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Sample records for zircaloy-4 endplate welds

  1. Linear Friction Welding of Dissimilar Materials 316L Stainless Steel to Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanjara, P.; Naik, B. S.; Yang, Q.; Cao, X.; Gholipour, J.; Chen, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    In the nuclear industry, there are a number of applications where the transition of stainless steel to Zircaloy is of technological importance. However, due to the differences in their properties there are considerable challenges associated with developing a joining process that will sufficiently limit the heat input and welding time—so as to minimize the extent of interaction at the joint interface and the resulting formation of intermetallic compounds—but still render a functional metallurgical bond between these two alloys. As such, linear friction welding, a solid-state joining technology, was selected in the present study to assess the feasibility of welding 316L stainless steel to Zircaloy-4. The dissimilar alloy welds were examined to evaluate their microstructural characteristics, microhardness evolution across the joint interface, static tensile properties, and fatigue behavior. Microstructural observations revealed a central intermixed region and, on the Zircaloy-4 side, dynamically recrystallized and thermomechanically affected zones were present. By contrast, deformation on the 316L stainless steel side was limited. In the intermixed region a drastic change in the composition was observed along with a local increase in hardness, which was attributed to the presence of intermetallic compounds, such as FeZr3 and Cr2Zr. The average yield (316 MPa) and ultimate tensile (421 MPa) strengths met the minimum strength properties of Zircaloy-4, but the elongation was relatively low ( 2 pct). The tensile and fatigue fracture of the welds always occurred at the interface in the mode of partial cohesive failure.

  2. Room temperature mechanical properties of electron beam welded zircaloy-4 sheet

    DOE PAGES

    Parga, C. J.; Rooyen, I. J.; Coryell, B. D.; ...

    2017-11-04

    Room temperature mechanical properties of electron beam welded and plain Zircaloy-4 sheet (1.6mm thick) have been measured and compared. Various welding parameters were utilized to join sheet material. Electron beam welded specimens and as-received sheet specimens show comparable mechanical properties. Zr-4 sheet displays anisotropy; tensile properties measured for transverse display higher elastic modulus, yield strength, reduction of area and slightly lower ductility than for the longitudinal (rolling direction). Higher welding power increases the alloy’s hardness, elastic modulus and yield strength, with a corresponding decrease in tensile strength and ductility. The hardness measured at weld is comparable to the parent metalmore » hardness. Hardness at heat-affected-zone is slightly higher. Electron microscopic examination shows distinct microstructure morphology and grain size at the weld zone, HAZ and parent metal. A correlation between welding parameters, mechanical properties and microstructural features was established for electron beam welded Zircaloy-4 sheet material.« less

  3. Room temperature mechanical properties of electron beam welded zircaloy-4 sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Parga, C. J.; Rooyen, I. J.; Coryell, B. D.

    Room temperature mechanical properties of electron beam welded and plain Zircaloy-4 sheet (1.6mm thick) have been measured and compared. Various welding parameters were utilized to join sheet material. Electron beam welded specimens and as-received sheet specimens show comparable mechanical properties. Zr-4 sheet displays anisotropy; tensile properties measured for transverse display higher elastic modulus, yield strength, reduction of area and slightly lower ductility than for the longitudinal (rolling direction). Higher welding power increases the alloy’s hardness, elastic modulus and yield strength, with a corresponding decrease in tensile strength and ductility. The hardness measured at weld is comparable to the parent metalmore » hardness. Hardness at heat-affected-zone is slightly higher. Electron microscopic examination shows distinct microstructure morphology and grain size at the weld zone, HAZ and parent metal. A correlation between welding parameters, mechanical properties and microstructural features was established for electron beam welded Zircaloy-4 sheet material.« less

  4. Numerical Simulations on the Laser Spot Welding of Zirconium Alloy Endplate for Nuclear Fuel Bundle Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, G.; Narayana, K. L.; Boggarapu, Nageswara Rao

    2018-03-01

    In the nuclear industry, a critical welding process is joining of an end plate to a fuel rod to form a fuel bundle. Literature on zirconium welding in such a critical operation is limited. A CFD model is developed and performed for the three-dimensional non-linear thermo-fluid analysis incorporating buoyancy and Marnangoni stress and specifying temperature dependent properties to predict weld geometry and temperature field in and around the melt pool of laser spot during welding of a zirconium alloy E110 endplate with a fuel rod. Using this method, it is possible to estimate the weld pool dimensions for the specified laser power and laser-on-time. The temperature profiles will estimate the HAZ and microstructure. The adequacy of generic nature of the model is validated with existing experimental data.

  5. Investigation of mechanical and microstructural properties of Zircaloy-4 under different experimental conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Silva, Chinthaka M.; Leonard, Keith J.; Van Abel, Eric; ...

    2017-12-09

    Here two types of Zircaloy-4 (alpha-annealed and beta-quenched) were investigated in their different forms. It was found that mechanical properties of Zircaloy-4 are affected significantly by welding and hydrogen-charging followed by neutron irradiation. Evaluation of microstructural properties of samples showed that these changes are mainly due to the formation of secondary phases such as hydrides—mostly along grain boundaries, dislocation channeling and their disruptions, and the increase in the type dislocation loops.

  6. Investigation of mechanical and microstructural properties of Zircaloy-4 under different experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Chinthaka M.; Leonard, Keith J.; Van Abel, Eric; Geringer, J. Wilna; Bryan, Chris D.

    2018-02-01

    Two types of Zircaloy-4 (alpha-annealed and beta-quenched) were investigated in their different forms. It was found that mechanical properties of Zircaloy-4 are affected significantly by welding and hydrogen-charging followed by neutron irradiation. Evaluation of microstructural properties of samples showed that these changes are mainly due to the formation of secondary phases such as hydrides-mostly along grain boundaries, dislocation channeling and their disruptions, and the increase in the type dislocation loops.

  7. Study on the hydrogenation of Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Dupim, Ivaldete; Moreira, João M. L.; Silva, Selma Luiza; Silva, Cecilia Chaves Guedes e.; Nunes, Oswaldo; Gomide, Ricardo Gonçalves

    2012-08-01

    In this article we investigate producing Zirconium powder from discarded Zircaloy-4 material through the hydride-dehydride method. We restrict our study to the first part of the method, namely the hydrogenation process. Differential thermal analyses of the hydrogenation process of the Zircaloy-4 show that no hydrogen absorption occurs at temperatures below 573 K and hydrogen gas pressure of 25 kPa. When the system temperature is raised to around 770 K, with the same gas pressure, the protecting oxide layer of the specimens can be overcome and they are quickly hydrogenated. The bulk of the reaction occurs in about 5 min with the precipitation of Zirconium hydrides in the Zr-δ and Zr-ɛ phases. Once the temperature passes 573 K, the incubation time to initiate the reaction is short (about 5 min). Tests in a tube furnace system with larger samples, hydrogen pressure varying from 30 to 180 kPa, and temperature from 700 to 833.15 K, show that the specimens are fully hydrogenated and can be easily pulverized. The results indicate that the hydrogenation of the Zircaloy-4 chips can be successfully undertaken at temperatures around 770 K and hydrogen gas pressure as low as 30 kPa.

  8. Sliding wear and friction behaviour of zircaloy-4 in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Garima; Limaye, P. K.; Jadhav, D. T.

    2009-11-01

    In water cooled nuclear reactors, the sliding of fuel bundles in fuel channel handling system can lead to severe wear and it is an important topic to study. In the present study, sliding wear behaviour of zircaloy-4 was investigated in water (pH ˜ 10.5) using ball-on-plate sliding wear tester. Sliding wear resistance zircaloy-4 against SS 316 was examined at room temperature. Sliding wear tests were carried out at different load and sliding frequencies. The coefficient of friction of zircaloy-4 was also measured during each tests and it was found to decrease slightly with the increase in applied load. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zircaloy-4 were identified to be microcutting, micropitting and microcracking of deformed subsurface zones in water.

  9. Understanding thermally activated plastic deformation behavior of Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; Alomari, A.; Murty, K. L.

    2018-06-01

    Understanding micromechanics of plastic deformation of existing materials is essential for improving their properties further and/or developing advanced materials for much more severe load bearing applications. The objective of the present work was to understand micromechanics of plastic deformation of Zircaloy-4, a zirconium-based alloy used as fuel cladding and channel (in BWRs) material in nuclear reactors. The Zircaloy-4 in recrystallized (at 973 K for 4 h) condition was subjected to uniaxial tensile testing at a constant cross-head velocity at temperatures in the range 293 K-1073 K and repeated stress relaxation tests at 293 K, 573 K, and 773 K. The minimum in the total elongation was indicative of dynamic strain aging phenomenon in this alloy in the intermediate temperature regime. The yield stress of the alloy was separated into effective and athermal components and the transition from thermally activated dislocation glide to athermal regime took place at around 673 K with the athermal stress estimated to be 115 MPa. The activation volume was found to be in the range of 40 b3 to 160 b3. The activation volume values and the data analyses using the solid-solution models in literature indicated dislocation-solute interaction to be a potential deformation mechanism in thermally activated regime. The activation energy calculated at 573 K was very close to that found for diffusivity of oxygen in α-Zr that was suggestive of dislocations-oxygen interaction during plastic deformation. This type of information may be helpful in alloy design in selecting different elements to control the deformation behavior of the material and impart desired mechanical properties in those materials for specific applications.

  10. Hydrogen motion in Zircaloy-4 cladding during a LOCA transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elodie, T.; Jean, D.; Séverine, G.; M-Christine, B.; Michel, C.; Berger, P.; Martine, B.; Antoine, A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen are key elements influencing the embrittlement of zirconium-based nuclear fuel cladding during the quench phase following a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The understanding of the mechanisms influencing the motion of these two chemical elements in the metal is required to fully describe the material embrittlement. High temperature steam oxidation tests were performed on pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples with hydrogen contents ranging between 11 and 400 wppm prior to LOCA transient. Thanks to the use of both Electron Probe Micro-Analysis (EPMA) and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (μ-ERDA), the chemical elements partitioning has been systematically quantified inside the prior-β phase. Image analysis and metallographic examinations were combined to provide an average oxygen profile as well as hydrogen profile within the cladding thickness after LOCA transient. The measured hydrogen profile is far from homogeneous. Experimental distributions are compared to those predicted numerically using calculations derived from a finite difference thermo-diffusion code (DIFFOX) developed at IRSN.

  11. Microstructure evolution of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 under charged particles irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaumé, M.; Onimus, F.; Dupuy, L.; Tissot, O.; Bachelet, C.; Mompiou, F.

    2017-11-01

    Recrystallized zirconium alloys are used as nuclear fuel cladding tubes of Pressurized Water Reactors. During operation, these alloys are submitted to fast neutron irradiation which leads to their in-reactor deformation and to a change of their mechanical properties. These phenomena are directly related to the microstructure evolution under irradiation and especially to the formation of -type dislocation loops. In the present work, the radiation damage evolution in recrystallized Zircaloy-4 has been studied using charged particles irradiation. The loop nucleation and growth kinetics, and also the helical climb of linear dislocations, were observed in-situ using a High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM) under 1 MeV electron irradiation at 673 and 723 K. In addition, 600 keV Zr+ ion irradiations were conducted at the same temperature. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) characterizations have been performed after both types of irradiations, and show dislocation loops with a Burgers vector belonging to planes close to { 10 1 bar 0 } first order prismatic planes. The nature of the loops has been characterized. Only interstitial dislocation loops have been observed after ion irradiation at 723 K. However, after electron irradiation conducted at 673 and 723 K, both interstitial and vacancy loops were observed, the proportion of interstitial loops increasing as the temperature is increased. The loop growth kinetics analysis shows that as the temperature increases, the loop number density decreases and the loop growth rate tends to increase. An increase of the flux leads to an increase of the loop number density and a decrease of the loop growth rate. The results are compared to previous works and discussed in the light of point defects diffusion.

  12. Surface treatment to form a dispersed Y2O3 layer on Zircaloy-4 tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yang-Il; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Guim, Hwan-Uk; Lim, Yoon-Soo; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Dong-Jun; Yang, Jae-Ho

    2018-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 is a traditional zirconium-based alloy developed for application in nuclear fuel cladding tubes. The surfaces of Zircaloy-4 tubes were treated using a laser beam to increase their mechanical strength. Laser beam scanning of a tube coated with yttrium oxide (Y2O3) resulted in the formation of a dispersed oxide layer in the tube's surface region. Y2O3 particles penetrated the Zircaloy-4 during the laser treatment and were distributed uniformly in the surface region. The thickness of the dispersed oxide layer varied from 50 to 140 μm depending on the laser beam trajectory. The laser treatment also modified the texture of the tube. The preferred basal orientation along the normal to the tube surface disappeared, and a random structure appeared after laser processing. The most obvious result was an increase in the mechanical strength. The tensile strength of Zircaloy-4 increased by 10-20% with the formation of the dispersed oxide layer. The compressive yield stress also increased, by more than 15%. Brittle fracture was observed in the surface-treated samples during tensile and compressive deformation at room temperature; however, the fracture behavior was changed in ductile at elevated temperatures.

  13. High- and Low-Temperature Deformation Behavior of Different Orientation Hot-Rolled Annealed Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Yingying; Gen, Qingfeng; Jiang, Hongwei; Shan, Debin; Guo, Bin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the hot-rolled annealed Zircaloy-4 samples with different orientation were subjected to uniaxial compression with a strain rate of 0.001 s-1 to obtain the stress-strain curves of different initial orientation samples at different temperatures. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique and transmission electron microscope (TEM) technique were used to analyze the microstructures and textures of compressed samples. The mechanical properties and microstructural evolution of rolling directions (RD), transverse directions (TD) and normal directions (ND) were investigated under the conditions of - 150 °C low temperature, room temperature and 200 °C high temperature (simulated lunar temperature environment). The results show that the strength of Zircaloy-4 decreases with the increase in deformation temperature, and the strength in three orientations is ND > TD > RD. The deformation mechanism of hot-rolled annealed Zircaloy-4 with different orientation is different. In RD, { 10\\bar{1}0} < {a} > prismatic slip has the highest Schmid factor (SF), so it is most easy to activate the slip, followed by TD orientation, and ND orientation is the most difficult to activate. The deformed grains abide slip→twinning→slip rule, and the different orientation Zircaloy-4 deformation mechanisms mainly are the twinning coordinated with the slip.

  14. Nondestructive hydrogen analysis of steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 by wide-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Qian, Shuo; Garrison, Ben; Smith, Tyler; Kim, Peter

    2018-04-01

    A nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the hydrogen content in high-temperature steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding was used to produce hydrided specimens with hydrogen content up to ≈500 wppm. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. The hydrided samples were then oxidized in steam up to ≈6.0 wt. % at 1100 °C. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness, and uniform oxide layers were formed on the sample surfaces by the steam oxidation. Small- and wide-angle neutron scattering were simultaneously performed to provide a quick (less than an hour per sample) measurement of the hydrogen content in various types of hydrided and oxidized Zircaloy-4. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in pre-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately by both small- and wide-angle neutron scattering. For steam-oxidized samples, the small-angle neutron scattering is contaminated with coherent scattering from additional structural features induced by the steam oxidation. However, the scattering intensity of the wide-angle neutron scattering increases proportionally with the hydrogen charged in the samples. The hydrogen content and wide-angle neutron scattering intensity are highly linearly correlated for the oxidized cladding samples examined in this work, and can be used to precisely determine the hydrogen content in steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 samples. Hydrogen contents determined by neutron scattering of oxidation samples were also found to be consistent with the results of chemical analysis within acceptable margins for error.

  15. Nondestructive hydrogen analysis of steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 by wide-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Qian, Shuo; Garrison, Ben

    In this study, a nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the hydrogen content in high-temperature steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding was used to produce hydrided specimens with hydrogen content up to ≈500 wppm. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. The hydrided samples were then oxidized in steam up to ≈6.0wt. % at 1100°C. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness,more » and uniform oxide layers were formed on the sample surfaces by the steam oxidation. Small- and wide-angle neutron scattering were simultaneously performed to provide a quick (less than an hour per sample) measurement of the hydrogen content in various types of hydrided and oxidized Zircaloy-4. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in pre-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately by both small- and wide-angle neutron scattering. For steam-oxidized samples, the small-angle neutron scattering is contaminated with coherent scattering from additional structural features induced by the steam oxidation. However, the scattering intensity of the wide-angle neutron scattering increases proportionally with the hydrogen charged in the samples. The hydrogen content and wide-angle neutron scattering intensity are highly linearly correlated for the oxidized cladding samples examined in this work, and can be used to precisely determine the hydrogen content in steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 samples. Hydrogen contents determined by neutron scattering of oxidation samples were also found to be consistent with the results of chemical analysis within acceptable margins for error.« less

  16. Nondestructive hydrogen analysis of steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 by wide-angle neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Yong; Qian, Shuo; Garrison, Ben; ...

    2018-04-15

    In this study, a nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the hydrogen content in high-temperature steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding was used to produce hydrided specimens with hydrogen content up to ≈500 wppm. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. The hydrided samples were then oxidized in steam up to ≈6.0wt. % at 1100°C. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness,more » and uniform oxide layers were formed on the sample surfaces by the steam oxidation. Small- and wide-angle neutron scattering were simultaneously performed to provide a quick (less than an hour per sample) measurement of the hydrogen content in various types of hydrided and oxidized Zircaloy-4. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in pre-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately by both small- and wide-angle neutron scattering. For steam-oxidized samples, the small-angle neutron scattering is contaminated with coherent scattering from additional structural features induced by the steam oxidation. However, the scattering intensity of the wide-angle neutron scattering increases proportionally with the hydrogen charged in the samples. The hydrogen content and wide-angle neutron scattering intensity are highly linearly correlated for the oxidized cladding samples examined in this work, and can be used to precisely determine the hydrogen content in steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 samples. Hydrogen contents determined by neutron scattering of oxidation samples were also found to be consistent with the results of chemical analysis within acceptable margins for error.« less

  17. Effects of pretreatment processes for Zr electrorefining of oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa Lee, Chang; Lee, Yoo Lee; Jeon, Min Ku; Choi, Yong Taek; Kang, Kweon Ho; Park, Geun Il

    2014-06-01

    The effect of pretreatment processes for the Zr electrorefining of oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes is examined in LiCl-KCl-ZrCl4 molten salts at 500 °C. The cyclic voltammetries reveal that the Zr dissolution kinetics is highly dependent on the thickness of a Zr oxide layer formed at 500 °C under air atmosphere. For the Zircaloy-4 tube covered with a 1 μm thick oxide layer, the Zr dissolution process is initiated from a non-stoichiometric Zr oxide surface through salt treatment at an open circuit potential in the molten salt electrolyte. The Zr dissolution of the samples in the middle range of oxide layer thickness appears to be more effectively derived by the salt treatment coupled with an anodic potential application at an oxidation potential of Zr. A modification of the process scheme offers an applicability of Zr electrorefining for the treatment of oxidized cladding hull wastes.

  18. High Resolution Neutron Radiography and Tomography of Hydrided Zircaloy-4 Cladding Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tyler S; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Ray, Holly B

    2015-01-01

    Neutron radiography for hydrogen analysis was performed with several Zircaloy-4 cladding samples with controlled hydrogen concentrations up to 1100 ppm. Hydrogen charging was performed in a process tube that was heated to facilitate hydrogen absorption by the metal. A correlation between the hydrogen concentration in the hydrided tubes and the neutron intensity was established, by which hydrogen content can be determined precisely in a small area (55 m x 55 m). Radiography analysis was also performed to evaluate the heating rate and its correlation with the hydrogen distribution through hydrided materials. In addition to radiography analysis, tomography experiments were performedmore » on Zircaloy-4 tube samples to study the local hydrogen distribution. Through tomography analysis a 3D reconstruction of the tube was evaluated in which an uneven hydrogen distribution in the circumferential direction can be observed.« less

  19. Brazing characteristics of a Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe eutectic alloy filler metal for Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung G.; Lim, C. H.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. S.; Lee, M. K.; Rhee, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    A Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe quaternary eutectic alloy was employed as a new Be-free brazing filler metal for Zircaloy-4 to supersede physically vapor-deposited Be coatings used conventionally with several disadvantages. The quaternary eutectic composition of Zr58Ti16Cu10Fe16 (at.%) showing a low melting temperature range from 832 °C to 853 °C was designed by a partial substitution of Zr with Ti based on a Zr-Cu-Fe ternary eutectic system. By applying an alloy ribbon with the determined composition, a highly reliable joint was obtained with a homogeneous formation of predominantly grown α-Zr phases owing to a complete isothermal solidification, exhibiting strength higher than that of Zircaloy-4. The homogenization of the joint was rate-controlled by the diffusion of the filler elements (Ti, Cu, and Fe) into the Zircaloy-4 base metal, and the detrimental segregation of the Zr2Fe phase in the central zone was completely eliminated by an isothermal holding at a brazing temperature of 920 °C for 10 min.

  20. The increase in fatigue crack growth rates observed for Zircaloy-4 in a PWR environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockeram, B. V.; Kammenzind, B. F.

    2018-02-01

    Cyclic stresses produced during the operation of nuclear reactors can result in the extension of cracks by processes of fatigue. Although fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) data for Zircaloy-4 in air are available, little testing has been performed in a PWR primary water environment. Test programs have been performed by Gee et al., in 1989 and Picker and Pickles in 1984 by the UK Atomic Energy Authority, and by Wisner et al., in 1994, that have shown an enhancement in FCGR for Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 in high-temperature water. In this work, FCGR testing is performed on Zircaloy-4 in a PWR environment in the hydrided and non-hydrided condition over a range of stress-intensity. Measurements of crack extension are performed using a direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. The cyclic rate in the PWR primary water environment is varied between 1 cycle per minute to 0.1 cycle per minute. Faster FCGR rates are observed in water in comparison to FCGR testing performed in air for the hydrided material. Hydrided and non-hydrided materials had similar FCGR values in air, but the non-hydrided material exhibited much lower rates of FCGR in a PWR primary water environment than for hydrided material. Hydrides are shown to exhibit an increased tendency for cracking or decohesion in a PWR primary water environment that results in an enhancement in FCGR values. The FCGR in the PWR primary water only increased slightly with decreasing cycle frequency in the range of 1 cycle per minute to 0.1 cycle per minute. Comparisons between the FCGR in water and air show the enhancement from the PWR environment is affected by the applied stress intensity.

  1. In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 °C). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr-4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  2. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Al Haj; Véronique, Peres; Eric, Serris; François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital; Michel, Cournil

    2015-06-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in the dense zirconia layer after 5 h of oxidation.

  3. Recovery and recrystalization kinetics of cold-worked Zircaloy-4 plate and tubing (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, O.M.

    1968-02-01

    Empirical kinetic equations were derived to describe the recovery region between 550 and 1020/sup 0/F for times to 4000 hours for 15 to 78% cold-worked Zircaloy-4 plate and tubing. The properties studied were electrical resistivity and X-ray line sharpening. Recrystallization kinetics were described with sigmoidal curves derived from X-ray intensity and microhardness data. Light, replica, and transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction were used to postulate recovery and recrystallization mechanisms. From a structural aspect, the annealing process in cold-worked Zircaloy-4 is visualized as a dislocation climb and annihilation process to the limit allowed by the size of the deformationmore » subcells, a reorientation of the subgrain material into a recrystallization texture, a growth of reoriented cells located in the most highly worked bands, and a consumption of less favorably strained and/or oriented cells by the high-angle boundaries of the reoriented cells. Comparison of 15 and 73% cold-worked tubing showed the activation energy to be less (21 versus 60 kcal/mol) and the subcell size greater (8000A versus 1000A) for the 15% cold-worked material. (NSA 22: 21698)« less

  4. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  5. Characterization of LWRS Hybrid SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Fuel Cladding after Gamma Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Isabella J van Rooyen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the gamma irradiation tests conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was to obtain a better understanding of chemical interactions and potential changes in microstructural properties of a mock-up hybrid nuclear fuel cladding rodlet design (unfueled) in a simulated PWR water environment under irradiation conditions. The hybrid fuel rodlet design is being investigated under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program for further development and testing of one of the possible advanced LWR nuclear fuel cladding designs. The gamma irradiation tests were performed in preparation for neutron irradiation tests planned for a silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic matrixmore » composite (CMC) zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) hybrid fuel rodlet that may be tested in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) if the design is selected for further development and testing« less

  6. Intergrannular strain evolution in a zircaloy-4 alloy with Widmanstatten microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Bjorn; Vogel, Sven C; Garlea, Eena

    2009-01-01

    A Zircaloy-4 alloy with Widmanstatten-Basketweave microstructure and random texture has been used to study the deformation systems responsible for the polycrystalline plasticity at the grain level. The evolution of internal strain and bulk texture is investigated using neutron diffraction and an elasto-plastic self-consistent (EPSC) modeling scheme. The macroscopic stress-strain behavior and intergranular (hkil-specific) strain development, parallel and perpendicular to the loading direction, were measured in-situ during uniaxial tensile loading. Then, the EPSC model was employed to simulate the experimental results. This modeling scheme accounts for the thermal anisotropy; elastic-plastic properties of the constituent grains; and activation, reorientation, and stress relaxationmore » associated with twinning. The agreement between the experiment and the model will be discussed as well as the critical resolved shear stresses (CRSS) and the hardening coefficients obtained from the model.« less

  7. Effect of He implantation on the microstructure of zircaloy-4 studied using in situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunes, M. A.; Harrison, R. W.; Greaves, G.; Hinks, J. A.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2017-09-01

    Zirconium alloys are of great importance to the nuclear industry as they have been widely used as cladding materials in light-water reactors since the 1960s. This work examines the behaviour of these alloys under He ion implantation for the purposes of developing understanding of the fundamental processes behind their response to irradiation. Characterization of zircaloy-4 samples using TEM with in situ 6 keV He irradiation up to a fluence of 2.7 ×1017ions ·cm-2 in the temperature range of 298 to 1148 K has been performed. Ordered arrays of He bubbles were observed at 473 and 1148 K at a fluence of 1.7 ×1017ions ·cm-2 in αZr, the hexagonal compact (HCP) and in βZr, the body centred cubic (BCC) phases, respectively. In addition, the dissolution behaviour of cubic Zr hydrides under He irradiation has been investigated.

  8. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of hydrides in Zircaloy-4 during thermomechanical cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N.; Koss, Donald A.; Motta, Arthur T.; ...

    2017-02-20

    The d-spacing evolution of both in-plane and out-of-plane hydrides has been studied using in situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction during thermo-mechanical cycling of cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4. The structure of the hydride precipitates is such that the δ{111} d-spacing of the planes aligned with the hydride platelet face is greater than the d-spacing of the 111 planes aligned with the platelet edges. Upon heating from room temperature, the δ{111} planes aligned with hydride plate edges exhibit bi-linear thermally-induced expansion. In contrast, the d-spacing of the (111) plane aligned with the hydride plate face initially contracts upon heating. Furthermore, these experimental resultsmore » can be understood in terms of a reversal of stress state associated with precipitating or dissolving hydride platelets within the α-zirconium matrix.« less

  9. Characterization of Hydrogen Embrittled Zircaloy-4 by Using a Van de Graaff Particle Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, John

    2013-04-01

    On-site, dry cask storage was originally by the intended to be a short-term solution for holding spent nuclear fuel. Due to the lack of a permanent storage facility, the nuclear power industry seeks to assess the effective lifetime of the casks. One issue which could compromise cask integrity is Hydrogen embrittlement. This phenomenon occurs in the Zircaloy-4 fuel-rod cladding and is caused by the formation of Zirconium hydrides. Over time, thermal stresses caused by the heat from reactions of the stored nuclear fuel could result in significant breaches of the cladding. Our group at Texas A&M University- Kingsville is conducting experiments to aid in determining when such breaches will occur. We will irradiate samples of the alloy with protons of energies up to 400 keV using a Van de Graaff particle accelerator. Once irradiated, their properties will be characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Vickers hardness tests.

  10. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  11. Crack growth through the thickness of thin-sheet Hydrided Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, Patrick A. C.

    In recent years, the limits on fuel burnup have been increased to allow an increase in the amount of energy produced by a nuclear fuel assembly thus reducing waste volume and allowing greater capacity factors. As a result, it is paramount to ensure safety after longer reactor exposure times in the case of design-basis accidents, such as reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA). Previously proposed failure criteria do not directly address the particular cladding failure mechanism during a RIA, in which crack initiation in brittle outer-layers is immediately followed by crack growth through the thickness of the thin-wall tubing. In such a case, the fracture toughness of hydrided thin-wall cladding material must be known for the conditions of through-thickness crack growth in order to predict the failure of high-burnup cladding. The fracture toughness of hydrided Zircaloy-4 in the form of thin-sheet has been examined for the condition of through-thickness crack growth as a function of hydride content and distribution at 25°C, 300°C, and 375°C. To achieve this goal, an experimental procedure was developed in which a linear hydride blister formed across the width of a four-point bend specimen was used to inject a sharp crack that was subsequently extended by fatigue pre-cracking. The electrical potential drop method was used to monitor the crack length during fracture toughness testing, thus allowing for correlation of the load-displacement record with the crack length. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics were used to interpret the experimental test results in terms of fracture toughness, and J-R crack growth resistance curves were generated. Finite element modeling was performed to adapt the classic theories of fracture mechanics applicable to thick-plate specimens to the case of through-thickness crack growth in thin-sheet materials, and to account for non-uniform crack fronts. Finally, the hydride microstructure was characterized in the vicinity of the crack tip by

  12. HRTEM and chemical study of an ion-irradiated chromium/zircaloy-4 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, A.; Ribis, J.; Brachet, J.-C.; Clouet, E.; Leprêtre, F.; Bordas, E.; Arnal, B.

    2018-06-01

    Chromium-coated zirconium alloys are being studied as Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding for Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Those materials are especially studied to improve the oxidation resistance of LWRs current fuel claddings in nominal and at High Temperature (HT) for hypothetical accidental conditions such as LOss of Coolant Accident. Beyond their HT behavior, it is essential to assess the materials behavior under irradiation. A first generation chromium/Zircaloy-4 interface was thus irradiated with 20 MeV Kr8+ ions at 400 °C up to 10 dpa. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and chemical analysis (EDS) were conducted at the Cr/Zr interface. The atomic structure of the interface reveals the presence of Zr(Fe, Cr)2 Laves phase, displaying both C14 and C15 structure. After irradiation, only the C14 structure was observed and atomic row matching was preserved across the different interfaces, thus ensuring a good adhesion of the coating after irradiation.

  13. A study on the reaction of Zircaloy-4 tube with hydrogen/steam mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Min; Kook, Dong-Hak; Cho, Il-Je; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2017-08-01

    In order to fundamentally understand the secondary hydriding mechanism of zirconium alloy cladding, the reaction of commercial Zircaloy-4 tubes with hydrogen and steam mixture was studied using a thermo-gravimetric analyser with two variables, H2/H2O ratio and temperature. Phenomenological analysis revealed that in the steam starvation condition, i.e., when the H2/H2O ratio is greater than 104, hydriding is the dominant reaction and the weight gain increases linearly after a short incubation time. On the other hand, when the gas ratio is 5 × 102 or 103, both hydriding and oxidation reactions take place simultaneously, leading to three distinct regimes: primary hydriding, enhanced oxidation, and massive hydriding. Microstructural changes of oxide demonstrate that when the weight gain exceeds a certain critical value, massive hydriding takes place due to the significant localized crack development within the oxide, which possibly simulates the secondary hydriding failure in a defective fuel operation. This study reveals that the steam starvation condition above the critical H2/H2O ratio is only a necessary condition for the secondary hydriding failure and, as a sufficient condition, oxide needs to grow sufficiently to reach the critical thickness that produces substantial crack development. In other words, in a real defective fuel operation incident, the secondary failure is initiated only when both steam starvation and oxide degradation conditions are simultaneously met. Therefore, it is concluded that the indispensable time for the critical oxide growth primarily determines the triggering time of massive hydriding failure.

