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Sample records for zirconate titanate ferroelectric

  1. Ferroelectric devices using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Young Hun; Shokri Kojori, Hossein; Kim, Sung Jin

    2016-02-01

    We successfully demonstrate the synthesis of lead zirconate titanate nanoparticles (PZT NPs) and a ferroelectric device using the synthesized PZT NPs. The crystalline structure and the size of the nanocrystals are studied using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. We observe <100 nm of PZT NPs and this result matches dynamic light scattering measurements. A solution-based low-temperature process is used to fabricate PZT NP-based devices on an indium tin oxide substrate. The fabricated ferroelectric devices are characterized using various optical and electrical measurements and we verify ferroelectric properties including ferroelectric hysteresis and the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect. Our approach enables low-temperature solution-based processes that could be used for various applications. To the best of our knowledge, this low-temperature solution processed ferroelectric device using PZT NPs is the first successful demonstration of its kind.

  2. Ferroelectric devices using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paik, Young Hun; Kojori, Hossein Shokri; Kim, Sung Jin

    2016-02-19

    We successfully demonstrate the synthesis of lead zirconate titanate nanoparticles (PZT NPs) and a ferroelectric device using the synthesized PZT NPs. The crystalline structure and the size of the nanocrystals are studied using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. We observe <100 nm of PZT NPs and this result matches dynamic light scattering measurements. A solution-based low-temperature process is used to fabricate PZT NP-based devices on an indium tin oxide substrate. The fabricated ferroelectric devices are characterized using various optical and electrical measurements and we verify ferroelectric properties including ferroelectric hysteresis and the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect. Our approach enables low-temperature solution-based processes that could be used for various applications. To the best of our knowledge, this low-temperature solution processed ferroelectric device using PZT NPs is the first successful demonstration of its kind.

  3. Structural contribution to the ferroelectric fatigue in lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterstein, M.; Rouquette, J.; Haines, J.; Papet, Ph.; Glaum, J.; Knapp, M.; Eckert, J.; Hoffman, M.

    2014-09-01

    Many ferroelectric devices are based on doped lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics with compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB), at which the relevant material's properties approach their maximum. Based on a synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of MPB PZT, bulk fatigue is unambiguously found to arise from a less effective field induced tetragonal-to-monoclinic transformation, at which the degradation of the polarization flipping is detected by a less intense and more diffuse anomaly in the atomic displacement parameter of lead. The time dependence of the ferroelectric response on a structural level down to 250 μs confirms this interpretation in the time scale of the piezolectric strain response.

  4. Effect of the Sintering Temperature on the Formation of Ferroelectric Properties of a Lead Zirconate-Titanate Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanova, E. V.; Topchiev, A. A.; Malyshkina, O. V.

    2018-04-01

    Effect of the sintering temperature on the formation of the microstructure, the domain structure, and the ferroelectric properties of a lead zirconate-titanate Pb(Ti x Zr1 - x )O3 piezoelectric ceramics has been studied. It is shown that the ferroelectric phase forms at a sintering temperature of 860°C. At higher sintering temperatures, the main effect on the properties is due to a unit cell deformation and free charge carriers.

  5. Lead zirconate titanate thin films directly on copper electrodes for ferroelectric, dielectric and piezoelectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingon, Angus I.; Srinivasan, Sudarsan

    2005-03-01

    Replacement of noble metal electrodes by base metals significantly lowers the cost of ferroelectric, piezoelectric and dielectric devices. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to process lead zirconate (Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3, or PZT) thin films directly on base metal copper foils. We explore the impact of the oxygen partial pressure during processing, and demonstrate that high-quality films and interfaces can be achieved through control of the oxygen partial pressure within a narrow window predicted by thermodynamic stability considerations. This demonstration has broad implications, opening up the possibility of the use of low-cost, high-conductivity copper electrodes for a range of Pb-based perovskite materials, including PZT films in embedded printed circuit board applications for capacitors, varactors and sensors; multilayer PZT piezoelectric stacks; and multilayer dielectric and electrostrictive devices based on lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate. We also point out that the capacitors do not fatigue on repeated switching, unlike those with Pt noble metal electrodes. Instead, they appear to be fatigue-resistant, like capacitors with oxide electrodes. This may have implications for ferroelectric non-volatile memories.

  6. Effect of polarization fatigue on the Rayleigh coefficients of ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate thin films: Experimental evidence and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, X. J.; Zhang, H. J.; Luo, Z. D.; Zhang, F. P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Q. D.; Fang, A. P.; Dkhil, B.; Zhang, M.; Ren, X. B.; He, H. L.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of polarization fatigue on the Rayleigh coefficients of ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film was systematically investigated. It was found that electrical fatigue strongly affects the Rayleigh behaviour of the PZT film. Both the reversible and irreversible Rayleigh coefficients decrease with increasing the number of switching cycles. This phenomenon is attributed to the growth of an interfacial degraded layer between the electrode and the film during electrical cycling. The methodology used in this work could serve as an alternative way for evaluating the fatigue endurance and degradation in dielectric properties of ferroelectric thin-film devices during applications.

  7. Effects of Thickness, Pulse Duration, and Size of Strip Electrode on Ferroelectric Electron Emission of Lead Zirconate Titanate Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Muhammad; Ren, Wei; Chen, Xiaofeng; Feng, Yujun; Shi, Peng; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2018-02-01

    Sol-gel-derived lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin-film emitters with thickness up to 9.8 μm have been prepared on Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si wafer via chemical solution deposition with/without polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) modification, and the relationship between the film thickness and electron emission investigated. Notable electron emission was observed on application of a trigger voltage of 120 V for PZT film with thickness of 1.1 μm. Increasing the film thickness decreased the threshold field to initiate electron emission for non-PVP-modified films. In contrast, the electron emission behavior of PVP-modified films did not show significant dependence on film thickness, probably due to their porous structure. The emission current increased with decreasing strip width and space between strips. Furthermore, it was observed that increasing the duration of the applied pulse increased the magnitude of the emission current. The stray field on the PZT film thickness was also calculated and found to increase with increasing ferroelectric sample thickness. The PZT emitters were found to be fatigue free up to 105 emission cycles. Saturated emission current of around 25 mA to 30 mA was achieved for the electrode pattern used in this work.

  8. Large Electrocaloric Effect in Relaxor Ferroelectric and Antiferroelectric Lanthanum Doped Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Biao; Li, Peilian; Tang, Zhenhua; Yao, Yingbang; Gao, Xingsen; Kleemann, Wolfgang; Lu, Sheng-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Both relaxor ferroelectric and antiferroelectric materials can individually demonstrate large electrocaloric effects (ECE). However, in order to further enhance the ECE it is crucial to find a material system, which can exhibit simultaneously both relaxor ferroelectric and antiferroelectric properties, or easily convert from one into another in terms of the compositional tailoring. Here we report on a system, in which the structure can readily change from antiferroelectric into relaxor ferroelectric and vice versa. To this end relaxor ferroelectric Pb0.89La0.11(Zr0.7Ti0.3)0.9725O3 and antiferroelectric Pb0.93La0.07(Zr0.82Ti0.18)0.9825O3 ceramics were designed near the antiferroelectric-ferroelectric phase boundary line in the La2O3-PbZrO3-PbTiO3 phase diagram. Conventional solid state reaction processing was used to prepare the two compositions. The ECE properties were deduced from Maxwell relations and Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire (LGD) phenomenological theory, respectively, and also directly controlled by a computer and measured by thermometry. Large electrocaloric efficiencies were obtained and comparable with the results calculated via the phenomenological theory. Results show great potential in achieving large cooling power as refrigerants. PMID:28345655

  9. Study on structural, dielectric, ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of Ba doped Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipti; Juneja, J. K.; Singh, Sangeeta; Raina, K. K.; Prakash, Chandra

    2013-12-01

    The perovskite Pb(1-x)BaxZr0.55Ti0.45O3 material (x=0.00, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, and 0.07) was synthesized by solid state reaction route. Green bodies were sintered at 1250 °C. All samples were subjected to X-ray diffraction analysis and they were found to be in single phase. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of temperature and frequency. Ferroelectric properties were studied as a function of temperature. Remnant polarization, saturation polarization and coercive field were determined for all the samples using ferroelectric loops. Piezoelectric properties such as d33 and electromechanical coupling factor (kp) were also measured at room temperature for all samples.

  10. Damage-free patterning of ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate thin films for microelectromechanical systems via contact printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Aaron

    This thesis describes the utilization and optimization of the soft lithographic technique, microcontact printing, to additively pattern ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films for application in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). For this purpose, the solution wetting, pattern transfer, printing dynamics, stamp/substrate configurations, and processing damages were optimized for incorporation of PZT thin films into a bio-mass sensor application. This patterning technique transfers liquid ceramic precursors onto a device stack in a desired configuration either through pattern definition in the stamp, substrate or both surfaces. It was determined that for ideal transfer of the pattern from the stamp to the substrate surface, wetting between the solution and the printing surface is paramount. To this end, polyurethane-based stamp surfaces were shown to be wet uniformly by polar solutions. Patterned stamp surfaces revealed that printing from raised features onto flat substrates could be accomplished with a minimum feature size of 5 mum. Films patterned by printing as a function of thickness (0.1 to 1 mum) showed analogous functional properties to continuous films that were not patterned. Specifically, 1 mum thick PZT printed features had a relative permittivity of 1050 +/- 10 and a loss tangent of 2.0 +/- 0.4 % at 10 kHz; remanent polarization was 30 +/- 0.4 muC/cm 2 and the coercive field was 45 +/- 1 kV/cm; and a piezoelectric coefficient e31,f of -7 +/- 0.4 C/m2. No pinching in the minor hysteresis loops or splitting of the first order reversal curve (FORC) distributions was observed. Non-uniform distribution of the solution over the printed area becomes more problematic as feature size is decreased. This resulted in solutions printed from 5 mum wide raised features exhibiting a parabolic shape with sidewall angles of ˜ 1 degree. As an alternative, printing solutions from recesses in the stamp surface resulted in more uniform solution thickness

  11. Correlation of electron backscatter diffraction and piezoresponse force microscopy for the nanoscale characterization of ferroelectric domains in polycrystalline lead zirconate titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, T. L.; Weaver, P. M.; Blackburn, J. F.; Stewart, M.; Cain, M. G.

    2010-08-01

    The functional properties of ferroelectric ceramic bulk or thin film materials are strongly influenced by their nanostructure, crystallographic orientation, and structural geometry. In this paper, we show how, by combining textural analysis, through electron backscattered diffraction, with piezoresponse force microscopy, quantitative measurements of the piezoelectric properties can be made at a scale of 25 nm, smaller than the domain size. The combined technique is used to obtain data on the domain-resolved effective single crystal piezoelectric response of individual crystallites in Pb(Zr0.4Ti0.6)O3 ceramics. The results offer insight into the science of domain engineering and provide a tool for the future development of new nanostructured ferroelectric materials for memory, nanoactuators, and sensors based on magnetoelectric multiferroics.

  12. Integration of PLZT and BST family oxides with GaN[Lead Lanthanum Zirconate Titanate, Barium Strontium Titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Osinsky, A.V.; Fuflyigin, V.N.; Wang, F.

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in the processing of complex-oxide materials has allowed the authors to monolithically grow ferroelectrics of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) and barium strontium titanate (BST) systems on a GaN/sapphire structure. High quality films of PLZT and BST were grown on GaN/c-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in a thickness range of 0.3--5 {micro}m by a sol-gel technique. Field-induced birefringence, as large as 0.02, was measured from a PLZT layer grown on a buffered GaN/sapphire structure. UV illumination was found to result in more symmetrical electrooptic hysteresis loop. BST films on GaN demonstrated a low frequency dielectric constant of up to 800more » with leakage current density as low as 5.5 {center_dot} 10{sup {minus}8} A/cm{sup 2}.« less

  13. Degradation of lead-zirconate-titanate ceramics under different dc loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balke, Nina; Granzow, Torsten; Rödel, Jürgen

    2009-05-01

    During poling and application in actuators, piezoelectric ceramics like lead-zirconate-titanate are exposed to static or cyclically varying electric fields, often leading to pronounced changes in the electromechanical properties. These fatigue phenomena depend on time, peak electric load, and temperature. Although this process impacts the performance of many actuator materials, its physical understanding remains elusive. This paper proposes a set of key experiments to systematically investigate the changes in the ferroelectric hysteresis, field-dependent relative permittivity, and piezoelectric coefficient after submitting the material to dc loads of varying amplitude and duration. The observed effects are explained based on a model of domain stabilization due to charge accumulation at domain boundaries.

  14. Ferroelectric properties of substituted barium titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Parveen; Singh, Sangeeta; Juneja, J. K.; Prakash, Chandra; Raina, K. K.

    2009-06-01

    Barium titanate (BT) is among the most studied ferroelectric material which has been used in various forms, e.g. bulk, thin and thick film, powder, in a number of applications. In order to achieve a material with desired properties, it is modified with a variety of substituents. Most common substituents have been strontium, calcium and zirconium. Here we report studies on lead and zirconium substituted BT. The material series with compositional formula Ba 0.80Pb 0.20Ti 1-xZr xO 3 with, 0< x<0.1 was chosen for investigations. The material was synthesized by solid state reaction method. Reacted powder compacted in form of circular discs were sintered in the range of 1300 °C. All the samples were subjected to X-ray analysis and found to be single phase. Ferroelectric properties were studied as a function of composition and temperature. Pr/ Ps ratio was determined. It was found to decrease with increase in x.

  15. Chemical Synthesis of Porous Barium Titanate Thin Film and Thermal Stabilization of Ferroelectric Phase by Porosity-Induced Strain.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norihiro; Osada, Minoru; Billah, Motasim; Bando, Yoshio; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hossain, Shahriar A

    2018-03-27

    Barium titanate (BaTiO3, hereafter BT) is an established ferroelectric material first discovered in the 1940s and still widely used because of its well-balanced ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, and dielectric constant. In addition, BT does not contain any toxic elements. Therefore, it is considered to be an eco-friendly material, which has attracted considerable interest as a replacement for lead zirconate titanate (PZT). However, bulk BT loses its ferroelectricity at approximately 130 °C, thus, it cannot be used at high temperatures. Because of the growing demand for high-temperature ferroelectric materials, it is important to enhance the thermal stability of ferroelectricity in BT. In previous studies, strain originating from the lattice mismatch at hetero-interfaces has been used. However, the sample preparation in this approach requires complicated and expensive physical processes, which are undesirable for practical applications. In this study, we propose a chemical synthesis of a porous material as an alternative means of introducing strain. We synthesized a porous BT thin film using a surfactant-assisted sol-gel method, in which self-assembled amphipathic surfactant micelles were used as an organic template. Through a series of studies, we clarified that the introduction of pores had a similar effect on distorting the BT crystal lattice, to that of a hetero-interface, leading to the enhancement and stabilization of ferroelectricity. Owing to its simplicity and cost effectiveness, this fabrication process has considerable advantages over conventional methods.

  16. Chemical Synthesis of Porous Barium Titanate Thin Film and Thermal Stabilization of Ferroelectric Phase by Porosity-Induced Strain

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Norihiro; Osada, Minoru; Billah, Motasim; Bando, Yoshio; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hossain, Shahriar A.

    2018-01-01

    Barium titanate (BaTiO3, hereafter BT) is an established ferroelectric material first discovered in the 1940s and still widely used because of its well-balanced ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, and dielectric constant. In addition, BT does not contain any toxic elements. Therefore, it is considered to be an eco-friendly material, which has attracted considerable interest as a replacement for lead zirconate titanate (PZT). However, bulk BT loses its ferroelectricity at approximately 130 °C, thus, it cannot be used at high temperatures. Because of the growing demand for high-temperature ferroelectric materials, it is important to enhance the thermal stability of ferroelectricity in BT. In previous studies, strain originating from the lattice mismatch at hetero-interfaces has been used. However, the sample preparation in this approach requires complicated and expensive physical processes, which are undesirable for practical applications. In this study, we propose a chemical synthesis of a porous material as an alternative means of introducing strain. We synthesized a porous BT thin film using a surfactant-assisted sol-gel method, in which self-assembled amphipathic surfactant micelles were used as an organic template. Through a series of studies, we clarified that the introduction of pores had a similar effect on distorting the BT crystal lattice, to that of a hetero-interface, leading to the enhancement and stabilization of ferroelectricity. Owing to its simplicity and cost effectiveness, this fabrication process has considerable advantages over conventional methods. PMID:29658917

  17. Nonlinearity and Scaling Behavior in Lead Zirconate Titanate Piezoceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, V.

    1998-03-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of the nonlinear dielectric and electromechanical response of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoceramics are presented. The piezoelectric strain of a series of donor doped (soft PZT) and acceptor doped (hard PZT) polycrystalline systems was measured under quasistatic (nonresonant) conditions. The measuring field was applied both parallel and perpendicular to the poling direction of the ceramic in order to investigate the influence of different symmetry conditions. Dielectric properties were studied in addition to the electromechanical measurements which enables us to compare piezoelectric and dielectric nonlinearities. Due to the different level and type of dopants, the piezoceramics examined differ significantly with regard to its Curie temperature (190^o Cferroelectric domain walls with individual depinning threshold whereas in large fields E>E_c2 the

  18. Pyroelectric response of lead zirconate titanate thin films on silicon: Effect of thermal stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesim, M. T.; Zhang, J.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Mantese, J. V.; Whatmore, R. W.; Alpay, S. P.

    2013-11-01

    Ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate [Pb(ZrxTi1-xO)3, (PZT x:1-x)] has received considerable interest for applications related to uncooled infrared devices due to its large pyroelectric figures of merit near room temperature, and the fact that such devices are inherently ac coupled, allowing for simplified image post processing. For ferroelectric films made by industry-standard deposition techniques, stresses develop in the PZT layer upon cooling from the processing/growth temperature due to thermal mismatch between the film and the substrate. In this study, we use a non-linear thermodynamic model to investigate the pyroelectric properties of polycrystalline PZT thin films for five different compositions (PZT 40:60, PZT 30:70, PZT 20:80, PZT 10:90, PZT 0:100) on silicon as a function of processing temperature (25-800 °C). It is shown that the in-plane thermal stresses in PZT thin films alter the out-of-plane polarization and the ferroelectric phase transformation temperature, with profound effect on the pyroelectric properties. PZT 30:70 is found to have the largest pyroelectric coefficient (0.042 μC cm-2 °C-1, comparable to bulk values) at a growth temperature of 550 °C; typical to what is currently used for many deposition processes. Our results indicate that it is possible to optimize the pyroelectric response of PZT thin films by adjusting the Ti composition and the processing temperature, thereby, enabling the tailoring of material properties for optimization relative to a specific deposition process.

  19. Effect of off-center ion substitution in morphotropic lead zirconate titanate composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Mohan K.; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Instan, Alvaro A.; Scott, James F.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2017-05-01

    A detailed study of the effect of off-center donor ion (Sc3+) substitution on structural, microstructural, optical, dielectric, electrical, and ferroelectric properties of morphotropic composition of lead zirconate titanate electroceramics with the stoichiometric formula Pb0.85Sc0.10Zr0.53Ti0.47O3 (PSZT) and synthesized using a high energy solid-state reaction technique was carried out. Powder x-ray diffractometry was used to identify the stabilized tetragonal phase (space group P 4 m m ) with considerably reduced tetragonal strain, c /a = 1.005. An analysis of the thermal dependence of the Raman results indicated a smooth displacive (ferroelectric-paraelectric) phase transition as revealed by the observed disappearance of the soft modes A1 (1TO) and A1 (2TO) above 460 K. The dielectric response of Pt/PSZT/Pt metal-ferroelectric-metal capacitors was probed over a wide range of thermal excursions (85-600 K) and ac signal frequencies (102-106 Hz). Thermally activated dynamic and static conduction processes indicate hopping conduction mechanism ( Ea c t ≤ 0.015 eV) and the formation of small polarons caused by the electron and/or hole-lattice (phonon) interaction ( Ea c t ≥ 0.1 eV) at low (100-300 K) and high temperatures (300-600 K), respectively. The reduction in remnant polarization obtained is in good agreement with the largely reduced tetragonal strain observed in this sample, ( Pr ∝ √{c /a -1 } ). DC conduction is dominated by Poole-Frenkel mechanism that assumes a Coulombic attraction between detrapped electrons and positively charged stationary defect species in the polycrystalline matrix.

  20. Development of lead zirconate titanate cantilevers on the micrometer length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher Robert

    The objective of this research project was to fabricate a functional ferroelectric microcantilever from patterned lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films. Cantilevers fabricated from ferroelectric materials have tremendous potential in sensing applications, particularly due to the increased sensitivity that miniaturized devices offer. This thesis highlights and explores a number of the processing issues that hindered the production of a working prototype. PZT is patterned using soft lithography-inspired techniques from a PZT chemical precursor solution derived by the chelation synthesis route. As the ability to pattern ceramic materials derived from sol-gels on the micrometer scale is a relatively new technology, this thesis aims to expand the scientific understanding of new issues that arise when working with these patterned films. For example, the use of Micromolding in Capillaries (MIMIC) to pattern the PZT thin films results in the evolution of topographical distortions from the shape of the original mold during the shrinkage of patterned thin film during drying and sintering. The factors that contribute to this effect have been explained and a new processing technique called MicroChannel Molding (muCM) was developed. This new process combines the advantages of soft lithography with traditional silicon microfabrication techniques to ensure compatibility with current industrial practices. This work lays the foundation for the future production of working ferroelectric microcantilevers. The proposed microfabrication process is described along with descriptions of each processing difficulty that was encountered. Modifications to the process are proposed along with the descriptions of alternative processing techniques that were attempted for the benefit of future researchers. This dissertation concludes with the electronic characterization of micropattemed PZT thin films. To our knowledge, the ferroelectric properties of patterned PZT thin films have never been

  1. Pressure, temperature, and electric field dependence of phase transformations in niobium modified 95/5 lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Wen D.; Carlos Valadez, J.; Gallagher, John A.

    2015-06-28

    Ceramic niobium modified 95/5 lead zirconate-lead titanate (PZT) undergoes a pressure induced ferroelectric to antiferroelectric phase transformation accompanied by an elimination of polarization and a volume reduction. Electric field and temperature drive the reverse transformation from the antiferroelectric to ferroelectric phase. The phase transformation was monitored under pressure, temperature, and electric field loading. Pressures and temperatures were varied in discrete steps from 0 MPa to 500 MPa and 25 °C to 125 °C, respectively. Cyclic bipolar electric fields were applied with peak amplitudes of up to 6 MV m{sup −1} at each pressure and temperature combination. The resulting electric displacement–electric field hysteresis loops weremore » open “D” shaped at low pressure, characteristic of soft ferroelectric PZT. Just below the phase transformation pressure, the hysteresis loops took on an “S” shape, which split into a double hysteresis loop just above the phase transformation pressure. Far above the phase transformation pressure, when the applied electric field is insufficient to drive an antiferroelectric to ferroelectric phase transformation, the hysteresis loops collapse to linear dielectric behavior. Phase stability maps were generated from the experimental data at each of the temperature steps and used to form a three dimensional pressure–temperature–electric field phase diagram.« less

  2. Active layers of high-performance lead zirconate titanate at temperatures compatible with silicon nano- and microeletronic [corrected] devices.

    PubMed

    Bretos, Iñigo; Jiménez, Ricardo; Tomczyk, Monika; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Vilarinho, Paula M; Calzada, M Lourdes

    2016-02-03

    Applications of ferroelectric materials in modern microelectronics will be greatly encouraged if the thermal incompatibility between inorganic ferroelectrics and semiconductor devices is overcome. Here, solution-processable layers of the most commercial ferroelectric compound--morphotrophic phase boundary lead zirconate titanate, namely Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT)--are grown on silicon substrates at temperatures well below the standard CMOS process of semiconductor technology. The method, potentially transferable to a broader range of Zr:Ti ratios, is based on the addition of crystalline nanoseeds to photosensitive solutions of PZT resulting in perovskite crystallization from only 350 °C after the enhanced decomposition of metal precursors in the films by UV irradiation. A remanent polarization of 10.0 μC cm(-2) is obtained for these films that is in the order of the switching charge densities demanded for FeRAM devices. Also, a dielectric constant of ~90 is measured at zero voltage which exceeds that of current single-oxide candidates for capacitance applications. The multifunctionality of the films is additionally demonstrated by their pyroelectric and piezoelectric performance. The potential integration of PZT layers at such low fabrication temperatures may redefine the concept design of classical microelectronic devices, besides allowing inorganic ferroelectrics to enter the scene of the emerging large-area, flexible electronics.

  3. Active layers of high-performance lead zirconate titanate at temperatures compatible with silicon nano- and microelecronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Bretos, Iñigo; Jiménez, Ricardo; Tomczyk, Monika; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Vilarinho, Paula M.; Calzada, M. Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Applications of ferroelectric materials in modern microelectronics will be greatly encouraged if the thermal incompatibility between inorganic ferroelectrics and semiconductor devices is overcome. Here, solution-processable layers of the most commercial ferroelectric compound ─ morphotrophic phase boundary lead zirconate titanate, namely Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) ─ are grown on silicon substrates at temperatures well below the standard CMOS process of semiconductor technology. The method, potentially transferable to a broader range of Zr:Ti ratios, is based on the addition of crystalline nanoseeds to photosensitive solutions of PZT resulting in perovskite crystallization from only 350 °C after the enhanced decomposition of metal precursors in the films by UV irradiation. A remanent polarization of 10.0 μC cm−2 is obtained for these films that is in the order of the switching charge densities demanded for FeRAM devices. Also, a dielectric constant of ~90 is measured at zero voltage which exceeds that of current single-oxide candidates for capacitance applications. The multifunctionality of the films is additionally demonstrated by their pyroelectric and piezoelectric performance. The potential integration of PZT layers at such low fabrication temperatures may redefine the concept design of classical microelectronic devices, besides allowing inorganic ferroelectrics to enter the scene of the emerging large-area, flexible electronics. PMID:26837240

  4. Ferroelectric relaxor behaviour and impedance spectroscopy of Bi2O3-doped barium zirconium titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Sandeep; Thakur, O P; Bhattacharya, D K; Sreenivas, K

    2009-03-01

    Bi2O3-doped barium zirconate titanate ceramics, Ba1-xBix(Zr0.05Ti0.95)O3, have been prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction method. The ferroelectric relaxor behaviour and dielectric properties have been investigated in detail. By XRD analysis, it is suggested that up to x = 0.04, Bi3+ substitutes A-site ion, and thereafter with higher Bi3+ content, it enters the B-site sub lattice. Substitution of Bi3+ ions induces ferroelectric relaxor behaviour and the degree of relaxation behaviour increases with bismuth concentration. The remanent polarization and strain behaviour show a slight increase with the substitution level. The degree of hysteresis (strain versus electric field) also reduces from 21.4% to 4.6% with bismuth substitution. Impedance measurements were made on the prepared sample over a wide range of temperatures (300-723 K) and frequencies (40 Hz-1 MHz), which show the presence of both bulk and grain boundary effects in the material. The bulk and grain boundary conductivities determined from impedance study indicate the Arrhenius-type thermally activated process. Impedance spectroscopy is shown to be an efficient method capable of detecting the contributions of the resistances of grains and grain boundaries to the complex impedance of a ceramic system, accurately estimating its electrical conductivity as well as its corresponding activation energies and drawing conclusions on its structural properties.

  5. Physically based DC lifetime model for lead zirconate titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garten, Lauren M.; Hagiwara, Manabu; Ko, Song Won; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2017-09-01

    Accurate lifetime predictions for Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 thin films are critical for a number of applications, but current reliability models are not consistent with the resistance degradation mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate. In this work, the reliability and lifetime of chemical solution deposited (CSD) and sputtered Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 thin films are characterized using highly accelerated lifetime testing (HALT) and leakage current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Temperature dependent HALT results and impedance spectroscopy show activation energies of approximately 1.2 eV for the CSD films and 0.6 eV for the sputtered films. The voltage dependent HALT results are consistent with previous reports, but do not clearly indicate what causes device failure. To understand more about the underlying physical mechanisms leading to degradation, the I-V data are fit to known conduction mechanisms, with Schottky emission having the best-fit and realistic extracted material parameters. Using the Schottky emission equation as a base, a unique model is developed to predict the lifetime under highly accelerated testing conditions based on the physical mechanisms of degradation.

  6. Direct-Write Laser Grayscale Lithography for Multilayer Lead Zirconate Titanate Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Robert R; Jordan, Delaney M; Smith, Gabriel L; Polcawich, Ronald G; Bedair, Sarah S; Potrepka, Daniel M

    2018-05-01

    Direct-write laser grayscale lithography has been used to facilitate a single-step patterning technique for multilayer lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films. A 2.55- -thick photoresist was patterned with a direct-write laser. The intensity of the laser was varied to create both tiered and sloped structures that are subsequently transferred into multilayer PZT(52/48) stacks using a single Ar ion-mill etch. Traditional processing requires a separate photolithography step and an ion mill etch for each layer of the substrate, which can be costly and time consuming. The novel process allows access to buried electrode layers in the multilayer stack in a single photolithography step. The grayscale process was demonstrated on three 150-mm diameter Si substrates configured with a 0.5- -thick SiO 2 elastic layer, a base electrode of Pt/TiO 2 , and a stack of four PZT(52/48) thin films of either 0.25- thickness per layer or 0.50- thickness per layer, and using either Pt or IrO 2 electrodes above and below each layer. Stacked capacitor structures were patterned and results will be reported on the ferroelectric and electromechanical properties using various wiring configurations and compared to comparable single layer PZT configurations.

  7. Study of samarium modified lead zirconate titanate and nickel zinc ferrite composite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Rekha; Juneja, J. K.; Singh, Sangeeta; Raina, K. K.; Prakash, Chandra

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, composites of samarium substituted lead zirconate titanate and nickel zinc ferrite with compositional formula 0.95Pb1-3x/2 SmxZr0.65Ti0.35O3-0.05Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4 (x=0, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03) were prepared by the conventional solid state route. X-ray diffraction analysis was carried out to confirm the coexistence of individual phases. Microstructural study was done by using scanning electron microscope. Dielectric constant and loss were studied as a function of temperature and frequency. To study ferroelectric and magnetic properties of the composite samples, corresponding P-E and M-H hysteresis loops were recorded. Change in magnetic properties of electrically poled composite sample (x=0.02) was studied to confirm the magnetoelectric (ME) coupling. ME coefficient (dE/dH) of the samples (x=0 and 0.02) was measured as a function of DC magnetic field.

  8. Cold sintering and electrical characterization of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dixiong; Guo, Hanzheng; Morandi, Carl S.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a cold sintering process for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ceramics and the associated processing-property relations. Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 has a very small, incongruent solubility that is a challenge during cold sintering. To circumvent this, a Pb(NO3)2 solution was used as the transient liquid phase. A bimodal lead zirconate titanate powder was densified to a relative density of 89% by cold sintering at 300 °C and 500 MPa. After the cold sintering step, the permittivity was 200, and the dielectric loss was 2.0%. A second heat-treatment involving a 3 h anneal at 900 °C increased the relative density to 99%; the resulting relative dielectric permittivity was 1300 at room temperature and 100 kHz. The samples showed well-defined ferroelectric hysteresis loops, having a remanent polarization of 28 μC/cm2. On poling, the piezoelectric coefficient d33 was ˜200 pC/N. With a 700 °C 3 h post-annealing, samples show a lower room temperature relative permittivity (950 at 100 kHz), but a 24 h hold time at 700 °C produces ceramics where there is an improved relative dielectric constant (1050 at 100 kHz).

  9. Characterization methodology for lead zirconate titanate thin films with interdigitated electrode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigon, R.; Raeder, T. M.; Muralt, P.

    2017-05-01

    The accurate evaluation of ferroelectric thin films operated with interdigitated electrodes is quite a complex task. In this article, we show how to correct the electric field and the capacitance in order to obtain identical polarization and CV loops for all geometrical variants. The simplest model is compared with corrections derived from Schwartz-Christoffel transformations, and with finite element simulations. The correction procedure is experimentally verified, giving almost identical curves for a variety of gaps and electrode widths. It is shown that the measured polarization change corresponds to the average polarization change in the center plane between the electrode fingers, thus at the position where the electric field is most homogeneous with respect to the direction and size. The question of maximal achievable polarization in the various possible textures, and compositional types of polycrystalline lead zirconate titanate thin films is revisited. In the best case, a soft (110) textured thin film with the morphotropic phase boundary composition should yield a value of 0.95Ps, and in the worst case, a rhombohedral (100) textured thin film should deliver a polarization of 0.74Ps.

  10. Evaluation of antibacterial properties of Barium Zirconate Titanate (BZT) nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Simin; Aghayan, Mahdi; Ghorani-Azam, Adel; Behdani, Mohammad; Asoodeh, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    So far, the antibacterial activity of some organic and inorganic compounds has been studied. Barium zirconate titanate [Ba(ZrxTi1-x)O3] (x = 0.05) nanoparticle is an example of inorganic materials. In vitro studies have provided evidence for the antibacterial activity of this nanoparticle. In the current study, the nano-powder was synthesized by sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction showed that the powder was single-phase and had a perovskite structure at the calcination temperature of 1000 °C. Antibacterial activity of the desired nanoparticle was assessed on two gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus PTCC1431 and Micrococcus luteus PTCC1625) and two gram-negative (Escherichia coli HP101BA 7601c and clinically isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacteria according to Radial Diffusion Assay (RDA). The results showed that the antibacterial activity of BZT nano-powder on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was acceptable. The minimum inhibitory concentration of this nano-powder was determined. The results showed that MIC values for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus were about 2.3 μg/mL, 7.3 μg/mL, 3 μg/mL and 12 μg/mL, respectively. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was also evaluated and showed that the growth of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus could be decreased at 2.3, 14, 3 and 18 μg/mL of BZT. Average log reduction in viable bacteria count in time-kill assay ranged between 6 Log10 cfu/mL to zero after 24 h of incubation with BZT nanoparticle. PMID:25763046

  11. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors based on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Peng

    2001-12-01

    In this thesis, modeling, fabrication and testing of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometers based on piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) films are investigated. Three different types of structures, cantilever beam, trampoline, and annular diaphragm, are studied. It demonstrates the high-performance, miniaturate, mass-production-compatible, and potentially circuitry-integratable piezoelectric-type PZT MEMS devices. Theoretical models of the cantilever-beam and trampoline accelerometers are derived via structural dynamics and the constitutive equations of piezoelectricity. The time-dependent transverse vibration equations, mode shapes, resonant frequencies, and sensitivities of the accelerometers are calculated through the models. Optimization of the silicon and PZT thickness is achieved with considering the effects of the structural dynamics, the material properties, and manufacturability for different accelerometer specifications. This work is the first demonstration of the fabrication of bulk-micromachined accelerometers combining a deep-trench reactive ion etching (DRIE) release strategy and thick piezoelectric PZT films deposited using a sol-gel method. Processing challenges which are overcome included materials compatibility, metallization, processing of thick layers, double-side processing, deep-trench silicon etching, post-etch cleaning and process integration. In addition, the processed PZT films are characterized by dielectric, ferroelectric (polarization electric-field hysteresis), and piezoelectric measurements and no adverse effects are found. Dynamic frequency response and impedance resonance measurements are performed to ascertain the performance of the MEMS accelerometers. The results show high sensitivities and broad frequency ranges of the piezoelectric-type PZT MEMS accelerometers; the sensitivities range from 0.1 to 7.6 pC/g for resonant frequencies ranging from 44.3 kHz to 3.7 kHz. The sensitivities were compared to

  12. Giant actuation strain nearly 0.6% in a periodically orthogonal poled lead titanate zirconate ceramic via reversible domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faxin; Wang, Qiangzhong; Miao, Hongchen

    2017-08-01

    The widely used ferroelectric ceramics based actuators always suffer from small output strains (typically ˜0.1%-0.15%). Non-180° domain switching can generate a large strain in ferroelectrics but it is usually irreversible. In this work, we tailored the domain structures in a soft lead titanate zirconate (PZT) ceramic by periodical orthogonal poling. The non-180° switching in this domain-engineered PZT ceramics turns to be reversible, resulting in a local giant actuation strain of nearly 0.6% under a field of 2 kV/mm at 0.1 Hz. The large interfacial stresses between regions with different poling directions during electric loading/unloading were thought to be responsible for the reversible non-180° domain switching. The switching strain drops quickly with the increasing frequency, and stabilized at about 0.2% at or above 1.0 Hz. The large actuation strain remains quite stable after 104 cycles of loading, which is very promising for low-frequency, large-strain actuators.

  13. Fabrication of lead zirconate titanate actuator via suspension polymerization casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Weiguo

    2000-10-01

    The research presented herein has focused on the fabrication of a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) telescopic actuator from Suspension Polymerization Casting (SPC). Two systems were studied: an acrylamide-based hydrogel, and an acrylate-based nonaqueous system. Analytical tools such as thermomechanical analysis (TMA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), chemorheology, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were used to investigate the polymerization and burnout processes. The acrylamide hydrogel polymerization casting process used hydroxymethyl acrylamide (HMAM) monofunctional monomer with methylenebisacrylamide (MBAM) difunctional monomer, or used methacrylamide (MAM) as monofunctional monomer. High solid loading PZT slurries with low viscosities were obtained by optimizing the amounts of dispersant and the PZT powders. The overall activation energy of gelation was calculated to be 60--76 kJ/mol for the monomer solution, this energy was increased to 91 kJ/mol with the addition of PZT powder. The results show that the PZT powder has a retardation effect on gelation. Although several PZT tubes were made using the acrylamide-based system, the demolding and drying difficulties made this process unsuitable for building internal structures, such as the telescopic actuator. The acrylate-based system was used successfully to build telescopic actuator. Efforts were made to study the influence of composition and experimental conditions on the polymerization process. Temperature was found to have the largest impact on polymerization. To adjust the polymerization temperature and time, initiator and/or catalyst were used. PZT powder has a catalytic effect on the polymerization process. Compared with acrylamide systems, acrylate provided a strong polymer network to support the ceramic green body. This high strength is beneficial for the demolding process, but it can easily cause cracks during the burnout process. To solve the burnout issue

  14. Lead zirconate titanate nanowire textile nanogenerator for wearable energy-harvesting and self-powered devices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weiwei; Bai, Suo; Yuan, Miaomiao; Qin, Yong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Jing, Tao

    2012-07-24

    Wearable nanogenerators are of vital importance to portable energy-harvesting and personal electronics. Here we report a method to synthesize a lead zirconate titanate textile in which nanowires are parallel with each other and a procedure to make it into flexible and wearable nanogenerators. The nanogenerator can generate 6 V output voltage and 45 nA output current, which are large enough to power a liquid crystal display and a UV sensor.

  15. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based thin film capacitors for embedded passive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyun

    Investigations on the key processing parameters and properties relationship for lead zirconate titanate (PZT, 52/48) based thin film capacitors for embedded passive capacitor application were performed using electroless Ni coated Cu foils as substrates. Undoped and Ca-doped PZT (52/48) thin film capacitors were prepared on electroless Ni coated Cu foil by chemical solution deposition. For PZT (52/48) thin film capacitors on electroless Ni coated Cu foil, voltage independent (zero tunability) capacitance behavior was observed. Dielectric constant reduced to more than half of the identical capacitor processed on Pt/SiO2/Si. Dielectric properties of the capacitors were mostly dependent on the crystallization temperature. Capacitance densities of almost 350 nF/cm2 and 0.02˜0.03 of loss tangent were routinely measured for capacitors crystallized at 575˜600°C. Leakage current showed dependence on film thickness and crystallization temperature. From a two-capacitor model, the existence of a low permittivity interface layer (permittivity ˜30) was suggested. For Ca-doped PZT (52/48) thin film capacitors prepared on Pt, typical ferroelectric and dielectric properties were measured up to 5 mol% Ca doping. When Ca-doped PZT (52/48) thin film capacitors were prepared on electroless Ni coated Cu foil, phase stability was influenced by Ca doping and phosphorous content. Dielectric properties showed dependence on the crystallization temperature and phosphorous content. Capacitance density of ˜400 nF/cm2 was achieved, which is an improvement by more than 30% compared to undoped composition. Ca doping also reduced the temperature coefficient of capacitance (TCC) less than 10%, all of them were consistent in satisfying the requirements of embedded passive capacitor. Leakage current density was not affected significantly by doping. To tailor the dielectric and reliability properties, ZrO2 was selected as buffer layer between PZT and electroless Ni. Only RF magnetron sputtering

  16. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; ...

    2014-11-17

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr 0 .5Ti 0 .5O 3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 10 15 neutrons/cm 2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which themore » effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.« less

  17. Thermostable ferroelectric capacitors based on graded films of barium strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumarkin, A. V.; Razumov, S. V.; Volpyas, V. A.; Gagarin, A. G.; Odinets, A. A.; Zlygostov, M. V.; Sapego, E. N.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of the pressure of working gas during the ion-plasma sputtering on properties of deposited ferroelectric barium strontium titanate coatings has been experimentally studied. Variations in the of pressure of the working gas during deposition allows the component composition of the deposited layer to be changed, which leads to the diffusion of the phase transition and the improvement of temperature stability of properties of ferroelectric film. The gradation of layers has an impact on the temperature of the dielectric permittivity maximum, the shape of the dependence of the capacity on temperature, and the capacitance-voltage characteristics of the capacitor structures.

  18. Correlation among oxygen vacancies in bismuth titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wei; Chen Kai; Yao Yangyang

    2004-11-15

    Pure Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} ceramics were prepared using the conventional solid-state reaction method and their dielectric properties were investigated. A dielectric loss peak with the relaxation-type characteristic was observed at about 370 K at 100 Hz frequency. This peak was confirmed to be associated with the migration of oxygen vacancies inside ceramics. The Cole-Cole fitting to this peak reveals a strong correlation among oxygen vacancies and this strong correlation is considered to commonly exist among oxygen vacancies in ferroelectrics. Therefore, the migration of oxygen vacancies in ferroelectric materials would demonstrate a collective behavior instead of an individual one duemore » to this strong correlation. Furthermore, this correlation is in proportion to the concentration and in inverse proportion to the activation energy of oxygen vacancies. These results could be helpful to the understanding of the fatigue mechanisms in ferroelectric materials.« less

  19. Ferromagnetism induced by entangled charge and orbital orderings in ferroelectric titanate perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Bristowe, N. C.; Varignon, J.; Fontaine, D.; Bousquet, E.; Ghosez, Ph.

