core fibers were developed. Applications include fiber lasers and transmission of high power lasers in surgery. For many applications, operating fibers under high temperatures is desirable. In a previous publication, the results of testing polymer cladded silica core fiber at 150°C for 6400 hours were given, along with 5000 hours of testing polymer films. The results at 150°C were encouraging, with little additional loss measured. Here we test polymers under more severe conditions, at 270°C, for periods up to 10 hours. The polymers' cured indices range from 1.374 to 1.397 (at 852 nm). Changes in Young's modulus, refractive index, yellowing, weight, hardness, strength, and elongation were observed. While these polymers cannot function at 270°C for extended periods, it is possible to expose them for shorter durations without significant damage. Some polymer properties actually improved after 4 hours of heating. Fibers clad with such polymers have been successfully jacketed with extruded materials, and have endured high temperatures for a few minutes. It is possible that a sensor, fiber laser or other fiber device could function in these temperatures for short periods without the coating properties changing beyond values required for operation.

  11. METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Poirier, R.H.

    1957-10-29

    S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

  12. Microbial reduction of uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Gorby, Y.A.; Landa, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    REDUCTION of the soluble, oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to insoluble U(IV) is an important mechanism for the immobilization of uranium in aquatic sediments and for the formation of some uranium ores1-10. U(VI) reduction has generally been regarded as an abiological reaction in which sulphide, molecular hydrogen or organic compounds function as the reductant1,2,5,11. Microbial involvement in U(VI) reduction has been considered to be limited to indirect effects, such as microbial metabolism providing the reduced compounds for abiological U(VI) reduction and microbial cell walls providing a surface to stimulate abiological U(VI) reduction1,12,13. We report here, however, that dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by electron transport to U(VI). This novel form of microbial metabolism can be much faster than commonly cited abiological mechanisms for U(VI) reduction. Not only do these findings expand the known potential terminal electron acceptors for microbial energy transduction, they offer a likely explanation for the deposition of uranium in aquatic sediments and aquifers, and suggest a method for biological remediation of environments contaminated with uranium.

  13. Uranium deposits of Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    Brazil is a country of vast natural resources, including numerous uranium deposits. In support of the country`s nuclear power program, Brazil has developed the most active uranium industry in South America. Brazil has one operating reactor (Angra 1, a 626-MWe PWR), and two under construction. The country`s economic challenges have slowed the progress of its nuclear program. At present, the Pocos de Caldas district is the only active uranium production. In 1990, the Cercado open-pit mine produced approximately 45 metric tons (MT) U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (100 thousand pounds). Brazil`s state-owned uranium production and processing company, Uranio do Brasil, announced itmore » has decided to begin shifting its production from the high-cost and nearly depleted deposits at Pocos de Caldas, to lower-cost reserves at Lagoa Real. Production at Lagoa Real is schedules to begin by 1993. In addition to these two districts, Brazil has many other known uranium deposits, and as a whole, it is estimated that Brazil has over 275,000 MT U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (600 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) in reserves.« less

  14. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, R.D.

    1957-08-27

    A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method, the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ converted to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent, such as CoF/sub 3/. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reac tion chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. After nitrogen gas is used to sweep out the hydrogen and the water vapor formed, and while continuing to inaintain the temperature between 400 deg C and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion of UO/sub 2/ to UF/sub 4/ the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to about 400 deg C or less, the UF/sub 4/ is mixed with the requisite quantity of CoF/sub 3/, and after evacuating the chamber, the mixture is heated to 300 to 400 deg C, and the resulting UF/sub 6/ is led off and delivered to a condenser.

  15. Final report on accident tolerant fuel performance analysis of APMT-Steel Clad/UO₂ fuel and APMT-Steel Clad/UN-U₃Si₅ fuel concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, Cetin; Galloway, Jack D.

    2014-09-12

    In FY2014 our group completed and documented analysis of new Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) concepts using BISON. We have modeled the viability of moving from Zircaloy to stainless steel cladding in traditional light water reactors (LWRs). We have explored the reactivity penalty of this change using the MCNP-based burnup code Monteburns, while attempting to minimize this penalty by increasing the fuel pellet radius and decreasing the cladding thickness. Fuel performance simulations using BISON have also been performed to quantify changes to structural integrity resulting from thinner stainless steel claddings. We account for thermal and irradiation creep, fission gas swelling, thermalmore » swelling and fuel relocation in the models for both Zircaloy and stainless steel claddings. Additional models that account for the lower oxidation stainless steel APMT are also invoked where available. Irradiation data for HT9 is used as a fallback in the absence of appropriate models. In this study the isotopic vectors within each natural element are varied to assess potential reactivity gains if advanced enrichment capabilities were levied towards cladding technologies. Recommendations on cladding thicknesses for a robust cladding as well as the constitutive components of a less penalizing composition are provided. In the first section (section 1-3), we present results accepted for publication in the 2014 TOPFUEL conference regarding the APMT/UO₂ ATF concept (J. Galloway & C. Unal, Accident Tolerant and Neutronically Favorable LWR Cladding, Proceedings of WRFPM 2014, Sendai, Japan, Paper No.1000050). Next we discuss our preliminary findings from the thermo-mechanical analysis of UN-U₃Si₅ fuel with APMT clad. In this analysis we used models developed from limited data that need to be updated when the irradiation data from ATF-1 test is available. Initial results indicate a swelling rate less than 1.5% is needed to prevent excessive clad stress.« less

  16. 78 FR 40200 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... breaches.'' Zircaloy is a type of zirconium alloy which includes both Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 cladding, but does not include M5 cladding. The M5 is a different type of zirconium alloy, which does not... ``zirconium alloy'' clad spent fuel assemblies in the 24PHB DSC, which would include both the ``zircaloy clad...

  17. PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM CARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.; Stethers, H.L.; Johnson, T.R.

    1964-03-24

    A process of preparing uranium monocarbide is de scribed. Uranium metal is dissolved in cadmium, zinc, cadmium-- zinc, or magnesium-- zinc alloy and a small quantity of alkali metal is added. Addition of stoichiometric amounts of carbon at 500 to 820 deg C then precipitates uranium monocarbide. (AEC)

  18. Process for recovering uranium

    DOEpatents

    MacWood, G. E.; Wilder, C. D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process useful in recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons is presented. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickel, copper, and iron is treated with an excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitnte the uranium, iron, and chromium and convert the nickel and copper to soluble ammonio complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/ sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temperature of about 500 to 400 deg C.

  19. PROCESS FOR RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    MacWood, G.E.; Wilder, C.D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process is described for recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickels copper, and iron is treated with excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitatc the uranium, irons and chromium and convert thc nickel and copper to soluble ammonia complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried, and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/ sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temprrature of about 300 to400 deg C.

  20. EXTRACTION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kesler, R.D.; Rabb, D.D.

    1959-07-28

    An improved process is presented for recovering uranium from a carnotite ore. In the improved process U/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is added to the comminuted ore along with the usual amount of NaCl prior to roasting. The amount of U/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ is dependent on the amount of free calcium oxide and the uranium in the ore. Specifically, the desirable amount of U/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is 3.2% for each 1% of CaO, and 5 to 6% for each 1% of uranium. The mixture is roasted at about 1560 deg C for about 30 min and then leached with a 3 to 9% aqueous solution of sodium carbonate.

  1. Method and etchant to join ag-clad BSSCO superconducting tape

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Iyer, Anand N.; Huang, Jiann Yuan

    1999-01-01

    A method of removing a silver cladding from high temperature superconducting material clad in silver (HTS) is disclosed. The silver clad HTS is contacted with an aqueous solution of HNO.sub.3 followed by an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and H.sub.2 O.sub.2 for a time sufficient to remove the silver cladding from the superconducting material without adversely affecting the superconducting properties of the superconducting material. A portion of the silver cladding may be masked with a material chemically impervious to HNO.sub.3 and to a combination of NH.sub.4 OH and H.sub.2 O.sub.2 to preserve the Ag coating. A silver clad superconductor is disclosed, made in accordance with the method discussed.

  2. Robust cladding light stripper for high-power fiber lasers using soft metals.

    PubMed

    Babazadeh, Amin; Nasirabad, Reza Rezaei; Norouzey, Ahmad; Hejaz, Kamran; Poozesh, Reza; Heidariazar, Amir; Golshan, Ali Hamedani; Roohforouz, Ali; Jafari, S Naser Tabatabaei; Lafouti, Majid

    2014-04-20

    In this paper we present a novel method to reliably strip the unwanted cladding light in high-power fiber lasers. Soft metals are utilized to fabricate a high-power cladding light stripper (CLS). The capability of indium (In), aluminum (Al), tin (Sn), and gold (Au) in extracting unwanted cladding light is examined. The experiments show that these metals have the right features for stripping the unwanted light out of the cladding. We also find that the metal-cladding contact area is of great importance because it determines the attenuation and the thermal load on the CLS. These metals are examined in different forms to optimize the contact area to have the highest possible attenuation and avoid localized heating. The results show that sheets of indium are very effective in stripping unwanted cladding light.

  3. Method and etchant to join Ag-clad BSSCO superconducting tape

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, U.; Iyer, A.N.; Huang, J.Y.

    1999-03-16

    A method of removing a silver cladding from high temperature superconducting material clad in silver (HTS) is disclosed. The silver clad HTS is contacted with an aqueous solution of HNO{sub 3} followed by an aqueous solution of NH{sub 4}OH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for a time sufficient to remove the silver cladding from the superconducting material without adversely affecting the superconducting properties of the superconducting material. A portion of the silver cladding may be masked with a material chemically impervious to HNO{sub 3} and to a combination of NH{sub 4}OH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to preserve the Ag coating. A silver clad superconductor is disclosed, made in accordance with the method discussed. 3 figs.

  4. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TUBING

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1958-04-15

    The manufacture of thin-walled uranium tubing by the hot-piercing techique is described. Uranium billets are preheated to a temperature above 780 d C. The heated billet is fed to a station where it is engaged on its external surface by three convex-surfaced rotating rollers which are set at an angle to the axis of the billet to produce a surface friction force in one direction to force the billet over a piercing mandrel. While being formed around the mandrel and before losing the desired shape, the tube thus formed is cooled by a water spray.

  5. TREATMENT OF URANIUM SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Slunder, C.J.

    1959-02-01

    An improved process is presented for prcparation of uranium surfaces prior to electroplating. The surfacc of the uranium to be electroplated is anodized in a bath comprising a solution of approximately 20 to 602 by weight of phosphoric acid which contains about 20 cc per liter of concentrated hydrochloric acid. Anodization is carried out for approximately 20 minutes at a current density of about 0.5 amperes per square inch at a temperature of about 35 to 45 C. The oxidic film produced by anodization is removed by dipping in strong nitric acid, followed by rinsing with water just prior to electroplating.

  6. Uranium Conversion & Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Karpius, Peter Joseph

    2017-02-06

    The isotopes of uranium that are found in nature, and hence in ‘fresh’ Yellowcake’, are not in relative proportions that are suitable for power or weapons applications. The goal of conversion then is to transform the U 3O 8 yellowcake into UF 6. Conversion and enrichment of uranium is usually required to obtain material with enough 235U to be usable as fuel in a reactor or weapon. The cost, size, and complexity of practical conversion and enrichment facilities aid in nonproliferation by design.

  7. PREPARATION OF URANIUM TRIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Buckingham, J.S.

    1959-09-01

    The production of uranium trioxide from aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate is discussed. The uranium trioxide is produced by adding sulfur or a sulfur-containing compound, such as thiourea, sulfamic acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonium sulfate, to the uranyl solution in an amount of about 0.5% by weight of the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, evaporating the solution to dryness, and calcining the dry residue. The trioxide obtained by this method furnished a dioxide with a considerably higher reactivity with hydrogen fluoride than a trioxide prepared without the sulfur additive.

  8. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  9. METHOD OF ELECTROPOLISHING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Walker, D.E.; Noland, R.A.

    1959-07-14

    A method of electropolishing the surface of uranium articles is presented. The process of this invention is carried out by immersing the uranium anticle into an electrolyte which contains from 35 to 65% by volume sulfuric acid, 1 to 20% by volume glycerine and 25 to 50% by volume of water. The article is made the anode in the cell and polished by electrolyzing at a voltage of from 10 to 15 volts. Discontinuing the electrolysis by intermittently withdrawing the anode from the electrolyte and removing any polarized film formed therein results in an especially bright surface.

  10. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  11. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Price, T.D.; Jeung, N.M.

    1958-06-17

    An improved precipitation method is described for the recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions. After removal of all but small amounts of Ni or Cu, and after complexing any iron present, the uranium is separated as the peroxide by adding H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The improvement lies in the fact that the addition of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and consequent precipitation are carried out at a temperature below the freezing; point of the solution, so that minute crystals of solvent are present as seed crystals for the precipitation.

  12. Experimental Study on Composite Light-weight Microporous Concrete Cladding Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lida, Tian; Dongyan, Wang; Kang, Liu

    2018-03-01

    A new type of composite light-weight microporous concrete cladding panel was developed, with the compound function of retaining and heat preservation. Two specimens of the new cladding panel and connection detailing were made for out-of-plane bending experiment. The results indicate that the new cladding panel and its connection detailing are of sufficient stiffness, bearing capacity and deformability under wind load and out-of-plane seismic action.

  13. Analysis of unclad and sub-clad semi-elliptical flaws in pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Irizarry-Quinones, H.; Macdonald, B.D.; McAfee, W.J.

    This study was conducted to support warm prestressing experiments on unclad and sub-clad flawed beams loaded in pure bending. Two cladding yield strengths were investigated: 0.6 Sy and 0.8 Sy, where Sy is the yield strength of the base metal. Cladding and base metal were assumed to be stress free at the stress relief temperature for the 3D elastic-plastic finite element analysis used to model the experiments. The model results indicated that when cooled from the stress relief temperature, the cladding was put in tension due to its greater coefficient of thermal expansion. When cooled, the cladding exhibited various amountsmore » of tensile yielding. The degree of yielding depended on the amount of cooling and the strength of the cladding relative to that of the base metal. When subjected to tensile bending stress, the sub-clad flaw elastic-plastic stress intensity factor, K{sub I}(J), was at first dominated by crack closing force due to tensile yielding in the cladding. Thus, imposed loads initially caused no increase in K{sub I}(J) near the clad-base interface. However, K{sub I}(J) at the flaw depth was little affected. When the cladding residual stress was overcome, K{sub I}(J) gradually increased until the cladding began to flow. Thereafter, the rate at which K{sub I}(J) increased with load was the same as that of an unclad beam. A plastic zone corrected K{sub I} approximation for the unclad flaw was found by the superposition of standard Newman and Raju solutions with those due to a cladding crack closure force approximated by the Kaya and Erdogan solution. These elastic estimates of the effect of cladding in reducing the crack driving force were quite in keeping with the 3D elastic-plastic finite element solution for the sub-clad flaw. The results were also compared with the analysis of clad beam experiments by Keeney and the conclusions by Miyazaki, et al. A number of sub-clad flaw specimens not subjected to warm prestressing were thought to have suffered

  14. Fabrication and testing of U–7Mo monolithic plate fuel with Zircaloy cladding

    DOE PAGES

    Pasqualini, E. E.; Robinson, A. B.; Porter, D. L.; ...

    2016-07-15

    The Materials Management and Minimization program is developing fuel designs to replace highly enriched fuel with fuels of low enrichment. In the most challenging cases, U–(7–10wt%)Mo monolithic plate fuel are proposed. The chosen design includes aluminum-alloy cladding, which provides some challenges in fabrication and fuel/cladding interaction in service. We investigated zircaloy cladding, specifically Zry–4as an alternative cladding, and development of a fabrication method was performed by researchers with the Comisión Nacionalde Energia Atómica (CNEA) in Argentina, resulting in test fuel plates (Zry–4 clad U–7Mo) which were subsequently tested in the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Because Zry–4 and U–(7–10)Mo havemore » similar high-temperature mechanical properties, fabrication was simplified in that the fuel foil and cladding could be co-rolled and bonded. The challenge was to prevent a thermal-expansion mismatch which could destroy the fuel/cladding bond before complete bonding was achieved; the solution was to prevent the composites from cooling significantly between roll passes. Our final product performed very well in-reactor, showing good bonding, very little fuel/cladding interaction, either from fabrication or in-reactor testing, and little swelling, especially no detectable heterogeneous bubble formation at the fuel/cladding interface tested to a fission density of up to 2.54E+21« less

  15. Measurement and removal of cladding light in high power fiber systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbaum, Till; Liem, Andreas; Schreiber, Thomas; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    The amount of cladding light is important to ensure longevity of high power fiber components. However, it is usually measured either by adding a cladding light stripper (and thus permanently modifying the fiber) or by using a pinhole to only transmit the core light (ignoring that there may be cladding mode content in the core area). We present a novel noninvasive method to measure the cladding light content in double-clad fibers based on extrapolation from a cladding region of constant average intensity. The method can be extended to general multi-layer radially symmetric fibers, e.g. to evaluate light content in refractive index pedestal structures. To effectively remove cladding light in high power systems, cladding light strippers are used. We show that the stripping efficiency can be significantly improved by bending the fiber in such a device and present respective experimental data. Measurements were performed with respect to the numerical aperture as well, showing the dependency of the CLS efficiency on the NA of the cladding light and implying that efficiency data cannot reliably be given for a certain fiber in general without regard to the properties of the guided light.

  16. High temperature gradient cobalt based clad developed using microwave hybrid heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, C. Durga; Joladarashi, Sharnappa; Ramesh, M. R.; Sarkar, Anunoy

    2018-04-01

    The development of cobalt based cladding on a titanium substrate using microwave cladding technique is benchmark in coating area. The developed cladding would serve the function of a corrosion resistant coating under high temperatures. Clads of thickness 500 µm have been developed by microwave hybrid heating. A microwave furnace of 2.45GHz frequency was used at a 900W power level for processing. Impact of processing time on melting and adhesion of clad has been discussed. The study also extended to static thermal analysis of simple parts with cladding using commercial Finite Element analysis (FEA) software. A comparative study is explored between four variants of the clad being developed. The analysis has been conducted using a square sample. Similar temperature gradient is also shown for a proposed multi-layer coating, which includes a thermal barrier coating yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) on top of the corrosion resistant clad. The YSZ coating would protect the corrosion resistant cladding and substrate from high temperatures.

  17. Development of data base with mechanical properties of un- and pre-irradiated VVER cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L.; Kaplar, E.

    1998-03-01

    Analysis of recent RIA test with PWR and VVER high burnup fuel, performed at CABRI, NSRR, IGR reactors has shown that the data base with mechanical properties of the preirradiated cladding is necessary to interpret the obtained results. During 1997 the corresponding cycle of investigations for VVER clad material was performed by specialists of NSI RRC KI and RIAR in cooperation with NRC (USA), IPSN (France) in two directions: measurements of mechanical properties of Zr-1%Nb preirradiated cladding versus temperature and strain rate; measurements of failure parameters for gas pressurized cladding tubes. Preliminary results of these investigations are presented in thismore » paper.« less

  18. Effects of Synchronous Rolling on Microstructure, Hardness, and Wear Resistance of Laser Multilayer Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Zha, G. C.; Xi, M. Z.; Gao, S. Y.

    2018-03-01

    A synchronous rolling method was proposed to assist laser multilayer cladding, and the effects of this method on microstructure, microhardness, and wear resistance were studied. Results show that the microstructure and mechanical properties of the traditional cladding layer exhibit periodic inhomogeneity. Synchronous rolling breaks the columnar dendrite crystals to improve the uniformity of the organization, and the residual plastic energy promotes the precipitation of strengthening phases, as CrB, M7C3, etc. The hardness and wear resistance of the extruded cladding layer increase significantly because of the grain refinement, formation of dislocations, and dispersion strengthening. These positive significances of synchronous rolling provide a new direction for laser cladding technology.

  19. Orientation-Dependent Displacement Sensor Using an Inner Cladding Fiber Bragg Grating

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tingting; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Bao, Weijia

    2016-01-01

    An orientation-dependent displacement sensor based on grating inscription over a fiber core and inner cladding has been demonstrated. The device comprises a short piece of multi-cladding fiber sandwiched between two standard single-mode fibers (SMFs). The grating structure is fabricated by a femtosecond laser side-illumination technique. Two well-defined resonances are achieved by the downstream both core and cladding fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The cladding resonance presents fiber bending dependence, together with a strong orientation dependence because of asymmetrical distribution of the “cladding” FBG along the fiber cross-section. PMID:27626427

  20. Fabrication and testing of U–7Mo monolithic plate fuel with Zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualini, E. E.; Robinson, A. B.; Porter, D. L.

    The Materials Management and Minimization program is developing fuel designs to replace highly enriched fuel with fuels of low enrichment. In the most challenging cases, U–(7–10wt%)Mo monolithic plate fuel are proposed. The chosen design includes aluminum-alloy cladding, which provides some challenges in fabrication and fuel/cladding interaction in service. We investigated zircaloy cladding, specifically Zry–4as an alternative cladding, and development of a fabrication method was performed by researchers with the Comisión Nacionalde Energia Atómica (CNEA) in Argentina, resulting in test fuel plates (Zry–4 clad U–7Mo) which were subsequently tested in the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Because Zry–4 and U–(7–10)Mo havemore » similar high-temperature mechanical properties, fabrication was simplified in that the fuel foil and cladding could be co-rolled and bonded. The challenge was to prevent a thermal-expansion mismatch which could destroy the fuel/cladding bond before complete bonding was achieved; the solution was to prevent the composites from cooling significantly between roll passes. Our final product performed very well in-reactor, showing good bonding, very little fuel/cladding interaction, either from fabrication or in-reactor testing, and little swelling, especially no detectable heterogeneous bubble formation at the fuel/cladding interface tested to a fission density of up to 2.54E+21« less

  1. Corrosion Resistance of Laser Clads of Inconel 625 and Metco 41C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Fidler, Lukáš; Fišerová, Pavla

    The present paper explores the impact of laser cladding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of the resulting surface. Powders of Inconel 625 and austenitic Metco 41C steel were deposited on steel substrate. It was confirmed that the level of dilution has profound impact on the corrosion resistance and that dilution has to be minimized. However, the chemical composition of the cladding is altered even in the course of the cladding process, a fact which is related to the increase in the substrate temperature. The cladding process was optimized to achieve maximum corrosion resistance. The results were verified and validated using microscopic observation, chemical analysis and corrosion testing.

  2. Finite Element Analysis of Laser Engineered Net Shape (LENS™) Tungsten Clad Squeeze Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhuja, Amit; Brevick, Jerald R.