  14. Estimation of ring tensile properties of steam oxidized Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding under simulated LOCA condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shriwastaw, R. S.; Sawarn, Tapan K.; Banerjee, Suparna; Rath, B. N.; Dubey, J. S.; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, J. L.; Bhasin, Vivek

    2017-09-01

    The present study involves the estimation of ring tensile properties of Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) fuel cladding made of Zircaloy-4, subjected to experiments under a simulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) condition. Isothermal steam oxidation experiments were conducted on clad tube specimens at temperatures ranging from 900 to 1200 °C at an interval of 50 °C for different soaking periods with subsequent quenching in water at ambient temperature. The specimens, which survived quenching, were then subjected to ambient temperature ring tension test (RTT). The microstructure was correlated with the mechanical properties. The yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) increased initially with rise in oxidation temperature and time duration but then decreased with further increase in oxidation. Ductility is adversely affected with rising oxidation temperature and longer holding time. A higher fraction of load bearing phase and lower oxygen content in it ensures higher residual ductility. Cladding shows almost zero ductility behavior in RIT when load bearing phase fraction is less than 0.72 and its average oxygen concentration is greater than 0.58 wt%.

  15. Effect of negative bias on TiAlSiN coating deposited on nitrided Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Zhou; Zhendong, Feng; Xiangfang, Fan; Yanhong, Liu; Huanlin, Li

    2018-01-01

    TiAlSiN coatings were deposited on the nitrided Zircaloy-4 by multi-arc ion plating at -100 V, -200 V and -300 V. In this study, the high temperature oxidation behavior of coatings was tested by a box-type resistance furnace in air for 3 h at 800 °C; the macro-morphology of coatings was observed and analyzed by a zoom-stereo microscope; the micro-morphology of coatings was analyzed by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical elements of samples were analyzed by an energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS); the adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate was measured by an automatic scratch tester; and the phases of coatings were analyzed by an X-ray diffractometer(XRD). Results show that the coating deposited at -100 V shows better high temperature oxidation resistance behavior, at the same time, Al elements contained in the coating is of the highest amount, meanwhile, the adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate is the highest, which is 33N. As the bias increases, high temperature oxidation resistance behavior of the coating weakens first and then increases, the amount of large particles on the surface of the coating increases first and then decreases whereas the density of the coating decreases first and then increases, and adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate increases first and then weakens. The coating's quality is relatively poor when the bias is -200 V.

  16. Post Quench Ductility Evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and Select Iron Alloys under Design Basis and Extended LOCA Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Keiser, James R; Terrani, Kurt A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post quench ductility of these alloys under postulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 were determined to be k = 2.173 107 g2/cm4/s C, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests atmore » 135 C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to four hours.« less

  17. Post-quench ductility evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and select iron alloys under design basis and extended LOCA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Keiser, J. R.; Terrani, K. A.; Bell, G. L.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 °C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post-quench ductility under postulated and extended LOCA conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 °C was determined to be k = 2.173 × 107 g2/cm4/s, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post-quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests at 135 °C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR ≈ 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to 4 h.

  18. Texture and hydride orientation relationship of Zircaloy-4 fuel clad tube during its fabrication for pressurized heavy water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaibhaw, Kumar; Rao, S. V. R.; Jha, S. K.; Saibaba, N.; Jayaraj, R. N.

    2008-12-01

    Zircaloy-4 material is used for cladding tube in pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) of 220 MWe and 540 MWe capacity in India. These tubes are fabricated by using various combinations of thermo-mechanical processes to achieve desired mechanical and corrosion properties. Cladding tube develops crystallographic texture during its fabrication, which has significant influence on its in-reactor performance. Due to radiolytic decomposition of water Zircaloy-4 picks-up hydrogen. This hydrogen in excess of its maximum solubility in reactor operating condition (˜300 °C), precipitates as zirconium hydrides causing embrittlement of cladding tube. Hydride orientation in the radial direction of the tube limits the service life and lowers the fuel burn-up in reactor. The orientation of the hydride primarily depends on texture developed during fabrication. A correlation between hydride orientation ( F n) with the texture in the tube during its fabrication has been developed using a second order polynomial. The present work is aimed at quantification and correlation of texture evolved in Zircaloy-4 cladding tube using Kearn's f-parameter during its fabrication process.

  19. In situ characterization of Zircaloy-4 oxidation at 500 °C in dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermoyal, J. J.; Dessemond, L.; Hammou, A.; Frichet, A.

    2001-10-01

    The in situ oxidation of Zircaloy-4 at 500 °C in dry air was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The coating of the alloy by a platinum film as electrode material was observed as not to modify the oxidation kinetic properties. After an initial cubic rate law, a transition to a quasi-linear curve occurs. The independence of the oxidation behavior to the Pt coupling is compatible with oxygen diffusion as the rate-determining step. During the pre-transition step, the rest potential of the cell Pt/oxide/Zy-4, the color of the oxide and the modulus of the single EIS signature indicate the high non-stoichiometry of the oxide. The kinetic transition was proposed to be correlated to the degradation of the film into a partially porous layer. This alteration of the oxide is associated to the appearance of a 1.2 V constant rest potential and the modification of the impedance diagrams in two high modulus contributions. The Cole-Cole representation has been used to demonstrate that the time variation of impedance spectra is related to the oxide growth. An equivalent circuit including two RC loops in series, whose capacitances are frequency dispersed, was proposed to be related to the film structure. Fitted data show that the thickness of the assumed protective layer of the film, close to the metal-oxide interface, is time independent in agreement with a constant oxidation rate. Finally, electrical properties of this inner layer were found to be quite different in pre- and post-transition stage.

  20. Hydride Microstructure at the Metal-Oxide Interface of Zircaloy-4 from H.B. Robinson Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N; Edmondson, Philip D; Terrani, Kurt A

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the hydride rim microstructure at the metal-oxide interface of Zircaloy-4 cladding segment removed from H.B. Robinson Nuclear Reactor by utilizing high resolution electron microscopy techniques with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the NSUF Rapid Turnout Experiment program. A complex stacking and orientation of hydride platelets has been observed below the sub-oxide layer. Furthermore, radial hydride platelets have been observed. EDS signals of both Fe and Cr has been reduced within hydrides whereas EDS signal of Sn is unaffected.

  1. Octanol reduces end-plate channel lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Peter W.; McBurney, Robert N.; Van Helden, Dirk

    1978-01-01

    1. Post-synaptic effects of n-octanol at concentrations of 0·1-1 mM were examined in toad sartorius muscles by use of extracellular and voltage-clamp techniques. 2. Octanol depressed the amplitude and duration of miniature end-plate currents and hence depressed neuromuscular transmission. 3. The decay of miniature end-plate currents remained exponential in octanol solutions even when the time constant of decay (τD) was decreased by 80-90%. 4. The lifetime of end-plate channels, obtained by analysis of acetylcholine noise, was also decreased by octanol. The average lifetime measured from noise spectra agreed reasonably well with the time constant of decay of miniature end-plate currents, both in control solution and in octanol solutions. 5. Octanol caused a reduction in the conductance of end-plate channels. Single channel conductance was on average about 25 pS in control solution and 20 pS in octanol. 6. In most cells the normal voltage sensitivity of the decay of miniature end-plate currents was retained in octanol solutions. The lifetime of end-plate channels measured from acetylcholine noise also remained voltage-sensitive in octanol solutions. In some experiments in which channel lifetime was exceptionally reduced the voltage sensitivity was less than normal. 7. In octanol solutions, τD was still very sensitive to temperature changes in most cells although in some the temperature sensitivity of τD was clearly reduced. Changes in τD with temperature could generally be fitted by the Arrhenius equation suggesting that a single step reaction controlled the decay of currents both in control and in octanol solutions. In some cells in which τD became less than 0·3 ms, the relationship between τD and temperature became inconsistent with the Arrhenius equation. 8. As the decay of end-plate currents in octanol solutions remains exponential, and the voltage and temperature sensitivity can be unchanged even when τD is significantly reduced, it seems likely that

  2. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    SciTech Connect

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designsmore » being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between

  3. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  4. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  5. Identifying osteoporotic vertebral endplate and cortex fractures

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Fernando Ruiz; Deng, Min; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic bone disease, and vertebral fractures (VFs) are the most common osteoporotic fracture. A single atraumatic VF may lead to the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Prevalent VFs increase the risk of future vertebral and non-vertebral osteoporotic fracture independent of bone mineral density (BMD). The accurate and clear reporting of VF is essential to ensure patients with osteoporosis receive appropriate treatment. Radiologist has a vital role in the diagnosis of this disease. Several morphometrical and radiological methods for detecting osteoporotic VF have been proposed, but there is no consensus regarding the definition of osteoporotic VF. A vertebra may fracture yet not ever result in measurable changes in radiographic height or area. To overcome these difficulties, algorithm-based qualitative approach (ABQ) was developed with a focus on the identification of change in the vertebral endplate. Evidence of endplate fracture (rather than variation in vertebral shape) is the primary indicator of osteoporotic fracture according to ABQ criteria. Other changes that may mimic osteoporotic fractures should be systemically excluded. It is also possible that vertebral cortex fracture may not initially occur in endplate. Particularly, vertebral cortex fracture can occur in anterior vertebral cortex without gross vertebral deformity (VD), or fractures deform the anterior vertebral cortex without endplate disruption. This article aims to serve as a teaching material for physicians or researchers to identify vertebral endplate/cortex fracture (ECF). Emphasis is particularly dedicated to identifying ECF which may not be associated apparent vertebral body collapse. We believe a combined approach based on standardized radiologic evaluation by experts and morphometry measurement is the most appropriate approach to detect and classify VFs. PMID:29184768

  6. Sagittal endplate morphology of the lower lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Palaniappan; Purushothaman, Balaji; Dvorak, Vlasta; Schratt, Walter; Thambiraj, Sathya; Boszczyk, Maximilian

    2012-05-01

    The sagittal profile of lumbar endplates is discrepant from current simplified disc replacement and fusion device design. Endplate concavity is symmetrical in the coronal plane but shows considerable variability in the sagittal plane, which may lead to implant-endplate mismatch. The aim of this investigation is to provide further analysis of the sagittal endplate morphology of the mid to lower lumbar spine study (L3–S1), thereby identifying the presence of common endplate shape patterns across these levels and providing morphological reference values complementing the findings of previous studies. Observational study. A total of 174 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the adult lumbar spine from the digital archive of our centre, which met the inclusion criteria, were studied. Superior (SEP) and inferior (IEP) endplate shape was divided into flat (no concavity), oblong (homogeneous concavity) and ex-centric (inhomogeneous concavity). The concavity depth (ECD) and location of concavity apex (ECA) relative to endplate diameter of the vertebrae L3–S1 were determined. Flat endplates were only predominant at the sacrum SEP (84.5%). The L5 SEP was flat in 24.7% and all other endplates in less than 10%. The majority of endplates were concave with a clear trend of endplate shape becoming more ex-centric from L3 IEP (56.9% oblong vs. 37.4% ex-centric) to L5 IEP (4% oblong vs. 94.3% ex-centric). Ex-centric ECA were always found in the posterior half of the lumbar endplates. Both the oblong and ex-centric ECD was 2-3 mm on average with the IEP of a motion segment regularly possessing the greater depth. A sex- or age-related difference could not be found. The majority of lumbar endplates are concave, while the majority of sacral endplates are flat. An oblong and an ex-centric endplate shape can be distinguished, whereby the latter is more common at the lower lumbar levels. The apex of the concavity of ex-centric discs is located in the posterior half of the endplate

  7. Effect of Isothermal Hold on the Microstructural Evolution of the Stainless Steel 304L/Zircaloy-4 Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebaili, A.; Taouinet, M.; Nibou, D.; Lebaili, S.; Hodaj, F.

    2017-07-01

    The transition from solid-state bonding of the stainless steel 304L/Zircaloy-4 diffusion couple to a partial liquid-phase bonding is important for the bonding process at temperatures ranging from 950 to 1050 °C. In this study, the temperature at which a melting process occurs at the interface after 45 min of isothermal holdings is determined experimentally. This melting process leads to a drastic change in the thickness of the reaction products zone (RPZ) as well as on its microstructure. Diffusion couples were characterized by SEM-EDS, and quantitative chemical analyses of different phases are performed by EPMA. The RPZ consists of three layers: the (α-Fe-Cr) phase layer and two layers consisting of Zr(Fe,Cr)2 (ɛ), Zr2(Fe,Ni) and (α-Zr) phases. The thickness of these layers strongly depends on the holding temperature. The analysis allowed the description of the physicochemical phenomena occurring during isothermal holding as well as during cooling. The solidification paths are determined at 1000, 1020 and 1050 °C. Hardness tests are performed on the bonded samples in order to qualify the mechanical properties of different phases of the RPZ. This study leads to a better understanding of the complex phenomena intervening in the joining process which is very useful for applications in industrial scale.

  8. Bending testing and characterization of surrogate nuclear fuel rods made of Zircaloy-4 cladding and aluminum oxide pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Jy-An John

    2016-10-01

    Behavior of surrogate nuclear fuel rods made of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding with alumina pellets under reversed cyclic bending was studied. Tests were performed under load or moment control at 5 Hz. The surrogate rods fractured under moment amplitudes greater than 10.16 Nm with fatigue lives between 2.4 × 103 and 2.2 × 106 cycles. Fatigue response of Zry-4 cladding was characterized by using flexural rigidity. Degradation of flexural rigidity was shown to depend on the moment and the prefatigue condition of specimens. Pellet-to-pellet interface (PPI), pellet-to-cladding interface (PCI), and pellet condition affect surrogate rod failure. Both debonding of PPI/PCI and pellet fracturing contribute to surrogate rod bending fatigue. The effect of sensor spacing on curvature measurement using three-point deflections was studied; the method based on effective gauge length is effective in sensor spacing correction. The database developed and the understanding gained in this study can serve as input to analysis of SNF (spent nuclear fuel) vibration integrity.

  9. Experimental and statistical study on fracture boundary of non-irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube under LOCA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narukawa, Takafumi; Yamaguchi, Akira; Jang, Sunghyon; Amaya, Masaki

    2018-02-01

    For estimating fracture probability of fuel cladding tube under loss-of-coolant accident conditions of light-water-reactors, laboratory-scale integral thermal shock tests were conducted on non-irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube specimens. Then, the obtained binary data with respect to fracture or non-fracture of the cladding tube specimen were analyzed statistically. A method to obtain the fracture probability curve as a function of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) was proposed using Bayesian inference for generalized linear models: probit, logit, and log-probit models. Then, model selection was performed in terms of physical characteristics and information criteria, a widely applicable information criterion and a widely applicable Bayesian information criterion. As a result, it was clarified that the log-probit model was the best among the three models to estimate the fracture probability in terms of the degree of prediction accuracy for both next data to be obtained and the true model. Using the log-probit model, it was shown that 20% ECR corresponded to a 5% probability level with a 95% confidence of fracture of the cladding tube specimens.

  10. Bending testing and characterization of surrogate nuclear fuel rods made of Zircaloy-4 cladding and aluminum oxide pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Jy-An John

    2016-07-20

    We studied behavior of surrogate nuclear fuel rods made of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding with alumina pellets under reversed cyclic bending. Tests were performed under load or moment control at 5 Hz, and an empirical correlation was established between rod fatigue life and amplitude of the applied moment. Fatigue response of Zry-4 cladding was further characterized by using flexural rigidity. Degradation of flexural rigidity was shown to depend on the moment applied and the prefatigue condition of specimens. Pellet-to-pellet interface (PPI), pellet-to-cladding interface (PCI), and pellet condition all affect surrogate rod failure. Bonding/debonding of PPI/PCI and pellet fracturing contribute to surrogatemore » rod bending fatigue. Also, the effect of sensor spacing on curvature measurement using three-point deflections was studied; the method based on effective specimen gauge length is effective in sensor spacing correction. Finally, we developed the database and gained understanding in this study such that it will serve as input to analysis of SNF vibration integrity.« less

  11. Design study of the geometry of the blanking tool to predict the burr formation of Zircaloy-4 sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jisun; Lee, Hyungyil; Kim, Dongchul; Kim, Naksoo

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we investigated factors that influence burr formation for zircaloy-4 sheet used for spacer grids of nuclear fuel roads. Factors we considered are geometric factors of punch. We changed clearance and velocity in order to consider the failure parameters, and we changed shearing angle and corner radius of L-shaped punch in order to consider geometric factors of punch. First, we carried out blanking test with failure parameter of GTN model using L-shaped punch. The tendency of failure parameters and geometric factors that affect burr formation by analyzing sheared edges is investigated. Consequently, geometric factor's influencing on the burr formation is also high as failure parameters. Then, the sheared edges and burr formation with failure parameters and geometric factors is investigated using FE analysis model. As a result of analyzing sheared edges with the variables, we checked geometric factors more affect burr formation than failure parameters. To check the reliability of the FE model, the blanking force and the sheared edges obtained from experiments are compared with the computations considering heat transfer.

  12. Air oxidation of Zircaloy-4 in the 600-1000 °C temperature range: Modeling for ASTEC code application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coindreau, O.; Duriez, C.; Ederli, S.

    2010-10-01

    Progress in the treatment of air oxidation of zirconium in severe accident (SA) codes are required for a reliable analysis of severe accidents involving air ingress. Air oxidation of zirconium can actually lead to accelerated core degradation and increased fission product release, especially for the highly-radiotoxic ruthenium. This paper presents a model to simulate air oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 in the 600-1000 °C temperature range. It is based on available experimental data, including separate-effect experiments performed at IRSN and at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The kinetic transition, named "breakaway", from a diffusion-controlled regime to an accelerated oxidation is taken into account in the modeling via a critical mass gain parameter. The progressive propagation of the locally initiated breakaway is modeled by a linear increase in oxidation rate with time. Finally, when breakaway propagation is completed, the oxidation rate stabilizes and the kinetics is modeled by a linear law. This new modeling is integrated in the severe accident code ASTEC, jointly developed by IRSN and GRS. Model predictions and experimental data from thermogravimetric results show good agreement for different air flow rates and for slow temperature transient conditions.

  13. Corrosion behavior in high-temperature pressurized water of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-based amorphous filler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung Gu; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku

    2017-05-01

    The compositional effects of ternary Zr-Cu-X (X: Al, Fe) amorphous filler alloys on galvanic corrosion susceptibility in high-temperature pressurized water were investigated for Zircaloy-4 brazed joints. Through an Al-induced microgalvanic reaction that deteriorated the overall nobility of the joint, application of the Zr-Cu-Al filler alloy caused galvanic coupling to develop readily between the Al-bearing joint and the Al-free base metal, finally leading to massive localized corrosion of the joint. Contrastingly, joints prepared with a Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy showed excellent corrosion resistance comparable to that of the Zircaloy-4 base metal, since the Cu and Fe elements forming fine intermetallic particles with Zr did not influence the electrochemical stability of the resultant joints. The present results demonstrate that Fe is a more suitable alloying element than Al for brazing filler alloys subjected to high-temperature corrosive environments.

  14. Significance of Vertebral Endplate Failure in Symptomatic Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Madan Mohan; Kaur, Sheetal; Sarangi, Jitendra; Mohapatra, Manoranjan

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Objective: Endplate lesions though have been implicated in the genesis of lumbar disc herniation (LDH), very little is known regarding their clinical course. Thus, the present study is aimed to investigate the incidence and types of endplate failure (EPF) in LDH and its correlation with the clinical symptoms and prognosis. Methods: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of 66 patients with isolated single level LDH were studied. Three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient (3D FSPGR) MRI and computed tomography scans were used to identify the bony and cartilaginous EPF. Twenty-five patients were operated on and 41 patients were treated conservatively. Changes in the pain score, function and neurology were noted at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 weeks. Results: Endplate lesions were observed in 64 patients (96.9%), including bony endplate failure (bony failure) in 47 patients (71.2%) and isolated cartilaginous endplate lesions in 17 patients (25.7%). Bony failure group had similar pain and functional scores but more severe neurological deficit at the initial evaluation. Clinical parameters improved in all groups, but the recovery was lesser in conservatively treated bony failure patients. Conclusion: Endplate lesions are commonly associated with symptomatic LDH. Presence of bony failure can increase neurological deficit and reduce the chance of recovery with conservative management. The 3D FSPGR sequence of MRI can be successfully used for detection of the endplate lesions in the herniated disc. PMID:28660105

  15. Significance of Vertebral Endplate Failure in Symptomatic Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Madan Mohan; Mahapatra, Sudhir Kumar; Kaur, Sheetal; Sarangi, Jitendra; Mohapatra, Manoranjan

    2017-05-01

    Prospective cohort study. Endplate lesions though have been implicated in the genesis of lumbar disc herniation (LDH), very little is known regarding their clinical course. Thus, the present study is aimed to investigate the incidence and types of endplate failure (EPF) in LDH and its correlation with the clinical symptoms and prognosis. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of 66 patients with isolated single level LDH were studied. Three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient (3D FSPGR) MRI and computed tomography scans were used to identify the bony and cartilaginous EPF. Twenty-five patients were operated on and 41 patients were treated conservatively. Changes in the pain score, function and neurology were noted at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 weeks. Endplate lesions were observed in 64 patients (96.9%), including bony endplate failure (bony failure) in 47 patients (71.2%) and isolated cartilaginous endplate lesions in 17 patients (25.7%). Bony failure group had similar pain and functional scores but more severe neurological deficit at the initial evaluation. Clinical parameters improved in all groups, but the recovery was lesser in conservatively treated bony failure patients. Endplate lesions are commonly associated with symptomatic LDH. Presence of bony failure can increase neurological deficit and reduce the chance of recovery with conservative management. The 3D FSPGR sequence of MRI can be successfully used for detection of the endplate lesions in the herniated disc.

  16. Growth and microstructure formation of isothermally-solidified Zircaloy-4 joints brazed by a Zr-Ti-Cu-Ni amorphous alloy ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Lim, C. H.; Lee, J. G.; Lee, M. K.; Rhee, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    The microstructure and growth characteristics of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed by a Zr48Ti16Cu17Ni19 (at.%) amorphous filler metal have been investigated with regard to the controlled isothermal solidification and intermetallic formation. Two typical joints were produced depending on the isothermal brazing temperature: (1) a dendritic growth structure including bulky segregation in the central zone (at 850 °C), and (2) a homogeneous dendritic structure throughout the joint without segregation (at 890 °C). The primary α-Zr phase was solidified isothermally, nucleating to grow into a joint with a cellular or dendritic structure. Also, the continuous Zr2Ni and particulate Zr2Cu phases were formed in the segregated center zone and at the intercellular region, respectively, owing to the different solubility and atomic mobility of the solute elements (Ti, Cu, and Ni) in the α-Zr matrix. A disappearance of the central Zr2Ni phase was also rate-controlled by the outward diffusion of the Cu and Ni elements. When the detrimental Zr2Ni intermetallic phase was eliminated by a complete isothermal solidification at 890 °C, the strengths of the joints were high enough to cause yielding and fracture in the base metal, exceeding those of the bulk Zircaloy-4, at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures (up to 400 °C).

  17. Azimuthally anisotropic hydride lens structures in Zircaloy 4 nuclear fuel cladding: High-resolution neutron radiography imaging and BISON finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jun-Li; Zhong, Weicheng; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Heuser, Brent J.

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution neutron radiography has been used to image bulk circumferential hydride lens particles in unirradiated Zircaloy 4 tubing cross section specimens. Zircaloy 4 is a common light water nuclear reactor (LWR) fuel cladding; hydrogen pickup, hydride formation, and the concomitant effect on the mechanical response are important for LWR applications. Ring cross section specimens with three hydrogen concentrations (460, 950, and 2830 parts per million by weight) and an as-received reference specimen were imaged. Azimuthally anisotropic hydride lens particles were observed at 950 and 2830 wppm. The BISON finite element analysis nuclear fuel performance code was used to model the system elastic response induced by hydride volumetric dilatation. The compressive hoop stress within the lens structure becomes azimuthally anisotropic at high hydrogen concentrations or high hydride phase fraction. This compressive stress anisotropy matches the observed lens anisotropy, implicating the effect of stress on hydride formation as the cause of the observed lens azimuthal asymmetry. The cause and effect relation between compressive stress and hydride lens anisotropy represents an indirect validation of a key BISON output, the evolved hoop stress associated with hydride formation.

  18. Endplate effect on aerodynamic characteristics of threedimensional wings in close free surface proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae Hwan; Kim, Mi Jeong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Hung, Pham Anh; Chun, Ho Hwan; Park, Dong Woo

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic characteristics of a three-dimensional (3D) wing with an endplate in the vicinity of the free surface by solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the turbulence closure model. The endplate causes a blockage effect on the flow, and an additional viscous effect especially near the endplate. These combined effects of the endplate significantly reduce the magnitudes of the velocities under the lower surface of the wing, thereby enhancing aerodynamic performance in terms of the force coefficients. The maximum lift-to-drag ratio of a wing with an endplate is increased 46% compared to that of wing without an endplate at the lowest clearance. The tip vortex of a wing-with-endplate (WWE) moved laterally to a greater extent than that of a wing-without-endplate (WOE). This causes a decrease in the induced drag, resulting in a reduction in the total drag.

  19. Study of the mechanical behavior of the hydride blister/rim structure in Zircaloy-4 using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jun-li; Han, Xiaochun; Heuser, Brent J.

    2016-04-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was utilized to study the mechanical response of the f.c.c delta hydride phase, the intermetallic precipitation with hexagonal C14 lave phase and the alpha-Zr phase in the Zircaloy-4 materials with a hydride rim/blister structure near one surface of the material during in-situ uniaxial tension experiment at 200 degrees C. The f.c.c delta was the only hydride phase observed in the rim/blister structure. The conventional Rietveld refinement was applied to measure the macro-strain equivalent response of the three phases. Two regions were delineated in the applied load versus lattice strain measurement: a linear elastic strain region andmore » region that exhibited load partitioning. Load partitioning was quantified by von Mises analysis. The three phases were observed to have similar elastic modulus at 200 degrees C.« less

  20. Stiffness of the endplate boundary layer and endplate surface topography are associated with brittleness of human whole vertebral bodies

    PubMed Central

    Nekkanty, Srikant; Yerramshetty, Janardhan; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Zauel, Roger; Johnson, Evan; Cody, Dianna D.; Yeni, Yener N.

    2013-01-01

    Stress magnitude and variability as estimated from large scale finite element (FE) analyses have been associated with compressive strength of human vertebral cancellous cores but these relationships have not been explored for whole vertebral bodies. In this study, the objectives were to investigate the relationship of FE-calculated stress distribution parameters with experimentally determined strength, stiffness, and displacement based ductility measures in human whole vertebral bodies, investigate the effect of endplate loading conditions on vertebral stiffness, strength, and ductility and test the hypothesis that endplate topography affects vertebral ductility and stress distributions. Eighteen vertebral bodies (T6-L3 levels; 4 female and 5 male cadavers, aged 40-98 years) were scanned using a flat panel CT system and followed with axial compression testing with Wood’s metal as filler material to maintain flat boundaries between load plates and specimens. FE models were constructed using reconstructed CT images and filler material was added digitally. Two different FE models with different filler material modulus simulating Wood’s metal and intervertebral disc (W-layer and D-layer models) were used. Element material modulus to cancellous bone was based on image gray value. Average, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation of von Mises stress in vertebral bone for W-layer and D-layer models and also the ratios of FE parameters from the two models (W/D) were calculated. Inferior and superior endplate surface topographical distribution parameters were calculated. Experimental stiffness, maximum load and work to fracture had the highest correlation with FE-calculated stiffness while experimental ductility measures had highest correlations with FE-calculated average von Mises stress and W-layer to D-layer stiffness ratio. Endplate topography of the vertebra was also associated with its structural ductility and the distribution parameter that best explained

  1. Effects of dithiothreitol on end-plate currents.

    PubMed Central

    Terrar, D A

    1978-01-01

    1. End-plate currents have been studied in frog cutaneus pectoris nerve-muscle preparations mounted in continuously flowing solution, using the voltage clamp technique. 2. Exposure of the muscle to 1 mM-dithiothreitol reduced the amplitude of end-plate currents by a factor of 2.7 (mean; range 1.6-3.4; twelve fibres). 3. 1 mM-dithiothreitol also caused a 2.7-fold (2.3-3.1) increase in the rate of decay, and a 1.4-fold (1.3-1.6) decrease in the time to peak of end-plate currents. During the onset of action of dithiothreitol, there was little or no indication of departure of end-plate current decay from a simple exponential. 4. Dithiothreitol actions on amplitude and decay of end-plate currents developed with similar time courses and both effects were slower in onset at pH 7.2 than at pH 8.5. 5. The actions of dithiothreitol were reversed by exposure of the muscle to 1 mM-5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). 6. Following dithiothreitol treatment, the rates of decay of end-plate currents continued to depend on membrane potential; there was little or no change in the slope of the relation between in (rate of decay) and membrane potential, consistent with little or no change in the dipole moment of a gating molecule for ion channels. 7. Dithiothreitol changed the relation between peak end-plate current and membrane potential, so that peak conductance increased at more negative membrane potentials; this finding could be accounted for in terms of the closure of ion-channel gates becoming faster though remaining voltage-sensitive after exposure to dithiothreitol. 8. It is concluded that dithiothreitol causes changes in the kinetics of gating of ion channels associated with receptors and that these changes accompany changes in the binding of ACh to receptors. PMID:25960

  2. Human Disc Nucleus Properties and Vertebral Endplate Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Azucena G.; Slichter, Chloe K.; Acosta, Frank L.; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E.; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Lotz, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Study of human cadaveric discs quantifying endplate permeability and porosity and correlating these with measures of disc quality: cell density, proteoglycan content, and overall degeneration. Permeability and porosity increased with age and were not correlated with cell density or overall degeneration, suggesting that endplate calcification may not accelerate disc degeneration. Study Design Experimental quantification of relationships between vertebral endplate morphology, permeability, disc cell density, glycosaminoglycan content and degeneration in samples harvested from human cadaveric spines. Objective To test the hypothesis that variation in endplate permeability and porosity contribute to changes in intervertebral disc cell density and overall degeneration. Summary of Background Data Cells within the intervertebral disc are dependent on diffusive exchange with capillaries in the adjacent vertebral bone. Previous findings suggest that blocked routes of transport negatively affect disc quality, yet there are no quantitative relationships between human vertebral endplate permeability, porosity, cell density and disc degeneration. Such relationships would be valuable for clarifying degeneration risk factors, and patient features that may impede efforts at disc tissue engineering. Methods Fifty-one motion segments were harvested from 13 frozen cadaveric human lumbar spines (32 to 85 years) and classified for degeneration using the MRI-based Pfirrmann scale. A cylindrical core was harvested from the center of each motion segment that included vertebral bony and cartilage endplates along with adjacent nucleus tissue. The endplate mobility, a type of permeability, was measured directly using a custom-made permeameter before and after the cartilage endplate was removed. Cell density within the nucleus tissue was estimated using the picogreen method while the nuclear GAG content was quantified using the DMMB technique. Specimens were imaged at 8 μm resolution using

  3. Stress corrosion crack initiation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment during creep, relaxation, and constant strain rate tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezequel, T.; Auzoux, Q.; Le Boulch, D.; Bono, M.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.; Chabretou, V.; Mozzani, N.; Rautenberg, M.