    2015-01-01

    In magnetic materials, the Pauli exclusion principle typically drives anti-alignment between electron spins on neighbouring species resulting in antiferromagnetic behaviour. Ferromagnetism exhibiting spontaneous spin alignment is a fairly rare behaviour, but once materialized is often associated with itinerant electrons in metals. Here we predict and rationalize robust ferromagnetism in an insulating oxide perovskite structure based on the popular titanate series. In half-doped layered titanates, the combination of Jahn–Teller and oxygen breathing motions opens a band gap and creates an unusual charge and orbital ordering of the Ti d electrons. It is argued that this intriguingly intricate electronic network favours the elusive inter-site ferromagnetic (FM) ordering, on the basis of intra-site Hund's rules. Finally, we find that the layered oxides are also ferroelectric with a spontaneous polarization approaching that of BaTiO3. The concepts are general and design principles of the technologically desirable FM ferroelectric multiferroics are presented. PMID:25807180

  20. Dielectric properties of rare earth (Sm and La) substituted lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipti, Singh, Sangeeta; Juneja, J. K.; Raina, K. K.; Prakash, Chandra

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper, we are reporting the studies on dielectric properties of Lanthanum (La) and Samarium (Sm) substituted Lead Zirconate Titanate with compositional formula Pb(1.02-x)SmxZr0.55Ti0.45O3 and Pb(1.02-x)LaxZr0.55Ti0.45O3 with x = 0.00, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03. The materials were synthesized by solid state reaction route. XRD analysis shows that all the samples be in single phase with tetragonal structure. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of temperature.

  1. Investigation of the effect of temperature on aging behavior of Fe-doped lead zirconate titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promsawat, Napatporn; Promsawat, Methee; Janphuang, Pattanaphong; Marungsri, Boonruang; Luo, Zhenhua; Pojprapai, Soodkhet

    The aging degradation behavior of Fe-doped Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) subjected to different heat-treated temperatures was investigated over 1000h. The aging degradation in the piezoelectric properties of PZT was indicated by the decrease in piezoelectric charge coefficient, electric field-induced strain and remanent polarization. It was found that the aging degradation became more pronounced at temperature above 50% of the PZT’s Curie temperature. A mathematical model based on the linear logarithmic stretched exponential function was applied to explain the aging behavior. A qualitative aging model based on polar macrodomain switchability was proposed.

  2. Anisotropy of domain switching in prepoled lead titanate zirconate ceramics under multiaxial electrical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Ming; Li, Fa-Xin; Fang, Dai-Ning

    2007-01-01

    The authors report an observation of anisotropic domain switching process in prepoled lead titanate zirconate (PZT) ceramics under multiaxial electrical loading. Prepoled PZT blocks were obliquely cut to apply an electric field at discrete angles θ (0°-180°) to the initial poling direction. Both the coercive field and switchable polarization are found to decrease significantly when sinθ increases from zero to unity. The measured strain curves show that most domains that accomplished 180° domain switching actually experienced two successive 90° switching. The oriented domain texture after poling plus the induced nonuniform stress are used to explain the observed domain switching anisotropy.

  3. Compact piezoelectric micromotor with a single bulk lead zirconate titanate stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Lan, Hua; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I.-Ming

    2013-04-01

    The advance of micro/nanotechnology promotes the development of micromotors in recent years. In this article, a compact piezoelectric ultrasonic micromotor with a single bulk lead zirconate titanate stator is proposed. A traveling wave is generated by superposition of bending modes with 90° phase difference excited by d15 inverse piezoelectric effects. The operating principle simplifies the system structure significantly, and provides a miniaturization solution. A research prototype with the size of 0.75× 0.75×1.55 mm is developed. It can produce start-up torque of 0.27μNmand maximum speed of 2760 r/min at 14RMS.

  4. Influence of crystal phases on electro-optic properties of epitaxially grown lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Shin; Seki, Atsushi; Masuda, Yoichiro

    2010-02-01

    We describe here how we have improved the crystal qualities and controlled the crystal phase of the lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) film without changing the composition ratio using an oxygen-pressure crystallization process. A PLZT film deposited on a SrTiO3 substrate with the largest electro-optic (EO) coefficient of 498 pm/V has been achieved by controlling the crystal phase of the film. Additionally, a fatigue-free lead zirconate titanate (PZT) capacitor with platinum electrodes has been realized by reducing the oxygen vacancies in the films.

  5. Residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate thin film tunable dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, L. M., E-mail: lmg309@psu.edu; Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Lam, P.

    2014-07-28

    Loss reduction is critical to develop Ba{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} thin film tunable microwave dielectric components and dielectric energy storage devices. The presence of ferroelectricity, and hence the domain wall contributions to dielectric loss, will degrade the tunable performance in the microwave region. In this work, residual ferroelectricity—a persistent ferroelectric response above the global phase transition temperature—was characterized in tunable dielectrics using Rayleigh analysis. Chemical solution deposited Ba{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}TiO{sub 3} films, with relative tunabilities of 86% over 250 kV/cm at 100 kHz, demonstrated residual ferroelectricity 65 °C above the ostensible paraelectric transition temperature. Frequency dispersion observed in the dielectric temperature response wasmore » consistent with the presence of nanopolar regions as one source of residual ferroelectricity. The application of AC electric field for the Rayleigh analysis of these samples led to a doubling of the dielectric loss for fields over 10 kV/cm at room temperature.« less

  6. Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Chunlei; Koval, Vladimir; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; McKinnon, Ruth; Viola, Giuseppe; Yan, Haixue

    2015-01-01

    Grain size effects on the physical properties of polycrystalline ferroelectrics have been extensively studied for decades; however there are still major controversies regarding the dependence of the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties on the grain size. Dense BaTiO3 ceramics with different grain sizes were fabricated by either conventional sintering or spark plasma sintering using micro- and nano-sized powders. The results show that the grain size effect on the dielectric permittivity is nearly independent of the sintering method and starting powder used. A peak in the permittivity is observed in all the ceramics with a grain size near 1 μm and can be attributed to a maximum domain wall density and mobility. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 and remnant polarization Pr show diverse grain size effects depending on the particle size of the starting powder and sintering temperature. This suggests that besides domain wall density, other factors such as back fields and point defects, which influence the domain wall mobility, could be responsible for the different grain size dependence observed in the dielectric and piezoelectric/ferroelectric properties. In cases where point defects are not the dominant contributor, the piezoelectric constant d33 and the remnant polarization Pr increase with increasing grain size. PMID:25951408

  7. Colossal Room-Temperature Electrocaloric Effect in Ferroelectric Polymer Nanocomposites Using Nanostructured Barium Strontium Titanates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangzu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Yang, Tiannan; Li, Qi; Chen, Long-Qing; Jiang, Shenglin; Wang, Qing

    2015-07-28

    The electrocaloric effect (ECE) refers to conversion of thermal to electrical energy of polarizable materials and could form the basis for the next-generation refrigeration and power technologies that are highly efficient and environmentally friendly. Ferroelectric materials such as ceramic and polymer films exhibit large ECEs, but each of these monolithic materials has its own limitations for practical cooling applications. In this work, nanosized barium strontium titanates with systematically varied morphologies have been prepared to form polymer nanocomposites with the ferroelectric polymer matrix. The solution-processed polymer nanocomposites exhibit an extraordinary room-temperature ECE via the synergistic combination of the high breakdown strength of a ferroelectric polymer matrix and the large change of polarization with temperature of ceramic nanofillers. It is found that a sizable ECE can be generated under both modest and high electric fields, and further enhanced greatly by tailoring the morphology of the ferroelectric nanofillers such as increasing the aspect ratio of the nanoinclusions. The effect of the geometry of the nanofillers on the dielectric permittivity, polarization, breakdown strength, ECE and crystallinity of the ferroelectric polymer has been systematically investigated. Simulations based on the phase-field model have been carried out to substantiate the experimental results. With the remarkable cooling energy density and refrigerant capacity, the polymer nanocomposites are promising for solid-state cooling applications.

  8. Active micromixer for microfluidic systems using lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT)-generated ultrasonic vibration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Goto, H; Matsumoto, M; Maeda, R

    2000-01-01

    A micromixer using direct ultrasonic vibration is first reported in this paper. The ultrasonic vibration was induced by a bulk lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT; 5 x 4 x 0.2 mm), which was excited by a 48 kHz square wave at 150 V (peak-to-peak). Liquids were mixed in a chamber (6 x 6 x 0.06 mm) with an oscillating diaphragm driven by the PZT. The oscillating diaphragm was in the size of 6 x 6 x 0.15 mm. Ethanol and water were used to test the mixing effectiveness. The laminar flows of ethanol (115 microL/min) and water (100 microL/min) were mixed effectively when the PZT was excited. The entire process was recorded using a video camera.

  9. Electromechanical properties of lead zirconate titanate piezoceramics under the influence of mechanical stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q M; Zhao, J

    1999-01-01

    In lead zirconate titanate piezoceramics, external stresses can cause substantial changes in the piezoelectric coefficients, dielectric constant, and elastic compliance due to nonlinear effects and stress depoling effects. In both soft and hard PZT piezoceramics, the aging can produce a memory effect that will facilitate the recovery of the poled state in the ceramics from momentary electric or stress depoling. In hard PZT ceramics, the local defect fields built up during the aging process can stabilize the ceramic against external stress depoling that results in a marked increase in the piezoelectric coefficient and electromechanical coupling factor in the ceramic under the stress. Although soft PZT ceramics can be easily stress depoled (losing piezoelectricity), a DC bias electric field, parallel to the original poling direction, can be employed to maintain the ceramic poling state so that the ceramic can be used at high stresses without depoling.

  10. Substrate clamping effects on irreversible domain wall dynamics in lead zirconate titanate thin films.

    PubMed

    Griggio, F; Jesse, S; Kumar, A; Ovchinnikov, O; Kim, H; Jackson, T N; Damjanovic, D; Kalinin, S V; Trolier-McKinstry, S

    2012-04-13

    The role of long-range strain interactions on domain wall dynamics is explored through macroscopic and local measurements of nonlinear behavior in mechanically clamped and released polycrystalline lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) films. Released films show a dramatic change in the global dielectric nonlinearity and its frequency dependence as a function of mechanical clamping. Furthermore, we observe a transition from strong clustering of the nonlinear response for the clamped case to almost uniform nonlinearity for the released film. This behavior is ascribed to increased mobility of domain walls. These results suggest the dominant role of collective strain interactions mediated by the local and global mechanical boundary conditions on the domain wall dynamics. The work presented in this Letter demonstrates that measurements on clamped films may considerably underestimate the piezoelectric coefficients and coupling constants of released structures used in microelectromechanical systems, energy harvesting systems, and microrobots.

  11. Conformable amplified lead zirconate titanate sensors with enhanced piezoelectric response for cutaneous pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Su, Yewang; Joe, Pauline; Yona, Raissa; Liu, Yuhao; Kim, Yun-Soung; Huang, YongAn; Damadoran, Anoop R; Xia, Jing; Martin, Lane W; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-08-05

    The ability to measure subtle changes in arterial pressure using devices mounted on the skin can be valuable for monitoring vital signs in emergency care, detecting the early onset of cardiovascular disease and continuously assessing health status. Conventional technologies are well suited for use in traditional clinical settings, but cannot be easily adapted for sustained use during daily activities. Here we introduce a conformal device that avoids these limitations. Ultrathin inorganic piezoelectric and semiconductor materials on elastomer substrates enable amplified, low hysteresis measurements of pressure on the skin, with high levels of sensitivity (~0.005 Pa) and fast response times (~0.1 ms). Experimental and theoretical studies reveal enhanced piezoelectric responses in lead zirconate titanate that follow from integration on soft supports as well as engineering behaviours of the associated devices. Calibrated measurements of pressure variations of blood flow in near-surface arteries demonstrate capabilities for measuring radial artery augmentation index and pulse pressure velocity.

  12. Electrical fatigue behaviour in lead zirconate titanate: an experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Mainak; Arockiarajan, A.

    2013-08-01

    A systematic investigation on electrical fatigue in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is carried out for different loading frequencies. Experiments are conducted up to 106 cycles to measure the electrical displacement and longitudinal strain on bulk ceramics in the bipolar mode with large electrical loading conditions. A simplified macroscopic model based on physical mechanisms of domain switching is developed to predict the non-linear behaviour. In this model, the volume fraction of a domain is used as the internal variable by considering the mechanisms of domain nucleation and propagation (domain wall movement). The measured material properties at different fatigue cycles are incorporated into the switching model as damage parameters and the classical strain versus electric field and electric displacement versus electric field curves are simulated. Comparison between the experiments and simulations shows that the proposed model can reproduce the characteristics of non-linear as well as fatigue responses.

  13. Observation of Failure and Domain Switching in Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Sugiyama, Eriko; Sato, Kazuto; Mizuno, Mamoru

    The mechanical and electrical properties (electromechanical coupling coefficient, piezoelectric constant and dielectric constant) of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics are investigated during mechanical static and cyclic loading. There are several failure characteristics which can alter the material properties of PZT ceramics. The elastic constant increases and electrical properties decrease with increasing the applied load. This is due to the internal strain arising from the domain switching. In this case, 90° domain switching occurs anywhere in the samples as the sample is loaded. It is also apparent that electrogenesis occurs several times during cyclic loading to the final fracture. This occurrence is related to the domain switching. The elastic constant and electrical properties can decrease because of crack generation in the PZT ceramics. Moreover, the elastic constant increases with increase of the mechanical load and decreases with decrease of the load. On the contrary, the opposite sense of change of the electrical properties is observed.

  14. Piezoelectric and dielectric performance of poled lead zirconate titanate subjected to electric cyclic fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Lin, Hua-Tay; Mottern, Alexander M.

    2012-02-01

    Poled lead zirconate titanate (PZT) material as a single-layer plate was tested using a piezodilatometer under electric cyclic loading in both unipolar and bipolar modes. Its responses were evaluated using unipolar and bipolar measurements on the same setup. The mechanical strain and charge density loops exhibited various variations when the material was cycled for more than 108 cycles. The various quantities including loop amplitude, hysteresis, switchable polarization, and coercive field were characterized accordingly under the corresponding measurement conditions. At the same time, the offset polarization and bias electric field of the material were observed to be changed and the trend was found to be related to the measurement conditions also. Finally, the piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients were analyzed and their implications for the application of interest have been discussed.

  15. Fatigue responses of lead zirconate titanate stacks under semibipolar electric cycling with mechanical preload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Cooper, Thomas A.; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A.

    2010-10-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stacks that had an interdigital internal electrode configuration were tested to more than 108 cycles. A 100 Hz semibipolar sine wave with a field range of +4.5/-0.9 kV/mm was used in cycling with a concurrently-applied 20 MPa preload. Significant reductions in piezoelectric and dielectric responses were observed during the cycling depending on the measuring condition. Extensive partial discharges were also observed. These surface events resulted in the erosion of external electrode and the exposure of internal electrodes. Sections prepared by sequential polishing technique revealed a variety of damage mechanisms including delaminations, pores, and etch grooves. The scale of damage was correlated with the degree of fatigue-induced reduction in piezoelectric and dielectric responses. The results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using a semibipolar mode to drive a PZT stack under a mechanical preload and illustrate the potential fatigue and damages of the stack in service.

  16. Thermally stimulated processes in samarium-modified lead titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláiz-Barranco, A.; García-Wong, A. C.; González-Abreu, Y.; Gagou, Y.; Saint-Grégoire, P.

    2013-08-01

    The thermally stimulated processes in a samarium-modified lead titanate ferroelectric system are analyzed from the thermally stimulated depolarization discharge current. The discharge due to the space charge injected during the poling process, the pyroelectric response and a conduction process related to oxygen vacancies are evaluated considering a theoretical decomposition by using a numerical method. The pyroelectric response is separated from other components to evaluate the polarization behavior and some pyroelectric parameters. High remanent polarization, pyroelectric coefficient and merit figure values are obtained at room temperature.

  17. Fatigue of extracted lead zirconate titanate multilayer actuators under unipolar high field electric cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lee, Sung Min; Wang, James L.

    Testing of large prototype lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stacks presents substantial technical challenges to electronic testing systems, so an alternative approach that uses subunits extracted from prototypes has been pursued. Extracted 10-layer and 20-layer plate specimens were subjected to an electric cycle test under an electric field of 3.0/0.0 kV/mm, 100 Hz to 10^8 cycles. The effects of measurement field level and stack size (number of PZT layers) on the fatigue responses of piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients were observed. On-line monitoring permitted examination of the fatigue response of the PZT stacks. The fatigue rate (based on on-line monitoring) and themore » fatigue index (based on the conductance spectrum from impedance measurement or small signal measurement) were developed to quantify the fatigue status of the PZT stacks. The controlling fatigue mechanism was analyzed against the fatigue observations. The data presented can serve as input to design optimization of PZT stacks and to operation optimization in critical applications such as piezoelectric fuel injectors in heavy-duty diesel engines.« less

  18. Fatigue of extracted lead zirconate titanate multilayer actuators under unipolar high field electric cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong, E-mail: wangh@ornl.gov; Lee, Sung-Min; Wang, James L.

    Testing of large prototype lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stacks presents substantial technical challenges to electronic testing systems, so an alternative approach that uses subunits extracted from prototypes has been pursued. Extracted 10-layer and 20-layer plate specimens were subjected to an electric cycle test under an electric field of 3.0/0.0 kV/mm, 100 Hz to 10{sup 8} cycles. The effects of measurement field level and stack size (number of PZT layers) on the fatigue responses of piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients were observed. On-line monitoring permitted examination of the fatigue response of the PZT stacks. The fatigue rate (based on on-line monitoring) and the fatiguemore » index (based on the conductance spectrum from impedance measurement or small signal measurement) were developed to quantify the fatigue status of the PZT stacks. The controlling fatigue mechanism was analyzed against the fatigue observations. The data presented can serve as input to design optimization of PZT stacks and to operation optimization in critical applications, such as piezoelectric fuel injectors in heavy-duty diesel engines.« less

  19. Fatigue of extracted lead zirconate titanate multilayer actuators under unipolar high field electric cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hong; Lee, Sung Min; Wang, James L.; ...

    2014-12-19

    Testing of large prototype lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stacks presents substantial technical challenges to electronic testing systems, so an alternative approach that uses subunits extracted from prototypes has been pursued. Extracted 10-layer and 20-layer plate specimens were subjected to an electric cycle test under an electric field of 3.0/0.0 kV/mm, 100 Hz to 10^8 cycles. The effects of measurement field level and stack size (number of PZT layers) on the fatigue responses of piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients were observed. On-line monitoring permitted examination of the fatigue response of the PZT stacks. The fatigue rate (based on on-line monitoring) and themore » fatigue index (based on the conductance spectrum from impedance measurement or small signal measurement) were developed to quantify the fatigue status of the PZT stacks. The controlling fatigue mechanism was analyzed against the fatigue observations. The data presented can serve as input to design optimization of PZT stacks and to operation optimization in critical applications such as piezoelectric fuel injectors in heavy-duty diesel engines.« less

  20. Elution of lead from lead zirconate titanate ceramics to acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumi, Takaaki; Takezawa, Shuhei; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki

    2017-10-01

    The amount of lead that eluted from lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics to artificial acid rain was evaluated. Four kinds of PZT ceramics, namely, pure PZT at MPB composition, CuO-added PZT, PZT with 10 mol % substitution of Ba for Pb, and CuO-added PZT with 10 mol % substitution of Ba for Pb, were used as samples of the elution test. These PZT ceramics of 8 mm2 and 1.1-1.2 mm thickness were suspended in 300 ml of H2SO4 solution of pH 4.0. The concentration of lead eluted from PZT was in the range from 0.2 to 0.8 ppm. It was found that both liquid phase formation by the addition of CuO and the substitution of Ba for Pb were effective to reduce the amount of lead that eluted. By fitting the leaching out curve with a classical equation, a master curve assuming no sampling effect was obtained. The lead concentration evaluated from the amount of lead that eluted from a commercial PZT plate to H2SO4 solution of pH 5.3 was almost the same as the limit in city water. It is concluded that PZT is not harmful to health and the environment and the amount of lead that eluted from PZT can be controlled by modifying PZT composition.

  1. Oxalate co-precipitation synthesis of calcium zirconate and calcium titanate powders.

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew

    2009-06-01

    Fine powders of calcium zirconate (CaZrO{sub 3}, CZ) and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}, CT) were synthesized using a nonaqueous oxalate co-precipitation route from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}4 H{sub 2}O and group(IV) n-butoxides (Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} or Zr(OBu{sup n}){sub 4}). Several reaction conditions and batch sizes (2-35 g) were explored to determine their influence on final particle size, morphology, and phase. Characterization of the as-prepared oxalate precursors, oven dried oxalate precursors (60-90 C), and calcined powders (635-900 C) were analyzed with TGA/DTA, XRD, TEM, and SEM. Densification and sintering studies on pressed CZ pellets at 1375 and 1400 C were also performed.more » Through the developed oxalate co-precipitation route, densification temperatures for CZ were lowered by 125 C from the 1500 C firing temperature required for conventional mixed oxide powders. Low field electrical tests of the CZ pellets indicated excellent dielectric properties with dielectric constants of {approx}30 and a dissipation factor of 0.0004 were measured at 1 kHz.« less

  2. Piezoelectric Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Ring Shaped Contour-Mode MEMS Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasambe, P. V.; Asgaonkar, V. V.; Bangera, A. D.; Lokre, A. S.; Rathod, S. S.; Bhoir, D. V.

    2018-02-01

    Flexibility in setting fundamental frequency of resonator independent of its motional resistance is one of the desired criteria in micro-electromechanical (MEMS) resonator design. It is observed that ring-shaped piezoelectric contour-mode MEMS resonators satisfy this design criterion than in case of rectangular plate MEMS resonators. Also ring-shaped contour-mode piezoelectric MEMS resonator has an advantage that its fundamental frequency is defined by in-plane dimensions, but they show variation of fundamental frequency with different Platinum (Pt) thickness referred as change in ratio of fNEW /fO . This paper presents the effects of variation in geometrical parameters and change in piezoelectric material on the resonant frequencies of Platinum piezoelectric-Aluminium ring-shaped contour-mode MEMS resonators and its electrical parameters. The proposed structure with Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) as the piezoelectric material was observed to be a piezoelectric material with minimal change in fundamental resonant frequency due to Platinum thickness variation. This structure was also found to exhibit extremely low motional resistance of 0.03 Ω as compared to the 31-35 Ω range obtained when using AlN as the piezoelectric material. CoventorWare 10 is used for the design, simulation and corresponding analysis of resonators which is Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis and design tool for MEMS devices.

  3. Non-aqueous electrochemical deposition of lead zirconate titanate films for flexible sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Sherin; Kumar, A. V. Ramesh; John, Reji

    2017-11-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is one of the most important piezoelectric materials widely used for underwater sensors. However, PZTs are hard and non-compliant and hence there is an overwhelming attention devoted toward making it flexible by preparing films on flexible substrates by different routes. In this work, the electrochemical deposition of composition controlled PZT films over flexible stainless steel (SS) foil substrates using non-aqueous electrolyte dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) was carried out. Effects of various key parameters involved in electrochemical deposition process such as current density and time of deposition were studied. It was found that a current density of 25 mA/cm2 for 5 min gave a good film. The morphology and topography evaluation of the films was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively, which showed a uniform morphology with a surface roughness of 2 nm. The PZT phase formation was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and corroborated with Raman spectroscopic studies. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss, hysteresis and I-V characteristics of the film was evaluated.

  4. The Effect of Acceptor and Donor Doping on Oxygen Vacancy Concentrations in Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT).

    PubMed

    Slouka, Christoph; Kainz, Theresa; Navickas, Edvinas; Walch, Gregor; Hutter, Herbert; Reichmann, Klaus; Fleig, Jürgen

    2016-11-22

    The different properties of acceptor-doped (hard) and donor-doped (soft) lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics are often attributed to different amounts of oxygen vacancies introduced by the dopant. Acceptor doping is believed to cause high oxygen vacancy concentrations, while donors are expected to strongly suppress their amount. In this study, La 3+ donor-doped, Fe 3+ acceptor-doped and La 3+ /Fe 3+ -co-doped PZT samples were investigated by oxygen tracer exchange and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in order to analyse the effect of doping on oxygen vacancy concentrations. Relative changes in the tracer diffusion coefficients for different doping and quantitative relations between defect concentrations allowed estimates of oxygen vacancy concentrations. Donor doping does not completely suppress the formation of oxygen vacancies; rather, it concentrates them in the grain boundary region. Acceptor doping enhances the amount of oxygen vacancies but estimates suggest that bulk concentrations are still in the ppm range, even for 1% acceptor doping. Trapped holes might thus considerably contribute to the charge balancing of the acceptor dopants. This could also be of relevance in understanding the properties of hard and soft PZT.

  5. Unexpectedly high piezoelectricity of Sm-doped lead zirconate titanate in the Curie point region.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Shruti B; Nolan, Michelle M; Tutuncu, Goknur; Forrester, Jennifer S; Sapper, Eva; Esteves, Giovanni; Granzow, Torsten; Thomas, Pam A; Nino, Juan C; Rojac, Tadej; Jones, Jacob L

    2018-03-07

    Large piezoelectric coefficients in polycrystalline lead zirconate titanate (PZT) are traditionally achieved through compositional design using a combination of chemical substitution with a donor dopant and adjustment of the zirconium to titanium compositional ratio to meet the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB). In this work, a different route to large piezoelectricity is demonstrated. Results reveal unexpectedly high piezoelectric coefficients at elevated temperatures and compositions far from the MPB. At temperatures near the Curie point, doping with 2 at% Sm results in exceptionally large piezoelectric coefficients of up to 915 pm/V. This value is approximately twice those of other donor dopants (e.g., 477 pm/V for Nb and 435 pm/V for La). Structural changes during the phase transitions of Sm-doped PZT show a pseudo-cubic phase forming ≈50 °C below the Curie temperature. Possible origins of these effects are discussed and the high piezoelectricity is posited to be due to extrinsic effects. The enhancement of the mechanism at elevated temperatures is attributed to the coexistence of tetragonal and pseudo-cubic phases, which enables strain accommodation during electromechanical deformation and interphase boundary motion. This work provides insight into possible routes for designing high performance piezoelectrics which are alternatives to traditional methods relying on MPB compositions.

  6. Fatigue of extracted lead zirconate titanate multilayer actuators under unipolar high field electric cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Lee, Sung-Min; Wang, James L.; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2014-12-01

    Testing of large prototype lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stacks presents substantial technical challenges to electronic testing systems, so an alternative approach that uses subunits extracted from prototypes has been pursued. Extracted 10-layer and 20-layer plate specimens were subjected to an electric cycle test under an electric field of 3.0/0.0 kV/mm, 100 Hz to 108 cycles. The effects of measurement field level and stack size (number of PZT layers) on the fatigue responses of piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients were observed. On-line monitoring permitted examination of the fatigue response of the PZT stacks. The fatigue rate (based on on-line monitoring) and the fatigue index (based on the conductance spectrum from impedance measurement or small signal measurement) were developed to quantify the fatigue status of the PZT stacks. The controlling fatigue mechanism was analyzed against the fatigue observations. The data presented can serve as input to design optimization of PZT stacks and to operation optimization in critical applications, such as piezoelectric fuel injectors in heavy-duty diesel engines.

  7. The Effect of Acceptor and Donor Doping on Oxygen Vacancy Concentrations in Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT)

    PubMed Central

    Slouka, Christoph; Kainz, Theresa; Navickas, Edvinas; Walch, Gregor; Hutter, Herbert; Reichmann, Klaus; Fleig, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The different properties of acceptor-doped (hard) and donor-doped (soft) lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics are often attributed to different amounts of oxygen vacancies introduced by the dopant. Acceptor doping is believed to cause high oxygen vacancy concentrations, while donors are expected to strongly suppress their amount. In this study, La3+ donor-doped, Fe3+ acceptor-doped and La3+/Fe3+-co-doped PZT samples were investigated by oxygen tracer exchange and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in order to analyse the effect of doping on oxygen vacancy concentrations. Relative changes in the tracer diffusion coefficients for different doping and quantitative relations between defect concentrations allowed estimates of oxygen vacancy concentrations. Donor doping does not completely suppress the formation of oxygen vacancies; rather, it concentrates them in the grain boundary region. Acceptor doping enhances the amount of oxygen vacancies but estimates suggest that bulk concentrations are still in the ppm range, even for 1% acceptor doping. Trapped holes might thus considerably contribute to the charge balancing of the acceptor dopants. This could also be of relevance in understanding the properties of hard and soft PZT. PMID:28774067

  8. Effect of bipolar electric fatigue on polarization switching in lead-zirconate-titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Sergey; Fedosov, Sergey; Glaum, Julia; Granzow, Torsten; Genenko, Yuri A.; von Seggern, Heinz

    2010-07-01

    From comparison of experimental results on polarization switching in fresh and electrically fatigued lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) over a wide range of applied fields and switching times it is concluded that fatigue alters the local field distribution inside the sample due to the generation of discrete defects, such as voids and cracks. Such defects have a strong influence on the overall electric field distribution by their shape and dielectric permittivity. On this hypothesis, a new phenomenological model of polarization switching in fatigued PZT is proposed. The model assumes that the fatigued sample can be composed of different local regions which exhibit different field strengths but otherwise can be considered as unfatigued. Consequently the temporal response of a fatigued sample is assumed to be the superposition of the field-dependent temporal responses of unfatigued samples weighted by their respective volume fraction. A certain part of the volume is excluded from the overall switching process due to the domain pinning even at earlier stages of fatigue, which can be recovered by annealing. Suitability of the proposed model is demonstrated by a good correlation between experimental and calculated data for differently fatigued samples. Plausible cause of the formation of such regions is the generation of defects such as microcracks and the change in electrical properties at imperfections such as pores or voids.

  9. MECHANICAL STRENGTH RESPONSES OF POLED LEAD ZIRCONATE TITANATE UNDER EXTREME ELECTRIC FIELD AND VARIOUS TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Zhang, Kewei

    PZT (lead zirconate titanate), particularly PZT-5A, is used in a variety of critical actuation and sensing systems because of its high Curie temperature and large piezoelectric coefficients. However, PZT is susceptible to mechanical failure. The evaluation of the mechanical strength of the material under the target working conditions is very important. This study presents part of the recent experimental developments in mechanical testing and evaluation of PZT materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Ball-on-ring and four-point bending testing setups were used, with modifications made to account for testing requirements from high-level electric field and elevated temperature. The poled PZT-5A ormore » equivalent material was tested under various specimen and testing conditions. The parameters of the distribution of strengths (characteristic strength and Weibull modulus) are discussed in relation to the testing conditions. Fractographic results based on scanning electron microscopy are also presented and discussed. The related data can serve as input for the design of piezoceramic devices, not only those used in energy systems like fuel injectors in heavy-duty diesel engines, but also those used in structural health monitoring, energy harvesting, and other critical systems in aerospace and civil engineering.« less

  10. Nucleation in the presence of long-range interactions. [performed on ferroelectric barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, P.

    1989-01-01

    Unlike droplet nucleation near a liquid-gas critical point, the decay of metastable phases in crystalline materials is strongly affected by the presence of long-range forces. Field quench experiments performed on the ferroelectric barium titanate indicate that nucleation in this material is markedly different from that observed in liquids. In this paper, a theory for nucleation at a first-order phase transition in which the mediating forces are long range is presented. It is found that the long-range force induces cooperative nucleation and growth processes, and that this feedback mechanism produces a well-defined delay time with a sharp onset in the transformation to the stable phase. Closed-form expressions for the characteristic onset time and width of the transition are developed, in good agreement with numerical and experimental results.

  11. Nd and Ru co-doped bismuth titanate polycrystalline thin films with improved ferroelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Kishor Kumar; Singh Rajput, Shailendra; Gupta, Rajeev; Roy, Amritendu; Garg, Ashish

    2018-02-01

    We report the ferroelectric properties of pulsed laser deposited thin films of Nd and Ru co-doped bismuth titanate (Bi4-x Nd x Ti3-y Ru y O12). Structural analysis of the as-grown films, using x-ray diffraction, showed a single-phase formation with a polycrystalline structure. In comparison to un-doped and Nd-doped films, ferroelectric measurements on co-doped films demonstrated improved properties with remnant polarization (P r) ~ 12.5 µC cm-2 and an enhanced electrical fatigue life for Bi3.25Nd0.75Ti2.8Ru0.20O12 films. The enhancement in remanent polarization is attributed to microscopic changes, such as local structural distortion and the modification of the dynamical/effective charges on constituent ions due to chemical strain upon simultaneous Bi- (A) and Ti- (B) site doping with Nd and Ru, which has a far stronger effect than only A-site doping with Nd. Piezoresponse force microscopy further confirmed the polar structure and domain switching at nanoscale. The films exhibit small yet finite magnetization at 10 K resulting from strain.

  12. Losses in Ferroelectric Materials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Wenhua; Cao, Wenwu

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials are the best dielectric and piezoelectric materials known today. Since the discovery of barium titanate in the 1940s, lead zirconate titanate ceramics in the 1950s and relaxor-PT single crystals (such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate and lead zinc niobate-lead titanate) in the 1980s and 1990s, perovskite ferroelectric materials have been the dominating piezoelectric materials for electromechanical devices, and are widely used in sensors, actuators and ultrasonic transducers. Energy losses (or energy dissipation) in ferroelectrics are one of the most critical issues for high power devices, such as therapeutic ultrasonic transducers, large displacement actuators, SONAR projectors, and high frequency medical imaging transducers. The losses of ferroelectric materials have three distinct types, i.e., elastic, piezoelectric and dielectric losses. People have been investigating the mechanisms of these losses and are trying hard to control and minimize them so as to reduce performance degradation in electromechanical devices. There are impressive progresses made in the past several decades on this topic, but some confusions still exist. Therefore, a systematic review to define related concepts and clear up confusions is urgently in need. With this objective in mind, we provide here a comprehensive review on the energy losses in ferroelectrics, including related mechanisms, characterization techniques and collections of published data on many ferroelectric materials to provide a useful resource for interested scientists and engineers to design electromechanical devices and to gain a global perspective on the complex physical phenomena involved. More importantly, based on the analysis of available information, we proposed a general theoretical model to describe the inherent relationships among elastic, dielectric, piezoelectric and mechanical losses. For multi-domain ferroelectric single crystals and ceramics, intrinsic and extrinsic energy

  13. Losses in Ferroelectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Wenhua; Cao, Wenwu

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials are the best dielectric and piezoelectric materials known today. Since the discovery of barium titanate in the 1940s, lead zirconate titanate ceramics in the 1950s and relaxor-PT single crystals (such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate and lead zinc niobate-lead titanate) in the 1980s and 1990s, perovskite ferroelectric materials have been the dominating piezoelectric materials for electromechanical devices, and are widely used in sensors, actuators and ultrasonic transducers. Energy losses (or energy dissipation) in ferroelectrics are one of the most critical issues for high power devices, such as therapeutic ultrasonic transducers, large displacement actuators, SONAR projectors, and high frequency medical imaging transducers. The losses of ferroelectric materials have three distinct types, i.e., elastic, piezoelectric and dielectric losses. People have been investigating the mechanisms of these losses and are trying hard to control and minimize them so as to reduce performance degradation in electromechanical devices. There are impressive progresses made in the past several decades on this topic, but some confusions still exist. Therefore, a systematic review to define related concepts and clear up confusions is urgently in need. With this objective in mind, we provide here a comprehensive review on the energy losses in ferroelectrics, including related mechanisms, characterization techniques and collections of published data on many ferroelectric materials to provide a useful resource for interested scientists and engineers to design electromechanical devices and to gain a global perspective on the complex physical phenomena involved. More importantly, based on the analysis of available information, we proposed a general theoretical model to describe the inherent relationships among elastic, dielectric, piezoelectric and mechanical losses. For multi-domain ferroelectric single crystals and ceramics, intrinsic and extrinsic energy

  14. Transverse piezoelectric coefficient measurement of flexible lead zirconate titanate thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dufay, T.; Guiffard, B.; Seveno, R.

    Highly flexible lead zirconate titanate, Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT), thin films have been realized by modified sol-gel process. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 31} was determined from the tip displacement of bending-mode actuators made of PZT cantilever deposited onto bare or RuO{sub 2} coated aluminium substrate (16 μm thick). The influence of the thickness of ruthenium dioxide RuO{sub 2} and PZT layers was investigated for Pb(Zr{sub 0.57}Ti{sub 0.43})O{sub 3}. The modification of Zr/Ti ratio from 40/60 to 60/40 was done for 3 μm thick PZT thin films onto aluminium (Al) and Al/RuO{sub 2} substrates. A laser vibrometer was used to measure the beammore » displacement under controlled electric field. The experimental results were fitted in order to find the piezoelectric coefficient. Very large tip deflections of about 1 mm under low voltage (∼8 V) were measured for every cantilevers at the resonance frequency (∼180 Hz). For a given Zr/Ti ratio of 58/42, it was found that the addition of a 40 nm thick RuO{sub 2} interfacial layer between the aluminium substrate and the PZT layer induces a remarkable increase of the d{sub 31} coefficient by a factor of 2.7, thus corresponding to a maximal d{sub 31} value of 33 pC/N. These results make the recently developed PZT/Al thin films very attractive for both low frequency bending mode actuating applications and vibrating energy harvesting.« less

  15. Microwave emission from lead zirconate titanate induced by impulsive mechanical load

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, A., E-mail: alexander.aman@ovgu.de; Packaging Group, Institute of Micro- and Sensorsytems, Otto-von-Guericke University, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg; Majcherek, S.

    2015-10-28

    This paper focuses on microwave emission from Lead zirconate titanate Pb [Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}] O{sub 3} (PZT) induced by mechanical stressing. The mechanical stress was initiated by impact of a sharp tungsten indenter on the upper surface of PZT ceramic. The sequences of microwave and current impulses, which flew from indenter to electric ground, were detected simultaneously. The voltage between the upper and lower surface of ceramic was measured to obtain the behavior of mechanical force acting on ceramic during the impact. It was found that the amplitude, form, and frequency of measured microwave impulses were different by compression andmore » restitution phase of impact. Two different mechanisms of electron emission, responsible for microwave impulse generation, were proposed based on the dissimilar impulse behavior. The field emission from tungsten indenter is dominant during compression, whereas ferroemission dominates during restitution phase. Indeed, it was observed that the direction of the current flow, i.e., sign of current impulses is changed by transitions from compression to restitution phase of impact. The observed dissimilar behavior of microwave impulses, caused by increasing and decreasing applied force, can be used to calculate the contact time and behavior of mechanical force during mechanical impact on ceramic surface. It is shown that the generation of microwave impulses exhibits high reproducibility, impulse intensity, a low damping factor, and high mechanical failure resistance. Based on these microwave emission properties of PZT, the development of new type of stress sensor with spatial resolution of few microns becomes possible.« less

  16. Barium titanate nanocrystals and nanocrystal thin films: Synthesis, ferroelectricity, and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Limin; Chen, Zhuoying; Wilson, James D.; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Robinson, Richard D.; Herman, Irving P.; Laibowitz, Robert; O'Brien, Stephen

    2006-08-01

    Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. We report the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of thin (<100nm thick) nanostructured thin films of barium titanate (BaTiO3) built from uniform nanoparticles (<20nm in diameter). We introduce a form of processing as a step toward the ability to prepare textured films based on assembly of nanoparticles. Essential to this approach is an understanding of the nanoparticle as a building block, combined with an ability to integrate them into thin films that have uniform and characteristic electrical properties. Our method offers a versatile means of preparing BaTiO3 nanocrystals, which can be used as a basis for micropatterned or continuous BaTiO3 nanocrystal thin films. We observe the BaTiO3 nanocrystals crystallize with evidence of tetragonality. We investigated the preparation of well-isolated BaTiO3 nanocrystals smaller than 10nm with control over aggregation and crystal densities on various substrates such as Si, Si /SiO2, Si3N4/Si, and Pt-coated Si substrates. BaTiO3 nanocrystal thin films were then prepared, resulting in films with a uniform nanocrystalline grain texture. Electric field dependent polarization measurements show spontaneous polarization and hysteresis, indicating ferroelectric behavior for the BaTiO3 nanocrystalline films with grain sizes in the range of 10-30nm. Dielectric measurements of the films show dielectic constants in the range of 85-90 over the 1KHz -100KHz, with low loss. We present nanocrystals as initial building blocks for the preparation of thin films which exhibit highly uniform nanostructured texture and grain sizes.

  17. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  18. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Land, Cecil E.; Martin, Stephen J.; Pfeifer, Kent B.

    1993-01-01

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image.