    2004-06-01

    In the aluminum high-pressure die-casting and indirect squeeze casting processes, local "squeeze" pins are often used to minimize internal solidification shrinkage in heavy casting sections. Squeeze pins frequently fail in service due to molten aluminum adhering to the H13 tool steel pins ("soldering"). A wide variety of coating materials and methods have been developed to minimize soldering on H13. However, these coatings are typically very thin, and experience has shown their performance on squeeze pins is highly variable. The LENS™ process was employed in this research to deposit a relatively thick tungsten cladding on squeeze pins. An advantage of this process was that the process parameters could be precisely controlled in order to produce a satisfactory cladding. Two fixtures were designed and constructed to enable the end and outer diameter (OD) of the squeeze pins to be clad. Analyses were performed on the clad pins to evaluate the microstructure and chemical composition of the tungsten cladding and the cladding-H13 substrate interface. A thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to assess the stress distribution as a function of cladding thickness on the pins during a typical casting thermal cycle. FEA results were validated via a physical test, where the clad squeeze pins were immersed into molten aluminum. Pins subjected to the test were evaluated for thermally induced cracking and resistance to soldering of the tungsten cladding.

  3. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM PITCHBLENDE

    DOEpatents

    Ruehle, A.E.

    1958-06-24

    The decontamination of uranium from molybdenum is described. When acid solutions containing uranyl nitrate are contacted with ether for the purpose of extracting the uranium values, complex molybdenum compounds are coextracted with the uranium and also again back-extracted from the ether with the uranium. This invention provides a process for extracting uranium in which coextraction of molybdenum is avoided. It has been found that polyhydric alcohols form complexes with molybdenum which are preferentially water-soluble are taken up by the ether extractant to only a very minor degree. The preferred embodiment of the process uses mannitol, sorbitol or a mixture of the two as the complexing agent.

  4. STRIPPING OF URANIUM FROM ORGANIC EXTRACTANTS

    DOEpatents

    Crouse, D.J. Jr.

    1962-09-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is given for recovering uranium values from uranium-containing solutions. Uranium is removed from a uranium-containing organic solution by contacting said organic solution with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution substantially saturated in uranium values. A uranium- containing precipitate is thereby formed which is separated from the organic and aqueous phases. Uranium values are recovered from this separated precipitate. (AE C)

  5. Uranium, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , soluble salts ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  6. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

    1959-07-01

    The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

  7. TEXTURES IN EXTRUDED URANIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, R.B.

    The preferred orientation or texture of alpha-extruded, cold-swaged, recrystallized, and beta-quenched uranium has been determined. An attempt is made to predict the mean thermal expansion coefficients from the texture and principal crystallographic thermal expansion coefficients. (auth)

  8. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A. T.; O'Toole, J. A.; Valicenti, R. A.; Maloy, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a solid state bonding technique suitable to clad tungsten targets with tantalum was completed to improve operation of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Centers spallation target. Significant deterioration of conventional bare tungsten targets has historically resulted in transfer of tungsten into the cooling system through corrosion resulting in increased radioactivity outside the target and reduction of delivered neutron flux. The fabrication method chosen to join the tantalum cladding to the tungsten was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) given the geometry constraints of a cylindrical assembly and previous success demonstrated at KENS. Nominal HIP parameters of 1500 °C, 200 MPa, and 3 h were selected based upon previous work. Development of the process included significant surface engineering controls and characterization given tantalums propensity for oxide and carbide formation at high temperatures. In addition to rigorous acid cleaning implemented at each step of the fabrication process, a three layer tantalum foil gettering system was devised such that any free oxygen and carbon impurities contained in the argon gas within the HIP vessel was mitigated to the extent possible before coming into contact with the tantalum cladding. The result of the numerous controls and refined techniques was negligible coarsening of the native Ta2O5 surface oxide, no measureable oxygen diffusion into the tantalum bulk, and no detectable carburization despite use of argon containing up to 5 ppm oxygen and up to 40 ppm total CO, CO2, or organic contaminants. Post bond characterization of the interface revealed continuous bonding with a few microns of species interdiffusion.

  9. Some recent studies on laser cladding and dissimilar welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, Rakesh; Ganesh, P.; Paul, C. P.; Albert, S. K.; Mudali, U. Kamachi; Nath, A. K.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous development of high power CO II laser technology and industrial application of lasers represent two important mandates of the laser program, being pursued at Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), India. The present paper describes some of the important laser material processing studies, involving cladding and dissimilar welding, performed in authors' laboratory. The first case study describes how low heat input characteristics of laser cladding process has been successfully exploited for suppressing dilution in "Colmonoy6" (a nickel-base hardfacing alloy) deposits on austenitic stainless steel components. Crack free hardfaced deposits were obtained by controlling heating and cooling rates associated with laser treatment. The results show significant advantage over Colmonoy 6 deposits made by GTAW, where a 2.5 mm thick region of dilution (with reduced hardness) develops next to substrateiclad interface. The next work involves laser-assisted deposition of graded "Stellite6" (a Co-base hardfacing alloy) with smooth transition in chemical composition and hardness for enhanced resistance against cracking, esp. under thermal cycling conditions. The following two case studies demonstrate significant improvement in corrosion properties of type 304L stainless steel by laser surface alloying, achieved through cladding route. The following case study demonstrates engineering of fusion zone microstructure of end plug dissimilar weld (between alloy D9 and type 3 16M stainless steel) by controlled preferential displacement of focused laser beam, which, in-turn, enhanced its resistance against solidification cracking. Crater appearing at the termination point of laser weld is also eliminated by ramping of laser power towards the end of laser welding. The last case study involves engineering of fusion zone microstructure of dissimilar laser weld between type 304 austenitic stainless steel and stabilized 17%Cr ferritic stainless steel by controlling welding parameters.

  10. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  11. Reactivity Initiated Accident Simulation to Inform Transient Testing of Candidate Advanced Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas R; Wysocki, Aaron J; Terrani, Kurt A

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Advanced cladding materials with potentially enhanced accident tolerance will yield different light water reactor performance and safety characteristics than the present zirconium-based cladding alloys. These differences are due to different cladding material properties and responses to the transient, and to some extent, reactor physics, thermal, and hydraulic characteristics. Some of the differences in reactors physics characteristics will be driven by the fundamental properties (e.g., absorption in iron for an iron-based cladding) and others will be driven by design modifications necessitated by the candidate cladding materials (e.g., a larger fuel pellet to compensate for parasitic absorption). Potential changes in thermalmore » hydraulic limits after transition from the current zirconium-based cladding to the advanced materials will also affect the transient response of the integral fuel. This paper leverages three-dimensional reactor core simulation capabilities to inform on appropriate experimental test conditions for candidate advanced cladding materials in a control rod ejection event. These test conditions are using three-dimensional nodal kinetics simulations of a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) in a representative state-of-the-art pressurized water reactor with both nuclear-grade iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) and silicon carbide based (SiC-SiC) cladding materials. The effort yields boundary conditions for experimental mechanical tests, specifically peak cladding strain during the power pulse following the rod ejection. The impact of candidate cladding materials on the reactor kinetics behavior of RIA progression versus reference zirconium cladding is predominantly due to differences in: (1) fuel mass/volume/specific power density, (2) spectral effects due to parasitic neutron absorption, (3) control rod worth due to hardened (or softened) spectrum, and (4) initial conditions due to power peaking and neutron transport cross sections in

  12. RIA simulation tests using driver tube for ATF cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N.; Brown, N. R.; Lowden, R. R.

    Pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) is a potential failure mechanism for accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding candidates during a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA). This report summarizes Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 research activities that were undertaken to evaluate the PCMI-like hoop-strain-driven mechanical response of ATF cladding candidates. To achieve various RIA-like conditions, a modified-burst test (MBT) device was developed to produce different mechanical pulses. The calibration of the MBT instrument was accomplished by performing mechanical tests on unirradiated Generation-I iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloy samples. Shakedown tests were also conducted in both FY 2016 and FY 2017 using unirradiated hydrided ZIRLO™ tube samples. This milestone reportmore » focuses on testing of ATF materials, but the benchmark tests with hydrided ZIRLO™ tube samples are documented in a recent journal article.a For the calibration and benchmark tests, the hoop strain was monitored using strain gauges attached to the sample surface in the hoop direction. A novel digital image correlation (DIC) system composed of a single high-speed camera and an array of six mirrors was developed for the MBT instrument to better resolve the failure behavior of samples and to provide useful data for validation of high-fidelity modeling and simulation tools. The DIC system enable a 360° view of a sample’s outer surface. This feature was added to the instrument to determine the precise failure location on a sample’s surface for strain predictions. The DIC system was tested on several silicon carbide fiber/silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite tube samples at various pressurization rates of the driver tube (which correspond to the strain rates for the samples). The hoop strains for various loading conditions were determined for the SiC/SiC composite tube samples. Future work is planned to enhance understanding of the failure behavior of the ATF cladding candidates of

  13. Widely tunable femtosecond solitonic radiation in photonic crystal fiber cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Jiahui; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Benabid, F.

    2010-03-15

    We report on a means to generate tunable ultrashort optical pulses. We demonstrate that dispersive waves generated by solitons within the small-core features of a photonic crystal fiber cladding can be used to obtain femtosecond pulses tunable over an octave-wide spectral range. The generation process is highly efficient and occurs at the relatively low laser powers available from a simple Ti:sapphire laser oscillator. The described phenomenon is general and will play an important role in other systems where solitons are known to exist.

  14. Cladding and duct materials for advanced nuclear recycle reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.; Klueh, R. L.; Maloy, S. A.; Toloczko, M. B.

    2008-01-01

    The expanded use of nuclear energy without risk of nuclear weapons proliferation and with safe nuclear waste disposal is a primary goal of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). To achieve that goal the GNEP is exploring advanced technologies for recycling spent nuclear fuel that do not separate pure plutonium, and advanced reactors that consume transuranic elements from recycled spent fuel. The GNEP’s objectives will place high demands on reactor clad and structural materials. This article discusses the materials requirements of the GNEP’s advanced nuclear recycle reactors program.

  15. Plasmonic slow light waveguide with hyperbolic metamaterials claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shuhai; Jiang, Chuhao; Yang, Zhiqiang; Li, Dacheng; Zhang, Wending; Mei, Ting; Zhang, Dawei

    2018-06-01

    Plasmonic waveguides with an insulator core sandwiched between hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs) claddings, i.e. HIH waveguide, are investigated for achieving wide slow-light band with adjustable working wavelength. The transfer matrix method and the finite-difference-time-domain simulation are employed to study waveguide dispersion characteristics and pulse propagation. By selecting proper silver filling ratios for HMMs, the hetero-HIH waveguide presents a slow-light band with a zero group velocity dispersion wavelength of 1.55 μm and is capable of buffering pulses with pulse width as short as ∼20 fs. This type of waveguides might be applicable for ultrafast slow-light application.

  16. A cladding-pumped, tunable holmium doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W Andrew; Haub, John; Carter, Adrian

    2013-11-18

    We present a tunable, high power cladding-pumped holmium doped fiber laser. The laser generated >15 W CW average power across a wavelength range of 2.043 - 2.171 μm, with a maximum output power of 29.7 W at 2.120 μm. The laser also produced 18.2 W when operating at 2.171 µm. To the best of our knowledge this is the highest power operation of a holmium doped laser at a wavelength >2.15 µm. We discuss the significance of background losses and fiber design for achieving efficient operation in holmium doped fibers.

  17. 31 CFR 540.309 - Natural uranium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Natural uranium. 540.309 Section 540... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.309 Natural uranium. The term natural uranium means uranium found in...

  18. 31 CFR 540.309 - Natural uranium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Natural uranium. 540.309 Section 540... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.309 Natural uranium. The term natural uranium means uranium found in...

  19. 31 CFR 540.309 - Natural uranium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Natural uranium. 540.309 Section 540... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.309 Natural uranium. The term natural uranium means uranium found in...

  20. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  1. Results of Uranium Dioxide-Tungsten Irradiation Test and Post-Test Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.; Debogdan, C. E.; Diianni, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    A uranium dioxide (UO2) fueled capsule was fabricated and irradiated in the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility. The capsule consisted of two bulk UO2 specimens clad with chemically vapor deposited tungsten (CVD W) 0.762 and 0.1016 cm (0.030-and 0.040-in.) thick, respectively. The second specimen with 0.1016-cm (0.040-in.) thick cladding was irradiated at temperature for 2607 hours, corresponding to an average burnup of 1.516 x 10 to the 20th power fissions/cu cm. Postirradiation examination showed distortion in the bottom end cap, failure of the weld joint, and fracture of the central vent tube. Diametral growth was 1.3 percent. No evidence of gross interaction between CVD tungsten or arc-cast tungsten cladding and the UO2 fuel was observed. Some of the fission gases passed from the fuel cavity to the gas surrounding the fuel specimen via the vent tube and possibly the end-cap weld failure. Whether the UO2 loss rates through the vent tube were within acceptable limits could not be determined in view of the end-cap weld failure.

  2. Laser Cladding of Ti-6Al-4 V Powder on Ti-6Al-4 V Substrate: Effect of Laser Cladding Parameters on Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottam, Ryan; Brandt, Milan

    The laser cladding of Ti-6Al-4 V powder on Ti-6Al-4 V substrate has been investigated to determine laser parameters that could be used as a repair technology for Ti-6Al-4 V components. The parameters chosen for the investigation were developed by an analytical laser cladding model. Holding clad height and melt pool depth constant, the traversing speed was varied between 300 mm/min and 1500 mm/min, an associated power for the given speed was calculated by the model. Two different melt pool depths were used in the calculation of laser power for a given process velocity. The resulting microstructures in the clad zone varied from a relatively thin martensitic structure to a dendritic/thick martensitic structure. The heat affected zone (HAZ) showed a refinement of the Widmanstatten microstructure with a decreasing laser traversing speed and a coarser martensitic structure for the sample prepared with a deeper melt pool.

  3. 77 FR 31834 - Clad Steel Plate from Japan: Final Results of the Expedited Third Sunset Review of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... rolling; simple hot-rolling of the cladding metal to ensure efficient welding to the basic metal; any... process to ensure welding (e.g., electrocladding), in which the cladding metal (nickel, chromium, etc.) is...

  4. Method of preparing uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, Harley A.; McClusky, James K.

    1976-04-27

    Sintered uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies having a controlled final carbon-to-uranium ratio are prepared, in an essentially continuous process, from U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and carbon by varying the weight ratio of carbon to U.sub.3 O.sub.8 in the feed mixture, which is compressed into a green body and sintered in a continuous heating process under various controlled atmospheric conditions to prepare the sintered bodies.

  5. Hydrogen permeation in FeCrAl alloys for LWR cladding application

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.; ...

    2015-03-19

    FeCrAl is an advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloy class, is a highly prevalent candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel cladding material. Compared with traditional zirconium alloy fuel cladding, increased tritium permeation through FeCrAl fuel cladding to the primary coolant is expected, raising potential safety concerns. In our study, the hydrogen permeability of several FeCrAl alloys was obtained using a static permeation test station, which was calibrated and validated using 304 stainless steel. The high hydrogen permeability of FeCrAl alloys leads to concerns with respect to potentially significant tritium release when used for fuel cladding in LWRs. Also, the total tritium inventory insidemore » the primary coolant of a light water reactor was quantified by applying a 1-dimensional steady state tritium diffusion model to demonstrate the dependence of tritium inventory on fuel cladding type. Furthermore, potential mitigation strategies for tritium release from FeCrAl fuel cladding were discussed and indicate the potential for application of an alumina layer on the inner clad surface to serve as a tritium barrier. More effort is required to develop a robust, economical mitigation strategy for tritium permeation in reactors using FeCrAl clad fuel assemblies.« less

  6. An Examination of Collaborative Learning Assessment through Dialogue (CLAD) in Traditional and Hybrid Human Development Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Wanda C.; Green, Peter J.; Fitch, Trey

    2010-01-01

    This investigation assessed the effectiveness of using Collaborative Learning Assessment through Dialogue (CLAD) (Fitch & Hulgin, 2007) with students in undergraduate human development courses. The key parts of CLAD are student collaboration, active learning, and altering the role of the instructor to a guide who enhances learning opportunities.…

  7. Hydrogen permeation in FeCrAl alloys for LWR cladding application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-06-01

    FeCrAl, an advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloy class, is a highly prevalent candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel cladding material. Compared with traditional zirconium alloy fuel cladding, increased tritium permeation through FeCrAl fuel cladding to the primary coolant is expected, raising potential safety concerns. In this study, the hydrogen permeability of several FeCrAl alloys was obtained using a static permeation test station, which was calibrated and validated using 304 stainless steel. The high hydrogen permeability of FeCrAl alloys leads to concerns with respect to potentially significant tritium release when used for fuel cladding in LWRs. The total tritium inventory inside the primary coolant of a light water reactor was quantified by applying a 1-dimensional steady state tritium diffusion model to demonstrate the dependence of tritium inventory on fuel cladding type. Furthermore, potential mitigation strategies for tritium release from FeCrAl fuel cladding were discussed and indicate the potential for application of an alumina layer on the inner clad surface to serve as a tritium barrier. More effort is required to develop a robust, economical mitigation strategy for tritium permeation in reactors using FeCrAl clad fuel assemblies.

  8. Assessment of wear coefficients of nuclear zirconium claddings without and with pre-oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Cooley, Kevin M.; Shaw, Austin H.

    In the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors, water-flow induced vibration is known to cause claddings on the fuel rods to rub against their supporting grids. Such grid-to-rod-fretting (GTRF) may lead to fretting wear-through and the leakage of radioactive species. The surfaces of actual zirconium alloy claddings in a reactor are inevitably oxidized in the high-temperature pressurized water, and some claddings are even pre-oxidized. As a result, the wear process of the surface oxide film is expected to be quite different from the zirconium alloy substrate. In this paper, we attempt to measure the wear coefficients of zirconium claddings withoutmore » and with pre-oxidation rubbing against grid samples using a bench-scale fretting tribometer. Results suggest that the volumetric wear coefficient of the pre-oxidized cladding is 50 to 200 times lower than that of the untreated cladding. In terms of the linear rate of wear depth, the pre-oxidized alloy wears about 15 times more slowly than the untreated cladding. Finally, fitted with the experimentally-determined wear rates, a stage-wise GTRF engineering wear model demonstrates good agreement with in-reactor experience in predicting the trend of cladding lives.« less

  9. Formation of anomalous eutectic in Ni-Sn alloy by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhitai; Lin, Xin; Cao, Yongqing; Liu, Fencheng; Huang, Weidong

    2018-02-01

    Ni-Sn anomalous eutectic is obtained by single track laser cladding with the scanning velocity from 1 mm/s to 10 mm/s using the Ni-32.5 wt.%Sn eutectic powders. The microstructure of the cladding layer and the grain orientations of anomalous eutectic were investigated. It is found that the microstructure is transformed from primary α-Ni dendrites and the interdendritic (α-Ni + Ni3Sn) eutectic at the bottom of the cladding layer to α-Ni and β-Ni3Sn anomalous eutectic at the top of the cladding layer, whether for single layer or multilayer laser cladding. The EBSD maps and pole figures indicate that the spatially structure of α-Ni phase is discontinuous and the Ni3Sn phase is continuous in anomalous eutectic. The transformation from epitaxial growth columnar at bottom of cladding layer to free nucleation equiaxed at the top occurs, i.e., the columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) at the top of cladding layer during laser cladding processing leads to the generation of anomalous eutectic.

  10. Assessment of wear coefficients of nuclear zirconium claddings without and with pre-oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Qu, Jun; Cooley, Kevin M.; Shaw, Austin H.; ...

    2016-03-16

    In the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors, water-flow induced vibration is known to cause claddings on the fuel rods to rub against their supporting grids. Such grid-to-rod-fretting (GTRF) may lead to fretting wear-through and the leakage of radioactive species. The surfaces of actual zirconium alloy claddings in a reactor are inevitably oxidized in the high-temperature pressurized water, and some claddings are even pre-oxidized. As a result, the wear process of the surface oxide film is expected to be quite different from the zirconium alloy substrate. In this paper, we attempt to measure the wear coefficients of zirconium claddings withoutmore » and with pre-oxidation rubbing against grid samples using a bench-scale fretting tribometer. Results suggest that the volumetric wear coefficient of the pre-oxidized cladding is 50 to 200 times lower than that of the untreated cladding. In terms of the linear rate of wear depth, the pre-oxidized alloy wears about 15 times more slowly than the untreated cladding. Finally, fitted with the experimentally-determined wear rates, a stage-wise GTRF engineering wear model demonstrates good agreement with in-reactor experience in predicting the trend of cladding lives.« less

  11. Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils

    DOEpatents

    Hofman, Gerard L [Downers Grove, IL; Meyer, Mitchell K [Idaho Falls, ID; Knighton, Gaven C [Moore, ID; Clark, Curtis R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2006-09-05

    A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

  12. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM-URANIUM NUCLEAR FUELS

    DOEpatents

    Gens, T.A.

    1962-07-10

    An improvement was made in a process of recovering uranium from a uranium-zirconium composition which was hydrochlorinated with gsseous hydrogen chloride at a temperature of from 350 to 800 deg C resulting in volatilization of the zirconium, as zirconium tetrachloride, and the formation of a uranium containing nitric acid insoluble residue. The improvement consists of reacting the nitric acid insoluble hydrochlorination residue with gaseous carbon tetrachloride at a temperature in the range 550 to 600 deg C, and thereafter recovering the resulting uranium chloride vapors. (AEC)

  13. Novel Accident-Tolerant Fuel Meat and Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Mariani; Pavel G Medvedev; Douglas L Porter

    A novel accident-tolerant fuel meat and cladding are here proposed. The fuel meat design incorporates annular fuel with inserts and discs that are fabricated from a material having high thermal conductivity, for example niobium. The inserts are rods or tubes. Discs separate the fuel pellets. Using the BISON fuel performance code it was found that the peak fuel temperature can be lowered by more than 600 degrees C for one set of conditions with niobium metal as the thermal conductor. In addition to improved safety margin, several advantages are expected from the lower temperature such as decreased fission gas releasemore » and fuel cracking. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. An enrichment of only 7.5% fully compensates the lost reactivity of the displaced UO2. Slightly higher enrichments, such as 9%, allow uprates and increased burnups to offset the initial costs for retooling. The design has applications for fast reactors and transuranic burning, which may accelerate its development. A zirconium silicide coating is also described for accident tolerant applications. A self-limiting degradation behavior for this coating is expected to produce a glassy, self-healing layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature, with some similarities to MoSi2 and other silicides. Both the fuel and coating may benefit from the existing technology infrastructure and the associated wide expertise for a more rapid development in comparison to other, more novel fuels and cladding.« less

  14. FRAPCON analysis of cladding performance during dry storage operations

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, David J.; Geelhood, Kenneth J.