    2018-02-01

    During accidental power transient conditions with Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI), the synergistic effect of the stress and strain imposed on the cladding by thermal expansion of the fuel, and corrosion by iodine released as a fission product, may lead to cladding failure by Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). In this study, internal pressure tests were conducted on unirradiated cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment. The goal was to investigate the influence of loading type (constant pressure tests, constant circumferential strain rate tests, or constant circumferential strain tests) and test temperature (320, 350, or 380 °C) on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC). The experimental results obtained with different loading types were consistent with each other. The apparent threshold hoop stress for I-SCC was found to be independent of the test temperature. SEM micrographs of the tested samples showed many pits distributed over the inner surface, which tended to coalesce into large pits in which a microcrack could initiate. A model for the time-to-failure of a cladding tube was developed using finite element simulations of the viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material and a modified Kachanov's damage growth model. The times-to-failure predicted by this model are consistent with the experimental data.

  4. The effect of papaine on the time course of the end-plate current.

    PubMed

    Humar, M; Kordas, M; Melik, Z

    1980-07-01

    Papaine is known to detach cholinesterases from the synaptic cleft. It could be expected that this would result in an increase of the amplitude and half-time of the end-plate current. Thus, the effect of papaine on the end-plate current. Thus, the effect of papaine on the end-plate current should be similar to the effect of anticholinesterase methanesulfonylfluoride. The end-plate current was recorded in frog skeletal muscle at various levels of membrane potential, before and after papaine was added to the bath. The effect of papaine was an increase of the half-time of the end-plate current, similarly as after treatment of the muscle by methanesulfonylfluoride. It seems that both papaine and methanesulfonylfluoride have a similar mechanism of action. In either experimental condition hydrolysis of transmitter is decreased or abolished, which results in an increase of the half-time of the end-plate current.

  5. Investigation of morphological, structural, and mechanical characteristics of Zircaloy-4 irradiated with 3.5 MeV hydrogen ions beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Butt, M. Z.; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2017-09-01

    Zircaloy-4 specimens were irradiated with 3.5 MeV hydrogen ions (dose range: 1  ×  1013 H+1 cm-2 to 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2) using a Pelletron accelerator. FESEM studies reveal formation of hydrogen micro-bubbles, bubbles induced blisters of irregular shapes, and development of cracks on the specimen surface, as in the case of pure zirconium. However, for the highest irradiation dose of 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2, agglomeration of flower-shape blisters is observed. XRD analysis shows that the most preferentially oriented crystallographic plane is (0 0 4) with texture coefficient values 1.832-2.308 depending on the ions dose. Its diffraction peak intensity first decreases with the increase in ions dose up to 5  ×  1013 H+1 cm-2 and later increases up to 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2. Opposite is found in case of diffraction peak width. Crystallite size and lattice strain determined by Williamson-Hall analysis display a linear relationship between the two with positive slope. Mechanical strength, namely yield stress (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and fracture stress (FS), increases sharply with ions dose up to 5  ×  1013 H+1 cm-2. For 1  ×  1014 H+1 cm-2 dose there is a sudden drop of stress to a lowest value and then a slow steady increase in stress up to the highest dose 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2. Same pattern is followed by uniform elongation and total elongation. All three stress parameters YS, UTS, and FS follow Inverse Hall-Petch relation.

  6. TEM study on the initial oxidation of Zircaloy-4 thin foil specimens heated in a low vacuum air condition at 280-300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Bang-xin; Zhu, Wei; Wen, Bang; Yao, Mei-yi; Li, Qiang; Wu, Lu; Zhang, Jin-long; Fang, Zhong-qiang

    2017-04-01

    As one of the important structural materials in nuclear industry, the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloy limits their in-pile application. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the corrosion mechanism of zirconium alloys. The zirconium-oxygen reaction at the O/M interface is one of the factors that affect the oxidation process. There are few reports in this regard. Ideally, the reaction process at the O/M interface has certain relevance with the initiation oxidation of zirconium, which provided a new way to investigate the reaction process by observing the initiation oxidation behaviours. To investigate the oxidation behaviours of zirconium alloy at the initial stage, in this paper, zircaloy-4 TEM thin foil specimens in 3 mm diameter were studied by TEM observation after heating in air condition with a vacuum of 3 Pa at 280 °C, 290 °C and 300 °C for 30 min exposures. The results show that, ZrO2 begin to nucleate at a size of 3-5 nm at a high Zr/O ratio of 10.4 and oxide layer formed while Zr/O was 4.6. As a result of stress caused by the P.B ratio of Zr, slip bands formed and a bcc structure sub-oxide b-ZrOx (a = 0.51 nm) grew up along with the slip bands was observed. At both sides of b-ZrOx, two hcp structure sub-oxides having the same a-axis lattice parameter and different c-axis lattice parameter were detected.

  7. Etude du comportement et de la modélisation viscoplastique du zircaloy 4recristallisé sous chargements monotones et cycliques uni et multiaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delobelle, P.; Robinet, P.

    1994-08-01

    The results of experiment performed on a recrystallized zircaloy 4 alloy in the intermediate temperature domain 20 leqslant T leqslant 400 ^{circ}C are presented. To characterize the anisotropy, especially at 350 ^{circ}C, the tests were made under both monotonic and cyclic uni- and bidirectional loadings, i.e. tension-compression, tension-torsion and tension-internal pressure tests. The different anisotropy coefficients and especially R^p = \\varepsilon^p_{θθ} /\\varepsilon^ p _ {{^-_-}{^-_-} } seem to be temperature independent. An important feature of the behavior of this alloy in the neighbourhood of 300 ^{circ}C is attributed to the dislocations-point defects interactions (dynamic strain aging), phenomena often observed in the solid solutions. For the 2D cyclic non proportional loadings it is shown that a weak supplementary hardening appears, which is a function of the degree of the phase lag. We propose to particularize and to apply a unified viscoplastic model with internal variables to the considered alloy, as the model as already been developed and identified elsewhere for other isotropic materials. From a general point of view the introduction of the anisotropy in the model is made by four tensors of rank 4 ; [ M] is assigned to the flow directions, [ N] to the linear parts of the kinematical hardening variables and [ Q] , [ R] respectively to the dynamic and static recoveries of these tensorial variables. This phenomenological formulation leads to a correct representation of the set of the experimental results presented at 350 ^{circ}C, which provides an a posteriori confirmation of the formalism used. On étudie, entre 20 et 400 ^{circ}C, à l'aide d'essais sous chargements multiaxiaux monotones et cycliques (traction, torsion et pression interne) les propriétés viscoplastiques anisotropes de tube de zircaloy 4 recristallisé. A la température de 350 ^{circ}C, l'anisotropie a été quantifiée de façon détaillée. Les quelques résultats obtenus

  8. In vitro comparison of endplate preparation between four mini-open interbody fusion approaches.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Robert; Lee, Yu-Po; Khajavi, Kaveh; Taylor, William; Chen, Foster; Bae, Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Discectomy and endplate preparation are important steps in interbody fusion for ensuring sufficient arthrodesis. While modern less-invasive approaches for lumbar interbody fusion have gained in popularity, concerns exist regarding their ability to allow for adequate disc space and endplate preparation. Thus, the purpose of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate and compare disc space and endplate preparation achieved with four less-invasive approaches for lumbar interbody fusion in cadaveric spines. A total of 24 disc spaces (48 endplates) from L2 to L5 were prepared in eight cadaveric torsos using mini-open anterior lumbar interbody fusion (mini-ALIF), minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MAS PLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MAS TLIF) or minimally invasive lateral, transpsoas interbody fusion (XLIF) on two specimens each, for a total of six levels and 12 endplates prepared per procedure type. Following complete discectomy and endplate preparation, spines were excised and split axially at the interbody disc spaces. Endplates were digitally photographed and evaluated using image analysis software. Area of endplate preparation was measured and qualitative evaluation was also performed to grade the quality of preparation. The XLIF approach resulted in the greatest relative area of endplate preparation (58.3 %) while mini-ALIF resulted in the lowest at 35.0 %. Overall, there were no differences in percentage of preparation between cranial and caudal endplates, though this was significantly different in the XLIF group (65 vs 52 %, respectively). ALL damage was observed in 3 MAS TLIF levels. Percentage of endplate that was deemed to have complete disc removal was highest in XLIF group with 90 % compared to 65 % in MAS TLIF group, 43 % in MAS PLIF, and 40 % in mini-ALIF group. Endplate damage area was highest in the MAS TLIF group at 48 % and lowest in XLIF group at 4 %. These results demonstrate that

  9. END-PLATE ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR: STRUCTURE, MECHANISM, PHARMACOLOGY, AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The synapse is a localized neurohumoral contact between a neuron and an effector cell and may be considered the quantum of fast intercellular communication. Analogously, the postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor may be considered the quantum of fast chemical to electrical transduction. Our understanding of postsynaptic receptors began to develop about a hundred years ago with the demonstration that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve released acetylcholine and slowed the heart beat. During the past 50 years, advances in understanding postsynaptic receptors increased at a rapid pace, owing largely to studies of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the motor endplate. The endplate AChR belongs to a large superfamily of neurotransmitter receptors, called Cys-loop receptors, and has served as an exemplar receptor for probing fundamental structures and mechanisms that underlie fast synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recent studies provide an increasingly detailed picture of the structure of the AChR and the symphony of molecular motions that underpin its remarkably fast and efficient chemoelectrical transduction. PMID:22811427

  10. Hyperconcavity of the lumbar vertebral endplates in the elite football lineman.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Claude T; Johnson, David C; Pavlov, Helene; Barnes, Ronnie; Warren, Russell F; Speer, Kevin P; Guettler, Joseph H

    2004-09-01

    Hyperconcavity of the vertebral endplates is a previously unreported radiologic phenomenon. To analyze hyperconcavity of the vertebral endplates with expansion of the disk space in pre-National Football League lineman and to determine its clinical significance. Descriptive anatomical study. Over a 2-year period (1992-1993), 266 elite football linemen were evaluated at the National Football League scouting combine held in Indianapolis, Indiana. Evaluation focused on the lumbosacral spine and included history, physical examination, and lateral radiographs. Measurements were taken of all the vertebral endplate defects of involved vertebrae and compared with an age-matched control group of 110 patients. The analyzed data revealed the following: (1) hyperconcavity of the vertebral endplates appeared as a distinct entity in a high percentage of pre-National Football League lineman (33%) compared with age-matched controls (8%), (2) there was a trend toward a lower incidence of lumbosacral spine symptoms in those players who displayed hyperconcavity of the vertebral endplates (16%) versus those who did not (25%), and (3) when hyperconcavity of the vertebral endplates was present, all 5 lumbosacral disk spaces were commonly affected. Hyperconcavity of the vertebral endplates and hypertrophy of the disk space are likely adaptive changes occurring over time in response to the repetitive high loading and axial stress experienced in football line play.

  11. Influence of tip end-plate on noise of small axial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hongya; Wang, Yanping; Lin, Peifeng; Jin, Yingzi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2017-02-01

    In this work, tip end-plate is used to improve the noise performance of small axial fans. Both numerical simulations and experimental methods were adopted to study the fluid flow and noise level of axial fans. Four modified models and the prototype are simulated. Influences of tip end-plate on static characteristics, internal flow field and noise of small axial fans are analyzed. The results show that on basis of the prototype, the model with the tip end-plate of 2 mm width and changed length achieved best noise performance. The overall sound pressure level of the model with the tip end-plate of 2 mm width and changed length is 2.4 dB less than that of the prototype at the monitoring point in specified far field. It is found that the mechanism of noise reduction is due to the decrease of vorticity variation on the surface of blades caused by the tip end-plate. Compared with the prototype, the static pressure of the model with the tip end-plate of 2 mm width and changed length at design flow rate decreases by 2 Pa and the efficiency decreases by 0.8%. It is concluded that the method of adding tip end-plate to impeller blades has a positive influence on reducing noise, but it may diminish the static characteristics of small axial fan to some extent.

  12. Influence of Alendronate and Endplate Degeneration to Single Level Posterior Lumbar Spinal Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Wootack; Ha, Seongil; Lim, Jae Hyeon; Jang, Il Tae

    2014-01-01

    Objective Using alendronate after spinal fusion is a controversial issue due to the inhibition of osteoclast mediated bone resorption. In addition, there are an increasing number of reports that the endplate degeneration influences the lumbar spinal fusion. The object of this retrospective controlled study was to evaluate how the endplate degeneration and the bisphosphonate medication influence the spinal fusion through radiographic evaluation. Methods In this study, 44 patients who underwent single-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using cage were examined from April 2007 to March 2009. All patients had been diagnosed as osteoporosis and would be recommended for alendronate medication. Endplate degeneration is categorized by the Modic changes. The solid fusion is defined if there was bridging bone between the vertebral bodies, either within or external to the cage on the plain X-ray and if there is less than 5° of angular difference in dynamic X-ray. Results In alendronate group, fusion was achieved in 66.7% compared to 73.9% in control group (no medication). Alendronate did not influence the fusion rate of PLIF. However, there was the statistical difference of fusion rate between the endplate degeneration group and the group without endplate degeneration. A total of 52.4% of fusion rate was seen in the endplate degeneration group compared to 91.3% in the group without endplate degeneration. The endplate degeneration suppresses the fusion process of PLIF. Conclusion Alendronate does not influence the fusion process in osteoporotic patients. The endplate degeneration decreases the fusion rate. PMID:25620981

  13. Indian hedgehog contributes to human cartilage endplate degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaowei; Yang, Kun; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Du, Guoqing; Fan, Shunwu; Wei, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To determine the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in human cartilage endplate (CEP) degeneration. CEP-degenerated tissues from patients with Modic I or II changes (n = 9 and 45, respectively) and normal tissues from vertebral burst fracture patients (n = 17) were collected. Specimens were either cut into slices for organ culture ex vivo or digested to isolate chondrocytes for cell culture in vitro. Ihh expression and the effect of Ihh on cartilage degeneration were determined by investigating degeneration markers in this study. Ihh expression and cartilage degeneration markers significantly increased in the Modic I and II groups. The expression of cartilage degeneration markers was positively correlated with degeneration severity. Gain-of-function for Ihh promoted expression of cartilage degeneration markers in vitro, while loss-of-function for Ihh inhibited their expression both in vitro and ex vivo. These findings demonstrated that Ihh promotes CEP degeneration. Blocking Ihh pathway has potential clinical usage for attenuating CEP degeneration.

  14. RESEARCH ON EFFECTS OF ACETYLCHOLINE ON THE MAMMALIAN MOTOR END-PLATE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    presumably through the release of a chemical mediator. (3) The chemical sensitivity of end-plate receptors in muscles from patients with myasthenia ... gravis is normal, suggesting that the neuromuscular defect in this disease is of pre-junctional origin.

  15. Correlation of cervical endplate strength with CT measured subchondral bone density

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, Nathaniel R.; Lu, Yen-Mou; Zhang, Xingkai; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Fang, Huang

    2007-01-01

    Cervical interbody device subsidence can result in screw breakage, plate dislodgement, and/or kyphosis. Preoperative bone density measurement may be helpful in predicting the complications associated with anterior cervical surgery. This is especially important when a motion preserving device is implanted given the detrimental effect of subsidence on the postoperative segmental motion following disc replacement. To evaluate the structural properties of the cervical endplate and examine the correlation with CT measured trabecular bone density. Eight fresh human cadaver cervical spines (C2–T1) were CT scanned and the average trabecular bone densities of the vertebral bodies (C3–C7) were measured. Each endplate surface was biomechanically tested for regional yield load and stiffness using an indentation test method. Overall average density of the cervical vertebral body trabecular bone was 270 ± 74 mg/cm3. There was no significant difference between levels. The yield load and stiffness from the indentation test of the endplate averaged 139 ± 99 N and 156 ± 52 N/mm across all cervical levels, endplate surfaces, and regional locations. The posterior aspect of the endplate had significantly higher yield load and stiffness in comparison to the anterior aspect and the lateral aspect had significantly higher yield load in comparison to the midline aspect. There was a significant correlation between the average yield load and stiffness of the cervical endplate and the trabecular bone density on regression analysis. Although there are significant regional variations in the endplate structural properties, the average of the endplate yield loads and stiffnesses correlated with the trabecular bone density. Given the morbidity associated with subsidence of interbody devices, a reliable and predictive method of measuring endplate strength in the cervical spine is required. Bone density measures may be used preoperatively to assist in the prediction of the strength

  16. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  17. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  18. A multiscale structural investigation of the annulus-endplate anchorage system and its mechanisms of failure.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Samantha A; Thambyah, Ashvin; Broom, Neil D

    2015-03-01

    The annulus-endplate anchorage system performs a critical role in the disc, creating a strong structural link between the compliant annulus and the rigid vertebrae. Endplate failure is thought to be associated with disc herniation, a recent study indicating that this failure mode occurs more frequently than annular rupture. The aim was to investigate the structural principles governing annulus-endplate anchorage and the basis of its strength and mechanisms of failure. Loading experiments were performed on ovine lumbar motion segments designed to induce annulus-endplate failure, followed by macro- to micro- to fibril-level structural analyses. The study was funded by a doctoral scholarship from our institution. Samples were loaded to failure in three modes: torsion using intact motion segments, in-plane tension of the anterior annulus-endplate along one of the oblique fiber angles, and axial tension of the anterior annulus-endplate. The anterior region was chosen for its ease of access. Decalcification was used to investigate the mechanical influence of the mineralized component. Structural analysis was conducted on both the intact and failed samples using differential interference contrast optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Two main modes of anchorage failure were observed--failure at the tidemark or at the cement line. Samples subjected to axial tension contained more tidemark failures compared with those subjected to torsion and in-plane tension. Samples decalcified before testing frequently contained damage at the cement line, this being more extensive than in fresh samples. Analysis of the intact samples at their anchorage sites revealed that annular subbundle fibrils penetrate beyond the cement line to a limited depth and appear to merge with those in the vertebral and cartilaginous endplates. Annulus-endplate anchorage is more vulnerable to failure in axial tension compared with both torsion and in-plane tension and is probably due to acute

  19. Geometry of the intervertebral volume and vertebral endplates of the human spine.

    PubMed

    van der Houwen, E B; Baron, P; Veldhuizen, A G; Burgerhof, J G M; van Ooijen, P M A; Verkerke, G J

    2010-01-01

    Replacement of a degenerated vertebral disc with an artificial intervertebral disc (AID) is currently possible, but poses problems, mainly in the force distribution through the vertebral column. Data on the intervertebral disc space geometry will provide a better fit of the prosthesis to the vertebrae, but current literature on vertebral disc geometry is very scarce or not suitable. In this study, existing CT-scans of 77 patients were analyzed to measure the intervertebral disc and vertebral endplate geometry of the lumbar spine. Ten adjacent points on both sides of the vertebrae (S1-superior to T12-inferior) and sagittal and transverse diameters were measured to describe the shape of the caudal and cranial vertebral planes of the vertebrae. It was found that the largest endplate depth is located in the middle or posterior regions of the vertebra, that there is a linear relationship between all inferior endplate depths and the endplate location (p < 0.0001) within the spinal column, and that the superior endplate depth increases with age by about 0.01 mm per year (p < 0.02). The wedge angle increases from T12-L1 to L5-S1. The results allow for improvement of the fit of intervertebral disc-prostheses to the vertebrae and optimized force transmission through the vertebral column.

  20. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  1. Digital tomosynthesis and high resolution computed tomography as clinical tools for vertebral endplate topography measurements: Comparison with microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oravec, Daniel; Quazi, Abrar; Xiao, Angela; Yang, Ellen; Zauel, Roger; Flynn, Michael J; Yeni, Yener N

    2015-12-01

    Endplate morphology is understood to play an important role in the mechanical behavior of vertebral bone as well as degenerative processes in spinal tissues; however, the utility of clinical imaging modalities in assessment of the vertebral endplate has been limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of two clinical imaging modalities (digital tomosynthesis, DTS; high resolution computed tomography, HRCT) to assess endplate topography by correlating the measurements to a microcomputed tomography (μCT) standard. DTS, HRCT, and μCT images of 117 cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebrae (T10-L1; 23 male, 19 female; ages 36-100 years) were segmented, and inferior and superior endplate surface topographical distribution parameters were calculated. Both DTS and HRCT showed statistically significant correlations with μCT approaching a moderate level of correlation at the superior endplate for all measured parameters (R(2)Adj=0.19-0.57), including averages, variability, and higher order statistical moments. Correlation of average depths at the inferior endplate was comparable to the superior case for both DTS and HRCT (R(2)Adj=0.14-0.51), while correlations became weak or nonsignificant for higher moments of the topography distribution. DTS was able to capture variations in the endplate topography to a slightly better extent than HRCT, and taken together with the higher speed and lower radiation cost of DTS than HRCT, DTS appears preferable for endplate measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Wind-tunnel Investigation of End-plate Effects of Horizontal Tails on a Vertical Tail Compared with Available Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Harry E

    1946-01-01

    A vertical-tail model with stub fuselage was tested in combination with various simulated horizontal tails to determine the effect of horizontal-tail span and location on the aerodynamic characteristics of the vertical tail. Available theoretical data on end-plate effects were collected and presented in the form most suitable for design purposes. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the measured and theoretical end-plate effects of horizontal tails on vertical tails, and the data indicated that the end-plate effect was determined more by the location of the horizontal tail than by the span of the horizontal tail. The horizontal tail gave most end-plate effect when located near either tip of the vertical tail and, when located near the base of the vertical tail, the end-plate effect was increased by moving the horizontal tail rearward.

  3. Welding Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  4. Microwave-Assisted Cytochemistry: Accelerated Visualization of Acetylcholinesterase at Motor Endplates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    ofAcetylcholinesterase at Motor Endplates John P. Petrali and Kenneth R. Mills INTRODUCTION Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the modulating enzyme of cholin ...utilized for this study was the Pelco 3440, 800 W. The animal used was the haired guinea pig, which was euthanatized by an overdose of Na pentobarbital

  5. Muscle fiber types composition and type identified endplate morphology of forepaw intrinsic muscles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Mi, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Xiao-Yun; Rui, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The failure to accept reinnervation is considered to be one of the reasons for the poor motor functional recovery of intrinsic hand muscles (IHMs) after nerve injury. Rat could be a suitable model to be used in simulating motor function recovery of the IHMs after nerve injury as to the similarities in function and anatomy of the muscles between human and rat. However, few studies have reported the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphologic characteristics of intrinsic forepaw muscles (IFMs) in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain isoforms and acetylcholine receptors were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and endplates on type-identified fibers of the lumbrical muscles (LMs), interosseus muscles (IMs), abductor digiti minimi (AM) and flexor pollicis brevis (FM) in rat forepaw. The majority of IFMs fibers were labeled positively for fast-switch fiber. However, the IMs were composed of only slow-switch fiber. With the exception of the IMs, the other IFMs had a part of hybrid fibers. Two-dimensional morphological characteristics of endplates on I and IIa muscle fiber had no significant differences among the IFMs. The LMs is the most suitable IFMs of rat to stimulate reinnervation of the IHMs after nerve injury. Gaining greater insight into the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphology in the IFMs of rat may help understand the pathological and functional changes of IFMs in rat model stimulating reinnervation of IHMs after peripheral nerve injury.

  6. Friction welding.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Results of an exploratory study of the structure and properties of friction welds in Udimet 700 (U-700) and TD-nickel (TD-Ni) bar materials, as well as dissimilar U-700/TD-Ni friction welds. Butt welds were prepared by friction welding 12.7-mm-diam U-700 bars and TD-Ni bars. Specimens for elevated temperature tensile and stress rupture testing were machined after a postweld heat treatment. Friction welding of U-700 shows great potential because the welds were found to be as strong as the parent metal in stress rupture and tensile tests at 760 and 980 C. In addition, the weld line was not detectable by metallographic examination after postheating. Friction welds in TD-Ni or between U-700 and TD-Ni were extremely weak at elevated temperatures. The TD-Ni friction welds could support only 9% as much stress as the base metal for 10-hour stress rupture life at 1090 C. The U-700/TD-Ni weld could sustain only 15% as much stress as the TD-Ni parent metal for a 10-hour stress rupture life at 930 C. Thus friction welding is not a suitable joining method for obtaining high-strength TD-Ni or U-700/TD-Ni weldments.

  7. Survey of welding processes.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  8. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  9. WELDING TORCH

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  10. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  11. Simulation of miniature endplate potentials in neuromuscular junctions by using a cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avella, Oscar Javier; Muñoz, José Daniel; Fayad, Ramón

    2008-01-01

    Miniature endplate potentials are recorded in the neuromuscular junction when the acetylcholine contents of one or a few synaptic vesicles are spontaneously released into the synaptic cleft. Since their discovery by Fatt and Katz in 1952, they have been among the paradigms in neuroscience. Those potentials are usually simulated by means of numerical approaches, such as Brownian dynamics, finite differences and finite element methods. Hereby we propose that diffusion cellular automata can be a useful alternative for investigating them. To illustrate this point, we simulate a miniature endplate potential by using experimental parameters. Our model reproduces the potential shape, amplitude and time course. Since our automaton is able to track the history and interactions of each single particle, it is very easy to introduce non-linear effects with little computational effort. This makes cellular automata excellent candidates for simulating biological reaction-diffusion processes, where no other external forces are involved.

  12. Parametric study of extended end-plate connection using finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mureşan, Ioana Cristina; Bâlc, Roxana

    2017-07-01

    End-plate connections with preloaded high strength bolts represent a convenient, fast and accurate solution for beam-to-column joints. The behavior of framework joints build up with this type of connection are sensitive dependent on geometrical and material characteristics of the elements connected. This paper presents results of parametric analyses on the behavior of a bolted extended end-plate connection using finite element modeling program Abaqus. This connection was experimentally tested in the Laboratory of Faculty of Civil Engineering from Cluj-Napoca and the results are briefly reviewed in this paper. The numerical model of the studied connection was described in detail in [1] and provides data for this parametric study.

  13. The significance of calcified fibrocartilage on the cortical endplate of the translational sheep spine model.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Sarina K; Bell, Spencer; Epperson, Richard Tyler; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2013-05-01

    To gain an understanding of the vertebral cortical endplate and factors that may affect the ability to achieve skeletal attachment to intervertebral implants and fusion, this study aimed to characterize the hypermineralized tissue on the cortical endplate of the vertebral body on a commonly used animal model. Skeletally mature sheep were injected with tetracycline prior to euthanasia and the C2-C3, T5-T6, and L2-L3 spinal motion segments were excised and prepared. Vertebral tissues were imaged using backscatter electron (BSE) imaging, histology, and tetracycline labeling was used to assess bone remodeling within different tissue layers. It was determined that the hypermineralized tissue layer was calcified fibrocartilage (CFC). No tetracycline labels were identified in the CFC layer, in contrast to single and double labels that were present in the underlying bone, indicating the CFC present on the cortical endplate was not being actively remodeled. The average thickness of the CFC layer was 146.3 ± 70.53 µm in the cervical region, 98.2 ± 40.29 µm in the thoracic region, and 150.89 ± 69.25 µm in the lumbar region. This difference in thickness may be attributed to the regional biomechanical properties of the spine. Results from this investigation indicate the presence of a nonremodeling tissue on the cortical endplate of the vertebral body in sheep spines, which attaches the intervertebral disc to the vertebrae. This tissue, if not removed, would likely prevent successful bony attachment to an intervertebral device in spinal fusion studies and total disc replacement surgeries. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of prosthesis endplate lordosis angles on L5-S1 kinematics after disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P; Wojewnik, Bartosz; Voronov, Leonard I; Havey, Robert M; Renner, Susan M; Zelenakova, Julia; McIntosh, Braden; Carandang, Gerard; Abjornson, Celeste; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2012-06-01

    We hypothesized that L5-S1 kinematics will not be affected by the lordosis distribution between the prosthesis endplates. Twelve cadaveric lumbosacral spines (51.3 ± 9.8 years) were implanted with 6° or 11° prostheses (ProDisc-L) with four combinations of superior/inferior lordosis (6°/0°, 3°/3°, 11°/0°, 3°/8°). Specimens were tested intact and after prostheses implantation with different lordosis distributions. Center of rotation (COR) and range of motion (ROM) were quantified. Six-degree lordosis prostheses (n = 7) showed no difference in flexion-extension ROM, regardless of design (6°/0° or 3°/3°) (p > 0.05). In lateral bending (LB), both designs reduced ROM (p < 0.05). In axial rotation, only the 3°/3° design reduced ROM (p < 0.05). Eleven-degree lordosis prostheses (n = 5) showed no difference in flexion-extension ROM for either design (p > 0.05). LB ROM decreased with distributed lordosis prostheses (3°/8°) (p < 0.05). Overall, L5-S1 range of motion was not markedly influenced by lordosis distribution among the two prosthesis endplates. The ProDisc-L prosthesis design where all lordosis is concentrated in the superior endplate yielded COR locations that were anterior and caudal to intact controls. The prosthesis with lordosis distributed between the two endplates yielded a COR that tended to be closer to intact. Further clinical and biomechanical studies are needed to assess the long-term impact of lordosis angle distribution on the fate of the facet joints.