  19. Ferroelectric triggering of carbon monoxide adsorption on lead zirco-titanate (001) surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tănase, Liviu Cristian; Apostol, Nicoleta Georgiana; Abramiuc, Laura Elena; Tache, Cristian Alexandru; Hrib, Luminița; Trupină, Lucian; Pintilie, Lucian; Teodorescu, Cristian Mihail

    2016-01-01

    Atomically clean lead zirco-titanate PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 (001) layers exhibit a polarization oriented inwards P(−), visible by a band bending of all core levels towards lower binding energies, whereas as introduced layers exhibit P(+) polarization under air or in ultrahigh vacuum. The magnitude of the inwards polarization decreases when the temperature is increased at 700 K. CO adsorption on P(−) polarized surfaces saturates at about one quarter of a monolayer of carbon, and occurs in both molecular (oxidized) and dissociated (reduced) states of carbon, with a large majority of reduced state. The sticking of CO on the surface in ultrahigh vacuum is found to be directly related to the P(−) polarization state of the surface. A simple electrostatic mechanism is proposed to explain these dissociation processes and the sticking of carbon on P(−) polarized areas. Carbon desorbs also when the surface is irradiated with soft X-rays. Carbon desorption when the polarization is lost proceeds most probably in form of CO2. Upon carbon desorption cycles, the ferroelectric surface is depleted in oxygen and at some point reverses its polarization, owing to electrons provided by oxygen vacancies which are able to screen the depolarization field produced by positive fixed charges at the surface. PMID:27739461

  20. Determination of the Steady State Leakage Current in Structures with Ferroelectric Ceramic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgornyi, Yu. V.; Vorotilov, K. A.; Sigov, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    Steady state leakage currents have been investigated in capacitor structures with ferroelectric solgel films of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) formed on silicon substrates with a lower Pt electrode. It is established that Pt/PZT/Hg structures, regardless of the PZT film thickness, are characterized by the presence of a rectifying contact similar to p-n junction. The steady state leakage current in the forward direction increases with a decrease in the film thickness and is determined by the ferroelectric bulk conductivity.

  1. Studies of ferroelectric and dielectric properties of pure and doped barium titanate prepared by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisen, Supriya; Mishra, Ashutosh; Jarabana, Kanaka M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) powders were synthesized via Sol-Gel auto combustion method using citric acid as a chelating agent. We study the behavior of ferroelectric and dielectric properties of pure and doped BaTiO3 on different concentration. To understand the phase and structure of the powder calcined at 900°C were characterized by X-ray Diffraction shows that tetragonal phase is dominant for pure and doped BTO and data fitted by Rietveld Refinement. Electric and Dielectric properties were characterized by P-E Hysteresis and Dielectric measurement. In P-E measurement ferroelectric loop tracer applied for different voltage. The temperature dependant dielectric constant behavior was observed as a function of frequency recorded on hp-Hewlett Packard 4192A, LF impedance, 5Hz-13Hz analyzer.

  2. Studies of ferroelectric and dielectric properties of pure and doped barium titanate prepared by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Bisen, Supriya; Mishra, Ashutosh; Jarabana, Kanaka M.

    2016-05-23

    In this work, Barium Titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) powders were synthesized via Sol-Gel auto combustion method using citric acid as a chelating agent. We study the behavior of ferroelectric and dielectric properties of pure and doped BaTiO{sub 3} on different concentration. To understand the phase and structure of the powder calcined at 900°C were characterized by X-ray Diffraction shows that tetragonal phase is dominant for pure and doped BTO and data fitted by Rietveld Refinement. Electric and Dielectric properties were characterized by P-E Hysteresis and Dielectric measurement. In P-E measurement ferroelectric loop tracer applied for different voltage. The temperature dependant dielectricmore » constant behavior was observed as a function of frequency recorded on hp-Hewlett Packard 4192A, LF impedance, 5Hz-13Hz analyzer.« less

  3. Room-temperature relaxor ferroelectricity and photovoltaic effects in tin titanate directly deposited on a silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Radhe; Sharma, Yogesh; Chang, Siliang; Pitike, Krishna C.; Sohn, Changhee; Nakhmanson, Serge M.; Takoudis, Christos G.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Tonelli, Rachel; Gardner, Jonathan; Scott, James F.; Katiyar, Ram S.; Hong, Seungbum

    2018-02-01

    Tin titanate (SnTi O3 ) has been notoriously impossible to prepare as a thin-film ferroelectric, probably because high-temperature annealing converts much of the S n2 + to S n4 + . In the present paper, we show two things: first, perovskite phase SnTi O3 can be prepared by atomic-layer deposition directly onto p -type Si substrates; and second, these films exhibit ferroelectric switching at room temperature, with p -type Si acting as electrodes. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the film is single-phase, preferred-orientation ferroelectric perovskite SnTi O3 . Our films showed well-saturated, square, and repeatable hysteresis loops of around 3 μ C /c m2 remnant polarization at room temperature, as detected by out-of-plane polarization versus electric field and field cycling measurements. Furthermore, photovoltaic and photoferroelectricity were found in Pt /SnTi O3/Si /SnTi O3/Pt heterostructures, the properties of which can be tuned through band-gap engineering by strain according to first-principles calculations. This is a lead-free room-temperature ferroelectric oxide of potential device application.

  4. Room-temperature relaxor ferroelectricity and photovoltaic effects in tin titanate directly deposited on a silicon substrate

    DOE PAGES

    Agarwal, Radhe; Sharma, Yogesh; Chang, Siliang; ...

    2018-02-20

    Tin titanate (SnTiO 3) has been notoriously impossible to prepare as a thin-film ferroelectric, probably because high-temperature annealing converts much of the Sn 2+ to Sn 4+. In the present paper, we show two things: first, perovskite phase SnTiO 3 can be prepared by atomic-layer deposition directly onto p-type Si substrates; and second, these films exhibit ferroelectric switching at room temperature, with p-type Si acting as electrodes. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the film is single-phase, preferred-orientation ferroelectric perovskite SnTiO 3. Our films showed well-saturated, square, and repeatable hysteresis loops of around 3μC/cm 2 remnant polarization at room temperature, asmore » detected by out-of-plane polarization versus electric field and field cycling measurements. Furthermore, photovoltaic and photoferroelectricity were found in Pt/SnTiO 3/Si/SnTiO 3/Pt heterostructures, the properties of which can be tuned through band-gap engineering by strain according to first-principles calculations. In conclusion, this is a lead-free room-temperature ferroelectric oxide of potential device application.« less

  5. Room-temperature relaxor ferroelectricity and photovoltaic effects in tin titanate directly deposited on a silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Radhe; Sharma, Yogesh; Chang, Siliang

    Tin titanate (SnTiO 3) has been notoriously impossible to prepare as a thin-film ferroelectric, probably because high-temperature annealing converts much of the Sn 2+ to Sn 4+. In the present paper, we show two things: first, perovskite phase SnTiO 3 can be prepared by atomic-layer deposition directly onto p-type Si substrates; and second, these films exhibit ferroelectric switching at room temperature, with p-type Si acting as electrodes. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the film is single-phase, preferred-orientation ferroelectric perovskite SnTiO 3. Our films showed well-saturated, square, and repeatable hysteresis loops of around 3μC/cm 2 remnant polarization at room temperature, asmore » detected by out-of-plane polarization versus electric field and field cycling measurements. Furthermore, photovoltaic and photoferroelectricity were found in Pt/SnTiO 3/Si/SnTiO 3/Pt heterostructures, the properties of which can be tuned through band-gap engineering by strain according to first-principles calculations. In conclusion, this is a lead-free room-temperature ferroelectric oxide of potential device application.« less

  6. Electric properties and phase transition behavior in lead lanthanum zirconate stannate titanate ceramics with low zirconate content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Tao; Lou, Qi-Wei; Chen, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Ling; Dong, Xian-Lin; Wang, Gen-Shui

    2015-11-01

    The phase transitions, dielectric properties, and polarization versus electric field (P-E) hysteresis loops of Pb0.97La0.02(Zr0.42Sn0.58-xTix)O3 (0.13≤ x ≤0.18) (PLZST) bulk ceramics were systematically investigated. This study exhibited a sequence of phase transitions by analyzing the change of the P-E hysteresis loops with increasing temperature. The antiferroelectric (AFE) to ferroelectric (FE) phase boundary of PLZST with the Zr content of 0.42 was found to locate at the Ti content between 0.14 and 0.15. This work is aimed to improve the ternary phase diagram of lanthanum-doped PZST with the Zr content of 0.42 and will be a good reference for seeking high energy storage density in the PLZST system with low-Zr content. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51202273, 11204304, and 11304334) and the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 14DZ2261000).

  7. A smart, intermittent driven particle sensor with an airflow change trigger using a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Tomimatsu, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Isozaki, Akihiro; Itoh, Toshihiro; Maeda, Ryutaro; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports on a smart, intermittent driven particle sensor with an airflow trigger. A lead zirconate titanate cantilever functions as the trigger, which detects an airflow change without requiring a power supply to drive the sensing element. Because an airflow change indicates that the particle concentration has changed, the trigger switches the optical particle counter from sleep mode to active mode only when the particle concentration surrounding the sensor changes. The sensor power consumption in sleep mode is 100 times less than that in the active mode. Thus, this intermittent driven method significantly reduces the total power consumption of the particle sensor. In this paper, we fabricate a prototype of the particle sensor and demonstrate that the optical particle counter can be switched on by the fabricated trigger and thus that the particle concentration can be measured.

  8. Mechanical and dielectric characterization of lead zirconate titanate(PZT)/polyurethane(PU) thin film composite for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboubakr, S.; Rguiti, M.; Hajjaji, A.; Eddiai, A.; Courtois, C.; d'Astorg, S.

    2014-04-01

    The Lead Zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic is known by its piezoelectric feature, but also by its stiffness, the use of a composite based on a polyurethane (PU) matrix charged by a piezoelectric material, enable to generate a large deformation of the material, therefore harvesting more energy. This new material will provide a competitive alternative and low cost manufacturing technology of autonomous systems (smart clothes, car seat, boat sail, flag ...). A thin film of the PZT/PU composite was prepared using up to 80 vol. % of ceramic. Due to the dielectric nature of the PZT, inclusions of this one in a PU matrix raises the permittivity of the composite, on other hand this latter seems to decline at high frequencies.

  9. Lead zirconate titanate nanoscale patterning by ultraviolet-based lithography lift-off technique for nano-electromechanical system applications.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Samuel; Saya, Daisuke; Mazenq, Laurent; Costecalde, Jean; Rèmiens, Denis; Soyer, Caroline; Nicu, Liviu

    2012-09-01

    The advantage of using lead zirconate titanate (PbZr(0.54)Ti(0.46)O(3)) ceramics as an active material in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) comes from its relatively high piezoelectric coefficients. However, its integration within a technological process is limited by the difficulty of structuring this material with submicrometer resolution at the wafer scale. In this work, we develop a specific patterning method based on optical lithography coupled with a dual-layer resist process. The main objective is to obtain sub-micrometer features by lifting off a 100-nm-thick PZT layer while preserving the material's piezoelectric properties. A subsequent result of the developed method is the ability to stack several layers with a lateral resolution of few tens of nanometers, which is mandatory for the fabrication of NEMS with integrated actuation and read-out capabilities.

  10. Improvement of fatigue resistance for multilayer lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based ceramic actuators by external mechanical loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang; Yue, Zhenxing; Ji, Ye; Chu, Xiangcheng; Li, Longtu

    2008-12-01

    The influence of external compressive loads, applied along a direction perpendicular to polarization, on fatigue behaviors of multilayer lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based ceramic actuators was investigated. Under no external mechanical load, a normal fatigue behavior was observed, demonstrating that both switching polarization (Pswitching) and remnant polarization (Pr) progressively decreased with increasing switching cycles due to domain pinning by charge point defects. However, an anomalous enhancement in both switching and remnant polarizations was observed upon application of the external compressive loads. After 5×106 cycles of polarization switching, Pswitching and Pr increase by about 13% and 6% at 40 MPa, respectively, while Pswitching and Pr increase by about 11% and 21% at 60 MPa, respectively. The improvement of fatigue resistance can be attributed to non-180° domain switching and suppression of microcracking, triggered by external mechanical loads.

  11. Lead zirconate titanate-nickel zink ferrite thick-film composites: obtaining by the screen printing technique and magnetoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, A. A.; Shkuratov, V. Ya.; Chernykh, I. A.; Fetisov, Y. K.

    2010-03-01

    Layered thick-film composites containing one lead zirconate titanate (PZT) layer, one nickel zinc ferrite (NZF) layer, two PZT-NZF layers, or three PZT-NZF-PZT layers each 40-50 μm thick are prepared. The layers are applied by screen printing on a ceramic aluminum oxide substrate with a preformed contact (conducting) layer. The dielectric properties of the composites are studied in the temperature interval 80-900 K and the frequency interval 25 Hz-1 MHz. Polarized samples exhibit piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and magnetoelectric effects. In tangentially magnetized two- and three-layer composites, the magnetoelectric conversion factor equals 57 kV/(m T) at low frequencies and reaches 2000 kV/(m T) at the mechanical resonance frequency.

  12. The anhysteretic polarisation of ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeswurm, B.; Segouin, V.; Daniel, L.; Webber, K. G.

    2018-02-01

    Measurement and calculation of anhysteretic curves is a well-established method in the field of magnetic materials and is applied to ferroelectric materials here. The anhysteretic curve is linked to a stable equilibrium state in the domain structure, and ignores dissipative effects related to mechanisms such as domain wall pinning. In this study, an experimental method for characterising the anhysteretic behaviour of ferroelectrics is presented, which is subsequently used to determine the anhysteretic polarisation response of polycrystalline barium titanate and a doped lead zirconate titanate composition at room temperature. Various external parameters, such as electric field, stress, and temperature, can significantly affect ferroelectric behaviour. Ferroelectric hysteresis curves can assess the importance of such effects but cannot distinguish their contribution on the different intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms involved in ferroelectric behaviour. In this work, the influence of compressive stress on the anhysteretic polarisation is measured and discussed. The comparison of the polarization loop to the anhysteretic curve under compressive stress elucidates the effects on the stable equilibrium domain configuration and dynamic effects associated to dissipation.

  13. Integration and High-Temperature Characterization of Ferroelectric Vanadium-Doped Bismuth Titanate Thin Films on Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Mattias; Khartsev, Sergiy; Östling, Mikael; Zetterling, Carl-Mikael

    2017-07-01

    4H-SiC electronics can operate at high temperature (HT), e.g., 300°C to 500°C, for extended times. Systems using sensors and amplifiers that operate at HT would benefit from microcontrollers which can also operate at HT. Microcontrollers require nonvolatile memory (NVM) for computer programs. In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of integrating ferroelectric vanadium-doped bismuth titanate (BiTV) thin films on 4H-SiC for HT memory applications, with BiTV ferroelectric capacitors providing memory functionality. Film deposition was achieved by laser ablation on Pt (111)/TiO2/4H-SiC substrates, with magnetron-sputtered Pt used as bottom electrode and thermally evaporated Au as upper contacts. Film characterization by x-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominately (117) orientation. P- E hysteresis loops measured at room temperature showed maximum 2 P r of 48 μC/cm2, large enough for wide read margins. P- E loops were measurable up to 450°C, with losses limiting measurements above 450°C. The phase-transition temperature was determined to be about 660°C from the discontinuity in dielectric permittivity, close to what is achieved for ceramics. These BiTV ferroelectric capacitors demonstrate potential for use in HT NVM applications for SiC digital electronics.

  14. Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials

    DOEpatents

    Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1999-06-01

    A process is disclosed for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications. 4 figs.

  15. Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials

    DOEpatents

    Voigt, James A.; Sipola, Diana L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Anderson, Mark T.

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications.

  16. Nano-embossing technology on ferroelectric thin film Pb(Zr0.3,Ti0.7)O3 for multi-bit storage application

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we apply nano-embossing technique to form a stagger structure in ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate [Pb(Zr0.3, Ti0.7)O3 (PZT)] films and investigate the ferroelectric and electrical characterizations of the embossed and un-embossed regions, respectively, of the same films by using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and Radiant Technologies Precision Material Analyzer. Attributed to the different layer thickness of the patterned ferroelectric thin film, two distinctive coercive voltages have been obtained, thereby, allowing for a single ferroelectric memory cell to contain more than one bit of data. PMID:21794156

  17. Synthesis of Ferroelectric Lead Titanate Nanohoneycomb Arrays via Lead Supplement Process

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Bongsoo; Hong, Seungbum; Ahn, Gun; ...

    2016-05-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel process to convert TiO 2 nanotubes into ferroelectric nanohoneycombs, comprised of vertically aligned PbTiO 3 nanotubes. Tube bottom opening process enabled effective infiltration of lead acetate precursor into the nanotubes. Finally, nanohoneycombs, which were converted via additional lead supplement process, showed uniform conversion and well-defined ferroelectric properties with the effective piezoelectric coefficient of approximately 20 pm/V, which was measured by piezoresponse force microscopy.

  18. Synthesis of Ferroelectric Lead Titanate Nanohoneycomb Arrays via Lead Supplement Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bongsoo; Hong, Seungbum; Ahn, Gun

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel process to convert TiO 2 nanotubes into ferroelectric nanohoneycombs, comprised of vertically aligned PbTiO 3 nanotubes. Tube bottom opening process enabled effective infiltration of lead acetate precursor into the nanotubes. Finally, nanohoneycombs, which were converted via additional lead supplement process, showed uniform conversion and well-defined ferroelectric properties with the effective piezoelectric coefficient of approximately 20 pm/V, which was measured by piezoresponse force microscopy.

  19. Influence of oxygen partial pressure on the composition and orientation of strontium-doped lead zirconate titanate thin films.

    PubMed

    Sriram, S; Bhaskaran, M; du Plessis, J; Short, K T; Sivan, V P; Holland, A S

    2009-01-01

    The influence of oxygen partial pressure during the deposition of piezoelectric strontium-doped lead zirconate titanate thin films is reported. The thin films have been deposited by RF magnetron sputtering in an atmosphere of high purity argon and oxygen (in the ratio of 9:1), on platinum-coated silicon substrates (heated to 650 degrees C). The influence of oxygen partial pressure is studied to understand the manner in which the stoichiometry of the thin films is modified, and to understand the influence of stoichiometry on the perovskite orientation. This article reports on the results obtained from films deposited at oxygen partial pressures of 1-5 mTorr. The thin films have been studied using a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GA-XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). XPS analysis highlights the marked influence of variations in oxygen pressure during sputtering, observed by variations in oxygen concentration in the thin films, and in some cases by the undesirable decrease in lead concentration in the thin films. GA-XRD is used to study the relative variations in perovskite peak intensities, and has been used to determine the deposition conditions to attain the optimal combination of stoichiometry and orientation. AFM scans show the marked influence of the oxygen partial pressure on the film morphology.

  20. Symmetries and multiferroic properties of novel room-temperature magnetoelectrics: Lead iron tantalate – lead zirconate titanate (PFT/PZT)

    DOE PAGES

    Sanchez, Dilsom A.; Ortega, N.; Kumar, Ashok; ...

    2011-12-05

    Mixing 60-70% lead zirconate titanate with 40-30% lead iron tantalate produces a single-phase, low-loss, room-temperature multiferroic with magnetoelectric coupling: (PbZr 0.53Ti 0.47O 3) (1-x)- (PbFe 0.5Ta 0.5O 3) x. Our study combines x-ray scattering, magnetic and polarization hysteresis in both phases, plus a second-order dielectric divergence (to epsilon = 6000 at 475 K for 0.4 PFT; to 4000 at 520 K for 0.3 PFT) for an unambiguous assignment as a C 2v-C 4v (Pmm2-P4mm) transition. Furthermore, the material exhibits square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops with 0.1 emu/g at 295 K and saturation polarization P r = 25 μC/cm 2, whichmore » actually increases (to 40 μC/cm 2) in the high-T tetragonal phase, representing an exciting new room temperature oxide multiferroic to compete with BiFeO 3. Additional transitions at high temperatures (cubic at T>1300 K) and low temperatures (rhombohedral or monoclinic at T<250 K) are found. Finally, these are the lowest-loss room-temperature multiferroics known, which is a great advantage for magnetoelectric devices.« less

  1. Fabrication and energy harvesting characteristics of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever generators with interdigitated electrode lead zirconate titanate laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-seon; Yun, Ji-sun; Park, Woon-ik; Hong, Youn-woo; Cho, Jeong-ho; Paik, Jong-hoo; Park, Yong Ho; Son, Chun-myung; Jeong, Young Hun

    2017-12-01

    Interdigitated electrode (IDE) unimorph piezoelectric cantilever generators (UPCGs) were fabricated and their energy harvesting characteristics were investigated. A hard lead zirconate titanate (PZT) material with a high mechanical quality factor (Q m) of 1280 was used for the active piezoelectric film of the IDE UPCGs. Two different laminated IDE UPCGs were prepared; one has Ag/Pd interdigitated electrode (IDE) formed only on the top and bottom PZT sheets (D-IDE), while the other has Ag/Pd IDE on all of the PZT sheets (M-IDE). Cofiring was conducted at 1050 °C for 2 h for PZT laminates with IDEs. The fabricated IDE UPCGs exhibited power densities of 50.4 µW/cm3 for the D-IDE and 820 µW/cm3 for the M-IDE. The UPCG with the M-IDE exhibited a higher performance than that with the D-IDE. Specifically, a significantly enhanced normalized power factor of 670 µW/(g2·cm3) was found at 118 Hz across 100 kΩ.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate thin films maintaining a post-CMOS compatible thermal budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatz, A.; Pantel, D.; Hanemann, T.

    2017-09-01

    Integration of lead zirconate titanate (Pb[Zrx,Ti1-x]O3 - PZT) thin films on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor substrates (CMOS) is difficult due to the usually high crystallization temperature of the piezoelectric perovskite PZT phase, which harms the CMOS circuits. In this work, a wafer-scale pulsed laser deposition tool was used to grow 1 μm thick PZT thin films on 150 mm diameter silicon wafers. Three different routes towards a post-CMOS compatible deposition process were investigated, maintaining a post-CMOS compatible thermal budget limit of 445 °C for 1 h (or 420 °C for 6 h). By crystallizing the perovskite LaNiO3 seed layer at 445 °C, the PZT deposition temperature can be lowered to below 400 °C, yielding a transverse piezoelectric coefficient e31,f of -9.3 C/m2. With the same procedure, applying a slightly higher PZT deposition temperature of 420 °C, an e31,f of -10.3 C/m2 can be reached. The low leakage current density of below 3 × 10-6 A/cm2 at 200 kV/cm allows for application of the post-CMOS compatible PZT thin films in low power micro-electro-mechanical-systems actuators.

  3. Fatigue and failure responses of lead zirconate titanate multilayer actuator under unipolar high-field electric cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan Wen; Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2013-07-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) multilayer actuators with an interdigital electrode design were studied under high electric fields (3 and 6 kV/mm) in a unipolar cycling mode. A 100 Hz sine wave was used in cycling. Five specimens tested under 6 kV/mm failed from 3.8 × 105 to 7 × 105 cycles, whereas three other specimens tested under 3 kV/mm were found to be still functional after 108 cycles. Variations in piezoelectric and dielectric responses of the tested specimens were observed during the fatigue test, depending on the measuring and cycling conditions. Selected fatigued and damaged actuators were characterized using an impedance analyzer or small signal measurement. Furthermore, involved fatigue and failure mechanisms were investigated using scanning acoustic microscope and scanning electron microscope. The extensive cracks and porous regions were revealed across the PZT layers on the cross sections of a failed actuator. The results from this study have demonstrated that the high-field cycling can accelerate the fatigue of PZT stacks as long as the partial discharge is controlled. The small signal measurement can also be integrated into the large signal measurement to characterize the fatigue response of PZT stacks in a more comprehensive basis. The former can further serve as an experimental method to test and monitor the behavior of PZT stacks.

  4. High Discharge Energy Density at Low Electric Field Using an Aligned Titanium Dioxide/Lead Zirconate Titanate Nanowire Array

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dou; Liu, Weiwei; Guo, Ru; Zhou, Kechao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Polymer‐based capacitors with high energy density have attracted significant attention in recent years due to their wide range of potential applications in electronic devices. However, the obtained high energy density is predominantly dependent on high applied electric field, e.g., 400–600 kV mm−1, which may bring more challenges relating to the failure probability. Here, a simple two‐step method for synthesizing titanium dioxide/lead zirconate titanate nanowire arrays is exploited and a demonstration of their ability to achieve high discharge energy density capacitors for low operating voltage applications is provided. A high discharge energy density of 6.9 J cm−3 is achieved at low electric fields, i.e., 143 kV mm−1, which is attributed to the high relative permittivity of 218.9 at 1 kHz and high polarization of 23.35 µC cm−2 at this electric field. The discharge energy density obtained in this work is the highest known for a ceramic/polymer nanocomposite at such a low electric field. The novel nanowire arrays used in this work are applicable to a wide range of fields, such as energy harvesting, energy storage, and photocatalysis. PMID:29610724

  5. High Discharge Energy Density at Low Electric Field Using an Aligned Titanium Dioxide/Lead Zirconate Titanate Nanowire Array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dou; Liu, Weiwei; Guo, Ru; Zhou, Kechao; Luo, Hang

    2018-02-01

    Polymer-based capacitors with high energy density have attracted significant attention in recent years due to their wide range of potential applications in electronic devices. However, the obtained high energy density is predominantly dependent on high applied electric field, e.g., 400-600 kV mm -1 , which may bring more challenges relating to the failure probability. Here, a simple two-step method for synthesizing titanium dioxide/lead zirconate titanate nanowire arrays is exploited and a demonstration of their ability to achieve high discharge energy density capacitors for low operating voltage applications is provided. A high discharge energy density of 6.9 J cm -3 is achieved at low electric fields, i.e., 143 kV mm -1 , which is attributed to the high relative permittivity of 218.9 at 1 kHz and high polarization of 23.35 µC cm -2 at this electric field. The discharge energy density obtained in this work is the highest known for a ceramic/polymer nanocomposite at such a low electric field. The novel nanowire arrays used in this work are applicable to a wide range of fields, such as energy harvesting, energy storage, and photocatalysis.

  6. Precursor dynamics in the ferroelectric phase transition of barium titanate single crystals studied by Brillouin light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Tae Hyun; Roleder, K.; Rytz, D.; Kojima, Seiji

    2011-09-01

    The acoustic anomalies and precursor dynamics of high-quality barium titanate single crystals were investigated by Brillouin light scattering and the birefringence measurements in the paraelectric phase above the cubic-to-tetragonal ferroelectric phase transition temperature (Tc). Two elastic stiffness coefficients C11 and C44, the related sound velocities, and their absorption coefficients were determined from Tc to 400∘C for the first time. The longitudinal acoustic (LA) mode showed a substantial softening over a wide temperature range above Tc which was accompanied by a remarkable increase in the acoustic damping as well as growth of central peaks. The broad central peak (CP) exhibited a two-mode and one-mode behavior in the paraelectric and ferroelectric phase, respectively, which was consistent with recent far-infrared reflectivity measurements and first-principle-based calculations [Ponomareva , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.77.012102 77, 012102 (2008)]. The acoustic anomalies and CP behavior were correlated with the anomalous birefringence, piezoelectric effect, and the deviation of the Curie-Weiss law observed from the same crystal. This strongly indicates similarity between the dynamics of polar clusters in typical ferroelectrics and the dynamics of polar nanoregions in relaxors, consistent with recent acoustic emission measurements [Dul’kin , Appl. Phys. Lett.APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.3464968 97, 032903 (2010)]. The relaxation times estimated from the central peak and the LA mode anomalies exhibited similar temperature dependences with comparable orders of magnitude, indicating that the polarization fluctuations due to the precursor polar clusters couples to the LA mode through density fluctuations. All these anomalies share common microscopic origin, correlated Ti off-centered motions forming polar clusters having local symmetry breaking in the paraelectric phase. The existence of the polar clusters were directly evidenced by the

  7. Residual stress relief due to fatigue in tetragonal lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D. A.; Mori, T.; Comyn, T. P.; Ringgaard, E.; Wright, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    High energy synchrotron XRD was employed to determine the lattice strain ɛ{111} and diffraction peak intensity ratio R{200} in tetragonal PZT ceramics, both in the virgin poled state and after a bipolar fatigue experiment. It was shown that the occurrence of microstructural damage during fatigue was accompanied by a reduction in the gradient of the ɛ{111}-cos2 ψ plot, indicating a reduction in the level of residual stress due to poling. In contrast, the fraction of oriented 90° ferroelectric domains, quantified in terms of R{200}, was not affected significantly by fatigue. The change in residual stress due to fatigue is interpreted in terms of a change in the average elastic stiffness of the polycrystalline matrix due to the presence of inter-granular microcracks.

  8. Strongly Enhanced Piezoelectric Response in Lead Zirconate Titanate Films with Vertically Aligned Columnar Grains.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh D; Houwman, Evert P; Dekkers, Matthijn; Rijnders, Guus

    2017-03-22

    Pb(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 (PZT) films with (001) orientation were deposited on Pt(111)/Ti/SiO 2 /Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. Variation of the laser pulse rate during the deposition of the PZT films was found to play a key role in the control of the microstructure and to change strongly the piezoelectric response of the thin film. The film deposited at low pulse rate has a denser columnar microstructure, which improves the transverse piezoelectric coefficient (d 31f ) and ferroelectric remanent polarization (P r ), whereas the less densely packed columnar grains in the film deposited at high pulse rates give rise to a significantly higher longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d 33f ) value. The effect of film thickness on the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the PZT films was also investigated. With increasing film thickness, the grain column diameter gradually increases, and also the average P r and d 33f values become larger. The largest piezoelectric coefficient of d 33f = 408 pm V -1 was found for a 4-μm film thickness. From a series of films in the thickness range 0.5-5 μm, the z-position dependence of the piezoelectric coefficient could be deduced. A local maximum value of 600 pm V -1 was deduced in the 3.5-4.5 μm section of the thickest films. The dependence of the film properties on film thickness is attributed to the decreasing effect of the clamping constraint imposed by the substrate and the increasing spatial separation between the grains with increasing film thickness.

  9. Strongly Enhanced Piezoelectric Response in Lead Zirconate Titanate Films with Vertically Aligned Columnar Grains

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) films with (001) orientation were deposited on Pt(111)/Ti/SiO2/Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. Variation of the laser pulse rate during the deposition of the PZT films was found to play a key role in the control of the microstructure and to change strongly the piezoelectric response of the thin film. The film deposited at low pulse rate has a denser columnar microstructure, which improves the transverse piezoelectric coefficient (d31f) and ferroelectric remanent polarization (Pr), whereas the less densely packed columnar grains in the film deposited at high pulse rates give rise to a significantly higher longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d33f) value. The effect of film thickness on the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the PZT films was also investigated. With increasing film thickness, the grain column diameter gradually increases, and also the average Pr and d33f values become larger. The largest piezoelectric coefficient of d33f = 408 pm V–1 was found for a 4-μm film thickness. From a series of films in the thickness range 0.5–5 μm, the z-position dependence of the piezoelectric coefficient could be deduced. A local maximum value of 600 pm V–1 was deduced in the 3.5–4.5 μm section of the thickest films. The dependence of the film properties on film thickness is attributed to the decreasing effect of the clamping constraint imposed by the substrate and the increasing spatial separation between the grains with increasing film thickness. PMID:28247756

  10. Temperature dependence of field-responsive mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Ching-Chang; Fancher, Chris M.; Isaac, Catherine

    2017-05-17

    An electric field loading stage was designed for use in a laboratory diffractometer that enables in situ investigations of the temperature dependence in the field response mechanisms of ferroelectric materials. The stage was demonstrated in this paper by measuring PbZr 1-xTi xO 3 (PZT) based materials—a commercially available PZT and a 1% Nb-doped PbZr 0.56Ti 0.44O 3 (PZT 56/44)—over a temperature range of 25°C to 250°C. The degree of non-180° domain alignment (η 002) of the PZT as a function of temperature was quantified. η 002 of the commercially available PZT increases exponentially with temperature, and was analyzed as amore » thermally activated process as described by the Arrhenius law. The activation energy for thermally activated domain wall depinning process in PZT was found to be 0.47 eV. Additionally, a field-induced rhombohedral to tetragonal phase transition was observed 5°C below the rhombohedral-tetragonal transition in PZT 56/44 ceramic. The field-induced tetragonal phase fraction was increased 41.8% after electrical cycling. Finally, a large amount of domain switching (η 002=0.45 at 1.75 kV/mm) was observed in the induced tetragonal phase.« less

  11. Domain pinning near a single-grain boundary in tetragonal and rhombohedral lead zirconate titanate films

    DOE PAGES

    Marincel, Dan M.; Zhang, H. R.; Briston, J.; ...

    2015-04-27

    The interaction of grain boundaries with ferroelectric domain walls strongly influences the extrinsic contribution to piezoelectric activity in Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 (PZT), ubiquitous in modern transducers and actuators. However, the fundamental understanding of these phenomena has been limited by complex mechanisms originating from the interplay of atomic-level domain wall pinning, collective domain wall dynamics, and emergent mesoscopic behavior. This contribution utilizes engineered grain boundaries created by depositing epitaxial PZT films with various Zr:Ti ratio onto 24º SrTiO 3 tilt bicrystals. The nonlinear piezoelectric response and surface domain structure across the boundary are investigated using piezoresponse force microscopy whilst cross section domainmore » structure is studied using transmission electron microscopy. The grain boundary reduces domain wall motion over a width of 800±70 nm for PZT 45:55 and 450±30 nm for PZT 52:48. Phase field modeling provides an understanding of the elastic and electric fields associated with the grain boundary and local domain configurations. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that complex mesoscopic behaviors can be explored to complement atomic-level pictures of the material system.« less

  12. Fabrication and characterization of thick-film piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate ceramic resonators by tape-casting.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lifeng; Sun, Yingying; Wang, Qing-Ming; Zhong, Youliang; Ou, Ming; Jiang, Zhishui; Tian, Wei

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, thick-film piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic resonators with thicknesses down to tens of micrometers have been fabricated by tape-casting processing. PZT ceramic resonators with composition near the morphotropic phase boundary and with different dopants added were prepared for piezoelectric transducer applications. Material property characterization for these thick-film PZT resonators is essential for device design and applications. For the property characterization, a recently developed normalized electrical impedance spectrum method was used to determine the electromechanical coefficient and the complex piezoelectric, elastic, and dielectric coefficients from the electrical measurement of resonators using thick films. In this work, nine PZT thick-film resonators have been fabricated and characterized, and two different types of resonators, namely thickness longitudinal and transverse modes, were used for material property characterization. The results were compared with those determined by the IEEE standard method, and they agreed well. It was found that depending on the PZT formulation and dopants, the relative permittivities ε(T)(33)/ε(0) measured at 2 kHz for these thick-films are in the range of 1527 to 4829, piezoelectric stress constants (e(33) in the range of 15 to 26 C/m(2), piezoelectric strain constants (d(31)) in the range of -169 × 10(-12) C/N to -314 × 10(-12) C/N, electromechanical coupling coefficients (k(t)) in the range of 0.48 to 0.53, and k(31) in the range of 0.35 to 0.38. The characterization results shows tape-casting processing can be used to fabricate high-quality PZT thick-film resonators, and the extracted material constants can be used to for device design and application.

  13. Processing and electrical properties of gallium-substituted lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajra, Sugato; Sharma, Pulkit; Sahoo, Sushrisangita; Rout, P. K.; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, the effect of gallium (Ga) substitution on structural, microstructural, electrical conductivity of Pb(ZrTi)O3 (PZT) in the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) region (i.e., Pb0.96Ga0.04(Zr0.48Ti0.52)0.99O3 (PGaZT-4)) was investigated. Increased grain density increases the resistivity of the Ga-modified PZT system. Preliminary structural analysis using X-ray diffraction pattern and data showed the existence of two phases [major tetragonal (T) and minor monoclinic (M)]. Field emission scanning electron micrograph (FESEM) showed the distribution of spherical as well as platelet type grains with small pores. The behavior of dielectric constant with temperature of PGaZT-4 exhibited the suppression of the ferroelectric phase transition [i.e., disappearance of Curie temperature ( T c)]. The complex impedance spectroscopy (CIS) technique helped to investigate the impedance parameters of PGaZT-4 in MPB region in a wide range of temperature (250-500 °C) and frequency (1-1000 kHz) region. The impedance parameters of the material are found to be strongly dependent on frequency of AC electric field and temperature. The substitution of gallium at the Pb site of PZT generally enhances the dielectric constant and decreases loss tangent. The AC conductivity vs frequency ( f = ω2 π) in the region of dispersion follows the universal response of Jonscher's equation. Enhanced resistive characteristics were observed for Ga-substituted PZT in comparison to the pure PZT, which was well ensured from the studies of electrical parameters, such as impedance and AC conductivity.

  14. Titan!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.

    2010-05-01

    Cassini-Huygens achieved Saturnian orbit on July 1, 2004. The first order of business was the safe delivery of the Huygens atmospheric probe to Titan that took place on January 14, 2005. Huygens descended under parachute obtaining observations all the way down to a safe landing. It revealed Titan for the first time. Stunning are the similarities between Titan and the Earth. Viewing the lakes and seas, the fluvial terrain, the sand dunes and other features through the hazy, nitrogen atmosphere, brings to mind the geological processes that created analogous features on the Earth. On Titan frozen water plays the geological role of rock; liquid methane takes the role of terrestrial water. The atmospheres of both Earth and Titan are predominately nitrogen gas. Titan's atmosphere contains 1.5% methane and no oxygen. The surface pressure on Titan is 1.5 times the Earth's. There are aerosol layers and clouds that come and go. Now, as Saturn proceeds along its solar orbit, the seasons are changing. The effects upon the transport of methane are starting to be seen. A large lake in the South Polar Region seems to be filling more as winter onsets. Will the size and number of the lakes in the South grow during winter? Will the northern lakes and seas diminish or dry up as northern summer progresses? How will the atmospheric circulation change? Much work remains not only for Cassini but also for future missions. Titan has many different environments to explore. These require more capable instruments and in situ probes. This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. Improved dielectric and ferroelectric properties of Mn doped barium zirconium titanate (BZT) ceramics for energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, Kanta Maan; Ahlawat, Neetu; Kundu, R. S.; Rani, Suman; Rani, Sunita; Ahlawat, Navneet; Murugavel, Sevi

    2018-06-01

    Lead free Mn doped barium zirconium titanate ceramic of composition BaZr0.045 (MnxTi1-x)0.955O3 (x = 0.00, 0.01, 0.02) were prepared by solid state reaction method. Tetragonal perovskite structure was confirmed by Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern. Analysis of Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs revealed that addition of Mn up to a certain limit accelerates grain growth of BZT ceramic. Static dielectric constant was successfully extended up to high frequencies with an appreciable decrease in dielectric loss about 70% for Mn doped BZT ceramics. The experimental data fitted with Curie Weiss Law and Power Law confirmed first order transition and diffusive behavior of the investigated system. The shifting of Curie temperature (Tc) from 387 K to 402 K indicated tendency for sustained ferroelectricity in doped BZMT ceramics. High value of percentage temperature coefficient of capacitance TCC >10% near Tc was observed for all the compositions and increases with Mn content in pure BZT. At room temperature, BZT modified ceramic corresponding to x = 0.01 composition shows better values of remnant polarization (Pr = 5.718 μC/cm2), saturation polarization (Ps = 14.410 μC/cm2), low coercive field (Ec = 0.612 kV/cm), and highest value of Pr/Ps = 0.396.

  16. Strain and ferroelectric soft-mode induced superconductivity in strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnett, K.; Narayan, Awadhesh; Spaldin, N. A.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the effects of strain on superconductivity with particular reference to SrTiO3. Assuming that a ferroelectric mode that softens under tensile strain is responsible for the coupling, an increase in the critical temperature and range of carrier densities for superconductivity is predicted, while the peak of the superconducting dome shifts towards lower carrier densities. Using a Ginzburg-Landau approach in 2D, we find a linear dependence of the critical temperature on strain: if the couplings between the order parameter and strains in different directions differ while their sum is fixed, different behaviors under uniaxial and biaxial strain can be understood.

  17. Recent Progress in Understanding the Shock Response of Ferroelectric Ceramics*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setchell, Robert E.

    2001-06-01

    Ferroelectric ceramics exhibit a permanent remanent polarization, and the use of shock depoling of these materials to achieve pulsed sources of electrical power was proposed in the late 1950s. During the following twenty years, extensive studies were conducted to examine the shock response of ferroelectric ceramics primarily based on lead zirconate titanate (PZT). Under limited conditions, relatively simple analytical models were found to adequately describe the observed electrical behavior. In general, however, the studies indicated a complex behavior involving finite-rate depoling kinetics with stress and field dependencies. Dielectric relaxation and shock-induced conductivity were also suggested. Unfortunately, few experimental studies were undertaken over the next twenty years, and the development of more comprehensive models was inhibited. In recent years, a strong interest in advancing numerical simulation capabilities has motivated new experimental studies and corresponding model development. More than seventy gas gun experiments have examined several ferroelectric ceramics, with most experiments on lead zirconate titanate having a Zr:Ti ratio of 95:5 and modified with 2ferroelectric but is near an antiferroelectric phase boundary, and depoling results from a shock-driven phase transition. Experiments have examined unpoled, normally poled, and axially poled PZT 95/5 over broad ranges of shock pressure and peak electric field. The extensive base of new data provides quantitative insights into the stress and field dependencies of depoling kinetics and dielectric properties, and is being actively utilized to develop and refine material response models used in numerical simulations of pulsed power devices.