    There is an increasing need in the U.S. and around the world to move used nuclear fuel from wet storage in fuel pools to dry storage in casks stored at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSI) or interim storage sites. The NRC limits cladding temperature to 400°C while maintaining cladding hoop stress below 90 MPa in an effort to avoid radial hydride reorientation. An analysis was conducted with FRAPCON-4.0 on three modern fuel designs with three representative used nuclear fuel storage temperature profiles that peaked at 400 °C. Results were representative of the majority of U.S. LWR fuel. They conservativelymore » showed that hoop stress remains below 90 MPa at the licensing temperature limit. Results also show that the limiting case for hoop stress may not be at the highest rod internal pressure in all cases but will be related to the axial temperature and oxidation profiles of the rods at the end of life and in storage.« less

  15. Single Mode Air-Clad Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Cary; Homa, Dan; Yu, Zhihao

    The observation of single mode propagation in an air-clad single crystal sapphire optical fiber at wavelengths at and above 783 nm is presented for the first time. A high-temperature wet acid etching method was used to reduce the diameter of a 10 cm length of commercially-sourced sapphire fiber from 125 micrometers to 6.5 micrometers, and far-field imaging provided modal information at intervals as the fiber diameter decreased. Modal volume was shown to decrease with decreasing diameter, and single mode behavior was observed at the minimum diameter achieved. While weakly-guiding approximations are generally inaccurate for low modal volume optical fiber withmore » high core-cladding refractive index disparity, consistency between these approximations and experimental results was observed when the effective numerical aperture was measured and substituted for the theoretical numerical aperture in weakly-guiding approximation calculations. With the demonstration of very low modal volume in sapphire at fiber diameters much larger than anticipated by legacy calculations, the resolution of sapphire fiber distributed sensors may be increased and other sensing schemes requiring very low modal volume, such as fiber Bragg gratings, may be realized in extreme environment applications.« less

  16. SiC/SiC Cladding Materials Properties Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Mary A.; Katoh, Yutai; Koyanagi, Takaaki

    When a new class of material is considered for a nuclear core structure, the in-pile performance is usually assessed based on multi-physics modeling in coordination with experiments. This report aims to provide data for the mechanical and physical properties and environmental resistance of silicon carbide (SiC) fiber–reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites for use in modeling for their application as accidenttolerant fuel cladding for light water reactors (LWRs). The properties are specific for tube geometry, although many properties can be predicted from planar specimen data. This report presents various properties, including mechanical properties, thermal properties, chemical stability under normal and offnormalmore » operation conditions, hermeticity, and irradiation resistance. Table S.1 summarizes those properties mainly for nuclear-grade SiC/SiC composites fabricated via chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). While most of the important properties are available, this work found that data for the in-pile hydrothermal corrosion resistance of SiC materials and for thermal properties of tube materials are lacking for evaluation of SiC-based cladding for LWR applications.« less

  17. Single Mode Air-Clad Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber

    DOE PAGES

    Hill, Cary; Homa, Dan; Yu, Zhihao; ...

    2017-05-03

    The observation of single mode propagation in an air-clad single crystal sapphire optical fiber at wavelengths at and above 783 nm is presented for the first time. A high-temperature wet acid etching method was used to reduce the diameter of a 10 cm length of commercially-sourced sapphire fiber from 125 micrometers to 6.5 micrometers, and far-field imaging provided modal information at intervals as the fiber diameter decreased. Modal volume was shown to decrease with decreasing diameter, and single mode behavior was observed at the minimum diameter achieved. While weakly-guiding approximations are generally inaccurate for low modal volume optical fiber withmore » high core-cladding refractive index disparity, consistency between these approximations and experimental results was observed when the effective numerical aperture was measured and substituted for the theoretical numerical aperture in weakly-guiding approximation calculations. With the demonstration of very low modal volume in sapphire at fiber diameters much larger than anticipated by legacy calculations, the resolution of sapphire fiber distributed sensors may be increased and other sensing schemes requiring very low modal volume, such as fiber Bragg gratings, may be realized in extreme environment applications.« less

  18. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pinmore » end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.« less

  19. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased airtightness and improved water management. For thick layers of exterior insulation (more than 1.5 in.), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been usedmore » by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. Although the approach has proven effective, there is significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of the vertical displacement resistance capacity. In addition, the long-term in-service performance of the system has been questioned due to potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of the cladding and effects of varying environmental conditions. In addition, the current International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) do not have a provision that specifically allows this assembly.« less

  20. Hydrogen motion in Zircaloy-4 cladding during a LOCA transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elodie, T.; Jean, D.; Séverine, G.; M-Christine, B.; Michel, C.; Berger, P.; Martine, B.; Antoine, A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen are key elements influencing the embrittlement of zirconium-based nuclear fuel cladding during the quench phase following a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The understanding of the mechanisms influencing the motion of these two chemical elements in the metal is required to fully describe the material embrittlement. High temperature steam oxidation tests were performed on pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples with hydrogen contents ranging between 11 and 400 wppm prior to LOCA transient. Thanks to the use of both Electron Probe Micro-Analysis (EPMA) and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (μ-ERDA), the chemical elements partitioning has been systematically quantified inside the prior-β phase. Image analysis and metallographic examinations were combined to provide an average oxygen profile as well as hydrogen profile within the cladding thickness after LOCA transient. The measured hydrogen profile is far from homogeneous. Experimental distributions are compared to those predicted numerically using calculations derived from a finite difference thermo-diffusion code (DIFFOX) developed at IRSN.

  1. PROCESS FOR PRODUCING URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, B.G.

    1954-09-14

    >This patent relates to improvements in the method for producing uranium tetrafluoride by treating an aqueous solutlon of a uranyl salt at an elevated temperature with a reducing agent effective in acld solutlon in the presence of hydrofluoric acid. Uranium tetrafluoride produced this way frequentiy contains impurities in the raw material serving as the source of uranium. Uranium tetrafluoride much less contaminated with impurities than when prepared by the above method can be prepared from materials containing such impurities by first adding a small proportion of reducing agent so as to cause a small fraction, for example 1 to 5% of the uranium tetrafluoride to be precipitated, rejecting such precipitate, and then precipitating and recovering the remainder of the uranium tetrafluoride.

  2. ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, W.N.

    1960-09-01

    An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

  3. The Mechanical Response of Advanced Claddings during Proposed Reactivity Initiated Accident Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N; Brown, Nicholas R; Terrani, Kurt A

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the failure mechanisms of advanced nuclear fuel cladding of FeCrAl at high-strain rates, similar to design basis reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). During RIA, the nuclear fuel cladding was subjected to the plane-strain to equibiaxial tension strain states. To achieve those accident conditions, the samples were deformed by the expansion of high strength Inconel alloy tube under pre-specified pressure pulses as occurring RIA. The mechanical response of the advanced claddings was compared to that of hydrided zirconium-based nuclear fuel cladding alloy. The hoop strain evolution during pressure pulses were collected in situ; the permanent diametral strains of bothmore » accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings and the current nuclear fuel alloys were determined after rupture.« less

  4. Cyclic furnace oxidation of clad WI-52 systems at 1040 C and 1090 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Cyclic furnace oxidation studies were conducted on the cobalt alloy WI-52 clad with Ni-30Cr, Fe-25Cr-4A1, and Ni-20Cr-4A1 foils (0.051 to 0.254 mm thick). Tests as long as 400 hours using 1- and 20-hour cycles showed that the Ni-Cr- and Fe-Cr-A1 claddings were about equally protective at both temperatures. The protective ability of these alloys was influenced by exposure temperature and cladding thickness. At both temperatures, they protected WI-52 about as well as, or better than, a widely used commercial aluminide coating. The Ni-Cr-Al claddings did not protect WI-52 nearly as well. Interdiffusion generally influenced the oxidation behavior of all clad WI-52 systems.

  5. Characteristics of Ni-Cr-Fe laser clad layers on EA4T steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenjing; Chen, Hui; Wang, Yongjing; Li, Congchen; Wang, Xiaoli

    2017-07-01

    The Ni-Cr-Fe metal powder was deposited on EA4T steel by laser cladding technology. The microstructure and chemical composition of the cladding layer were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The bonding ability between the cladding layer and the matrix was measured. The results showed that the bonding between the cladding layer and the EA4T steel was metallurgical bonding. The microstructure of cladding layer was composed of planar crystals, columnar crystals and dendrite, which consisted of Cr2Ni3, γ phase, M23C6 and Ni3B phases. When the powder feeding speed reached 4 g/min, the upper bainite occurred in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Moreover, the tensile strength of the joint increased, while the yield strength and the ductility decreased.

  6. Laser and Pressure Resistance Weld of Thin-Wall Cladding for LWR Accident-Tolerant Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Jerred, N.; Perez, E.; Haggard, D. C.

    2018-02-01

    FeCrAl alloy with typical composition of approximately Fe-15Cr-5Al is considered a primary candidate cladding material for light water reactor accident-tolerant fuel because of its superior resistance to oxidation in high-temperature steam compared with Zircaloy cladding. Thin-walled FeCrAl cladding at 350 μm wall thickness is required, and techniques for joining endplug to cladding need to be developed. Fusion-based laser weld and solid-state joining with pressure resistance weld were investigated in this study. The results of microstructural characterization, mechanical property evaluation by tensile testing, and hydraulic pressure burst testing of the welds for the cladding-endplug specimen are discussed.

  7. Laser and Pressure Resistance Weld of Thin-Wall Cladding for LWR Accident-Tolerant Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Jerred, N.; Perez, E.; Haggard, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    FeCrAl alloy with typical composition of approximately Fe-15Cr-5Al is considered a primary candidate cladding material for light water reactor accident-tolerant fuel because of its superior resistance to oxidation in high-temperature steam compared with Zircaloy cladding. Thin-walled FeCrAl cladding at 350 μm wall thickness is required, and techniques for joining endplug to cladding need to be developed. Fusion-based laser weld and solid-state joining with pressure resistance weld were investigated in this study. The results of microstructural characterization, mechanical property evaluation by tensile testing, and hydraulic pressure burst testing of the welds for the cladding-endplug specimen are discussed.

  8. Strengthening Effect of Incremental Shear Deformation on Ti Alloy Clad Plate with a Ni-Based Alloy Laser-Clad Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Zha, G. C.; Kong, F. X.; Wu, M. L.; Feng, X.; Gao, S. Y.

    2017-05-01

    A Ti-6Al-4V alloy clad plate with a Tribaloy 700 alloy laser-clad layer is subjected to incremental shear deformation, and we evaluate the structural evolution and mechanical properties of the specimens. Results indicate the significance of the incremental shear deformation on the strengthening effect. The wear resistance and Vickers hardness of the laser-clad layer are enhanced due to increased dislocation density. The incremental shear deformation can increase the bonding strength of the laser-clad layer and the corresponding substrate and can break the columnar crystals in the laser-clad layer near the interface. These phenomena suggest that shear deformation eliminates the defects on the interface of the laser-clad layer and the substrate. Substrate hardness is evidently improved, and the strengthening effect is caused by the increased dislocation density and shear deformation. This deformation can then transform the α- and β-phases in the substrate into a high-intensity ω-phase.

  9. PROCESS FOR REMOVING NOBLE METALS FROM URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Knighton, J.B.

    1961-01-31

    A pyrometallurgical method is given for purifying uranium containing ruthenium and palladium. The uranium is disintegrated and oxidized by exposure to air and then the ruthenium and palladium are extracted from the uranium with molten zinc.

  10. FORMATION OF URANIUM PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M. Jr.

    1959-03-17

    A method is described for precipitation of uranium peroxide from uranium- containing solutions so as to obtain larger aggregates which facilitates washings decantations filtrations centrifugations and the like. The desired larger aggregate form is obtained by maintaining the pH of the solution in the approximate range of 1 to 3 and the temperature at about 25 deg C or below while carrytng out the precipitation. Then prior to removal of the precipitate a surface active sulfonated bicarboxyacids such as di-octyl sodium sulfo-succinates is incorporated in an anount of the order of 0.01 to 0.05 percent by weights and the slurry is allowed to ripen for about one-half hour at a temperatare below 10 deg C.

  11. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Foster, L.S.; Magel, T.T.

    1958-05-13

    A modified process is described for the production of uranium metal by means of a bomb reduction of UF/sub 4/. Difficulty is sometimes experienced in obtaining complete separation of the uranium from the slag when the process is carried out on a snnall scale, i.e., for the production of 10 grams of U or less. Complete separation may be obtained by incorporating in the reaction mixture a quantity of MnCl/sub 2/, so that this compound is reduced along with the UF/sub 4/ . As a result a U--Mn alloy is formed which has a melting point lower than that of pure U, and consequently the metal remains molten for a longer period allowing more complete separation from the slag.

  12. METHOD OF DISSOLVING URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Slotin, L.A.

    1958-02-18

    This patent relates to an economicai means of dissolving metallic uranium. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of perchloric acid to the concentrated nitric acid in which the uranium is being dissolved greatly shortens the time necessary for dissolution of the metal. Thus the use of about 1 or 2 percent of perchioric acid based on the weight of the nitric acid used, reduces the time of dissolution of uranium by a factor of about 100.

  13. METHOD OF JACKETING URANIUM BODIES

    DOEpatents

    Maloney, J.O.; Haines, E.B.; Tepe, J.B.

    1958-08-26

    An improved process is presented for providing uranium slugs with thin walled aluminum jackets. Since aluminum has a slightiy higher coefficient of thermal expansion than does uraaium, both uranium slugs and aluminum cans are heated to an elevated temperature of about 180 C, and the slug are inserted in the cans at that temperature. During the subsequent cooling of the assembly, the aluminum contracts more than does the uranium and a tight shrink fit is thus assured.

  14. PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, C.H. Jr.; Reynolds, F.L.

    1959-01-13

    A process is presented for producing oxygen-free uranium metal comprising contacting iodine vapor with crude uranium in a reaction zone maintained at 400 to 800 C to produce a vaporous mixture of UI/sub 4/ and iodine. Also disposed within the maction zone is a tungsten filament which is heated to about 1600 C. The UI/sub 4/, upon contacting the hot filament, is decomposed to molten uranium substantially free of oxygen.

  15. WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-08-26

    A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

  16. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from abovemore » on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown.« less

  17. Sputtering of uranium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, R.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study of the sputtering of U-235 atoms from foil targets by hydrogen, helium, and argon ions, which was performed by observing tracks produced in mica by fission fragments following thermal-neutron-induced fission. The technique used allowed measurements of uranium sputtering yields of less than 0.0001 atom/ion as well as yields involving the removal of less than 0.01 monolayer of the uranium target surface. The results reported include measurements of the sputtering yields for 40-120-keV protons, 40-120-keV He-4(+) ions, and 40- and 80-keV Ar-40(+) ions, the mass distribution of chunks emitted during sputtering by the protons and 80-keV Ar-40(+) ions, the total chunk yield during He-4(+) sputtering, and some limited data on molecular sputtering by H2(+) and H3(+). The angular distribution of the sputtered uranium is discussed, and the yields obtained are compared with the predictions of collision cascade theory.

  18. Uranium mining in France

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.

    Since the onset of the first ''oil shock'' in 1974, France has pursued a policy of steadily increasing energy independence based on nuclear power for generation of electricity. In 1973, nuclear reactors supplied only 8% of France's electrical power. A strong development effort lifted the nuclear share to 23% in 1980, to 66% in 1985, and the plan is to raise the total to 75% by 1990. In 1976, Cogema (Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires) was organized from the production division of France's Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) to handle fuel supply and spent fuel reprocessing for the expanding industrymore » (see subsequent article on Cogema). In parallel with growth of the French nuclear power, Cogema has become a world leader in all aspects of the fuel cycle, providing services not only domestically but internationally as well. As a uranium mining company, Cogema has steadily developed domestic and foreign sources of supply, and over the years it has maintained the world's strongest uranium exploration effort throughout the ups and downs of the market. As a result, the company has become the world's leading uranium supplier, with about 20% of total production contributed either by its domestic mining divisions or overseas subsidiaries.« less

  19. METHOD FOR RECOVERING URANIUM FROM OILS

    DOEpatents

    Gooch, L.H.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for recovering uranium from hydrocarbon oils, wherein the uranium is principally present as UF/sub 4/. According to the invention, substantially complete removal of the uranium from the hydrocarbon oil may be effected by intimately mixing one part of acetone to about 2 to 12 parts of the hydrocarbon oil containing uranium and separating the resulting cake of uranium from the resulting mixture. The uranium in the cake may be readily recovered by burning to the oxide.

  20. THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.; Brewer, L.

    1959-02-10

    A method is presented of preparing uranium metal of high purity consisting contacting impure U metal with halogen vapor at between 450 and 550 C to form uranium halide vapor, contacting the uranium halide vapor in the presence of H/sub 2/ with a refractory surface at about 1400 C to thermally decompose the uranium halides and deposit molten U on the refractory surface and collecting the molten U dripping from the surface. The entire operation is carried on at a sub-atmospheric pressure of below 1 mm mercury.

  1. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  2. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    PubMed Central

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed. PMID:20195447

  3. ELECTROLYTIC PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Lofthouse, E.

    1954-08-31

    This patent relates to electrolytic methods for the production of uranium tetrafluoride. According to the present invention a process for the production of uranium tetrafluoride comprises submitting to electrolysis an aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride containing free hydrofluoric acid. Advantageously the aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride is obtained by dissolving uranium hexafluoride in water. On electrolysis, the uranyl ions are reduced to uranous tons at the cathode and immediately combine with the fluoride ions in solution to form the insoluble uranium tetrafluoride which is precipitated.

  4. SEPARATION OF THORIUM FROM URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Bane, R.W.

    1959-09-01

    A description is given for the separation of thorium from uranium by forming an aqueous acidic solution containing ionic species of thorium, uranyl uranium, and hydroxylamine, flowing the solution through a column containing the phenol-formaldehyde type cation exchange resin to selectively adsorb substantially all the thorium values and a portion of the uranium values, flowing a dilute solution of hydrochloric acid through the column to desorb the uranium values, and then flowing a dilute aqueous acidic solution containing an ion, such as bisulfate, which has a complexing effect upon thortum through the column to desorb substantially all of the thorium.

  5. PROCESS OF PRODUCING REFRACTORY URANIUM OXIDE ARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, N.E.

    1957-12-01

    A method is presented for fabricating uranium oxide into a shaped refractory article by introducing a uranium halide fluxing reagent into the uranium oxide, and then mixing and compressing the materials into a shaped composite mass. The shaped mass of uranium oxide and uranium halide is then fired at an elevated temperature so as to form a refractory sintered article. It was found in the present invention that the introduction of a uraninm halide fluxing agent afforded a fluxing action with the uranium oxide particles and that excellent cohesion between these oxide particles was obtained. Approximately 90% of uranium dioxide and 10% of uranium tetrafluoride represent a preferred composition.

  6. A model for recovery of scrap monolithic uranium molybdenum fuel by electrorefining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Kleeck, Melissa A.

    The goal of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program (RERTR) is toreduce enrichment at research and test reactors, thereby decreasing proliferation risk at these facilities. A new fuel to accomplish this goal is being manufactured experimentally at the Y12 National Security Complex. This new fuel will require its own waste management procedure,namely for the recovery of scrap from its manufacture. The new fuel is a monolithic uraniummolybdenum alloy clad in zirconium. Feasibility tests were conducted in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner using scrap U-8Mo fuel alloy. These tests proved that a uranium product could be recovered free of molybdenum from this scrap fuel by electrorefining. Tests were also conducted using U-10Mo Zr clad fuel, which confirmed that product could be recovered from a clad version of this scrap fuel at an engineering scale, though analytical results are pending for the behavior of Zr in the electrorefiner. A model was constructed for the simulation of electrorefining the scrap material produced in the manufacture of this fuel. The model was implemented on two platforms, Microsoft Excel and MatLab. Correlations, used in the model, were developed experimentally, describing area specific resistance behavior at each electrode. Experiments validating the model were conducted using scrap of U-10Mo Zr clad fuel in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner. The results of model simulations on both platforms were compared to experimental results for the same fuel, salt and electrorefiner compositions and dimensions for two trials. In general, the model demonstrated behavior similar to experimental data but additional refinements are needed to improve its accuracy. These refinements consist of a function for surface area at anode and cathode based on charge passed. Several approximations were made in the model concerning areas of electrodes which should be replaced by a more accurate function describing these areas.

  7. FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

    1962-06-26

    A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

  8. 12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM CASTING OPERATIONS CEASED IN 1988. (11/14/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  9. Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound

    DOEpatents

    Rothman, Alan B.; Graczyk, Donald G.; Essling, Alice M.; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2001-01-01

    A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

  10. Innovative coating of nanostructured vanadium carbide on the F/M cladding tube inner surface for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Phillpot, Simon

    Fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) have been acknowledged as a critical issue in a metallic fuel/steel cladding system due to the formation of low melting intermetallic eutectic compounds between the fuel and cladding steel, resulting in reduction in cladding wall thickness as well as a formation of eutectic compounds that can initiate melting in the fuel at lower temperature. In order to mitigate FCCI, diffusion barrier coatings on the cladding inner surface have been considered. In order to generate the required coating techniques, pack cementation, electroplating, and electrophoretic deposition have been investigated. However, these methods require a high processing temperaturemore » of above 700 oC, resulting in decarburization and decomposition of the martensites in a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) cladding steel. Alternatively, organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) can be a promising process due to its low processing temperature of below 600 oC. The aim of the project is to conduct applied and fundamental research towards the development of diffusion barrier coatings on the inner surface of F/M fuel cladding tubes. Advanced cladding steels such as T91, HT9 and NF616 have been developed and extensively studied as advanced cladding materials due to their excellent irradiation and corrosion resistance. However, the FCCI accelerated by the elevated temperature and high neutron exposure anticipated in fast reactors, can have severe detrimental effects on the cladding steels through the diffusion of Fe into fuel and lanthanides towards into the claddings. To test the functionality of developed coating layer, the diffusion couple experiments were focused on using T91 as cladding and Ce as a surrogate lanthanum fission product. By using the customized OMCVD coating equipment, thin and compact layers with a few micron between 1.5 µm and 8 µm thick and average grain size of 200 nm and 5 µm were successfully obtained at the specimen coated between

  11. Mechanical Properties of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Stainless Steel Cladding After Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Fahy, James; Kolosov, Oleg; Wilbraham, Richard J.; Döbeli, Max; Renevier, Nathalie; Ball, Jonathan; Ritter, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    The production of helium bubbles in advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) cladding could represent a significant hazard for both the mechanical stability and long-term storage of such materials. However, the high radioactivity of AGR cladding after operation presents a significant barrier to the scientific study of the mechanical properties of helium incorporation, said cladding typically being analyzed in industrial hot cells. An alternative non-active approach is to implant He2+ into unused AGR cladding material via an accelerator. Here, a feasibility study of such a process, using sequential implantations of helium in AGR cladding steel with decreasing energy is carried out to mimic the buildup of He (e.g., 50 appm) that would occur for in-reactor AGR clad in layers of the order of 10 µm in depth, is described. The implanted sample is subsequently analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, atomic force and ultrasonic force microscopies. As expected, the irradiated zones were affected by implantation damage (< 1 dpa). Nonetheless, such zones undergo only nanoscopic swelling and a small hardness increase ( 10%), with no appreciable decrease in fracture strength. Thus, for this fluence and applied conditions, the integrity of the steel cladding is retained despite He2+ implantation.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Stainless Steel Cladding After Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Fahy, James; Kolosov, Oleg; Wilbraham, Richard J.; Döbeli, Max; Renevier, Nathalie; Ball, Jonathan; Ritter, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    The production of helium bubbles in advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) cladding could represent a significant hazard for both the mechanical stability and long-term storage of such materials. However, the high radioactivity of AGR cladding after operation presents a significant barrier to the scientific study of the mechanical properties of helium incorporation, said cladding typically being analyzed in industrial hot cells. An alternative non-active approach is to implant He2+ into unused AGR cladding material via an accelerator. Here, a feasibility study of such a process, using sequential implantations of helium in AGR cladding steel with decreasing energy is carried out to mimic the buildup of He (e.g., 50 appm) that would occur for in-reactor AGR clad in layers of the order of 10 µm in depth, is described. The implanted sample is subsequently analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, atomic force and ultrasonic force microscopies. As expected, the irradiated zones were affected by implantation damage (< 1 dpa). Nonetheless, such zones undergo only nanoscopic swelling and a small hardness increase ( 10%), with no appreciable decrease in fracture strength. Thus, for this fluence and applied conditions, the integrity of the steel cladding is retained despite He2+ implantation.