  15. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    The purpose of this welding program is to provide students with skills and techniques to become employed as advanced apprentice welders. The welding program manual includes the following sections: (1) course description; (2) general objectives; (3) competencies; (4) curriculum outline for 13 areas; (5) 13 references; and (6) student progress…

  16. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  17. The permeability of the endplate channel to organic cations in frog muscle

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The relative permeability of endplate channels to many organic cations was determined by reversal-potential criteria. Endplate currents induced by iontophoretic "puffs" of acetylcholine were studied by a Vaseline gap, voltage clamp method in cut muscle fibers. Reversal potential changes were measured as the NaCl of the bathing medium was replaced by salts of organic cations, and permeability ratios relative to Na+ ions were calculated from the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation. 40 small monovalent organic cations had permeability ratios larger than 0.1. The most permeant including NH4+, hydroxylamine, hydrazine, methylamine, guanidine, and several relatives of guanidine had permeability ratios in the range 1.3--2.0. However, even cations such as imidazole, choline, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane, triethylamine, and glycine methylester were appreciably permeant with permeability ratios of 0.13--0.95. Four compounds with two charged nitrogen groups were also permeant. Molecular models of the permeant ions suggest that the smallest cross-section of the open pore must be at least as large as a square, 6.5 A x 6.5 A. Specific chemical factors seem to be less important than access or friction in determining the ionic selectivity of the endplate channel. PMID:6247422

  18. WELDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  19. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  20. Prevalence, Patterns, and Genetic Association Analysis of Modic Vertebral Endplate Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Rajagopalan, Veera Ranjani; Natesan, Senthil; Muthuraja, Raveendran; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chee; Chan, Danny; Kao, Patrick Yu Ping; Yee, Anita; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Study Design A prospective genetic association study. Purpose The etiology of Modic changes (MCs) is unclear. Recently, the role of genetic factors in the etiology of MCs has been evaluated. However, studies with a larger patient subset are lacking, and candidate genes involved in other disc degeneration phenotypes have not been evaluated. We studied the prevalence of MCs and genetic association of 41 candidate genes in a large Indian cohort. Overview of Literature MCs are vertebral endplate signal changes predominantly observed in the lumbar spine. A significant association between MCs and lumbar disc degeneration and nonspecific low back pain has been described, with the etiopathogenesis implicating various mechanical, infective, and biochemical factors. Methods We studied 809 patients using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging to determine the prevalence, patterns, distribution, and type of lumbar MCs. Genetic association analysis of 71 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 41 candidate genes was performed based on the presence or absence of MCs. SNPs were genotyped using the Sequenome platform, and an association test was performed using PLINK software. Results The mean age of the study population (n=809) was 36.7±10.8 years. Based on the presence of MCs, the cohort was divided into 702 controls and 107 cases (prevalence, 13%). MCs were more commonly present in the lower (149/251, 59.4%) than in the upper (102/251, 40.6%) endplates. L4–5 endplates were the most commonly affected levels (30.7%). Type 2 MCs were the most commonly observed pattern (n=206, 82%). The rs2228570 SNP of VDR (p=0.02) and rs17099008 SNP of MMP20 (p=0.03) were significantly associated with MCs. Conclusions Genetic polymorphisms of SNPs of VDR and MMP20 were significantly associated with MCs. Understanding the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of MCs is important for planning preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:28874978

  1. Prevalence, Patterns, and Genetic Association Analysis of Modic Vertebral Endplate Changes.

    PubMed

    Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Shanmuganathan, Rajasekaran; Rajagopalan, Veera Ranjani; Natesan, Senthil; Muthuraja, Raveendran; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chee; Chan, Danny; Kao, Patrick Yu Ping; Yee, Anita; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2017-08-01

    A prospective genetic association study. The etiology of Modic changes (MCs) is unclear. Recently, the role of genetic factors in the etiology of MCs has been evaluated. However, studies with a larger patient subset are lacking, and candidate genes involved in other disc degeneration phenotypes have not been evaluated. We studied the prevalence of MCs and genetic association of 41 candidate genes in a large Indian cohort. MCs are vertebral endplate signal changes predominantly observed in the lumbar spine. A significant association between MCs and lumbar disc degeneration and nonspecific low back pain has been described, with the etiopathogenesis implicating various mechanical, infective, and biochemical factors. We studied 809 patients using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging to determine the prevalence, patterns, distribution, and type of lumbar MCs. Genetic association analysis of 71 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 41 candidate genes was performed based on the presence or absence of MCs. SNPs were genotyped using the Sequenome platform, and an association test was performed using PLINK software. The mean age of the study population (n=809) was 36.7±10.8 years. Based on the presence of MCs, the cohort was divided into 702 controls and 107 cases (prevalence, 13%). MCs were more commonly present in the lower (149/251, 59.4%) than in the upper (102/251, 40.6%) endplates. L4-5 endplates were the most commonly affected levels (30.7%). Type 2 MCs were the most commonly observed pattern (n=206, 82%). The rs2228570 SNP of VDR ( p =0.02) and rs17099008 SNP of MMP20 ( p =0.03) were significantly associated with MCs. Genetic polymorphisms of SNPs of VDR and MMP20 were significantly associated with MCs. Understanding the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of MCs is important for planning preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  2. Relationship between screw sagittal angle and stress on endplate of adjacent segments after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with internal fixation: a Chinese finite element study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Yibo; Shen, Hongxing

    2017-12-01

    In order to reduce the incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD), the current study was designed to establish Chinese finite element models of normal 3rd~7th cervical vertebrae (C3-C7) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with internal fixation , and analyze the influence of screw sagittal angle (SSA) on stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments. Mimics 8.1 and Abaqus/CAE 6.10 softwares were adopted to establish finite element models. For C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate, their anterior areas had the maximum stress in anteflexion position, and their posterior areas had the maximum stress in posterior extension position. As SSA increased, the stress reduced. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on anterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 12.67% and 7.99% in anteflexion position, respectively. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on posterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 9.68% and 10.22% in posterior extension position, respectively. The current study established Chinese finite element models of normal C3-C7 and ACCF with internal fixation , and demonstrated that as SSA increased, the stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments decreased. In clinical surgery, increased SSA is able to play important role in protecting the adjacent cervical segments and reducing the incidence of ASD.

  3. Automated Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O.; Lawless, K. G.; Kurgan, C.; Nunes, A. C.; Graham, B. F.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, C. S.; Shepard, R.

    1993-01-01

    Fully automated variable-polarity plasma arc VPPA welding system developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. System eliminates defects caused by human error. Integrates many sensors with mathematical model of the weld and computer-controlled welding equipment. Sensors provide real-time information on geometry of weld bead, location of weld joint, and wire-feed entry. Mathematical model relates geometry of weld to critical parameters of welding process.

  4. Rotation Capacity of Bolted Flush End-Plate Stiffened Beam-to-Column Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Krzysztof; Kozłowski, Aleksander

    2017-06-01

    One of the flexibility parameters of semi-rigid joints is rotation capacity. Plastic rotation capacity is especially important in plastic design of framed structures. Current design codes, including Eurocode 3, do not posses procedures enabling designers to obtain value of rotation capacity. In the paper the calculation procedure of the rotation capacity for stiffened bolted flush end-plate beam-to-column connections has been proposed. Theory of experiment design was applied with the use of Hartley's PS/DS-P:Ha3 plan. The analysis was performed with the use of finite element method (ANSYS), based on the numerical experiment plan. The determination of maximal rotation angle was carried out with the use of regression analysis. The main variables analyzed in parametric study were: pitch of the bolt "w" (120-180 mm), the distance between the bolt axis and the beam upper edge cg1 (50-90 mm) and the thickness of the end-plate tp (10-20 mm). Power function was proposed to describe available rotation capacity of the joint. Influence of the particular components on the rotation capacity was also investigated. In the paper a general procedure for determination of rotation capacity was proposed.

  5. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  6. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  7. Weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Aendenroomer, A.J.R.; Ouden, G. den

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding and with the possibility to use this oscillation for in-process control of weld penetration. Welding experiments were carried out under different welding conditions. During welding the weld pool was triggered into oscillation by the normal welding pulses or by extra current pulses. The oscillation frequency was measured both during the pulse time and during the base time by analyzing the arc voltage variation using a Fast Fourier Transformation program. Optimal results are obtained when full penetration occurs during the pulse time and partial penetration during the base time. Undermore » these conditions elliptical overlapping spot welds are formed. In the case of full penetration the weld pool oscillates in a low frequency mode (membrane oscillation), whereas in the case of partial penetration the weld pool oscillates in a high frequency mode (surface oscillation). Deviation from the optimal welding conditions occurs when high frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (underpenetration) or when low frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (overpenetration). In line with these results a penetration sensing system with feedback control was designed, based on the criterion that optimal weld penetration is achieved when two peaks are observed in the frequency distribution. The feasibility of this sensing system for orbital tube welding was confirmed by the results of experiments carried out under various welding conditions.« less

  8. Electroslag and electrogas welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    These two new joining methods perform welding in the vertical position, and therein lies the secret of their impressive advantages in material handling, in weld preparation, in welding speed, in freedom from distortion, and in weld soundness. Once the work has been set in the proper vertical position for welding, no further plate handling is required. The molten filler metal is held in place by copper shoes or dams, and the weld is completed in one pass.

  9. Thermal Behaviour of Beams with Slant End-Plate Connection Subjected to Nonsymmetric Gravity Load

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Mohd Hanim; Talebi, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Research on the steel structures with confining of axial expansion in fixed beams has been quite intensive in the past decade. It is well established that the thermal behaviour has a key influence on steel structural behaviours. This paper describes mechanical behaviour of beams with bolted slant end-plate connection with nonsymmetric gravity load, subjected to temperature increase. Furthermore, the performance of slant connections of beams in steel moment frame structures in the elastic field is investigated. The proposed model proved that this flexible connection system could successfully decrease the extra thermal induced axial force by both of the friction force dissipation among two faces of slant connection and a small upward movement on the slant plane. The applicability of primary assumption is illustrated. The results from the proposed model are examined within various slant angles, thermal and friction factors. It can be concluded that higher thermal conditions are tolerable when slanting connection is used. PMID:24587720

  10. Thermal behaviour of beams with slant end-plate connection subjected to nonsymmetric gravity load.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkesh, Farshad; Osman, Mohd Hanim; Talebi, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Research on the steel structures with confining of axial expansion in fixed beams has been quite intensive in the past decade. It is well established that the thermal behaviour has a key influence on steel structural behaviours. This paper describes mechanical behaviour of beams with bolted slant end-plate connection with nonsymmetric gravity load, subjected to temperature increase. Furthermore, the performance of slant connections of beams in steel moment frame structures in the elastic field is investigated. The proposed model proved that this flexible connection system could successfully decrease the extra thermal induced axial force by both of the friction force dissipation among two faces of slant connection and a small upward movement on the slant plane. The applicability of primary assumption is illustrated. The results from the proposed model are examined within various slant angles, thermal and friction factors. It can be concluded that higher thermal conditions are tolerable when slanting connection is used.

  11. Numerical Study of Electrostatic Field Distortion on LPTPC End-Plates based on Bulk Micromegas Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Purba; Bhattacharya, Deb Sankar; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Majumdar, Nayana; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Colas, Paul; Attié, David

    2018-02-01

    The R&D activities for the linear collider TPC (LC-TPC) are currently working on the adoption of the micro pattern devices for the gaseous amplification stage. Several beam tests have been carried out at DESY with a 5 GeV electron beam in a 1 T superconducting magnet. We worked on a large prototype TPC with an end-plate that was built, for the first time, using seven resistive bulk Micromegas modules. During experiments, reduced signal sensitivity was observed at the boundary of these modules. Electrostatic field distortion near the module boundaries was considered to be the possible major reason behind these observations. In the present work, we will explore this hypothesis through numerical simulation. Our aim has been to understand the origin of distortions observed close to the edges of the test beam modules and to explore the possibility of using the Garfield simulation framework for investigating a phenomenon as complex as distortion.

  12. Tomosyn-2 is required for normal motor performance in mice and sustains neurotransmission at motor endplates.

    PubMed

    Geerts, Cornelia J; Plomp, Jaap J; Koopmans, Bastijn; Loos, Maarten; van der Pijl, Elizabeth M; van der Valk, Martin A; Verhage, Matthijs; Groffen, Alexander J A

    2015-07-01

    Tomosyn-1 (STXBP5) is a soluble NSF attachment protein receptor complex-binding protein that inhibits vesicle fusion, but the role of tomosyn-2 (STXBP5L) in the mammalian nervous system is still unclear. Here we generated tomosyn-2 null (Tom2(KO/KO)) mice, which showed impaired motor performance. This was accompanied by synaptic changes at the neuromuscular junction, including enhanced spontaneous acetylcholine release frequency and faster depression of muscle motor endplate potentials during repetitive stimulation. The postsynaptic geometric arrangement and function of acetylcholine receptors were normal. We conclude that tomosyn-2 supports motor performance by regulation of transmitter release willingness to sustain synaptic strength during high-frequency transmission, which makes this gene a candidate for involvement in neuromuscular disorders.

  13. Expression of miR-625 and Fas in cervical vertebral cartilage endplate.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Beilei; Zhan, Yan; Wang, Wei; Zhan, Yunzhong; Liu, Bingsheng

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess miR-625 and Fas expression in normal and degenerative cervical cartilage endplate (CEP) tissues. Following biof-informatics analysis, the Fas gene was predicted to be one of the targets of miR-625. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blotting were used to detect miR-625 and Fas expression in normal and degenerative CEP. A luciferase reporter assay was used to identify whether miR-625 could directly target the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of Fas. Lentiviral overexpression and/or inhibition vectors of miR-625 (pre-miR-625)/antigomiR-625 were constructed to determine whether overexpression or inhibition of miR-625 could affect Fas and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression in cartilaginous endplate cells (CECs) and tissues. qPCR analysis demonstrated that miR-625 expression in degenerative CEP was significantly lower than in normal CEP tissue, while the production of Fas in degenerated CEP was significantly higher. Results from western blotting also showed a significant increase in Fas expression in degenerative CEP. miR-625 can bind directly to the 3'-UTR of the Fas gene. However, this inhibition was attenuated by a target mutation in the miR-625-binding site of the 3'-UTR of Fas mRNA. In addition, following transfection of CECs with pre-miR-625 and antigomiR-625, expression of Fas significantly decreased and increased, respectively, and Bcl-2 expression was upregulated and downregulated, respectively. Upregulation of miR-625 can inhibit Fas expression and further affect Bcl-2 expression in CEP degeneration, suggesting that miR-625-mediated inhibition of the Fas gene is important in cervical degeneration.

  14. Estimating the timing of quantal releases during end-plate currents at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Kloot, W

    1988-01-01

    1. Following motor nerve stimulation there is a period of greatly enhanced quantal release, called the early release period or ERP (Barrett & Stevens, 1972b). Until now, measurements of the probability of quantal releases at different points in the ERP have come from experiments in which quantal output was greatly reduced, so that the time of release of individual quanta could be detected or so that the latency to the release of the first quantum could be measured. 2. A method has been developed to estimate the timing of quantal release during the ERP that can be used at much higher levels of quantal output. The assumption is made that each quantal release generates an end-plate current (EPC) that rises instantaneously and then decays exponentially. The peak amplitude of the quantal currents and the time constant for their decay are measured from miniature end-plate currents (MEPCs). Then a number of EPCs are averaged, and the times of release of the individual quanta during the ERP estimated by a simple mathematical method for deconvolution derived by Cohen, Van der Kloot & Attwell (1981). 3. The deconvolution method was tested using data from preparations in high-Mg2+ low-Ca2+ solution. One test was to reconstitute the averaged EPCs from the estimated times of quantal release and the quantal currents, by using Fourier convolution. The reconstructions fit well to the originals. 4. Reconstructions were also made from averaged MEPCs which do not rise instantaneously and the estimated times of quantal release.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2466987

  15. Evaluation of intervertebral disc cartilaginous endplate structure using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung M; Yoder, Jonathon H; Wright, Alexander C; Smith, Lachlan J; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2013-08-01

    The cartilaginous endplate (CEP) is a thin layer of hyaline cartilage positioned between the vertebral endplate and nucleus pulposus (NP) that functions both as a mechanical barrier and as a gateway for nutrient transport into the disc. Despite its critical role in disc nutrition and degeneration, the morphology of the CEP has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to visualize and report observations of the CEP three-dimensional morphology, and quantify CEP thickness using an MRI FLASH (fast low-angle shot) pulse sequence. MR imaging of ex vivo human cadaveric lumbar spine segments (N = 17) was performed in a 7T MRI scanner with sequence parameters that were selected by utilizing high-resolution T1 mapping, and an analytical MRI signal model to optimize image contrast between CEP and NP. The CEP thickness at five locations along the mid-sagittal AP direction (center, 5 mm, 10 mm off-center towards anterior and posterior) was measured, and analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Bonferonni test. For further investigation, six in vivo volunteers were imaged with a similar sequence in a 3T MRI scanner. In addition, decalcified and undecalcified histology was performed, which confirmed that the FLASH sequence successfully detected the CEP. CEP thickness determined by MRI in the mid-sagittal plane across all lumbar disc levels and locations was 0.77 ± 0.24 mm ex vivo. The CEP thickness was not different across disc levels, but was thinner toward the center of the disc. This study demonstrates the potential of MRI FLASH imaging for structural quantification of the CEP geometry, which may be developed as a technique to evaluate changes in the CEP with disc degeneration in future applications.

  16. The permeability of endplate channels to monovalent and divalent metal cations

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The relative permeability of endplate channels to monovalent and divalent metal ions was determined from reversal potentials. Thallium is the most permeant ion with a permeability ratio relative to Na+ of 2.5. The selectivity among alkali metals is weak with a sequence, Cs+ greater than Rb+ greater than K+ greater than Na+ greater than Li+, and permeability ratios of 1.4, 1.3, 1.1, 1.0, and 0.9. The selectivity among divalent ions is also weak, with a sequence for alkaline earths of Mg++ greater than Ca++ greater than Ba++ greater than Sr++. The transition metal ions Mn++, Co++, Ni++, Zn++, and Cd++ are also permeant. Permeability ratios for divalent ions decreased as the concentration of divalent ion was increased in a manner consistent with the negative surface potential theory of Lewis (1979 J. Physiol. (Lond.). 286: 417--445). With 20 mM XCl2 and 85.5 mM glucosamine.HCl in the external solution, the apparent permeability ratios for the alkaline earth cations (X++) are in the range 0.18--0.25. Alkali metal ions see the endplate channel as a water-filled, neutral pore without high-field-strength sites inside. Their permeability sequence is the same as their aqueous mobility sequence. Divalent ions, however, have a permeability sequence almost opposite from their mobility sequence and must experience some interaction with groups in the channel. In addition, the concentrations of monovalent and divalent ions are increased near the channel mouth by a weak negative surface potential. PMID:6247423

  17. WELDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.; DeWitt, D.E.; Nelson, I.V.

    1963-04-23

    This patent covers an arrangement for replacing air in a welding chamber with an inert gas. This operation usually is time-consuming because of the tendency of the inert gas to mix with the air being removed from the welding chamber. The chamber is open at the bottom and has at its top a cover and a porous plate a little below the cover. The inert gas is admitted to the chamber through two screened openings in the cover. On passing through the porous plate, the gas acts as a piston extending across the chamber and moving downwardly to expel the air through the lower open end of the chamber, with a minimum of mixing with the air being expelled. (AEC)

  18. WELDING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  19. Friction Stir Weld System for Welding and Weld Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor); Romine, Peter L. (Inventor); Oelgoetz, Peter A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A friction stir weld system for welding and weld repair has a base foundation unit connected to a hydraulically controlled elevation platform and a hydraulically adjustable pin tool. The base foundation unit may be fixably connected to a horizontal surface or may be connected to a mobile support in order to provide mobility to the friction stir welding system. The elevation platform may be utilized to raise and lower the adjustable pin tool about a particular axis. Additional components which may be necessary for the friction stir welding process include back plate tooling, fixturing and/or a roller mechanism.

  20. Friction plug welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Riki (Inventor); Hibbard, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction plug welding (FPW) usage is advantageous for friction stir welding (FSW) hole close-outs and weld repairs in 2195 Al--Cu--Li fusion or friction stir welds. Current fusion welding methods of Al--Cu--Li have produced welds containing varied defects. These areas are found by non-destructive examination both after welding and after proof testing. Current techniques for repairing typically small (<0.25) defects weaken the weldment, rely heavily on welders' skill, and are costly. Friction plug welding repairs increase strength, ductility and resistance to cracking over initial weld quality, without requiring much time or operator skill. Friction plug welding while pulling the plug is advantageous because all hardware for performing the weld can be placed on one side of the workpiece.

  1. Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  2. Weld-Bead Shaver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guirguis, Kamal; Price, Daniel S.

    1990-01-01

    Hand-held power tool shaves excess metal from inside circumference of welded duct. Removes excess metal deposited by penetration of tungsten/inert-gas weld or by spatter from electron-beam weld. Produces smooth transition across joint. Easier to use and not prone to overshaving. Also cuts faster, removing 35 in. (89 cm) of weld bead per hour.

  3. Introduction to Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  4. Laser welding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  5. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  6. Pressure distributions induced by elevon deflections on swept wings and adjacent end-plate surfaces at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, L. G., II; Johnson, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Surface pressure distributions are presented for regions where three-dimensional separated flow effects are prominent on swept-wing-elevon-end-plate models of 0 degree, 50 degree, and 70 degree sweepback, and with 0 degree, 10 degree, 20 degree, and 30 degree elevon deflections. Surface-oil-flow photographs and pressure distributions on the flat-plate wing, elevon, and end-plate surfaces are presented for numerous geometric variations, including various spacings between the elevon and the end plate, with and without a tip fin. The data, for a free-stream Mach number of 6 and a wing-root-chord Reynolds number of 20 x 10 to the sixth power, reveal considerably larger regions of elevon induced loads on the adjacent end-plate surface than would be anticipated by using inviscid flow analyses.

  7. 3D characterization of morphological changes in the intervertebral disc and endplate during aging: A propagation phase contrast synchrotron micro-tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yong; Liao, Shenghui; Zeng, Hao; Ni, Shuangfei; Tintani, Francis; Hao, Yongqiang; Wang, Lei; Wu, Tianding; Lu, Hongbin; Duan, Chunyue; Hu, Jianzhong

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of functional changes in the intervertebral disc (IVD) and interaction with endplate is essential to elucidate the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration disease (IDDD). To date, the simultaneous depiction of 3D micro-architectural changes of endplate with aging and interaction with IVD remains a technical challenge. We aim to characterize the 3D morphology changes of endplate and IVD during aging using PPCST. The lumbar vertebral level 4/5 IVDs harvested from 15-day-, 4- and 24-month-old mice were initially evaluated by PPCST with histological sections subsequently analyzed to confirm the imaging efficiency. Quantitative assessments of age-related trends after aging, including mean diameter, volume fraction and connectivity of the canals, and endplate porosity and thickness, reached a peak at 4 months and significantly decreased at 24 months. The IVD volume consistently exhibited same trend of variation with the endplate after aging. In this study, PPCST simultaneously provided comprehensive details of 3D morphological changes of the IVD and canal network in the endplate and the interaction after aging. The results suggest that PPCST has the potential to provide a new platform for attaining a deeper insight into the pathogenesis of IDDD, providing potential therapeutic targets. PMID:28266560

  8. Laser weld jig

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Haupt, David L.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  9. Human cartilage endplate permeability varies with degeneration and intervertebral disc site.

    PubMed

    DeLucca, John F; Cortes, Daniel H; Jacobs, Nathan T; Vresilovic, Edward J; Duncan, Randall L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-02-29

    Despite the critical functions the human cartilage endplate (CEP) plays in the intervertebral disc, little is known about its structural and mechanical properties and their changes with degeneration. Quantifying these changes with degeneration is important for understanding how the CEP contributes to the function and pathology of the disc. Therefore the objectives of this study were to quantify the effect of disc degeneration on human CEP mechanical properties, determine the influence of superior and inferior disc site on mechanics and composition, and simulate the role of collagen fibers in CEP and disc mechanics using a validated finite element model. Confined compression data and biochemical composition data were used in a biphasic-swelling model to calculate compressive extrafibrillar elastic and permeability properties. Tensile properties were obtained by applying published tensile test data to an ellipsoidal fiber distribution. Results showed that with degeneration CEP permeability decreased 50-60% suggesting that transport is inhibited in the degenerate disc. CEP fibers are organized parallel to the vertebrae and nucleus pulposus and may contribute to large shear strains (0.1-0.2) and delamination failure of the CEP commonly seen in herniated disc tissue. Fiber-reinforcement also reduces CEP axial strains thereby enhancing fluid flux by a factor of 1.8. Collectively, these results suggest that the structure and mechanics of the CEP may play critical roles in the solute transport and disc mechanics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Early effects of carbachol on the morphology of motor endplates of mammalian skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Tilman

    2010-03-01

    Long-term disturbance of the calcium homeostasis of motor endplates (MEPs) causes necrosis of muscle fibers. The onset of morphological changes in response to this disturbance, particularly in relation to the fiber type, is presently unknown. Omohyoid muscles of mice were incubated for 1-30 minutes in 0.1 mM carbachol, an acetylcholine agonist that causes an inward calcium current. In these muscles, the structural changes of the sarcomeres and the MEP sarcoplasm were evaluated at the light- and electron-microscopic level. Predominantly in type I fibers, carbachol incubation resulted in strong contractures of the sarcomeres underlying the MEPs. Owing to these contractures, the usual beret-like form of the MEP-associated sarcoplasm was deformed into a mushroom-like body. Consequently, the squeezed MEPs partially overlapped the adjacent muscle fiber segments. There are no signs of contractures below the MEPs if muscles were incubated in carbachol in calcium-free Tyrode's solution. Carbachol induced inward calcium current and produced fiber-type-specific contractures. This finding points to differences in the handling of calcium in MEPs. Possible mechanisms for these fiber-type-specific differences caused by carbachol-induced calcium entry are assessed.

  11. Diffusion and binding constants for acetylcholine derived from the falling phase of miniature endplate currents.

    PubMed Central

    Land, B R; Harris, W V; Salpeter, E E; Salpeter, M M

    1984-01-01

    In previous papers we studied the rising phase of a miniature endplate current (MEPC) to derive diffusion and forward rate constants controlling acetylcholine (AcCho) in the intact neuromuscular junction. The present study derives similar values (but with smaller error ranges) for these constants by including experimental results from the falling phase of the MEPC. We find diffusion to be 4 X 10(-6) cm2 s-1, slightly slower than free diffusion, forward binding to be 3.3 X 10(7) M-1 s-1, and the distance from an average release site to the nearest exit from the cleft to be 1.6 micron. We also estimate the back reaction rates. From our values we can accurately describe the shape of MEPCs under different conditions of receptor and esterase concentration. Since we suggest that unbinding is slower than isomerization, we further predict that there should be several short "closing flickers" during the total open time for an AcCho-ligated receptor channel. PMID:6584895

  12. MRI Quantification of Human Spine Cartilage Endplate Geometry: Comparison With Age, Degeneration, Level, and Disc Geometry

    PubMed Central

    DeLucca, John F.; Peloquin, John M.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Wright, Alexander C.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2017-01-01

    Geometry is an important indicator of disc mechanical function and degeneration. While the geometry and associated degenerative changes in the nucleus pulposus and the annulus fibrosus are well-defined, the geometry of the cartilage endplate (CEP) and its relationship to disc degeneration are unknown. The objectives of this study were to quantify CEP geometry in three dimensions using an MRI FLASH imaging sequence and evaluate relationships between CEP geometry and age, degeneration, spinal level, and overall disc geometry. To do so, we assessed the MRI-based measurements for accuracy and repeatability. Next, we measured CEP geometry across a larger sample set and correlated CEP geometric parameters to age, disc degeneration, level, and disc geometry. The MRI-based measures resulted in thicknesses (0.3–1 mm) that are comparable to prior measurements of CEP thickness. CEP thickness was greatest at the anterior/posterior (A/P) margins and smallest in the center. The CEP A/P thickness, axial area, and lateral width decreased with age but were not related to disc degeneration. Age-related, but not degeneration-related, changes in geometry suggest that the CEP may not follow the progression of disc degeneration. Ultimately, if the CEP undergoes significant geometric changes with aging and if these can be related to low back pain, a clinically feasible translation of the FLASH MRI-based measurement of CEP geometry presented in this study may prove a useful diagnostic tool. PMID:27232974

  13. Human Cartilage Endplate Permeability Varies with Degeneration and Intervertebral Disc Site

    PubMed Central

    DeLucca, John F.; Cortes, Daniel H.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Duncan, Randall L.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the critical functions the human cartilage endplate (CEP) plays in the intervertebral disc, little is known about its structural and mechanical properties and their changes with degeneration. Quantifying these changes with degeneration is important for understanding how the CEP contributes to the function and pathology of the disc. Therefore the objectives of this study were to quantify the effect of disc degeneration on human CEP mechanical properties, determine the influence of superior and inferior disc site on mechanics and composition, and simulate the role of collagen fibers in CEP and disc mechanics using a validated finite element model. Confined compression data and biochemical composition data were used in a biphasic-swelling model to calculate compressive extrafibrillar elastic and permeability properties. Tensile properties were obtained by applying published tensile test data to an ellipsoidal fiber distribution. Results showed that with degeneration CEP permeability decreased 50–60% suggesting that transport is inhibited in the degenerate disc. CEP fibers are organized parallel to the vertebrae and nucleus pulposus and may contribute to large shear strains (0.1–0.2) and delamination failure of the CEP commonly seen in herniated disc tissue. Fiber-reinforcement also reduces CEP axial strains thereby enhancing fluid flux by a factor of 1.8. Collectively, these results suggest that the structure and mechanics of the CEP may play critical roles in the solute transport and disc mechanics. PMID:26874969

  14. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  15. Welding in airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rechtlich, A; Schrenk, M

    1928-01-01

    The present article attempts to explain the principles for the production of a perfect weld and to throw light on the unexplained problems. Moreover, it is intended to elucidate the possibilities of testing the strength and reliability of welded parts.

  16. Infrared Thermography For Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Lucky, Brian D.; Spiegel, Lyle B.; Hudyma, Russell M.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared imaging and image-data-processing system shows temperatures of joint during welding and provides data from which rates of heating and cooling determined. Information used to control welding parameters to ensure reliable joints, in materials which microstructures and associated metallurgical and mechanical properties depend strongly on rates of heating and cooling. Applicable to variety of processes, including tungsten/inert-gas welding; plasma, laser, and resistance welding; cutting; and brazing.

  17. Coil Welding Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  18. Penetration in GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1990-01-01

    The size and shape of the weld bead produced in GTA welding depends on the magnitude and distribution of the energy incident on the workpiece surfaces as well as the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece. The input energy is largely controllable through the welding parameters selected, however the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece is less subject to control. Changes in energy dissipation can produce large changes in weld shape or penetration. Heat transport away from the weld pool is almost entirely by conduction, but heat transport in the weld pool is more complicated. Heat conduction throughmore » the liquid is an important component, but heat transport by convection (mass transport) is often the dominant mechanism. Convective heat transport is directional and changes the weld pool shape from that produced by conduction alone. Surface tension gradients are often the dominant forces driving fluid flow in GTA weld pools. These gradients are sensitive functions of weld pool chemistry and the energy input distribution to the weld. Experimental and theoretical work conducted primarily in the past decade has greatly enhanced our understanding of weld pool fluid flow, the forces which drive it, and its effects on weld pool shape. This work is reviewed here. While less common, changes in energy dissipation through the unmelted portion of the workpiece can also affect fusion zone shape or penetration. These effects are also described. 41 refs., 9 figs.« less

  19. Portable Weld Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Douglas

    This training manual, which was developed for employees of an automotive plant, is designed to teach trainees to operate a portable weld tester (Miyachi MM-315). In chapter 1, the weld tester's components are illustrated and described, and the procedure for charging its batteries is explained. Chapter 2 illustrates the weld tester's parts,…

  20. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  1. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  2. Welding Course Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  3. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  4. Effect of temperature on endplate potential rundown and recovery in rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Moyer, M; van Lunteren, E

    2001-05-01

    The amplitude of neuromuscular junction end-plate potentials (EPPs) decreases quickly within a train but recovers nearly completely from train to train during intermittent stimulation. Rundown has been shown to be dependent not only on the rate of transmitter release but also on the rate of replenishment of the depleted neurotransmitter at the site of release. Two groups of processes have been proposed for synaptic vesicle recycling, both of which involve multiple energy-requiring steps and enzymatic reactions and which therefore would be expected to be very temperature-sensitive. The present study tested the hypothesis that low temperature therefore increases the rate of EPP amplitude rundown. Studies were performed in vitro on rat diaphragm and used micro-conotoxin to allow normal-sized EPPs to be recorded from intact fibers. EPP amplitude rundown during intermittent stimulation at 20 and 50 Hz (duty cycle 333 ms) was greater at 20 degrees C than it was at 37 degrees C. Initially, temperature affected only intra-train rundown but, over longer periods of stimulation, both intra- and inter-train rundown were significantly accelerated by cold temperature. Cumulative EPP amplitudes were calculated by successively adding the amplitudes of each EPP during the stimulation period to provide an estimate of total neurotransmitter release in the neuromuscular junction. The cumulative EPP amplitude was significantly lower at 20 degrees C than it was at 37 degrees C during both 20 and 50 Hz stimulation. These data indicate that the mechanism involved in EPP amplitude rundown and recovery is temperature-sensitive, with a greater decrement in EPP amplitude at cold than at warm temperatures.