  18. Optical, electrical and elastic properties of ferroelectric domain walls in lithium niobate and lithium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungwon

    Ferroelectric LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 crystals have developed, over the last 50 years as key materials for integrated and nonlinear optics due to their large electro-optic and nonlinear optical coefficients and a broad transparency range from 0.4 mum-4.5 mum wavelengths. Applications include high speed optical modulation and switching in 40GHz range, second harmonic generation, optical parametric amplification, pulse compression and so on. Ferroelectric domain microengineering has led to electro-optic scanners, dynamic focusing lenses, total internal reflection switches, and quasi-phase matched (QPM) frequency doublers. Most of these applications have so far been on non-stoichiometric compositions of these crystals. Recent breakthroughs in crystal growth have however opened up an entirely new window of opportunity from both scientific and technological viewpoint. The growth of stoichiometric composition crystals has led to the discovery of many fascinating effects arising from the presence or absence of atomic defects, such as an order of magnitude changes in coercive fields, internal fields, domain backswitching and stabilization phenomenon. On the nanoscale, unexpected features such as the presence of wide regions of optical contrast and strain have been discovered at 180° domain walls. Such strong influence of small amounts of nonstoichiometric defects on material properties has led to new device applications, particularly those involving domain patterning and shaping such as QPM devices in thick bulk crystals and improved photorefractive damage compositions. The central focus of this dissertation is to explore the role of nonstoichiometry and its precise influence on macroscale and nanoscale properties in lithium niobate and tantalate. Macroscale properties are studied using a combination of in-situ and high-speed electro-optic imaging microscopy and electrical switching experiments. Local static and dynamic strain properties at individual domain walls is studied

  19. Antiferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition in lead zinc niobate modified lead zirconate ceramics: crystal studies, microstructure, thermal and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukkha, Usa; Muanghlua, Rangson; Niemcharoen, Surasak; Boonchoma, Banjong; Vittayakorn, Naratip

    2010-08-01

    The combination of antiferroelectric PbZrO3 (PZ) and relaxor ferroelectric Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3 was prepared via the columbite precursor method. The basic characterizations were performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), linear thermal expansion, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques, dielectric spectroscopy, and hysteresis measurement. The XRD result indicated that the solid solubility limit of the (1- x)PZ- xPZN system was about x=0.40. The crystal structure of (1- x)PZ- xPZN transformed from orthorhombic to rhombohedral symmetry when the concentration of PZN was increased. A ferroelectric intermediate phase began to appear between the paraelectric and antiferroelectric phases of pure PZ, with increasing PZN content. In addition, the temperature range of the ferroelectric phase increased with increasing PZN concentration. The morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) in this system was located close to the composition, x=0.20.

  20. Electronic structure of layered ferroelectric high-k titanate La2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Grivel, J.-C.; Kesler, V. G.

    2009-02-01

    The electronic structure of binary titanate La2Ti2O7 has been studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Spectral features of valence band and all constituent element core levels have been considered. The Auger parameters of titanium and oxygen in La2Ti2O7 are determined as αTi = 872.4 and αO = 1042.3 eV. Chemical bonding effects have been discussed with binding energy (BE) differences ΔTi = (BE O 1s - BE Ti 2p3/2) = 71.6 eV and ΔLa = (BE La 3d5/2 - BE O 1s) = 304.7 eV as key parameters in comparison with those in several titanium- and lanthanum-bearing oxides.

  1. Electronic structure of layered ferroelectric high-k titanate Pr2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Grivel, J.-C.; Kesler, V. G.; Troitskaia, I. B.

    2012-11-01

    The spectroscopic parameters and electronic structure of binary titanate Pr2Ti2O7 have been studied by IR-, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the powder sample prepared by solid state synthesis. The spectral features of valence band and all constituent element core levels have been considered. The Auger parameters of titanium and oxygen in Pr2Ti2O7 have been determined as αTi=872.8 and αO=1042.3 eV. Variations of cation-anion bond ionicity have been discussed using binding energy differences ΔTi=(BE O 1s-BE Ti 2p3/2)=71.6 eV and ΔPr=BE(Pr 3d5/2)-BE(O 1s)=403.8 eV as key parameters in comparison with those of other titanium- and praseodymium-bearing oxides.

  2. A Bayesian approach to modeling diffraction profiles and application to ferroelectric materials

    DOE PAGES

    Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Guerrier, Jonathon; Esteves, Giovanni; ...

    2017-02-01

    A new statistical approach for modeling diffraction profiles is introduced, using Bayesian inference and a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. This method is demonstrated by modeling the degenerate reflections during application of an electric field to two different ferroelectric materials: thin-film lead zirconate titanate (PZT) of composition PbZr 0.3Ti 0.7O 3and a bulk commercial PZT polycrystalline ferroelectric. Here, the new method offers a unique uncertainty quantification of the model parameters that can be readily propagated into new calculated parameters.

  3. A battery-less photo-detector enabled with simultaneous ferroelectric sensing and energy harnessing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Szu Cheng; Yao, Kui; Chen, Yi Fan

    2013-08-01

    A self-sustainable mechanism for simultaneously sensing and harnessing photon energy was proposed and implemented to create a battery-less and wire-less ultraviolet sensor made of ferroelectric lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin film with in-plane polarization configuration. The mechanism involved accumulating and storing the photovoltaic charge, and transferring the stored charge via a piezoelectric switch to a radio frequency transmitter. The time-interval between the radio frequency pulses generated by the transmitter was inversely proportional to the photo-intensity. The sustainability of the operation was ascribed to the low leakage, high photovoltage, and linear current-voltage characteristics of ferroelectric sensing material instead of semiconductors.

  4. Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.

    1999-01-01

    With a launch in December 2001, Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) can observe Titan in the interval after Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) but before the onset of observations by Cassini. By virtue of its broad spectral coverage in the thermal infrared, 10-180 micron, its moderately high spectral resolution, approaching lambda/delta lambda=600 over part of this wavelength range, and the very high sensitivity of its helium- cooled detectors, the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) and MIPS on SIRTF can address several issues raised through earlier observations by the Voyager IRIS experiment and by ISO. These include, for example, a better characterization of the vertical distribution of water in Titan's middle and upper atmospheres and the discovery of new compounds, such as allene or proprionitrile. This talk will address the temperature- and composition-sounding capabilities of SIRTF, particularly in the context of how they will complement Cassini observations and aid in their planning.

  5. Synthesis and ferroelectric properties of La-substituted PZFNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pratibha; Singh, Sangeeta; Juneja, J. K.; Prakash, Chandra; Raina, K. K.; Kumar, Vinod; Pant, R. P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we are reporting a systematic study on ferroelectric properties of lanthanum (La) substituted modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZFNT) ceramics which were fabricated by mixed oxide process. La contents were varied in between 0 and 0.01 in steps of 0.0025. The X-ray diffraction study shows single phase for all samples. Silver electrode was deposited on flat surfaces of sintered discs for P-E (polarization vs. electric field) measurements. All compositions exhibited well-defined ferroelectric behavior at room temperature. Hysteresis loops were also recorded at different temperatures for all the compositions which showed typical variation of ferroelectric nature. The PLZFNT composition with 1 mol% of La showed the best retention behavior. The results are discussed.

  6. Enhanced energy harvesting in commercial ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Satyanarayan; Chauhan, Aditya; Vaish, Rahul

    2014-04-01

    Ferroelectric materials are used in a number of applications ranging from simple sensors and actuators to ferroelectric random access memories (FRAMs), transducers, health monitoring system and microelectronics. The multiphysical coupling ability possessed by these materials has been established to be useful for energy harvesting applications. However, conventional energy harvesting techniques employing ferroelectric materials possess low energy density. This has prevented the successful commercialization of ferroelectric based energy harvesting systems. In this context, the present study aims at proposing a novel approach for enhanced energy harvesting using commercially available ferroelectric materials. This technique was simulated to be used for two commercially available piezoelectric materials namely PKI-552 and APCI-840, soft and hard lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) pervoskite ceramics, respectively. It was observed that a maximum energy density of 348 kJm-3cycle-1 can be obtained for cycle parameters of (0-1 ton compressive stress and 1-25 kV.cm-1 electric field) using APCI-840. The reported energy density is several hundred times larger than the maximum energy density reported in the literature for vibration harvesting systems.

  7. Pressure dependence of electron density distribution and d-p-π hybridization in titanate perovskite ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Takamitsu; Nakamoto, Yuki; Ahart, Muhtar; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2018-04-01

    Electron density distributions of PbTi O3 , BaTi O3 , and SrTi O3 were determined by synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction up to 55 GPa at 300 K and ab initio quantum chemical molecular orbital (MO) calculations, together with a combination of maximum entropy method calculations. The intensity profiles of Bragg peaks reveal split atoms in both ferroelectric PbTi O3 and BaTi O3 , reflecting the two possible positions occupied by the Ti atom. The experimentally obtained atomic structure factor was used for the determination of the deformation in electron density and the d-p-π hybridization between dx z (and dy z) of Ti and px (and py) of O in the Ti-O bond. Ab initio MO calculations proved the change of the molecular orbital coupling and of Mulliken charges with a structure transformation. The Mulliken charge of Ti in the Ti O6 octahedron increased in the ionicity with increasing pressure in the cubic phase. The bonding nature is changed with a decrease in the hybridization of the Ti-O bond and the localization of the electron density with increasing pressure. The hybridization decreases with pressure and disappears in the cubic paraelectric phase, which has a much more localized electron density distribution.

  8. Two-diode behavior in metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor structures with bismuth titanate interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmuş, Perihan; Altindal, Şemsettin

    2017-10-01

    In this study, electrical parameters of the Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p-Si metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structure and their temperature dependence were investigated using current-voltage (I-V) data measured between 120 K and 300 K. Semi-logarithmic I-V plots of the structure revealed that fabricated structure presents two-diode behavior that leads to two sets of ideality factor, reverse saturation current and zero-bias barrier height (BH) values. Obtained results of these parameters suggest that current conduction mechanism (CCM) deviates strongly from thermionic emission theory particularly at low temperatures. High values of interface states and nkT/q-kT/q plot supported the idea of deviation from thermionic emission. In addition, ln(I)-ln(V) plots suggested that CCM varies from one bias region to another and depends on temperature as well. Series resistance values were calculated using Ohm’s law and Cheungs’ functions, and they decreased drastically with increasing temperature.

  9. Polarization switching behavior of one-axis-oriented lead zirconate titanate films fabricated on metal oxide nanosheet layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Hiroshi; Ichinose, Daichi; Shiraishi, Takahisa; Shima, Hiromi; Kiguchi, Takanori; Akama, Akihiko; Nishida, Ken; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    For the application of electronic devices using ferroelectric/piezoelectric components, one-axis-oriented tetragonal Pb(Zr0.40Ti0.60)O3 (PZT) films with thicknesses of up to 1 µm were fabricated with the aid of a Ca2Nb3O10 nanosheet (ns-CN) template for preferential crystal growth for evaluating their polarization switching behavior. The ns-CN template was supported on ubiquitous silicon (Si) wafer by a simple dip coating technique, followed by the repetitive chemical solution deposition (CSD) of PZT films. The PZT films were grown successfully with preferential crystal orientation of PZT(100) up to the thickness of 1020 nm. The (100)-oriented PZT film with ∼1 µm thickness exhibited unique polarization behavior of ferroelectric polarization, i.e., a marked increase in remanent polarization (P r) up to approximately 40 µC/cm2 induced by domain switching under high electric field, whereas the film with a lower thickness showed only a lower P r of approximately 11 µC/cm2 even under a high electric field. The ferroelectric property of the (100)-oriented PZT film after domain switching on ns-CN/Pt/Si can be comparable to those of (001)/(100)-oriented epitaxial PZT films.

  10. Structure and phase formation behavior and dielectric and magnetic properties of lead iron tantalate-lead zirconate titanate multiferroic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wongmaneerung, R., E-mail: re_nok@yahoo.com; Tipakontitikul, R.; Jantaratana, P.

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • The multiferroic ceramics consisted of PFT and PZT. • Crystal structure changed from cubic to mixedcubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. • Dielectric showed the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior. • Magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops. - Abstract: Multiferroic (1 − x)Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}–xPb(Zr{sub 0.53}Ti{sub 0.47})O{sub 3} (or PFT–PZT) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure and phase formation of the ceramics were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The local structure surrounding Fe and Ti absorbing atoms was investigated by synchrotron X-ray Absorption Near-Edgemore » Structure (XANES) measurement. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of frequency and temperature using a LCR meter. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to determine the magnetic hysteresis loops. XRD study indicated that the crystal structure of the sample changed from pure cubic to mixed cubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. XANES measurements showed that the local structure surrounding Fe and Ti ions was similar. Dielectric study showed that the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior while the magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops.« less

  11. Electric field tuning of magnetism in heterostructure of yttrium iron garnet film/lead magnesium niobate-lead zirconate titanate ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianyun; Ponchel, Freddy; Tiercelin, Nicolas; Chen, Ying; Rémiens, Denis; Lasri, Tuami; Wang, Genshui; Pernod, Philippe; Zhang, Wenbin; Dong, Xianlin

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the converse magnetoelectric (CME) effect by electric field tuning of magnetization in an original heterostructure composed of a polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film and a lead magnesium niobate-lead zirconate titanate (PMN-PZT) ceramic is presented. The magnetic performances of the YIG films with different thicknesses under a DC electric field applied to the PMN-PZT ceramics and a bias magnetic field are investigated. All the magnetization-electric field curves are found to be in good agreement with the butterfly like strain curve of the PMN-PZT ceramic. Both the sharp deformation of about 2.5‰ of PMN-PZT and the easy magnetization switching of YIG are proposed to be the reasons for the strongest CME interaction in the composite at the small electric coercive field of PMN-PZT (4.1 kV/cm) and the small magnetic coercive field of YIG (20 Oe) where the magnetic susceptibility reaches its maximum value. A remarkable CME coefficient of 3.1 × 10-7 s/m is obtained in the system with a 600 nm-thick YIG film. This heterostructure combining multiferroics and partially magnetized ferrite concepts is able to operate under a small or even in the absence of an external bias magnetic field and is more compact and power efficient than the traditional magnetoelectric devices.

  12. Using the methods of radiospectroscopy (EPR, NMR) to study the nature of the defect structure of solid solutions based on lead zirconate titanate (PZT).

    PubMed

    Bykov, Igor; Zagorodniy, Yuriy; Yurchenko, Lesya; Korduban, Alexander; Nejezchleb, Karel; Trachevsky, Vladimir; Dimza, Vilnis; Jastrabik, Lubomir; Dejneka, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    The nature of intrinsic and impurity point defects in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics has been explored. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) methods, several impurity sites have been identified in the materials, including the Fe(3+)-oxygen vacancy (VO) complex and Pb ions. Both of these centers are incorporated into the PZT lattice. The Fe(3+) –VО paramagnetic complex serves as a sensitive probe of the local crystal field in the ceramic; the symmetry of this defect roughly correlates with PZT phase diagram as the composition is varied from PbTiO3 to PbZrO3. NMR spectra (207)Pb in PbTiO3, PbZrO3, and PZT with iron content from 0 to 0.4 wt% showed that increasing the iron concentration leads to a distortion of the crystal structure and to improvement of the electrophysical parameters of the piezoceramics. This is due to the formation of a phase which has a higher symmetry, but at high concentrations of iron (>0.4 wt%), it leads to sharp degradation of electrophysical parameters.

  13. Design and Fabrication of 1D and 2D Micro Scanners Actuated by Double Layered Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Bimorph Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaur, Jiunnjye; Zhang, Lulu; Maeda, Ryutaro; Matsumoto, Sohei; Khumpuang, Sommawan

    2002-06-01

    Micro scanners including 1D scanner beams and 2D scanning micromirrors are designed and fabricated. In order to yield large bending force, the sol-gel derived double layered lead zirconate titanate (PZT) structures are developed to be the actuator components. In our developed fabrication process, the use of thermal treatment and the addition of one platinium/titanium film played an important role to yield the well-crystallized perovskite phase and decrease the residual strss of total cantilever structures successfully. In the case of 1D scanner beams with the size of 750× 230 μm2, the optical scanning angle was 41.2 deg with respect to actuation with AC 5 V at 2706 Hz. Under the applied bias of 10 V, the bimorph beam bended upward and the deflection angle of 34.3 deg was measured. A 2D scanning micromirror supported by four suspended double layered PZT actuators was designed to rotate around two orthogonal axes by the operation at different resonant frequencies. While resonating with AC 7.5 V at 3750 Hz and 5350 Hz, the maximum scanning area of 24\\circ× 26\\circ was obtained.

  14. Molecular ferroelectrics: where electronics meet biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiangyu; Liu, Yuanming; Zhang, Yanhang; Cai, Hong-Ling; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2013-12-28

    In the last several years, we have witnessed significant advances in molecular ferroelectrics, with the ferroelectric properties of molecular crystals approaching those of barium titanate. In addition, ferroelectricity has been observed in biological systems, filling an important missing link in bioelectric phenomena. In this perspective, we will present short historical notes on ferroelectrics, followed by an overview of the fundamentals of ferroelectricity. The latest developments in molecular ferroelectrics and biological ferroelectricity will then be highlighted, and their implications and potential applications will be discussed. We close by noting molecular ferroelectric as an exciting frontier between electronics and biology, and a number of challenges ahead are also described.

  15. Molecular ferroelectrics: where electronics meet biology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiangyu; Liu, Yuanming; Zhang, Yanhang; Cai, Hong-Ling; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2013-01-01

    In the last several years, we have witnessed significant advances in molecular ferroelectrics, with ferroelectric properties of molecular crystals approaching those of barium titanate. In addition, ferroelectricity has been observed in biological systems, filling an important missing link in bioelectric phenomena. In this perspective, we will present short historical notes on ferroelectrics, followed by overview on the fundamentals of ferroelectricity. Latest development in molecular ferroelectrics and biological ferroelectricity will then be highlighted, and their implications and potential applications will be discussed. We close by noting molecular ferroelectric as an exciting frontier between electronics and biology, and a number of challenges ahead are also noted. PMID:24018952

  16. Measurement of Ferroelectric Films in MFM and MFIS Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jackson D.

    For many years ferroelectric memory has been used in applications requiring low power, yet mainstream adoption has been stifled due to integration and scaling issues. With the renewed interest in these devices due to the recent discovery of ferroelectricity in HfO2, it is imperative that the properties of these films are well understood. To aid that end, a ferroelectric analysis package has been developed and released on GitHub and PyPI under a creative commons non-commercial share-alike license. This package contains functions for visualization and analysis of data from polarization, leakage current, and FORC measurements as well as basic modeling capability. Functionality is verified via the analysis of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) capacitors, where a multi-domain simulation based on an experimental Preisach density shows decent agreement despite measurement noise. The package is then used in the analysis of ferroelectric HfO2 films deposited in metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) and metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) stacks. 13.5 nm HfO2 films deposited on a semiconductor surface are shown to have a coercive voltage of 2.5 V, rather than the 1.9 V of the film in an MFM stack. This value further increases to 3-5 V when a lightly doped semiconductor depletion and inversion capacitance is added to the stack. The magnitude of this change is more than can be accounted for from the 10% voltage drop across the interfacial oxide layer, indicating that the modified surface properties are impacting the formation of the ferroelectric phase during anneal. In light of this, care should be taken to map out ferroelectric HfO2 properties using the particular physical stack that will be used, rather than using an MFM stack as a proxy.

  17. Recent Progress in Understanding the Shock Response of Ferroelectric Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setchell, R. E.

    2002-07-01

    Ferroelectric ceramics exhibit a permanent remanent polarization, and shock depoling of these materials to achieve pulsed sources of electrical power was proposed in the late 1950s. During the following twenty years, extensive studies were conducted to examine the shock response of ferroelectric ceramics primarily based on lead zirconate titanate (PZT). Under limited conditions, relatively simple analytical models were found to adequately describe the observed electrical behavior. A more complex behavior was indicated over broader conditions, however, resulting in the incorporation of shock-induced conductivity and dielectric relaxation into analytical models. Unfortunately, few experimental studies were undertaken over the next twenty years, and the development of more comprehensive models was inhibited. In recent years, a strong interest in advancing numerical simulation capabilities has motivated new experimental studies and corresponding model development. More than seventy gas gun experiments have examined several ferroelectric ceramics, with most experiments on lead zirconate titanate having a Zr:Ti ratio of 95:5 and modified with 2% niobium (PZT 95/5). This material is nominally ferroelectric but is near an antiferroelectric phase boundary, and depoling results from a shock-driven phase transition. Experiments have examined unpoled, normally poled, and axially poled PZT 95/5 over broad ranges of shock pressure and peak electric field. The extensive base of new data provides quantitative insights into both the stress and field dependencies of depoling kinetics, and the significance of pore collapse at higher stresses. The results are being actively utilized to develop and refine material response models used in numerical simulations of pulsed power devices.

  18. Investigations on structural and multiferroic properties of artificially engineered lead zirconate titanate-cobalt iron oxide layered nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Achury, Nora Patricia

    relaxation peaks near the step-up characteristic respectively. The Cole-Cole plots indicate that the most of the dielectric response came from the bulk (grains) MLs below 300 K, whereas grain boundaries and electrode-MLs effects prominent at elevated temperature. The dielectric loss relaxation peaks shifted to higher frequency side with increase in temperature, finally above 300 K, it went out experimental frequency window. Our Cole-Cole fitting of dielectric loss spectra indicated marked deviation from the ideal Debye type of relaxation which is more prominent at elevated temperature. Master modulus spectra support the observation from impedance spectra, it also indicate that the difference between C g and Cgb are higher compared to polycrystalline MLs indicating less effects of grain boundary in highly oriented MLs. We have explained these electrical properties of MLs by Maxwell-Wagner type contributions arising from the interfacial charge at the interface of the MLs structure. Three different types of frequency dependent conduction process were observed at elevated temperature (>300 K), which well fitted with the double power law, sigma(o) = sigma(0) + A 1on1 + A 2on2, it indicates conduction at: Low frequency (<1 kHz) may be due to long range ordering (frequency independent), mid frequency (<10 kHz) may be due to short range hopping, and high frequency (<1 MHz) due to the localized relaxation hopping mechanism. The last part of the thesis is devoted to the study of the multiferroic and magnetoelectric properties of the ML thin films. Both polycrystalline and highly oriented films showed well saturated ferroelectric and ferromagnetic hysteresis loops at room temperature. Temperature dependence of ferroelectric properties showed that polarization slowly decreases from 300 K to 200 K, with complete collapse of polarization at ˜ 100 K, but there was complete recovery of the polarization during heating, which was repeatable over many different experiments. At the same time

  19. Fabrication and Evaluation of One-Axis Oriented Lead Zirconate Titanate Films Using Metal-Oxide Nanosheet Interface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minemura, Yoshiki; Nagasaka, Kohei; Kiguchi, Takanori; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Nanosheet Ca2Nb3O20 (ns-CN) layers with pseudo-perovskite-type crystal configuration were applied on the surface of polycrystalline metal substrates to achieve preferential crystal orientation of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) films for the purpose of enhanced ferroelectricity comparable to that of epitaxial thin films. PZT films with tetragonal symmetry (Zr/Ti=0.40:0.60) were fabricated by chemical solution deposition (CSD) on ns-CN-buffered Inconel 625 and SUS 316L substrates, while ns-CN was applied on the the substrates by dip-coating. The preferential crystal growth on the ns-CN layer can be achieved by favorable lattice matching between (001)/(100)PZT and (001)ns-CN planes. The degree of (001) orientation was increased for PZT films on ns-CN/Inconel 625 and ns-CN/SUS 316L substrates, whereas randomly-oriented PZT films with a lower degree of (001) orientation were grown on bare and Inconel 625 films. Enhanced remanent polarization of 60 µC/cm2 was confirmed for the PZT films on ns-CN/metal substrates, ascribed to the preferential alignment of the polar [001] axis normal to the substrate surface, although it also suffered from higher coercive field above 500 kV/cm caused by PZT/metal interfacial reaction.

  20. Thickness dependence of the poling and current-voltage characteristics of paint films made up of lead zirconate titanate ceramic powder and epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusa, Shigenori; Iwasawa, Naozumi

    1995-11-01

    A specially prepared paint made up of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic powder and epoxy resin was coated on an aluminum plate and was cured at room temperature, thus forming the paint film of 25-300 μm thickness with a PZT volume fraction of 53%. The paint film was then poled at room temperature, and the poling behavior was determined by measuring the piezoelectric activity as a function of poling field. The poling behavior shows that the piezoelectric activity obtained at a given poling field increases with an increase in the film thickness from 25 to 300 μm. The current-voltage characteristic of the paint film, on the other hand, shows that the increase in the film thickness leads not only to an increase in the magnitude of the current density at a given electric field but also to an increase in the critical electric field at which the transition from the ohmic to space-charge-limited conduction takes place. This fact indicates that the amount of the space charge of electrons injected into the paint film decreases as the film thickness increases. Furthermore, comparison of the current-voltage characteristic of the paint film with that of a pure epoxy film reveals that the space charge is accumulated largely at the interface between the PZT and epoxy phases in the paint film. On the basis of this finding, a model is developed for the poling behavior of the paint film by taking into account a possible effect of the space-charge accumulation and a broad distribution of the electric field in the PZT phase. This model is shown to give an excellent fit to the experimental data of the piezoelectric activity obtained here as a function of poling field and film thickness.

  1. Lead-free piezoelectric (K,Na)NbO3-based ceramic with planar-mode coupling coefficient comparable to that of conventional lead zirconate titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohbayashi, Kazushige; Matsuoka, Takayuki; Kitamura, Kazuaki; Yamada, Hideto; Hishida, Tomoko; Yamazaki, Masato

    2017-06-01

    We developed a (K,Na)NbO3-based lead-free piezoelectric ceramic with a KTiNbO5 system, (K1- x Na x )0.86Ca0.04Li0.02Nb0.85O3-δ-K0.85Ti0.85Nb1.15O5-BaZrO3-Fe2O3-MgO (K1- x N x N-NTK-FM). K1- x N x N-NTK-FM ceramic exhibits a very dense microstructure and a coupling coefficient of k p = 0.59, which is almost comparable to that of conventional lead zirconate titanate (PZT). The (K,Na)NbO3-based ceramic has the Γ15 mode for a wide x range. The nanodomains of orthorhombic (K,Na)NbO3 with the M3 mode coexist within the tetragonal Γ15 mode (K,Na)NbO3 matrix. Successive phase transition cannot occur with increasing x. The maximum k p is observed at approximately the minimum x required to generate the M3 mode phase. Unlike the behavior at the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) in PZT, the characteristics of K1- x N x N-NTK-FM ceramic in this region changed moderately. This gentle phase transition seems to be a relaxor, although the diffuseness degree is not in line with this hypothesis. Furthermore, piezoelectric properties change from “soft” to “hard” upon the M3 mode phase aggregation.

  2. Electric and ferroelectric properties of PZT/BLT multilayer films prepared by photochemical metal-organic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeong-Ho; Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho; Hill, Ross H.; Hwang, Yun Taek

    2009-01-01

    The electric and ferroelectric properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and lanthanum-substituted bismuth titanate (BLT) multilayer films prepared using photosensitive precursors were characterized. The electric and ferroelectric properties were investigated by studying the effect of the stacking order of four ferroelectric layers of PZT or BLT in 4-PZT, PZT/2-BLT/PZT, BLT/2-PZT/BLT, and 4-BLT multilayer films. The remnant polarization values of the 4-BLT and BLT/2-PZT/BLT multilayer films were 12 and 17 μC/cm 2, respectively. Improved ferroelectric properties of the PZT/BLT multilayer films were obtained by using a PZT intermediate layer. The films which contained a BLT layer on the Pt substrate had improved leakage currents of approximately two orders of magnitude and enhanced fatigue resistances compared to the films with a PZT layer on the Pt substrate. These improvements are due to the reduced number of defects and space charges near the Pt electrodes. The PZT/BLT multilayer films prepared by photochemical metal-organic deposition (PMOD) possessed enhanced electric and ferroelectric properties, and allow direct patterning to fabricate micro-patterned systems without dry etching.

  3. Evolution of orientation degree, lattice dynamics and electronic band structure properties in nanocrystalline lanthanum-doped bismuth titanate ferroelectric films by chemical solution deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinzhong; Chen, Xiangui; Jiang, Kai; Shen, Yude; Li, Yawei; Hu, Zhigao; Chu, Junhao

    2011-08-21

    Ferroelectric lanthanum (La)-substituted bismuth titanate (Bi(4-x)La(x)Ti(3)O(12), BLT) nanocrystalline films with the composition range of 0 ≤x≤ 1 have been directly deposited on n-type Si (100) substrates by chemical solution deposition. The La substitution effects on the preferred orientation, surface morphology, phonon modes, emission bands and electronic band structures of the BLT films have been investigated by microscopy, Raman scattering, photoluminescence and spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. X-Ray diffraction analysis shows that the films are polycrystalline and exhibit the pure perovskite phase structure. With increasing La composition, the (100)-orientation degree can be enhanced and the root-mean-square roughnesses slightly increase from 6.5 to 8.3 nm. It was found that the Raman-active mode A(1g)[Bi] at about 59 cm(-1) is unchanged while the B(1g) and A(1g)[Ti] phonon modes at about 648 and 853 cm(-1) are shifted towards higher frequency by about 36.6 and 8.4 cm(-1), respectively. Photoluminescence spectra show that the intensity of the peak located at about 2.3 eV increases with the La composition, except for the Bi(3)LaTi(3)O(12) film, due to the smallest grain size and oxygen vacancy defects. The optical constants of the BLT films have been uniquely extracted by fitting the measured ellipsometric spectra with a four-phase layered model (air/surface rough layer/BLT/Si) in the photon energy range of 0.73-4.77 eV. The Adachi dielectric function model has been successfully applied and reasonably describes the optical response behavior of the ferroelectric BLT films. Moreover, the film packing density decreases while the optical band gap linearly increases from 3.610 ± 0.066 to 3.758 ± 0.068 eV with increasing La composition. It is surmised that the phenomena are mainly ascribed to the variations of the electronic structure, especially for the conduction band, which is perturbed by the La doping. This journal is © The Royal

  4. Orientation dependent ferroelectric properties in samarium doped bismuth titanate thin films grown by the pulsed-laser-ablation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhenxiang; Kannan, Chinna Venkatasamy; Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Hideo; Wang, Xiaolin

    2006-07-01

    Samarium doped bismuth titanate thin films with the composition of Bi3.25Sm0.75Ti3O12 and with strong preferred orientations along the c axis and the (117) direction were fabricated on Pt /TiO2/SiO2/Si substrate by pulsed laser ablation. Measurements on Pt /BSmT/Pt capacitors showed that the c-axis oriented film had a small remanent polarization (2Pr) of 5μC/cm2, while the highly (117) oriented film showed a 2Pr value of 54μC/cm2 at an electrical field of 268kV/cm and a coercive field Ec of 89kV/cm. This is different from the sol-gel derived c-axis oriented Bi3.15Sm0.85Ti3O12 film showing a 2Pr value of 49μC/cm2.

  5. Fatigue and retention in ferroelectric Y-Ba-Cu-O/Pb-Zr-Ti-O/Y-Ba-Cu-O heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, R.; Chan, W. K.; Wilkens, B.; Gilchrist, H.; Sands, T.; Tarascon, J. M.; Keramidas, V. G.; Fork, D. K.; Lee, J.; Safari, A.

    1992-09-01

    Fatigue and retention characteristics of ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate thin films grown with Y-Ba-Cu-O(YBCO) thin-film top and bottom electrodes are found to be far superior to those obtained with conventional Pt top electrodes. The heterostructures reported here have been grown in situ by pulsed laser deposition on yttria-stabilized ZrO2 buffer [100] Si and on [001] LaAlO3. Both the a- and c-axis orientations of the YBCO lattice have been used as electrodes. They were prepared using suitable changes in growth conditions.

  6. Enhanced fatigue and retention in ferroelectric thin film memory capacitors by post-top electrode anneal treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Thin film ferroelectric capacitors comprising a ferroelectric film sandwiched between electrodes for nonvolatile memory operations are rendered more stable by subjecting the capacitors to an anneal following deposition of the top electrode. The anneal is done so as to form the interface between the ferroelectric film and the top electrode. Heating in an air oven, laser annealing, or electron bombardment may be used to form the interface. Heating in an air oven is done at a temperature at least equal to the crystallization temperature of the ferroelectric film. Where the ferroelectric film comprises lead zirconate titanate, annealing is done at about 550 to 600 C for about 10 to 15 minutes. The formation treatment reduces the magnitude of charge associated with the nonswitching pulse in the thin film ferroelectric capacitors. Reduction of this charge leads to significantly more stable nonvolatile memory operations in both digital and analog memory devices. The formation treatment also reduces the ratio of change of the charge associated with the nonswitching pulse as a function of retention time. These improved memory devices exhibit greater performance in retention and reduced fatigue in memory arrays.

  7. Enhanced fatigue and retention in ferroelectric thin film memory capacitors by post-top electrode anneal treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Thin film ferroelectric capacitors (10) comprising a ferroelectric film (18) sandwiched between electrodes (16 and 20) for nonvolatile memory operations are rendered more stable by subjecting the capacitors to an anneal following deposition of the top electrode (20). The anneal is done so as to form the interface (22) between the ferroelectric film and the top electrode. Heating in an air oven, laser annealing, or electron bombardment may be used to form the interface. Heating in an air oven is done at a temperature at least equal to the crystallization temperature of the ferroelectric film. Where the ferroelectric film comprises lead zirconate titanate, annealing is done at about 550.degree. to 600.degree. C. for about 10 to 15 minutes. The formation treatment reduces the magnitude of charge associated with the non-switching pulse in the thin film ferroelectric capacitors. Reduction of this charge leads to significantly more stable nonvolatile memory operations in both digital and analog memory devices. The formation treatment also reduces the ratio of change of the charge associated with the non-switching pulse as a function of retention time. These improved memory devices exhibit greater performance in retention and reduced fatigue in memory arrays.

  8. Measurement and modeling of dielectric properties of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ferroelectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Renoud, Raphaël; Borderon, Caroline; Gundel, Hartmut W

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity of lead zirconate titanate ferroelectric thin films are studied in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 100 MHz. The permittivity is well fitted by the Cole-Cole model. The variation of the relaxation time with the temperature is described by the Arrhenius law and an activation energy of 0.38 eV is found. Because of its nonlinear character, the dielectric response of the ferroelectric sample depends on the amplitude of the applied ac electric field. The permittivity is composed of three different contributions: the first is due to intrinsic lattice, the second is due to domain wall vibrations, and the third is due to domain wall jumps between pinning centers. This last contribution depends on the electric field, so it is important to control the field amplitude to obtain the desired values of permittivity and tunability.

  9. Electron emission and beam generation using ferroelectric cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flechtner, Donald D.

    1999-06-01

    In 1989, researchers at CERN published the discovery of significant electron emission (1-100 A/cm2) from Lead-Lanthanum-Zirconate- Titanate (PLZT). The publication of these results led to international interest in ferroelectric cathodes studies for use in pulsed power devices. At Cornell University in 1991, experiments with Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) compositions were begun to study the feasibility of using this ferroelectric material as a cathode in the electron gun section of High Power Traveling Wave Tube Amplifier Experiments. Current-voltage characteristics were documented for diode voltages ranging from 50-500,000 V with anode cathode gaps of.5-6 cm. A linear current-voltage relation was found for voltages less than 50 kV. For diode voltages >=200 kV, a typical Child-Langmuir V3/2 dependence was observed. Additional experiments have demonstrated repetition rates of up to 50 Hz with current densities of >=20 A/cm2. These results have been used in the ongoing design and construction of the electron gun for a 500 kV pulse modulator capable of repetitive operation at 1 Hz. The electron gun uses a PZT 55/45 (Pb(Zr.55,Ti.45 )O3) cathode to produce a <=400 A electron beam focused by a converging magnetic field. Studies of the emission process itself indicate the initial electrons are produced by field emission from the metallic grid applied to the front surface of the cathode. The field emission is induced by the application of a fast rising 1-3 kV, 150 ns pulse to the rear electrode of the 1 mm thick ferroelectric. Field emission can lead to explosive emission from microprotrusions and metal-ferroelectric-vacuum triple points forming a diffuse plasma on the surface of the sample. Under long pulse experiments (1-5 μs), plasma velocities of ~2 cm/μs were measured from gap closure rates. Results from an ion Faraday cup experiment showed ion velocities of 1-2 cm/μs. Experimental evidence indicates the electron emission is dependent on the field emission initiated

  10. Electric field cycling behavior of ferroelectric hafnium oxide.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Tony; Schroeder, Uwe; Pešić, Milan; Popovici, Mihaela; Pershin, Yuriy V; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2014-11-26

    HfO2 based ferroelectrics are lead-free, simple binary oxides with nonperovskite structure and low permittivity. They just recently started attracting attention of theoretical groups in the fields of ferroelectric memories and electrostatic supercapacitors. A modified approach of harmonic analysis is introduced for temperature-dependent studies of the field cycling behavior and the underlying defect mechanisms. Activation energies for wake-up and fatigue are extracted. Notably, all values are about 100 meV, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than for conventional ferroelectrics like lead zirconate titanate (PZT). This difference is mainly atttributed to the one to two orders of magnitude higher electric fields used for cycling and to the different surface to volume ratios between the 10 nm thin films in this study and the bulk samples of former measurements or simulations. Moreover, a new, analog-like split-up effect of switching peaks by field cycling is discovered and is explained by a network model based on memcapacitive behavior as a result of defect redistribution.

  11. Low temperature dielectric relaxation in ordinary perovskite ferroelectrics: enlightenment from high-energy x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, D. A.; Levit, R.; Fancher, C. M.; Esteves, G.; Jones, J. L.; E García, J.

    2017-05-01

    Ordinary ferroelectrics exhibit a second order phase transition that is characterized by a sharp peak in the dielectric permittivity at a frequency-independent temperature. Furthermore, these materials show a low temperature dielectric relaxation that appears to be a common behavior of perovskite systems. Tetragonal lead zirconate titanate is used here as a model system in order to explore the origin of such an anomaly, since there is no consensus about the physical phenomenon involved in it. Crystallographic and domain structure studies are performed from temperature dependent synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurement. Results indicate that the dielectric relaxation cannot be associated with crystallographic or domain configuration changes. The relaxation process is then parameterized by using the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann phenomenological equation. Results allow us to hypothesize that the observed phenomenon is due to changes in the dynamic behavior of the ferroelectric domains related to the fluctuation of the local polarization.

  12. Low temperature dielectric relaxation in ordinary perovskite ferroelectrics: enlightenment from high-energy x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Ochoa, D. A.; Levit, R.; Fancher, C. M.; ...

    2017-04-05

    We report that ordinary ferroelectrics exhibit a second order phase transition that is characterized by a sharp peak in the dielectric permittivity at a frequency-independent temperature. Furthermore, these materials show a low temperature dielectric relaxation that appears to be a common behavior of perovskite systems. Tetragonal lead zirconate titanate is used here as a model system in order to explore the origin of such an anomaly, since there is no consensus about the physical phenomenon involved in it. Crystallographic and domain structure studies are performed from temperature dependent synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurement. Results indicate that the dielectric relaxation cannot bemore » associated with crystallographic or domain configuration changes. The relaxation process is then parameterized by using the Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann phenomenological equation. Finally, results allow us to hypothesize that the observed phenomenon is due to changes in the dynamic behavior of the ferroelectric domains related to the fluctuation of the local polarization.« less

  13. HAFNIAN ZIRCONS

    SciTech Connect

    von Knorring, O.; Hornung, G.

    1961-06-17

    Two hafnia zircons were examined in detail, one from Mtoko in Southern Rhodesia, containing 21% HfO/sub 2/, and the other from Karibib in South-West Africa, with 31% HfO/sub 2/. In both cases the zircons are associated with the later tantalum-rich phase of mineralization. The Mtoko zircon forms small, mauve- colored, independent crystals in the albitic zone of the pegmatite. The zircon from Karibib occurs in larger reddish-brown masses, partly intergrown with minute manganotantalite crystals and set in a matrix of lithium-bearing mica, albite, quartz and kaolinized feldspar. Some crystals show dominant pyramid faces, with a suppressed prism. Both zircons exhibitmore » an intense golden-yellow fluorescence in UV light. The zircon from Karibib was found to be only weakly radioactive. Data are given concerning various properties of the two zircons. (P.C.H.)« less

  14. Fabrication and investigation of three-dimensional ferroelectric capacitors for the application of FeRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Pin; Lisker, Marco; Kalkofen, Bodo; Burte, Edmund P.

    2016-03-01

    Ferroelectric capacitors made by lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films and iridium electrodes are fabricated on three-dimensional structures and their properties are investigated. The iridium films are grown by Plasma Enhanced MOCVD at 300°C, while the PZT films are deposited by thermal MOCVD at different process temperatures between 450°C and 550°C. The step coverage and composition uniformity of the PZT films on trench holes and lines are investigated. Phase separation of PZT films has been observed on both 3D and planar structures. No clear dependences of the crystallization and composition of PZT on 3D structure topography have been found. STEM EDX line scans show a uniform Zr/(Zr+Ti) concentration ratio along the 3D profile but the variation of the Pb/(Zr+Ti) concentration ratio is large because of the phase separation. 3D ferroelectric capacitors show good ferroelectric properties but have much higher leakage currents than 2D ferroelectric capacitors. Nevertheless, during cycling tests the degradation of the remnant polarization between 2D and 3D capacitors is similar after 109 switching cycles. In addition, the sidewalls and bottoms of the 3D structures seem to have comparable remnant polarizations with the horizontal top surfaces.