  13. Effect of Temperature and Sheet Temper on Isothermal Solidification Kinetics in Clad Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal solidification (IS) is a phenomenon observed in clad aluminum brazing sheets, wherein the amount of liquid clad metal is reduced by penetration of the liquid clad into the core. The objective of the current investigation is to quantify the rate of IS through the use of a previously derived parameter, the Interface Rate Constant (IRC). The effect of peak temperature and initial sheet temper on IS kinetics were investigated. The results demonstrated that IS is due to the diffusion of silicon (Si) from the liquid clad layer into the solid core. Reduced amounts of liquid clad at long liquid duration times, a roughened sheet surface, and differences in resolidified clad layer morphology between sheet tempers were observed. Increased IS kinetics were predicted at higher temperatures by an IRC model as well as by experimentally determined IRC values; however, the magnitudes of these values are not in good agreement due to deficiencies in the model when applied to alloys. IS kinetics were found to be higher for sheets in the fully annealed condition when compared with work-hardened sheets, due to the influence of core grain boundaries providing high diffusivity pathways for Si diffusion, resulting in more rapid liquid clad penetration.

  14. Early implementation of SiC cladding fuel performance models in BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2015-09-18

    SiC-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) [5–8] are being developed and evaluated internationally as potential LWR cladding options. These development activities include interests within both the DOE-NE LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and the DOE-NE Advanced Fuels Campaign. The LWRS Program considers SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) as offering potentially revolutionary gains as a cladding material, with possible benefits including more efficient normal operating conditions and higher safety margins under accident conditions [9]. Within the Advanced Fuels Campaign, SiC-based composites are a candidate ATF cladding material that could achieve several goals, such as reducing the rates of heat and hydrogen generation duemore » to lower cladding oxidation rates in HT steam [10]. This work focuses on the application of SiC cladding as an ATF cladding material in PWRs, but these work efforts also support the general development and assessment of SiC as an LWR cladding material in a much broader sense.« less

  15. New metric for optimizing Continuous Loop Averaging Deconvolution (CLAD) sequences under the 1/f noise model

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xian; Yuan, Han; Chen, Wufan; Ding, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Continuous loop averaging deconvolution (CLAD) is one of the proven methods for recovering transient auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in rapid stimulation paradigms, which requires an elaborated stimulus sequence design to attenuate impacts from noise in data. The present study aimed to develop a new metric in gauging a CLAD sequence in terms of noise gain factor (NGF), which has been proposed previously but with less effectiveness in the presence of pink (1/f) noise. We derived the new metric by explicitly introducing the 1/f model into the proposed time-continuous sequence. We selected several representative CLAD sequences to test their noise property on typical EEG recordings, as well as on five real CLAD electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings to retrieve the middle latency responses. We also demonstrated the merit of the new metric in generating and quantifying optimized sequences using a classic genetic algorithm. The new metric shows evident improvements in measuring actual noise gains at different frequencies, and better performance than the original NGF in various aspects. The new metric is a generalized NGF measurement that can better quantify the performance of a CLAD sequence, and provide a more efficient mean of generating CLAD sequences via the incorporation with optimization algorithms. The present study can facilitate the specific application of CLAD paradigm with desired sequences in the clinic. PMID:28414803

  16. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Tobias; Rommel, Daniel; Scherm, Florian; Gorywoda, Marek; Glatzel, Uwe

    2017-03-10

    Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co-28Cr-9W-1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE) study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  17. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Tobias; Rommel, Daniel; Scherm, Florian; Gorywoda, Marek; Glatzel, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co–28Cr–9W–1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE) study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable. PMID:28772639

  18. Orientation-dependent fiber-optic accelerometer based on grating inscription over fiber cladding.

    PubMed

    Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang; Guo, Tuan; Bao, Weijia; Su, Dan; Yang, Hangzhou

    2014-12-01

    An orientation-sensitive fiber-optic accelerometer based on grating inscription over fiber cladding has been demonstrated. The sensor probe comprises a compact structure in which a short section of thin-core fiber (TCF) stub containing a "cladding" fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is spliced to another single-mode fiber (SMF) without any lateral offset. A femtosecond laser side-illumination technique was utilized to ensure that the grating inscription remains close to the core-cladding interface of the TCF. The core mode and the cladding mode of the TCF are coupled at the core-mismatch junction, and two well-defined resonances in reflection appear from the downstream FBG, in which the cladding resonance exhibits a strong polarization and bending dependence due to the asymmetrical distribution of the cladding FBG along the fiber cross section. Strong orientation dependence of the vibration (acceleration) measurement has been achieved by power detection of the cladding resonance. Meanwhile, the unwanted power fluctuations and temperature perturbations can be referenced out by monitoring the fundamental core resonance.

  19. Copper cladding on polymer surfaces by ionization-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Tomoki; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Usui, Hiroaki

    2018-03-01

    Copper thin films were prepared on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polyimide (PI) substrates by an ionization-assisted vapor deposition method. The films had a polycrystalline structure, and their crystallite size decreased with increasing ion acceleration voltage V a. Ion acceleration was effective in reducing the surface roughness of the films. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed that the copper/polymer interface showed increased corrugation with increasing V a. The increase in V a also induced the chemical modification of polymer chains of the PET substrate, but the PI substrate underwent smaller modification after ion bombardment. Most importantly, the adhesion strength between the copper film and the PET substrate increased with increasing V a. It was concluded that ionization-assisted deposition is a promising technique for preparing metal clad layers on flexible polymer substrates.

  20. Dispersion properties of plasma cladded annular optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KianiMajd, M.; Hasanbeigi, A.; Mehdian, H.; Hajisharifi, K.

    2018-05-01

    One of the considerable problems in a conventional image transferring fiber optic system is the two-fold coupling of propagating hybrid modes. In this paper, using a simple and practical analytical approach based on exact modal vectorial analysis together with Maxwell's equations, we show that applying plasma as a cladding medium of an annular optical fiber can remove this defect of conventional fiber optic automatically without any external instrument as the polarization beam splitter. Moreover, the analysis indicates that the presence of plasma in the proposed optical fiber could extend the possibilities for controlling the propagation property. The proposed structure presents itself as a promising route to advanced optical processing and opens new avenues in applied optics and photonics.

  1. Bioactivity of calcium phosphate bioceramic coating fabricated by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizhi; Liu, Qibin; Xu, Peng; Li, Long; Jiang, Haibing; Bai, Yang

    2016-05-01

    There were always strong expectations for suitable biomaterials used for bone regeneration. In this study, to improve the biocompatiblity of titanium alloy, calcium phosphate bioceramic coating was obtained by laser cladding technology. The microstructure, phases, bioactivity, cell differentiation, morphology and resorption lacunae were investigated by optical microscope (OM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and scanning electronic microscope (SEM), respectively. The results show that bioceramic coating consists of three layers, which are a substrate, an alloyed layer and a ceramic layer. Bioactive phases of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were found in ceramic coating. Osteoclast precursors have excellent proliferation on the bioceramic surface. The bioceramics coating could be digested by osteoclasts, which led to the resorption lacunae formed on its surface. It revealed that the gradient bioceramic coating has an excellent bioactivity.

  2. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  3. Uranium extraction: Fuel from seawater

    DOE PAGES

    Tsouris, Costas; Oak Ridge National Lab.

    2017-02-17

    Over four billion tonnes of uranium are currently in the oceans that could be harvested for nuclear fuel, but current capture methods have limited performance and reusability. Now, an electrochemical method using modified carbon electrodes is shown to be promising for the extraction of uranium from seawater.

  4. ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-08-26

    A method is described for preparing uranium objects prior to nickel electroplating. The process consiats in treating the surface of the uranium with molten ferric chloride hexahydrate, at a slightiy elevated temperature. This treatment etches the metal surface providing a structure suitable for the application of adherent electrodeposits and at the same time plates the surface with a thin protective film of iron.

  5. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  6. METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM SUSPENSIONS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; McAdams, W.A.

    1958-08-26

    A process is presented for separating colloidally dissed uranium oxides from the heavy water medium in upwhich they are contained. The method consists in treating such dispersions with hydrogen peroxide, thereby converting the uranium to non-colloidal UO/sub 4/, and separating the UO/sub 4/ sfter its rapid settling.

  7. Fabrication and testing of U-7Mo monolithic plate fuel with Zircaloy cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqualini, E. E.; Robinson, A. B.; Porter, D. L.; Wachs, D. M.; Finlay, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear fuel designs are being developed to replace highly enriched fuel used in research and test reactors with fuels of low enrichment. In the most challenging cases, U-(7-10 wt%)Mo monolithic plate fuels are proposed. One of the considered designs includes aluminum-alloy cladding, which provides some challenges in fabrication and fuel/cladding interaction during service. Zircaloy cladding, specifically Zry-4, was investigated as an alternative cladding, and development of a fabrication method was performed by researchers with the Comisión Nacionalde Energia Atómica (CNEA) in Argentina, resulting in test fuel plates (Zry-4 clad U-7Mo) which were subsequently tested in the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Because Zry-4 and U-(7-10)Mo have similar high-temperature mechanical properties, fabrication was simplified in that the fuel foil and cladding could be co-rolled and bonded. The challenge was to prevent a thermal-expansion mismatch, which could destroy the fuel/cladding bond before complete bonding was achieved; the solution was to prevent the composites from cooling significantly during or between roll passes. The final product performed very well in-reactor, showing good bonding, very little fuel/cladding interaction-either from fabrication or in-reactor testing-and little swelling, especially no detectable heterogeneous bubble formation at the fuel/cladding interface tested to a fission density of up to 2.7E+21 (average) fissions/cm3, 3.8E+21 (peak).

  8. Methodology for Mechanical Property Testing of Fuel Cladding Using a Expanded Plug Wedge Test

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John

    2014-01-01

    An expanded plug method was developed earlier for determining the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding. This method tests fuel rod cladding ductility by utilizing an expandable plug to radially stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The circumferential or hoop strain is determined from the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. A developed procedure is used to convert the load circumferential strain data from the ring tests into material pseudo-stress-strain curves, from which material properties of the cladding can be extracted. However, several deficiencies existed in this expanded-plug test that can impact the accuracy of test results, suchmore » as that the large axial compressive stress resulted from the expansion plug test can potentially induce the shear failure mode of the tested specimen. Moreover, highly nonuniform stress and strain distribution in the deformed clad gage section and significant compressive stresses, induced by bending deformation due to clad bulging effect, will further result in highly nonconservative estimates of the mechanical properties for both strength and ductility of the tested clad. To overcome the aforementioned deficiencies associated with the current expansion plug test, systematic studies have been conducted. By optimizing the specific geometry designs, selecting the appropriate material for the expansion plug, and adding new components into the testing system, a modified expansion plug testing protocol has been developed. A general procedure was also developed to determine the hoop stress in the tested ring specimen. A scaling factor, -factor, was used to convert the ring load Fring into hoop stress , and is written as _ = F_ring/tl , where t is the clad thickness and l is the clad length. The generated stress-strain curve agrees well with the associated tensile test data in both elastic and plastic deformation regions.« less

  9. Laser performance and modeling of RE3+:YAG double-clad crystalline fiber waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Lee, Huai-Chuan; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2018-02-01

    We report on laser performance of ceramic Yb:YAG and single crystal Tm:YAG double-clad crystalline fiber waveguide (CFW) lasers towards the goal of demonstrating the design and manufacturing strategy of scaling to high output power. The laser component is a double-clad CFW, with RE3+:YAG (RE = Yb, Tm respectively) core, un-doped YAG inner cladding, and ceramic spinel or sapphire outer cladding. Laser performance of the CFW has been demonstrated with 53.6% slope efficiency and 27.5-W stable output power at 1030-nm for Yb:YAG CFW, and 31.6% slope efficiency and 46.7-W stable output power at 2019-nm for Tm:YAG CFW, respectively. Adhesive-Free Bond (AFB®) technology enables a designable refractive index difference between core and inner cladding, and designable core and inner cladding sizes, which are essential for single transverse mode CFW propagation. To guide further development of CFW designs, we present thermal modeling, power scaling and design of single transverse mode operation of double-clad CFWs and redefine the single-mode operation criterion for the double-clad structure design. The power scaling modeling of double-clad CFW shows that in order to achieve the maximum possible output power limited by the physical properties, including diode brightness, thermal lens effect, and simulated Brillion scattering, the length of waveguide is in the range of 0.5 2 meters. The length of an individual CFW is limited by single crystal growth and doping uniformity to about 100 to 200 mm lengths, and also by availability of starting crystals and manufacturing complexity. To overcome the limitation of CFW lengths, end-to-end proximity-coupling of CFWs is introduced.

  10. METHOD OF ELECTROPLATING ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Rebol, E.W.; Wehrmann, R.F.

    1959-04-28

    This patent relates to a preparation of metallic uranium surfaces for receiving coatings, particularly in order to secure adherent electroplated coatings upon uranium metal. In accordance with the invention the uranium surface is pretreated by degreasing in trichloroethylene, followed by immersion in 25 to 50% nitric acid for several minutes, and then rinsed with running water, prior to pickling in trichloroacetic acid. The last treatment is best accomplished by making the uranium the anode in an aqueous solution of 50 per cent by weight trichloroacetic acid until work-distorted crystals or oxide present on the metal surface have been removed and the basic crystalline structure of the base metal has been exposed. Following these initial steps the metallic uranium is rinsed in dilute nitric acid and then electroplated with nickel. Adnerent firmly-bonded coatings of nickel are obtained.

  11. Single-mode fiber laser based on core-cladding mode conversion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Schülzgen, Axel; Peyghambarian, N

    2008-02-15

    A single-mode fiber laser based on an intracavity core-cladding mode conversion is demonstrated. The fiber laser consists of an Er-doped active fiber and two fiber Bragg gratings. One Bragg grating is a core-cladding mode converter, and the other Bragg grating is a narrowband high reflector that selects the lasing wavelength. Coupling a single core mode and a single cladding mode by the grating mode converter, the laser operates as a hybrid single-mode laser. This approach for designing a laser cavity provides a much larger mode area than conventional large-mode-area step-index fibers.

  12. Numerical modelling on stimulated Brillouin scattering characterization for Graphene-clad tapered silica fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hui Jing; Abdullah, Fairuz; Ismail, Aiman

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents finite numerical modelling on the cross-sectional region of tapered single mode fiber and graphene-clad tapered fiber. Surface acoustic wave propagation across the tapered surface region on tapered single mode fiber has a high threshold power at 61.87 W which is challenging to overcome by the incident pump wave. Surface acoustic wave propagation of fiber surface however made tapered wave plausible in the optical sensor application. This research introduces graphene as the cladding layer on tapered fiber, acoustic confinement occurs due to the graphene cladding which lowers the threshold power from 61.87 W to 2.17 W.

  13. Process for removing carbon from uranium

    DOEpatents

    Powell, George L.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon contamination is removed from uranium and uranium alloys by heating in inert atmosphere to 700.degree.-1900.degree.C in effective contact with yttrium to cause carbon in the uranium to react with the yttrium. The yttrium is either in direct contact with the contaminated uranium or in indirect contact by means of an intermediate transport medium.

  14. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium enrichment means the process of...

  15. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium enrichment means the process of...

  16. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium enrichment means the process of...

  17. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium enrichment means the process of...

  18. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  19. THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM GAS MIXTURE

    DOEpatents

    Jury, S.H.

    1964-03-17

    A method of separating uranium from a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and other gases is described that comprises bringing the mixture into contact with anhydrous calcium sulfate to preferentially absorb the uranium hexafluoride on the sulfate. The calcium sulfate is then leached with a selective solvent for the adsorbed uranium. (AEC)

  20. 31 CFR 540.309 - Natural uranium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Natural uranium. 540.309 Section 540.309 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.309 Natural uranium. The term natural uranium means uranium found in...

  1. 31 CFR 540.309 - Natural uranium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural uranium. 540.309 Section 540.309 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.309 Natural uranium. The term natural uranium means uranium found in...

  2. ELUTION OF URANIUM FROM RESIN

    DOEpatents

    McLEan, D.C.

    1959-03-10

    A method is described for eluting uranium from anion exchange resins so as to decrease vanadium and iron contamination and permit recycle of the major portion of the eluats after recovery of the uranium. Diminution of vanadium and iron contamination of the major portion of the uranium is accomplished by treating the anion exchange resin, which is saturated with uranium complex by adsorption from a sulfuric acid leach liquor from an ore bearing uranium, vanadium and iron, with one column volume of eluant prepared by passing chlorine into ammonium hydroxide until the chloride content is about 1 N and the pH is about 1. The resin is then eluted with 8 to 9 column volumes of 0.9 N ammonium chloride--0.1 N hydrochloric acid solution. The eluants are collected separately and treated with ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate which is filtered therefrom. The uranium salt from the first eluant is contaminated with the major portion of ths vanadium and iron and is reworked, while the uranium recovered from the second eluant is relatively free of the undesirable vanadium and irons. The filtrate from the first eluant portion is discarded. The filtrate from the second eluant portion may be recycled after adding hydrochloric acid to increase the chloride ion concentration and adjust the pH to about 1.

  3. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  4. The Development of Expansion Plug Wedge Test for Clad Tubing Structure Mechanical Property Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Jiang, Hao

    2016-01-12

    To determine the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding in a hot cell, a simple test was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is described fully in US Patent Application 20060070455, “Expanded plug method for developing circumferential mechanical properties of tubular materials.” This method is designed for testing fuel rod cladding ductility in a hot cell using an expandable plug to stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The specimen strain is determined using the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. This method removes many complexities associated with specimen preparation and testing. The advantages are themore » simplicity of measuring the test component assembly in the hot cell and the direct measurement of the specimen’s strain. It was also found that cladding strength could be determined from the test results.« less

  5. The honey insertion cladding to improve the sensitivity of temperature polymer optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arwani, M.; Kuswanto, H.

    2018-04-01

    The sensitivity of temperature polymer optical fiber (POF) sensor has been studied. Part of cladding (9 cm) was substituted with honey. Polymer cladding was stripped mechanically and the honey inserted into the tube. Plastic gel closed the two end sides of the tubes. The optical power output was detected by Optical Power Meter (OPM). Honey cladding and temperature changing effect to the internal reflection and optical fiber output intensity. Highest output intensity changing at 20°C was shown by optical fiber coated by longan honey as cladding. The range of 10-50° C, as the rise of surroundings temperature, the attenuation was getting smaller. Best sensitivity was fiber with sensing part coated by Longan honey. Best linearity was sensing fiber with sensing part coated by Pracimantoro honey.

  6. Microstructural characterization of AA5183 aluminum clad AISI 1018 steel prepared by electro spark deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastkerdar, E.; Aghajani, H.; Kianvash, A.; Sorrell, C. C.

    2018-04-01

    The application of a simple and effective technique, electro spark deposition (ESD), to create aluminum clad steel plate has been studied. AA5183 aluminum rods were used as the rotating electrode for cladding of the AISI 1018 steel. The microstructure of the interfacial zone including the intermetallic compounds (IMC) layer and the clad metal have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM and STEM). According to the results sound aluminum clad with thickness up to 25–30 μm can be achieved. Very thin (<4 μm) IMC layer was formed at the Al/Fe interface and the structural (electron diffraction pattern) and chemical analysis (STEM) conducted by TEM confirmed that the layer is constituted of Fe rich phases, both implying a much improved mechanical properties. Investigation of the orientations of phases at the interfacial zone confirmed absence of any preferred orientation.

  7. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  8. Development and study the performance of PBA cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic biosensor for urea detection

    SciTech Connect

    Botewad, S. N.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G., E-mail: gajananggm@yahoo.co.in

    2016-05-06

    The fabrication and study of a cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic urea biosensor based on evanescent wave absorbance has been presented. The sensor was prepared using cladding modification technique by removing a small portion of cladding of an optical fiber and modifying with an active cladding of porous polyaniline-boric acid (PBA) matrix to immobilize enzyme-urease through cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. The nature of as-synthesized and deposited PBA film on fiber optic sensing element was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The performance of the developed sensor was studied for different urea concentrations in solutions prepared in phosphatemore » buffer.« less

  9. Effects of hydrogen on thermal creep behaviour of Zircaloy fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suman, Siddharth; Khan, Mohd Kaleem; Pathak, Manabendra; Singh, R. N.

    2018-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are extensively used for nuclear fuel cladding. Creep is one of the most likely degradation mechanisms for fuel cladding during reactor operating and repository conditions. Fuel cladding tubes undergo waterside corrosion during service and hydrogen is produced as a result of it-a fraction of which is picked up by cladding. Hydrogen remains in solid solution up to terminal solid solubility and it precipitates as brittle hydride phase in the zirconium metal matrix beyond this limiting concentration. Hydrogen, either in solid solution or as precipitated hydride, alters the creep behaviour of zirconium alloys. The present article critically reviews the influence of hydrogen on thermal creep behaviour of zirconium alloys, develops the systematic understanding of this multifaceted phenomenon, and delineates the thrust areas which require further investigations.

  10. Experimental verification of a theoretical model of an active cladding optical fiber fluorosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Briant, Alvin L.; Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.; Nankung, Juock S.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to verify a theoretical model on the injection efficiency of sources in the cladding of an optical fiber. The theoretical results predicted an increase in the injection efficiency for higher differences in refractive indices between the core and cladding. The experimental apparatus used consisted of a glass rod 50 cm long, coated at one end with a thin film of fluorescent substance. The fluorescent substance was excited with side illumination, perpendicular to the rod axis, using a 476 nm Argon-ion laser. Part of the excited fluorescence was injected into the core and guided to a detector. The signal was measured for several different cladding refractive indices. The cladding consisted of sugar dissolved in water and the refractive index was changed by varying the sugar concentration in the solution. The results indicate that the power injected into the rod, due to evanescent wave injection, increases with the difference in refractive index which is in qualitative agreement with theory.