  5. Etomidate evokes synaptic vesicle exocytosis without increasing miniature endplate potentials frequency at the mice neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Valadão, Priscila Aparecida Costa; Naves, Lígia Araújo; Gomez, Renato Santiago; Guatimosim, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    Etomidate is an intravenous anesthetic used during anesthesia induction. This agent induces spontaneous movements, especially myoclonus after its administration suggesting a putative primary effect at the central nervous system or the periphery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the presynaptic and postsynaptic effects of etomidate at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Diaphragm nerve muscle preparations were isolated and stained with the styryl dye FM1-43, a fluorescent tool that tracks synaptic vesicles exo-endocytosis that are key steps for neurotransmission. We observed that etomidate induced synaptic vesicle exocytosis in a dose-dependent fashion, an effect that was independent of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. By contrast, etomidate-evoked exocytosis was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) because its effect was abolished in Ca(2+)-free medium and also inhibited by omega-Agatoxin IVA (30 and 200nM) suggesting the participation of P/Q-subtype Ca(2+) channels. Interestingly, even though etomidate induced synaptic vesicle exocytosis, we did not observe any significant difference in the frequency and amplitude of miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs) in the presence of the anesthetic. We therefore investigated whether etomidate could act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors labeled with α-bungarotoxin-Alexa 594 and we observed less fluorescence in preparations exposed to the anesthetic. In conclusion, our results suggest that etomidate exerts a presynaptic effect at the NMJ inducing synaptic vesicle exocytosis, likely through the activation of P-subtype voltage gated Ca(2+) channels without interfering with MEPPs frequency. The present data contribute to a better understanding about the effect of etomidate at the neuromuscular synapse and may help to explain some clinical effects of this agent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrostatic pressure modifies the action of octanol and atropine on frog endplate conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Ashford, M. L.; Macdonald, A. G.; Wann, K. T.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of octanol, ethanol and atropine were examined on the time course of decay (tau D) of miniature endplate currents (m.e.p.cs) in the frog neuromuscular junction at normal and high pressure. Octanol (25-100 microM) decreased reversibly the tau D of m.e.p.cs in a dose-dependent manner, 100 microM reducing tau D to 0.39 of the control value. Higher concentrations (200-500 microM) additionally depressed the amplitude of m.e.p.cs. Hydrostatic pressure (3.19 and 5.25 MPa) reduced the tau D of octanol (25-100 microM)-shortened m.e.p.cs. Thus 3.19 MPa and 5.25 MPa reduced the tau D in the presence of 100 microM octanol to 0.75 and 0.78 of the octanol treated values. This effect was not completely reversed on decompression. The m.e.p.c. amplitude is reversibly decreased by pressure in the presence of octanol. Hydrostatic pressure (3.19-15.55 MPa) did not modify the effect of ethanol on tau D. At 10.40 and 15.55 MPa the tau D was increased equally in the absence or presence of ethanol. Atropine (60 microM) reduced the tau D and amplitude of m.e.p.cs to 0.33 and 0.63 of the control values. These effects were completely reversible. Hydrostatic pressure (3.19 and 5.25 MPa) reduced the tau D of atropine-shortened m.e.p.cs to 0.82 and 0.77 of the atropine-treated values respectively. This effect was not completely reversed on decompression. Hydrostatic pressure also reversibly depressed the amplitude of atropine-treated m.e.p.cs. The implications of these drug-hydrostatic pressure interactions are discussed. PMID:6333262

  7. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  8. Programmable Positioner For Spot Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roden, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Welding station mechanized by installing preset indexing system and gear drive. Mechanism includes a low-cost, versatile, single-axis motion control and motor drive to provide fully-automatic weld sequencing and spot-to-spot spacing. Welding station relieves operator of some difficult, tedious tasks and increases both productivity and quality of welds. Results in welds of higher quality and greater accuracy, fewer weld defects, and faster welding operation.

  9. Study of weld offset in longitudinally welded SSME HPFTP inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Spanyer, K. S.; Brunair, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Welded joints are an essential part of rocket engine structures such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. Defects produced in the welding process can be detrimental to weld performance. Recently, review of the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) titanium inlet X-rays revealed several weld discrepancies such as penetrameter density issues, film processing discrepancies, weld width discrepancies, porosity, lack of fusion, and weld offsets. Currently, the sensitivity of welded structures to defects is of concern. From a fatigue standpoint, weld offset may have a serious effect since local yielding, in general, aggravates cyclic stress effects. Therefore, the weld offset issue is considered in this report. Using the FEM and beamlike plate approximations, parametric studies were conducted to determine the influence of weld offsets and a variation of weld widths in longitudinally welded cylindrical structures with equal wall thicknesses on both sides of the joint. Following the study, some conclusions are derived for the weld offsets.

  10. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Smith, Frank M.; O'Leary, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  11. Can an Endplate-conformed Cervical Cage Provide a Better Biomechanical Environment than a Typical Non-conformed Cage?: A Finite Element Model and Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Hao-Cheng; Yin, Bo; Xia, Xin-Lei; Ma, Xiao-Sheng; Wang, Hong-Li; Yin, Jun; Shao, Ming-Hao; Lyu, Fei-Zhou; Jiang, Jian-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of endplate-conformed cervical cages by finite element method (FEM) analysis and cadaver study. Twelve specimens (C2 -C7 ) and a finite element model (C3 -C7 ) were subjected to biomechanical evaluations. In the cadaver study, specimens were randomly assigned to intact (I), endplate-conformed (C) and non-conformed (N) groups with C4-5 discs as the treated segments. The morphologies of the endplate-conformed cages were individualized according to CT images of group C and the cages fabricated with a 3-D printer. The non-conformed cages were wedge-shaped and similar to commercially available grafts. Axial pre-compression loads of 73.6 N and moment of 1.8 Nm were used to simulate flexion (FLE), extension (EXT), lateral bending (LB) and axial rotation (AR). Range of motion (ROM) at C4-5 of each specimen was recorded and film sensors fixed between the cages and C5 superior endplates were used to detect interface stress. A finite element model was built based on the CT data of a healthy male volunteer. The morphologies of the endplate-conformed and wedge-shaped, non-conformed cervical cages were both simulated by a reverse engineering technique and implanted at the segment of C4-5 in the finite element model for biomechanical evaluation. Force loading and grouping were similar to those applied in the cadaver study. ROM of C4-5 in group I were recorded to validate the finite element model. Additionally, maximum cage-endplate interface stresses, stress distribution contours on adjoining endplates, intra-disc stresses and facet loadings at adjacent segments were measured and compared between groups. In the cadaver study, Group C showed a much lower interface stress in all directions of motion (all P < 0.05) and the ROM of C4-5 was smaller in FLE-EXT (P = 0.001) but larger in AR (P = 0.017). FEM analysis produced similar results: the model implanted with an endplate-conformed cage presented a lower interface stress with a more

  12. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  13. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  14. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  15. Back pain's association with vertebral end-plate signal changes in sciatica.

    PubMed

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; van der Kallen, Bas F; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-02-01

    Patients with sciatica frequently experience disabling back pain. One of the proposed causes for back pain is vertebral end-plate signal changes (VESC) as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To report on VESC findings, changes of VESC findings over time, and the correlation between VESC and disabling back pain in patients with sciatica. A randomized clinical trial with 1 year of follow-up. Patients with 6 to 12 weeks of sciatica who participated in a multicenter, randomized clinical trial comparing an early surgery strategy with prolonged conservative care with surgery if needed. Patients were assessed by means of the 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain (with 0 representing no pain and 100 the worst pain ever experienced) at baseline and 1 year. Disabling back pain was defined as a VAS score of at least 40 mm. Patients underwent MRI both at baseline and after 1 year follow-up. Presence and change of VESC was correlated with disabling back pain using chi-square tests and logistic regression analysis. At baseline, 39% of patients had disabling back pain. Of the patients with VESC at baseline, 40% had disabling back pain compared with 38% of the patients with no VESC (p=.67). The prevalence of type 1 VESC increased from 1% at baseline to 35% 1 year later in the surgical group compared with an increase from 3% to 11% in the conservative group. The prevalence of type 2 VESC decreased from 40% to 29% in the surgical group while remaining almost stable in the conservative group at 41%. The prevalence of disabling back pain at 1 year was 12% in patients with no VESC at 1 year, 16% in patients with type 1 VESC, 11% in patients with type 2 VESC, and 3% in patients with both types 1 and 2 VESC (p=.36). Undergoing surgery was associated with increase in the extent of VESC (odds ratio [OR], 8.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.7-15.7; p<.001). Patients who showed an increase in the extent of VESC after 1 year did not significantly report more disabling

  16. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  17. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  18. Welding and joining: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of NASA-developed technology in welding and joining. Topics discussed include welding equipment, techniques in welding, general bonding, joining techniques, and clamps and holding fixtures.

  19. Welding skate with computerized controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  20. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  1. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  2. Welding in Space Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The potential was discussed for welding in space, its advantages and disadvantages, and what type of programs can benefit from the capability. Review of the various presentations and comments made in the course of the workshop suggests several routes to obtaining a better understanding of how welding processes can be used in NASA's initiatives in space. They are as follows: (1) development of a document identifying well processes and equipment requirements applicable to space and lunar environments; (2) more demonstrations of welding particular hardware which are to be used in the above environments, especially for space repair operations; (3) increased awareness among contractors responsible for building space equipment as to the potential for welding operations in space and on other planetary bodies; and (4) continuation of space welding research projects is important to maintain awareness within NASA that welding in space is viable and beneficial.

  3. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  4. Enhanced diffusion welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.; Moore, T. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Surfaces of unrecrystallized alloys are sanded and polished. This is followed by a two-step welding process by which the strength of the parent metal is retained at the weld joint. The first step forces the surfaces into intimate contact at a temperature where the metal still has good ductility. The second step causes diffusion, recrystallization, and grain growth across the original weld interface.

  5. WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-08-26

    A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

  6. Dual wire welding torch and method

    DOEpatents

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  7. Robot welding process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  8. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  9. Welding of hermetic connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hieber, D.E.

    1976-08-01

    Certain systems use hermetically-sealed multipin connectors welded into a stainless steel support ring. Failure of these hermetic seals during welding continues to be a problem, and similar problems are anticipated on advanced systems. Since the assembly is expensive, and the detection, prevention, and repair of hermetic seal failures is costly, development of an improved welding process is important. Extended service life also requires a lower system leak rate, thus causing an increased need for maintaining the hermetic seal without supplemental epoxy sealing and repair. Experience shows that up to 70 percent of the 10-pin SA1810-2 connectors have gross leaks (greatermore » than 0.003 mm/sup 3//s Standard Temperature and Pressure (STP)) after being welded using established welding processes and without using the epoxy pre-seal process. Acceptable leak rates of less than 0.00001 mm/sup 3//s STP were achieved from 20 SA1810-2 10-pin connectors using heat sinks and an intermittent gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) weld technique. The process developed consists of using a massive copper heat sink with silicon thermal joint compound to maintain control of temperature in the hermetic seal area and using a 12-segment GTA weld with compressed argon gas cooling between weld segments. The process and techniques developed are considered acceptable for welding the SA1810 family of connectors.« less

  10. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  11. P120-Catenin Protects Endplate Chondrocytes From Intermittent Cyclic Mechanical Tension Induced Degeneration by Inhibiting the Expression of RhoA/ROCK-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Guang; Ma, Ming-Ming; Zheng, Quan; Shen, Xiang; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Xu, Jia-Jia; Wang, Chuan-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Ling

    2016-08-15

    The changes of endplate chondrocytes induced by intermittent cyclic mechanical tension (ICMT) were observed by realtime reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. To investigate the role of RhoA/ROCK-1 signaling pathway and E-cadherin/P120-catenin complex in endplate chondrocytes degeneration induced by ICMT. ICMT can induce the endplate chondrocyte degeneration. However, the relationship between P120-catenin or RhoA/ROCK-1 signaling pathway and endplate chondrocytes degeneration induced by ICMT is not clear. ICMT (strain at 0.5 Hz sinusoidal curve at 8% elongation) was applied to rat endplate chondrocytes for 6 days, 16 hours a day. The cell viability and apoptosis were examined by the LIVE/DEAD assay and flow cytometry. Histological staining was used to examine the lumbar disc tissue morphology and extracellular matrix. To regulate RhoA/ROCK-1 signaling pathway and the expression of E-cadherin and P120-catenin, RhoA/ROCK-1 pathway-specific inhibitors, E-cadherin, and p120-catenin plasmid were applied. Coimmunoprecipitation was employed to examine the interaction between E-cadherin and P120-catenin, P120-catenin, and RhoA. The related gene expression and protein location was examined by realtime reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. There was no change of viability verified by LIVE/DEAD assay and flow cytometry after ICMT loading. ICMT loading led to RhoA/ROCK-1 signaling activation and the loss of the chondrogenic phenotype of endplate chondrocytes. Inhibition of RhoA/ROCK-1 signaling pathway significantly ameliorated the degeneration induced by ICMT. The expression of P120-catenin and E-cadherin were inhibited by ICMT. ICMT reduced the interaction between P120-catenin and E-cadherin. Furthermore, over-expression of P120-catenin and E-cadherin can suppress the expression of chondrogenic gene, over-expression of P120-catenin can suppress the RhoA/ROCK-1

  12. Effect of the Location of Endplate Cement Extravasation on Adjacent Level Fracture in Osteoporotic Patients Undergoing Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Mary Kristen; Petersen, Brian; Glueck, Deborah; Kriedler, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The most widely researched risk/complication following vertebroplasty (VP) or kyphoplasty (KP) is that of adjacent level fracture (ALF). Current literature results regarding the effect of intradiscal extravasation of cement on the risk of ALF is conflicting with about half of the studies concluding there is no added risk with endplate extravasation and half of the studies reporting opposite conclusions. The purpose of the study is to further stratify the data to determine whether specifically the location and extent of endplate cement extravasation more strongly affect ALF risk in osteoporotic patients following either VP or balloon KP. Retrospective cohort study. University teaching hospital. One hundred and fifty-six cemented levels in 80 patients, treated at a single center between 2008 and 2012 were reviewed. Age, gender, T-score, body mass index, and osteoporosis type (primary or secondary) were recorded. An ALF was defined as a fracture: 1) in a non-cemented vertebra; 2) adjacent to a cemented level; and 3) not due to trauma or malignancy. Location of the cement extravasation (anterior, middle, or posterior third of the vertebral body) and extravasation extent (percentage of the intervertebral disc height occupied by the bolus) were measured. A logistic modeling strategy permitted examining the association between the location and extent of extravasation and the odds of ALF. ALF occurred in 14 of the 52 patients (27%) and 20 of the 98 levels (20.4%) remaining after exclusions. Odds of ALF were 5.9 times higher (95% CI: 1.6 to 21.2, P = 0.008) with extravasation when compared to no leakage. Odds of ALF in a given patient were 22.6 times higher (95% CI: 3.0 to 170.9, P = 0.003) with anterior extravasation when compared to no leakage. Leakage in the middle or posterior thirds and extent of extravasation were not associated with ALF. Limitations of the study include the retrospective study design and small sample size as well as the retrospective implementation

  13. Adaptive weld control for high-integrity welding applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced adaptive control weld system for high-integrity welding applications is presented. The system consists of a state-of-the-art weld control subsystem, motion control subsystem, and sensor subsystem which closes the loop on the process. The adaptive control subsystem (ACS), which is required to totally close the loop on weld process control, consists of a multiprocessor system, data acquisition hardware, and three welding sensors which provide measurements from all areas around the torch in real time. The ACS acquires all 'measurables' and feeds offset trims back into the weld control and motion control subsystems to modify the 'controllables' in order to maintain a previously defined weld quality.

  14. Advanced Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In order to more easily join the huge sections of the Space Shuttle external tank, Marshall Space Flight Center initiated development of the existing concept of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding. VPPA welding employs a variable current waveform that allows the system to operate for preset time increments in either of two polarity modes for effective joining of light alloys.

  15. Friction Stir Welding Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    The research of this summer was a continuation of work started during the previous summer faculty fellowship period. The Friction Stir Welding process (FSW) patented by The Welding Institute (TWI), in Great Britain, has become a popular topic at the Marshall Space Flight Center over the past year. Last year it was considered a novel approach to welding but few people took it very seriously as a near term solution. However, due to continued problems with cracks in the new aluminum-lithium space shuttle external tank (ET), the friction stir process is being mobilized at full speed in an effort to mature this process for the potential manufacture of flight hardware. It is now the goal of NASA and Lockheed-Martin Corporation (LMC) to demonstrate a full-scale friction stir welding system capable of welding ET size barrel sections. The objectives this summer were: (1) Implementation and validation of the rotating dynamometer on the MSFC FSW system; (2) Collection of data for FSW process modeling efforts; (3) Specification development for FSW implementation on the vertical weld tool; (4) Controls and user interface development for the adjustable pin tool; and (5) Development of an instrumentation system for the planishing process. The projects started this summer will lead to a full scale friction stir welding system that is expected to produce a friction stir welded shuttle external tank type barrel section. The success of this could lead to the implementation of the friction stir process for manufacturing future shuttle external tanks.

  16. Laser Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  17. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  18. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usoro, Hogan

    Designed to be a workable guide for instructors serving the occupational needs of various categories of disadvantaged and handicapped students, this welding curriculum contains fourteen units of self-paced and self-contained instructional materials. The instructional units cover the following topics: job opportunities in welding, safety rules in…

  19. Fusion Welding Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-30

    ratios of iron to chromium and manganese to chromium (Cr content does not change significantly) for three different steels. As can be seen Mn...weld defects such as humping and undercutting of the weld bead. Humping and undercutting are common in high travel speed and high current GTAW

  20. NASA welding assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to demonstrate the cycle life capability of welded solar cell modules relative to a soldered solar cell module in a simulated low earth orbit thermal environment. A total of five 18-cell welded (parallel gap resistance welding) modules, three 18-cell soldered modules, and eighteen single cell samples were fabricated using 2 x 4 cm silicon solar cells from ASEC, fused silica cover glass from OCLI, silver plated Invar interconnectors, DC 93-500 adhesive, and Kapton-Kevlar-Kapton flexible substrate material. Zero degree pull strength ranged from 2.4 to 5.7 lbs for front welded contacts (40 samples), and 3.5 to 6.2 lbs for back welded contacts (40 samples). Solar cell cross sections show solid state welding on both front and rear contacts. The 18-cell welded modules have a specific power of 124 W/kg and an area power density of 142 W/sq m (both at 28 C). Three welded and one soldered module were thermal cycle tested in a thermal vacuum chamber simulating a low earth orbit thermal environment.

  1. Welding blades to rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoklo, K. H.; Moore, T. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described to form T-joints between dissimilar thickness parts by magnetic force upset welding. This type of resistance welding is used to join compressor and turbine parts which thereby reduces the weight and cost of jet engines.

  2. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  3. Desensitization shortens the high-quantal-content endplate current time course in frog muscle with intact cholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Giniatullin, R A; Talantova, M; Vyskocil, F

    1997-08-01

    1. The desensitization induced by bath-applied carbachol or acetylcholine (ACh) and potentiated by proadifen (SKF 525A) was studied in the frog sartorius with intact synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE). 2. The reduction in the density and number of postsynaptic receptors produced by desensitization lowered the amplitude of the endplate currents (EPCs) and shortened the EPC decay when the quantal content (m) of the EPC was about 170 and when multiple release of quanta at single active zones was highly probably. The shortening of high-quantal-content EPCs persisted for at least 15 min after the wash-out of agonists, at a time when the amplitude had recovered fully. 3. The decay times of the low-quantal-content EPCs recorded from preparations pretreated with 5 mM Mg2+ (m approximately 70) and single-quantum miniature endplate currents (MEPCs) were not affected by carbachol, ACh or proadifen. 4. The desensitization of ACh receptors potentiated by proadifen, prevented completely the 6- to 8-fold prolongation of EPC which was induced by neostigmine inhibition of synaptic AChE. 5. It is assumed that high-quantal-content EPCs increase the incidence of multiple quanta release at single active zones and the probability of repetitive binding of ACh molecules which leads to EPC prolongation. The shortening which persists after complete recovery of the amplitude during wash-out of the exogenous agonist is probably due to 'trapping' of ACh molecules onto rapidly desensitized receptors and the reduced density of functional AChRs during the quantum action.

  4. Welds in thermoplastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. S.

    Welding methods are reviewed that can be effectively used for joining of thermoplastic composites and continuous-fiber thermoplastics. Attention is given to the use of ultrasonic, vibration, hot-plate, resistance, and induction welding techniques. The welding techniques are shown to provide complementary weld qualities for the range of thermoplastic materials that are of interest to industrial and technological applications.

  5. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  6. Multihole Arc-Welding Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaim, Benji D.

    1989-01-01

    Modified orifice for variable-polarity plasma-arc welding directs welding plume so it creates clean, even welds on both Inconel(R) and aluminum alloys. Includes eight holes to relieve back pressure in plasma. Quality of welds on ferrous and nonferrous alloys improved as result.

  7. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  8. Determination of GTA Welding Efficiencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    continue on reverse if ncessary andidentify by block number) A method is developed for estimating welding efficiencies for moving arc GTAW processes...Dutta, Co-Advi r Department of Mechanical Engineering ii ABSTRACT A method is developed for estimating welding efficiencies for moving arc GTAW ...17 Figure 10. Miller Welding Equipment ............. ... 18 Figure 11. GTAW Torch Setup for Automatic Welding. . 19 Figure 12

  9. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  10. Effect of welding position on porosity formation in aluminum alloy welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haryung, J.; Wroth, R. S.

    1967-01-01

    Program investigates the effects of varied welding positions on weld qualities. Progressive changes in bead geometry occur as the weld plane angle is varied from upslope to downslope. The gravitational effect on the weld puddle varies greatly with welding position.

  11. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  12. Weld analysis and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  13. Health effects of welding.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M

    2003-01-01

    Many of the epidemiology studies performed are difficult to compare because of differences in worker populations, industrial settings, welding techniques, duration of exposure, and other occupational exposures besides welding fumes. Some studies were conducted in carefully controlled work environments, others during actual workplace conditions, and some in laboratories. Epidemiology studies have shown that a large number of welders experience some type of respiratory illness. Respiratory effects seen in full-time welders have included bronchitis, airway irritation, lung function changes, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders. Although epidemiological studies have demonstrated an increase in pulmonary illness after exposure to welding fumes, little information of the causality, dose-response, and possible underlying mechanisms regarding the inhalation of welding fumes exists. Even less information is available about the neurological, reproductive, and dermal effects after welding fume exposure. Moreover, carcinogenicity and short-term and long-term toxicology studies of welding fumes in animals are lacing or incomplete. Therefore, an understanding of possible adverse health effects of exposure to welding fumes is essential to risk assessment and the development of prevention strategies and will impact a large population of workers.

  14. Pipeline welding goes mechanized

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, R.

    1999-11-01

    Spread four has bugs in the cornfield--but not to worry. The bug referred to here is a mechanized welding bug, specifically a single welding head, computer-aided gas metal arc (GMAW) system from CRC-Evans Automatic Welding powered by a Miller Electric XMT{reg{underscore}sign} 304 inverter-based welding machine. The bug operator and owner of 32 inverters is Welded Construction, L.P., of Perrysburgh, Ohio. Spread four is a 147-mile stretch of the Alliance Pipeline system (Alliance) cutting through the cornfields of northeast Iowa. While used successfully in Canada and Europe for onshore and offshore pipeline construction for 30 years, this is the first large-scalemore » use of mechanized welding in the US on a cross-country pipeline. On longer, larger-diameter and thicker-wall pipe projects--the Alliance mainline has 1,844 miles of pipe, most of it 36-in. diameter with a 0.622-in. wall thickness--mechanized GMAW offers better productivity than manual shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). In addition, high-strength steels, such as the API 5L Grade X70 pipe used on the Alliance, benefit from the low-hydrogen content of certain solid and tubular wire electrodes.« less

  15. Weld Wire Investigation Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.A.

    1999-03-22

    After GTA welding reservoir A production/process prove-in assemblies, X-ray examination detected a lack of sidewall fusion. After examining several possible causes, it was determined that the weld wire filler metal was responsible, particularly the wire cleaning process. The final conclusion was that the filler wire must be abrasively cleaned in a particular manner to perform as required. The abrasive process was incorporated into the wire material specification, ensuring consistency for all reservoir GTA welding at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T).

  16. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  17. Thermal stir welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  18. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  19. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffery; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal Stir Shielding is a revolutionary new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating and stirring functions are independent allowing more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  20. Laser weld jig. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, P.; Haupt, D.L.

    1980-12-05

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reusable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  1. Friction stir welding tool

    DOEpatents

    Tolle, Charles R.; Clark, Denis E.; Barnes, Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  2. Weld failure detection

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  3. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  4. Friction stir weld tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  5. Welding and joining techniques.

    PubMed

    Chipperfield, F A; Dunkerton, S B

    2001-05-01

    There is a welding solution for most applications. As products must meet more stringent requirements or require more flexible processes to aid design or reduce cost, further improvements or totally new processes are likely to be developed. Quality control aspects are also becoming more important to meet regulation, and monitoring and control of welding processes and the standardised testing of joints will meet some if not all of these requirements.

  6. Weld braze technique

    DOEpatents

    Kanne, Jr., William R.; Kelker, Jr., John W.; Alexander, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    High-strength metal joints are formed by a combined weld-braze technique. A hollow cylindrical metal member is forced into an undersized counterbore in another metal member with a suitable braze metal disposed along the bottom of the counterbore. Force and current applied to the members in an evacuated chamber results in the concurrent formation of the weld along the sides of the counterbore and a braze along the bottom of the counterbore in one continuous operation.

  7. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1985-09-04

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  8. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1987-12-15

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder is disclosed. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws. 5 figs.

  9. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  10. EB welding of launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Attila

    While large structural components can be electron beam (EB) welded, equipment and operating costs increase with the requisite vacuum chamber's size. Attention is presently given to cost-effective ways of EB welding launch-vehicle assemblies without compromise of weld quality in such alloys as 2219, 2090, Weldalite, and HP9-4-30/20. Weld strengths at both room and cryogenic temperatures that were 50 percent higher than those obtainable for such materials with arc welding have been demonstrated. Fracture toughnesses were also 40-50 percent higher than arc-welded values. Attention is given to EB joint fit-up allowables for 2219-T87 Al alloy.

  11. Weld radiograph enigmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, Wartan A.

    1986-01-01

    Weld radiograph enigmas are features observed on X-ray radiographs of welds. Some of these features resemble indications of weld defects, although their origin is different. Since they are not understood, they are a source of concern. There is a need to identify their causes and especially to measure their effect on weld mechanical properties. A method is proposed whereby the enigmas can be evaluated and rated, in relation to the full spectrum of weld radiograph indications. Thie method involves a signature and a magnitude that can be used as a quantitive parameter. The signature is generated as the diference between the microdensitometer trace across the radiograph and the computed film intensity derived from a thickness scan along the corresponding region of the sample. The magnitude is the measured difference in intensity between the peak and base line values of the signature. The procedure is demonstated by comparing traces across radiographs of a weld sample before and after the introduction of a hole and by a system based on a MacIntosh mouse used for surface profiling.

  12. Automatic Welding System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    Robotic welding has been of interest to industrial firms because it offers higher productivity at lower cost than manual welding. There are some systems with automated arc guidance available, but they have disadvantages, such as limitations on types of materials or types of seams that can be welded; susceptibility to stray electrical signals; restricted field of view; or tendency to contaminate the weld seam. Wanting to overcome these disadvantages, Marshall Space Flight Center, aided by Hayes International Corporation, developed system that uses closed-circuit TV signals for automatic guidance of the welding torch. NASA granted license to Combined Technologies, Inc. for commercial application of the technology. They developed a refined and improved arc guidance system. CTI in turn, licensed the Merrick Corporation, also of Nashville, for marketing and manufacturing of the new system, called the CT2 Optical Trucker. CT2 is a non-contracting system that offers adaptability to broader range of welding jobs and provides greater reliability in high speed operation. It is extremely accurate and can travel at high speed of up to 150 inches per minute.

  13. Study of lesions of the lumbar endplate based on the stage of maturation of the lumbar vertebral body: the relationship between skeletal maturity and chronological age.

    PubMed

    Uraoka, Hideyuki; Higashino, Kosaku; Morimoto, Masatoshi; Yamashita, Kazuta; Tezuka, Fumitake; Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Murase, Masaaki; Sairyo, Koichi

    2018-02-01

    The lesion of the lumbar endplate is sometimes identified in the vertebrae of children and adolescents. The purpose of this study is to compare between skeletal maturity and chronological age. The second purpose of this study is to clarify the lesions of the lumbar endplate based on the maturation of the lumbar vertebral body. Six hundred and thirty-two (485 men and 147 women) consecutive patients were included. The mean age at the first medical examination was 13.8 years. Their skeletal maturity was evaluated based on the appearances of the secondary ossification center of L3. The area of the endplate lesions was classified into five types. The apophyseal stage was observed from 10 years old to 18 years old, and the apophyseal stage was shown the peak at 14 years old. The appearance of the apophyseal ring was observed earlier in female patients than in male patients. For the concave type, the lesion at upper level vertebra was more prevalent. The anterior and middle type of the lesion at upper level vertebra was more prevalent. For the posterior type, the lesion of the inferior rim of L4 and the lesion of the rim of L5 were more prevalent. This study emerged after comparing skeletal maturity based on the maturation of the lumbar vertebral body with the chronological age of a large number of patients and examining the lesions of the lumbar endplate based on the stage of maturation of the lumbar vertebral body.

  14. Vertebral end-plate fractures as a result of high rate pressure loading in the nucleus of the young adult porcine spine.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen H M; Gregory, Diane E; McGill, Stuart M

    2008-01-01

    In a healthy spine, end-plate fractures occur from excessive pressurization of the intervening nucleus. Younger spines are most susceptible to such type of injury due to the highly hydraulic nature of their intervertebral discs. The purpose of this paper was to confirm this fracture mechanism of the healthy spine through the pressurization of the nucleus in the absence of external compressive loading. Sixteen functional porcine spine units were dissected and both injection and pressure transducer needles were inserted into the nucleus of the intervertebral disc. Hydraulic fluid was rapidly injected into the nucleus until failure occurred. Peak pressure and rate of pressure development were monitored. Spine units were dissected to determine the type and location of fracture. Fifteen of the 16 spine units fractured (the remaining unit had a degenerated disc). Of the 15 fractures, 13 occurred at the posterior margin of the end-plate along the lines of the growth plates. A slightly exponential relationship was found between peak pressure and its rate of development (R(2) = 0.544). Also, in each of the growth-plate fractured specimens, nuclear material was forcefully emitted, during fracture, from the intervertebral disc into the vertebral foramen. The posterior end-plate fractures produced here are similar to those often seen in young adult humans. This provides insight into a mechanism of fracture development through pressurization of the nucleus that might be seen in older adolescents and younger adults during athletic events or mild trauma.

  15. Electrical stimulation of paralyzed vibrissal muscles reduces endplate reinnervation and does not promote motor recovery after facial nerve repair in rats.

    PubMed

    Sinis, Nektarios; Horn, Frauke; Genchev, Borislav; Skouras, Emmanouil; Merkel, Daniel; Angelova, Srebrina K; Kaidoglou, Katerina; Michael, Joern; Pavlov, Stoyan; Igelmund, Peter; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Irintchev, Andrey; Dunlop, Sarah A; Angelov, Doychin N

    2009-10-01

    The outcome of peripheral nerve injuries requiring surgical repair is poor. Recent work has suggested that electrical stimulation (ES) of denervated muscles could be beneficial. Here we tested whether ES has a positive influence on functional recovery after injury and surgical repair of the facial nerve. Outcomes at 2 months were compared to animals receiving sham stimulation (SS). Starting on the first day after end-to-end suture (facial-facial anastomosis), electrical stimulation (square 0.1 ms pulses at 5 Hz at an ex tempore established threshold amplitude of between 3.0 and 5.0V) was delivered to the vibrissal muscles for 5 min a day, 3 times a week. Restoration of vibrissal motor performance following ES or SS was evaluated using the video-based motion analysis and correlated with the degree of collateral axonal branching at the lesion site, the number of motor endplates in the target musculature and the quality of their reinnervation, i.e. the degree of mono- versus poly-innervation. Neither protocol reduced collateral branching. ES did not improve functional outcome, but rather reduced the number of innervated motor endplates to approximately one-fifth of normal values and failed to reduce the proportion of poly-innervated motor endplates. We conclude that ES is not beneficial for recovery of whisker function after facial nerve repair in rats.