  15. Novel Photovoltaic Devices Using Ferroelectric Material and Colloidal Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Young Hun

    As the global concern for the financial and environmental costs of traditional energy resources increases, research on renewable energy, most notably solar energy, has taken center stage. Many alternative photovoltaic (PV) technologies for 'the next generation solar cell' have been extensively studied to overcome the Shockley-Queisser 31% efficiency limit as well as tackle the efficiency vs. cost issues. This dissertation focuses on the novel photovoltaic mechanism for the next generation solar cells using two inorganic nanomaterials, nanocrystal quantum dots and ferroelectric nanoparticles. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) materials are widely studied and easy to synthesize using solution based chemistry. One of the fascinating properties of the PZT material is a Bulk Photovoltaic effect (BPVE). This property has been spotlighted because it can produce very high open circuit voltage regardless of the electrical bandgap of the materials. However, the poor optical absorption of the PZT materials and the required high temperature to form the ferroelectric crystalline structure have been obstacles to fabricate efficient photovoltaic devices. Colloidal quantum dots also have fascinating optical and electrical properties such as tailored absorption spectrum, capability of the bandgap engineering due to the wide range of material selection and quantum confinement, and very efficient carrier dynamics called multiple exciton generations. In order to utilize these properties, many researchers have put numerous efforts in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic research and there has been remarkable progress in the past decade. However, several drawbacks are still remaining to achieve highly efficient photovoltaic device. Traps created on the large surface area, low carrier mobility, and lower open circuit voltage while increasing the absorption of the solar spectrum is main issues of the nanocrystal based photovoltaic effect. To address these issues and to take the advantages of

  16. Possible ferrimagnetism and ferroelectricity of half-substituted rare-earth titanate: A first-principles study on Y0.5La0.5TiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ming; Zhang, Hui-Min; Weng, Ya-Kui; Zhang, Yang; Dong, Shuai

    2016-04-01

    Titanates with the perovskite structure, including ferroelectrics (e.g., BaTiO3) and ferromagnetic ones (e.g., YTiO3), are important functional materials. Recent theoretical studies predicted multiferroic states in strained EuTiO3 and titanate superlattices, the former of which has already been experimental confirmed. Here, a first-principles calculation is performed to investigate the structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of Y half-substituted LaTiO3. Our results reveal that the magnetism of Y0.5La0.5TiO3 sensitively depends on its structural details because of the inherent phase competition. The lowest energy state is the ferromagnetic state, resulting in 0.25 μ B /Ti. Furthermore, some configurations of Y0.5La0.5TiO3 exhibit hybrid improper polarizations, which can be significantly affected by magnetism, resulting in the multiferroic properties. Because of the quenching disorder of substitution, the real Y0.5La0.5TiO3 material with random A-site ions may exhibit interesting relaxor behaviors.

  17. Effect of La and W dopants on dielectric and ferroelectric properties of PZT thin films prepared by sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Mi; Zhang, Zebin; Zhang, Weikang; Zhang, Ping

    2018-01-01

    La or W-doped lead zirconate titanate thin films (PLZT or PZTW) were prepared on platinized silicon substrates by sol-gel process. The effects of La or W dopant on the phase development, microstructure, dielectric and ferroelectric characteristics of films were studied. For PLZT films, the optimum doping concentration was found to be 2 mol%. While for PZTW films, the dielectric and ferroelectric properties were found to be improved as the doping concentration increased. The fatigue properties of PLZT and PZTW thin films were also investigated, the results showed that A- or B-site donor doping could improve the fatigue properties of PZT thin films. The theory of oxygen vacancy was used to explain the performance improvement caused by donor doping.

  18. Giant lateral electrostriction in ferroelectric liquid-crystalline elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, W.; Skupin, H.; Tolksdorf, C.; Gebhard, E.; Zentel, R.; Krüger, P.; Lösche, M.; Kremer, F.

    2001-03-01

    Mechanisms for converting electrical energy into mechanical energy are essential for the design of nanoscale transducers, sensors, actuators, motors, pumps, artificial muscles, and medical microrobots. Nanometre-scale actuation has to date been mainly achieved by using the (linear) piezoelectric effect in certain classes of crystals (for example, quartz), and `smart' ceramics such as lead zirconate titanate. But the strains achievable in these materials are small-less than 0.1 per cent-so several alternative materials and approaches have been considered. These include grafted polyglutamates (which have a performance comparable to quartz), silicone elastomers (passive material-the constriction results from the Coulomb attraction of the capacitor electrodes between which the material is sandwiched) and carbon nanotubes (which are slow). High and fast strains of up to 4 per cent within an electric field of 150MVm-1 have been achieved by electrostriction (this means that the strain is proportional to the square of the applied electric field) in an electron-irradiated poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) copolymer. Here we report a material that shows a further increase in electrostriction by two orders of magnitude: ultrathin (less than 100nanometres) ferroelectric liquid-crystalline elastomer films that exhibit 4 per cent strain at only 1.5 MVm-1. This giant electrostriction was obtained by combining the properties of ferroelectric liquid crystals with those of a polymer network. We expect that these results, which can be completely understood on a molecular level, will open new perspectives for applications.

  19. Effects of crystallization interfaces on irradiated ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, S. J.; Williams, S. C.; Cress, C. D.; Bassiri-Gharb, N.

    2017-11-01

    This work investigates the role of crystallization interfaces and chemical heterogeneity in the radiation tolerance of chemical solution-deposited lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films. Two sets of PZT thin films were fabricated with crystallization performed at (i) every deposited layer or (ii) every three layers. The films were exposed to a range of 60Co gamma radiation doses, between 0.2 and 20 Mrad, and their functional response was compared before and after irradiation. The observed trends indicate enhancements of dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric responses at low radiation doses and degradation of the same at higher doses. Response enhancements are expected to result from low-dose (≤2 Mrad), ionizing radiation-induced charging of internal interfaces—an effect that results in neutralization of pre-existing internal bias in the samples. At higher radiation doses (>2 Mrad), accumulation and self-ordering of radiation-modified, mobile, oxygen vacancy-related defects contribute to degradation of dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties, exacerbated in the samples with more crystallization layers, potentially due to increased defect accumulation at these internal interfaces. These results suggest that the interaction between radiation and crystallization interfaces is multifaceted—the effects of ionization, domain wall motion, point defect mobility, and microstructure are considered.

  20. Explicit formulas for effective piezoelectric coefficients of ferroelectric 0-3 composites based on effective medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. K.; Poon, Y. M.; Shin, F. G.

    2003-01-01

    Explicit formulas were derived for the effective piezoelectric stress coefficients of a 0-3 composite of ferroelectric spherical particles in a ferroelectric matrix which were then combined to give the more commonly used strain coefficients. Assuming that the elastic stiffness of the inclusion phase is sufficiently larger than that of the matrix phase, the previously derived explicit expressions for the case of a low volume concentration of inclusion particles [C. K. Wong, Y. M. Poon, and F. G. Shin, Ferroelectrics 264, 39 (2001); J. Appl. Phys. 90, 4690 (2001)] were "transformed" analytically by an effective medium theory (EMT) with appropriate approximations, to suit the case of a more concentrated suspension. Predictions of the EMT expressions were compared with the experimental values of composites of lead zirconate titanate ceramic particles dispersed in polyvinylidene fluoride and polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene copolymer, reported by Furukawa [IEEE Trans. Electr. Insul. 24, 375 (1989)] and by Ng et al. [IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 47, 1308 (2000)] respectively. Fairly good agreement was obtained. Comparisons with other predictions, including the predictions given by numerically solving the EMT scheme, were also made. It was found that the analytic and numeric EMT schemes agreed with each other very well for an inclusion of volume fraction not exceeding 60%.

  1. High-frequency, transient magnetic susceptibility of ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, Craig A.

    1996-10-01

    A significant high-frequency magnetic susceptibility was measured both in weakly polarized and nonpolarized samples of barium titanate, lead zirconate titanate, and carnauba wax. Magnetic susceptibility measurements were made from 10 to 500 MHz using a thin film permeameter at room temperature; initial susceptibilities ranged from 0.1 to 2.5. These values are larger than expected for paramagnets and smaller than expected for ferromagnets. It was found that the magnetic susceptibility decreases rapidly with exposure to the exciting field. The origin of the magnetic susceptibility is thought to originate with the applied time varying electric field associated with the susceptibility measurements. An electric field acts to rotate an electric dipole, creating a magnetic quadrupole if the two moments are balanced, and a net magnetic dipole moment if imbalanced. It is thought that local electrostatic fields created at ferroelectric domain discontinuities associated with grain boundaries create an imbalance in the anion rotation that results in a net, measurable, magnetic moment. The origin of the magnetic aftereffect may be due to the local heating of the material through the moving charges associated with the magnetic moment.

  2. Enhanced ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties in La-modified PZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kour, P.; Pradhan, S. K.; Kumar, Pawan; Sinha, S. K.; Kar, Manoranjan

    2016-06-01

    The effect of lanthanum (La) doping on ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) sample has been investigated. Pb1- x La x Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 ceramics with x = 0.00, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.10 were prepared by the sol-gel technique. Raman and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy have been employed to understand the structural modification due to ionic size mismatch. Raman spectra show the existence of both rhombohedral and tetragonal crystal symmetries. It also shows the dielectric relaxation with increase in La concentration in the sample. The increase in lattice strain due to La doping increases the remnant polarization and coercive field. The linear piezoelectric coefficient increases with the increase in La concentration. It reveals that La-substituted PZT is a better candidate for piezoelectric sensor applications as compared to that of PZT.

  3. Tunable ferroelectric meta-material phase shifter embedded inside low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tork, Hossam S.

    This dissertation describes electrically tunable microwave devices utilizing low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) and thick film via filled with the ferroelectric materials barium strontium titanate (BST) and barium zirconate titanate (BZT). Tunable ferroelectric capacitors, zero meta-material phase shifters, and tunable meta-material phase shifters are presented. Microwave phase shifters have many applications in microwave devices. They are essential components for active and passive phased array antennas and their most common use is in scanning phased array antennas. They are used in synthetic aperture radars (SAR), low earth orbit (LEO) communication satellites, collision warning radars, and intelligent vehicle highway systems (IVHS), in addition to various other applications. Tunable ferroelectric materials have been investigated, since they offer the possibility of lowering the total cost of phased arrays. Two of the most promising ferroelectric materials in microwave applications are BST and BZT. The proposed design and implementation in this research introduce new types of tunable meta-material phase shifters embedded inside LTCC, which use BST and BZT as capacitive tunable dielectric material controlled by changing the applied voltage. This phase shifter has the advantages of meta-material structures, which produce little phase error and compensation while having the simultaneous advantage of using LTCC technology for embedding passive components that improve signal integrity (several signal lines, power planes, and ground planes) by using different processes like via filling, screen printing, laminating and firing that can be produced in compact sizes at a low cost. The via filling technique was used to build tunable BST, BZT ferroelectric material capacitors to control phase shift. Finally, The use of the proposed ferroelectric meta-material phase shifter improves phase shifter performance by reducing insertion loss in both transmitting and receiving

  4. Triggering Incipient Ferroelectricity in Calcium Copper Titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12) ceramics through partial B-site substitution with Te4+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Nabadyuti; Varma, K. B. R.

    Double perovskite structured dielectric ceramic CaCu3Ti4- x TexO12 (CCTTO) (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2) was fabricated from the powder obtained by conventional solid state synthetic route. The room temperature XRD patterns for the x = 0, 0.05, 0.075 modified samples were confirmed to possess a single phase with cubic space group Im3by Rietveld refinement. But, the Rietveld refinement performed on XRD patterns recorded for the compositions corresponding to x = 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 shows the coexistence of the cubic phase (space group Im3; a = 7.4065Å) and tetragonal phase (space group I4/mcm; a = 7.369 Å and c = 6.967 Å). The dielectric properties of these ceramics were studied over a wide frequency (40Hz-2MHz) and temperature range (30-400K). The Te4+ doped samples (CCTTO) exhibited dielectric permittivity (?r) value of ~23-33X103 which is more than twice that of undoped CCTO (~11x103) at 1kHz. A decreasing trend in dielectric permittivity with increasing temperature, a signature of incipient ferroelectricity, was observed for all the samples. Barrett's formula was invoked to rationalize the dielectric permittivity variation as a function of temperature. The incipient ferroelectric behavior is correlated with soft phonon mode observed in temperature dependent Raman Spectroscopic studies. .

  5. High photovoltages in ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, P. S.

    1976-01-01

    The short-circuit currents and photo-emfs were measured for various ceramics including barium titanate, lead metaniobate, and lead titanate. It is suggested that the emfs and currents arise from the presence of photoconductor-insulator sandwiches in the presence of space-charge-produced internal fields. Results are in agreement with the proposed theory and indicate that the ferroelectric ceramics are not only producers of high-voltage photoelectricity but a photo-battery, the polarity and magnitude of which can be switched by application of an electrical signal.

  6. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of making non-volatile digital memory devices of barium titanate, BaTiO3, that are integrated onto a silicon substrate with the required ferroelectric film produced by processing, compatible with silicon technology was examined.

  7. Photoelectron spectroscopic and microspectroscopic probes of ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tǎnase, Liviu C.; Abramiuc, Laura E.; Teodorescu, Cristian M.

    2017-12-01

    This contribution is a review of recent aspects connected with photoelectron spectroscopy of free ferroelectric surfaces, metals interfaced with these surfaces, graphene-like layers together with some exemplifications concerning molecular adsorption, dissociations and desorptions occurring from ferroelectrics. Standard photoelectron spectroscopy is used nowadays in correlation with other characterization techniques, such as piezoresponse force microscopy, high resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, and ferroelectric hysteresis cycles. In this work we will concentrate mainly on photoelectron spectroscopy and spectro-microscopy characterization of ferroelectric thin films, starting from atomically clean ferroelectric surfaces of lead zirco-titanate, then going towards heterostructures using this material in combination with graphene-like carbon layers or with metals. Concepts involving charge accumulation and depolarization near surface will be revisited by taking into account the newest findings in this area.

  8. Sensitivity Enhancement in Magnetic Sensors Based on Ferroelectric-Bimorphs and Multiferroic Composites.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Qu, Peng; Petrov, Vladimir; Qu, Hongwei; Srinivasan, Gopalan

    2016-02-20

    Multiferroic composites with ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phases have been studied in recent years for use as sensors of AC and DC magnetic fields. Their operation is based on magneto-electric (ME) coupling between the electric and magnetic subsystems and is mediated by mechanical strain. Such sensors for AC magnetic fields require a bias magnetic field to achieve pT-sensitivity. Novel magnetic sensors with a permanent magnet proof mass, either on a ferroelectric bimorph or a ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composite, are discussed. In both types, the interaction between the applied AC magnetic field and remnant magnetization of the magnet results in a mechanical strain and a voltage response in the ferroelectric. Our studies have been performed on sensors with a Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet proof mass on (i) a bimorph of oppositely-poled lead zirconate titanate (PZT) platelets and (ii) a layered multiferroic composite of PZT-Metglas-Ni. The sensors have been characterized in terms of sensitivity and equivalent magnetic noise N. Noise N in both type of sensors is on the order of 200 pT/√Hz at 1 Hz, a factor of 10 improvement compared to multiferroic sensors without a proof mass. When the AC magnetic field is applied at the bending resonance for the bimorph, the measured N ≈ 700 pT/√Hz. We discuss models based on magneto-electro-mechanical coupling at low frequency and bending resonance in the sensors and theoretical estimates of ME voltage coefficients are in very good agreement with the data.

  9. Sensitivity Enhancement in Magnetic Sensors Based on Ferroelectric-Bimorphs and Multiferroic Composites

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Qu, Peng; Petrov, Vladimir; Qu, Hongwei; Srinivasan, Gopalan

    2016-01-01

    Multiferroic composites with ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phases have been studied in recent years for use as sensors of AC and DC magnetic fields. Their operation is based on magneto-electric (ME) coupling between the electric and magnetic subsystems and is mediated by mechanical strain. Such sensors for AC magnetic fields require a bias magnetic field to achieve pT-sensitivity. Novel magnetic sensors with a permanent magnet proof mass, either on a ferroelectric bimorph or a ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composite, are discussed. In both types, the interaction between the applied AC magnetic field and remnant magnetization of the magnet results in a mechanical strain and a voltage response in the ferroelectric. Our studies have been performed on sensors with a Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet proof mass on (i) a bimorph of oppositely-poled lead zirconate titanate (PZT) platelets and (ii) a layered multiferroic composite of PZT-Metglas-Ni. The sensors have been characterized in terms of sensitivity and equivalent magnetic noise N. Noise N in both type of sensors is on the order of 200 pT/√Hz at 1 Hz, a factor of 10 improvement compared to multiferroic sensors without a proof mass. When the AC magnetic field is applied at the bending resonance for the bimorph, the measured N ≈ 700 pT/√Hz. We discuss models based on magneto-electro-mechanical coupling at low frequency and bending resonance in the sensors and theoretical estimates of ME voltage coefficients are in very good agreement with the data. PMID:26907290

  10. Variation of Strontium (Sr) in the Ferroelectric Material Barium Strontium Titanate (Ba1-xSrxTiO3) by Co precipitation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subarwanti, Y.; Safitri, R. D.; Supriyanto, A.; Iriani, Y.; Jamaludin, A.

    2017-02-01

    Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) have been made with variation strontium (Sr) 10%, 30% and 50% by co-precipitation method. This study aims to determine influence addition Sr against the crystal structure, crystallite size, lattice parameter, grain size and dielectric constant. Samples have been made by co-precipitation method and then the samples were sintered by furnace at 1100°C with holding time 4 hours. Characterization of BST use X-Ray Diffraction instrument, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Resistance Capacitance Inductance (RCL meter). Based on result obtained, the larger Sr content cause the diffraction angle shift to the right (the greater) and crystallinity increasing. But, the value of dielectric constant, crystallite size and grain size decreasing with additional Sr content. Measurement of dielectric constant (K) performed in the frequency range 1 kHz to 100 kHz and the highest value at Sr content 0.1 i.e. 258.35. The addition of Sr content 30% and 50% change the crystal structure from tetragonal to cubic which has paraelectric phase.

  11. Ferroelectric translational antiphase boundaries in nonpolar materials

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xian-Kui; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Kvasov, Alexander; Roleder, Krystian; Jia, Chun-Lin; Setter, Nava

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials are heavily used in electro-mechanics and electronics. Inside the ferroelectric, domain walls separate regions in which the spontaneous polarization is differently oriented. Properties of ferroelectric domain walls can differ from those of the domains themselves, leading to new exploitable phenomena. Even more exciting is that a non-ferroelectric material may have domain boundaries that are ferroelectric. Many materials possess translational antiphase boundaries. Such boundaries could be interesting entities to carry information if they were ferroelectric. Here we show first that antiphase boundaries in antiferroelectrics may possess ferroelectricity. We then identify these boundaries in the classical antiferroelectric lead zirconate and evidence their polarity by electron microscopy using negative spherical-aberration imaging technique. Ab initio modelling confirms the polar bi-stable nature of the walls. Ferroelectric antiphase boundaries could make high-density non-volatile memory; in comparison with the magnetic domain wall memory, they do not require current for operation and are an order of magnitude thinner. PMID:24398704

  12. Local probing of ferroelectric and ferroelastic switching through stress-mediated piezoelectric spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Edwards, David; Bastani, Yaser; Cao, Ye; ...

    2016-01-19

    The role of local strains is fundamental to the large effective piezoelectric and ferroelectric response of thin films. Therefore a method to investigate local strain-induced phenomena is imperative. Here, pressure induced domain reorganization is reported in lead zirconate titanate films with composition near the morphotropic phase boundary. An approach is thus demonstrated to simultaneously study the role of applied mechanical pressure on multiple local properties of the film. In particular, the modification of hysteresis loops collected at different tip pressures is consistent with first mostly ferroelastic and then ferroelectric dominated reorientation of domains under increasing applied pressure. The pressure inducedmore » domain writing is also investigated through phase field simulations where the applied pressure is generally found to increase the in-plane polarization of the domains with respect to the out-of-plane component, corroborating the experimental observations. The approach developed here has the potential to explore other hysteretic phenomena and phase transitions in a spatially resolved manner with varying local pressure.« less

  13. Enlarging photovoltaic effect: combination of classic photoelectric and ferroelectric photovoltaic effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjiao; Su, Xiaodong; Shen, Mingrong; Dai, Zhihua; Zhang, Lingjun; He, Xiyun; Cheng, Wenxiu; Cao, Mengyu; Zou, Guifu

    2013-01-01

    Converting light energy to electrical energy in photovoltaic devices relies on the photogenerated electrons and holes separated by the built-in potential in semiconductors. Photo-excited electrons in metal electrodes are usually not considered in this process. Here, we report an enhanced photovoltaic effect in the ferroelectric lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) by using low work function metals as the electrodes. We believe that electrons in the metal with low work function could be photo-emitted into PLZT and form the dominant photocurrent in our devices. Under AM1.5 (100 mW/cm²) illumination, the short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage of Mg/PLZT/ITO are about 150 and 2 times of those of Pt/PLZT/ITO, respectively. The photovoltaic response of PLZT capacitor was expanded from ultraviolet to visible spectra, and it may have important impact on design and fabrication of high performance photovoltaic devices based on ferroelectric materials.

  14. Evaluation of Data Retention Characteristics for Ferroelectric Random Access Memories (FRAMs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Teverovsky, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Data retention and fatigue characteristics of 64 Kb lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based Ferroelectric Random Access Memories (FRAMs) microcircuits manufactured by Ramtron were examined over temperature range from -85 C to +310 C for ceramic packaged parts and from -85 C to +175 C for plastic parts, during retention periods up to several thousand hours. Intrinsic failures, which were caused by a thermal degradation of the ferroelectric cells, occurred in ceramic parts after tens or hundreds hours of aging at temperatures above 200 C. The activation energy of the retention test failures was 1.05 eV and the extrapolated mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) at room temperature was estimated to be more than 280 years. Multiple write-read cycling (up to 3x10(exp 7)) during the fatigue testing of plastic and ceramic parts did not result in any parametric or functional failures. However, operational currents linearly decreased with the logarithm of number of cycles thus indicating fatigue process in PZT films. Plastic parts, that had more recent date code as compared to ceramic parts, appeared to be using die with improved process technology and showed significantly smaller changes in operational currents and data access times.

  15. Enlarging photovoltaic effect: combination of classic photoelectric and ferroelectric photovoltaic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingjiao; Su, Xiaodong; Shen, Mingrong; Dai, Zhihua; Zhang, Lingjun; He, Xiyun; Cheng, Wenxiu; Cao, Mengyu; Zou, Guifu

    2013-01-01

    Converting light energy to electrical energy in photovoltaic devices relies on the photogenerated electrons and holes separated by the built-in potential in semiconductors. Photo-excited electrons in metal electrodes are usually not considered in this process. Here, we report an enhanced photovoltaic effect in the ferroelectric lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) by using low work function metals as the electrodes. We believe that electrons in the metal with low work function could be photo-emitted into PLZT and form the dominant photocurrent in our devices. Under AM1.5 (100 mW/cm2) illumination, the short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage of Mg/PLZT/ITO are about 150 and 2 times of those of Pt/PLZT/ITO, respectively. The photovoltaic response of PLZT capacitor was expanded from ultraviolet to visible spectra, and it may have important impact on design and fabrication of high performance photovoltaic devices based on ferroelectric materials. PMID:23811832

  16. Supramolecular ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Tayi, Alok S; Kaeser, Adrien; Matsumoto, Michio; Aida, Takuzo; Stupp, Samuel I

    2015-04-01

    Supramolecular chemistry uses non-covalent interactions to coax molecules into forming ordered assemblies. The construction of ordered materials with these reversible bonds has led to dramatic innovations in organic electronics, polymer science and biomaterials. Here, we review how supramolecular strategies can advance the burgeoning field of organic ferroelectricity. Ferroelectrics - materials with a spontaneous and electrically reversible polarization - are touted for use in non-volatile computer memories, sensors and optics. Historically, this physical phenomenon has been studied in inorganic materials, although some organic examples are known and strong interest exists to extend the search for ferroelectric molecular systems. Other undiscovered applications outside this regime could also emerge. We describe the key features necessary for molecular and supramolecular dipoles in organic ferroelectrics and their incorporation into ordered systems, such as porous frameworks and liquid crystals. The goal of this Review is to motivate the development of innovative supramolecular ferroelectrics that exceed the performance and usefulness of known systems.

  17. Subtractive fabrication of ferroelectric thin films with precisely controlled thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievlev, Anton V.; Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Leonard, Donovan N.; Agar, Joshua C.; Velarde, Gabriel A.; Martin, Lane W.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Maksymovych, Petro; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2018-04-01

    The ability to control thin-film growth has led to advances in our understanding of fundamental physics as well as to the emergence of novel technologies. However, common thin-film growth techniques introduce a number of limitations related to the concentration of defects on film interfaces and surfaces that limit the scope of systems that can be produced and studied experimentally. Here, we developed an ion-beam based subtractive fabrication process that enables creation and modification of thin films with pre-defined thicknesses. To accomplish this we transformed a multimodal imaging platform that combines time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with atomic force microscopy to a unique fabrication tool that allows for precise sputtering of the nanometer-thin layers of material. To demonstrate fabrication of thin-films with in situ feedback and control on film thickness and functionality we systematically studied thickness dependence of ferroelectric switching of lead-zirconate-titanate, within a single epitaxial film. Our results demonstrate that through a subtractive film fabrication process we can control the piezoelectric response as a function of film thickness as well as improve on the overall piezoelectric response versus an untreated film.

  18. Subtractive fabrication of ferroelectric thin films with precisely controlled thickness

    DOE PAGES

    Ievlev, Anton; Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Leonard, Donovan N.; ...

    2018-02-22

    The ability to control thin-film growth has led to advances in our understanding of fundamental physics as well as to the emergence of novel technologies. However, common thin-film growth techniques introduce a number of limitations related to the concentration of defects on film interfaces and surfaces that limit the scope of systems that can be produced and studied experimentally. Here, we developed an ion-beam based subtractive fabrication process that enables creation and modification of thin films with pre-defined thicknesses. To accomplish this we transformed a multimodal imaging platform that combines time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with atomic force microscopy tomore » a unique fabrication tool that allows for precise sputtering of the nanometer-thin layers of material. To demonstrate fabrication of thin-films with in situ feedback and control on film thickness and functionality we systematically studied thickness dependence of ferroelectric switching of lead-zirconate-titanate, within a single epitaxial film. Lastly, our results demonstrate that through a subtractive film fabrication process we can control the piezoelectric response as a function of film thickness as well as improve on the overall piezoelectric response versus an untreated film.« less

  19. Subtractive fabrication of ferroelectric thin films with precisely controlled thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Ievlev, Anton; Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Leonard, Donovan N.

    The ability to control thin-film growth has led to advances in our understanding of fundamental physics as well as to the emergence of novel technologies. However, common thin-film growth techniques introduce a number of limitations related to the concentration of defects on film interfaces and surfaces that limit the scope of systems that can be produced and studied experimentally. Here, we developed an ion-beam based subtractive fabrication process that enables creation and modification of thin films with pre-defined thicknesses. To accomplish this we transformed a multimodal imaging platform that combines time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with atomic force microscopy tomore » a unique fabrication tool that allows for precise sputtering of the nanometer-thin layers of material. To demonstrate fabrication of thin-films with in situ feedback and control on film thickness and functionality we systematically studied thickness dependence of ferroelectric switching of lead-zirconate-titanate, within a single epitaxial film. Lastly, our results demonstrate that through a subtractive film fabrication process we can control the piezoelectric response as a function of film thickness as well as improve on the overall piezoelectric response versus an untreated film.« less

  20. Subtractive fabrication of ferroelectric thin films with precisely controlled thickness.

    PubMed

    Ievlev, Anton V; Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Leonard, Donovan N; Agar, Joshua C; Velarde, Gabriel A; Martin, Lane W; Kalinin, Sergei V; Maksymovych, Petro; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2018-04-02

    The ability to control thin-film growth has led to advances in our understanding of fundamental physics as well as to the emergence of novel technologies. However, common thin-film growth techniques introduce a number of limitations related to the concentration of defects on film interfaces and surfaces that limit the scope of systems that can be produced and studied experimentally. Here, we developed an ion-beam based subtractive fabrication process that enables creation and modification of thin films with pre-defined thicknesses. To accomplish this we transformed a multimodal imaging platform that combines time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with atomic force microscopy to a unique fabrication tool that allows for precise sputtering of the nanometer-thin layers of material. To demonstrate fabrication of thin-films with in situ feedback and control on film thickness and functionality we systematically studied thickness dependence of ferroelectric switching of lead-zirconate-titanate, within a single epitaxial film. Our results demonstrate that through a subtractive film fabrication process we can control the piezoelectric response as a function of film thickness as well as improve on the overall piezoelectric response versus an untreated film.

  1. Titan Submarines!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleson, S. R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Paul, M. V.; Hartwig, J. W.; Walsh, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    A NIAC Phase II submarine concept, dubbed 'Titan Turtle' for Saturn's moon Titan's northern sea, Ligea Mare. A design concept including science and operations is described for this -180°C liquid methane sea.

  2. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ferroelectric films of barium titanate were synthesized on silicon and quartz substrates, and the photoelectric effect in the structure consisting of metal deposited ferroelectric barium titanate film silicon was studied. A photovoltage with polarity that depends on the direction of the remanent polarization was observed. The deposition of BaTiO3 on silicon and fused quartz substrates was accomplished by an rf sputtering technique. A series of experiments to study the growth of ferroelectric BaTiO3 films on single crystal silicon and fused quartz substrates were conducted. The ferroelectric character in these films was found on the basis of evidence from the polarization electric field hysteresis loops, capacitance voltage and capacitance temperature techniques and from X-ray diffraction studies.

  3. Ferroelectric Domain Structure and Local Piezoelectric Properties of Lead-Free (Ka0.5Na0.5)NbO3 and BiFeO3-Based Piezoelectric Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Alikin, Denis; Turygin, Anton; Kholkin, Andrei; Shur, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of novel methods for the local characterization of ferroelectric domains open up new opportunities not only to image, but also to control and to create desired domain configurations (domain engineering). The morphotropic and polymorphic phase boundaries that are frequently used to increase the electromechanical and dielectric performance of ferroelectric ceramics have a tremendous effect on the domain structure, which can serve as a signature of complex polarization states and link local and macroscopic piezoelectric and dielectric responses. This is especially important for the study of lead-free ferroelectric ceramics, which is currently replacing traditional lead-containing materials, and great efforts are devoted to increasing their performance to match that of lead zirconate titanate (PZT). In this work, we provide a short overview of the recent progress in the imaging of domain structure in two major families of ceramic lead-free systems based on BiFeO3 (BFO) and (Ka0.5Na0.5)NbO3 (KNN). This can be used as a guideline for the understanding of domain processes in lead-free piezoelectric ceramics and provide further insight into the mechanisms of structure–property relationship in these technologically important material families. PMID:28772408

  4. Halving Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-11

    Titan seasonal hemispheric dichotomy is chronicled in black and white, with the moon northern half appearing slightly lighter than the dark southern half in this image taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft.

  5. Modeling and Implementation of HfO2-based Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, Spencer Allen

    HfO2-based ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) represent a unique opportunity as both a next-generation digital non-volatile memory and as synapse devices in braininspired logic systems, owing to their higher reliability compared to filamentary resistive random-access memory (ReRAM) and higher speed and lower power consumption compared to competing devices, including phase-change memory (PCM) and state-of-the-art FTJ. Ferroelectrics are often easier to deposit and have simpler material structure than films for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). Ferroelectric HfO2 also enables complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility, since lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and BaTiO3-based FTJs often are not. No other groups have yet demonstrated a HfO2-based FTJ (to best of the author's knowledge) or applied it to a suitable system. For such devices to be useful, system designers require models based on both theoretical physical analysis and experimental results of fabricated devices in order to confidently design control systems. Both the CMOS circuitry and FTJs must then be designed in layout and fabricated on the same die. This work includes modeling of proposed device structures using a custom python script, which calculates theoretical potential barrier heights as a function of material properties and corresponding current densities (ranging from 8x103 to 3x10-2 A/cm 2 with RHRS/RLRS ranging from 5x105 to 6, depending on ferroelectric thickness). These equations were then combined with polynomial fits of experimental timing data and implemented in a Verilog-A behavioral analog model in Cadence Virtuoso. The author proposes tristate CMOS control systems, and circuits, for implementation of FTJ devices as digital memory and presents simulated performance. Finally, a process flow for fabrication of FTJ devices with CMOS is presented. This work has therefore enabled the fabrication of FTJ devices at RIT and the continued investigation of them as applied to any

  6. Efficiency of thermoelectric conversion in ferroelectric film capacitive structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpyas, V. A.; Kozyrev, A. B.; Soldatenkov, O. I.; Tepina, E. R.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal heating/cooling conditions for metal-insulator-metal structures based on barium strontium titanate ferroelectric films are studied by numerical methods with the aim of their application in capacitive thermoelectric converters. A correlation between the thermal and capacitive properties of thin-film ferroelectric capacitors is considered. The time of the temperature response and the rate of variation of the capacitive properties of the metal-insulator-metal structures are determined by analyzing the dynamics of thermal processes. Thermophysical calculations are carried out that take into consideration the real electrical properties of barium strontium titanate ferroelectric films and allow estimation of thermal modulation parameters and the efficiency of capacitive thermoelectric converters on their basis.

  7. Integrating Nano-patterned Ferromagnetic and Ferroelectric Thin Films for Electrically Tunable RF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tengxing; Peng, Yujia; Jiang, Wei

    Tunable radio frequency (RF) components are pivotal elements in frequency-agile and multifunctional systems. However, there is a technical barrier to achieve miniaturized fully electrically tunable RF components. This paper provides and demonstrates the efficacy of a first unique design methodology in developing fully electrically tunable RF components by integrating ferromagnetic (e.g., Permalloy) and ferroelectric (e.g., Lead Zirconate Titanate: PZT) thin films patterns. Permalloy thin film has been patterned in nanometer scale to improve its ferromagnetic resonance frequency (FMR) for RF applications. Tunable inductors are developed with the utilization of different thickness of Permalloy thin film, which show over 50% incrementmore » in inductance and over 4% in tunability with DC current. More tunability can be achieved with multiple layers of Permalloy thin film and optimized thickness. A fully electrically tunable slow wave RF transmission line with simultaneously variable inductance and capacitance density has been implemented and thoroughly investigated for the first time. Measured results show that a fixed phase shift of 90° can be achieved from 1.5 GHz to 1.85 GHz continuously by applying external DC current from 0 to 200 mA and external DC voltage from 0 to 15 Volts, respectively.« less

  8. In situ 2D diffraction as a tool to characterize ferroelectric and piezoelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamidy, N. I.; Kovacova, V.; Bernasconi, A.; Le Rhun, G.; Vaxelaire, N.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper the application of 2D x-ray diffraction (XRD2) as a technique to characterize in situ during electrical cycling the properties of a ferroelectric and piezoelectric thin film is discussed. XRD2 is one type of XRD on which a 2D detector is used instead of a point detector. This technique enables simultaneous recording of many sample information in a much shorter time compared to conventional XRD. The discussion is focused especially on the data processing technique of the huge data acquired. The methodology to calculate an effective piezoelectric coefficient, analyze the phase and texture, and estimate the domain size and shape is described in this paper. This methodology is then applied to a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film at the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) composition (i.e. Pb[Zr0.52Ti0.48]O3) with a preferred orientation of (1 0 0). The in situ XRD2 characterization was conducted in the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. Since a high-energy beam with vertical resolution as small as 100 nm was used, a cross-sectional scan of the sample was performed over the entire thickness of the film. From these experimental results, a better understanding on the piezoelectricity phenomena in PZT thin film at MPB composition were achieved, providing original feedback between the elaboration processes and functional properties of the film.

  9. Using the ferroelectric/ferroelastic effect at cryogenic temperatures for set-and-hold actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, J. B.; Golinveaux, F. S.; Lynch, C. S.

    2018-06-01

    The ferroelectric and ferroelastic properties of lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) based stack actuators have been characterized at temperatures down to 25 K and under various levels of constant compressive stress. Experiments indicate that the coercive field and magnitude of strain at the coercive field display an inverse relationship with temperature. A factor of 5.5 increase in coercive field, and a factor of 4.3 increase in strain is observed at 25 K in comparison to the room-temperature conditions. This information was used to induce non-180° domain wall motion in the material through the application of electric fields at or near the coercive field. The change in remanent strain accompanying these effects was shown to increase in magnitude as temperature decreased, reaching values of 2000 ppm at 25 K. This behavior was also shown to be temporally stable even under compressive loads. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the material can be returned to its original strain state through a repolarizing electric field. This switchable behavior could be exploited for future set-and-hold type actuators operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. Integrating Nano-patterned Ferromagnetic and Ferroelectric Thin Films for Electrically Tunable RF Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Tengxing; Peng, Yujia; Jiang, Wei; ...

    2016-10-31

    Tunable radio frequency (RF) components are pivotal elements in frequency-agile and multifunctional systems. However, there is a technical barrier to achieve miniaturized fully electrically tunable RF components. This paper provides and demonstrates the efficacy of a first unique design methodology in developing fully electrically tunable RF components by integrating ferromagnetic (e.g., Permalloy) and ferroelectric (e.g., Lead Zirconate Titanate: PZT) thin films patterns. Permalloy thin film has been patterned in nanometer scale to improve its ferromagnetic resonance frequency (FMR) for RF applications. Tunable inductors are developed with the utilization of different thickness of Permalloy thin film, which show over 50% incrementmore » in inductance and over 4% in tunability with DC current. More tunability can be achieved with multiple layers of Permalloy thin film and optimized thickness. A fully electrically tunable slow wave RF transmission line with simultaneously variable inductance and capacitance density has been implemented and thoroughly investigated for the first time. Measured results show that a fixed phase shift of 90° can be achieved from 1.5 GHz to 1.85 GHz continuously by applying external DC current from 0 to 200 mA and external DC voltage from 0 to 15 Volts, respectively.« less

  11. Ceramic with zircon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An article comprises a silicon-containing substrate and a zircon coating. The article can comprise a silicon carbide/silicon (SiC/Si) substrate, a zircon (ZrSiO.sub.4) intermediate coating and an external environmental/thermal barrier coating.

  12. Two Titans

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-11

    These two views of Saturn's moon Titan exemplify how NASA's Cassini spacecraft has revealed the surface of this fascinating world. Cassini carried several instruments to pierce the veil of hydrocarbon haze that enshrouds Titan. The mission's imaging cameras also have several spectral filters sensitive to specific wavelengths of infrared light that are able to make it through the haze to the surface and back into space. These "spectral windows" have enable the imaging cameras to map nearly the entire surface of Titan. In addition to Titan's surface, images from both the imaging cameras and VIMS have provided windows into the moon's ever-changing atmosphere, chronicling the appearance and movement of hazes and clouds over the years. A large, bright and feathery band of summer clouds can be seen arcing across high northern latitudes in the view at right. These views were obtained with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 21, 2017. Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create the natural-color view at left. The false-color view at right was made by substituting an infrared image (centered at 938 nanometers) for the red color channel. The views were acquired at a distance of approximately 613,000 miles (986,000 kilometers) from Titan. Image scale is about 4 miles (6 kilometers) per pixel. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21624

  13. Phonon scattering mechanisms dictating the thermal conductivity of lead zirconate titanate (PbZr 1- xTi xO 3) thin films across the compositional phase diagram

    DOE PAGES

    Foley, Brian M.; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; DiAntonio, Christopher; ...

    2017-05-23

    This paper represents a thorough investigation of the thermal conductivity (κ) in both thin film and bulk PbZr 1–xTi xO 3 (PZT) across the compositional phase diagram. Given the technological importance of PZT as a superb piezoelectric and ferroelectric material in devices and systems impacting a wide array of industries, this research serves to fill the gap in knowledge regarding the thermal properties. The thermal conductivities of both thin film and bulk PZT are found to vary by a considerable margin as a function of composition x. Additionally, we observe a discontinuity in κ in the vicinity of the morphotropicmore » phase boundary (MPB, x = 0.48) where there is a 20%–25% decrease in κ in our thin film data, similar to that found in literature data for bulk PZT. The comparison between bulk and thin film materials highlights the sensitivity of κ to size effects such as film thickness and grain size even in disordered alloy/solid-solution materials. A model for the thermal conductivity of PZT as a function of composition (κ(x)) is presented, which enables the application of the virtual crystal approximation for alloy-type material systems with very different crystals structures, resulting in differing temperature trends for κ. We show that in the case of crystalline solid-solutions where the thermal conductivity of one of the parent materials exhibits glass-like temperature trends the compositional dependence of thermal conductivity is relatively constant for most values of x. Finally, this is in stark contrast with the typical trends of thermal conductivity with x in alloys, where the thermal conductivity increases dramatically as the composition of the alloy or solid-solution approaches that of a pure parent materials (i.e., as x = 0 or 1).« less

  14. Phonon scattering mechanisms dictating the thermal conductivity of lead zirconate titanate (PbZr 1- xTi xO 3) thin films across the compositional phase diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian M.; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; DiAntonio, Christopher

    This paper represents a thorough investigation of the thermal conductivity (κ) in both thin film and bulk PbZr 1–xTi xO 3 (PZT) across the compositional phase diagram. Given the technological importance of PZT as a superb piezoelectric and ferroelectric material in devices and systems impacting a wide array of industries, this research serves to fill the gap in knowledge regarding the thermal properties. The thermal conductivities of both thin film and bulk PZT are found to vary by a considerable margin as a function of composition x. Additionally, we observe a discontinuity in κ in the vicinity of the morphotropicmore » phase boundary (MPB, x = 0.48) where there is a 20%–25% decrease in κ in our thin film data, similar to that found in literature data for bulk PZT. The comparison between bulk and thin film materials highlights the sensitivity of κ to size effects such as film thickness and grain size even in disordered alloy/solid-solution materials. A model for the thermal conductivity of PZT as a function of composition (κ(x)) is presented, which enables the application of the virtual crystal approximation for alloy-type material systems with very different crystals structures, resulting in differing temperature trends for κ. We show that in the case of crystalline solid-solutions where the thermal conductivity of one of the parent materials exhibits glass-like temperature trends the compositional dependence of thermal conductivity is relatively constant for most values of x. Finally, this is in stark contrast with the typical trends of thermal conductivity with x in alloys, where the thermal conductivity increases dramatically as the composition of the alloy or solid-solution approaches that of a pure parent materials (i.e., as x = 0 or 1).« less

  15. Ferroelectric ultrathin perovskite films

    DOEpatents

    Rappe, Andrew M; Kolpak, Alexie Michelle

    2013-12-10

    Disclosed herein are perovskite ferroelectric thin-film. Also disclosed are methods of controlling the properties of ferroelectric thin films. These films can be used in a variety materials and devices, such as catalysts and storage media, respectively.

  16. Ferroelectrics for semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, M.; Wu, Z.; Vasant Kumar, C. V. R.; Amm, D. T.; Griswold, E. M.