  11. High power cladding light stripper using segmented corrosion method: theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lu; Yan, Mingjian; Han, Zhigang; Wang, Hailin; Shen, Hua; Zhu, Rihong

    2017-04-17

    We present the segmented corrosion method that uses hydrofluoric acid to etch the fiber of a fiber laser for removing high-power cladding light to improve stripping uniformity and power handling capability. For theoretical guidelines, we propose a simulation model of etched-fiber stripping to evaluate the relationship between the etched-fiber parameters and cladding light attenuation and to analyze the stripping uniformity achieved with segmented corrosion. A two-segment etched fiber is fabricated with cladding light attenuation of 19.8 dB and power handling capability up to 670 W. We find that the cladding light is stripped uniformly and the temperature distribution is uniform without the formation of hot spots.

  12. Fabrication of versatile cladding light strippers and fiber end-caps with CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, M.; Theeg, T.; Wysmolek, M.; Ottenhues, C.; Pulzer, T.; Neumann, J.; Kracht, D.

    2018-02-01

    We report on novel fabrication schemes of versatile cladding light strippers and end-caps via CO2 laser radiation. We integrated cladding light strippers in SMA-like connectors for reliable and stable fiber-coupling of high-power laser diodes. Moreover, the application of cladding light strippers in typical fiber geometries for high-power fiber lasers was evaluated. In addition, we also developed processes to fuse end-caps to fiber end faces via CO2 laser radiation and inscribe the fibers with cladding light strippers near the end-cap. Corresponding results indicate the great potential of such devices as a monolithic and low-cost alternative to SMA connectors.

  13. Kilowatt-level cladding light stripper for high-power fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Sun, Junyi; Huang, Yusheng; Li, Dan; Wang, Xuejiao; Xiao, Qirong; Gong, Mali

    2017-03-01

    We designed and fabricated a high-power cladding light stripper (CLS) by combining a fiber-etched CLS with a cascaded polymer-recoated CLS. The etched fiber reorganizes the numerical aperture (NA) distribution of the cladding light, leading to an increase in the leakage power and a flatter distribution of the leakage proportion in the cascaded polymer-recoated fiber. The index distribution of the cascaded polymer-recoated fiber is carefully designed to ensure an even leakage of cladding light. More stages near the index of 1.451 are included to disperse the heat. The CLS is capable of working consistently under 1187 W of cladding light with an attenuation of 26.59 dB, and the highest local temperature is less than 35°C.

  14. Development and study the performance of PBA cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic biosensor for urea detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botewad, S. N.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G.

    2016-05-01

    The fabrication and study of a cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic urea biosensor based on evanescent wave absorbance has been presented. The sensor was prepared using cladding modification technique by removing a small portion of cladding of an optical fiber and modifying with an active cladding of porous polyaniline-boric acid (PBA) matrix to immobilize enzyme-urease through cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. The nature of as-synthesized and deposited PBA film on fiber optic sensing element was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The performance of the developed sensor was studied for different urea concentrations in solutions prepared in phosphate buffer.

  15. The Effect of Rare Earth on the Structure and Performance of Laser Clad Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ruiliang; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Dong, Qing

    Laser cladding is one kind of advanced surface modification technology and has the abroad prospect in making the wear-resistant coating on metal substrates. However, the application of laser cladding technology does not achieve the people's expectation in the practical production because of many defects such as cracks, pores and so on. The addiction of rare earth can effectively reduce the number of cracks in the clad coating and enhance the coating wear-resistance. In the paper, the effects of rare earth on metallurgical quality, microstructure, phase structure and wear-resistance are analyzed in turns. The preliminary discussion is also carried out on the effect mechanism of rare earth. At last, the development tendency of rare earth in the laser cladding has been briefly elaborated.

  16. Surface modification of SS-316L steel using microwave processed Ni/WC based composite clads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Sarbjeet; Singh, Dilkaran; Gupta, Dheeraj; Jain, Vivek; Bhowmick, Hiralal

    2018-04-01

    In the present investigation, the claddings of Ni/WC based composite powder were developed on SS-316L steel through microwave hybrid heating method. The experimental trials were carried out inside a domestic microwave oven working at 2.45 GHz and 900 W. The so developed composite clads were characterized using XRD, Vicker's microhardness measurement, and SEM/EDS. The presence of different phases like Co3W3C, NiW, FeNi3, NiSi was confirmed by XRD analysis. Microstructural analysis revealed that the clad of approximately 0.6 mm thickness was developed with no interfacial cracks and negligible porosity. The WC particles were uniformly distributed in the form of cellular structure inside Ni matrix. The average Vicker's microhardness value of the clad section was observed as 925±50 HV, which is three times that of the SS-316L substrate.

  17. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Ryan; George, Nathan M.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling themore » integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl-cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl, and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs

  18. Finite element simulation of a novel composite light-weight microporous cladding panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lida; Wang, Dongyan

    2018-04-01

    A novel composite light-weight microporous cladding panel with matched connection detailing is developed. Numerical simulation on the experiment is conducted by ABAQUS. The accuracy and rationality of the finite element model is verified by comparison between the simulation and the experiment results. It is also indicated that the novel composite cladding panel is of desirable bearing capacity, stiffness and deformability under out-of-plane load.

  19. Laser Cladding of Ni, Nb, and Mg Alloys for Improved Environmental Resistance at High Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    v*LASER CLADDING OF NI , Nb AND Mg ALLOYS < FOR 7IMPR-OVED ENVIIONM ENTAL I RESISTANCE AT HIGH TEMPERATURE Final Report for Research Conducted through...resistance at high temperature. Major emphasis has been on Ni -Cr-Al-Hf system. Microstructural evolution and oxidation properties of Ni and Nb alloys ...metastable crystalline and amorphous structure on a) the high temperature oxidation properties of laser clad Ni and Nb alloys , and b) the corrosion

  20. Q-switched pulse laser generation from double-cladding Nd:YAG ceramics waveguides.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Luan, Qingfang; Liu, Fengqin; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez

    2013-08-12

    This work reports on the Q-switched pulsed laser generation from double-cladding Nd:YAG ceramic waveguides. Double-cladding waveguides with different combination of diameters were inscribed into a sample of Nd:YAG ceramic. With an additional semiconductor saturable absorber, stable pulsed laser emission at the wavelength of 1064 nm was achieved with pulses of 21 ns temporal duration and ~14 μJ pulse energy at a repetition rate of 3.65 MHz.

  1. Determination of uranium in zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuttitta, F.; Daniels, G.J.

    1959-01-01

    A routine fluorimetric procedure is described for the determination of trace amounts of uranium in zircon. It employs the direct extraction of uranyl nitrate with ethyl acetate using phosphate as a retainer for zirconium. Submicrogram amounts or uranium are separated in the presence of 100,000 times the amount of zirconium. The modified procedure has been worked out using synthetic mixtures of known composition and zircon. Results of analyses have an accuracy of 97-98% of the contained uranium and a standard deviation of less than 2.5%. ?? 1959.

  2. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hellman, N.N.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for separating uranium from thorium wherein the ratio of thorium to uranium is between 100 to 10,000. According to the invention the thoriumuranium mixture is dissolved in nitric acid, and the solution is prepared so as to obtain the desired concentration within a critical range of from 4 to 8 N with regard to the total nitrate due to thorium nitrate, with or without nitric acid or any nitrate salting out agent. The solution is then contacted with an ether, such as diethyl ether, whereby uranium is extracted into ihe organic phase while thorium remains in the aqueous phase.

  3. Pyrophoric behaviour of uranium hydride and uranium powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guyadec, F.; Génin, X.; Bayle, J. P.; Dugne, O.; Duhart-Barone, A.; Ablitzer, C.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal stability and spontaneous ignition conditions of uranium hydride and uranium metal fine powders have been studied and observed in an original and dedicated experimental device placed inside a glove box under flowing pure argon. Pure uranium hydride powder with low amount of oxide (<0.5 wt.%) was obtained by heat treatment at low temperature in flowing Ar/5%H2. Pure uranium powder was obtained by dehydration in flowing pure argon. Those fine powders showed spontaneous ignition at room temperature in air. An in situ CCD-camera displayed ignition associated with powder temperature measurement. Characterization of powders before and after ignition was performed by XRD measurements and SEM observations. Oxidation mechanisms are proposed.

  4. An Innovative Accident Tolerant LWR Fuel Rod Design Based on Uranium-Molybdenum Metal Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Robert O.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Henager, Charles H.

    2016-09-12

    The US Department of Energy is developing a uranium-molybdenum metal alloy Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel concept for Light Water Reactor applications that provides improved fuel performance during normal operation, anticipated operational occurrences, and postulated accidents. The high initial uranium atom density, the high thermal conductivity, and a low heat capacity permit a U-Mo-based fuel assembly to meet important design and safety requirements. These attributes also result in a fuel design that can satisfy increased fuel utilization demands and allow for improved accident tolerance in LWRs. This paper summarizes the results obtained from the on-going activities to; 1) evaluate the impactmore » of the U-10wt%Mo thermal properties on operational and accident safety margins, 2) produce a triple extrusion of stainless steel cladding/niobium liner/U-10Mo fuel rod specimen and 3) test the high temperature water corrosion of rodlet samples containing a drilled hole in the cladding. Characterization of the cladding and liner thickness uniformity, microstructural features of the U-Mo gamma phase, and the metallurgical bond between the component materials will be presented. The results from corrosion testing will be discussed which yield insights into the resistance to attack by water ingress during high temperature water exposure for the triple extruded samples containing a drilled hole. These preliminary evaluations find that the U-10Mo fuel design concept has many beneficial features that can meet or improve conventional LWR fuel performance requirements under normal operation, AOOs, and postulated accidents. The viability of a deployable U-Mo fuel design hinges on demonstrating that fabrication processes and alloying additions can produce acceptable irradiation stability during normal operation and accident conditions and controlled metal-water reaction rates in the unlikely event of a cladding perforation. In the area of enhanced accident tolerance, a key

  5. 5  W output power from a double-clad hybrid fiber with Yb-doped phosphate core and silicate cladding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Longfei; He, Dongbing; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Chunlei; Feng, Suya; Wang, Meng; Chen, Danping; Hu, Lili

    2017-08-01

    For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we report on the realization of a laser from a Yb-doped phosphate core/silicate cladding double-clad hybrid fiber. 5 W output power was extracted with 14.6% slope efficiency and a laser spectrum of a 1027 nm central wavelength from a 20 cm long single-mode fiber with a ∼10  μm core diameter in a 20%-4% laser cavity. The laser efficiency can be significantly enhanced by correspondingly adjusting and optimizing the laser oscillator.

  6. A pulse-controlled modified-burst test instrument for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    DOE PAGES

    Cinbiz, M. Nedim; Brown, Nicholas R.; Terrani, Kurt A.; ...

    2017-06-03

    Pellet-cladding mechanical interaction due to thermal expansion of nuclear fuel pellets during a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) is a potential mechanism for failure of nuclear fuel cladding. To investigate the mechanical behavior of cladding during an RIA, we developed a mechanical pulse-controlled modified burst test instrument that simulates transient events with a pulse width from 10 to 300 ms. This paper includes validation tests of unirradiated and prehydrided ZIRLO cladding tubes. A ZIRLO cladding sample with a hydrogen content of 168 wt. ppm showed ductile behavior and failed at the maximum limits of the test setup with hoop strain to failuremore » greater than 9.2%. ZIRLO samples showed high resistance to failure even at very high hydrogen contents (1,466 wt. ppm). When the hydrogen content was increased to 1,554 wt. ppm, brittle-like behavior was observed at a hoop strain of 2.5%. Preliminary scoping tests at room temperature with FeCrAl tubes were conducted to imitate the pulse behavior of transient test reactors during integral tests. The preliminary FeCrAl tests are informative from the perspective of characterizing the test rig and supporting the design of integral tests for current and potentially accident tolerant cladding materials.« less

  7. Progress and Challenges of Ultrasonic Testing for Stress in Remanufacturing Laser Cladding Coating

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiao-Ling; Dong, Shi-Yun; Xu, Bin-Shi; Cao, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Stress in laser cladding coating is an important factor affecting the safe operation of remanufacturing components. Ultrasonic testing has become a popular approach in the nondestructive evaluation of stress, because it has the advantages of safety, nondestructiveness, and online detection. This paper provides a review of ultrasonic testing for stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating. It summarizes the recent research outcomes on ultrasonic testing for stress, and analyzes the mechanism of ultrasonic testing for stress. Remanufacturing laser cladding coating shows typical anisotropic behaviors. The ultrasonic testing signal in laser cladding coating is influenced by many complex factors, such as microstructure, defect, temperature, and surface roughness, among others. At present, ultrasonic testing for stress in laser cladding coating can only be done roughly. This paper discusses the active mechanism of micro/macro factors in the reliability of stress measurement, as well as the impact of stress measurement on the quality and safety of remanufacturing components. Based on the discussion, this paper proposes strategies to nondestructively, rapidly, and accurately measure stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating. PMID:29438309

  8. Review and perspective: Sapphire optical fiber cladding development for harsh environment sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Buric, Michael; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Nakano, Jinichiro; Liu, Bo; Chorpening, Benjamin T.

    2018-03-01

    The potential to use single-crystal sapphire optical fiber as an alternative to silica optical fibers for sensing in high-temperature, high-pressure, and chemically aggressive harsh environments has been recognized for several decades. A key technological barrier to the widespread deployment of harsh environment sensors constructed with sapphire optical fibers has been the lack of an optical cladding that is durable under these conditions. However, researchers have not yet succeeded in incorporating a high-temperature cladding process into the typical fabrication process for single-crystal sapphire fibers, which generally involves seed-initiated fiber growth from the molten oxide state. While a number of advances in fabrication of a cladding after fiber-growth have been made over the last four decades, none have successfully transitioned to a commercial manufacturing process. This paper reviews the various strategies and techniques for fabricating an optically clad sapphire fiber which have been proposed and explored in published research. The limitations of current approaches and future prospects for sapphire fiber cladding are discussed, including fabrication methods and materials. The aim is to provide an understanding of the past research into optical cladding of sapphire fibers and to assess possible material systems for future research on this challenging problem for harsh environment sensors.

  9. A pulse-controlled modified-burst test instrument for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Cinbiz, M. Nedim; Brown, Nicholas R.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    Pellet-cladding mechanical interaction due to thermal expansion of nuclear fuel pellets during a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) is a potential mechanism for failure of nuclear fuel cladding. To investigate the mechanical behavior of cladding during an RIA, we developed a mechanical pulse-controlled modified burst test instrument that simulates transient events with a pulse width from 10 to 300 ms. This paper includes validation tests of unirradiated and prehydrided ZIRLO cladding tubes. A ZIRLO cladding sample with a hydrogen content of 168 wt. ppm showed ductile behavior and failed at the maximum limits of the test setup with hoop strain to failuremore » greater than 9.2%. ZIRLO samples showed high resistance to failure even at very high hydrogen contents (1,466 wt. ppm). When the hydrogen content was increased to 1,554 wt. ppm, brittle-like behavior was observed at a hoop strain of 2.5%. Preliminary scoping tests at room temperature with FeCrAl tubes were conducted to imitate the pulse behavior of transient test reactors during integral tests. The preliminary FeCrAl tests are informative from the perspective of characterizing the test rig and supporting the design of integral tests for current and potentially accident tolerant cladding materials.« less

  10. Progress and Challenges of Ultrasonic Testing for Stress in Remanufacturing Laser Cladding Coating.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Ling; Dong, Shi-Yun; Xu, Bin-Shi; Cao, Yong

    2018-02-13

    Stress in laser cladding coating is an important factor affecting the safe operation of remanufacturing components. Ultrasonic testing has become a popular approach in the nondestructive evaluation of stress, because it has the advantages of safety, nondestructiveness, and online detection. This paper provides a review of ultrasonic testing for stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating. It summarizes the recent research outcomes on ultrasonic testing for stress, and analyzes the mechanism of ultrasonic testing for stress. Remanufacturing laser cladding coating shows typical anisotropic behaviors. The ultrasonic testing signal in laser cladding coating is influenced by many complex factors, such as microstructure, defect, temperature, and surface roughness, among others. At present, ultrasonic testing for stress in laser cladding coating can only be done roughly. This paper discusses the active mechanism of micro/macro factors in the reliability of stress measurement, as well as the impact of stress measurement on the quality and safety of remanufacturing components. Based on the discussion, this paper proposes strategies to nondestructively, rapidly, and accurately measure stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating.

  11. Two-Channel SPR Sensor Combined Application of Polymer- and Vitreous-Clad Optic Fibers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yong; Su, Yudong; Liu, Chunlan; Nie, Xiangfei; Liu, Zhihai; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yonghui

    2017-12-09

    By combining a polymer-clad optic fiber and a vitreous-clad optic fiber, we proposed and fabricated a novel optic fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor to conduct two-channel sensing at the same detection area. The traditional optic fiber SPR sensor has many disadvantages; for example, removing the cladding requires corrosion, operating it is dangerous, adjusting the dynamic response range is hard, and producing different resonance wavelengths in the sensing area to realize a multi-channel measurement is difficult. Therefore, in this paper, we skillfully used bare fiber grinding technology and reverse symmetry welding technology to remove the cladding in a multi-mode fiber and expose the evanescent field. On the basis of investigating the effect of the grinding angle on the dynamic range change of the SPR resonance valley wavelength and sensitivity, we combined polymer-clad fiber and vitreous-clad fiber by a smart design structure to realize at a single point a two-channel measurement fiber SPR sensor. In this paper, we obtained a beautiful spectral curve from a multi-mode fiber two-channel SPR sensor. In the detection range of the refractive rate between 1.333 RIU and 1.385 RIU, the resonance valley wavelength of channel Ⅰ shifted from 622 nm to 724 nm with a mean average sensitivity of 1961 nm/RIU and the resonance valley wavelength of channel Ⅱ shifted from 741 nm to 976 nm with a mean average sensitivity of 4519 nm/RIU.

  12. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in the Laser Multilayered Cladding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fanrong; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2010-12-01

    The current work examines the heat-and-mass transfer process in the laser multilayered cladding of H13 tool steel powder by numerical modeling and experimental validation. A multiphase transient model is developed to investigate the evolution of the temperature field and flow velocity of the liquid phase in the molten pool. The solid region of the substrate and solidified clad, the liquid region of the melted clad material, and the gas region of the surrounding air are included. In this model, a level-set method is used to track the free surface motion of the molten pool with the powder material feeding and scanning of the laser beam. An enthalpy-porosity approach is applied to deal with the solidification and melting that occurs in the cladding process. Moreover, the laser heat input and heat losses from the forced convection and heat radiation that occurs on the top surface of the deposited layer are incorporated into the source term of the governing equations. The effects of the laser power, scanning speed, and powder-feed rate on the dilution and height of the multilayered clad are investigated based on the numerical model and experimental measurements. The results show that an increase of the laser power and powder feed rate, or a reduction of the scanning speed, can increase the clad height and directly influence the remelted depth of each layer of deposition. The numerical results have a qualitative agreement with the experimental measurements.

  13. Shielding gas effect to diffusion activities of magnesium and copper on aluminum clad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manurung, Charles SP; Napitupulu, Richard AM

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum is the second most metal used in many application, because of its corrosion resistance. The Aluminum will be damaged in over time if it’s not maintained in good condition. That is important to give protection to the Aluminums surface. Cladding process is one of surface protection methodes, especially for metals. Aluminum clad copper (Al/Cu) or copper clad aluminum (Cu/Al) composite metals have been widely used for many years. These mature protection method and well tested clad metal systems are used industrially in a variety application. The inherent properties and behavior of both copper and aluminum combine to provide unique performance advantages. In this paper Aluminum 2024 series will be covered with Aluminum 1100 series by hot rolling process. Observations will focus on diffusion activities of Mg and Cu that not present on Aluminum 1100 series. The differences of clad material samples is the use of shielding gas during heating before hot rolling process. The metallurgical characteristics will be examined by using optical microscopy. Transition zone from the interface cannot be observed but from Energy Dispersive Spectrometry it’s found that Mg and Cu are diffused from base metal (Al 2024) to the clad metal (Al 1100). Hardness test proved that base metals hardness to interface was decrease.

  14. URANIUM PURIFICATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Ruhoff, J.R.; Winters, C.E.

    1957-11-12

    A process is described for the purification of uranyl nitrate by an extraction process. A solution is formed consisting of uranyl nitrate, together with the associated impurities arising from the HNO/sub 3/ leaching of the ore, in an organic solvent such as ether. If this were back extracted with water to remove the impurities, large quantities of uranyl nitrate will also be extracted and lost. To prevent this, the impure organic solution is extracted with small amounts of saturated aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate thereby effectively accomplishing the removal of impurities while not allowing any further extraction of the uranyl nitrate from the organic solvent. After the impurities have been removed, the uranium values are extracted with large quantities of water.

  15. Thermochemical Compatibility and Oxidation Resistance of Advanced LWR Fuel Cladding

    DOE PAGES

    Besmann, T. M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Unocic, K. A.

    2016-06-21

    We assessed the thermochemical compatibility of potential replacement cladding materials for zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Considered were FeCrAl steel (similar to Kanthal APMT), Nb-1%Zr (similar to PWC-11), and a hybrid SiC-composite with a metallic barrier layer. The niobium alloy was also seen as requiring an oxidation protective layer, and a diffusion silicide was investigated. Metallic barrier layers for the SiC-composite reviewed included a FeCrAl alloy, Nb-1%Zr, and chromium. Thermochemical calculations were performed to determine oxidation behavior of the materials in steam, and for hybrid SiC-composites possible interactions between the metallic layer and SiC. Additionally, experimental exposures of SiC-alloymore » reaction couples at 673K, 1073K, and 1273K for 168 h in an inert atmosphere were made and microanalysis performed. Whereas all materials were determined to oxidize under higher oxygen partial pressures in the steam environment, these varied by material with expected protective oxides forming. Finally, the computed and experimental results indicate the formation of liquid phase eutectic in the FeCrAl-SiC system at the higher temperatures.« less

  16. Laser stereolithography by multilayer cladding of metal powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jendrzejewski, Rafal; Rabczuk, Grazyna T.; Zaremba, R.; Sliwinski, Gerard

    1998-07-01

    3D-structures obtained by means of laser cladding of the metal alloy powders: bronze B10 and stellite 6 and the process parameters are studied experimentally. The structures are made trace-on-trace by remelting of the metal powder injected into the focusing region of the 1.2 kW CO2 laser beam. For the powder and sample feeding rates of 8-22 g/min and 0.4-1.2 m/min, respectively, and the applied beam intensities not exceeding 2 X 105 W cm-2 the process is stable and regular traces connected via fusion zones are produced for each material. The thickness of these zones does not exceed several per cent of the layer height. The process results in the efficient formation of multilayer structures. From their geometry the effect of energy coupling and interaction parameters are deduced. Moreover, the microanalysis by means of SEM- and optical photographs of samples produced under different experimental conditions confirms the expected mechanical properties, low porosity and highly homogenous structure of the multilayers. In addition to the known material stellite 6 the bronze B10 is originally proposed for a rapid prototyping.