  16. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction andmore » speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.« less

  17. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  18. Pre-weld heat treatment improves welds in Rene 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of Rene 41 prior to welding reduces the incidence of cracking during post-weld heat treatment. The microstructure formed during the slow cooling rate favors elevated temperature ductility. Some vestiges of this microstructure are apparently retained during welding and thus enhance strain-age crack resistance in air.

  19. Weld pool oscillation during GTA welding of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.H.; Ouden, G. den

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with the oscillation behavior of weld pools in the case of GTA bead-on-plate welding of mild steel, Fe 360. During welding, the weld pool was brought into oscillation by applying short current pulses, and the oscillation frequency and amplitude were measured by monitoring the arc voltage. It was found that the oscillation of the partially penetrated weld pool is dominated by one of two different oscillation modes (Mode 1 and Mode 2) depending on the welding conditions, whereas the oscillation of the fully penetrated weld pool is characterized bymore » a third oscillation mode (Mode 3). It is possible to maintain partially penetrated weld pool oscillation in Mode 1 by choosing appropriate welding conditions. Under these conditions, an abrupt decrease in oscillation frequency occurs when the weld pool transfers from partial penetration to full penetration. Thus, weld penetration can be in-process controlled by monitoring the oscillation frequency during welding.« less

  20. Basic Welding Skills. Welding Module 1. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a six-unit module in basic welding skills. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: the welding profession, personal safety,…

  1. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  2. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    DOEpatents

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  3. Laser Beam Welding of Nitride Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongping; Yin, Guobin; Shulkin, Boris

    Laser beam welding is a joining technique that has many advantages over conventional GMAW welding, such as low heat input, short cycle time as well as good cosmetic welds. Laser beam welding has been widely used for welding powertrain components in automotive industry. When welding nitride steel components, however, laser beam welding faces a great challenge. The difficulty lies in the fact that the nitride layer in the joint releases the nitrogen into the weld pool, resulting in a porous weld. This research presents an industrial ready solution to prevent the nitrogen from forming gas bubbles in the weld.

  4. Understanding the impact of insulating and conducting endplate boundary conditions on turbulence in CSDX through nonlocal simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Vaezi, P.; Holland, C.; Thakur, S. C.; ...

    2017-04-01

    The Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment (CSDX) linear plasma device provides a unique platform for investigating the underlying physics of self-regulating drift-wave turbulence/zonal flow dynamics. A minimal model of 3D drift-reduced nonlocal cold ion fluid equations which evolves density, vorticity, and electron temperature fluctuations, with proper sheath boundary conditions, is used to simulate dynamics of the turbulence in CSDX and its response to changes in parallel boundary conditions. These simulations are then carried out using the BOUndary Turbulence (BOUT++) framework and use equilibrium electron density and temperature profiles taken from experimental measurements. The results show that density gradient-driven drift-waves are themore » dominant instability in CSDX. However, the choice of insulating or conducting endplate boundary conditions affects the linear growth rates and energy balance of the system due to the absence or addition of Kelvin-Helmholtz modes generated by the sheath-driven equilibrium E × B shear and sheath-driven temperature gradient instability. Moreover, nonlinear simulation results show that the boundary conditions impact the turbulence structure and zonal flow formation, resulting in less broadband (more quasi-coherent) turbulence and weaker zonal flow in conducting boundary condition case. These results are qualitatively consistent with earlier experimental observations.« less

  5. Frontoxins, three-finger toxins from Micrurus frontalis venom, decrease miniature endplate potential amplitude at frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Moreira, K G; Prates, M V; Andrade, F A C; Silva, L P; Beirão, P S L; Kushmerick, C; Naves, L A; Bloch, C

    2010-08-01

    Neurotoxicity is a major symptom of envenomation caused by Brazilian coral snake Micrurus frontalis. Due to the small amount of material that can be collected, no neurotoxin has been fully sequenced from this venom. In this work we report six new three-finger like toxins isolated from the venom of the coral snake M. frontalis which we named Frontoxin (FTx) I-VI. Toxins were purified using multiple steps of RP-HPLC. Molecular masses were determined by MALDI-TOF and ESI ion-trap mass spectrometry. The complete amino acid sequence of FTx II, III, IV and V were determined by sequencing of overlapping proteolytic fragments by Edman degradation and by de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of FTx I, II, III and VI predict 4 conserved disulphide bonds and structural similarity to previously reported short-chain alpha-neurotoxins. FTx IV and V each contained 10 conserved cysteines and share high similarity with long-chain alpha-neurotoxins. At the frog neuromuscular junction FTx II, III and IV reduced miniature endplate potential amplitudes in a time-and concentration-dependent manner suggesting Frontoxins block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of Filtration Bleb and Endplate Positioning Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Eyes Implanted with Long-Tube Glaucoma Drainage Devices.

    PubMed

    Sano, Ichiya; Tanito, Masaki; Uchida, Koji; Katsube, Takashi; Kitagaki, Hajime; Ohira, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate ocular fluid filtration and endplate positioning in glaucomatous eyes with long-tube glaucoma drainage devices (GDDs) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the effects of various factors on postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP). This observational case series included 27 consecutive glaucomatous eyes (18 men, 7 women; mean age ± standard error, 63.0±2.0 years) who underwent GDD implantation (n = 8 Ahmed Glaucoma Valves [AGV] and n = 19 Baerveldt Glaucoma Implants [BGI]). Tubes were inserted into the pars plana in 23 eyes and anterior chamber in 4 eyes. Six months postoperatively, high-resolution orbital images were obtained using 3-Tesla MRI with head-array coils, and the filtering bleb volume, bleb height, and distances between the anterior endplate edge and corneal center or limbus or between the endplate and orbital wall were measured. In MR images obtained by three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) sequences, the shunt endplate was identified as low-intensity signal, and the filtering bleb was identified as high-intensity signals above and below the endplate in all eyes. The 6-month-postoperative IOP level was correlated negatively with bleb volume (r = -0.4510, P = 0.0182) and bleb height (r = -0.3954, P = 0.0412). The postoperative IOP was significantly (P = 0.0026) lower in BGI-implanted eyes (12.2±0.7 mmHg) than AGV-implanted eyes (16.7±1.2 mmHg); bleb volume was significantly (P = 0.0093) larger in BGI-implanted eyes (478.8±84.2 mm3) than AGV-implanted eyes (161.1±52.3 mm3). Other parameters did not differ. The presence of intraorbital/periocular accumulation of ocular fluid affects postoperative IOP levels in eyes implanted with long-tube GDDs. Larger filtering blebs after BGI than AGI implantations explain lower postoperative IOP levels achieved with BGI than AGV. The findings will contribute to better understanding of IOP reducing mechanism of long-tube GDDs.

  7. Theoretical Foundation for Weld Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traugott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Differential equations describe physics of tungsten/inert-gas and plasma-arc welding in aluminum. Report collects and describes necessary theoretical foundation upon which numerical welding model is constructed for tungsten/inert gas or plasma-arc welding in aluminum without keyhole. Governing partial differential equations for flow of heat, metal, and current given, together with boundary conditions relevant to welding process. Numerical estimates for relative importance of various phenomena and required properties of 2219 aluminum included

  8. Orbital friction stir weld system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor); Carter, Robert W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention is an apparatus for joining the ends of two cylindrical (i.e., pipe-shaped) sections together with a friction stir weld. The apparatus holds the two cylindrical sections together and provides back-side weld support as it makes a friction stir weld around the circumference of the joined ends.

  9. Capillary flow weld-bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Jones, R. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention of a weld-bonding technique for titanium plates was described. This involves fastening at least two plates of titanium together using spot-welding and applying a bead of adhesive along the edge of the resistance spot-welded joint which upon heating, flows and fills the separation between the joint components.

  10. Improved welding of Rene-41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, S.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-tungsten arc welding with a filler of Rene-41 produces strong welded joints. When Rene-41 is used, resistance to strain-age cracking is greatly increased by post-weld solution annealing in an inert atmosphere. Mechanical properties of Rene-41 and Hastelloy-W are compared.

  11. Robotic Welding and Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

  12. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  13. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  14. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  15. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    DOEpatents

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  16. Plasma Processes of Cutting and Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-01

    TIG process. 2.2.2 Keyhole Welding In plasma arc welding , the term...Cutting 3 3 4 4 4 2.2 Plasma Arc Welding 5 2.2.1 Needle Arc Welding 2.2.2 Keyhole Welding 5 6 3. Applications 8 93.1 Economics 4. Environmental Aspects of...Arc Lengths III. Needle Arc Welding Conditions IV. Keyhole Welding Conditions v. Chemical Analyses of Plates Used - vii - 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

  17. Weld bead profile of laser welding dissimilar joints stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Ghusoon R.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.; Abdulhadi, Hassan A.

    2017-10-01

    During the process of laser welding, the material consecutively melts and solidifies by a laser beam with a peak high power. Several parameters such as the laser energy, pulse frequency, pulse duration, welding power and welding speed govern the mode of the welding process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of peak power, incident angle, and welding speed on the weld bead geometry. The first investigation in this context was conducted using 2205-316L stainless steel plates through the varying of the welding speed from 1.3 mm/s to 2.1 mm/s. The second investigation was conducted by varying the peak power from 1100 W to 1500 W. From the results of the experiments, the welding speed and laser power had a significant effect on the geometry of the weld bead, and the variation in the diameter of the bead pulse-size. Due to the decrease in the heat input, welding speed affected penetration depth more than bead width, and a narrow width of heat affected zone was achieved ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Conclusively, weld bead geometry dimensions increase as a function of peak power; at over 1350 W peak power, the dimensions lie within 30 μm.

  18. Crystallographic texture and microstructural changes in fusion welds of recrystallized Zry-4 rolled plates

    DOE PAGES

    Riffo, A. Moya; Vicente Alvarez, M. A.; Santisteban, J. R.; ...

    2017-02-08

    This study presents a detailed characterization of the microstructural and crystallographic texture changes observed in the transition region in a weld between two Zircaloy-4 cold rolled and recrystallized plates. The microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy under polarized light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Texture changes were characterized at different lengthscales: in the micrometric size, orientation imaging maps (OIM) were constructed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in the millimetre scale, high energy XRD experiments were done at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) and compared to neutron diffraction texture determinations performed in the HIPPO instrument at Los Alamos National Laboratory.more » In the heat affected zone (HAZ) we observed the development of Widmanstätten microstructures, typical of the α( hcp) to β( bcc) phase transformation. Associated with these changes a rotation of the c-poles is found in the HAZ and fusion zone. While the base material shows the typical texture of a cold rolled plate, with their c-poles pointing 35° apart from the normal direction of the plate in the normal-transversal line, in the HAZ, c-poles align along the transversal direction of the plate and then re-orient along different directions, all of these changes occurring within a lengthscale in the order of mm. The evolution of texture in this narrow region was captured by both OIM and XRD, and is consistent with previous measurements done by Neutron Diffraction in the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The microstructural and texture changes along the HAZ were interpreted as arising due to the effect of differences in the cooling rate and β grain size on the progress of the different α variants during transformation. Fast cooling rates and large β grains are associated to weak variant selection during the β–>α transformation, while slow cooling rates and fine β grains result in strong variant

  19. Crystallographic texture and microstructural changes in fusion welds of recrystallized Zry-4 rolled plates

    SciTech Connect

    Riffo, A. Moya; Vicente Alvarez, M. A.; Santisteban, J. R.

    This study presents a detailed characterization of the microstructural and crystallographic texture changes observed in the transition region in a weld between two Zircaloy-4 cold rolled and recrystallized plates. The microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy under polarized light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Texture changes were characterized at different lengthscales: in the micrometric size, orientation imaging maps (OIM) were constructed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in the millimetre scale, high energy XRD experiments were done at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) and compared to neutron diffraction texture determinations performed in the HIPPO instrument at Los Alamos National Laboratory.more » In the heat affected zone (HAZ) we observed the development of Widmanstätten microstructures, typical of the α( hcp) to β( bcc) phase transformation. Associated with these changes a rotation of the c-poles is found in the HAZ and fusion zone. While the base material shows the typical texture of a cold rolled plate, with their c-poles pointing 35° apart from the normal direction of the plate in the normal-transversal line, in the HAZ, c-poles align along the transversal direction of the plate and then re-orient along different directions, all of these changes occurring within a lengthscale in the order of mm. The evolution of texture in this narrow region was captured by both OIM and XRD, and is consistent with previous measurements done by Neutron Diffraction in the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The microstructural and texture changes along the HAZ were interpreted as arising due to the effect of differences in the cooling rate and β grain size on the progress of the different α variants during transformation. Fast cooling rates and large β grains are associated to weak variant selection during the β–>α transformation, while slow cooling rates and fine β grains result in strong variant

  20. Crystallographic texture and microstructural changes in fusion welds of recrystallized Zry-4 rolled plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya Riffo, A.; Vicente Alvarez, M. A.; Santisteban, J. R.; Vizcaino, P.; Limandri, S.; Daymond, M. R.; Kerr, D.; Okasinski, J.; Almer, J.; Vogel, S. C.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents a detailed characterization of the microstructural and crystallographic texture changes observed in the transition region in a weld between two Zircaloy-4 cold rolled and recrystallized plates. The microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy under polarized light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Texture changes were characterized at different lengthscales: in the micrometric size, orientation imaging maps (OIM) were constructed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in the millimetre scale, high energy XRD experiments were done at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) and compared to neutron diffraction texture determinations performed in the HIPPO instrument at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the heat affected zone (HAZ) we observed the development of Widmanstätten microstructures, typical of the α(hcp) to β(bcc) phase transformation. Associated with these changes a rotation of the c-poles is found in the HAZ and fusion zone. While the base material shows the typical texture of a cold rolled plate, with their c-poles pointing 35° apart from the normal direction of the plate in the normal-transversal line, in the HAZ, c-poles align along the transversal direction of the plate and then re-orient along different directions, all of these changes occurring within a lengthscale in the order of mm. The evolution of texture in this narrow region was captured by both OIM and XRD, and is consistent with previous measurements done by Neutron Diffraction in the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The microstructural and texture changes along the HAZ were interpreted as arising due to the effect of differences in the cooling rate and β grain size on the progress of the different α variants during transformation. Fast cooling rates and large β grains are associated to weak variant selection during the β->α transformation, while slow cooling rates and fine β grains result in strong variant selection.

  1. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  2. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  3. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  4. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  5. Pulsed welding plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz'kov, A.; Pustovykh, O.; Verevkin, A.; Terekhin, V.; Shachek, A.; Tyasto, A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that in order to form the current pulse of a near rectangular shape, which provides conversion of the welding arc into a dynamic mode, it is rational to connect a forming element made on the basis of an artificial forming line in series to the welding DC circuit. The paper presents a diagram of a pulsed device for welding with a non-consumable electrode in argon which was developed using the forming element. The conversion of the arc into the dynamic mode is illustrated by the current and voltage oscillograms of the arc gap and the dynamic characteristic of the arc within the interval of one pulse generation time in the arc gap. The background current travels in the interpulse interval.

  6. Advanced Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In order to more easily join the huge sections of the Space Shuttle external tank, Marshall Space Flight Center initiated development of the existing concept of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding. VPPA welding employs a variable current waveform that allows the system to operate for preset time increments in either of two polarity modes for effective joining of light alloys. Marshall awarded the torch contract to B & B Precision Machine, which produced a torch for the Shuttle, then automated the system, and eventually delivered a small torch used by companies such as Whirlpool for sheet metal welding of appliance parts and other applications. The dependability of the torch offers cost and time advantages.

  7. Milestones in welding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolby, Richard E.

    2013-09-01

    Sir Alan's PhD thesis describes his research into cracking during arc welding of armour steels. Throughout his career, he had a strong interest in defects of all types, how they formed in metallic structures and how the larger ones could be detected and sized by non-destructive techniques. He was also vitally concerned with how defects impacted on the engineering integrity of welded structures, particularly the risk of fracture in nuclear plant. This study presents a view of some of the major milestones in global welding technology that took place over the 60 or more years of Sir Alan's career and highlights those where he had a personal and direct involvement.

  8. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  9. Research on the Effect of Welding Speed on the Quality of Welding Seam Based on the Local Dry Underwater Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Chen, Wu; Wang, Huagang; Ba, Jinyu; Li, Bing

    2017-12-01

    The repair of nuclear spent fuel pool has a high requirement for the quality of welding, the welding speed directly affects the quality of the weld when local dry automatic underwater welding is used to repair the damaged surface. Under the condition of the same condition, the local dry automatic underwater welding test was carried out under the condition of the same welding condition. Taking the 20cm as the experimental condition, after massive experiments show that when the welding speed is approximately 48cm/min the weld quality is high, meeting the design requirements, based on the double layer shrinkage nozzle chamber of local dry underwater automatic welding.

  10. Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum explains the friction stir welding process in terms of two basic concepts: the concentration of deformation in a shear surface enveloping the tool and the composition of the overall plastic flow field around the tool from simple flow field components. It is demonstrated how weld structure may be understood and torque, drag, and lateral tool forces may be estimated using these concepts. Some discrepancies between computations and accompanying empirical data are discussed in the text. This work is intended to be helpful to engineers in diagnosing problems and advancing technology.

  11. Numerical and experimental determination of weld pool shape during high-power diode laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimpel, Andrzej; Lisiecki, Aleksander; Szymanski, Andrzej; Hoult, Anthony P.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, results of investigations on the shape of weld pool during High Power Diode Laser (HPDL) welding are presented. The results of tests showed that the shape of weld pool and mechanism of laser welding with a rectangular pattern of 808 nm laser radiation differs distinctly from previous laser welding mechanisms. For all power densities the conduction mode welds were observed and weld pool geometry depends significantly on the welding parameters.

  12. Ultrasonic Welding of Hybrid Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Guntram; Balle, Frank; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    A central research field of the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Kaiserslautern (WKK), Germany, is the realization of innovative hybrid joints by ultrasonic metal welding. This article gives an overview of suitable ultrasonic welding systems as well as of essential machine and material parameters, which influence the quality of the welds. Besides the ultrasonic welding of dissimilar metals such as Al to Cu or Al to steels, the welds between newly developed materials like aluminum foam sandwiches or flat flexible cables also can be realized. Moreover, the joining of glass and ceramic to sheet metals is a point of interest at the WKK. By using the ultrasonic metal welding process, it is possible to realize metal/glass welds with tensile shear strengths of 50 MPa. For metal/ceramic joints, the shear strengths values up to 150 MPa were measured. Finally, selected results about the occurring bonding mechanisms will be discussed.

  13. 73rd American Welding Society annual meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The volume includes the abstracts of papers presented at the 73rd American Welding Society Annual Meeting. Detailed summaries are given for 118 technical sessions papers discussing computer and control applications in welding, stainless steel, nickel and nickel alloys, weld metal microstructure, shipbuilding, consumables, structural welding, investigations in arc welding and cutting, arc welding processes, weldability testing, piping and tubing, high energy beam welding processes, welding metallurgy of structural steels, new applications, weld metal behavior, NDT certification, aluminum welding, submerged arc welding, modeling studies, resistance welding, friction welding, and safety and health. The 23rd International AWS Brazing and Soldering Conference wasmore » also held during this meeting. The topics presented in 24 papers included recent developments in soldering technology, brazing of stainless steel, brazing of ceramics and nickel material, filler metal developments for torch brazing, and developments in diffusion and induction brazing.« less

  14. Method and apparatus for assessing weld quality

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Johnson, John A.; Carlson, Nancy M.; Clark, Denis E.; Taylor, Paul L.; Reutzel, Edward W.

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus for determining a quality of a weld produced by a welding device according to the present invention includes a sensor operatively associated with the welding device. The sensor is responsive to at least one welding process parameter during a welding process and produces a welding process parameter signal that relates to the at least one welding process parameter. A computer connected to the sensor is responsive to the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor. A user interface operatively associated with the computer allows a user to select a desired welding process. The computer processes the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor in accordance with one of a constant voltage algorithm, a short duration weld algorithm or a pulsed current analysis module depending on the desired welding process selected by the user. The computer produces output data indicative of the quality of the weld.

  15. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  16. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance with...

  17. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance with...

  18. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance with...

  19. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance with...

  20. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance with...

  1. Effect of hyperconcavity of the lumbar vertebral endplates on the playing careers of professional american football linemen.

    PubMed

    Paxton, E Scott; Moorman, Claude T; Chehab, Eric L; Barnes, Ronnie P; Warren, Russell F; Brophy, Robert H

    2010-11-01

    Hyperconcavity of the lumbar spine has been found in a disproportionate percentage of college football lineman evaluated at the National Football League (NFL) Combine compared with age-matched controls. College football linemen with hyperconcavity of the lumbar spine are more likely to play in the NFL and to have a longer career in professional football. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Ninety three linemen from the 1992 and 1993 NFL Combines with hyperconcavity of the lumbar spine were compared with 191 linemen from the same combines without these changes in the lumbar spine. The percentage of athletes who played at least 1 game for an NFL team and the average length of career was calculated for both groups. In addition, the length of career for players with these changes was compared with those of matched controls based on other injuries and surgeries, year drafted, and round drafted. There was no difference in the likelihood of playing professional football between linemen with lumbar spine changes (54 of 93 [58%]) and those without (101 of 191 [53%]) (P = .41). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in length of career in terms of years played, games played, or games started. Hyperconcavity of the lumbar spine does not appear to have any effect on the potential professional American football careers of college football linemen entering the NFL. Endplate changes on radiographs are not a significant screening tool for elite American football linemen. Further study of larger populations is needed to definitively answer whether these adaptive changes in the lumbar spine have any clinical relevance to these athletes.

  2. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures...

  3. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  4. Welding Development: Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the basic understanding of the friction stir welding process. It covers process description, pin tool operation and materials, metal flow theory, mechanical properties, and materials welded using the process. It also discusses the thermal stir welding process and the differences between thermal stir and friction stir welding. MSFC weld tools used for development are also presented.

  5. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures...

  6. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures...

  7. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures...

  8. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures...

  9. Acoustic-Emission Weld-Penetration Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maram, J.; Collins, J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld penetration monitored by detection of high-frequency acoustic emissions produced by advancing weld pool as it melts and solidifies in workpiece. Acoustic emission from TIG butt weld measured with 300-kHz resonant transducer. Rise in emission level coincides with cessation of weld penetration due to sudden reduction in welding current. Such monitoring applied to control of automated and robotic welders.

  10. The effect of welding parameters on penetration in GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Shirali, A.A.; Mills, K.C.

    1993-07-01

    The effect of various welding parameters on the penetration of GTA welds has been investigated. Increases in welding speed were found to reduce penetration; however, increases in welding current were observed to increase the penetration in high sulfur (HS) casts and decrease penetration in low sulfur (LS) steels. Plots of penetration as a function of increasing linear energy (the heat supplied per unit length of weld) revealed a similar trend with increased penetration in HS casts, but the penetration in LS casts was unaffected by increases in linear energy. These results support the Burgardt-Heiple proposition that changes in welding parametersmore » on penetration can be explained in terms of their effect, sequentially, on the temperature gradient and the Marangoni forces operating in the weld pool. Increases in arc length were found to decrease weld penetration regardless of the sulfur concentration of the steel, and the effects of electrode geometry and welding position on weld penetration were also investigated.« less

  11. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  12. Welding. Competencies for Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    Materials contained in this guide present competencies describing welding skills necessary for success in initial employment or applicable to advanced educational placement, and may be used by administrators, students, and secondary and postsecondary vocational teachers. The student outcomes section provides guidelines for planning of and…

  13. Welding Supplementary Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Don; And Others

    This document contains supplemental materials for special needs high school students intended to facilitate their mainstreaming in regular welding classes. Teacher's materials precede the materials for students and include general notes for the instructor, suggestions, eight references, a class progress chart, a questionnaire on the usefulness of…

  14. State Skill Standards: Welding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for welding programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any statewide…

  15. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  16. Welding. Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge Vocational-Technical Center, Winter Haven, FL.

    These 23 learning guides are self-instructional packets for 23 tasks identified as essential for performance on an entry-level job in welding. Each guide is based on a terminal performance objective (task) and 1-4 enabling objectives. For each enabling objective, some or all of these materials may be presented: learning steps (outline of student…

  17. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  18. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  19. Lightweight, High-Current Welding Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starck, Thomas F.; Brennan, Andrew D.

    1989-01-01

    Lighweight resistance-welding, hand-held gun supplies alternating or direct current over range of 600 to 4,000 A and applies forces from 40 to 60 lb during welding. Used to weld metal sheets in multilayered stacks.

  20. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  1. Torch kit for welding in difficult areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Miniature tungsten inert gas welding torch, used with variously formed interchangeable soft copper tubing extensions, provides inexpensive, accurate welding capability for inaccessible joints. Kit effectively welds stainless steel tubing 0.089 cm thick. Other applications are cited.

  2. Closed circuit TV system monitors welding operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, M.

    1967-01-01

    TV camera system that has a special vidicon tube with a gradient density filter is used in remote monitoring of TIG welding of stainless steel. The welding operations involve complex assembly welding tools and skates in areas of limited accessibility.

  3. Intelligent Weld Manufacturing: Role of Integrated Computational Welding Engineering

    DOE PAGES

    David, Stan A.; Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili; ...

    2017-12-02

    A master welder uses his sensory perceptions to evaluate the process and connect them with his/her knowledge base to take the necessary corrective measures with his/her acquired skills to make a good weld. All these actions must take place in real time. Success depends on intuition and skills, and the procedure is labor-intensive and frequently unreliable. The solution is intelligent weld manufacturing. The ultimate goal of intelligent weld manufacturing would involve sensing and control of heat source position, weld temperature, weld penetration, defect formation and ultimately control of microstructure and properties. This involves a solution to a problem (welding) withmore » many highly coupled and nonlinear variables. The trend is to use an emerging tool known as intelligent control. This approach enables the user to choose a desirable end factor such as properties, defect control, or productivity to derive the selection of process parameters such as current, voltage, or speed to provide for appropriate control of the process. Important elements of intelligent manufacturing are sensing and control theory and design, process modeling, and artificial intelligence. Significant progress has been made in all these areas. Integrated computational welding engineering (ICWE) is an emerging field that will aid in the realization of intelligent weld manufacturing. The paper will discuss the progress in process modeling, microstructure, properties, and process control and automation and the importance of ICWE. Also, control and automation strategies for friction stir welding will be discussed.« less

  4. Intelligent Weld Manufacturing: Role of Integrated Computational Welding Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    David, Stan A.; Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    A master welder uses his sensory perceptions to evaluate the process and connect them with his/her knowledge base to take the necessary corrective measures with his/her acquired skills to make a good weld. All these actions must take place in real time. Success depends on intuition and skills, and the procedure is labor-intensive and frequently unreliable. The solution is intelligent weld manufacturing. The ultimate goal of intelligent weld manufacturing would involve sensing and control of heat source position, weld temperature, weld penetration, defect formation and ultimately control of microstructure and properties. This involves a solution to a problem (welding) withmore » many highly coupled and nonlinear variables. The trend is to use an emerging tool known as intelligent control. This approach enables the user to choose a desirable end factor such as properties, defect control, or productivity to derive the selection of process parameters such as current, voltage, or speed to provide for appropriate control of the process. Important elements of intelligent manufacturing are sensing and control theory and design, process modeling, and artificial intelligence. Significant progress has been made in all these areas. Integrated computational welding engineering (ICWE) is an emerging field that will aid in the realization of intelligent weld manufacturing. The paper will discuss the progress in process modeling, microstructure, properties, and process control and automation and the importance of ICWE. Also, control and automation strategies for friction stir welding will be discussed.« less

  5. Factors affecting weld root morphology in laser keyhole welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostevarg, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Welding production efficiency is usually optimised if full penetration can be achieved in a single pass. Techniques such as electron and laser beam welding offer deep high speed keyhole welding, especially since multi-kilowatt lasers became available. However, there are limitations for these techniques when considering weld imperfections such as weld cap undercuts, interior porosity or humps at the root. The thickness of sheets during full penetration welding is practically limited by these root humps. The mechanisms behind root morphology formation are not yet satisfactory understood. In this paper root humping is studied by reviewing previous studies and findings and also by sample examination and process observation by high speed imaging. Different process regimes governing root quality are presented, categorized and explained. Even though this study mainly covers laser beam and laser arc hybrid welding, the presented findings can generally be applied full penetration welding in medium to thick sheets, especially the discussion of surface tension effects. As a final result of this analysis, a map of methods to optimise weld root topology is presented.

  6. [Hygienic evaluation of new welding processes and welding materials].

    PubMed

    Gorban', L N

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of contaminating the breathing air zone with hazardous substances in manual and semi-automated welding increases with the intensity of their formation in the arc zone. This necessitates more comprehensive data on both the specific excreta and the formation intensity of the most hazardous substances, such as hard and gaseous compounds of welding aerosols, with due account of the welding regimen used and electrode diameter, wires, etc. When calculating the effectiveness of both local and general ventilation systems in welding shops, a possibility of a specific one-way hazardous action of some chemical substances (e.g. chromium, fluorine, etc.) should be taken into account.

  7. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Timothy B. (Inventor); Milly, Peter F., Sr. (Inventor); White, J. Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  8. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  9. Industrial laser welding evaluation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hella, R.; Locke, E.; Ream, S.

    1974-01-01

    High power laser welding was evaluated for fabricating space vehicle boosters. This evaluation was made for 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. aluminum (2219) and 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. D6AC steel. The Avco HPL 10 kW industrial laser was used to perform the evaluation. The objective has been achieved through the completion of the following technical tasks: (1) parameter study to optimize welding and material parameters; (2) preparation of welded panels for MSFC evaluation; and (3) demonstration of the repeatability of laser welding equipment. In addition, the design concept for a laser welding system capable of welding large space vehicle boosters has been developed.

  10. Investigation on mechanical properties of welded material under different types of welding filler (shielded metal arc welding)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Abdullah Mohd; Lair, Noor Ajian Mohd; Wei, Foo Jun

    2018-05-01

    The Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) is (or the Stick welding) defined as a welding process, which melts and joins metals with an arc between a welding filler (electrode rod) and the workpieces. The main objective was to study the mechanical properties of welded metal under different types of welding fillers and current for SMAW. This project utilized the Design of Experiment (DOE) by adopting the Full Factorial Design. The independent variables were the types of welding filler and welding current, whereas the other welding parameters were fixed at the optimum value. The levels for types of welding filler were by the models of welding filler (E6013, E7016 and E7018) used and the levels for welding current were 80A and 90A. The responses were the mechanical properties of welded material, which include tensile strength and hardness. The experiment was analyzed using the two way ANOVA. The results prove that there are significant effects of welding filler types and current levels on the tensile strength and hardness of the welded metal. At the same time, the ANOVA results and interaction plot indicate that there are significant interactions between the welding filler types and the welding current on both the hardness and tensile strength of the welded metals, which has never been reported before. This project found that when the amount of heat input with increase, the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and hardness decrease. The optimum tensile strength for welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7016 and the optimum of hardness of welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7018 at welding current of 80A.