    1992-11-01

    The technology for the implementation of the integration of thin film ferroelectrics with silicon processing for various devices is described, and factors affecting the integration of ferroelectric films with semiconductor processing are discussed. Consideration is also given to film properties, the properties of electrode materials and structures, and the phenomena of ferroelectric fatigue and aging. Particular attention is given to the nonmemory device application of ferroelectrics.

  17. Strain and in-plane orientation effects on the ferroelectricity of (111)-oriented tetragonal Pb(Zr0.35Ti0.65)O3 thin films prepared by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Hiroki; Menou, Nicolas; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    The growth and characterization of epitaxial (111)-oriented Pb(Zr0.35Ti0.65)O3 films deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on (100)-oriented silicon substrates [(111)SrRuO3‖(111)Pt ‖(100)yttria-stabilizedzirconia‖(100)Si] are reported. The orientation, microstructure, and electric properties of these films are compared to those of fiber-textured highly (111)-oriented lead zirconate titanate (PZT) films deposited on (111)SrRuO3/(111)Pt/TiOx/SiO2/(100)Si substrates and epitaxial (111)-oriented PZT films deposited on (111)SrRuO3‖(111)SrTiO3 substrates. The ferroelectric properties of these films are not drastically influenced by the in-plane orientation of the film and by the strain state imposed by the underlying substrate. These results support the use of fiber-textured highly (111)-oriented films in highly stable ferroelectric capacitors.

  18. Synthesis, microstructure and dielectric properties of zirconium doped barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rohtash; School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi; Asokan, K.

    2016-05-23

    We report on synthesis, microstructural and relaxor ferroelectric properties of Zirconium(Zr) doped Barium Titanate (BT) samples with general formula Ba(Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x})O{sub 3} (x=0.20, 0.35). These lead-free ceramics were prepared by solid state reaction route. The phase transition behavior and temperature dependent dielectric properties and composition dependent ferroelectric properties were investigated. XRD analysis at room temperature confirms phase purity of the samples. SEM observations revealed retarded grain growth with increasing Zr mole fraction. Dielectric properties of BZT ceramics is influenced significantly by small addition of Zr mole fraction. With increasing Zr mole fraction, dielectric constant decreases while FWHM and frequencymore » dispersion increases. Polarization vs electric field hysteresis measurements reveal ferroelectric relaxor phase at room temperature. The advantages of such substitution maneuvering towards optimizing ferroelectric properties of BaTiO{sub 3} are discussed.« less

  19. Titan Touchdown

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-11

    On Jan. 14, 2005, ESA's Huygens probe made its descent to the surface of Saturn's hazy moon, Titan. Carried to Saturn by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, Huygens made the most distant landing ever on another world, and the only landing on a body in the outer solar system. This video uses actual images taken by the probe during its two-and-a-half hour fall under its parachutes. Also include mission animation.

  20. Titan Submarine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-15

    What would a submarine to explore the liquid methane seas of Saturn's Moon Titan look like? This video shows one submarine concept that would explore both the shoreline and the depths of this strange world that has methane rain, rivers and seas! The design was developed for the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Program, by NASA Glenn's COMPASS Team, and technologists and scientists from the Applied Physics Lab and submarine designers from the Applied Research Lab.

  1. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    The photoelectric effect in structures consisting of metal deposited barium titanate film silicon is described. A radio frequency sputtering technique is used to deposit ferroelectric barium titantate films on silicon and quartz. Film properties are measured and correlated with the photoelectric effect characteristics of the films. It was found that to obtain good quality pin hole free films, it is necessary to reduce the substrate temperature during the last part of the deposition. The switching ability of the device with internal applied voltage is improved when applied with a ferroelectric memory device.

  2. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  3. Titan Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s methane clouds have received much attention since they were first discovered spectroscopically (Griffith et al. 1998). Titan's seasons evolve slowly, and there is growing evidence of a seasonal response in the regions of methane cloud formation (e.g. Rodriguez et al. 2009). A complete, three-dimensional view of Titan’s clouds is possible through the determination of cloud-top heights from Cassini images (e.g., Ádámkovics et al. 2010). Even though Titan’s surface is warmed by very little sunlight, we now know Titan’s methane clouds are convective, evolving through tens of kilometers of altitude on timescales of hours to days with dynamics similar to clouds that appear on Earth (Porco et al. 2005). Cassini ISS has also shown evidence of rain storms on Titan that produce surface accumulation of methane (Turtle et al. 2009). Most recently, Cassini has revealed a 1000-km-scale, arrow-shaped cloud at the equator followed by changes that appear to be evidence of surface precipitation (Turtle et al. 2011b). Individual convective towers simulated with high fidelity indicate that surface convergence of methane humidity and dynamic lifting are required to trigger deep, precipitating convection (e.g. Barth & Rafkin 2010). The global expanses of these cloud outbursts, the evidence for surface precipitation, and the requirement of dynamic convergence and lifting at the surface to trigger deep convection motivate an analysis of storm formation in the context of Titan’s global circulation. I will review our current understanding of Titan’s methane meteorology using Cassini and ground-based observations and, in particular, global circulation model simulations of Titan’s methane cycle. When compared with cloud observations, our simulations indicate an essential role for planetary-scale atmospheric waves in organizing convective storms on large scales (Mitchell et al. 2011). I will end with predictions of Titan’s weather during the upcoming northern

  4. Revisiting the blocking force test on ferroelectric ceramics using high energy x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, L., E-mail: laurent.daniel@u-psud.fr; GeePs; Hall, D. A.

    2015-05-07

    The blocking force test is a standard test to characterise the properties of piezoelectric actuators. The aim of this study is to understand the various contributions to the macroscopic behaviour observed during this experiment that involves the intrinsic piezoelectric effect, ferroelectric domain switching, and internal stress development. For this purpose, a high energy diffraction experiment is performed in-situ during a blocking force test on a tetragonal lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic (Pb{sub 0.98}Ba{sub 0.01}(Zr{sub 0.51}Ti{sub 0.49}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3}). It is shown that the usual macroscopic linear interpretation of the test can also be performed at the single crystal scale,more » allowing the identification of local apparent piezoelectric and elastic properties. It is also shown that despite this apparent linearity, the blocking force test involves significant non-linear behaviour mostly due to domain switching under electric field and stress. Although affecting a limited volume fraction of the material, domain switching is responsible for a large part of the macroscopic strain and explains the high level of inter- and intra-granular stresses observed during the course of the experiment. The study shows that if apparent piezoelectric and elastic properties can be identified for PZT single crystals from blocking stress curves, they may be very different from the actual properties of polycrystalline materials due to the multiplicity of the physical mechanisms involved. These apparent properties can be used for macroscopic modelling purposes but should be considered with caution if a local analysis is aimed at.« less

  5. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; ...

    2016-10-13

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. But, until now, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. We report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity-the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice-but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules.more » This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals.« less

  6. Titanic: A Statistical Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takis, Sandra L.

    1999-01-01

    Uses the available data about the Titanic's passengers to interest students in exploring categorical data and the chi-square distribution. Describes activities incorporated into a statistics class and gives additional resources for collecting information about the Titanic. (ASK)

  7. Inside Titan Author Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-28

    This artist concept shows a possible scenario for the internal structure of Titan, as suggested by data from NASA Cassini spacecraft. Scientists have been trying to determine what is under Titan organic-rich atmosphere and icy crust.

  8. Lakes on Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-24

    The Cassini spacecraft, using its radar system, has discovered very strong evidence for hydrocarbon lakes on Titan. Dark patches, which resemble terrestrial lakes, seem to be sprinkled all over the high latitudes surrounding Titan north pole

  9. Titan Haze is Falling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-05

    The change in Titan haze layer is illustrated in this figure, derived from data obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft. The picture of Titan in panel a was taken on May 3, 2006, panel b was taken on April 2, 2010.

  10. Dark and Light Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-08

    NASA Cassini spacecraft examines Titan dark and light seasonal hemispheric dichotomy as it images the moon with a filter sensitive to near-infrared light. This image also shows Titan north polar hood.

  11. Titan Haze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie M.; West, Robert; Lavvas, Panayotis

    2011-01-01

    The Titan haze exerts a dominating influence on surface visibility and atmospheric radiative heating at optical and near-infrared wavelengths and our desire to understand surface composition and atmospheric dynamics provides a strong motivation to study the properties of the haze. Prior to the Cassini/Huygens missions the haze was known to be global in extent, with a hemispheric contrast asymmetry, with a complicated structure in the polar vortex region poleward of about 55 deg latitude, and with a distinct layer near 370 km altitude outside of the polar vortex at the time of the Voyager 2 flyby. The haze particles measured by the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft were both highly polarizing and strongly forward scattering, a combination that seems to require an aggregation of small (several tens of nm radius) primary particles. These same properties were seen in the Cassini orbiter and Huygens Probe data. The most extensive set of optical measurements were made inside the atmosphere by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) instrument on the Huygens Probe. At the probe location as determined by the DISR measurements the average haze particle contained about 3000 primary particles whose radius is about 40 nm. Three distinct vertical regions were seen in the DISR data with differing particle properties. Refractive indices of the particles in the main haze layer resemble those reported by Khare et al. between O.3S and about 0.7 micron but are more absorbing than the Khare et al. results between 0.7 micron and the long-wavelength limit of the DISR spectra at 1.6 micron. These and other results are described by Tomasko et al., and a broader summary of results was given by Tomasko and West,. New data continue to stream in from the Cassini spacecraft. New data analyses and new laboratory and model results continue to move the field forward. Titan's 'detached' haze layer suffered a dramatic drop in altitude near equinox in 2009 with implications for the circulation

  12. Oxygen diffusion in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.

    1997-05-01

    Oxygen diffusion in natural, non-metamict zircon was characterized under both dry and water-present conditions at temperatures ranging from 765°C to 1500°C. Dry experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure by encapsulating polished zircon samples with a fine powder of 18O-enriched quartz and annealing the sealed capsules in air. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels (7-70 MPa) or a piston cylinder apparatus (400-1000 MPa) on zircon samples encapsulated with both 18O-enriched quartz and 18O water. Diffusive-uptake profiles of 18O were measured in all samples with a particle accelerator, using the 18O(p, α) 15N reaction. For dry experimental conditions at 1100-1500°C, the resulting oxygen diffusivities (24 in all) are well described by: D dry (m 2/s) = 1.33 × 10 -4exp(-53920/T) There is no suggestion of diffusive anisotropy. Under wet conditions at 925°C, oxygen diffusion shows little or no dependence upon P H 2O in the range 7-1000 MPa, and is insensitive to total pressure as well. The results of 27 wet experiments at 767-1160°C and 7-1000 MPa can be described a single Arrhenius relationship: D wet (m 2/s) = 5.5 × 10 -12exp(-25280/T) The insensitivity of oxygen diffusion to P H 2O means that applications to geologic problems can be pursued knowing only whether the system of interest was 'wet' (i.e., P H 2O > 7MPa ) or 'dry'. Under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust), zircons are extremely retentive of their oxygen isotopic signatures, to the extent that δ 18O would be perturbed at the center of a 200 μm zircon only during an extraordinarily hot and protracted event (e.g., 65 Ma at 900°C). Under wet conditions, δ 18O may or may not be retained in the central regions of individual crystals, cores or overgrowth rims, depending upon the specific thermal history of the system.

  13. Ferroelectric switching of elastin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanming; Cai, Hong-Ling; Zelisko, Matthew; Wang, Yunjie; Sun, Jinglan; Yan, Fei; Ma, Feiyue; Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Zheng, Hairong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sharma, Pradeep; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectricity has long been speculated to have important biological functions, although its very existence in biology has never been firmly established. Here, we present compelling evidence that elastin, the key ECM protein found in connective tissues, is ferroelectric, and we elucidate the molecular mechanism of its switching. Nanoscale piezoresponse force microscopy and macroscopic pyroelectric measurements both show that elastin retains ferroelectricity at 473 K, with polarization on the order of 1 μC/cm2, whereas coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations predict similar polarization with a Curie temperature of 580 K, which is higher than most synthetic molecular ferroelectrics. The polarization of elastin is found to be intrinsic in tropoelastin at the monomer level, analogous to the unit cell level polarization in classical perovskite ferroelectrics, and it switches via thermally activated cooperative rotation of dipoles. Our study sheds light onto a long-standing question on ferroelectric switching in biology and establishes ferroelectricity as an important biophysical property of proteins. This is a critical first step toward resolving its physiological significance and pathological implications. PMID:24958890

  14. Miniature Cryogenic Valves for a Titan Lake Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Zimmerman, Wayne; Takano, Nobuyuki; Avellar, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini mission has revealed Titan to be one of the most Earthlike worlds in the Solar System complete with many of the same surface features including lakes, river channels, basins, and dunes. But unlike Earth, the materials and fluids on Titan are composed of cryogenic organic compounds with lakes of liquid methane and ethane. One of the potential mission concepts to explore Titan is to land a floating platform on one of the Titan Lakes and determine the local lake chemistry. In order to accomplish this within the expected mass volume and power budgets there is a need to pursue the development for a low power lightweight cryogenic valves which can be used along with vacuum lines to sample lake liquid and to distribute to various instruments aboard the Lander. To meet this need we have initiated the development of low power cryogenic valves and actuators based on a single crystal piezoelectric flextensional stacks produced by TRS Ceramics Inc. Since the origin of such high electromechanical properties of Relaxor-PT single crystals is due to the polarization rotation effect, (i.e., intrinsic contributions), the strain per volt decrease at cryogenic temperatures is much lower than in standard Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) ceramics. This makes them promising candidates for cryogenic actuators with regards to the stroke for a given voltage. This paper will present our Titan Lake Sampling and Sample Handling system design and the development of small cryogenic piezoelectric valves developed to meet the system specifications.

  15. Intensive Titan exploration begins.

    PubMed

    Mahaffy, Paul R

    2005-05-13

    The Cassini Orbiter spacecraft first skimmed through the tenuous upper atmosphere of Titan on 26 October 2004. This moon of Saturn is unique in our solar system, with a dense nitrogen atmosphere that is cold enough in places to rain methane, the feedstock for the atmospheric chemistry that produces hydrocarbons, nitrile compounds, and Titan's orange haze. The data returned from this flyby supply new information on the magnetic field and plasma environment around Titan, expose new facets of the dynamics and chemistry of Titan's atmosphere, and provide the first glimpses of what appears to be a complex, fluid-processed, geologically young Titan surface.

  16. Tunable Microwave Filter Design Using Thin-Film Ferroelectric Varactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridasan, Vrinda

    rejection, and constant bandwidth is designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The filters are fabricated using barium strontium titanate (BST) varactors. Electromagnetic simulations and measured results of the tunable two-pole ferroelectric filter are analyzed to explore the origins of high insertion loss in ferroelectric filters. The results indicate that the high-permittivity of the BST (a ferroelectric) not only makes the filters tunable and compact, but also increases the conductive loss of the ferroelectric-based tunable resonators which translates into high insertion loss in ferroelectric filters.

  17. Etching fission tracks in zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique has been developed whereby fission tracks can be etched in zircon with a solution of sodium hydroxide at 220??C. Etching time varied between 15 minutes and 5 hours. Colored zircon required less etching time than the colorless varieties.

  18. Ferroelectric Light Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Elliott, Jr., James R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A light control device is formed by ferroelectric material and N electrodes positioned adjacent thereto to define an N-sided regular polygonal region or circular region there between where N is a multiple of four.

  19. Zircon growth in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaulina, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    The possibility of direct dating of the deformation process is critical for understanding of orogenic belts evolution. Establishing the age of deformation by isotopic methods is indispensable in the case of uneven deformation overlapping, when later deformation inherits the structural plan of the early strains, and to distinguish them on the basis of the structural data only is impossible. A good example of zircon from the shear zones is zircon formed under the eclogite facies conditions. On the one hand, the composition of zircon speaks about its formation simultaneously to eclogitic paragenesis (Rubatto, Herman, 1999; Rubatto et al., 2003). On the other hand, geological studies show that mineral reactions of eclogitization are often held only in areas of shear deformations, which provides access of fluid to the rocks (Austrheim, 1987; Jamtveit et al., 2000; Bingen et al., 2004). Zircons from mafic and ultramafic rocks of the Tanaelv and Kolvitsa belts (Kola Peninsula, the Baltic Shield) have showed that the metamorphic zircon growth is probably controlled by the metamorphic fluid regime, as evidenced by an increase of zircon quantity with the degree of shearing. The internal structure of zircon crystals can provide an evidence of zircon growth synchronous with shearing. The studied crystals have a sector zoning and often specific "patchy" zoning (Fig. 1), which speaks about rapid change of growth conditions. Such internal structure can be compared with the "snowball" garnet structure reflecting the rotation of crystals during their growth under a shift. Rapidly changing crystallization conditions can also be associated with a small amount of fluid, where supersaturation is changing even at a constant temperature. Thus, the growth of metamorphic zircon in shear zones is more likely to occur in the fluid flow synchronous with deformation. A distinctive feature of zircons in these conditions is isometric shape and sector "patchy" zoning. The work was supported by

  20. Strong polarization enhancement in asymmetric three-component ferroelectric superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Christen, Hans M.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Lowndes, Douglas H.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical predictions-motivated by recent advances in epitaxial engineering-indicate a wealth of complex behaviour arising in superlattices of perovskite-type metal oxides. These include the enhancement of polarization by strain and the possibility of asymmetric properties in three-component superlattices. Here we fabricate superlattices consisting of barium titanate (BaTiO3), strontium titanate (SrTiO3) and calcium titanate (CaTiO3) with atomic-scale control by high-pressure pulsed laser deposition on conducting, atomically flat strontium ruthenate (SrRuO3) layers. The strain in BaTiO3 layers is fully maintained as long as the BaTiO3 thickness does not exceed the combined thicknesses of the CaTiO3 and SrTiO3 layers. By preserving full strain and combining heterointerfacial couplings, we find an overall 50% enhancement of the superlattice global polarization with respect to similarly grown pure BaTiO3, despite the fact that half the layers in the superlattice are nominally non-ferroelectric. We further show that even superlattices containing only single-unit-cell layers of BaTiO3 in a paraelectric matrix remain ferroelectric. Our data reveal that the specific interface structure and local asymmetries play an unexpected role in the polarization enhancement.

  1. Future Exploration of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Titan Decadal Panel Collaboration

    2001-11-01

    Titan promises to be the Mars of the Outer Solar System - the focus of not only the broadest range of investigations in planetary science but also the focus of public attention. The reasons for exploring Titan are threefold: 1. Titan and Astrobiology : Titan ranks with Mars and Europa as a prime body for astrobiological study due to its abundant organics. Like Europa, it may well have a liquid water interior. 2. Titan - A world in its own right. Titan deserves study even only to put other satellites (its remarkably smaller Saturnian siblings, and its same-sized but volatile-poor Jovian counterparts) in context. The added dimension of an atmosphere makes Titan's origin and evolution particularly interesting. 3. Titan - an environmental laboratory for Earth. Titan will be an unrivalled place to investigate meteorological, oceanographical and other processes. Many of these (e.g. wave generation by wind) are only empirically parameterized - the very different physical parameters of the Titan environment will bring new insights to these phenomena. While Cassini-Huygens will dramatically boost our knowledge of Titan, it will likely only whet our appetite for more. The potential for prebiotic materials at various locations (in particular where liquid water has interacted with photochemical deposits) and the need to monitor Titan's meteorology favor future missions that may exploit Titan's unique thick-atmosphere, low-gravity environment - a mobile platform like an airship or helicopter, able to explore on global scales, but access the surface for in-situ chemical analysis and probe the interior by electromagnetic and seismic means. Such missions have dramatic potential to capture the public's imagination, on both sides of the Atlantic.

  2. Mixed electrochemical–ferroelectric states in nanoscale ferroelectrics

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Sang Mo; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kumar, Rajeev; ...

    2017-05-01

    Ferroelectricity on the nanoscale has been the subject of much fascination in condensed-matter physics for over half a century. In recent years, multiple reports claiming ferroelectricity in ultrathin ferroelectric films based on the formation of remnant polarization states, local electromechanical hysteresis loops, and pressure-induced switching were made. But, similar phenomena were reported for traditionally non-ferroelectric materials, creating a significant level of uncertainty in the field. We show that in nanoscale systems the ferroelectric state is fundamentally inseparable from the electrochemical state of the surface, leading to the emergence of a mixed electrochemical–ferroelectric state. We explore the nature, thermodynamics, and thicknessmore » evolution of such states, and demonstrate the experimental pathway to establish its presence. Our analysis reconciles multiple prior studies, provides guidelines for studies of ferroelectric materials on the nanoscale, and establishes the design paradigm for new generations of ferroelectric-based devices.« less

  3. Freeze cast porous barium titanate for enhanced piezoelectric energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscow, J. I.; Zhang, Y.; Kraśny, M. J.; Lewis, R. W. C.; Taylor, J.; Bowen, C. R.

    2018-06-01

    Energy harvesting is an important developing technology for a new generation of self-powered sensor networks. This paper demonstrates the significant improvement in the piezoelectric energy harvesting performance of barium titanate by forming highly aligned porosity using freeze casting. Firstly, a finite element model demonstrating the effect of pore morphology and angle with respect to poling field on the poling behaviour of porous ferroelectrics was developed. A second model was then developed to understand the influence of microstructure-property relationships on the poling behaviour of porous freeze cast ferroelectric materials and their resultant piezoelectric and energy harvesting properties. To compare with model predictions, porous barium titanate was fabricated using freeze casting to form highly aligned microstructures with excellent longitudinal piezoelectric strain coefficients, d 33. The freeze cast barium titanate with 45 vol.% porosity had a d 33  =  134.5 pC N‑1 compared to d 33  =  144.5 pC N‑1 for dense barium titanate. The d 33 coefficients of the freeze cast materials were also higher than materials with uniformly distributed spherical porosity due to improved poling of the aligned microstructures, as predicted by the models. Both model and experimental data indicated that introducing porosity provides a large reduction in the permittivity () of barium titanate, which leads to a substantial increase in energy harvesting figure of merit, , with a maximum of 3.79 pm2 N‑1 for barium titanate with 45 vol.% porosity, compared to only 1.40 pm2 N‑1 for dense barium titanate. Dense and porous barium titanate materials were then used to harvest energy from a mechanical excitation by rectification and storage of the piezoelectric charge on a capacitor. The porous barium titanate charged the capacitor to a voltage of 234 mV compared to 96 mV for the dense material, indicating a 2.4-fold increase that was similar to that

  4. Microstructure of epitaxial ferroelectric/metal oxide electrode thin film heterostructures on LaAlO{sub 3} and silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ghonge, S.G.; Goo, E.; Ramesh, R.

    1994-12-31

    TEM and X-ray diffraction studies of PZT, PLZT, lead titanate and bismuth titanate ferroelectric thin films and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x}(YBCO), Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}(BSCCO) and La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3}(LSCO) electrically conductive oxide thin films, that are sequentially deposited by pulsed laser ablation, show that these films may be deposited epitaxially onto LaAlO{sub 3}(LAO) or Si substrates. The conductive oxides are promising candidates for use is electrodes in place of metal electrodes in integrated ferroelectric device applications. The oxide electrodes are more chemically compatible with the ferroelectric films. High resolution electron microscopy his been used to investigate the interfacemore » between the ferroelectric and metal oxide thin films and no reaction was detected. Epitaxial growth is possible due to the similar crystal structures and the small lattice mismatch. The lattice mismatch that is present causes the domains in the ferroelectric films to be preferentially oriented and in the case of lead titanate, the film is single domain. These films may also have potential applications in integrated optical devices.« less

  5. Night Side of Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-02-23

    NASA Voyager 2 obtained this wide-angle image of the night side of Titan on Aug. 25, 1979. This is a view of Titan extended atmosphere. the bright orangish ring being caused by the atmosphere scattering of the incident sunlight.

  6. Conserving the Giant Titans

    Science.gov Websites

    Virtual Herbarium Conserving the Giant Titans The gigantic and pungent Titan Arum or Corpse Flower Milonic.com Copyright © 2007 Virtual Herbarium - All rights reserved 11935 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables, FL

  7. Titan's Exotic Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2006-09-01

    Images of Titan, taken during the joint NASA and European Space Agency Cassini-Huygens mission, invoke a feeling of familiarity: washes wind downhill to damp lakebeds; massive cumuli form and quickly dissipate, suggestive of rain; and dark oval regions resemble lakes. These features arise from Titan's unique similarity with Earth: both cycle liquid between their surfaces and atmospheres, but in Titan's cool atmosphere it is methane that exists as a gas, liquid, and ice. While Titan enticingly resembles Earth, its atmosphere is 10 times thicker, so that its radiative time constant near the surface exceeds a Titan year, and prohibits large thermal gradients and seasonal surface temperature variations exceeding 3K. Titan also lacks oceans - central to Earth's climate - and instead stores much of its condensible in its atmosphere. As a result, Titan's weather differs remarkably from Earth's. Evidence for this difference appears in the location of Titan's large clouds, which frequent a narrow band at 40S latitude and a region within 30 latitude of the S. Pole. Ground-based and Cassini observations, combined with thermodynamic considerations, indicate that we are seeing large convective cloud systems. Detailed cloud models and general circulation models further suggest that these are severe rain storms, which will migrate with the change in season. Outside these migrating "gypsy" cloud bands, the atmosphere appears to be calm, humid and thus frequented by thin stratiform clouds. An intriguingly alien environment is predicted. Yet, the combined effects of Titan's patchy wet surface, atmospheric tides, possible ice volcanoes, and detailed seasonal variations remain unclear as we have witnessed only one season so far. This talk will review observations of Titan's lower atmosphere and modeling efforts to explain the observations, and explore the questions that still elude us.

  8. What makes the difference in perovskite titanates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Roleder, Krystian; Ko, Jae-Hyeon

    2018-06-01

    We have investigated in detail the lattice dynamics of five different perovskite titanates ATiO3 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba, Pb, Eu) where the A sites are occupied by +2 ions. In spite of the largely ionic character of these ions, the properties of these compounds differ substantially. They range from order/disorder like, to displacive ferroelectric, quantum paraelectric, and antiferromagnetic. All compounds crystallize in the cubic structure at high temperature and undergo structural phase transitions to tetragonal symmetry, partly followed by further transitions to lower symmetries. Since the TiO6 moiety is the essential electronic and structural unit, the question arises, what makes the significant difference between them. It is shown that the lattice dynamics of these compounds are very different, and that mode-mode coupling effects give rise to many distinct properties. In addition, the oxygen ion nonlinear polarizability plays a key role since it dominates the anharmonicity of these perovskites and determines the structural instability.

  9. Size effects of 109° domain walls in rhombohedral barium titanate single crystals—A molecular statics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, Florian, E-mail: florian.endres@ltm.uni-erlangen.de; Steinmann, Paul, E-mail: paul.steinmann@ltm.uni-erlangen.de

    2016-01-14

    Ferroelectric functional materials are of great interest in science and technology due to their electromechanically coupled material properties. Therefore, ferroelectrics, such as barium titanate, are modeled and simulated at the continuum scale as well as at the atomistic scale. Due to recent advancements in related manufacturing technologies the modeling and simulation of smart materials at the nanometer length scale is getting more important not only to predict but also fundamentally understand the complex material behavior of such materials. In this study, we analyze the size effects of 109° nanodomain walls in ferroelectric barium titanate single crystals in the rhombohedral phasemore » using a recently proposed extended molecular statics algorithm. We study the impact of domain thicknesses on the spontaneous polarization, the coercive field, and the lattice constants. Moreover, we discuss how the electromechanical coupling of an applied electric field and the introduced strain in the converse piezoelectric effect is affected by the thickness of nanodomains.« less

  10. Ferroelectric large polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kiyoshi; Zhu, X.-Y.

    2018-05-01

    Kiyoshi Miyata and X.-Y. Zhu analyse the ferroelectric-like dielectric response of lead halide perovskites in the terahertz region and discuss the potential role of polar nanodomains in accounting for the defect tolerance and low recombination rates of these materials.

  11. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials have great potential in influencing the future of small scale electronics. At a basic level, this is because ferroelectric surfaces are charged, and so interact strongly with charge-carrying metals and semiconductors - the building blocks for all electronic systems. Since the electrical polarity of the ferroelectric can be reversed, surfaces can both attract and repel charges in nearby materials, and can thereby exert complete control over both charge distribution and movement. It should be no surprise, therefore, that microelectronics industries have already looked very seriously at harnessing ferroelectric materials in a variety of applications, from solid state memory chips (FeRAMs) to field effect transistors (FeFETs). In all such applications, switching the direction of the polarity of the ferroelectric is a key aspect of functional behavior. The mechanism for switching involves the field-induced nucleation and growth of domains. Domain coarsening, through domain wall propagation, eventually causes the entire ferroelectric to switch its polar direction. It is thus the existence and behavior of domains that determine the switching response, and ultimately the performance of the ferroelectric device. A major issue, associated with the integration of ferroelectrics into microelectronic devices, has been that the fundamental properties associated with ferroelectrics, when in bulk form, appear to change quite dramatically and unpredictably when at the nanoscale: new modes of behaviour, and different functional characteristics from those seen in bulk appear. For domains, in particular, the proximity of surfaces and boundaries have a dramatic effect: surface tension and depolarizing fields both serve to increase the equilibrium density of domains, such that minor changes in scale or morphology can have major ramifications for domain redistribution. Given the importance of domains in dictating the overall switching characteristics of a device

  12. The astrobiology of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, F.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Hebrard, E.; Israel, G.; Nguyen, M.-J.; Szopa, C.; Gpcos Team

    Largest satellite of Saturn and the only satellite in the solar system having a dense atmosphere, Titan is one of the key planetary bodies for astrobiological studies, due to several aspects: Its analogies with planet Earth, in spite of much lower temperatures, The Cassini-Huygens data have largely confirmed the many analogies between Titan and our own planet. Both have similar vertical temperature profiles, (although much colder, of course, on Titan). Both have condensable and non condensable greenhouse gases in their atmosphere. Both are geologically very active. Furthermore, the data also suggest strongly the presence of a methane cycle on Titan analogous to the water cycle on Earth. The presence of an active organic chemistry, involving several of the key compounds of prebiotic chemistry. The recent data obtained from the Huygens instruments show that the organic matter in Titan low atmosphere (stratosphere and troposphere) is mainly concentrated in the aerosol particles. Because of the vertical temperature profile in this part of the atmosphere, most of the volatile organics are probably mainly condensed on the aerosol particles. The nucleus of these particles seems to be made of complex macromolecular organic matter, well mimicked in the laboratory by the "Titan's tholins". Now, laboratory tholins are known to release many organic compounds of biological interest, such as amino acids and purine and pyrimidine bases, when they are in contact with liquid water. Such hydrolysis may have occurred on the surface of Titan, in the bodies of liquid water which episodically may form on Titan's surface from meteoritic and cometary impacts. The formation of biologically interesting compounds may also occur in the deep water ocean, from the hydrolysis of complex organic material included in the chrondritic matter accreted during the formation of Titan. The possible emergence and persistence of Life on Titan 1 All ingredients which seems necessary for Life are present on

  13. Not So Titanic

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-13

    Titan may be a "large" moon -- its name even implies it! -- but it is still dwarfed by its parent planet, Saturn. As it turns out, this is perfectly normal. Although Titan (3200 miles or 5150 kilometers across) is the second-largest moon in the solar system, Saturn is still much bigger, with a diameter almost 23 times larger than Titan's. This disparity between planet and moon is the norm in the solar system. Earth's diameter is "only" 3.7 times our moon's diameter, making our natural satellite something of an oddity. (Another exception to the rule: dwarf planet Pluto's diameter is just under two times that of its moon.) So the question isn't why is Titan so small (relatively speaking), but why is Earth's moon so big? This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Titan. North on Titan is up. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on April 18, 2015 using a near-infrared spectral filter with a passband centered at 752 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 930,000 miles (1.5 million kilometers) from Titan. Image scale is 56 miles (90 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18326

  14. Titan Accent Mark

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-05

    A coincidence of viewing angle makes Pandora appear to be hovering over Titan, almost like an accent mark. Little Pandora is much closer to Cassini than hazy Titan in this view. (Titan is nearly three times farther away.) Even so, Titan (3,200 miles or 5,150 kilometers across) dwarfs Pandora (50 miles or 81 kilometers across). This gives us some sense of the diversity in sizes, and shapes, of Saturn's many moons. North on Titan is up and rotated 19 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 4, 2015. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.2 million miles (1.9 million kilometers) from Titan. Image scale is 7 miles (12 kilometers) per pixel on Titan. Pandora is at a distance of 436,000 miles (698,000 kilometers) away from the spacecraft. The scale on Pandora is about 3 miles (4 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18338

  15. Titan's Variable Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini observations have found that the plasma and magnetic field conditions upstream of Titan are far more complex than they were thought to be after the Voyager encounter. Rymer et al., (2009) used the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) electron observations to classify the plasma conditions along Titan's orbit into 5 types (Plasma Sheet, Lobe, Mixed, Magnetosheath and Misc.). Nemeth et al., (2011) found that the CAPS ion observations could also be separated into the same plasma regions as defined by Rymer et al. Additionally the T-96 encounter found Titan in the solar wind adding a sixth classification. Understanding the effects of the variable upstream plasma conditions on Titan's plasma interaction and the evolution of Titan's ionosphere/atmosphere is one of the main objectives of the Cassini mission. To compliment the mission we perform hybrid simulations of Titan's plasma interaction to examine the effects of the incident plasma distribution function and the flow velocity. We closely examine the results on Titan's induced magnetosphere and the resulting pickup ion properties.

  16. Titan's organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  17. Anomalous permittivity in fine-grain barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrander, Steven Paul

    Fine-grain barium titanate capacitors exhibit anomalously large permittivity. It is often observed that these materials will double or quadruple the room temperature permittivity of a coarse-grain counterpart. However, aside from a general consensus on this permittivity enhancement, the properties of the fine-grain material are poorly understood. This thesis examines the effect of grain size on dielectric properties of a self-consistent set of high density undoped barium titanate capacitors. This set included samples with grain sizes ranging from submicron to ˜20 microns, and with densities generally above 95% of the theoretical. A single batch of well characterized powder was milled, dry-pressed then isostatically-pressed. Compacts were fast-fired, but sintering temperature alone was used to control the grain size. With this approach, the extrinsic influences are minimized within the set of samples, but more importantly, they are normalized between samples. That is, with a single batch of powder and with identical green processing, uniform impurity concentration is expected. The fine-grain capacitors exhibited a room temperature permittivity of ˜5500 and dielectric losses of ˜2%. The Curie-temperature decreased by {˜}5sp°C from that of the coarse-grain material, and the two ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition temperatures increased by {˜}10sp°C. The grain size induced permittivity enhancement was only active in the tetragonal and orthorhombic phases. Strong dielectric anomalies were observed in samples with grain size as small as {˜}0.4\\ mum. It is suggested that the strong first-order character observed in the present data is related to control of microstructure and stoichiometry. Grain size effects on conductivity losses, ferroelectric losses, ferroelectric dispersion, Maxwell-Wagner dispersion, and dielectric aging of permittivity and loss were observed. For the fine-grain material, these observations suggest the suppression of domain wall

  18. Ferroelectric memory based on molybdenum disulfide and ferroelectric hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Wui Chung; Jiang, Hao; Xia, Qiangfei; Zhu, Wenjuan

    Recently, ferroelectric hafnium oxide (HfO2) was discovered as a new type of ferroelectric material with the advantages of high coercive field, excellent scalability (down to 2.5 nm), and good compatibility with CMOS processing. In this work, we demonstrate, for the first time, 2D ferroelectric memories with molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as the channel material and aluminum doped HfO2 as the ferroelectric gate dielectric. A 16 nm thick layer of HfO2, doped with 5.26% aluminum, was deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), then subjected to rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 1000 °C, and the polarization-voltage characteristics of the resulting metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) capacitors were measured, showing a remnant polarization of 0.6 μC/cm2. Ferroelectric memories with embedded ferroelectric hafnium oxide stacks and monolayer MoS2 were fabricated. The transfer characteristics after program and erase pulses revealed a clear ferroelectric memory window. In addition, endurance (up to 10,000 cycles) of the devices were tested and effects associated with ferroelectric materials, such as the wake-up effect and polarization fatigue, were observed. This research can potentially lead to advances of 2D materials in low-power logic and memory applications.

  19. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N.; Sun, F.

    2014-05-19

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  20. Li isotopes in archean zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Ushikubo, T.; Kita, N.; Cavosie, A. J.; Kozdon, R.; Valley, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Li is a fluid mobile, moderately incompatible element with a large mass difference between its two stable isotopes. Different processes can fractionate 7Li/6Li (fluid-rock interaction, metamorphic reactions, and Li diffusion), leading to variation by over 50‰ of δ7Li for common crustal material. These large variations make δ7Li a potential tracer of continental weathering and of the fluids affecting magma sources. Here, we report δ7Li and trace elements in Archean igneous zircons from TTG and sanukitoid granitoids from the Superior Province (Canada) in order to characterize Li in Archean zircons from well-described samples. These data are compared to detrital zircons from the Jack Hills (Western Australia) for which parent rock-type is uncertain. This study aims to better understand Li substitution in zircon and to evaluate the utility of δ7Li and [Li] for Archean petrogenesis. Zircons (n=71) were analyzed for δ7Li and trace elements (Li, P, Ca, Ti, V, Fe, Y, REE, U, Th) using an IMS-1280 ion microprobe. Most of the zircons display typical igneous REE patterns and zoning by CL. [Li] averages 13.1 ± 9 for TTG, 25.7 ± 19 for Sanukitoid and 31.0 ± 14 ppm for Jack Hills zircons, which are distinct from mantle-related zircons (<0.1 ppm). Values of δ7Li average 1.0 ± 4.5‰ for TTGs, 6.3 ± 4.4‰ for sanukitoids and -2.6 ± 8.8‰ for Jack Hills samples. Trace elements were analyzed from single spots in order to evaluate coupled substitutions. Atomic ratios (3Li+Y+REE)/P average 2.6, showing that Li and trivalent atoms are not charge-balanced by P, and suggesting that Li does not replace Zr, according to the xenotime substitution. However, (Y+REE)/(Li+P) atomic ratios average 1.0 ± 0.6, supporting the hypothesis that Li is interstitial and partly compensates trivalent cations. Several observations in this study suggest that [Li] is primary in the studied zircons: i) if Li is interstitial, charge-balance and slow diffusion of REE would control Li mobility

  1. Bismuth Sodium Titanate Based Materials for Piezoelectric Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Klaus; Feteira, Antonio; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The ban of lead in many electronic products and the expectation that, sooner or later, this ban will include the currently exempt piezoelectric ceramics based on Lead-Zirconate-Titanate has motivated many research groups to look for lead-free substitutes. After a short overview on different classes of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with large strain, this review will focus on Bismuth-Sodium-Titanate and its solid solutions. These compounds exhibit extraordinarily high strain, due to a field induced phase transition, which makes them attractive for actuator applications. The structural features of these materials and the origin of the field-induced strain will be revised. Technologies for texturing, which increases the useable strain, will be introduced. Finally, the features that are relevant for the application of these materials in a multilayer design will be summarized. PMID:28793724

  2. Determination of uranium in zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuttitta, F.; Daniels, G.J.

    1959-01-01

    A routine fluorimetric procedure is described for the determination of trace amounts of uranium in zircon. It employs the direct extraction of uranyl nitrate with ethyl acetate using phosphate as a retainer for zirconium. Submicrogram amounts or uranium are separated in the presence of 100,000 times the amount of zirconium. The modified procedure has been worked out using synthetic mixtures of known composition and zircon. Results of analyses have an accuracy of 97-98% of the contained uranium and a standard deviation of less than 2.5%. ?? 1959.

  3. Raising the Titanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Romona

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which groups of students investigate engineering principles by writing a feasibility study to raise the luxury liner, Titanic. The problem statement and directions, and suggestions for problem solutions are included. (CW)

  4. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  5. Titan and Callisto

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-08

    These images compare surface features observed by NASA Cassini spacecraft at the Xanadu region on Saturn moon Titan left, and features observed by NASA Galileo spacecraft on Jupiter cratered moon Callisto right.

  6. Titan Two Halves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-13

    Two different seasons on Titan in different hemispheres can be seen in this image. The moon northern half appears slightly darker than the southern half in this view taken in visible blue light by NASA Cassini spacecraft.

  7. Titan Kraken Mare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-28

    NASA Cassini spacecraft looks toward Saturn largest moon, Titan, and spies the huge Kraken Mare in the moon north. Kraken Mare, a large sea of liquid hydrocarbons, is visible as a dark area near the top of the image.

  8. The greenhouse of Titan.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of non-gray radiative equilibrium and gray convective equilibrium on Titan suggests that a massive molecular-hydrogen greenhouse effect may be responsible for the disagreement between the observed IR temperatures and the equilibrium temperature of an atmosphereless Titan. Calculations of convection indicate a probable minimum optical depth of 14 which corresponds to a molecular hydrogen shell of substantial thickness with total pressures of about 0.1 bar. It is suggested that there is an equilibrium between outgassing and blow-off on the one hand and accretion from the protons trapped in a hypothetical Saturnian magnetic field on the other, in the present atmosphere of Titan. It is believed that an outgassing equivalent to the volatilization of a few kilometers of subsurface ice is required to maintain the present blow-off rate without compensation for all geological time. The presence of an extensive hydrogen corona around Titan is postulated, with surface temperatures up to 200 K.

  9. Mapping Titan Cloud Coverage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-21

    This graphic, constructed from data obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft, shows the percentage of cloud coverage across the surface of Saturn moon Titan. The color scale from black to yellow signifies no cloud coverage to complete cloud coverage.

  10. Equatorial Titan Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-17

    NASA Cassini spacecraft chronicles the change of seasons as it captures clouds concentrated near the equator of Saturn largest moon, Titan. Methane clouds in the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere, appear white here.