  17. Process for making a martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding product

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Lobsinger, Ralph J.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.

    1990-01-01

    This is a very narrowly defined martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding material for liquid metal cooled reactors, and a process for making such a martensitic steel alloy material. The alloy contains about 10.6 wt. % chromium, about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, about 0.85 wt. % manganese, about 0.2 wt. % niobium, about 0.37 wt. % silicon, about 0.2 wt. % carbon, about 0.2 wt. % vanadium, 0.05 maximum wt. % nickel, about 0.015 wt. % nitrogen, about 0.015 wt. % sulfur, about 0.05 wt. % copper, about 0.007 wt. % boron, about 0.007 wt. % phosphorous, and with the remainder being essentially iron. The process utilizes preparing such an alloy and homogenizing said alloy at about 1000.degree. C. for 16 hours; annealing said homogenized alloy at 1150.degree. C. for 15 minutes; and tempering said annealed alloy at 700.degree. C. for 2 hours. The material exhibits good high temperature strength (especially long stress rupture life) at elevated temperature (500.degree.-760.degree. C.).

  18. Microstructure characteristics of Ni/WC composite cladding coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gui-rong; Huang, Chao-peng; Song, Wen-ming; Li, Jian; Lu, Jin-jun; Ma, Ying; Hao, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    A multilayer tungsten carbide particle (WCp)-reinforced Ni-based alloy coating was fabricated on a steel substrate using vacuum cladding technology. The morphology, microstructure, and formation mechanism of the coating were studied and discussed in different zones. The microstructure morphology and phase composition were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In the results, the coating presents a dense and homogeneous microstructure with few pores and is free from cracks. The whole coating shows a multilayer structure, including composite, transition, fusion, and diffusion-affected layers. Metallurgical bonding was achieved between the coating and substrate because of the formation of the fusion and diffusion-affected layers. The Ni-based alloy is mainly composed of γ-Ni solid solution with finely dispersed Cr7C3/Cr23C6, CrB, and Ni+Ni3Si. WC particles in the composite layer distribute evenly in areas among initial Ni-based alloying particles, forming a special three-dimensional reticular microstructure. The macrohardness of the coating is HRC 55, which is remarkably improved compared to that of the substrate. The microhardness increases gradually from the substrate to the composite zone, whereas the microhardness remains almost unchanged in the transition and composite zones.

  19. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, X M; Yang, H R; Cui, Y D; Chen, G W; Yang, Y; Wu, X Q; Yao, X K; Han, D D; Han, X X; Zeng, C; Guo, J; Li, W L; Cheng, G; Tong, L M

    2016-05-16

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light-matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light-graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics.

  20. Laser Cladding of Composite Bioceramic Coatings on Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Han, Jiege; Wang, Chunming; Huang, Anguo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, silicon nitride (Si3N4) and calcium phosphate tribasic (TCP) composite bioceramic coatings were fabricated on a Ti6Al4V (TC4) alloy using Nd:YAG pulsed laser, CO2 CW laser, and Semiconductor CW laser. The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, mechanical properties, and biological behavior were carefully investigated. These investigations were conducted employing scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and other methodologies. The results showed that both Si3N4 and Si3N4/TCP composite coatings were able to form a compact bonding interface between the coating and the substrate by using appropriate laser parameters. The coating layers were dense, demonstrating a good surface appearance. The bioceramic coatings produced by laser cladding have good mechanical properties. Compared with that of the bulk material, microhardness of composite ceramic coatings on the surface significantly increased. In addition, good biological activity could be obtained by adding TCP into the composite coating.

  1. Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation (BSC Report)

    SciTech Connect

    None

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation to the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased air tightness and improved water management (Hutcheon 1964, Lstiburek 2007). The intent of the meeting was to review the current state of industry knowledge regarding cladding attachment overmore » exterior insulation with a specific focus on: 1. Gravity load resistance, 2. Wind load resistance. The presentations explore these topics from an engineering design, laboratory testing, field monitoring, as well as practical construction perspective. By bringing various groups together (who have been conduction research or have experience in this area), a more holistic review of the design limits and current code language proposals can be completed and additional gaps identified. The results of which will help inform design standards and criteria.« less

  2. Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation to the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on thestructure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased air tightness and improved water management (Hutcheon 1964, Lstiburek 2007). The intent of the meeting was to review the current state of industry knowledge regarding cladding attachment over exteriormore » insulation with a specific focus on: 1. Gravity load resistance, 2. Wind load resistance. The presentations explorethese topics from an engineering design, laboratory testing, field monitoring, as well as practical construction perspective. By bringing various groups together (who have been conduction research or have experience in this area), a more holistic review of the design limits and current code language proposals can be completed and additional gaps identified. The results of which will help informdesign standards and criteria.« less

  3. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X. M.; Yang, H. R.; Cui, Y. D.; Chen, G. W.; Yang, Y.; Wu, X. Q.; Yao, X. K.; Han, D. D.; Han, X. X.; Zeng, C.; Guo, J.; Li, W. L.; Cheng, G.; Tong, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light–matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light–graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics. PMID:27181419

  4. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1983-06-10

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  5. METHOD OF DEHYDRATING URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.O.; Fogel, C.C.; Palmer, W.E.

    1962-12-18

    Drying and dehydration of aqueous-precipitated uranium tetrafluoride are described. The UF/sub 4/ which normally contains 3 to 4% water, is dispersed into the reaction zone of an operating reactor wherein uranium hexafluoride is being reduced to UF/sub 4/ with hydrogen. The water-containing UF/sub 4/ is dried and blended with the UF/sub 4/ produced in the reactor without interfering with the reduction reaction. (AEC)

  6. HEAT TREATMENT OF ELECTROPLATED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hoglund, P.F.

    1958-07-01

    A method is described for improving electroplated coatings on uranium. Such coatings are often porous, and in an effort to remedy this, the coatings are heat treated by immersing the coated specimen ln a bath of fused salt or molten methl. Since the hase metal, uranium, is an active metal, such a procedure often results in reactions between the base metal and the heating medium. This difficulty can be overcome by using liquid organopolysiloxanes as the heating medium.

  7. SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.; Schweikher, E.W.

    1958-05-27

    The treatment of metallic uranium to provide a surface to which adherent electroplates can be applied is described. Metallic uranium is subjected to an etchant treatment in aqueous concentrated hydrochloric acid, and the etched metal is then treated to dissolve the resulting black oxide and/or chloride film without destroying the etched metal surface. The oxide or chloride removal is effected by means of moderately concentrated nitric acid in 3 to 20 seconds.

  8. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  9. MELTING AND PURIFICATION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Gray, C.F.

    1958-09-16

    A process is described for treating uranium ingots having inner metal portions and an outer oxide skin. The method consists in partially supporting such an ingot on the surface of a grid or pierced plate. A sufficient weight of uranium is provided so that when the mass becomes molten, the oxide skin bursts at the unsupported portions of its bottom surface, allowing molten urantum to flow through the burst skin and into a container provided below.

  10. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bushaw, Bruce A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  11. Pellet Cladding Mechanical Interaction Modeling Using the Extended Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin W.; Jiang, Wen; Dolbow, John E.

    As a brittle material, the ceramic UO2 used as light water reactor fuel experiences significant fracturing throughout its life, beginning with the first rise to power of fresh fuel. This has multiple effects on the thermal and mechanical response of the fuel/cladding system. One such effect that is particularly important is that when there is mechanical contact between the fuel and cladding, cracks that extending from the outer surface of the fuel into the volume of the fuel cause elevated stresses in the adjacent cladding, which can potentially lead to cladding failure. Modeling the thermal and mechanical response of themore » cladding in the vicinity of these surface-breaking cracks in the fuel can provide important insights into this behavior to help avoid operating conditions that could lead to cladding failure. Such modeling has traditionally been done in the context of finite-element-based fuel performance analysis by modifying the fuel mesh to introduce discrete cracks. While this approach is effective in capturing the important behavior at the fuel/cladding interface, there are multiple drawbacks to explicitly incorporating the cracks in the finite element mesh. Because the cracks are incorporated in the original mesh, the mesh must be modified for cracks of specified location and depth, so it is difficult to account for crack propagation and the formation of new cracks at other locations. The extended finite element method (XFEM) has emerged in recent years as a powerful method to represent arbitrary, evolving, discrete discontinuities within the context of the finite element method. Development work is underway by the authors to implement XFEM in the BISON fuel performance code, and this capability has previously been demonstrated in simulations of fracture propagation in ceramic nuclear fuel. These preliminary demonstrations have included only the fuel, and excluded the cladding for simplicity. This paper presents initial results of efforts to apply

  12. Validation and evaluation of common large-area display set (CLADS) performance specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, David J.; Gorenflo, Ronald L.

    1998-09-01

    Battelle is under contract with Warner Robins Air Logistics Center to design a Common Large Area Display Set (CLADS) for use in multiple Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) applications that currently use 19- inch Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs). Battelle engineers have built and fully tested pre-production prototypes of the CLADS design for AWACS, and are completing pre-production prototype displays for three other platforms simultaneously. With the CLADS design, any display technology that can be packaged to meet the form, fit, and function requirements defined by the Common Large Area Display Head Assembly (CLADHA) performance specification is a candidate for CLADS applications. This technology independent feature reduced the risk of CLADS development, permits life long technology insertion upgrades without unnecessary redesign, and addresses many of the obsolescence problems associated with COTS technology-based acquisition. Performance and environmental testing were performed on the AWACS CLADS and continues on other platforms as a part of the performance specification validation process. A simulator assessment and flight assessment were successfully completed for the AWACS CLADS, and lessons learned from these assessments are being incorporated into the performance specifications. Draft CLADS specifications were released to potential display integrators and manufacturers for review in 1997, and the final version of the performance specifications are scheduled to be released to display integrators and manufacturers in May, 1998. Initial USAF applications include replacements for the E-3 AWACS color monitor assembly, E-8 Joint STARS graphics display unit, and ABCCC airborne color display. Initial U.S. Navy applications include the E-2C ACIS display. For these applications, reliability and maintainability are key objectives. The common design will reduce the cost of operation and maintenance by an estimated 3.3M per year on E-3 AWACS

  13. PROCESS FOR PRODUCING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, R.D.

    1957-10-22

    A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ convented to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reaction chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. The oven is then swept clean of hydrogen and the water vapor formed by means of nitrogen and then while continuing to maintain the temperature between 400 and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion to uranium tetrafluoride, the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to ahout 400 deg C, and elemental fluorine is used as the fluorinating agent for the conversion of UF/sub 4/ into UF/sub 6/. The fluorine gas is passed into the chamber, and the UF/sub 6/ formed passes out and is delivered to a condenser.

  14. BISON Investigation of the Effect of the Fuel- Cladding Contact Irregularities on the Peak Cladding Temperature and FCCI Observed in AFC-3A Rodlet 4

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Pavel G.

    2016-09-01

    The primary objective of this report is to document results of BISON analyses supporting Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) activities. Specifically, the present report seeks to provide explanation for the microstructural features observed during post irradiation examination of the helium-bonded annular U-10Zr fuel irradiated during the AFC-3A experiment. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-3A rodlet revealed microstructural features indicative of the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the fuel-cladding interface. Presence of large voids was also observed in the same locations. BISON analyses were performed to examine stress and temperature profiles and to investigate possible correlation between the voids andmore » FCCI. It was found that presence of the large voids lead to a formation of circumferential temperature gradients in the fuel that may have redirected migrating lanthanides to the locations where fuel and cladding are in contact. Resulting localized increase of lanthanide concentration is expected to accelerate FCCI. The results of this work provide important guidance to the post irradiation examination studies. Specifically, the hypothesis of lanthanides being redirected from the voids to the locations where the fuel and the cladding are in contact should be verified by conducting quantitative electron microscopy or Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer (EPMA). The results also highlight the need for computer models capable of simulating lanthanide diffusion in metallic fuel and establish a basis for validation of such models.« less

  15. Property Investigation of Laser Cladded, Laser Melted and Electron Beam Melted Ti-Al6-V4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED Figure 3: Examples of electron beam melted net shape parts; powder bed [3]. 1.4 Laser Cladding ...description, www.arcam.com. [4] K.-H. Hermann, S. Orban, S. Nowotny, Laser Cladding of Titanium Alloy Ti6242 to Restore Damaged Blades, Proceedings...Property Investigation of Laser Cladded , Laser Melted and Electron Beam Melted Ti-Al6-V4 Johannes Vlcek EADS Deutschland GmbH Corporate Research

  16. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  17. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR URANIUM RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

    1958-06-17

    A process is described for extracting uranium from uranium ore, wherein the uranium is substantially free from molybdenum contamination. In a solvent extraction process for recovering uranium, uranium and molybdenum ions are extracted from the ore with ether under high acidity conditions. The ether phase is then stripped with water at a lower controiled acidity, resaturated with salting materials such as sodium nitrate, and reextracted with the separation of the molybdenum from the uranium without interference from other metals that have been previously extracted.

  18. Clad-pumped Er-nanoparticle-doped fiber laser (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Colin C.; Friebele, E. Joseph; Rhonehouse, Daniel L.; Marcheschi, Barbara A.; Peele, John R.; Kim, Woohong; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Youming; Pattnaik, Radha K.; Dubinskii, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Erbium-doped fiber lasers are attractive for directed energy weapons applications because they operate in a wavelength region that is both eye-safer and a window of high atmospheric transmission. For these applications a clad-pumped design is desirable, but the Er absorption must be high because of the areal dilution of the doped core vs. the pump cladding. High Er concentrations typically lead to Er ion clustering, resulting in quenching and upconversion. Nanoparticle (NP) doping of the core overcomes these problems by physically surrounding the Er ions with a cage of Al and O in the NP, which keeps them separated to minimize excited state energy transfer. A significant issue is obtaining high Er concentrations without the NP agglomeration that degrades the optical properties of the fiber core. We have developed the process for synthesizing stable Er-NP suspension which have been used to fabricate EDFs with Er concentrations >90 dB/m at 1532 nm. Matched clad fibers have been evaluated in a core-pumped MOPA with pump and signal wavelengths of 1475 and 1560 nm, respectively, and efficiencies of 72% with respect to absorbed pump have been obtained. We have fabricated both NP- and solution-doped double clad fibers, which have been measured in a clad-pumped laser testbed using a 1532 nm pump. The 1595 nm laser efficiency of the NP-doped fiber was 47.7%, which is high enough for what is believed to be the first laser experiment with the cladding pumped, NP-doped fiber. Further improvements are likely with a shaped cladding and new low-index polymer coatings with lower absorption in the 1500 - 1600 nm range.

  19. Recycle of Zirconium from Used Nuclear Fuel Cladding: A Major Element of Waste Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Emory D; DelCul, Guillermo D; Terekhov, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    Feasibility tests were initiated to determine if the zirconium in commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding can be recovered in sufficient purity to permit re-use, and if the recovery process can be operated economically. Initial tests are being performed with unirradiated, non-radioactive samples of various types of Zircaloy materials that are used in UNF cladding to develop the recovery process and determine the degree of purification that can be obtained. Early results indicate that quantitative recovery can be accomplished and product contamination with alloy constituents can be controlled sufficiently to meet purification requirements. Future tests with actual radioactive UNF claddingmore » are planned. The objective of current research is to determine the feasibility of recovery and recycle of zirconium from used fuel cladding wastes. Zircaloy cladding, which contains 98+% of hafnium-free zirconium, is the second largest mass, on average {approx}25 wt %, of the components in used U.S. light-water-reactor fuel assemblies. Therefore, recovery and recycle of the zirconium would enable a large reduction in geologic waste disposal for advanced fuel cycles. Current practice is to compact or grout the cladding waste and store it for subsequent disposal in a geologic repository. This paper describes results of initial tests being performed with unirradiated, non-radioactive samples of various types of Zircaloy materials that are used in UNF cladding to develop the recovery process and determine the degree of purification that can be obtained. Future tests with actual radioactive UNF cladding are planned.« less

  20. Characterizing the effects of cladding on semi-elliptical longitudinal surface flaws in cylindrical vessels subjected to internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, D.E.; Yoon, K.K.

    1996-12-01

    Flaws on the inside surface of cladded reactor vessels are often analyzed by modelling the carbon steel base metal without consideration of a layer of stainless steel cladding material, thus ignoring the effects of this bimetallic discontinuity. Adding cladding material to the inside surface of a finite element model of a vessel raises concerns regarding adequate mesh refinement in the vicinity of the base metal/cladding interface. This paper presents results of three-dimensional linear stress analysis that has been performed to obtain stress intensity factors for clad and unclad reactor vessels subjected to internal pressure loading. The study concentrates on semi-ellipticalmore » longitudinal surface flaws with a 6 to 1 length-to-depth ratio and flaw depths of 1/8 and 1/4 of the base metal thickness. Various meshing schemes are evaluated for modelling the crack front profile, with particular emphasis on the region near the inside surface and at the base metal/cladding interface. The shape of the crack front profile through the cladding layer and the number of finite elements used to discretize the cladding thickness are found to have a significant influence on typical fracture mechanic measures of the crack tip stress fields. Results suggest that the stress intensity factor at the inner surface of a cladded vessel may be affected as much by the finite element mesh near the surface as by the material discontinuity between the two parts of the structure.« less

  1. Research on microstructure properties of the TiC/Ni-Fe-Al coating prepared by laser cladding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Junke; Xu, Zifa; Zan, Shaoping; Zhang, Wenwu; Sheng, Liyuan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the laser cladding method was used to preparation the TiC reinforced Ni-Fe-Al coating on the Ni base superalloy. The Ti/Ni-Fe-Al powder was preset on the Ni base superalloy and the powder layer thickness is 0.5mm. A fiber laser was used the melting Ti/Ni-Fe-Al powder in an inert gas environment. The shape of the cladding layer was tested using laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) under different cladding parameters such as the laser power, the melting velocity and the defocused amount. The microstructure, the micro-hardness was tested by LSCM, SEM, Vickers hardness tester. The test result showed that the TiC particles was distributed uniformly in the cladding layer and hardness of the cladding layer was improved from 180HV to 320HV compared with the Ni-Fe-Al cladding layer without TiC powder reinforced, and a metallurgical bonding was produced between the cladding layer and the base metal. The TiC powder could make the Ni-Fe-Al cladding layer grain refining, and the more TiC powder added in the Ni-Fe-Al powder, the smaller grain size was in the cladding layer.

  2. Transmission of laser pulses with high output beam quality using step-index fibers having large cladding

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer P; Joshi, Sachin

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus and method for transmission of laser pulses with high output beam quality using large core step-index silica optical fibers having thick cladding, are described. The thick cladding suppresses diffusion of modal power to higher order modes at the core-cladding interface, thereby enabling higher beam quality, M.sup.2, than are observed for large core, thin cladding optical fibers. For a given NA and core size, the thicker the cladding, the better the output beam quality. Mode coupling coefficients, D, has been found to scale approximately as the inverse square of the cladding dimension and the inverse square root of the wavelength. Output from a 2 m long silica optical fiber having a 100 .mu.m core and a 660 .mu.m cladding was found to be close to single mode, with an M.sup.2=1.6. Another thick cladding fiber (400 .mu.m core and 720 .mu.m clad) was used to transmit 1064 nm pulses of nanosecond duration with high beam quality to form gas sparks at the focused output (focused intensity of >100 GW/cm.sup.2), wherein the energy in the core was <6 mJ, and the duration of the laser pulses was about 6 ns. Extending the pulse duration provided the ability to increase the delivered pulse energy (>20 mJ delivered for 50 ns pulses) without damaging the silica fiber.

  3. Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. Themore » semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.« less

  4. Cladding glass ceramic for use in high powered lasers

    DOEpatents

    Marker, A.J.; Campbell, J.H.

    1998-02-17

    A Cu-doped/Fe-doped low expansion glass ceramic composition comprising in Wt. %: SiO{sub 2} 50--65; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} 18--27; P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 0--10; Li{sub 2}O 2--6; Na{sub 2}O 0--2; K{sub 2}O 0--2; B{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1; MgO 0--4; ZnO 0--5; CaO 0--4; BaO 0--5; TiO{sub 2} 1--3; ZrO{sub 3} 1--3; As{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; CuO 0--3; and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1 wherein the total amount of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is 80--89 wt. %, and said glass ceramic contains as a dopant 0.1--3 wt. % CuO, 0.1--1 wt. % Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a combined CuO+Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} amount of 0.1--4 wt. %. The glass ceramic composition is suitable for use as a cladding material for solid laser energy storage mediums as well as for use in beam attenuators for measuring laser energy level and beam blocks or beam dumps used for absorbing excess or unused laser energy.

  5. Cladding glass ceramic for use in high powered lasers

    DOEpatents

    Marker, Alexander J.; Campbell, John H.

    1998-01-01

    A Cu-doped/Fe-doped low expansion glass ceramic composition comprising in Wt. %: SiO{sub 2} 50--65; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} 18--27; P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 0--10; Li{sub 2}O 2--6; Na{sub 2}O 0--2; K{sub 2}O 0--2; B{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1; MgO 0--4; ZnO 0--5; CaO 0--4; BaO 0--5; TiO{sub 2} 1--3; ZrO{sub 3} 1--3; As{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; CuO 0--3; and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1 wherein the total amount of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is 80--89 wt. %, and said glass ceramic contains as a dopant 0.1--3 wt. % CuO, 0.1--1 wt. % Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a combined CuO+Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} amount of 0.1--4 wt. %. The glass ceramic composition is suitable for use as a cladding material for solid laser energy storage mediums as well as for use in beam attenuators for measuring laser energy level and beam blocks or beam dumps used for absorbing excess or unused laser energy.

  6. Modified ring stretch tensile testing of Zr-1Nb cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.B.; Majumdar, S.; Ruther, W.E.

    1998-03-01

    In a round robin effort between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire in France, and the Russian Research Centre-Kurchatov Institute, Argonne National Laboratory conducted 16 modified ring stretch tensile tests on unirradiated samples of zr-1Nb cladding, which is used in Russian VVER reactors. Test were conducted at two temperatures (25 and 400 C) and two strain rates (0.001 and 1 s{sup {minus}1}). At 25 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), uniform elongation (UE), and total elongation (TE) were 201 MPa, 331 MPa, 18.2%, and 57.6%, respectively. Atmore » 400 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 109 MPa, 185 MPa, 15.4%, and 67.7%, respectively. Finally, at 400 C and 1 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 134 MPa, 189 MPa, 18.9%, and 53.4%, respectively. The high strain rate tests at room temperature were not successful. Test results proved to be very sensitive to the amount of lubrication used on the inserts; because of the large contact area between the inserts and specimen, too little lubrication leads to significantly higher strengths and lower elongations being reported. It is also important to note that only 70 to 80% of the elongation takes place in the gauge section, depending on specimen geometry. The appropriate percentage can be estimated from a simple model or can be calculated from finite-element analysis.« less

  7. 40 CFR 421.320 - Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary uranium subcategory. 421.320 Section 421.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Uranium Subcategory § 421.320 Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium... uranium (including depleted uranium) by secondary uranium facilities. ...