  11. SMAW Ceramic Weld Backing Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    marked similarity to the open root technique in that the " keyhole " technique, commnly used to maxmize penetration with SMAW open root welding , was also...melt into the sides of the bevel and penetrate into the root opening to form a keyhole . Once the keyhole was established, normal welding current was...hot start to melt through the taper, welding proceeded to the keyhole . Once in the keyhole , the electrode was positioned in front of the puddle but not

  12. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  13. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  14. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  15. Socket welds in nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.A.; Torres, L.L.

    1995-12-31

    Socket welds are easier and faster to make than are butt welds. However, they are often not used in nuclear facilities because the crevices between the pipes and the socket sleeves may be subject to crevice corrosion. If socket welds can be qualified for wider use in facilities that process nuclear materials, the radiation exposures to welders can be significantly reduced. The current tests at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are designed to determine if socket welds can be qualified for use in the waste processing system at a nuclear fuel processing plant.

  16. Modeling of the Weld Shape Development During the Autogenous Welding Process by Coupling Welding Arc with Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenchao; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2010-10-01

    A numerical model of the welding arc is coupled to a model for the heat transfer and fluid flow in the weld pool of a SUS304 stainless steel during a moving GTA welding process. The described model avoids the use of the assumption of the empirical Gaussian boundary conditions, and at the same time, provides reliable boundary conditions to analyze the weld pool. Based on the two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical modeling of the argon arc, the heat flux to workpiece, the input current density, and the plasma drag stress are obtained. The arc temperature contours, the distributions of heat flux, and current density at the anode are in fair agreement with the reported experimental results. Numerical simulation and experimental studies to the weld pool development are carried out for a moving GTA welding on SUS304 stainless steel with different oxygen content from 30 to 220 ppm. The calculated result show that the oxygen can change the Marangoni convection from outward to inward direction on the liquid pool surface and make the wide shallow weld shape become narrow deep one. The calculated result for the weld shape and weld D/W ratio agrees well with the experimental one.

  17. The NASA welding assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J.; Bozek, J.

    1984-01-01

    The potential cost and performance advantages of welding was understood but ignored by solar panel manufacturers in the U.S. Although NASA, DOD and COMSAT have supported welding development efforts, soldering remains the only U.S. space qualified method for interconnecting solar cells. The reason is that no U.S. satellite prime contractor found it necessary, due to mission requirements, to abandon the space proven soldering process. It appears that the proposed NASA space station program will provide an array requirement, a 10 year operation in a low Earth orbital environment, that mandates welding. The status of welding technology in the U.S. is assessed.

  18. Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    An ambitious project to develop an advanced, automated welding system is being funded as part of the Navy Joining Center with Babcock & Wilcox as the prime integrator. This program, the Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS), involves the integration of both planning and real-time control activities. Planning functions include the development of a graphical decision support system within a standard, portable environment. Real-time control functions include the development of a modular, intelligent, real-time control system and the integration of a number of welding process sensors. This paper presents each of these components of the PAWS and discusses how they can be utilized to automate the welding operation.

  19. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  20. Portable electron beam weld chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. R.; Dimino, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development and characteristics of portable vacuum chamber for skate type electron beam welding are discussed. Construction and operational details of equipment are presented. Illustrations of equipment are provided.

  1. High glucose-induced excessive reactive oxygen species promote apoptosis through mitochondrial damage in rat cartilage endplate cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zengxin; Lu, Wei; Zeng, Qingmin; Li, Defang; Ding, Lei; Wu, Jingping

    2018-04-16

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important factor in intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Apoptosis of cartilage endplate (CEP) cells is one of the initiators of IDD. However, the effects of high glucose on CEP cells are still unknown. Therefore, we conducted the present study to evaluate the effects of high glucose on CEP cells and to identify the mechanisms of those effects. Rat CEP cells were isolated and cultured in 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS, normal control) or high-glucose medium (10% FBS + 0.1 M glucose or 10% FBS + 0.2 M glucose, experimental conditions) for 1 or 3 days. In addition, CEP cells were treated with 0.2 M glucose for 3 days in the presence or absence of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA, 0.15 M). Flow cytometry was performed to identify and quantify the degree of apoptosis. The expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was assessed by flow cytometry, and mitochondrial damage (mitochondrial membrane potential) was assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, Bcl-2, Bax, and cytochrome c were evaluated by Western blotting. High glucose significantly increased apoptosis and ROS accumulation in CEP cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, a disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential was detected in rat CEP cells cultured in the two high glucose concentrations. Incubating in high glucose enhanced the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, Bax, and cytochrome c but decreased the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. ALA inhibited the expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, Bax, and cytochrome c but enhanced the expression of Bcl-2. ALA also prevented disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential in CEP cells. This study demonstrates that high glucose-induced excessive reactive oxygen species promote mitochondrial damage, thus causing apoptosis in rat CEP cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ALA could prevent

  2. Ceramic Weld Backing Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    carbonate; compunds of oxides~ such as steatite ( soapstone ), or cordierite; or non-oxidic Compunds, such as silicon carbide (Carborundum). These...with the Varies magnetic holding devices, steel trays which hold the ceramic tiles and in turn are held over the weld joint by magnets . The other brands...was noticed. The practicality and adpatability of magnetic holding devices to a construction environment were evaluated. The devices eval- uated were

  3. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  4. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  5. Sustainability of Welding Process through Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sued, M. K.; Samsuri, S. S. M.; Kassim, M. K. A. M.; Nasir, S. N. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    Welding process is in high demand, which required a competitive technology to be adopted. This is important for sustaining the needs of the joining industries without ignoring the impact of the process to the environment. Friction stir welding (FSW) is stated to be benefitting the environment through low energy consumption, which cannot be achieved through traditional arc welding. However, this is not well documented, especially for bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW). Therefore, an investigation is conducted by measuring current consumption of the machine during the BFSW process. From the measurement, different phases of BFSW welding process and its electrical demand are presented. It is found that in general total energy in BFSW is about 130kW inclusive of all identified process phases. The phase that utilise for joint formation is in weld phase that used the highest total energy of 120kWs. The recorded total energy is still far below the traditional welding technology and the conventional friction stir welding (CFSW) energy demand. This indicates that BFSW technology with its vast benefit able to sustain the joining technology in near future.

  6. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  7. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  8. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOEpatents

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  9. Improving the Quality of Welding Seam of Automatic Welding of Buckets Based on TCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Min

    2018-02-01

    Since February 2014, the welding defects of the automatic welding line of buckets have been frequently appeared. The average repair time of each bucket is 26min, which seriously affects the production efficiency and welding quality. We conducted troubleshooting, and found the main reasons for the welding defects of the buckets were the deviations of the center points of the robot tools and the poor quality of the locating welding. We corrected the gripper, welding torch, and accuracy of repeat positioning of robots to control the quality of positioning welding. The welding defect rate of buckets was reduced greatly, ensuring the production efficiency and welding quality.

  10. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  11. Spot-Welding Gun Is Easy To Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Nguyen, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Electrical-resistance spot-welding gun designed to produce more welds per unit time by decreasing technician's effort and fatigue. Vacuum cups on frame secure welding gun to workpiece while compressed air drives welding tip against workpiece to make spot resistance weld. When weld completed, vacuum in frame cups released so frame and gun moved to position of next spot weld.

  12. Plating To Reinforce Welded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otousa, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Electrodeposition used to strengthen welded joints gouged, nicked, or suffered other mechanical damage. Plating cell, typically of acrylic plastic such as poly (Methylmetacrylate), is assembled around part to be plated. Areas not to be plated are masked with plater's tape. Weld area is plated in standard nickel-plating process.

  13. Welding, V-TECS Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Charles G.; And Others

    This guide provides job-related tasks, performance objectives, performance guides, resources, teaching activities, evaluation standards, and criterion-referenced measures in three units of a welding course. Through the curriculum content of the welding course, the guide helps teachers lead students through the learning process, including the…

  14. Monitoring Welding-Gas Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, Kevin L.

    1988-01-01

    System monitors welding gas to ensure characteristics within predetermined values. Responds to changes that might go unnoticed by human operator and acts quickly to prevent weld defects. Electronic pressure controller employs various amounts of gain, equalization, and compensation to respond to changes in gas-supply pressure. Works in conjuction with pressure/oxygen/moisture monitor.

  15. Welding--Trade or Profession?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, C. E.; Smith, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a collaborative program between schools with the purpose of training and providing advanced education in welding. Modern manufacturing is turning to automation to increase productivity, but it can be a great challenge to program robots and other computer-controlled welding and joining systems. Computer programming and…

  16. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  17. Displaced electrode process for welding

    DOEpatents

    Heichel, L.J.

    1975-08-26

    A method is described for the butt-welding of a relatively heavy mass to a relatively small mass such as a thin-wall tube. In butt-welding heat is normally applied at the joint between the two pieces which are butt-welded together. The application of heat at the joint results in overheating the tube which causes thinning of the tube walls and porosity in the tube material. This is eliminated by displacing the welding electrode away from the seam toward the heavier mass so that heat is applied to the heavy mass and not at the butt seam. Examples of the parameters used in welding fuel rods are given. The cladding and end plugs were made of Zircalloy. The electrode used was of 2 percent thoriated tungsten. (auth)

  18. Welding of high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W B

    1928-01-01

    A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.

  19. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    PubMed

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  20. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding

    PubMed Central

    Fethke, Nathan B.; Peters, Thomas M.; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.

    2016-01-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2mg m−3 for bare beam; 65.7mg m−3 for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8mg m−3 for bare beam; 15.8mg m−3 for through deck), zinc (0.2mg m−3 for bare beam; 15.8mg m−3 for through deck), and manganese (0.9mg m−3 for bare beam; 1.5mg m−3 for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17nm) through deck conditions (34±34nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure levels during

  1. Wire-Guide Manipulator For Automated Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Tim; White, Kevin; Gordon, Steve; Emerich, Dave; Richardson, Dave; Faulkner, Mike; Stafford, Dave; Mccutcheon, Kim; Neal, Ken; Milly, Pete

    1994-01-01

    Compact motor drive positions guide for welding filler wire. Drive part of automated wire feeder in partly or fully automated welding system. Drive unit contains three parallel subunits. Rotations of lead screws in three subunits coordinated to obtain desired motions in three degrees of freedom. Suitable for both variable-polarity plasma arc welding and gas/tungsten arc welding.

  2. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., the secondary of all welding transformers used in multispot, projection and seam welding machines... counterbalancing impractical or unnecessary. (2) Safety chains. All portable welding guns, transformers and related...) Grounding. The secondary and case of all portable welding transformers shall be grounded. Secondary...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., the secondary of all welding transformers used in multispot, projection and seam welding machines... counterbalancing impractical or unnecessary. (2) Safety chains. All portable welding guns, transformers and related...) Grounding. The secondary and case of all portable welding transformers shall be grounded. Secondary...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., the secondary of all welding transformers used in multispot, projection and seam welding machines... counterbalancing impractical or unnecessary. (2) Safety chains. All portable welding guns, transformers and related...) Grounding. The secondary and case of all portable welding transformers shall be grounded. Secondary...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., the secondary of all welding transformers used in multispot, projection and seam welding machines... counterbalancing impractical or unnecessary. (2) Safety chains. All portable welding guns, transformers and related...) Grounding. The secondary and case of all portable welding transformers shall be grounded. Secondary...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., the secondary of all welding transformers used in multispot, projection and seam welding machines... counterbalancing impractical or unnecessary. (2) Safety chains. All portable welding guns, transformers and related...) Grounding. The secondary and case of all portable welding transformers shall be grounded. Secondary...

  7. Tailor-welded blanks and their production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi

    2005-01-01

    Tailor welded blanks had been widely used in the automobile industry. A tailor welded blank consists of several flat sheets that were laser welded together before stamping. A combination of different materials, thickness, and coatings could be welded together to form a blank for stamping car body panels. As for the material for automobile industry, this technology was one of the development trend for automobile industry because of its weight reduction, safety improvement and economical use of materials. In this paper, the characters and production of tailor welded blanks in the market were discussed in detail. There had two major methods to produce tailor welded blanks. Laser welding would replace mesh seam welding for the production of tailor welded blanks in the future. The requirements on the edge preparation of unwelded blanks for tailor welded blanks were higher than the other steel processing technology. In order to produce the laser welded blank, there had the other process before the laser welding in the factory. In the world, there had three kinds of patterns for the large volume production of tailor welded blanks. In China, steel factory played the important role in the promotion of the application of tailor welded blanks. The competition for the supply of tailor welded blanks to the automobile industry would become fierce in the near future. As a result, the demand for the quality control on the production of tailor welded blanks would be the first priority concern for the factory.

  8. A method of monitoring contact (pointed) welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessonov, V. B.; Staroverov, N. E.; Larionov, I. A.; Guk, K. K.; Obodovskiy, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    The technology of welding parts of different thicknesses from various materials is improved, which is why the range of applied types and methods of welding is constantly expanding. In this regard, the issue of monitoring welded joints is particularly acute. The goal was: to develop a method of non-destructive radiographic inspection of point welds with a high accuracy rating of its quality.

  9. Borescope Aids Welding In Confined Spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasco, Eddie; Acuna, Ronald A.

    1990-01-01

    Welding torch holds video borescope to give operator view of workpiece in enclosed space. Operator sees clear, magnified image on video monitor and manipulates torch accordingly, despite visual obstruction presented by enclosure. Tinted shield tilted up while torch being positioned, then down to block excess light during welding. Reduces welding time by 50 percent, and increases quality of weld substantially.

  10. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in...

  11. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  12. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler and...

  13. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  14. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  15. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler and...

  16. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler and...

  17. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler and...

  18. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints shall be fusion... § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Welding...

  19. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints shall be fusion... § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Welding...

  20. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  1. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler and...

  2. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints shall be fusion... § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Welding...

  3. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints shall be fusion... § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Welding...

  4. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  5. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  6. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  7. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  9. Automatic welding systems for large ship hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arregi, B.; Granados, S.; Hascoet, JY.; Hamilton, K.; Alonso, M.; Ares, E.

    2012-04-01

    Welding processes represents about 40% of the total production time in shipbuilding. Although most of the indoor welding work is automated, outdoor operations still require the involvement of numerous operators. To automate hull welding operations is a priority in large shipyards. The objective of the present work is to develop a comprehensive welding system capable of working with several welding layers in an automated way. There are several difficulties for the seam tracking automation of the welding process. The proposed solution is the development of a welding machine capable of moving autonomously along the welding seam, controlling both the position of the torch and the welding parameters to adjust the thickness of the weld bead to the actual gap between the hull plates.

  10. U-Groove aluminum weld strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1996-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe peaking, which induces bending under uniaxial loading. The filler strain-hardening decreased with increasing filler pass sequence, producing the weakest welds on the last pass side. Current welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects which reduce the weld strength. A depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve depeaking in the welding process. The intent is to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  11. NASA Design Strengthens Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process-a combination of extruding and forging-ideal for use when the original metal characteristics must remain as unchanged as possible. While exploring methods to improve the use of FSW in manufacturing, engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center created technologies to address the method's shortcomings. MTS Systems Corporation, of Eden Prairie, Minnesota, discovered the NASA-developed technology and then signed a co-exclusive license agreement to commercialize Marshall's design for use in high-strength structural alloys. The resulting process offers the added bonuses of being cost-competitive, efficient, and most importantly, versatile.

  12. Control of Welding Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    lower level, widens and then narrows again at the root (like an upside-down Coca - Cola bottle), shrinkage voids and/or solidification cracking can be...Virginia 22312. Printed in the United States of America. c. -f .1 P .0 . W% 4P .P.,.0.1 % % % % MS -. r ~~Pi -V"I.J:.6_-%n W-- -VI .: : 4 r, ’ % : -X ML_...utilizing feedback and real-time adjustment of the welding current based on one or the other measurement, were marketed . Unfortunately, none of these

  13. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  14. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  15. Current issues and problems in welding science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S. A.; Debroy, T.

    1992-07-01

    Recent advances in welding science are examined with consideration given to the progress made in understanding physical processes of welding and in understanding weldment microstructure and properties and the correlation between microstructure and properties of the welds. Particular attention is given to the methods used for intelligent control and automation of welding. Also discussed are issues and problems that were brought to the surface by technological advances and interdisciplinary research on welding.

  16. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginez, R.; Lewis, J. R.; Millett, A. U.; Saenger, K. A.; Skelly, J. K.; Standiford, V. E.; Whiteman, J. O.

    1978-01-01

    Skate-weld carriage and track assembly were developed for controlled fusion welding on compound-curvature surfaces. Unlike fixed-position carriage used for vertical, horizontal, and circumferential welding, carriage has suspension system that permits angular positioning of weld head on carriage. It also has carriage-and-drive track mechanism capable of traveling over compound curvatures. Carriage is designed with universal mounting platform so that slim tools, weld heads, or X-ray units can be interchanged without need for realinement.

  17. Repair welding of gamma titanium aluminide castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, T. J.

    This paper examines the GTA repair welding of cast Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb gamma titanium aluminide. Pre-weld heat treatment, preheat and welding parameters are evaluated and discussed. A wide range of GTAW parameters is demonstrated for use with this alloy and the resulting weld structure is examined. The effects of postweld heat treatment on the structure of the weld deposit is also determined.

  18. Analysis And Control System For Automated Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.; Kennedy, Larry Z.; Rodgers, Michael H.; Goode, K. Wayne

    1994-01-01

    Automated variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding apparatus operates under electronic supervision by welding analysis and control system. System performs all major monitoring and controlling functions. It acquires, analyzes, and displays weld-quality data in real time and adjusts process parameters accordingly. Also records pertinent data for use in post-weld analysis and documentation of quality. System includes optoelectronic sensors and data processors that provide feedback control of welding process.

  19. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  20. Parametric study in weld mismatch of longitudinally welded SSME HPFTP inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Spanyer, K. L.; Brunair, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Welded joints are an essential part of pressure vessels such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turbopumps. Defects produced in the welding process can be detrimental to weld performance. Recently, review of the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) titanium inlet x rays revealed several weld discrepancies such as penetrameter density issues, film processing discrepancies, weld width discrepancies, porosity, lack of fusion, and weld offsets. Currently, the sensitivity of welded structures to defects is of concern. From a fatigue standpoint, weld offset may have a serious effect since local yielding, in general, aggravates cyclic stress effects. Therefore, the weld offset issue is considered. Using the finite element method and mathematical formulations, parametric studies were conducted to determine the influence of weld offsets and a variation of weld widths in longitudinally welded cylindrical structures with equal wall thickness on both sides of the joint. From the study, the finite element results and theoretical solutions are presented.

  1. Laser welding of fused quartz

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  2. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  3. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOEpatents

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  4. Residual stresses in welded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  5. The technology and welding joint properties of hybrid laser-tig welding on thick plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenghai, Zhang; Yifu, Shen; Huijuan, Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The technologies of autogenous laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding are used on thick plate of high strength lower alloy structural steel 10CrNiMnMoV in this article. The unique advantages of hybrid laser-TIG welding is summarized by comparing and analyzing the process parameters and welding joints of autogenous laser welding laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding. With the optimal process parameters of hybrid welding, the good welding joint without visible flaws can be obtained and its mechanical properties are tested according to industry standards. The results show that the hybrid welding technology has certain advantages and possibility in welding thick plates. It can reduce the demands of laser power, and it is significant for lowering the aspect ratio of weld during hybrid welding, so the gas in the molten pool can rise and escape easily while welding thick plates. Therefore, the pores forming tendency decreases. At the same time, hybrid welding enhances welding speed, and optimizes the energy input. The transition and grain size of the microstructure of hybrid welding joint is better and its hardness is higher than base material. Furthermore, its tensile strength and impact toughness is as good as base material. Consequently, the hybrid welding joint can meet the industry needs completely.

  6. Novel Process Revolutionizes Welding Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Glenn Research Center, Delphi Corporation, and the Michigan Research Institute entered into a research project to study the use of Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) in the construction and repair of stationary structures with multiple geometries and dissimilar materials, such as those NASA might use on the Moon or Mars. Traditional welding technologies are burdened by significant business and engineering challenges, including high costs of equipment and labor, heat-affected zones, limited automation, and inconsistent quality. DRW addresses each of those issues, while drastically reducing welding, manufacturing, and maintenance costs.

  7. Automated Variable-Polarity Plasma-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, S. C., III; Munafo, P.; Munafo, A.; Biddle, A.; Wilson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Variable-polarity plasma-arc methods produces better welds at lower cost than gas-shielded tungsten-arc welding in assemblies. Weld porosity very low and costs of joint preparation, depeaking, inspection, and weld repair minimized.

  8. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  9. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    DOEpatents

    Sheaffer, Donald A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tung, David M.; Schroder, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  10. Research and application of self - propagating welding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yunhe; Li, Zhizun; Wang, Jianjiang; Sun, Liming

    2018-04-01

    Self-propagating welding is an important application area of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis technology (SHS technology), suitable for special environment and special materials welding. This paper briefly introduces the principle of self - propagating welding and its technical characteristics, and briefly summarizes the current research and application of SHS welding around three aspects of thin film welding, welding of refractory welding and emergency welding of battlefield.

  11. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  12. Comparison between hybrid laser-MIG welding and MIG welding for the invar36 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Li, Yubo; Ou, Wenmin; Yu, Fengyi; Chen, Jie; Wei, Yanhong

    2016-11-01

    The invar36 alloy is suitable to produce mold of composite materials structure because it has similar thermal expansion coefficient with composite materials. In the present paper, the MIG welding and laser-MIG hybrid welding methods are compared to get the more appropriate method to overcome the poor weldability of invar36 alloy. According to the analysis of the experimental and simulated results, it has been proved that the Gauss and cone combined heat source model can characterize the laser-MIG hybrid welding heat source well. The total welding time of MIG welding is 8 times that of hybrid laser-MIG welding. The welding material consumption of MIG welding is about 4 times that of hybrid laser-MIG welding. The stress and deformation simulation indicate that the peak value of deformation during MIG welding is 3 times larger than that of hybrid laser-MIG welding.

  13. Welding process modelling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.; Adenwala, Jinen A.

    1993-01-01

    The research and analysis performed, and software developed, and hardware/software recommendations made during 1992 in development of the PC-based data acquisition system for support of Welding Process Modeling and Control is reported. A need was identified by the Metals Processing Branch of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, for a mobile data aquisition and analysis system, customized for welding measurement and calibration. Several hardware configurations were evaluated and a PC-based system was chosen. The Welding Measurement System (WMS) is a dedicated instrument, strictly for the use of data aquisition and analysis. Although the WMS supports many of the functions associated with the process control, it is not the intention for this system to be used for welding process control.

  14. Etchant for incoloy-903 welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstmeyer, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Special reagent consists of 1 part 90% lactic acid, 1 part 70% nitric acid, and 4 part, 37% hydrochloric acid. Solution etches parent and weld metals at same rate, without overetching. Underlying grain structure of both metals is revealed.

  15. Welding, brazing, and soldering handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, A. B.; Koehler, M. L.; Metzler, J. W.; Sturges, S. R.

    1969-01-01

    Handbook gives information on the selection and application of welding, brazing, and soldering techniques for joining various metals. Summary descriptions of processes, criteria for process selection, and advantages of different methods are given.

  16. Impact Tests of Welded Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1936-04-01

    indicate that good welds by these two last named processes give excellent impact results. Welds subjected to extremely low or high temperature merit...variation with temperature of the ratio of shear to tensile stress developed in the Izod or Charpy test, falls from a high to an exceedingly low value...and Larsen also showed that high nitrogen or oxygen content shifted the "zone of transition" to higher temperatures , and that normalizing shifted the

  17. Laser based spot weld characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  18. Welding abilities of UFG metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawiński, Łukasz; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Olejnik, Lech; Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Fratini, Livan

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafine Grained (UFG) metals are characterized by an average grain size of <1 µm and mostly high angle grain boundaries. These materials exhibit exceptional improvements in strength, superplastic behaviour and in some cases enhanced biocompatibility. UFG metals barstock can be fabricated effectively by means of Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) methods. However, the obtained welded joints with similar properties to the base of UFG material are crucial for the production of finished engineering components. Conventional welding methods based on local melting of the joined edges cannot be used due to the UFG microstructure degradation caused by the heat occurrence in the heat affected zone. Therefore, the possibility of obtaining UFG materials joints with different shearing plane (SP) positions by means of friction welded processes, which do not exceed the melting temperature during the process, should be investigated. The article focuses on the Linear Friction Welding (LFW) method, which belongs to innovative welding processes based on mixing of the friction-heated material in the solid state. LFW is a welding process used to joint bulk components. In the process, the friction forces work due to the high frequency oscillation and the pressure between the specimens is converted in thermal energy. Character and range of recrystallization can be controlled by changing LFW parameters. Experimental study on the welded UFG 1070 aluminum alloy by means of FLW method, indicates the possibility of reducing the UFG structure degradation in the obtained joint. A laboratory designed LFW machine has been used to weld the specimens with different contact pressure and oscillation frequency.

  19. NASA welding assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofel, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A long duration test has been conducted for comparing various methods of attaching electrical interconnects to solar cells for near Earth orbit spacecraft. Representative solar array modules have been thermally cycled for 36,000 cycles between -80 and +80 C on this JPL and NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored work. This test simulates the environmental stress of more than 6 years on a near Earth spacecraft as it cycles in and out of the Earth's shadow. Evaluations of the integrity of these modules were made by visual and by electrical examinations before starting the cycling and then at periodic intervals during the cycling tests. Modules included examples of parallel gap and of ultrasonic welding, as well as soldering. The materials and fabrication processes are state of the art, suitable for forming large solar arrays of spacecraft quality. The modules survived his extensive cycling without detectable degradation in their ability to generate power under sunlight illumination.

  20. Totally confined explosive welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  1. NASA welding assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofel, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A long duration test was conducted for comparing various methods of attaching electrical interconnects to solar cells for near Earth orbit spacecraft. Representative solar array modules were thermally cycled for 36,000 cycles between -80 and +80 C. The environmental stress of more than 6 years on a near Earth spacecraft as it cycles in and out of the earth's shadow was simulated. Evaluations of the integrity of these modules were made by visual and by electrical examinations before starting the cycling and then at periodic intervals during the cycling tests. Modules included examples of parallel gap and of ultrasonic welding, as well as soldering. The materials and fabrication processes are state of the art, suitable for forming large solar arrays of spacecraft quality. The modules survived this extensive cycling without detectable degradation in their ability to generate power under sunlight illumination.

  2. Influence of Welding Process and Post Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Dissimilar Aluminium Alloy Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Ramana, V. S. N.; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    Welding of dissimilar Aluminum alloy welds is becoming important in aerospace, shipbuilding and defence applications. In the present work, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar aluminium alloys using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and friction stir welding (FSW) processes. An attempt was also made to study the effect of post weld heat treatment (T4 condition) on microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of these welds. Results of the present investigation established the differences in microstructures of the base metals in T4 condition and in annealed conditions. It is evident that the thickness of the PMZ is relatively more on AA2014 side than that of AA6061 side. In FS welds, lamellar like shear bands are well noticed on the top of the stir zone. The concentration profile of dissimilar friction stir weld in T4 condition revealed that no diffusion has taken place at the interface. Poor Hardness is observed in all regions of FS welds compared to that of GTA welds. Pitting corrosion resistance of the dissimilar FS welds in all regions was improved by post weld heat treatment.

  3. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  4. Weld bonding of titanium with polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Orell, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A conductive adhesive primer and a capillary flow adhesive were developed for weld bonding titanium alloy joints. Both formulations contained ingredients considered to be non-carcinogenic. Lap-shear joint test specimens and stringer-stiffened panels were weld bonded using a capillary flow process to apply the adhesive. Static property information was generated for weld bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F). The capillary flow process was demonstrated to produce weld bonded joints of equal strength to the weld through weld bonding process developed previously.

  5. Pipe weld crown removal device

    DOEpatents

    Sword, Charles K.; Sette, Primo J.

    1992-01-01

    A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

  6. Laser Welding in Electronic Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The laser has proven its worth in numerous high reliability electronic packaging applications ranging from medical to missile electronics. In particular, the pulsed YAG laser is an extremely flexible and versatile too] capable of hermetically sealing microelectronics packages containing sensitive components without damaging them. This paper presents an overview of details that must be considered for successful use of laser welding when addressing electronic package sealing. These include; metallurgical considerations such as alloy and plating selection, weld joint configuration, design of optics, use of protective gases and control of thermal distortions. The primary limitations on use of laser welding electronic for packaging applications are economic ones. The laser itself is a relatively costly device when compared to competing welding equipment. Further, the cost of consumables and repairs can be significant. These facts have relegated laser welding to use only where it presents a distinct quality or reliability advantages over other techniques of electronic package sealing. Because of the unique noncontact and low heat inputs characteristics of laser welding, it is an ideal candidate for sealing electronic packages containing MEMS devices (microelectromechanical systems). This paper addresses how the unique advantages of the pulsed YAG laser can be used to simplify MEMS packaging and deliver a product of improved quality.

  7. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  8. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    Sease, John D

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. Inmore » recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.« less

  9. U-Groove Aluminum Weld Strength Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1997-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. One is the source of peaking in which the extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe angular distortion that induces bending under uniaxial loading. The other is the filler strain hardening decreasing with increasing filler pass sequences, producing the weakest welds on the last weld pass side. Both phenomena are governed by weld pass sequences. Many industrial welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects, which reduce the weld strength. A depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thickness, pass numbers, and sequences to improve depeaking in the welding process. The result was to select the number and sequence of weld passes to reverse the peaking angle such as to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension component side to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  10. Weld procedure produces quality welds for thick sections of Hastelloy-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flens, F. J.; Fletcher, C. W.; Glasier, L. F., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Welding program produces premium quality, multipass welds in heavy tube sections of Hastelloy-X. It develops semiautomatic tungsten/inert gas procedures, weld wire procurement specifications material weld properties, welder-operator training, and nondestructive testing inspection techniques and procedures.

  11. Structure of welded joints obtained by contact weld in nanostructured titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenov, V. A.; Klopotov, A. A.; Gnysov, S. F.; Vlasov, V. A.; Lychagin, D. V.; Chumaevskii, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the research of the weld structure of two Ti specimens of the type VT6 that have nano- and submicrocrystalline structures. Electrical contact welding is used to obtain welds. The acicular structure is formed in the weld area. Two types of defects are detected, namely micropores and microcracks.

  12. Development of technique for laser welding of biological tissues using laser welding device and nanocomposite solder.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, A; Ichcitidze, L; Podgaetsky, V; Ryabkin, D; Pyankov, E; Saveliev, M; Selishchev, S

    2015-08-01

    The laser device for welding of biological tissues has been developed involving quality control and temperature stabilization of weld seam. Laser nanocomposite solder applied onto a wound to be weld has been used. Physicochemical properties of the nanocomposite solder have been elucidated. The nature of the tissue-organizing nanoscaffold has been analyzed at the site of biotissue welding.

  13. Welding of Thin Steel Plates by Hybrid Welding Process Combined TIG Arc with YAG Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewon; Suga, Yasuo; Koike, Takashi

    TIG arc welding and laser welding are used widely in the world. However, these welding processes have some advantages and problems respectively. In order to improve problems and make use of advantages of the arc welding and the laser welding processes, hybrid welding process combined the TIG arc with the YAG laser was studied. Especially, the suitable welding conditions for thin steel plate welding were investigated to obtain sound weld with beautiful surface and back beads but without weld defects. As a result, it was confirmed that the shot position of the laser beam is very important to obtain sound welds in hybrid welding. Therefore, a new intelligent system to monitor the welding area using vision sensor is constructed. Furthermore, control system to shot the laser beam to a selected position in molten pool, which is formed by TIG arc, is constructed. As a result of welding experiments using these systems, it is confirmed that the hybrid welding process and the control system are effective on the stable welding of thin stainless steel plates.