  11. Clash of the Titans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2010-01-01

    WebQuests and the 5E learning cycle are titans of the science classroom. These popular inquiry-based strategies are most often used as separate entities, but the author has discovered that using a combined WebQuest and 5E learning cycle format taps into the inherent power and potential of both strategies. In the lesson, "Clash of the Titans,"…

  12. Space Art "Titan"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-13

    Artist Daniel Zeller used the breathtaking imagery from the Cassini spacecraft as a departure point to interpret the intricate surface of Saturn’s moon Titan in this peice titled "Titan". Cassini entered Saturn's orbit in July of 2004 after a seven-year voyage. It then began a four-year mission that includes more than 70 orbits around the ringed planet and its moons. Ink on Paper, 17x21. 2006. Copyrighted: For more information contact Curator, NASA Art Program.

  13. Titan's Ammonia Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M.; Choukroun, M.

    2011-01-01

    NH3 has long been considered an important component in the formation and evolution of the outer planet satellites. NH3 is particularly important for Titan, since it may serve as the reservoir for atmospheric nitrogen. A brightening seen on Titan starting in 2004 may arise from a transient low-lying fog or surface coating of ammonia. The spectral shape suggests the ammonia is anhydrous, a molecule that hydrates quickly in the presence of water.

  14. Dunelands of Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-02

    Saturn's frigid moon Titan has some characteristics that are oddly similar to Earth, but still slightly alien. It has clouds, rain and lakes (made of methane and ethane), a solid surface (made of water ice), and vast dune fields (filled with hydrocarbon sands). The dark, H-shaped area seen here contains two of the dune-filled regions, Fensal (in the north) and Aztlan (to the south). Cassini's cameras have frequently monitored the surface of Titan (3200 miles or 5150 kilometers across) to look for changes in its features over the course of the mission. Any changes would help scientists better understand different phenomena like winds and dune formation on this strangely earth-like moon. For a closer view of Fensal-Aztlan, see PIA07732 . This view looks toward the leading side of Titan. North on Titan is up. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 25, 2015 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 938 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 450,000 miles (730,000 kilometers) from Titan and at a Sun-Titan-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 32 degrees. Image scale is 3 miles (4 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18341

  15. Enhanced airglow at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Emilie; Esposito, Larry; Wahlund, Jan-Erik

    2016-06-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) instrument made thousand of observations of Titan since its arrival in the Saturnian system in 2004, but only few of them have been analyzed yet. Using the imaging capability of UVIS combined to a big data analytics approach, we have been able to uncover an unexpected pattern in this observations: on several occasions the Titan airglow exhibits an enhanced brightness by approximately a factor of 2, generally combined with a lower altitude of the airglow emission peak. These events typically last from 10 to 30 minutes and are followed and preceded by an airglow of regular and expected level of brightness and altitude. Observations made by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instrument onboard Cassini allowed us to correlate the enhanced airglow observed on T-32 with an electron burst. The timing of the burst and the level of energetic electrons (1 keV) observed by CAPS correspond to a brighter and lower than typical airglow displayed on the UVIS data. Furthermore, during T-32 Titan was inside the Saturn's magnetosheath and thus more subject to bombardment by energetic particles. However, our analysis demonstrates that the presence of Titan inside the magnetosheath is not a necessary condition for the production of an enhanced airglow, as we detected other similar events while Titan was within Saturn's magnetosphere. The study presented here aims to a better understanding of the interactions of Titan's upper atmosphere with its direct environment.

  16. High Temperature Ferroelectrics for Actuators: Recent Developments and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehirlioglu, Alp; Kowalski, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    A variety of piezoelectric applications have been driving the research in development of new high temperature ferroelectrics; ranging from broader markets such as fuel and gas modulation and deep well oil drilling to very specific applications such as thermoacoustic engines and ultrasonic drilling on the surface of Venus. The focus has been mostly on increasing the Curie temperature. However, greater challenges for high temperature ferroelectrics limit the operating temperature to levels much below the Curie temperature. These include enhanced loss tangent and dc conductivity at high fields as well as depoling due to thermally activated domain rotation. The initial work by Eitel et al. [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 40 [10, Part 1] 59996002 (2001)] increased interest in investigation of Bismuth containing perovskites in solid solution with lead titanate. Issues that arise vary from solubility limits to increased tetragonality; the former one prohibits processing of morphotropic phase boundary, while the latter one impedes thorough poling of the polycrystalline ceramics. This talk will summarize recent advances in development of high temperature piezoelectrics and provide information about challenges encountered as well as the approaches taken to improve the high temperature behavior of ferroelectrics with a focus on applications that employ the converse piezoelectric effect.

  17. Peering Through Titan Haze

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-04

    This composite image shows an infrared view of Saturn's moon Titan from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, acquired during the mission's "T-114" flyby on Nov. 13, 2015. The spacecraft's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument made these observations, in which blue represents wavelengths centered at 1.3 microns, green represents 2.0 microns, and red represents 5.0 microns. A view at visible wavelengths (centered around 0.5 microns) would show only Titan's hazy atmosphere (as in PIA14909). The near-infrared wavelengths in this image allow Cassini's vision to penetrate the haze and reveal the moon's surface. During this Titan flyby, the spacecraft's closest-approach altitude was 6,200 miles (10,000 kilometers), which is considerably higher than those of typical flybys, which are around 750 miles (1,200 kilometers). The high flyby allowed VIMS to gather moderate-resolution views over wide areas (typically at a few kilometers per pixel). The view looks toward terrain that is mostly on the Saturn-facing hemisphere of Titan. The scene features the parallel, dark, dune-filled regions named Fensal (to the north) and Aztlan (to the south), which form the shape of a sideways letter "H." Several places on the image show the surface at higher resolution than elsewhere. These areas, called subframes, show more detail because they were acquired near closest approach. They have finer resolution, but cover smaller areas than data obtained when Cassini was farther away from Titan. Near the limb at left, above center, is the best VIMS view so far of Titan's largest confirmed impact crater, Menrva (first seen by the RADAR instrument in PIA07365). Similarly detailed subframes show eastern Xanadu, the basin Hotei Regio, and channels within bright terrains east of Xanadu. (For Titan maps with named features see http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/Page/TITAN/target.) Due to the changing Saturnian seasons, in this late northern spring view, the illumination is significantly

  18. The environment of Titan, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Information regarding the physical characteristics of Titan and atmospheric models necessary to support design and mission planning of spacecraft that are to orbit Titan, enter its atmosphere or land on its surface is given.

  19. Mimas...and Titan Beyond

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-01-03

    Titan, Saturn largest moon and Mimas in the foreground are seen together in this view from Cassini. Titan gravity is weaker than Earth, so the moon atmosphere is quite extended -- a quality hinted at in this view

  20. Titan Saturn System Mission Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Lunine, J.; Reh, K.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Erd, C.; Beauchamp, P.; Matson, D.

    2012-10-01

    The Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM), another future mission proposed for Titan's exploration, includes an orbiter and two in situ elements: a hot-air balloon and a lake lander. The instrumentation of those two elements will be presented.

  1. Map of Titan - April 2011

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-26

    This global digital map of Saturn moon Titan was created using images taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft imaging science subsystem ISS. Because of the scattering of light by Titan dense atmosphere, no topographic shading is visible here.

  2. Titan Extraterrestrial Land of Lakes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-12

    A colorized flyover of Titan's hydrocarbon seas and lakes. Data was collected by the Cassini spacecraft radar instrument between 2004 and 2013 during several flybys of Titan. Heights of features are exaggerated 10 times.

  3. Titan's impact history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Impacts play a major role in the growth and evolution of planets, satellites, and other nameless things. Titan is no exception. This talk will address a subset of the following topics: (i) The modern impact rate is constrained by the population of Centaurs and the impact rate at Jupiter. (ii) Titan's thick atmosphere and volatile surface cause it to respond to major impacts in an Earth-like manner. The impact that made Menrva - the 440 km diameter impact basin sited near the current apex of Titan's motion - was big enough to raise the average global surface temperature above 273 K, which suggests that water rain was possible. This would have been followed by methane drizzles lasting for thousands of years. More modest impacts will generate crater lakes and will saturate the atmosphere with methane, the latter leading to hundreds of years of intermittent drizzle. (iii) Impact ejecta from Menrva will strike Hyperion and should saturate the latter with sesquinary craters. (iv) In any modern story of how Titan got its atmosphere, solar nebular condensates (comets) deliver the volatiles. A consequence of a cometogenic atmosphere is that the atmosphere is heavily processed by strong shocks. The high temperatures produce a wide range of chemical species that would not otherwise be abundant. Some of these will survive to mix into the atmosphere (e.g., CO) or freeze out to fall to the surface (e.g. CO2). (v) That Titan even has an atmosphere, when Callisto and Ganymede do not, is an excellent question. The leading explanation is that Titan alone was made from ammonia - and methane - rich stuff. But the competition between impact delivery and impact expulsion of volatiles can strongly favor Titan over Callisto. Stable isotopes as well as total volatile inventories provide constraints.

  4. Titan's atmosphere and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörst, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    Titan is the only moon with a substantial atmosphere, the only other thick N2 atmosphere besides Earth's, the site of extraordinarily complex atmospheric chemistry that far surpasses any other solar system atmosphere, and the only other solar system body with stable liquid currently on its surface. The connection between Titan's surface and atmosphere is also unique in our solar system; atmospheric chemistry produces materials that are deposited on the surface and subsequently altered by surface-atmosphere interactions such as aeolian and fluvial processes resulting in the formation of extensive dune fields and expansive lakes and seas. Titan's atmosphere is favorable for organic haze formation, which combined with the presence of some oxygen-bearing molecules indicates that Titan's atmosphere may produce molecules of prebiotic interest. The combination of organics and liquid, in the form of water in a subsurface ocean and methane/ethane in the surface lakes and seas, means that Titan may be the ideal place in the solar system to test ideas about habitability, prebiotic chemistry, and the ubiquity and diversity of life in the universe. The Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturn system has provided a wealth of new information allowing for study of Titan as a complex system. Here I review our current understanding of Titan's atmosphere and climate forged from the powerful combination of Earth-based observations, remote sensing and in situ spacecraft measurements, laboratory experiments, and models. I conclude with some of our remaining unanswered questions as the incredible era of exploration with Cassini-Huygens comes to an end.

  5. Relaxor properties of barium titanate crystals grown by Remeika method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Michel; Tiagunov, Jenia; Dul'kin, Evgeniy; Mojaev, Evgeny

    2017-06-01

    Barium titanate (BaTiO3, BT) crystals have been grown by the Remeika method using both the regular KF and mixed KF-NaF (0.6-0.4) solvents. Typical acute angle "butterfly wing" BT crystals have been obtained, and they were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (including energy dispersive spectroscopy), conventional dielectric and acoustic emission methods. A typical wing has a triangular plate shape which is up to 0.5 mm thick with a 10-15 mm2 area. The plate has a (001) habit and an atomically smooth outer surface. Both K+ and F- solvent ions are incorporated as dopants into the crystal lattice during growth substituting for Ba2+ and O2- ions respectively. The dopants' distribution is found to be inhomogeneous, their content being almost an order of magnitude higher (up to 2 mol%) at out surface of the plate relatively to the bulk. A few μm thick surface layer is formed where a multidomain ferroelectric net is confined between two≤1 μm thick dopant-rich surfaces. The layer as a whole possess relaxor ferroelectric properties, which is apparent from the appearance of additional broad maxima, Tm, in the temperature dependence of the dielectric permittivity around the ferroelectric phase transition. Intense acoustic emission responses detected at temperatures corresponding to the Tm values allow to observe the Tm shift to lower temperatures at higher frequencies, or dispersion, typical for relaxor ferroelectrics. The outer surface of the BT wing can thus serve as a relaxor thin film for various electronic application, such as capacitors, or as a substrate for BT-based multiferroic structure. Crystals grown from KF-NaF fluxes contain sodium atoms as an additional impurity, but the crystal yield is much smaller, and while the ferroelectric transition peak is diffuse it does not show any sign of dispersion typical for relaxor behavior.

  6. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    DOE PAGES

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; ...

    2014-11-05

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this study, we describe an oxide/oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr₀̣.₂Ti₀.₈O₃-LaNiO₃ where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, inmore » one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7 eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.« less

  7. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  8. Weather on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, C. A.; Hall, J. L.; Geballe, T. R.

    2000-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere potentially sports a cycle similar to the hydrologic one on Earth with clouds, rain and seas, but with methane playing the terrestrial role of water. Over the past ten years many independent efforts indicated no strong evidence for cloudiness until some unique spectra were analyzed in 1998 (Griffith et al.). These surprising observations displayed enhanced fluxes of 14-200% on two nights at precisely the wavelengths (windows) that sense Titan's lower altitude where clouds might reside. The morphology of these enhancements in all 4 windows observed indicate that clouds covered ~6-9% of Titan's surface and existed at ~15 km altitude. Here I discuss new observations recorded in 1999 aimed to further characterize Titan's clouds. While we find no evidence for a massive cloud system similar to the one observed previously, 1%-4% fluctuations in flux occur daily. These modulations, similar in wavelength and morphology to the more pronounced ones observed earlier, suggest the presence of clouds covering <=1% of Titan's disk. The variations are too small to have been detected by most prior measurements. Repeated observations, spaced 30 minutes apart, indicate a temporal variability observable in the time scale of a couple of hours. The cloud heights hint that convection governs their evolutions. Their short lives point to the presence of rain. C. A. Griffith and J. L. Hall are supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program NAG5-6790.

  9. Hypsometry of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Stiles, Bryan; Le Gall, Alice; Hayes, Alexander; Aharonson, Oded; Wood, Charles A.; Stofan, Ellen; Kirk, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Cassini RADAR topography data are used to evaluate Titan's hypsometric profile, and to make comparisons with other planetary bodies. Titan's hypsogram is unimodal and strikingly narrow compared with the terrestrial planets. To investigate topographic extremes, a novel variant on the classic hypsogram is introduced, with a logarithmic abscissa to highlight mountainous terrain. In such a plot, the top of the terrestrial hypsogram is quite distinct from those of Mars and Venus due to the 'glacial buzz-saw' that clips terrestrial topography above the snowline. In contrast to the positive skew seen in other hypsograms, with a long tail of positive relief due to mountains, there is an indication (weak, given the limited data for Titan so far) that the Titan hypsogram appears slightly negatively skewed, suggesting a significant population of unfilled depressions. Limited data permit only a simplistic comparison of Titan topography with other icy satellites but we find that the standard deviation of terrain height (albeit at different scales) is similar to those of Ganymede and Europa.

  10. The tides of Titan.

    PubMed

    Iess, Luciano; Jacobson, Robert A; Ducci, Marco; Stevenson, David J; Lunine, Jonathan I; Armstrong, John W; Asmar, Sami W; Racioppa, Paolo; Rappaport, Nicole J; Tortora, Paolo

    2012-07-27

    We have detected in Cassini spacecraft data the signature of the periodic tidal stresses within Titan, driven by the eccentricity (e = 0.028) of its 16-day orbit around Saturn. Precise measurements of the acceleration of Cassini during six close flybys between 2006 and 2011 have revealed that Titan responds to the variable tidal field exerted by Saturn with periodic changes of its quadrupole gravity, at about 4% of the static value. Two independent determinations of the corresponding degree-2 Love number yield k(2) = 0.589 ± 0.150 and k(2) = 0.637 ± 0.224 (2σ). Such a large response to the tidal field requires that Titan's interior be deformable over time scales of the orbital period, in a way that is consistent with a global ocean at depth.

  11. Titan Despeckled Montage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-12

    This montage of Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of the surface of Titan shows four examples of how a newly developed technique for handling noise results in clearer, easier to interpret views. The top row of images was produced in the manner used since the mission arrived in the Saturn system a decade ago; the row at bottom was produced using the new technique. The three leftmost image pairs show bays and spits of land in Ligea Mare, one of Titan's large hydrocarbon seas. The rightmost pair shows a valley network along Jingpo Lacus, one of Titan's larger northern lakes. North is toward the left in these images. Each thumbnail represents an area 70 miles (112 kilometers) wide. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19053

  12. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Charles A.; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randy; Lopes, Rosaly; Mitchell, Karl; Stofan, Ellen; ,

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles.

  13. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, C.A.; Lorenz, R.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Mitchell, Ken; Stofan, E.

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Titanic Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    New Detailed VLT Images of Saturn's Largest Moon Optimizing space missions Titan, the largest moon of Saturn was discovered by Dutch astronomer Christian Huygens in 1655 and certainly deserves its name. With a diameter of no less than 5,150 km, it is larger than Mercury and twice as large as Pluto. It is unique in having a hazy atmosphere of nitrogen, methane and oily hydrocarbons. Although it was explored in some detail by the NASA Voyager missions, many aspects of the atmosphere and surface still remain unknown. Thus, the existence of seasonal or diurnal phenomena, the presence of clouds, the surface composition and topography are still under debate. There have even been speculations that some kind of primitive life (now possibly extinct) may be found on Titan. Titan is the main target of the NASA/ESA Cassini/Huygens mission, launched in 1997 and scheduled to arrive at Saturn on July 1, 2004. The ESA Huygens probe is designed to enter the atmosphere of Titan, and to descend by parachute to the surface. Ground-based observations are essential to optimize the return of this space mission, because they will complement the information gained from space and add confidence to the interpretation of the data. Hence, the advent of the adaptive optics system NAOS-CONICA (NACO) [1] in combination with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile now offers a unique opportunity to study the resolved disc of Titan with high sensitivity and increased spatial resolution. Adaptive Optics (AO) systems work by means of a computer-controlled deformable mirror that counteracts the image distortion induced by atmospheric turbulence. It is based on real-time optical corrections computed from image data obtained by a special camera at very high speed, many hundreds of times each second (see e.g. ESO Press Release 25/01 , ESO PR Photos 04a-c/02, ESO PR Photos 19a-c/02, ESO PR Photos 21a-c/02, ESO Press Release 17/02, and ESO Press Release 26/03 for earlier NACO

  15. Diurnal variations of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1,000 and 1,400 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from 8 close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Though there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ~700 cm-3 below ~1,300 km. Such a plateau is associated with the combination of distinct diurnal variations of light and heavy ions. Light ions (e.g. CH5+, HCNH+, C2H5+) show strong diurnal variation, with clear bite-outs in their nightside distributions. In contrast, heavy ions (e.g. c-C3H3+, C2H3CNH+, C6H7+) present modest diurnal variation, with significant densities observed on the nightside. We propose that the distinctions between light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through "fast" ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through "slow" electron dissociative recombination. The INMS data suggest day-to-night transport as an important source of ions on Titan's nightside, to be distinguished from the conventional scenario of auroral ionization by magnetospheric particles as the only ionizing source on the nightside. This is supported by the strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effects of day-to-night transport on the ionospheric structures of Titan. The predicted diurnal variation has similar general characteristics to those observed, with some apparent discrepancies which could be reconciled by imposing fast horizontal thermal winds in Titan's upper atmosphere.

  16. Highly aligned arrays of high aspect ratio barium titanate nanowires via hydrothermal synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowland, Christopher C.; Zhou, Zhi; Malakooti, Mohammad H.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the development of a hydrothermal synthesis procedure that results in the growth of highly aligned arrays of high aspect ratio barium titanate nanowires. Using a multiple step, scalable hydrothermal reaction, a textured titanium dioxide film is deposited on titanium foil upon which highly aligned nanowires are grown via homoepitaxy and converted to barium titanate. Scanning electron microscope images clearly illustrate the effect the textured film has on the degree of orientation of the nanowires. The alignment of nanowires is quantified by calculating the Herman's Orientation Factor, which reveals a 58% improvement in orientation as compared to growthmore » in the absence of the textured film. The ferroelectric properties of barium titanate combined with the development of this scalable growth procedure provide a powerful route towards increasing the efficiency and performance of nanowire-based devices in future real-world applications such as sensing and power harvesting.« less

  17. Titan's highly variable plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, D. A.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1982-02-01

    It is noted that Titan's plasma environment is variable for two reasons. The variability of the solar wind is such that Titan may be located in the outer magnetosphere, the magnetosheath, or the interplanetary medium around noon Saturnian local time. What is more, there are local time variations in Saturn's magnetosphere. The location of the stagnation point of Saturn's magnetosphere is calculated, assuming a terrestrial type magnetosphere. Characteristic plasma parameters along the orbit of Titan are shown for high solar wind pressure. During crossings of the Saturnian magnetopause or bow shock by Titan, abrupt changes in the flow direction and stagnation pressure are expected, as are rapid associated changes in Titan's uppermost atmosphere.

  18. Northern Summer on Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-14

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft sees bright methane clouds drifting in the summer skies of Saturn's moon Titan, along with dark hydrocarbon lakes and seas clustered around the north pole. Compared to earlier in Cassini's mission, most of the surface in the moon's northern high latitudes is now illuminated by the sun. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 9, 2017, using a spectral filter that preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 938 nanometers. Cassini obtained the view at a distance of about 315,000 miles (507,000 kilometers) from Titan. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21615

  19. Expansion of Titan atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, S.; Moslem, W. M.; Radi, A.

    2017-05-01

    Self-similar plasma expansion approach is used to solve a plasma model based on the losing phenomenon of Titan atmospheric composition. To this purpose, a set of hydrodynamic fluid equations describing a plasma consisting of two positive ions with different masses and isothermal electrons is used. With the aid of self-similar transformation, numerical solution of the fluid equations has been performed to examine the density, velocity, and potential profiles. The effects of different plasma parameters, i.e., density and temperature ratios, are studied on the expanding plasma profiles. The present investigation could be useful to recognize the ionized particles escaping from Titan atmosphere.

  20. Performance Enhancement of Tunable Bandpass Filters Using Selective Etched Ferroelectric Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Mueller, Carl H.; VanKeuls, Fred W.; Subramanyam, Guru; Vignesparamoorthy, Sivaruban

    2003-01-01

    The inclusion of voltage-tunable barium strontium titanate (BSTO) thin films into planar band pass filters offers tremendous potential to increase their versatility. The ability to tune the passband so as to correct for minor deviations in manufacturing tolerances, or to completely reconfigure the operating frequencies of a microwave communication system, are highly sought-after goals. However, use of ferroelectric films in these devices results in higher dielectric losses, which in turn increase the insertion loss and decrease the quality factors of the filters. This study explores the use of patterned ferroelectric layers to minimize dielectric losses without degrading tunability. Patterning the ferroelectric layers enables us to constrict the width of the ferroelectric layers between the coupled microstrip lines, and minimize losses due to ferroelectric layers. Coupled one-pole microstrip bandpass filters with fundamental resonances at approx. 7.2 GHz and well defined harmonic resonances at approx. 14.4 and approx. 21.6 GHz, were designed, simulated and tested. For one of the filters, experimental results verified that its center frequency was tunable by 528 MHz at a center frequency of 21.957 GHz, with insertion losses varying from 4.3 to 2.5 dB, at 0 and 3.5 V/micron, respectively. These data demonstrate that the tuning-to-loss figure of merit of tunable microstrip filters can be greatly improved using patterned ferroelectric thin films as the tuning element, and tuning can be controlled by engineering the ferroelectric constriction in the coupled sections.

  1. Titan's "Hot Cross Bun": A Titan Laccolith?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Stofan, E. R.; Wall, S. D.; Wood, C.; Kirk, R. L.; Lucas, A.; Mitchell, K. L.; Lunine, J. I.; Turtle, E. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Malaska, M.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2012-10-01

    Cassini’s RADAR instrument acquired Synthetic Aperture Radar data during the T83 flyby on May 22, 2012. The data showed a feature centered at 38.5N, 203W that resembles a “hot cross bun”. This type of feature has not been seen on Titan before, even though 52% of Titan’s surface has been imaged using SAR. The feature, approximately 100 km across, is mostly radar bright but the cross pattern, interpreted to be extensional fractures, located roughly at the center of the brighter area, appears darker at radar wavelengths (2.3 cm). Radar illumination of the image indicates that the fractures are lower in elevation than the surrounding bright region. The morphology of the region is markedly similar to that of a 30-km dome-shaped feature on Venus that lies at the summit of the Kunapipi volcano. The Venus feature is interpreted to be the result of intrusion of magma at the summit of the volcano [1]. A similar feature, interpreted as a laccolith, is seen on the Moon near the crater Ramsden [2]. The lunar feature, imaged by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the cross-shaped depression over a 300 m high rise. No topographic data for the feature on Titan are available at this time, but the morphology seen by the SAR data suggests that the feature may have been formed by material pushing up from below. Laccoliths form when an igneous intrusion splits apart two strata, resulting in a domeline structure. This previously unknown type of structure on Titan may be yet another indication of cryovolcanism. [1] Stofan, E.R., et al, Icarus, 152, 75-95, 2001. [2] Wichman, R.W. and Schultz, P. H. (1996). Icarus, 122, Issue 1, July 1996, pages 193-199. doi:10.1006/icar.1996.0118

  2. Switchable and Tunable Bulk Acoustic Wave Devices Based on Ferroelectric Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Almonir

    The explosive development of personal communications systems, navigation, satellite communications as well as personal computer and data processing systems together with the constant demand for higher speeds and larger bandwidths has driven fabrication technology to its limits. This, in turn, necessitates the development of novel functional materials for the fabrication of devices with superior performance and higher capacity at reduced manufacturing costs. Ferroelectric materials such as barium strontium titanate (BST) and strontium titanium oxide (STO) have received more attention by researchers and industry because of their field-induced piezoelectric property. This property gives these types of ferroelectric materials the ability to be switchable and tunable in the presence of an electric field. These features have allowed the ferroelectric materials to be used in many applications such as non-volatile memory and DRAMs, sensors, pyroelectric detectors, and tunable microwave devices. Therefore, with the ever increasing complexity in RF front-end receivers, and the demand for services (which in turn requires more functionalities), ferroelectric bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators and filters that are intrinsically switchable and tunable promise to reduce the size and complexity of component parts. In this work, we present the design, fabrication and experimental evaluation of switchable and tunable thin film bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators, filters and duplexers for radio frequency (RF) applications. The switchability and tunability of these devices come from utilizing the electrostrictive effect of ferroelectric materials such as barium strontium titanate (BST) with the application of an external DC-bias voltage. The BAW resonators, filters and duplexers in this work were fabricated on different substrates as solidly mounted resonator (SMR) structure with number of periodic layers of silicon dioxide and tantalum oxide as a Bragg reflector in order to

  3. Titan Mystery Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-21

    This comparison of two views from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, taken fairly close together in time, illustrates a peculiar mystery: Why would clouds on Saturn's moon Titan be visible in some images, but not in others? In the top view, a near-infrared image from Cassini's imaging cameras, the skies above Saturn's moon Titan look relatively cloud free. But in the bottom view, at longer infrared wavelengths, Cassini sees a large field of bright clouds. Even though these views were taken at different wavelengths, researchers would expect at least a hint of the clouds to show up in the upper image. Thus they have been trying to understand what's behind the difference. As northern summer approaches on Titan, atmospheric models have predicted that clouds will become more common at high northern latitudes, similar to what was observed at high southern latitudes during Titan's late southern summer in 2004. Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) teams have been observing Titan to document changes in weather patterns as the seasons change, and there is particular interest in following the onset of clouds in the north polar region where Titan's lakes and seas are concentrated. Cassini's "T120" and "T121" flybys of Titan, on June 7 and July 25, 2016, respectively, provided views of high northern latitudes over extended time periods -- more than 24 hours during both flybys. Intriguingly, the ISS and VIMS observations appear strikingly different from each other. In the ISS observations (monochrome image at top), surface features are easily identifiable and only a few small, isolated clouds were detected. In contrast, the VIMS observations (color image at bottom) suggest widespread cloud cover during both flybys. The observations were made over the same time period, so differences in illumination geometry or changes in the clouds themselves are unlikely to be the cause for the apparent discrepancy: VIMS shows persistent

  4. Ferroelectricity in corundum derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Meng; Vanderbilt, David

    The search for new ferroelectric (FE) materials holds promise for broadening our understanding of FE mechanisms and extending the range of application of FE materials. The known FE materials LiNbO3 can be regarded as derived from the A2O3 corundum structure with cation ordering. Here we consider more general binary (AB O3) and ternary (A2 BB' O6) corundum derivatives as an extended class of potential FE materials, motivated by the fact that some members of this class have recently been synthesized. There are four structure types for these corundum derivatives, and the number of cation combinations is enormous, but in many cases the energy barriers for polarization reversal may be too large to allow FE behavior. Here we present a first-principles study of the polar structure, coherent FE barrier, and domain-wall switching barrier for a representative set of polar corundum derivatives, allowing us to identify several potentially new FE materials. We also discuss the conditions under which ferroelectricity is compatible with magnetic ordering. Finally, we identify several empirical measures that can provide a rule of thumb for estimating the barrier energies. Our results should assist in the experimental search for new FE materials in the corundum derivative family. This work is supported by ONR Grant No. N-00014-12-1-1035.

  5. Ferroelectricity in corundum derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Meng; Vanderbilt, David

    2016-04-01

    The search for new ferroelectric (FE) materials holds promise for broadening our understanding of FE mechanisms and extending the range of application of FE materials. Here we investigate a class of A B O3 and A2B B'O6 materials that can be derived from the X2O3 corundum structure by mixing two or three ordered cations on the X site. Most such corundum derivatives have a polar structure, but it is unclear whether the polarization is reversible, which is a requirement for a FE material. In this paper, we propose a method to study the FE reversal path of materials in the corundum derivative family. We first categorize the corundum derivatives into four classes and show that only two of these allow for the possibility of FE reversal. We then calculate the energy profile and energy barrier of the FE reversal path using first-principles density functional methods with a structural constraint. Furthermore, we identify several empirical measures that can provide a rule of thumb for estimating the energy barriers. Finally, the conditions under which the magnetic ordering is compatible with ferroelectricity are determined. These results lead us to predict several potentially new FE materials.

  6. Pulsed-Laser Crystallization of Ferroelectric/Piezoelectric Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekhar, Adarsh

    Integration of ferroelectric/piezoelectric thin films, such as those of lead zirconate titanate (PZT), with temperature sensitive substrates (complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS), or polymers) would benefit from growth at substrate temperatures below 400°C. However, high temperatures are usually required for obtaining good quality PZT films via conventional routes like rapid thermal processing (>550°C). Those conditions are not compatible either with polymer substrates or completed CMOS circuits and dictate exploration of alternative methods to realize integration with such substrates. In part of this work, factors influencing KrF excimer laser induced crystallization of amorphous sputtered Pb(Zr0.30Ti0.70)O3 thin films at substrate temperatures < 215°C were investigated. (111) Pt/Si substrates were utilized to understand the process window. Laser energy densities studied were in the range 35 - 85 mJ/cm2. The Pb content in the films was varied via the Ar gas pressure (in the range 5 mTorr - 9 mTorr) during sputtering of amorphous films. It was seen that a higher Pb content in the asdeposited films aided nucleation of the perovskite phase. Ozone-containing ambients (10% O3/90% O2) during the annealing promoted the formation of the metastable Pb-rich pyrochlore/fluorite phase, while annealing in pure oxygen produced the perovskite phase at relatively lower annealing laser energy densities. Heterogeneous nucleation from the substrate is favored on utilizing a layer-by-layer growth and crystallization process. Films were also grown on polymers using this method. Ferroelectric switching was demonstrated, but extensive process optimization would be needed to reduce leakage and porosity. Real time laser annealing during growth allows for scaling of the layer-by-layer growth process. A pulsed laser deposition system with in situ laser annealing was thus designed, built, and utilized to grow Pb(Zr 0.52Ti0.48)O3 thin films on a laser crystallized Pb(Zr0.20Ti0

  7. Trace element chemistry of zircons from oceanic crust: A method for distinguishing detrital zircon provenance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimes, Craig B.; John, Barbara E.; Kelemen, P.B.; Mazdab, F.K.; Wooden, J.L.; Cheadle, Michael J.; Hanghoj, K.; Schwartz, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    We present newly acquired trace element compositions for more than 300 zircon grains in 36 gabbros formed at the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic and Southwest Indian Ridges. Rare earth element patterns for zircon from modern oceanic crust completely overlap with those for zircon crystallized in continental granitoids. However, plots of U versus Yb and U/Yb versus Hf or Y discriminate zircons crystallized in oceanic crust from continental zircon, and provide a relatively robust method for distinguishing zircons from these environments. Approximately 80% of the modern ocean crust zircons are distinct from the field defined by more than 1700 continental zircons from Archean and Phanerozoic samples. These discrimination diagrams provide a new tool for fingerprinting ocean crust zircons derived from reservoirs like that of modern mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) in both modern and ancient detrital zircon populations. Hadean detrital zircons previously reported from the Acasta Gneiss, Canada, and the Narryer Gneiss terrane, Western Australia, plot in the continental granitoid field, supporting hypotheses that at least some Hadean detrital zircons crystallized in continental crust forming magmas and not from a reservoir like modern MORB. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  8. Strained enabled Ferroelectricity in CaTiO3 Thin Films Probed by Nonlinear Optics and Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Eftihia; Kumar, Amit; Denev, Sava; Brooks, Charles; Schlom, Darrell; Eklund, Carl-Johan; Rabe, Karin M.; Fennie, Craig J.; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2009-03-01

    Calcium titanate, CaTiO3 is not a ferroelectric in its bulk form. However, first principles calculations predict that biaxially tensile strained CaTiO3 thin films should become ferroelectric. Here, we indeed confirm that strained CaTiO3 films become ferroelectric with a Curie temperature of ˜125K. Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements, polarization studies, and in-situ electric-field measurements for a number of films with different strain values will be presented: CaTiO3/DyScO3(110), CaTiO3/SrTiO3 (100),CaTiO3/GdScO3/NdGaO3(110), CaTiO3/LaSrAlO3(001) as well as for a single crystal CaTiO3. From these studies, we conclude that strained CaTiO3 films are ferroelectric with a point group symmetry of mm2, and show reversible domain switching characteristics under an electric field. We also present results of variable temperature piezoelectric force microscopy for imaging the polar domains in the ferroelectric phase. These results suggest that strain is a valuable tool for inducing polar, long range ferroelectric order in even non-polar ceramic materials such as CaTiO3.

  9. Highlighting Titan's Hazes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-11

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft looks toward the night side of Saturn's moon Titan in a view that highlights the extended, hazy nature of the moon's atmosphere. During its long mission at Saturn, Cassini has frequently observed Titan at viewing angles like this, where the atmosphere is backlit by the Sun, in order to make visible the structure of the hazes. Titan's high-altitude haze layer appears blue here, whereas the main atmospheric haze is orange. The difference in color could be due to particle sizes in the haze. The blue haze likely consists of smaller particles than the orange haze. Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this natural-color view. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on May 29, 2017. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.2 million miles (2 million kilometers) from Titan. Image scale is 5 miles (9 kilometers) per pixel. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21625

  10. The lakes of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Elachi, C.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.D.; Stiles, B.; Mitchell, K.L.; Ostro, S.; Soderblom, L.; Wood, C.; Zebker, H.; Wall, S.; Janssen, M.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Paillou, P.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2007-01-01

    The surface of Saturn's haze-shrouded moon Titan has long been proposed to have oceans or lakes, on the basis of the stability of liquid methane at the surface. Initial visible and radar imaging failed to find any evidence of an ocean, although abundant evidence was found that flowing liquids have existed on the surface. Here we provide definitive evidence for the presence of lakes on the surface of Titan, obtained during the Cassini Radar flyby of Titan on 22 July 2006 (T16). The radar imaging polewards of 70?? north shows more than 75 circular to irregular radar-dark patches, in a region where liquid methane and ethane are expected to be abundant and stable on the surface. The radar-dark patches are interpreted as lakes on the basis of their very low radar reflectivity and morphological similarities to lakes, including associated channels and location in topographic depressions. Some of the lakes do not completely fill the depressions in which they lie, and apparently dry depressions are present. We interpret this to indicate that lakes are present in a number of states, including partly dry and liquid-filled. These northern-hemisphere lakes constitute the strongest evidence yet that a condensable-liquid hydrological cycle is active in Titan's surface and atmosphere, in which the lakes are filled through rainfall and/or intersection with the subsurface 'liquid methane' table. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Titan Lingering Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-03

    Lots of clouds are visible in this infrared image of Saturn's moon Titan. These clouds form and move much like those on Earth, but in a much slower, more lingering fashion, new results from NASA's Cassini spacecraft show. Scientists have monitored Titan's atmosphere for three-and-a-half years, between July 2004 and December 2007, and observed more than 200 clouds. The way these clouds are distributed around Titan matches scientists' global circulation models. The only exception is timing—clouds are still noticeable in the southern hemisphere while fall is approaching. Three false-color images make up this mosaic and show the clouds at 40 to 50 degrees mid-latitude. The images were taken by Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer during a close flyby of Titan on Sept. 7, 2006, known as T17. For a similar view see PIA12005. Each image is a color composite, with red shown at the 2-micron wavelength, green at 1.6 microns, and blue at 2.8 microns. An infrared color mosaic is also used as a background (red at 5 microns, green at 2 microns and blue at 1.3 microns). The characteristic elongated mid-latitude clouds, which are easily visible in bright bluish tones are still active even late into 2006-2007. According to climate models, these clouds should have faded out since 2005. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12004

  12. Above Titan South

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-17

    Titan south polar vortex seems to float above the moon south pole in this Cassini spacecraft view. The vortex, which is a mass of gas swirling around the south pole high in the moon atmosphere, can be seen in the lower right of this view.

  13. Titan's icy scar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, C. A.; Penteado, P. F.; Turner, J. D.; Neish, C. D.; Mitri, G.; Montiel, M. J.; Schoenfeld, A.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    2017-09-01

    We conduct a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of Cassini/VIMS [1] infrared spectral windows to identify and quantify weak surface features, with no assumptions on the haze and surface characteris- tics. This study maps the organic sediments, supplied by past atmospheres, as well as ice-rich regions that constitute Titan's bedrock.

  14. Nanomechanics of Ferroelectric Thin Films and Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Chen , L.Q.

    2016-08-31

    The focus of this chapter is to provide basic concepts of how external strains/stresses altering ferroelectric property of a material and how to evaluate quantitatively the effect of strains/stresses on phase stability, domain structure, and material ferroelectric properties using the phase-field method. The chapter starts from a brief introduction of ferroelectrics and the Landau-Devinshire description of ferroelectric transitions and ferroelectric phases in a homogeneous ferroelectric single crystal. Due to the fact that ferroelectric transitions involve crystal structure change and domain formation, strains and stresses can be produced inside of the material if a ferroelectric transition occurs and it is confined.more » These strains and stresses affect in turn the domain structure and material ferroelectric properties. Therefore, ferroelectrics and strains/stresses are coupled to each other. The ferroelectric-mechanical coupling can be used to engineer the material ferroelectric properties by designing the phase and structure. The followed section elucidates calculations of the strains/stresses and elastic energy in a thin film containing a single domain, twinned domains to complicated multidomains constrained by its underlying substrate. Furthermore, a phase field model for predicting ferroelectric stable phases and domain structure in a thin film is presented. Examples of using substrate constraint and temperature to obtain interested ferroelectric domain structures in BaTiO3 films are demonstrated b phase field simulations.« less

  15. Titan Temperature Lag Maps

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-18

    This sequence of maps shows varying surface temperatures on Saturn moon Titan at two-year intervals, from 2004 to 2016. The measurements were made by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer CIRS instrument on NASA Cassini spacecraft. The maps show thermal infrared radiation (heat) coming from Titan's surface at a wavelength of 19 microns, a spectral window at which the moon's otherwise opaque atmosphere is mostly transparent. Temperatures have been averaged around the globe from east to west (longitudinally) to emphasize the seasonal variation across latitudes (from north to south). Black regions in the maps are areas for which there was no data. Titan's surface temperature changes slowly over the course of the Saturn system's long seasons, which each last seven and a half years. As on Earth, the amount of sunlight received at each latitude varies as the sun's illumination moves northward or southward over the course of the 30-year-long Saturnian year. When Cassini arrived at Saturn in 2004, Titan's southern hemisphere was in late summer and was therefore the warmest region. Shortly after the 2009 equinox, in 2010, temperatures were symmetrical across the northern and southern hemispheres, mimicking the distribution observed by Voyager 1 in 1980 (one Titan year earlier). Temperatures subsequently cooled in the south and rose in the north, as southern winter approached. While the overall trend in the temperature shift is clearly evident in these maps, there is narrow banding in several places that is an artifact of making the observations through Titan's atmosphere. The moon's dense, hazy envelope adds noise to the difficult measurement. Although it moves in latitude, the maximum measured temperature on Titan remains around -292 degrees Fahrenheit (-179.6 degrees Celsius, 93.6 Kelvin), with a minimum temperature at the winter pole only 6 degrees Fahrenheit (3.5 degrees Celsius or Kelvin) colder. This is a much smaller contrast than exists between Earth's warmest and

  16. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  17. The permittivity and refractive index measurements of doped barium titanate (BT-BCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeker, Michael A.; Kundu, Souvik; Maurya, Deepam; Kang, Min-Gyu; Sosa, Alejandro; Mudiyanselage, Rathsara R. H. H.; Clavel, Michael; Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu; Hudait, Mantu K.; Priya, Shashank; Khodaparast, Giti A.

    2017-11-01

    While piezoelectric- ferroelectric materials offer great potential for nonvolatile random access memory, most commonly implemented ferroelectrics contain lead which imposes a challenge in meeting environmental regulations. One promising candidate for lead-free, ferroelectric material based memory is (1 - x) BaTiO3 - xBa(Cu1 / 3 Nb2 / 3) O3 (BT-BCN), x = 0.025 . The samples studied here were grown on a Si substrate with an HfO2 buffer layer, thereby preventing the interdiffusion of BT-BTCN into Si. This study provides further insight into the physical behavior of BT-BCN that will strengthen the foundation for developing switching devices. The sample thicknesses ranged from 1.5 to 120 nm, and piezoelectric force microscopy was employed in order to understand the local ferroelectric behaviors. Dielectric constant as a function of frequency demonstrated enhanced frequency dispersion indicating the polar nature of the composition. The relative permittivity was found to change significantly with varying bias voltage and exhibited a tunability of 82%. The difference in the peak position during up and down sweeps is due to the presence of the spontaneous polarization. Furthermore, reflectometry was performed to determine the refractive index of samples with differing thicknesses. Our results demonstrate that refractive indices are similar to that of barium titanate. This is a promising result indicating that improved ferroelectric properties are obtained without compromising the optical properties.