  8. 40 CFR 421.320 - Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... secondary uranium subcategory. 421.320 Section 421.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Uranium Subcategory § 421.320 Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium... uranium (including depleted uranium) by secondary uranium facilities. ...

  9. 40 CFR 421.320 - Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary uranium subcategory. 421.320 Section 421.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Uranium Subcategory § 421.320 Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium... uranium (including depleted uranium) by secondary uranium facilities. ...

  10. 40 CFR 421.320 - Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary uranium subcategory. 421.320 Section 421.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Uranium Subcategory § 421.320 Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium... uranium (including depleted uranium) by secondary uranium facilities. ...

  11. 40 CFR 421.320 - Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary uranium subcategory. 421.320 Section 421.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Uranium Subcategory § 421.320 Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium... uranium (including depleted uranium) by secondary uranium facilities. ...

  12. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  13. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sayed Ali, Samar Reda; Hussein, Abdel Hamid Ahmed; Nofal, Adel Abdel Menam Saleh; Elgazzar, Haytham Abdelrafea; Sabour, Hassan Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm−2. An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times. PMID:29036935

  14. Investigation of cladding and coating stripping methods for specialty optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Dhital, Dipesh; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2011-03-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology is used extensively in several engineering fields, including smart structures, health and usage monitoring, non-destructive testing, minimum invasive sensing, safety monitoring, and other advanced measurement fields. A general optical fiber consists of a core, cladding, and coating layers. Many sensing principles require that the cladding or coating layer should be removed or modified. In addition, since different sensing systems are needed for different types of optical fibers, it is very important to find and sort out the suitable cladding or coating removal method for a particular fiber. This study focuses on finding the cladding and coating stripping methods for four recent specialty optical fibers, namely: hard polymer-clad fiber, graded-index plastic optical fiber, copper/carbon-coated optical fiber, and aluminum-coated optical fiber. Several methods, including novel laser stripping and conventional chemical and mechanical stripping, were tried to determine the most suitable and efficient technique. Microscopic investigation of the fiber surfaces was used to visually evaluate the mechanical reliability. Optical time domain reflectometric signals of the successful removal cases were investigated to further examine the optical reliability. Based on our results, we describe and summarize the successful and unsuccessful methods.

  15. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  16. Wear Characteristics of Ni-Based Hardfacing Alloy Deposited on Stainless Steel Substrate by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Limaye, P. K.; Kumar, Santosh; Kushwaha, Ram P.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Srivastava, Dinesh; Soni, N. L.; Patel, R. J.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, dry sliding wear characteristics of the Ni-based hardfacing alloy (Ni-Mo-Cr-Si) deposited on stainless steel SS316L substrate by laser cladding have been presented. Dry sliding wear behavior of the laser clad layer was evaluated against two different counter bodies, AISI 52100 chromium steel (~850 VHN) and tungsten carbide ball (~2200 VHN) to study both adhesive and abrasive wear characteristics, in comparison with the substrate SS316L using ball on plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance was evaluated as a function of load and sliding speed for a constant sliding amplitude and sliding distance. The wear mechanisms were studied on the basis of wear surface morphology and microchemical analysis of the wear track using SEM-EDS. Laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si on SS316L exhibited much higher hardness (~700 VHN) than that of substrate SS316L (~200 VHN). The laser clad layer exhibited higher wear resistance as compared to SS316L substrate while sliding against both the counterparts. However, the improvement in the wear resistance of the clad layer as compared to the substrate was much higher while sliding against AISI 52100 chromium steel than that while sliding against WC, at the same contact stress intensity.

  17. 20-W 1952-nm tandem hybrid single and double clad TDFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Clément; Tench, Robert E.; Delavaux, Jean-Marc

    2018-02-01

    A simple engineering design is important for achieving high Thulium-doped amplifier (TDFA) performance such as good power conversion, low noise figure (NF), scalable output power, high gain, and stable operation over a large dynamic range. In this paper we report the design, performance, and simulation of two stage high-power 1952 nm hybrid single and double clad TDFAs. The first stage of our hybrid amplifier is a single clad design, and the second stage is a double clad design. We demonstrate TDFAs with an output power greater than 20 W with single-frequency narrow linewidth (i.e. MHz) input signals at both 1952 and 2004 nm. An optical 10 dB bandwidth of 80 nm is derived from the ASE spectrum. The power stage is constructed with 10 μm core active fibers showing a maximum optical slope efficiency greater than 50 %. The experimental results lead to a 1 dB agreement with our simulation tool developed for single clad and double clad TDFAs. Overall this hybrid amplifier offers versatile features with the potential of much higher output power.

  18. Microstructure and properties of laser-clad high-temperature wear-resistant alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongqiang

    1999-02-01

    A 2-kW CO 2 laser with a powder feeder was used to produce alloy coatings with high temperature-wear resistance on the surface of steel substrates. To analyze the microstructure and microchemical composition of the laser-clad layers, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system was employed. X-ray diffraction techniques were applied to characterize the phases formed during the cladding process. The results show that the microstructure of the cladding alloy consists mainly of many dispersed particles (W 2C, (W,Ti)C 1- x, WC), a lamellar eutectic carbide M 12C, and an (f.c.c) matrix. Hardness tested at room and high temperature showed that the laser-clad zone has a moderate room temperature hardness and relatively higher elevated temperature hardness. The application of the laser-clad layer to a hot tool was very successful, and its operational life span was prolonged 1 to 4 times.

  19. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy.

    PubMed

    Al-Sayed Ali, Samar Reda; Hussein, Abdel Hamid Ahmed; Nofal, Adel Abdel Menam Saleh; Hasseb Elnaby, Salah Elden Ibrahim; Elgazzar, Haytham Abdelrafea; Sabour, Hassan Abdel

    2017-10-15

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm -2 . An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times.

  20. Magnetostrictive clad steel plates for high-performance vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenjun; Nakajima, Kenya; Onodera, Ryuichi; Tayama, Tsuyoki; Chiba, Daiki; Narita, Fumio

    2018-02-01

    Energy harvesting technology is becoming increasingly important with the appearance of the Internet of things. In this study, a magnetostrictive clad steel plate for harvesting vibration energy was proposed. It comprises a cold-rolled FeCo alloy and cold-rolled steel joined together by thermal diffusion bonding. The performances of the magnetostrictive FeCo clad steel plate and conventional FeCo plate cantilevers were compared under bending vibration; the results indicated that the clad steel plate construct exhibits high voltage and power output compared to a single-plate construct. Finite element analysis of the cantilevers under bending provided insights into the magnetic features of a clad steel plate, which is crucial for its high performance. For comparison, the experimental results of a commercial piezoelectric bimorph cantilever were also reported. In addition, the cold-rolled FeCo and Ni alloys were joined by thermal diffusion bonding, which exhibited outstanding energy harvesting performance. The larger the plate volume, the more the energy generated. The results of this study indicated not only a promising application for the magnetostrictive FeCo clad steel plate as an efficient energy harvester, related to small vibrations, but also the notable feasibility for the formation of integrated units to support high-power trains, automobiles, and electric vehicles.

  1. Microstructure and Antiwear Property of Laser Cladding Ni–Co Duplex Coating on Copper

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiyong; Liang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Junwei; Ning, Zhe; Jin, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Ni–Co duplex coatings were cladded onto Cu to improve the antiwear properties of Cu products. Prior to laser cladding, n-Al2O3/Ni layers were introduced as interlayers between laser cladding coatings and Cu substrates to improve the laser absorptivity of these substrates and ensure defect-free laser cladding coatings. The structure and morphology of the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy, and the phases of the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Their hardness was measured using a microhardness tester. Experimental results showed that defect-free composite coatings were obtained and that the coatings were metallurgically bonded to the substrates. The surface of the Ni–Co duplex coatings comprised a Co-based solid solution, Cr7C3, (Fe,Ni)23C6, and other strengthening phases. The microhardness and wear resistance of the duplex coatings were significantly improved compared with the Cu substrates. The average microhardness of the cladded coatings was 845.6 HV, which was approximately 8.2 times greater than that of the Cu substrates (102.6 HV). The volume loss of the Cu substrates was approximately 7.5 times greater than that of the Ni–Co duplex coatings after 60 min of sliding wear testing. The high hardness of and lack of defects in the Ni–Co duplex coatings reduced the plastic deformation and adhesive wear of the Cu substrates, resulting in improved wear properties. PMID:28773755

  2. Microstructure and Antiwear Property of Laser Cladding Ni-Co Duplex Coating on Copper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiyong; Liang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Junwei; Ning, Zhe; Jin, Hui

    2016-07-28

    Ni-Co duplex coatings were cladded onto Cu to improve the antiwear properties of Cu products. Prior to laser cladding, n-Al₂O₃/Ni layers were introduced as interlayers between laser cladding coatings and Cu substrates to improve the laser absorptivity of these substrates and ensure defect-free laser cladding coatings. The structure and morphology of the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy, and the phases of the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Their hardness was measured using a microhardness tester. Experimental results showed that defect-free composite coatings were obtained and that the coatings were metallurgically bonded to the substrates. The surface of the Ni-Co duplex coatings comprised a Co-based solid solution, Cr₇C₃, (Fe,Ni) 23 C₆, and other strengthening phases. The microhardness and wear resistance of the duplex coatings were significantly improved compared with the Cu substrates. The average microhardness of the cladded coatings was 845.6 HV, which was approximately 8.2 times greater than that of the Cu substrates (102.6 HV). The volume loss of the Cu substrates was approximately 7.5 times greater than that of the Ni-Co duplex coatings after 60 min of sliding wear testing. The high hardness of and lack of defects in the Ni-Co duplex coatings reduced the plastic deformation and adhesive wear of the Cu substrates, resulting in improved wear properties.

  3. An analytical model to predict and minimize the residual stress of laser cladding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanna, N.; Crouch, R.; Kabir, I. R.; Naher, S.

    2018-02-01

    Laser cladding is one of the advanced thermal techniques used to repair or modify the surface properties of high-value components such as tools, military and aerospace parts. Unfortunately, tensile residual stresses generate in the thermally treated area of this process. This work focuses on to investigate the key factors for the formation of tensile residual stress and how to minimize it in the clad when using dissimilar substrate and clad materials. To predict the tensile residual stress, a one-dimensional analytical model has been adopted. Four cladding materials (Al2O3, TiC, TiO2, ZrO2) on the H13 tool steel substrate and a range of preheating temperatures of the substrate, from 300 to 1200 K, have been investigated. Thermal strain and Young's modulus are found to be the key factors of formation of tensile residual stresses. Additionally, it is found that using a preheating temperature of the substrate immediately before laser cladding showed the reduction of residual stress.

  4. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Barry B.; Walker, T. B.; Bruffey, S. H.

    2016-08-31

    Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when themore » solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using nonradioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.« less

  5. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Barry B.; Walker, T. B.; Bruffey, Stephanie H.

    2016-08-31

    This report is issued as the first revision to FCRD-MRWFD-2016-000297. Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-basedmore » cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using non-radioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.« less

  6. Corrosion inhibition of steam generator tubesheet by Alloy 690 cladding in secondary side environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Do Haeng; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Han, Jung Ho; Shim, Hee Sang

    2013-11-01

    Denting is a phenomenon that a steam generator tube is distorted by a volume expansion of corrosion products of the tube support and tubesheet materials adjacent to the tube. Although denting has been mitigated by a modification of the design and material of the tube support structures, it has been an inevitable concern in the crevice region of the top of tubesheet. This paper provides a new technology to prevent denting by cladding the secondary surface of the tubesheet with a corrosion resistant material. In this study, Alloy 690 material was cladded onto the surface of an SA508 tubesheet to a thickness of about 9 mm. The corrosion rates of the original SA508 tubesheet and the Alloy 690 clad material were measured in acidic and alkaline simulated environments. Using Alloy 690 cladding, the corrosion rate of the tubesheet within a magnetite sludge pile decreased by a factor of 680 in 0.1 M NiCl2 solution at 300 °C, and by a factor of 58 in 2 M NaOH solution at 315 °C. This means that denting can drastically be prevented by cladding the secondary tubesheet surface with corrosion resistant materials.

  7. Western Abandoned Uranium Mine Region Maps

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Map of the Western Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) Region, more than 100 abandoned uranium mine claims generally located along the Little Colorado River and Highway 89 in the Cameron, Coalmine Canyon, Bodaway/Gap, and Leupp Chapters in Northern Arizona.

  8. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  9. Western Abandoned Uranium Mine Region Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact sheets related to Western Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) Region, more than 100 abandoned uranium mine claims located along the Little Colorado River and Highway 89, ain the Cameron, Coalmine Canyon, Bodaway/Gap, and Leupp Chapters in Northern Arizona.

  10. Absorption of Thermal Neutrons in Uranium

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Creutz, E. C.; Wilson, R. R.; Wigner, E. P.

    1941-09-26

    A knowledge of the absorption processes for neutrons in uranium is important for planning a chain reaction experiment. The absorption of thermal neutrons in uranium and uranium oxide has been studied. Neutrons from the cyclotron were slowed down by passage through a graphite block. A uranium or uranium oxide sphere was placed at various positions in the block. The neutron intensity at different points in the sphere and in the graphite was measured by observing the activity induced in detectors or uranium oxide or manganese. It was found that both the fission activity in the uranium oxide and the activity induced in manganese was affected by non-thermal neutrons. An experimental correction for such effects was made by making measurements with the detectors surrounded by cadmium. After such corrections the results from three methods of procedure with the uranium oxide detectors and from the manganese detectors were consistent to within a few per cent.

  11. Variations in the uranium isotopic compositions of uranium ores from different types of uranium deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarova, Yulia A.; Kyser, T. Kurt; Geagea, Majdi Lahd; Chipley, Don

    2014-12-01

    Variations in 238U/235U and 234U/238U ratios were measured in uranium minerals from a spectrum of uranium deposit types, as well as diagenetic phosphates in uranium-rich basins and peraluminous rhyolites and associated autunite mineralisation from Macusani Meseta, Peru. Mean δ238U values of uranium minerals relative to NBL CRM 112-A are 0.02‰ for metasomatic deposits, 0.16‰ for intrusive, 0.18‰ for calcrete, 0.18‰ for volcanic, 0.29‰ for quartz-pebble conglomerate, 0.29‰ for sandstone-hosted, 0.44‰ for unconformity-type, and 0.56‰ for vein, with a total range in δ238U values from -0.30‰ to 1.52‰. Uranium mineralisation associated with igneous systems, including low-temperature calcretes that are sourced from U-rich minerals in igneous systems, have low δ238U values of ca. 0.1‰, near those of their igneous sources, whereas uranium minerals in basin-hosted deposits have higher and more variable values. High-grade unconformity-related deposits have δ238U values around 0.2‰, whereas lower grade unconformity-type deposits in the Athabasca, Kombolgie and Otish basins have higher δ238U values. The δ234U values for most samples are around 0‰, in secular equilibrium, but some samples have δ234U values much lower or higher than 0‰ associated with addition or removal of 234U during the past 2.5 Ma. These δ238U and δ234U values suggest that there are at least two different mechanisms responsible for 238U/235U and 234U/238U variations. The 234U/238U disequilibria ratios indicate recent fluid interaction with the uranium minerals and preferential migration of 234U. Fractionation between 235U and 238U is a result of nuclear-field effects with enrichment of 238U in the reduced insoluble species (mostly UO2) and 235U in oxidised mobile species as uranyl ion, UO22+, and its complexes. Therefore, isotopic fractionation effects should be reflected in 238U/235U ratios in uranium ore minerals formed either by reduction of uranium to UO2 or chemical

  12. METHOD OF APPLYING COPPER COATINGS TO URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protecting metallic uranium, which comprises anodic etching of the uranium in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution containing chloride ions, cleaning the etched uranium in aqueous nitric acid solution, promptly electro-plating the cleaned uranium in a copper electro-plating bath, and then electro-plating thereupon lead, tin, zinc, cadmium, chromium or nickel from an aqueous electro-plating bath.

  13. PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Morris, G.O.

    1955-06-21

    This patent relates to a process for the recovery of uranium from impure uranium tetrafluoride. The process consists essentially of the steps of dissolving the impure uranium tetrafluoride in excess dilute sulfuric acid in the presence of excess hydrogen peroxide, precipitating ammonium uranate from the solution so formed by adding an excess of aqueous ammonia, dissolving the precipitate in sulfuric acid and adding hydrogen peroxide to precipitate uranium peroxdde.

  14. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    DOEpatents

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  15. RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM URANIUM BEARING RAW MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Michal, E.J.; Porter, R.R.

    1959-06-16

    Uranium leaching from ground uranium-bearing raw materials using MnO/sub 2/ in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ is described. The MnO/sub 2/ oxidizes U to the leachable hexavalent state. The MnO/sub 2/ does not replace Fe normally added, because the Fe complexes P and catalyzes the MnO/sub 2/ reaction. Three examples of continuous processes are given, but batch operation is also possible. The use of MnO/sub 2/ makes possible recovery of very low U values. (T.R.H.)

  16. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  17. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  18. METHOD AND FLUX COMPOSITION FOR TREATING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Foote, F.

    1958-08-23

    ABS>A flux composition is described fer use with molten uranium or uranium alloys. The flux consists of about 46 weight per cent calcium fiuoride, 46 weight per cent magnesium fluoride and about 8 weight per cent of uranium tetrafiuoride.

  19. Health effects of uranium: new research findings.

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug; Buchner, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Recent plans for a nuclear renaissance in both established and emerging economies have prompted increased interest in uranium mining. With the potential for more uranium mining worldwide and a growth in the literature on the toxicology and epidemiology of uranium and uranium mining, we found it timely to review the current state of knowledge. Here, we present a review of the health effects of uranium mining, with an emphasis on newer findings (2005-2011). Uranium mining can contaminate air, water, and soil. The chemical toxicity of the metal constitutes the primary environmental health hazard, with the radioactivity of uranium a secondary concern. The update of the toxicologic evidence on uranium adds to the established findings regarding nephrotoxicity, genotoxicity, and developmental defects. Additional novel toxicologic findings, including some at the molecular level, are now emerging that raise the biological plausibility of adverse effects on the brain, on reproduction, including estrogenic effects, on gene expression, and on uranium metabolism. Historically, most epidemiology on uranium mining has focused on mine workers and radon exposure. Although that situation is still overwhelmingly true, a smaller emerging literature has begun to form around environmental exposure in residential areas near uranium mining and processing facilities. We present and critique such studies. Clearly, more epidemiologic research is needed to contribute to causal inference. As much damage is irreversible, and possibly cumulative, present efforts must be vigorous to limit environmental uranium contamination and exposure.

  20. CATALYZED OXIDATION OF URANIUM IN CARBONATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Clifford, W.E.

    1962-05-29

    A process is given wherein carbonate solutions are employed to leach uranium from ores and the like containing lower valent uranium species by utilizing catalytic amounts of copper in the presence of ammonia therein and simultaneously supplying an oxidizing agent thereto. The catalysis accelerates rate of dissolution and increases recovery of uranium from the ore. (AEC)

  1. TUNGSTEN INTERFERENCE IN VOLUMETRIC ANALYSIS OF URANIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, R.F.; Articolo, O.

    1958-08-01

    Tungsten was found to have a negligible effect on the determination of uranium in uranium-zirconium alloys by the Jones reductor-dichromate method used at KAPL. The tungstate ion interferred seriously and gave high results. However, the soluble tungsten was precipitated by intensive fuming with sulfuric acid and rendered ineffective in tbe subsequent oxidationreduction reactions of the uranium. (auth)

  2. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section 540.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium enrichment means the process of...

  3. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.; Johns, I.B.

    1959-03-10

    The removal of fission products such as strontium, barium, cesium, rubidium, or iodine from neutronirradiated uranium is described. Uranium halide or elemental halogen is added to melted irradiated uranium to convert the fission products to either more volatile compositions which vaporize from the melt or to higher melting point compositions which separate as solids.

  4. Fuel Performance Calculations for FeCrAl Cladding in BWRs

    SciTech Connect

    George, Nathan; Sweet, Ryan; Maldonado, G. Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This study expands upon previous neutronics analyses of the reactivity impact of alternate cladding concepts in boiling water reactor (BWR) cores and directs focus toward contrasting fuel performance characteristics of FeCrAl cladding against those of traditional Zircaloy. Using neutronics results from a modern version of the 3D nodal simulator NESTLE, linear power histories were generated and supplied to the BISON-CASL code for fuel performance evaluations. BISON-CASL (formerly Peregrine) expands on material libraries implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and the MOOSE framework by providing proprietary material data. By creating material libraries for Zircaloy and FeCrAl cladding, the thermomechanical behaviormore » of the fuel rod (e.g., strains, centerline fuel temperature, and time to gap closure) were investigated and contrasted.« less

  5. Structural transformations in hull material clad by nitrogen stainless steel using various methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaradze, V. V.; Kataeva, N. V.; Mushnikova, S. Yu.; Khar'kov, O. A.; Kalinin, G. Yu.; Yampol'skii, V. D.

    2014-02-01

    Specimens of a 10N3KhDMBF shipbuilding hull steel were clad by a 04Kh20N6G11M2AFB nitrogen austenitic steel using various treatment conditions, which included hot rolling, austenitic facing, and explosive welding followed by hot rolling and heat treatment. Between the base and cladding materials, an intermediate layer with variable concentrations of chromium, manganese, and nickel was found, in which a martensitic structure was formed. In all the cases, the strength of bonding of the cladding layer to the hull steel (determined in tests for shear to fracture) was fairly high (σsh = 437-520 MPa). The only exception was the specimen produced by unidirectional facing without subsequent hot rolling (σsh = 308 MPa), in which nonfusions between the faced beads of stainless steel were detected.

  6. Highly scalable, resonantly cladding-pumped, Er-doped fiber laser with record efficiency.

    PubMed

    Dubinskii, M; Zhang, J; Ter-Mikirtychev, V

    2009-05-15

    We report the performance of a resonantly cladding-pumped, Yb-free, Er-doped fiber laser. We believe this is the first reported resonantly cladding-pumped fiber-Bragg-grating-based, Er-doped, large-mode-area (LMA) fiber laser. The laser, pumped by fiber-coupled InGaAsP/InP laser diode modules at 1,532.5 nm, delivers approximately 48 W of cw output at 1,590 nm. It is believed to be the highest power ever reported from a Yb-free Er-doped LMA fiber. This fully integrated laser also has the optical-to-optical efficiency of approximately 57%, to the best of our knowledge, the highest efficiency reported for cladding-pumped unidirectionally emitting Er-doped laser.