  14. Effects of welding technology on welding stress based on the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianke; Jin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Finite element method is used to simulate the welding process under four different conditions of welding flat butt joints. Welding seams are simulated with birth and death elements. The size and distribution of welding residual stress is obtained in the four kinds of welding conditions by Q345 manganese steel plate butt joint of the work piece. The results shown that when using two-layers welding,the longitudinal and transverse residual stress were reduced;When welding from Middle to both sides,the residual stress distribution will change,and the residual stress in the middle of the work piece was reduced.

  15. Development Of Advanced Welding Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Report describes development of next-generation control system for variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. When fully developed, system expected to incorporate advanced sensors and adaptive control of position of and current in welding torch.

  16. An Optimized Trajectory Planning for Welding Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilong; Wang, Jun; Li, Shuting; Ren, Jun; Wang, Quan; Cheng, Qunchao; Li, Wentao

    2018-03-01

    In order to improve the welding efficiency and quality, this paper studies the combined planning between welding parameters and space trajectory for welding robot and proposes a trajectory planning method with high real-time performance, strong controllability and small welding error. By adding the virtual joint at the end-effector, the appropriate virtual joint model is established and the welding process parameters are represented by the virtual joint variables. The trajectory planning is carried out in the robot joint space, which makes the control of the welding process parameters more intuitive and convenient. By using the virtual joint model combined with the B-spline curve affine invariant, the welding process parameters are indirectly controlled by controlling the motion curve of the real joint. To solve the optimal time solution as the goal, the welding process parameters and joint space trajectory joint planning are optimized.

  17. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOEpatents

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  18. The keyhole region in VPPA welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1988-01-01

    The morphology and properties of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld composite zone are intimately related to the physical processes associated with the keyhole. The effects of microsegregation and transient weld stress on macrosegregation in the weld tool are examined. In addition the electrical character of straight and reverse polarity portions of the arc cycle were characterized. The results of the former study indicate that alloy 2219 is weldable because large liquid volumes are available during latter stages of weld solidification. Strains in the pool region, acting in conjunction with weld microsegregation can produce macrosegregation great enough to produce radiographic contrast effects in welds. Mechanisms of surface copper enrichment were identified. The latter study has demonstrated that increased heat is delivered to workpieces if the reverse polarity proportion of the weld cycle is increased. Current in the straight polarity portion of the welding cycle increased as the reverse cycle proportion increased. Voltage during reverse polarity segments is large.

  19. Laser-GMA Hybrid Pipe Welding System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Experimental Results.................................................................................................34 Autogenous Laser Welds...APPENDIX B. Training Manual – Overview of System Components and Software...................... APPENDIX C. NASSCO...17. Autogenous laser welds in different joint configurations (10 mm thick mild steel, 5 mm land

  20. The effects of welded joint characteristics on its properties in HDPE thermal fusion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongbin; Peng, Jun

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, PE100 pipes with the diameter of 200 mm and the thickness of 11.9 mm were used as material. The welded joints were obtained in different welding pressures with the optimal welding temperature of 220∘C. Reheating process on the welded joints with the temperature of 130∘C was carried out. The joints exhibited X-type, and the cause of X-type joints was discussed. The temperature field in the forming process of welded joints was measured, and tensile and bending tests on welded joints were carried out. The fracture surface of welded joints was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and crystallinity calculation was taken by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanism of X-type weld profile effects on welded joints properties was analyzed. It was concluded that the mechanical properties of welded joints decrease with the reduced X distance between lines.

  1. Pre-resistance-welding resistance check

    DOEpatents

    Destefan, Dennis E.; Stompro, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

  2. Trailing Shield For Welding On Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coby, John B., Jr.; Gangl, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Trailing shield ensures layer of inert gas covers hot, newly formed bead between two tubes or pipes joined by plasma arc welding. Inert gas protects weld bead from oxidation by air until cooler and less vulnerable to oxidation. Intended for use on nickel-base alloy pipes, on which weld beads remain hot enough to oxidize after primary inert-gas purge from welding-torch cup has passed.

  3. Welding polarity effects on weld spatters and bead geometry of hyperbaric dry GMAW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Long; Wu, Jinming; Huang, Junfen; Huang, Jiqiang; Zou, Yong; Liu, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Welding polarity has influence on welding stability to some extent, but the specific relationship between welding polarity and weld quality has not been found, especially under the hyperbaric environment. Based on a hyperbaric dry welding experiment system, gas metal arc welding(GMAW) experiments with direct current electrode positive(DCEP) and direct current electrode negative(DCEN) operations are carried out under the ambient pressures of 0.1 MPa, 0.4 MPa, 0.7 MPa and 1.0 MPa to find the influence rule of different welding polarities on welding spatters and weld bead geometry. The effects of welding polarities on the weld bead geometry such as the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are discussed. The experimental results show that the welding spatters gradually grow in quantity and size for GMAW with DCEP, while GMAW with DCEN can produce fewer spatters comparatively with the increase of the ambient pressure. Compared with DCEP, the welding current and arc voltage waveforms for DCEN is more stable and the distribution of welding current probability density for DCEN is more concentrated under the hyperbaric environment. When the ambient pressure is increased from 0.1 MPa to 1.0 MPa, the effects of welding polarities on the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are as follows: an increase of 0.8 mm for the weld reinforcement is produced by GMAW with DCEN and 1.3 mm by GMAW with DCEP, a decrease of 7.2 mm for the weld width is produced by DCEN and 6.1 mm by DCEP; and an increase of 3.9 mm for the penetration is produced by DCEN and 1.9 mm by DCEP. The proposed research indicates that the desirable stability in the welding procedure can be achieved by GMAW with DCEN operation under the hyperbaric environment.

  4. Low Speed Control for Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Amplifier module allows rotating positioner of automatic welding machine to operate at speeds below normal range. Low speeds are precisely regulated by a servomechanism as are normal-range speeds. Addition of module to standard welding machine makes it unnecessary to purchase new equipment for low-speed welding.

  5. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. R.; Korb, L. J.; Oleksiak, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Systems approach to high-quality aluminum welding uses square-butt joints, kept away from sharp contour changes. Intersecting welds are configured for T-type intersections rather than crossovers. Differences in panel thickness are accommodated with transition step areas where thickness increases or decreases within weld, but never at intersection.

  6. Sensors control gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, T.A.; Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1997-04-01

    The response time of a trained welder from the time a weld problem is identified to the time action is taken is about one second--especially after a long, uneventful period of welding. This is acceptable for manual welding because it is close to the time it takes for the weld pool to solidify. If human response time were any slower, manual welding would not be possible. However, human response time is too slow to respond to some weld events, such as melting of the contact tube in gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and only automated intelligent control systems can reactmore » fast enough to correct or avoid these problems. Control systems incorporate welding knowledge that enables intelligent decisions to be made about weld quality and, ultimately, to keep welding parameters in the range where only high-quality welds are produced. This article discusses the correlation of electrical signals with contact-tube wear, changes in shielding gas, changes in arc length, and other weld process data.« less

  7. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions that...

  8. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions that...

  9. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions that...

  10. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions that...

  11. Bronchial reactions to exposure to welding fumes.

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, G R; Chan-Yeung, M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the airway response and its mechanism to welding fumes in six welders with respiratory symptoms. METHODS: Methacholine and welding challenge tests were carried out. The concentration of welding fumes during the exposure test was measured. On two subjects who developed bronchoconstricition to welding challenge, additional tests were carried out including prick, patch, and inhalation challenges with metal salt solutions. RESULTS: Three subjects developed immediate bronchial reaction to exposure to welding fume; one to mild steel and stainless steel welding, another to mild steel and galvanised welding, and one only to galvanised welding. They all had a moderate to pronounced degree of non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The concentration of fumes during welding tests, particularly to galvanised welding, was high. An inhalation challenge test with zinc chloride salt solution in two subjects who reacted to galvanised welding was negative. Prick and patch tests with zinc chloride were also negative. CONCLUSION: The airway response to welding in these subjects is non-specific and is due to irritation rather than to sensitisation. PMID:9538358

  12. Bronchial reactions to exposure to welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Contreras, G R; Chan-Yeung, M

    1997-11-01

    To study the airway response and its mechanism to welding fumes in six welders with respiratory symptoms. Methacholine and welding challenge tests were carried out. The concentration of welding fumes during the exposure test was measured. On two subjects who developed bronchoconstricition to welding challenge, additional tests were carried out including prick, patch, and inhalation challenges with metal salt solutions. Three subjects developed immediate bronchial reaction to exposure to welding fume; one to mild steel and stainless steel welding, another to mild steel and galvanised welding, and one only to galvanised welding. They all had a moderate to pronounced degree of non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The concentration of fumes during welding tests, particularly to galvanised welding, was high. An inhalation challenge test with zinc chloride salt solution in two subjects who reacted to galvanised welding was negative. Prick and patch tests with zinc chloride were also negative. The airway response to welding in these subjects is non-specific and is due to irritation rather than to sensitisation.

  13. 49 CFR 179.100-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.100-9 Section 179.100-9... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-9 Welding. (a) All..., appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be...

  14. 30 CFR 77.408 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding operations. 77.408 Section 77.408 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.408 Welding operations. Welding operations shall be shielded and the...

  15. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints... W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be...

  16. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions that...

  17. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11...-11 Welding. (a) Except for closure of openings and a maximum of two circumferential closing joints in... subchapter). (d) Each welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR 27708...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1729 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding operations. 75.1729 Section 75.1729 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1729 Welding operations. Welding...

  19. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Design Requirements § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall...

  20. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design temperature...

  1. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints... of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy...

  2. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design temperature...

  3. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b...

  4. 49 CFR 179.100-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding. 179.100-9 Section 179.100-9... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-9 Welding. (a) All joints shall be..., see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b...

  5. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11... Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400-11 Welding. (a... welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR 27708, June 16, 1983, as...

  6. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11... Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400-11 Welding. (a... welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR 27708, June 16, 1983, as...

  7. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal joints must be... class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in accordance with...

  8. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design temperature...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1729 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Welding operations. 75.1729 Section 75.1729 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1729 Welding operations. Welding...

  10. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design temperature...

  11. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal joints must be... class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in accordance with...

  12. 30 CFR 77.408 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Welding operations. 77.408 Section 77.408 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.408 Welding operations. Welding operations shall be shielded and the...

  13. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the outer...

  14. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the outer...

  15. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design temperature...

  16. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b...

  17. 30 CFR 77.408 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Welding operations. 77.408 Section 77.408 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.408 Welding operations. Welding operations shall be shielded and the...

  18. 30 CFR 77.408 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Welding operations. 77.408 Section 77.408 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.408 Welding operations. Welding operations shall be shielded and the...

  19. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11... Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400-11 Welding. (a... welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR 27708, June 16, 1983, as...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1729 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Welding operations. 75.1729 Section 75.1729 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1729 Welding operations. Welding...

  1. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the outer...

  2. 30 CFR 77.408 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Welding operations. 77.408 Section 77.408 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.408 Welding operations. Welding operations shall be shielded and the...

  3. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the outer...

  4. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1729 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Welding operations. 75.1729 Section 75.1729 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1729 Welding operations. Welding...

  6. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal joints must be... class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in accordance with...

  7. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal joints must be... class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in accordance with...

  8. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11... Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400-11 Welding. (a... welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR 27708, June 16, 1983, as...

  9. 49 CFR 179.100-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding. 179.100-9 Section 179.100-9... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-9 Welding. (a) All joints shall be..., see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b...

  10. 49 CFR 179.100-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding. 179.100-9 Section 179.100-9... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-9 Welding. (a) All joints shall be..., see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1729 - Welding operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Welding operations. 75.1729 Section 75.1729 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1729 Welding operations. Welding...

  12. 49 CFR 179.100-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding. 179.100-9 Section 179.100-9... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-9 Welding. (a) All joints shall be..., see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b...

  13. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b...

  14. Friction Stir Welding of Magnesium Alloy Type AZ 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupec, Tomáš; Behúlová, Mária; Turňa, Milan; Sahul, Miroslav

    The paper deals with welding of Mg alloy of the type AZ 31 by Friction Stir Welding technology (FSW). The FSW technology is at present predominantly used for welding light metals and alloys, as aluminium, magnesium and their alloys. Experimental part consists of performing the simulation and fabrication of welded joints on a new-installed welding equipment available at the Welding Research Institute — Industrial Institute of SR Bratislava. Welding tools made of tool steel type H 13 were used for welding experiments. Geometry of welding tools was designed on the base of literature knowledge. Suitable welding parameters and conditions were determined using numerical simulation. Main emphasis was laid upon the tool revolutions, welding speed and tool bevel angle. The effect of welding parameters on the quality of welded joints was assessed. Assessment of welded joints was carried out by radiography, light microscopy, hardness measurement and EDX microanalysis. Static tensile test was employed for mechanical testing.

  15. Advanced Welding Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Accutron Tool & Instrument Co.'s welder was originally developed as a tool specifically for joining parts made of plastic or composite materials in any atmosphere to include the airless environment of space. Developers decided on induction or magnetic heating to avoid causing deformation and it also can be used with almost any type of thermoplastic material. Induction coil transfers magnetic flux through the plastic to a metal screen that is sandwiched between the sheets of plastic to be joined. When welder is energized, alternating current produces inductive heating on the screen causing the adjacent plastic surfaces to melt and flow into the mesh, creating a bond on the total surface area. Dave Brown, owner of Great Falls Canoe and Kayak Repair, Vienna, VA, uses a special repair technique based on operation of the Induction Toroid Welder to fix canoes. Whitewater canoeing poses the problem of frequent gashes that are difficult to repair. The main reason is that many canoes are made of plastics. The commercial Induction model is a self-contained, portable welding gun with a switch on the handle to regulate the temperature of the plastic melting screen. Welder has a broad range of applications in the automobile, appliance, aerospace and construction industries.

  16. Percussive arc welding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hollar, Jr., Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

  17. [(Modic) signal alterations of vertebral endplates and their correlation to a minimally invasive treatment of lumbar disc herniation using epidural injections].

    PubMed

    Liphofer, J P; Theodoridis, T; Becker, G T; Koester, O; Schmid, G

    2006-11-01

    To study the influence of (Modic) signal alterations (SA) of the cartilage endplate (CEP) of vertebrae L3-S1 on the outcome of an in-patient minimally invasive treatment (MIT) using epidural injections on patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). The MR images of 59 consecutive patients with LDH within segments L3/L4 - L5/S1 undergoing in-patient minimally invasive treatment with epidural injections were evaluated in a clinical study. The (Modic) signal alterations of the CEP were recorded using T1- and T2-weighted sagittal images. On the basis of the T2-weighted sagittal images, the extension and distribution of the SA were measured by dividing each CEP into 9 areas. The outcome of the MIT was recorded using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) before and after therapy and in a 3-month follow-up. Within a subgroup of patients (n = 35), the distribution and extension of the signal alterations were correlated with the development of the ODI. Segments with LDH showed significantly more (p < 0.001) SA of the CEP than segments without LDH. Although the extension of the SA was not dependent on sex, it did increase significantly with age (p = 0.017). The outcome after MIT did not depend on the sex and age of the patients nor on the type of LDH. The SA extension tended to have a negative correlation with the outcome after MIT after 3 months (p = 0.071). A significant negative correlation could be established between the SA extension in the central section of the upper endplate and the outcome after 3 months (p = 0.019). 1. Lumbar disc herniation is clearly associated with the prevalence of (Modic) signal alterations. 2. Extensive signal alterations tend to correlate with a negative outcome of an MIT using epidural injections. 3. Such SA in the central portion of the upper CEP correlate significantly with a negative treatment result. 4. The central portion of the upper CEP being extensively affected by (Modic) SA is a negative predictor for the success of a minimally

  18. Modic changes in endplates of lumbar vertebral bodies: prevalence and association with low back and sciatic pain among middle-aged male workers.

    PubMed

    Kuisma, Mari; Karppinen, Jaro; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Ojala, Risto; Haapea, Marianne; Heliövaara, Markku; Korpelainen, Raija; Taimela, Simo; Natri, Antero; Tervonen, Osmo

    2007-05-01

    Cross-sectional comparison of self-reported low back pain (LBP) symptoms and Modic findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To investigate associations of frequency and intensity of LBP and sciatic pain with Modic changes in a sample of middle-aged male workers with or without whole-body vibration exposure. Vertebral endplate changes are bone marrow lesions visible on MRI and are assumed to be associated with degenerative intervertebral disc disease. Associations of these so-called Modic changes with clinical symptoms are controversial. Furthermore, most of these studies have been performed in selected series of patients. A total of 228 middle-aged male workers (159 train engineers and 69 sedentary controls) from northern Finland underwent sagittal T1 and T2-weighted MRI. Both endplates of 1140 lumbar interspaces were graded for type and extent of Modic changes. Logistic regression was used to analyze associations of pain variables with Modic changes. Train engineers had on the average higher sciatic pain scores than the sedentary controls, but the prevalence of Modic changes was similar in both occupational groups. Altogether, 178 Modic changes in 128 subjects were recorded: 30% were type I, 66% type II, and 4% both types I and II. Eighty percent of changes occurred at L4-L5 or L5-S1. Modic changes at L5-S1 showed significant association with pain symptoms with increased frequency of LBP (odds ratio [OR] 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-3.15) and sciatica episodes (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.01-1.89), and with higher LBP visual analog scores during the past week (OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.06-1.70). Type I lesions and extensive lesions in particular were closely associated with pain. Modic changes at L5-S1 and Modic type I lesions are more likely to be associated with pain symptoms than other types of Modic changes or changes located at other lumbar levels.

  19. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  20. Electron Beam Welding to Join Gamma Titanium Aluminide Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Thomas Joseph (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is provided for welding two gamma titanium aluminide articles together. The method includes preheating the two articles to a welding temperature of from about 1700 F to about 2100 F, thereafter electron beam welding the two articles together at the welding temperature and in a welding vacuum to form a welded structure, and thereafter annealing the welded structure at an annealing temperature of from about 1800 F to about 2200 F, to form a joined structure.

  1. Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis

    DOEpatents

    Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Zimmerman, G.; Jacques, S.

    1998-10-27

    A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or ``welded`` using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage. 8 figs.

  2. Friction Stir Welding and NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, K Renee

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks and other areas used on the Space Launch System (SLS) NASA's SLS is an advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle which will provide an entirely new capability for science and human exploration beyond Earth's orbit. The SLS will give the nation a safe, affordable and sustainable means of reaching beyond our current limits and open new doors of discovery from the unique vantage point of space This talk will elaborate on the SR-FSW process and it's usage on the current Space Launch System Program at NASA.

  3. Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis

    DOEpatents

    Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Zimmerman, George; Jacques, Steven

    1998-10-27

    A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

  4. Advances in welding science: A perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S. A.; Vitek, J. M.; Babu, S. S.; Debroy, T.

    The ultimate goal of welding technology is to improve the joint integrity and increase productivity. Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based tailoring of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes.

  5. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Essien, Marcelino; Keicher, David M.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Jellison, James L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  6. Grain refinement control in TIG arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A method for controlling grain size and weld puddle agitation in a tungsten electrode inert gas welding system to produce fine, even grain size and distribution is disclosed. In the method the frequency of dc welding voltage pulses supplied to the welding electrode is varied over a preselected frequency range and the arc gas voltage is monitored. At some frequency in the preselected range the arc gas voltage will pass through a maximum. By maintaining the operating frequency of the system at this value, maximum weld puddle agitation and fine grain structure are produced.

  7. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Ganjiang; Nowak, Daniel Anthony; Murphy, John Thomas

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  8. Experimental investigation on the weld pool formation process in plasma keyhole arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Anh, Nguyen; Tashiro, Shinichi; Van Hanh, Bui; Tanaka, Manabu

    2018-01-01

    This paper seeks to clarify the weld pool formation process in plasma keyhole arc welding (PKAW). We adopted, for the first time, the measurement of the 3D convection inside the weld pool in PKAW by stereo synchronous imaging of tungsten tracer particles using two sets of x-ray transmission systems. The 2D convection on the weld pool surface was also measured using zirconia tracer particles. Through these measurements, the convection in a wide range of weld pools from the vicinity of the keyhole to the rear region was successfully visualized. In order to discuss the heat transport process in a weld pool, the 2D temperature distribution on the weld pool surface was also measured by two-color pyrometry. The results of the comprehensive experimental measurement indicate that the shear force due to plasma flow is found to be the dominant driving force in the weld pool formation process in PKAW. Thus, heat transport in a weld pool is considered to be governed by two large convective patterns near the keyhole: (1) eddy pairs on the surface (perpendicular to the torch axis), and (2) eddy pairs on the bulk of the weld pool (on the plane of the torch). They are formed with an equal velocity of approximately 0.35 m s-1 and are mainly driven by shear force. Furthermore, the flow velocity of the weld pool convection becomes considerably higher than that of other welding processes, such as TIG welding and GMA welding, due to larger plasma flow velocity.

  9. Welding processes and ocular hazards and protection.

    PubMed

    Pabley, A S; Keeney, A H

    1981-07-01

    There are approximately 60 different forms of welding, but only six of these are commonly used. Shielded metal-arc or stick welding, gas metal-arc welding, and oxyacetylene welding are the most frequently used. All produce ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiation at damaging levels. Conventional glass welding shields contain ultraviolet, visible, and infrared absorbers. Infrared absorbers, however, cause heating and secondary re-radiation. New polycarbonate lenses offer greater impact resistance, and have less tendency to welding spatter. Early abrasion-resistant and reflective coatings on plastics were ineffective. Thin layers of gold with proprietary coatings provide cool reflection and surface resistance. Thermal monitoring of welding indicated that these new shields reduce temperature rises above the ambient by 150% to 175% compared to green glass filter plates without interfering with the welder's vision.

  10. Welding of gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An article made of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, cooling the entire article to a welding temperature of from about 1000.degree. F. to about 1400.degree. F., welding a preselected region in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected region so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected region, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the gamma titanium aluminide alloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  11. Sensor Control of Robot Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sias, F. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The potential for using computer vision as sensory feedback for robot gas-tungsten arc welding is investigated. The basic parameters that must be controlled while directing the movement of an arc welding torch are defined. The actions of a human welder are examined to aid in determining the sensory information that would permit a robot to make reproducible high strength welds. Special constraints imposed by both robot hardware and software are considered. Several sensory modalities that would potentially improve weld quality are examined. Special emphasis is directed to the use of computer vision for controlling gas-tungsten arc welding. Vendors of available automated seam tracking arc welding systems and of computer vision systems are surveyed. An assessment is made of the state of the art and the problems that must be solved in order to apply computer vision to robot controlled arc welding on the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  12. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

    1960-05-10

    An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

  13. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  14. Effects of alloying element on weld characterization of laser-arc hybrid welding of pure copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Kangda; Gong, Mengcheng; Xie, Yong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-06-01

    Effects of alloying elements of Si and Sn on weld characterizations of laser-arc hybrid welded pure copper (Cu) with thickness of 2 mm was studied in detail by using different wires. The weld microstructure was analyzed, and the mechanical properties (micro-hardness and tensile property), conductivity and corrosion resistance were tested. The results showed that the alloying elements benefit the growth of column grains within weld fusion zone (FZ), increase the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the FZ and weld corrosion resistance, and decrease weld conductivity. The mechanisms were discussed according to the results.

  15. Study made to establish parameters and limitations of explosive welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhemus, F. C.

    1967-01-01

    It is theorized that metal jetting must be present for welding to occur, therefore an explosive weld interface may indicate the relation between the metal jet velocity and shock wave velocity in welding. Parameters for effecting explosive welding in patches of 3 or 4 inches in diameter were established, and found applicable to explosive welding of patches of various sizes.

  16. Mathematical Model Of Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process developed for use in predicting characteristics of welds and thus serves as guide for selection of process parameters. Parameters include welding electric currents in, and durations of, straight and reverse polarities; rates of flow of plasma and shielding gases; and sizes and relative positions of welding electrode, welding orifice, and workpiece.

  17. 49 CFR 195.234 - Welds: Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welds: Nondestructive testing. 195.234 Section 195... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.234 Welds: Nondestructive testing. (a) A weld may be... weld. (b) Any nondestructive testing of welds must be performed— (1) In accordance with a written set...

  18. Automatic, nondestructive test monitors in-process weld quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, F. C.

    1968-01-01

    Instrument automatically and nondestructively monitors the quality of welds produced in microresistance welding. It measures the infrared energy generated in the weld as the weld is made and compares this energy with maximum and minimum limits of infrared energy values previously correlated with acceptable weld-strength tolerances.

  19. General Mechanical Repair. Welding. Volume 2. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    Five units on welding are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are the following: introduction to oxyacetylene welding, oxyacetylene welding positions and applications, use of the cutting torch, introduction to shielded metal arc welding, and welding joints and positions. Each instructional unit generally contains eight components:…

  20. 49 CFR 192.235 - Preparation for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preparation for welding. 192.235 Section 192.235... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.235 Preparation for welding. Before beginning any welding, the welding surfaces must be clean and free of any material that...

  1. 49 CFR 192.235 - Preparation for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preparation for welding. 192.235 Section 192.235... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.235 Preparation for welding. Before beginning any welding, the welding surfaces must be clean and free of any material that...

  2. 49 CFR 192.235 - Preparation for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preparation for welding. 192.235 Section 192.235... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.235 Preparation for welding. Before beginning any welding, the welding surfaces must be clean and free of any material that...

  3. 49 CFR 192.235 - Preparation for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preparation for welding. 192.235 Section 192.235... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.235 Preparation for welding. Before beginning any welding, the welding surfaces must be clean and free of any material that...

  4. 49 CFR 192.235 - Preparation for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preparation for welding. 192.235 Section 192.235... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.235 Preparation for welding. Before beginning any welding, the welding surfaces must be clean and free of any material that...

  5. Mixing weld gases offers advantages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, J. L.; Mendenhall, M. M.

    1969-01-01

    Argon added to helium during gas tungsten arc cover-pass welding in the horizontal position results in a better controlled wider bead width, increased arc stability, and reduction in heat input. Adequate filler material wetness and penetration pass coverage is possible with only one pass.

  6. Welding torch gas cup extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a gas shielded electric arc welding torch having a detachable gas cup extension which may be of any desired configuration or length. The gas cup extension assembly is mounted on a standard electric welding torch gas cup to enable welding in areas with limited access. The gas cup assembly has an upper tubular insert that fits within the gas cup such that its lower portion protrudes thereform and has a lower tubular extension that is screwed into the lower portion. The extension has a rim to define the outer perimeter of the seat edge about its entrance opening so a gasket may be placed to effect an airtight seal between the gas cup and extension. The tubular extension may be made of metal or cermaic material that can be machined. The novelty lies in the use of an extension assembly for a standard gas cup of an electric arc welding torch which extension assembly is detachable permitting the use of a number of extensions which may be of different configurations and materials and yet fit the standard gas cup.

  7. Applied Welding Technology Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Idaho state curriculum guide provides lists of tasks, performance objectives, and enabling objectives for instruction in welding. Following an introduction and a list of tasks, the bulk of the document consists of 10 modules, each of which is a list of tasks and the performance objectives and enabling objectives that pertain to each task. The…

  8. Welding Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for six occupations in the welding series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space for…

  9. Validation of Welding Curriculum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Sheila D.

    A study was conducted to validate the welding curriculum materials developed and published by the Oklahoma State Department of Vocational and Technical Education. Twelve instructors collected achievement data (unit tests, assignment sheets, and evaluation forms) concerning the performance of 280 students on a total of 46 instructional units. Item…

  10. Welding. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a welding program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability skills needed…

  11. Lets Quantify Our Welding Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinn, Glen C.

    1973-01-01

    By using the nick-break test, and the guided bend test, a student of welding can individually assess his performance either in a formal class setting, or at the home, farm, or job. Employment of these tests will tend to limit personal bias in evaluation. (KP)

  12. High-frequency welding trials.

    PubMed

    Kelch, R

    2000-09-01

    The high-frequency weldability of a new family of polyolefin films is compared with that of conventional films made of other polymers. A comparison of the optimum weld parameters of all the films and the results of performance testing of all the pouches produced are reported.

  13. Electrode cartridge for pulse welding

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnen, John Joseph Francis; Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich; Mamutov, Alexander

    A cartridge assembly for a tool includes a cartridge body or casing that contains a conductor. A conductor is connected to a pulse generator or source of stored charge that is discharged to vaporize the conductor and create an electro-hydraulic or electro-magnetic shockwave that is used to impact or pulse weld two parts together.

  14. Alining Large Cylinders for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehl, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Special tooling alines and holds internally-stiffened large-diameter cylindrical parts for welding. Alinement brackets attached to strengthening fins on insides of cylindrical tank sections. Jackscrews on brackets raised or lowered to eliminate mismatches between adjacent sections. Tooling substantially reduces costs while allowing more precise control and improved quality.

  15. Welding. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on modern gas and arc welding is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids on the servicing of automotive and off-the-road agricultural and construction equipment. Materials provide basic information with illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. The eight sections…

  16. Optical-Fiber-Welding Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Mann, W. A.; Goldstein, R.

    1985-01-01

    Technique yields joints with average transmissivity of 91.6 percent. Electric arc passed over butted fiber ends to melt them together. Maximum optical transmissivity of joint achieved with optimum choice of discharge current, translation speed, and axial compression of fibers. Practical welding machine enables delicate and tedious joining operation performed routinely.

  17. Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    These instructional materials assist teachers in improving instruction on the fundamentals of welding. The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and 27 references. Seven units of…

  18. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  19. Welded joints integrity analysis and optimization for fiber laser welding of dissimilar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yuewei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Li, Peigen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Dissimilar materials welded joints provide many advantages in power, automotive, chemical, and spacecraft industries. The weld bead integrity which is determined by process parameters plays a significant role in the welding quality during the fiber laser welding (FLW) of dissimilar materials. In this paper, an optimization method by taking the integrity of the weld bead and weld area into consideration is proposed for FLW of dissimilar materials, the low carbon steel and stainless steel. The relationships between the weld bead integrity and process parameters are developed by the genetic algorithm optimized back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN). The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is taken for optimizing the predicted outputs from GA-BPNN for the objective. Through the optimization process, the desired weld bead with good integrity and minimum weld area are obtained and the corresponding microstructure and microhardness are excellent. The mechanical properties of the optimized joints are greatly improved compared with that of the un-optimized welded joints. Moreover, the effects of significant factors are analyzed based on the statistical approach and the laser power (LP) is identified as the most significant factor on the weld bead integrity and weld area. The results indicate that the proposed method is effective for improving the reliability and stability of welded joints in the practical production.

  20. Automatic orbital GTAW welding: Highest quality welds for tomorrow's high-performance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henon, B. K.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic orbital gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG welding is certain to play an increasingly prominent role in tomorrow's technology. The welds are of the highest quality and the repeatability of automatic weldings is vastly superior to that of manual welding. Since less heat is applied to the weld during automatic welding than manual welding, there is less change in the metallurgical properties of the parent material. The possibility of accurate control and the cleanliness of the automatic GTAW welding process make it highly suitable to the welding of the more exotic and expensive materials which are now widely used in the aerospace and hydrospace industries. Titanium, stainless steel, Inconel, and Incoloy, as well as, aluminum can all be welded to the highest quality specifications automatically. Automatic orbital GTAW equipment is available for the fusion butt welding of tube-to-tube, as well as, tube to autobuttweld fittings. The same equipment can also be used for the fusion butt welding of up to 6 inch pipe with a wall thickness of up to 0.154 inches.