  7. High power operation of cladding pumped holmium-doped silica fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Hemming, Alexander; Bennetts, Shayne; Simakov, Nikita; Davidson, Alan; Haub, John; Carter, Adrian

    2013-02-25

    We report the highest power operation of a resonantly cladding-pumped, holmium-doped silica fibre laser. The cladding pumped all-glass fibre utilises a fluorine doped glass layer to provide low loss cladding guidance of the 1.95 µm pump radiation. The operation of both single mode and large-mode area fibre lasers was demonstrated, with up to 140 W of output power achieved. A slope efficiency of 59% versus launched pump power was demonstrated. The free running emission was measured to be 2.12-2.15 µm demonstrating the potential of this architecture to address the long wavelength operation of silica based fibre lasers with high efficiency.

  8. Low loss depressed cladding waveguide inscribed in YAG:Nd single crystal by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey; Mezentsev, Vladimir; Shestakov, Alexander; Bennion, Ian

    2012-02-13

    A depressed cladding waveguide with record low loss of 0.12 dB/cm is inscribed in YAG:Nd(0.3at.%) crystal by femtosecond laser pulses with an elliptical beam waist. The waveguide is formed by a set of parallel tracks which constitute the depressed cladding. It is a key element for compact and efficient CW waveguide laser operating at 1064 nm and pumped by a multimode laser diode. Special attention is paid to mechanical stress resulting from the inscription process. Numerical calculation of mode distribution and propagation loss with the elasto-optical effect taken into account leads to the conclusion that the depressed cladding is a dominating factor in waveguide mode formation, while the mechanical stress only slightly distorts waveguide modes.

  9. Novel intercore-cladding lithium niobate thin film coated MOEMS fiber sensor/modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamlson, Tracee L.; Konreich, Phillip; Yu, Chung

    2005-01-01

    A MOEMS fiber modulator/sensor is fabricated by depositing a lithium niobate sol-gel thin film between the core and cladding of a fiber preform. The preform is then drawn into 125-micron fibers. Such a MOEMS modulator design is expected to enhance existing lithium niobate undersea acousto-optic sound wave detectors. In our proposed version, the lithium niobate thin film alters the ordinary silica core/cladding boundary conditions such that, when a stress or strain is applied to the fiber, the core light confinement factor changes, leading to modulation of fiber light transmission. Test results of the lithium niobate embedded fiber with a 1550-nm, 4-mW laser source revealed a reduction in light transmission with applied tension. As a comparison, using the same laser source, an ordinary silica core/cladding fiber did not exhibit any reduction in transmitted light when the same strain was applied. Further experimental work and theoretical analysis is ongoing.

  10. Double-clad fiber with a tapered end for confocal endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lemire-Renaud, Simon; Strupler, Mathias; Benboujja, Fouzi; Godbout, Nicolas; Boudoux, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    We present a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) for use in confocal endomicroscopy to reduce speckle contrast, increase signal collection while preserving optical sectioning. The DCFC is made by incorporating a double-clad tapered fiber (DCTF) to a fused-tapered DCFC for achromatic transmission (from 1265 nm to 1325 nm) of > 95% illumination light trough the single mode (SM) core and collection of > 40% diffuse light through inner cladding modes. Its potential for confocal endomicroscopy is demonstrated in a spectrally-encoded imaging setup which shows a 3 times reduction in speckle contrast as well as 5.5 × increase in signal collection compared to imaging with a SM fiber. PMID:22076259

  11. Double-clad fiber with a tapered end for confocal endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lemire-Renaud, Simon; Strupler, Mathias; Benboujja, Fouzi; Godbout, Nicolas; Boudoux, Caroline

    2011-11-01

    We present a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) for use in confocal endomicroscopy to reduce speckle contrast, increase signal collection while preserving optical sectioning. The DCFC is made by incorporating a double-clad tapered fiber (DCTF) to a fused-tapered DCFC for achromatic transmission (from 1265 nm to 1325 nm) of > 95% illumination light trough the single mode (SM) core and collection of > 40% diffuse light through inner cladding modes. Its potential for confocal endomicroscopy is demonstrated in a spectrally-encoded imaging setup which shows a 3 times reduction in speckle contrast as well as 5.5 × increase in signal collection compared to imaging with a SM fiber.

  12. Femtosecond laser inscribed cladding waveguide lasers in Nd:LiYF4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-Ling; Huang, Ze-Ping; Ye, Yong-Kai; Wang, Hai-Long

    2018-06-01

    Depressed circular cladding, buried waveguides were fabricated in Nd:LiYF4 crystals with an ultrafast Yb-doped fiber master-oscillator power amplifier laser. Waveguides were optimized by varying the laser writing conditions, such as pulse energy, focus depth, femtosecond laser polarization and scanning velocity. Under optical pump at 799 nm, cladding waveguides showed continuous-wave laser oscillation at 1047 nm. Single- and multi-transverse modes waveguide laser were realized by varying the waveguide diameter. The maximum output power in the 40 μm waveguide is ∼195 mW with a slope efficiency of 34.3%. The waveguide lasers with hexagonal and cubic cladding geometry were also realized.

  13. Effect of mo Content on Microstructure and Properties of Laser Cladding Fe-BASED Alloy Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoli, Ma; Kaiming, Wang; Hanguang, Fu; Jiang, Ju; Yongping, Lei; Dawei, Yi

    Mo alloying Fe-based coating was fabricated on the surface of Q235 steel by using 6 kW fiber laser. The effects of Mo additions on the microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of the cladding layer were studied by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Vickers hardness tester and M-200 ring block wear tester. Research results showed that the microstructure of Mo-free cladding layer mainly consisted of matrix and eutectic structure. The matrix was martensite and retained austenite. The eutectic structure mainly consisted of M2(B,C) and M7(C,B)3 type of eutectic borocarbides. With the increase of Mo content, there was no significant change in the matrix. However, the eutectic structure was transformed from M2(B,C)- and M7(C,B)3-type borocarbides into M2(B,C)-, M7(C,B)3- and M23(C,B)6-type borocarbides. When the content of Mo is 4.0wt.%, the Mo2C-type carbide appear on the matrix, and parts of the borocarbide networks are broken. The change of microhardness of the cladding layer was not obvious with the increase of Mo content. But the increase of Mo content increases the wear resistance of the cladding layer. The wear resistance of cladding layer with 4.0wt.% Mo is 2.4 times as much as the cladding layer which is Mo-free.

  14. Two-Channel SPR Sensor Combined Application of Polymer- and Vitreous-Clad Optic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yong; Su, Yudong; Liu, Chunlan; Nie, Xiangfei; Liu, Zhihai; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yonghui

    2017-01-01

    By combining a polymer-clad optic fiber and a vitreous-clad optic fiber, we proposed and fabricated a novel optic fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor to conduct two-channel sensing at the same detection area. The traditional optic fiber SPR sensor has many disadvantages; for example, removing the cladding requires corrosion, operating it is dangerous, adjusting the dynamic response range is hard, and producing different resonance wavelengths in the sensing area to realize a multi-channel measurement is difficult. Therefore, in this paper, we skillfully used bare fiber grinding technology and reverse symmetry welding technology to remove the cladding in a multi-mode fiber and expose the evanescent field. On the basis of investigating the effect of the grinding angle on the dynamic range change of the SPR resonance valley wavelength and sensitivity, we combined polymer-clad fiber and vitreous-clad fiber by a smart design structure to realize at a single point a two-channel measurement fiber SPR sensor. In this paper, we obtained a beautiful spectral curve from a multi-mode fiber two-channel SPR sensor. In the detection range of the refractive rate between 1.333 RIU and 1.385 RIU, the resonance valley wavelength of channel Ⅰ shifted from 622 nm to 724 nm with a mean average sensitivity of 1961 nm/RIU and the resonance valley wavelength of channel Ⅱ shifted from 741 nm to 976 nm with a mean average sensitivity of 4519 nm/RIU. PMID:29232841

  15. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Ting; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-07-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%-40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V8C7, M7C3, and M23C6 were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content. No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. The corrosion resistance of the clads was decreased with the increase in the VC content, demonstrating the negative effect of VC on the corrosion resistance of AISI 420 stainless steel

  16. METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

  17. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM TUNGSTEN

    DOEpatents

    Newnam, K.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the rccovery of uranium which has adhered to tungsten parts in electromagnetic isotope separation apparatus. Such a tungsten article is dissolved electrolytically in 20% NaOH by using the tungsten article as the anode. The resulting solution, containing soluble sodium lungstate and an insoluble slime, is then filtered. The slime residue is ignited successively with sodium nitrate and sodium pyrosulfate and leashed, and the resulting filtrates are combined with the original filtrate. Uranium is then recovered from the combined flltrates by diuranate precipitation.

  18. PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, J.W.C.

    1959-09-29

    A process is described for the production of uranium by the autothermic reduction of an anhydrous uranium halide with an alkaline earth metal, preferably magnesium One feature is the initial reduction step which is brought about by locally bringing to reaction temperature a portion of a mixture of the reactants in an open reaction vessel having in contact with the mixture a lining of substantial thickness composed of calcium fluoride. The lining is prepared by coating the interior surface with a plastic mixture of calcium fluoride and water and subsequently heating the coating in situ until at last the exposed surface is substantially anhydrous.

  19. 77 FR 38825 - Clad Steel Plate From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Clad Steel Plate From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... order on clad steel plate from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material...

  20. 77 FR 59158 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Application for Approval of Copper-Clad Iron Shot and Fluoropolymer Shot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... June 20, 2012 (77 FR 36980), and one for the fluoropolymer shot coatings on July 6, 2012 (77 FR 39983... Bird Hunting; Application for Approval of Copper-Clad Iron Shot and Fluoropolymer Shot Coatings as... approve copper-clad iron shot and fluoropolymer coatings for hunting waterfowl and coots. We published a...

  1. 78 FR 65573 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Application for Approval of Copper-Clad Iron Shot and Fluoropolymer Shot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... supported approval of the shot and the coatings, and one contained no useful information. Therefore, as... Hunting; Application for Approval of Copper-Clad Iron Shot and Fluoropolymer Shot Coatings as Nontoxic for... environmental assessments. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, approve copper-clad iron shot and...

  2. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi; Suud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  3. Combined optical coherence tomography and hyper-spectral imaging using a double clad fiber coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay-Lord, Robin; Lurie, Kristen L.; Attendu, Xavier; Mageau, Lucas; Godbout, Nicolas; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K.; Strupler, Mathias; Boudoux, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    This proceedings shows the combination of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Hyper-Spectral Imaging (HSI) using a double-clad optical fiber. The single mode core of the fiber is used to transmit OCT signals, while the cladding, with its large collection area, provides an efficient way to capture the reflectance spectrum of the sample. The combination of both methods enables three-dimensional acquisition of sample morphology with OCT, enhanced by the molecular information contained in its hyper-spectral image. We believe that the combination of these techniques could result in endoscopes with enhanced tissue identification capability.

  4. Development and Validation of Accident Models for FeCrAl Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence; Hales, Jason Dean

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this milestone report is to present the work completed in regards to material model development for FeCrAl cladding and highlight the results of applying these models to Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) and Station Blackouts (SBO). With the limited experimental data available (essentially only the data used to create the models) true validation is not possible. In the absence of another alternative, qualitative comparisons during postulated accident scenarios between FeCrAl and Zircaloy-4 cladded rods have been completed demonstrating the superior performance of FeCrAl.

  5. Air-clad fibres for astronomical instrumentation: focal-ratio degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åslund, Mattias L.; Canning, John

    2009-05-01

    Focal-ratio degradation (FRD) of light launched into high-numerical aperture (NA) single-annulus all-silica undoped air-clad fibres at an NA of 0.54 is reported. The measured annular light distribution remained Gaussian after 30 m of propagation, but the angular FWHM of the output annulus doubled from 4° after 1 m propagation to 8.5° after 30 m, which is significantly larger than that reported of standard doped-silica fibres (NA < 0.22). No significant diffractive effects were observed. The design of air-clad fibres for broad-band, high-NA astrophotonics applications is discussed.

  6. Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperature on the Ductility of High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M. C.; Burtseva, T. A.

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister and/or cask drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in, and potential embrittlement of, high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures (PCT) and hoop stresses. Extensive precipitation of radial hydrides could lower the failure hoop stresses and strains, relative to limits established for as-irradiated cladding from discharged fuel rods stored in pools, at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  7. Metal-water reaction and cladding deformation models for RELAP5/MOD3

    SciTech Connect

    Caraher, D.L.; Shumway, R.W.

    1989-06-01

    A model for calculating the reaction of zirconium with steam according to the Cathcart-Pawel correlation has been incorporated into RELAP5/MOD3. A cladding deformation model which computes swelling and rupture of the cladding according to the empirical correlations for Powers and Meyer has also been incorporated into RELAP5/MOD3. This report gives the background of the models, documents their implantation into the RELAP5 subroutines, and reports the developmental assessment done on the models. 4 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. FIBER AND INTEGRATED OPTICS: Radiative losses in single-mode fiber waveguides with a depressed cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. V.; Kurkov, Andrei S.; Miroshnichenko, S. I.; Semenov, V. A.

    1989-11-01

    A comparison was made of the calculated and measured radiative losses suffered by the fundamental and first higher modes in real waveguide structures with a depressed cladding. It was found that in determination of the operating range of single-mode waveguides with a depressed cladding it is essential to allow not only for the increase in the losses due to leaking of the fundamental HE11 mode at long wavelengths, but also for the shift of the cutoff wavelength of the first higher HE21 mode for shorter wavelengths.

  9. 20 W continuous-wave cladding-pumped Nd-doped fiber laser at 910 nm.

    PubMed

    Laroche, M; Cadier, B; Gilles, H; Girard, S; Lablonde, L; Robin, T

    2013-08-15

    We demonstrate a double-clad fiber laser operating at 910 nm with a record power of 20 W. Laser emission on the three-level scheme is enabled by the combination of a small inner cladding-to-core diameter ratio and a high brightness pump source at 808 nm. A laser conversion efficiency as high as 44% was achieved in CW operating regime by using resonant fiber Bragg reflectors at 910 nm that prevent the lasing at the 1060 nm competing wavelength. Furthermore, in a master oscillator power-amplifier scheme, an amplified power of 14.8 W was achieved at 914 nm in the same fiber.

  10. Bend-resistant large mode area fiber with novel segmented cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shaoshuo; Ning, Tigang; Pei, Li; Li, Jing; Zheng, Jingjing

    2018-01-01

    A novel structure of segment cladding fiber (SCF) with characteristics of bend-resistance and large-mode-area (LMA) is proposed. In this new structure, the high refractive index (RI) core is periodically surrounded by high RI fan-segmented claddings. Numerical investigations show that effective single-mode operation of the proposed fiber with mode field area of 700 μm2 can be achieved when the bending radius is 15 cm. Besides, this fiber is insensitive to the bending orientation at the ranging of [-180°, 180°]. The proposed design shows great potential in high power fiber lasers and amplifiers with compact structure.

  11. Neodymium-doped phosphate fiber lasers with an all-solid microstructured inner cladding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang; Zhou, Qinling; Yu, Chunlei; Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping

    2012-06-15

    We report on high-power fiber lasers based on index-guiding, all-solid neodymium-doped (Nd-doped) phosphate photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a hexagonal-shaped inner cladding. The optimum fiber laser with a 36 cm length active fiber, generated up to 7.92 W output power at 1053 nm, which benefited from a high absorption coefficient for pump power due to its noncircular inner cladding. The guiding properties of the all-solid PCF were also investigated. A stable mode with a donut-shaped profile and a power-dependent laser beam quality have been observed experimentally and analyzed.

  12. Release behavior of uranium in uranium mill tailings under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Tongjiang; Sun, Hongjuan; Yue, Huanjuan

    2017-05-01

    Uranium contamination is observed in sedimentary geochemical environments, but the geochemical and mineralogical processes that control uranium release from sediment are not fully appreciated. Identification of how sediments and water influence the release and migration of uranium is critical to improve the prevention of uranium contamination in soil and groundwater. To understand the process of uranium release and migration from uranium mill tailings under water chemistry conditions, uranium mill tailing samples from northwest China were investigated with batch leaching experiments. Results showed that water played an important role in uranium release from the tailing minerals. The uranium release was clearly influenced by contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH under water chemistry conditions. Longer contact time, higher liquid content, and extreme pH were all not conducive to the stabilization of uranium and accelerated the uranium release from the tailing mineral to the solution. The values of pH were found to significantly influence the extent and mechanisms of uranium release from minerals to water. Uranium release was monitored by a number of interactive processes, including dissolution of uranium-bearing minerals, uranium desorption from mineral surfaces, and formation of aqueous uranium complexes. Considering the impact of contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH on uranium release from uranium mill tailings, reducing the water content, decreasing the porosity of tailing dumps and controlling the pH of tailings were the key factors for prevention and management of environmental pollution in areas near uranium mines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Method for producing uranium atomic beam source

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.

    1976-06-15

    A method for producing a beam of neutral uranium atoms is obtained by vaporizing uranium from a compound UM.sub.x heated to produce U vapor from an M boat or from some other suitable refractory container such as a tungsten boat, where M is a metal whose vapor pressure is negligible compared to that of uranium at the vaporization temperature. The compound, for example, may be the uranium-rhenium compound, URe.sub.2. An evaporation rate in excess of about 10 times that of conventional uranium beam sources is produced.

  14. Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, Howard; Seltzer, Steven F.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

  15. Process for alloying uranium and niobium

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.; Masters, David R.; Chapman, Lloyd R.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys such as U-6Nb are prepared by forming a stacked sandwich array of uraniun sheets and niobium powder disposed in layers between the sheets, heating the array in a vacuum induction melting furnace to a temperature such as to melt the uranium, holding the resulting mixture at a temperature above the melting point of uranium until the niobium dissolves in the uranium, and casting the uranium-niobium solution. Compositional uniformity in the alloy product is enabled by use of the sandwich structure of uranium sheets and niobium powder.

  16. Laser Cladding of TiAl Intermetallic Alloy on Ti6Al4V -Process Optimization and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárcel, B.; Serrano, A.; Zambrano, J.; Amigó, V.; Cárcel, A. C.

    In order to improve Ti6Al4V high-temperature resistance and its tribological properties, the deposition of TiAl intermetallic (Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb) coating on a Ti6Al4V substrate by coaxial laser cladding has been investigated. Laser cladding by powder injection is an emerging laser material processing technique that allows the deposition of thick protective coatings on substrates,using a high power laser beam as heat source. Laser cladding is a multiple-parameter-dependent process. The main process parameters involved (laser power, powder feeding rate, scanning speed and preheating temperature) has been optimized. The microstructure and geometrical quantities (clad area and dilution) of the coating was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition the cooling rate of the clad during the process was measured by a dual-color pyrometer. This result has been related to defectology and mechanical coating properties.

  17. Suppression of dilution in Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy cladding layer by controlling diode laser beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, Daichi; Funada, Yoshinori; Abe, Nobuyuki; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Tatsumi, Yoshihiro; Yoneyama, Mikio

    2018-02-01

    A Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy layer was produced on a type 304 stainless steel plate by laser cladding. In order to produce cladding layer with smooth surface and low dilution, influence of laser beam profile on cladding layer was investigated. A laser beam with a constant spatial intensity at the focus spot was used to suppress droplet formation during the cladding layer formation. This line spot, formed with a focussing unit designed by our group, suppressed droplet generation. The layer formed using this line spot with a constant spatial intensity had a much smoother surface compared to a layer formed using a line spot with a Gaussian-like beam. In addition, the dilution of the former layer was much smaller. These results indicated that a line spot with a constant spatial intensity was more effective in producing a cladding layer with smooth surface and low dilution because it suppressed droplet generation.

  18. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's tabulation of volcanogenic uranium deposits lists 100 deposits in 20 countries, with major deposits in Russia, Mongolia, and China. Collectively these deposits are estimated to contain uranium resources of approximately 500,000 tons of uranium, which amounts to 6 percent of the known global resources. Prior to the 1990s, these deposits were considered to be small (less than 10,000 tons of uranium) with relatively low to moderate grades (0.05 to 0.2 weight percent of uranium). Recent availability of information on volcanogenic uranium deposits in Asia highlighted the large resource potential of this deposit type. For example, the Streltsovskoye district in eastern Russia produced more than 100,000 tons of uranium as of 2005; with equivalent resources remaining. Known volcanogenic uranium deposits within the United States are located in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. These deposits produced an estimated total of 800 tons of uranium during mining from the 1950s through the 1970s and have known resources of 30,000 tons of uranium. The most recent estimate of speculative resources proposed an endowment of 200,000 tons of uranium.

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hot wire laser clad layers for repairing precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Peng; Cai, Zhipeng; Feng, Zhenhua; Wang, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel (PH-MSS) is widely used as load-bearing parts because of its excellent overall properties. It is economical and flexible to repair the failure parts instead of changing new ones. However, it is difficult to keep properties of repaired part as good as those of the substrate. With preheating wire by resistance heat, hot wire laser cladding owns both merits of low heat input and high deposition efficiency, thus is regarded as an advantaged repairing technology for damaged parts of high value. Multi-pass layers were cladded on the surface of FV520B by hot wire laser cladding. The microstructure and mechanical properties were compared and analyzed for the substrate and the clad layer. For the as-cladded layer, microstructure was found non-uniform and divided into quenched and tempered regions. Tensile strength was almost equivalent to that of the substrate, while ductility and impact toughness deteriorated much. With using laser scanning layer by layer during laser cladding, microstructure of the clad layers was tempered to fine martensite uniformly. The ductility and toughness of the clad layer were improved to be equivalent to those of the substrate, while the tensile strength was a little lower than that of the substrate. By adding TiC nanoparticles as well as laser scanning, the precipitation strengthening effect was improved and the structure was refined in the clad layer. The strength, ductility and toughness were all improved further. Finally, high quality clad layers were obtained with equivalent or even superior mechanical properties to the substrate, offering a valuable technique to repair PH-MSS.

  20. Method development and validation for simultaneous determination of IEA-R1 reactor’s pool water uranium and silicon content by ICP OES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, J. C.; Guilhen, S. N.; Cotrim, M. E. B.; Pires, M. A. F.

    2018-03-01

    IPEN’s research reactor, IEA-R1, an open pool type research reactor moderated and cooled by light water. High quality water is a key factor in preventing the corrosion of the spent fuel stored in the pool. Leaching of radionuclides from the corroded fuel cladding may be prevented by an efficient water treatment and purification system. However, as a safety management policy, IPEN has adopted a water chemistry control which periodically monitors the levels of uranium (U) and silicon (Si) in the pool’s reactor, since IEA-R1 employs U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel. An analytical method was developed and validated for the determination of uranium and silicon by ICP OES. This work describes the validation process, in a context of quality assurance, including the parameters selectivity, linearity, quantification limit, precision and recovery.