  18. Ferroelectric infrared detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Lashley, Jason Charles; Opeil, Cyril P.; Smith, James Lawrence

    2010-03-30

    An apparatus and method are provided for sensing infrared radiation. The apparatus includes a sensor element that is positioned in a magnetic field during operation to ensure a .lamda. shaped relationship between specific heat and temperature adjacent the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric material comprising the sensor element. The apparatus is operated by inducing a magnetic field on the ferroelectric material to reduce surface charge on the element during its operation.

  19. Effect of Selectively Etched Ferroelectric Thin-Film Layer on the Performance of a Tunable Bandpass Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanyam, Guru; Vignesparamoorthy, Sivaruban; Mueller, Carl; VanKeuls, Fred; Warner, Joseph; Miranda, Felix A.

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to study the effect of a selectively etched ferroelectric thin film layer on the performance of an electrically tunable filter. An X-band tunable filter was designed, fabricated and tested on a selectively etched Barium Strontium Titanate (BSTO) ferroelectric thin film layer. Tunable filters with varying lengths of BSTO thin-film in the input and output coupling gaps were modeled, as well as experimentally tested. Experimental results showed that filters with coupling gaps partially filled with BSTO maintained frequency tunability and improved the insertion loss by approx. 2dB. To the best of our knowledge, these results represent the first experimental demonstration of the advantages of selective etching in the performance of thin film ferroelectric-based tunable microwave components.

  20. Squeezing and Stretching Titan Author Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-28

    This artist concept shows tides on Titan raised by Saturn gravity, as detected by NASA Cassini spacecraft. Saturn gravitational pull on Titan, its largest moon, varies as Titan orbits along an elliptical path around the planet every 16 days.

  1. Flexible ferroelectric element based on van der Waals heteroepitaxy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Bitla, Yugandhar; Huang, Chun-Wei; Do, Thi Hien; Liu, Heng-Jui; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Ma, Chun-Hao; Jang, Chi-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Hong; Chiu, Po-Wen; Wu, Wen-Wei; Chen, Yi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2017-06-01

    We present a promising technology for nonvolatile flexible electronic devices: A direct fabrication of epitaxial lead zirconium titanate (PZT) on flexible mica substrate via van der Waals epitaxy. These single-crystalline flexible ferroelectric PZT films not only retain their performance, reliability, and thermal stability comparable to those on rigid counterparts in tests of nonvolatile memory elements but also exhibit remarkable mechanical properties with robust operation in bent states (bending radii down to 2.5 mm) and cycling tests (1000 times). This study marks the technological advancement toward realizing much-awaited flexible yet single-crystalline nonvolatile electronic devices for the design and development of flexible, lightweight, and next-generation smart devices with potential applications in electronics, robotics, automotive, health care, industrial, and military systems.

  2. Flexible ferroelectric element based on van der Waals heteroepitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jie; Bitla, Yugandhar; Huang, Chun-Wei; Do, Thi Hien; Liu, Heng-Jui; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Ma, Chun-Hao; Jang, Chi-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Hong; Chiu, Po-Wen; Wu, Wen-Wei; Chen, Yi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2017-01-01

    We present a promising technology for nonvolatile flexible electronic devices: A direct fabrication of epitaxial lead zirconium titanate (PZT) on flexible mica substrate via van der Waals epitaxy. These single-crystalline flexible ferroelectric PZT films not only retain their performance, reliability, and thermal stability comparable to those on rigid counterparts in tests of nonvolatile memory elements but also exhibit remarkable mechanical properties with robust operation in bent states (bending radii down to 2.5 mm) and cycling tests (1000 times). This study marks the technological advancement toward realizing much-awaited flexible yet single-crystalline nonvolatile electronic devices for the design and development of flexible, lightweight, and next-generation smart devices with potential applications in electronics, robotics, automotive, health care, industrial, and military systems. PMID:28630922

  3. Dark Spots on Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-02

    This recent image of Titan reveals more complex patterns of bright and dark regions on the surface, including a small, dark, circular feature, completely surrounded by brighter material. During the two most recent flybys of Titan, on March 31 and April 16, 2005, Cassini captured a number of images of the hemisphere of Titan that faces Saturn. The image at the left is taken from a mosaic of images obtained in March 2005 (see PIA06222) and shows the location of the more recently acquired image at the right. The new image shows intriguing details in the bright and dark patterns near an 80-kilometer-wide (50-mile) crater seen first by Cassini's synthetic aperture radar experiment during a Titan flyby in February 2005 (see PIA07368) and subsequently seen by the imaging science subsystem cameras as a dark spot (center of the image at the left). Interestingly, a smaller, roughly 20-kilometer-wide (12-mile), dark and circular feature can be seen within an irregularly-shaped, brighter ring, and is similar to the larger dark spot associated with the radar crater. However, the imaging cameras see only brightness variations, and without topographic information, the identity of this feature as an impact crater cannot be conclusively determined from this image. The visual infrared mapping spectrometer, which is sensitive to longer wavelengths where Titan's atmospheric haze is less obscuring -- observed this area simultaneously with the imaging cameras, so those data, and perhaps future observations by Cassini's radar, may help to answer the question of this feature's origin. The new image at the right consists of five images that have been added together and enhanced to bring out surface detail and to reduce noise, although some camera artifacts remain. These images were taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera using a filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 938 nanometers -- considered to be the imaging science subsystem's best spectral filter

  4. Titan Polar Maps - 2015

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-09

    The northern and southern hemispheres of Titan are seen in these polar stereographic maps, assembled in 2015 using the best-available images of the giant Saturnian moon from NASA's Cassini mission. The images were taken by Cassini's imaging cameras using a spectral filter centered at 938 nanometers, allowing researchers to examine variations in albedo (or inherent brightness) across the surface of Titan. These maps utilize imaging data collected through Cassini's flyby on April 7, 2014, known as "T100." Titan's north pole was not well illuminated early in Cassini's mission, because it was winter in the northern hemisphere when the spacecraft arrived at Saturn. Cassini has been better able to observe northern latitudes in more recent years due to seasonal changes in solar illumination. Compared to the previous version of Cassini's north polar map (see PIA11146), this map provides much more detail and fills in a large area of missing data. The imaging data in these maps complement Cassini synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mapping of Titan's north pole (see PIA17655). The uniform gray area in the northern hemisphere indicates a gap in the imaging coverage of Titan's surface, to date. The missing data will be imaged by Cassini during flybys on December 15, 2016 and March 5, 2017. Lakes are also seen in the southern hemisphere map, but they are much less common than in the north polar region. Only a lakes have been confirmed in the south. The dark, footprint-shaped feature at 180 degrees west is Ontario Lacus; a smaller lake named Crveno Lacus can be seen as a very dark spot just above Ontario. The dark-albedo area seen at the top of the southern hemisphere map (at 0 degrees west) is an area called Mezzoramia. Each map is centered on one of the poles, and surface coverage extends southward to 60 degrees latitude. Grid lines indicate latitude in 10-degree increments and longitude in 30-degree increments. The scale in the full-size versions of these maps is 4,600 feet (1

  5. The Veils of Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-05-06

    The veils of Saturn's most mysterious moon have begun to lift in Cassini's eagerly awaited first glimpse of the surface of Titan, a world where scientists believe organic matter rains from hazy skies and seas of liquid hydrocarbons dot a frigid surface. Surface features previously observed only from Earth-based telescopes are now visible in images of Titan taken in mid-April by Cassini through one of the narrow angle camera's spectral filters specifically designed to penetrate the thick atmosphere. The image scale is 230 kilometers (143 miles) per pixel, and it rivals the best Earth-based images. The two images displayed here show Titan from a vantage point 17 degrees below its equator, yielding a view from 50 degrees north latitude all the way to its south pole. The image on the left was taken four days after the image on the right. Titan rotated 90 degrees in that time. The two images combined cover a region extending halfway around the moon. The observed brightness variations suggest a diverse surface, with variations in average reflectivity on scales of a couple hundred kilometers. The images were taken through a narrow filter centered at 938 nanometers, a spectral region in which the only obstacle to light is the carbon-based, organic haze. Despite the rather long 38-second exposure times, there is no noticeable smear due to spacecraft motion. The images have been magnified 10 times and enhanced in contrast to bring out details. No further processing to remove the effects of the overlying atmosphere has been performed. The superimposed grid over the images illustrates the orientation of Titan -- north is up and rotated 25 degrees to the left -- as well as the geographical regions of the satellite that are illuminated and visible. The yellow curve marks the position of the boundary between day and night on Titan. The enhanced image contrast makes the region within 20 degrees of this day and night division darker than usual. The Sun illuminates Titan from the

  6. Detrital zircons and Earth system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, R.

    2016-12-01

    Zircon is a mineral commonly produced in silicic magmatism. Therefore, due to its resilience and exceedingly long residence times in the continental crust, detrital zircon records can be used to track processes associated with silicic magmatism throughout Earth history. In this contribution I will address the potential role of preservational biases in zircon record, and further discuss how zircon datasets can be used to help better understand the relationship between lithospheric and Earth system evolution. I will use large compilations of zircon data to trace the composition and weatherability of the continental crust, to evaluate temporal rates of crustal recycling, and finally to track spatiotemporal variation in continental arc magmatism and volcanic CO2 outgassing throughout Earth history. These records demonstrate that secular changes in plate tectonic regimes played a prominent role in modulating conditions of the ocean+atmosphere system and long-term climate state for the last 3 billion years.

  7. Characteristics of zircon suitable for REE extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Hoshino, M.

    2011-12-01

    Zircons (ZrSiO4) from Naegi and Ohro granitic pegmatites, Japan and from Saigon alkaline basalt, Vietnam, were mineralogically characterized by inductively couples plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), electron-microprobe analysis (EMPA), X-ray powder diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy and leaching experiment. The powder XRD and Raman spectra analyses show that the degree of crystallinity decreases from Saigon, to Ohro and Naegi zircons. Quantitative analytical results by the EMPA indicate that the Naegi and Ohro zircon samples contain a large amount of REE2O3, while REE contents in Saigon zircon are below detection limit. The leaching experiments for the present zircons under the condition of a solvent 1M-HCl, at a room temperature to 250 °C and retention time of 30h resulted in about 100 %, 50 % and 1 % recoveries of REE from the Naegi, Ohro and Saigon zircons, respectively. Leaching experiments for the Naegi zircon under the condition of a solvent 1N-HCl, heating temperature of 50 °C, 100 °C, 150 °C and 200 °C, and retention time 30h, showed that a significant amount of REE was leached out at a temperature above 150 °C. However, the leaching experiments of the Naegi and Ohro zircons at room temperature (about 25 °C) show that REE were hard to be leached. These results indicates that both low crystallinity of zircon and higher leaching temperature are requisite for effective leaching of REE from zircon.

  8. Titanic exploration with GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kerski, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    To help teachers and students investigate one of the world's most famous historical events using the geographic perspective and GIS tools and methods, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) created a set of educational lessons based on the RMS Titanic's April 1912 sailing. With these lessons, student researchers can learn about latitude and longitude, map projections, ocean currents, databases, maps, and images through the analysis of the route, warnings, sinking, rescue, and eventual discovery of the submerged ocean liner in 1985. They can also consider the human and physical aspects of the maiden voyage in the North Atlantic Ocean at a variety of scales, from global to regional to local. Likewise, their investigations can reveal how the sinking of the Titanic affected future shipping routes.

  9. Ethane ocean on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.; Yung, Y.L.

    1983-01-01

    Voyager I radio occultation data is employed to develop a qualitative model of an ethane ocean on Titan. It is suggested that the ocean contains 25 percent CH4 and that the ocean is in dynamic equilibrium with an N2 atmosphere. Previous models of a CH4 ocean are discounted due to photolysis rates of CH4 gas. Tidal damping of Titan's orbital eccentricity is taken as evidence for an ocean layer approximately 1 km deep, with the ocean floor being covered with a solid C2H2 layer 100 to 200 m thick. The photolytic process disrupting the CH4, if the estimates of the oceanic content of CH4 are correct, could continue for at least one billion years. Verification of the model is dependent on detecting CH4 clouds in the lower atmosphere, finding C2H6 saturation in the lower troposphere, or obtaining evidence of a global ocean.

  10. RADAR Reveals Titan Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Callahan, P.; Seu, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.; Elachi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper is a K(sub u)-band (13.78 GHz, lambda = 2.17 cm) linear polarized RADAR instrument capable of operating in synthetic aperture (SAR), scatterometer, altimeter and radiometer modes. During the first targeted flyby of Titan on 26 October, 2004 (referred to as Ta) observations were made in all modes. Evidence for topographic relief based on the Ta altimetry and SAR data are presented here. Additional SAR and altimetry observations are planned for the T3 encounter on 15 February, 2005, but have not been carried out at this writing. Results from the T3 encounter relevant to topography will be included in our presentation. Data obtained in the Ta encounter include a SAR image swath

  11. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  12. Giant Magnetoelectric Energy Conversion Utilizing Inter-Ferroelectric Phase Transformations in Ferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkel, Peter; Staruch, Margo

    Phase transition-based electromechanical transduction permits achieving a non-resonant broadband mechanical energy conversion see (Finkel et al Actuators, 5 [1] 2. (2015)) , the idea is based on generation high energy density per cycle , at least 100x of magnitude larger than linear piezoelectric type generators in stress biased [011]cut relaxor ferroelectric Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) single crystal can generate reversible strain >0.35% at remarkably low fields (0.1 MV/m) for tens of millions of cycles. Recently we demonstrated that large strain and polarization rotation can be generated for over 40 x 106cycles with little fatigue by realization of reversible ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition in [011] cut PIN-PMN-PT relaxor ferroelectric single crystal while sweeping through the transition with a low applied electric field <0.18 MV/m under mechanical stress. This methodology was extended in the present work to propose magnetoelectric (ME) composite hybrid system comprised of highly magnetostrictive alloymFe81.4Ga18.6 (Galfenol), and lead indium niobate-lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PIN-PMN-PT) domain engineered relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. A small time-varying magnetic field applied to this system causes the magnetostrictive element to expand, and the resulting stress forces the phase change in the relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. ME coupling coefficient was fond to achieve 80 V/cm Oe near the FR-FO phase transition that is at least 100X of magnitude higher than any currently reported values.

  13. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  14. Hydrocarbon lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, Giuseppe; Showman, Adam P.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2007-02-01

    The Huygens Probe detected dendritic drainage-like features, methane clouds and a high surface relative humidity (∼50% ) on Titan in the vicinity of its landing site [Tomasko, M.G., and 39 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 765-778; Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779-784], suggesting sources of methane that replenish this gas against photo- and charged-particle chemical loss on short (10-100) million year timescales [Atreya, S.K., Adams, E.Y., Niemann, H.B., Demick-Montelara, J.E., Owen, T.C., Fulchignoni, M., Ferri, F., Wilson, E.H., 2006. Planet. Space Sci. In press]. On the other hand, Cassini Orbiter remote sensing shows dry and even desert-like landscapes with dunes [Lorenz, R.D., and 39 colleagues, 2006a. Science 312, 724-727], some areas worked by fluvial erosion, but no large-scale bodies of liquid [Elachi, C., and 34 colleagues, 2005. Science 308, 970-974]. Either the atmospheric methane relative humidity is declining in a steady fashion over time, or the sources that maintain the relative humidity are geographically restricted, small, or hidden within the crust itself. In this paper we explore the hypothesis that the present-day methane relative humidity is maintained entirely by lakes that cover a small part of the surface area of Titan. We calculate the required minimum surface area coverage of such lakes, assess the stabilizing influence of ethane, and the implications for moist convection in the atmosphere. We show that, under Titan's surface conditions, methane evaporates rapidly enough that shorelines of any existing lakes could potentially migrate by several hundred m to tens of km per year, rates that could be detected by the Cassini orbiter. We furthermore show that the high relative humidity of methane in Titan's lower atmosphere could be maintained by evaporation from lakes covering only 0.002-0.02 of the whole surface.

  15. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  16. A Titanic Labyrinth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-29

    This synthetic-aperture radar image was obtained by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its T-120 pass over Titan's southern latitudes on June 7, 2016. The image is centered near 47 degrees south, 153 degrees west. It covers an area of 87 by 75 miles (140 by 120 kilometers) and has a resolution of about 1,300 feet (400 meters). Radar illuminates the scene from the left at a 35-degree incidence angle. The features seen here are an excellent example of "labyrinth terrain." Labyrinth terrains on Titan are thought to be higher areas that have been cut apart by rivers of methane, eroded or dissolved as they were either lifted up or left standing above as the region around them lowered. (Other examples of labyrinth terrain can be seen in PIA10219.) In this image, several obvious valley systems have developed, draining liquids from methane rainfall toward the southeast (at top). Several of these systems are near parallel (running from upper left to lower right), suggesting that either the geological structure of the surface or the local topographic gradient (the general slope across the area) may be influencing their direction. Also presented here is an annotated version of the image, along with an aerial photograph of a region in southern Java known as Gunung Kidul that resembles this Titan labyrinth. This region is limestone that has been dissolved and eroded by water, creating a system of canyons called polygonal karst. Like on Titan, the canyons show a trend from upper left to lower right, in this case controlled by faults or joints. (Java photo from Haryono and Day, Journal of Cave and Karst Studies 66 (2004) 62-69, courtesy of Eko Haryono.) http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20708

  17. Electronic structure of barium strontium titanate by soft-x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Y.; Underwood, J.H.; Gullikson, E.M.

    1997-04-01

    Perovskite-type titanates, such as Strontium Titanate (STO), Barium Titanate (BTO), and Lead Titanate (PTO) have been widely studied because they show good electric and optical properties. In recent years, thin films of Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) have been paid much attention as dielectrics of dynamic random access memory (DRAM) capacitors. BST is a better insulator with a higher dielectric constant than STO and can be controlled in a paraelectric phase with an appropriate ratio of Ba/Sr composition, however, few studies have been done on the electronic structure of the material. Studies of the electronic structure of such materials can bemore » beneficial, both for fundamental physics research and for improving technological applications. BTO is a famous ferroelectric material with a tetragonal structure, in which Ti and Ba atoms are slightly displaced from the lattice points. On the other hand, BST keeps a paraelectric phase, which means that the atoms are still at the cubic lattice points. It should be of great interest to see how this difference of the local structure around Ti atoms between BTO and BST effects the electronic structure of these two materials. In this report, the authors present the Ti L{sub 2,3} absorption spectra of STO, BTO, and BST measured with very high accuracy in energy of the absorption features.« less

  18. Landscape Evolution of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Titan may have acquired its massive atmosphere relatively recently in solar system history. The warming sun may have been key to generating Titan's atmosphere over time, starting from a thin atmosphere with condensed surface volatiles like Triton, with increased luminosity releasing methane, and then large amounts of nitrogen (perhaps suddenly), into the atmosphere. This thick atmosphere, initially with much more methane than at present, resulted in global fluvial erosion that has over time retreated towards the poles with the removal of methane from the atmosphere. Basement rock, as manifested by bright, rough, ridges, scarps, crenulated blocks, or aligned massifs, mostly appears within 30 degrees of the equator. This landscape was intensely eroded by fluvial processes as evidenced by numerous valley systems, fan-like depositional features and regularly-spaced ridges (crenulated terrain). Much of this bedrock landscape, however, is mantled by dunes, suggesting that fluvial erosion no longer dominates in equatorial regions. High midlatitude regions on Titan exhibit dissected sedimentary plains at a number of localities, suggesting deposition (perhaps by sediment eroded from equatorial regions) followed by erosion. The polar regions are mainly dominated by deposits of fluvial and lacustrine sediment. Fluvial processes are active in polar areas as evidenced by alkane lakes and occasional cloud cover.

  19. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of nonequilibrium phenomena on the Saturn satellite Titan indicate the occurrence of organic chemical evolution. Greenhouse and thermal inversion models of Titan's atmosphere provide environmental constraints within which various pathways for organic chemical synthesis are assessed. Experimental results and theoretical modeling studies suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite may be dominated by two atmospheric processes: energetic-particle bombardment and photochemistry. Reactions initiated in various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic ray, Saturn wind, and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4 - N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the C2-hydrocarbons, the UV-visible-absorbing stratospheric haze, and the reddish color of the satellite. Photochemical reactions of CH4 can also account for the presence of C2-hydrocarbons. In the lower Titan atmosphere, photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. Hot H-atom reactions initiated by photo-dissociation of NH3 can couple the chemical reactions of NH3 and CH4 and produce organic matter.

  20. Thickness dependent charge transport in ferroelectric BaTiO3 heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pooja; Rout, P. K.; Singh, Manju; Rakshit, R. K.; Dogra, Anjana

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO3) film thickness on the charge transport mechanism in pulsed laser deposited epitaxial metal-ferroelectric semiconductor junctions. The current (I)-voltage (V) measurements across the junctions comprising of 20-500 nm thick BaTiO3 and conducting bottom electrode (Nb: SrTiO3 substrate or La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 buffer layer) demonstrate the space charge limited conduction. Further analysis indicates a reduction in the ratio of free to trapped carriers with increasing thickness in spite of decreasing trap density. Such behaviour arises the deepening of the shallow trap levels (<0.65 eV) below conduction band with increasing thickness. Moreover, the observed hysteresis in I-V curves implies a bipolar resistive switching behaviour, which can be explained in terms of charge trapping and de-trapping process.

  1. Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting using inter-ferroelectric phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez Moyet, Richard; Rossetti, George A., E-mail: george.rossetti-jr@uconn.edu; Stace, Joseph

    Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting is demonstrated under low frequency excitation (<50 Hz) using [110]{sub C}-poled lead indium niobate-lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate relaxor ferroelectric single crystals with compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary. The efficiency of power generation at the stress-induced phase transition between domain-engineered rhombohedral and orthorhombic ferroelectric states is as much as four times greater than is obtained in the linear piezoelectric regime under identical measurement conditions but during loading below the coercive stress of the phase change. The phase transition mode of electromechanical transduction holds potential for non-resonant energy harvesting from low-frequency vibrations and does not require mechanical frequencymore » up-conversion.« less

  2. An Intrinsically Switchable Ladder-Type Ferroelectric BST-on-Si Composite FBAR Filter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungku; Mortazawi, Amir

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a ladder-type bulk acoustic wave (BAW) intrinsically switchable filter based on ferroelectric thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (FBARs). The switchable filter can be turned on and off by the application of an external bias voltage due to the electrostrictive effect in thin-film ferroelectrics. In this paper, Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) is used as the ferroelectric material. A systematic design approach for switchable ladder-type ferroelectric filters is provided based on required filter specifications. A switchable filter is implemented in the form of a BST-on-Si composite structure to control the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient of FBARs. As an experimental verification, a 2.5-stage intrinsically switchable BST-on-Si composite FBAR filter is designed, fabricated, and measured. Measurement results for a typical BST-on-Si composite FBAR show a resonator mechanical quality factor (Q(m)) of 971, as well as a (Q(m)) × f of 2423 GHz. The filter presented here provides a measured insertion loss of 7.8 dB, out-of-band rejection of 26 dB, and fractional bandwidth of 0.33% at 2.5827 GHz when the filter is in the on state at a dc bias of 40 V. In its off state, the filter exhibits an isolation of 31 dB.

  3. Titan's methane clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of the 12C/13C and D/H isotopic ratios in Titan's methane show intriguing differences from the values recorded in the giant planets. This implies that either (1) the atmosphere was differently endowed with material at the time of formation, or (2) evolutionary processes are at work in the moon's atmosphere - or some combination of the two. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Instrument (GCMS) found 12CH4/13CH4 = 82 +/- 1 (Niemann et al. 2005), some 7% lower than the giant planets' value of 88 +/- 7 (Sada et al. 1996), which closely matches the terrestrial inorganic standard of 89. The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has previously reported 12CH4/13CH4 of 77 +/-3 based on nadir sounding, which we now revise upwards to 80 +/- 4 based on more accurate limb sounding. The CIRS and GCMS results are therefore in agreement about an overall enrichment in 13CH4 of ~10%. The value of D/H in Titan's CH4 has long been controversial: historical measurements have ranged from about 8-15 x 10-5 (e.g. Coustenis et al. 1989, Coustenis et al. 2003). A recent measurement based on CIRS limb data by Bezard et al. (2007) puts the D/H in CH4 at (13 +/- 1) x 10-5, very much greater than in Jupiter and Saturn, ~2 x 10-5 (Mahaffy et al. 1998, Fletcher et al. 2009). To add complexity, the 12C/13C and D/H vary among molecules in Titan atmosphere, typically showing enhancement in D but depletion in 13C in the daughter species (H2, C2H2, C2H6), relative to the photochemical progenitor, methane. Jennings et al. (2009) have sought to interpret the variance in carbon isotopes as a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE), whilst an explanation for the D/H in all molecules remains elusive (Cordier et al. 2008). In this presentation we argue that evolution of isotopic ratios in Titan's methane over time forms a ticking 'clock', somewhat analogous to isotopic ratios in geochronology. Under plausible assumptions about the initial values and subsequent replenishment, various

  4. Geomorphic Units on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Malaska, M. J.; Schoenfeld, A.; Birch, S. P.; Hayes, A. G., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed the surface of Titan in unprecedented detail. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode on the Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is able to penetrate clouds and haze to provide high resolution (~350 m spatial resolution at best) views of the surface geology. The instrument's other modes (altimetry, scatterometry, radiometry) also provide valuable data for interpreting the geology, as do other instruments on Cassini, in particular, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Continuing the initial work described in Lopes et al. (2010, Icarus, 212, 744-750), we have established the major geomorphologic unit classes on Titan using data from flybys Ta through T92 (October 2004-July 2013). We will present the global distribution of the major classes of units and, where there are direct morphological contacts, describe how these classes of units relate to each other in terms of setting and emplacement history. The classes of units are mountainous/hummocky terrains, plains, dunes, labyrinthic terrains and lakes. The oldest classes of units are the mountainous/hummocky and the labyrinthic terrains. The mountainous/hummocky terrains consist of mountain chains and isolated radar-bright terrains. The labyrinthic terrains consist of highly incised dissected plateaux with medium radar backscatter. The plains are younger than both mountainous/hummocky and labyrinthic unit classes. Dunes and lakes are the youngest unit classes on Titan; no contact is observed between the dunes and lakes but it is likely that both processes are still active. We have identified individual features such as craters, channels, and candidate cryovolcanic features. Characterization and comparison of the properties of the unit classes and the individual features with data from radiometry, ISS, and VIMS provides information on their composition and possible provenance. We can use these correlations to also infer global

  5. Geomorphic Units on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly; Malaska, Michael; Schoenfeld, Ashley; Birch, Samuel; Hayes, Alexander; Solomonidou, Anezina; Radebaugh, Jani

    2015-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed the surface of Titan in unprecedented detail. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode on the Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is able to penetrate clouds and haze to provide high resolution (~350 m spatial resolution at best) views of the surface geology. The instrument's other modes (altimetry, scatterometry, radiometry) also provide valuable data for interpreting the geology, as do other instruments on Cassini, in particular, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Continuing the initial work described in Lopes et al. (2010, Icarus, 212, 744-750), we have established the major geomorphologic unit classes on Titan using data from flybys Ta through T92 (October 2004-July 2013). We will present the global distribution of the major classes of units and, where there are direct morphological contacts, describe how these classes of units relate to each other in terms of setting and emplacement history. The classes of units are mountainous/hummocky terrains, plains, dunes, labyrinthic terrains and lakes. The oldest classes of units are the mountainous/hummocky and the labyrinthic terrains. The mountainous/hummocky terrains consist of mountain chains and isolated radar-bright terrains. The labyrinthic terrains consist of highly incised dissected plateaux with medium radar backscatter. The plains are younger than both mountainous/hummocky and labyrinthic unit classes. Dunes and lakes are the youngest unit classes on Titan; no contact is observed between the dunes and lakes but it is likely that both processes are still active. We have identified individual features such as craters, channels, and candidate cryovolcanic features. Characterization and comparison of the properties of the unit classes and the individual features with data from radiometry, ISS, and VIMS provides information on their composition and possible provenance. We can use these correlations to also infer global

  6. Coexistence of weak ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity in the high pressure LiNbO3-type phase of FeTiO3.

    PubMed

    Varga, T; Kumar, A; Vlahos, E; Denev, S; Park, M; Hong, S; Sanehira, T; Wang, Y; Fennie, C J; Streiffer, S K; Ke, X; Schiffer, P; Gopalan, V; Mitchell, J F

    2009-07-24

    We report the magnetic and electrical characteristics of polycrystalline FeTiO_{3} synthesized at high pressure that is isostructural with acentric LiNbO_{3} (LBO). Piezoresponse force microscopy, optical second harmonic generation, and magnetometry demonstrate ferroelectricity at and below room temperature and weak ferromagnetism below approximately 120 K. These results validate symmetry-based criteria and first-principles calculations of the coexistence of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism in a series of transition metal titanates crystallizing in the LBO structure.

  7. Coexistence of Weak Ferromagnetism and Ferroelectricity in the High Pressure LiNbO3-Type Phase of FeTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, T.; Kumar, A.; Vlahos, E.; Denev, S.; Park, M.; Hong, S.; Sanehira, T.; Wang, Y.; Fennie, C. J.; Streiffer, S. K.; Ke, X.; Schiffer, P.; Gopalan, V.; Mitchell, J. F.

    2009-07-01

    We report the magnetic and electrical characteristics of polycrystalline FeTiO3 synthesized at high pressure that is isostructural with acentric LiNbO3 (LBO). Piezoresponse force microscopy, optical second harmonic generation, and magnetometry demonstrate ferroelectricity at and below room temperature and weak ferromagnetism below ˜120K. These results validate symmetry-based criteria and first-principles calculations of the coexistence of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism in a series of transition metal titanates crystallizing in the LBO structure.

  8. Ferroelectric negative capacitance domain dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Michael; Khan, Asif Islam; Serrao, Claudy; Lu, Zhongyuan; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Pešić, Milan; Slesazeck, Stefan; Schroeder, Uwe; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Transient negative capacitance effects in epitaxial ferroelectric Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 capacitors are investigated with a focus on the dynamical switching behavior governed by domain nucleation and growth. Voltage pulses are applied to a series connection of the ferroelectric capacitor and a resistor to directly measure the ferroelectric negative capacitance during switching. A time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau approach is used to investigate the underlying domain dynamics. The transient negative capacitance is shown to originate from reverse domain nucleation and unrestricted domain growth. However, with the onset of domain coalescence, the capacitance becomes positive again. The persistence of the negative capacitance state is therefore limited by the speed of domain wall motion. By changing the applied electric field, capacitor area or external resistance, this domain wall velocity can be varied predictably over several orders of magnitude. Additionally, detailed insights into the intrinsic material properties of the ferroelectric are obtainable through these measurements. A new method for reliable extraction of the average negative capacitance of the ferroelectric is presented. Furthermore, a simple analytical model is developed, which accurately describes the negative capacitance transient time as a function of the material properties and the experimental boundary conditions.

  9. Titan after Cassini Huygens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, P. M.; Lunine, J.; Lebreton, J.; Coustenis, A.; Matson, D.; Reh, K.; Erd, C.

    2008-12-01

    In 2005, the Huygens Probe gave us a snapshot of a world tantalizingly like our own, yet frozen in its evolution on the threshold of life. The descent under parachute, like that of Huygens in 2005, is happening again, but this time in the Saturn-cast twilight of winter in Titan's northern reaches. With a pop, the parachute is released, and then a muffled splash signals the beginning of the first floating exploration of an extraterrestrial sea-this one not of water but of liquid hydrocarbons. Meanwhile, thousands of miles away, a hot air balloon, a "montgolfiere," cruises 6 miles above sunnier terrain, imaging vistas of dunes, river channels, mountains and valleys carved in water ice, and probing the subsurface for vast quantities of "missing" methane and ethane that might be hidden within a porous icy crust. Balloon and floater return their data to a Titan Orbiter equipped to strip away Titan's mysteries with imaging, radar profiling, and atmospheric sampling, much more powerful and more complete than Cassini was capable of. This spacecraft, preparing to enter a circular orbit around Saturn's cloud-shrouded giant moon, has just completed a series of flybys of Enceladus, a tiny but active world with plumes that blow water and organics from the interior into space. Specialized instruments on the orbiter were able to analyze these plumes directly during the flybys. Titan and Enceladus could hardly seem more different, and yet they are linked by their origin in the Saturn system, by a magnetosphere that sweeps up mass and delivers energy, and by the possibility that one or both worlds harbor life. It is the goal of the NASA/ESA Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) to explore and investigate these exotic and inviting worlds, to understand their natures and assess the possibilities of habitability in this system so distant from our home world. Orbiting, landing, and ballooning at Titan represent a new and exciting approach to planetary exploration. The TSSM mission

  10. Rapid synthesis of barium titanate microcubes using composite-hydroxides-mediated avenue

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xi; Ouyang, Jing, E-mail: jingouyang@csu.edu.cn; Jin, Jiao

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Barium titanate oxides microcubes can be synthesized within 1 min. • Composite-hydroxides-mediated strategy provided a possible large scale production. • BST obtained in the strategy showed fairly good crystallinity and tetragonality. - Abstract: This paper reports the rapid synthesis of barium titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}, BTO) microcubes via composite-hydroxides-mediated reaction within 1 min. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) results confirmed both cubic and tetragonal lattices in the sample and the uniform microcubes with an average size of 1 μm. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrum indicated that the band gap of the BTO powder wasmore » 3.05 eV. Ferroelectric polarization vs. electric field (P–E) tests showed that the ferroelectric domains had formed in the as-synthesized BTO microcubes and sintered ceramics. BTO ceramics sintered at 1100 °C for 3 h showed fairly good tetragonality and possessed a maximum polarization of 0.21 μC/cm{sup 2}, indicating that the sintering temperature for the BTO powders prepared via this method was relatively low. The process and equipment reported herein provided a potential method for the rapid synthesis of titanate based perovskites.« less

  11. Flyover of Sotra Facula, Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-14

    This frame from a movie is based on data from NASA Cassini spacecraft and shows a flyover of an area of Saturn moon Titan known as Sotra Facula. Scientists believe Sotra is the best case for an ice volcano, or cryovolcano, region on Titan.

  12. Titan's Methane Cycle is Closed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Doppler tracking of the Cassini spacecraft determined a polar moment of inertia for Titan of 0.34 (Iess et al., 2010, Science, 327, 1367). Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, one interpretation is that Titan's silicate core is partially hydrated (Castillo-Rogez and Lunine, 2010, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L20205). These authors point out that for the core to have avoided complete thermal dehydration to the present day, at least 30% of the potassium content of Titan must have leached into an overlying water ocean by the end of the core overturn. We calculate that for probable ammonia compositions of Titan's ocean (compositions with greater than 1% ammonia by weight), that this amount of potassium leaching is achievable via the substitution of ammonium for potassium during the hydration epoch. Formation of a hydrous core early in Titan's history by serpentinization results in the loss of one hydrogen molecule for every hydrating water molecule. We calculate that complete serpentinization of Titan's core corresponds to the release of more than enough hydrogen to reconstitute all of the methane atoms photolyzed throughout Titan's history. Insertion of molecular hydrogen by double occupancy into crustal clathrates provides a storage medium and an opportunity for ethane to be converted back to methane slowly over time--potentially completing a cycle that extends the lifetime of methane in Titan's surface atmosphere system by factors of several to an order of magnitude over the photochemically-calculated lifetime.

  13. Synthesis of nanosized sodium titanates

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, David T.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L.; Elvington, Mark C.

    2015-09-29

    Methods directed to the synthesis and peroxide-modification of nanosized monosodium titanate are described. Methods include combination of reactants at a low concentration to a solution including a nonionic surfactant. The nanosized monosodium titanate can exhibit high selectivity for sorbing various metallic ions.

  14. Refractory Materials of Zirconate. Part 2: Synthesis and some properties of strontium, zirconate, calcium zirconate and barium zirconate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okubo, Tsutomo; Yonemochi, Osamu; Nakamura, Kazuo; Maeda, Minoru

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compounds SrZrO3, CaZrO3, and BaZrO3 were synthesized by solid reaction and arc fusion, and their properties examined. Results were as follows: (1) in the synthesis of CaZrO3 by solid reaction, ZrO2 solid solution with cubic form was produced, which then changed into CaZrO3; (2) the BaZrO3 was a cubic form and did not show any transformation, while SrZrO3 and CaZrO3 with an orthorhombic form transformed to a cubic form at high temperature; and (3) the solubility of BaZrO3 in acid and its vaporization rate at a high temperature were greater than those of zirconates.

  15. Titan's Lakes in a Beaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodyss, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    The surface of Titan presents a complex, varied surfaced, with mountains, plains, dunes, rivers, lakes and seas, composed of a layer of organics over a water ice bedrock. Over the past 10 years, our group at JPL has developed a variety of techniques to study the chemistry of Titan's organic surface under relevant temperature and pressure conditions (90-100 K, 1.5 bar). Dissolution, precipitation, and both covalent and non-covalent chemical processes are examined using Raman and infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, optical microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. Despite the low temperatures, our experiments are revealing that a rich and active organic chemistry is possible on Titan's surface. Laboratory experiments like these can provide crucial insights into the geological processes occurring Titan's surface, and help explain the wealth of observational data returned by the Cassini/Huygens mission. This type of data is also critical for the development of future missions to Titan.

  16. Ti-in-Zircon Thermometer: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, B.; Cavosie, A. J.; Clechenko, C. C.; Fournelle, J.; Kita, N. T.; Lackey, J.; Page, F.; Wilde, S. A.; Valley, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    The titanium in zircon thermometer has been applied to 167 zircons from diverse rock types. These rocks include metamorphosed anorthosite and gabbro (1.15 Ga, intrusion age), and unmetamorphosed granitic pegmatite (0.9 Ga) from the Adirondack Highlands; metaluminous and peraluminous granites (114-90 Ma) of the Sierra Nevada Batholith; megacrysts from kimberlite pipes in southern Africa, Brazil, and Siberia; and detrital zircons (4.4-3.9 Ga) of metaconglomerate from Jack Hills, Western Australia. Titanium concentration in zircon was analysed using a CAMECA IMS-1280 ion microprobe (see Page et al., this volume). Spot analyses were correlated to U-Pb SHRIMP pits especially for Adirondack and Jack Hills zircons. The majority of zircons have Ti-content less than 10 ppm. Variability, in excess of analytical precision, within individual zircons is observed in about one-third of crystals. In general, there is no systematic change in Ti from core to rim (identified by cathodoluminescence) of zircons, or with regard to age, U content, Th/U ratio, or U-Pb age concordance for these non-metamict grains. The average temperatures for zircon crystallization in different rock suites using the experimental/empirical calibration of Watson and Harrison (W&H, 2005, Science 308:841), assuming the presence of rutile and quartz, are estimated to be: anorthosite 735±41°C (1SD, n=24; Ti = 10±5 ppm); metagabbro 714±31°C (n=19; Ti = 8±4 ppm); Adirondack pegmatite 500±16°C (n=5; Ti = 0.3±0.1 ppm); metaluminous and peraluminous granites from Sierra Nevada 681±67°C (n=53; Ti = 6±5 ppm) and 613±75°C (n=68; Ti = 3±3 ppm); kimberlite megacrysts 740±64°C (n=169; Ti = 14±13 ppm) (Page et al., this volume); and detrital zircons from Jack Hills metaconglomerate 718±63°C (n=64; Ti = 10±9 ppm). Most of the host rocks contain ilmenite or titanite suggesting that α(TiO2)>0.5, but rutile activity is unknown for megacrysts and detrital zircons. Pegmatite contains no Ti-rich minerals

  17. Ferroelectric Fluid Flow Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An active valve is controlled and driven by external electrical actuation of a ferroelectric actuator to provide for improved passage of the fluid during certain time periods and to provide positive closure of the valve during other time periods. The valve provides improved passage in the direction of flow and positive closure in the direction against the flow. The actuator is a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature, said dome shaped actuator having a rim and an apex. and a dome height measured from a plane through said rim said apex that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and an outside surface of said dome shaped actuator.

  18. Recent patents on perovskite ferroelectric nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    Ferroelectric oxide materials with a perovskite structure have promising applications in electronic devices such as random access memories, sensors, actuators, infrared detectors, and so on. Recent advances in science and technology of ferroelectrics have resulted in the feature sizes of ferroelectric-based electronic devices entering into nanoscale dimensions. At nanoscale perovskite ferroelectric materials exhibit a pronounced size effect manifesting itself in a significant deviation of the properties of low-dimensional structures from the bulk and film counterparts. One-dimensional perovskite ferroelectric nanotube/nanowire systems, offer fundamental scientific opportunities for investigating the intrinsic size effects in ferroelectrics. In the past several years, much progress has been made both in fabrication and physical property testing of perovskite ferroelectric nanostructures. In the first part of this paper, the recent patents and literatures for fabricating ferroelectric nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes, and nanorings with promising features, are reviewed. The second part deals with the recent advances on the physical property testing of perovskite ferroelectric nanostructures. The third part summarizes the recently patents and literatures about the microstructural characterizations of perovskite ferroelectric nanostructures, to improve their crystalline quality, morphology and uniformity. Finally, we conclude this review with personal perspectives towards the potential future developments of perovskite ferroelectric nanostructures.

  19. Cryovolcanism on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Showman, A. P.; Lunine, J. I.; Lopes, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Remote sensing observations yield evidence for cryovolcanism on Titan, and evolutionary models support (but do not require) the presence of an ammonia-water subsurface ocean. The impetus for invoking ammonia as a constituent in an internal ocean and cryovolcanic magma comes from two factors. First, ammonia-water liquid has a lower freezing temperature than pure liquid water, enabling cryovolcanism under the low- temperature conditions prevalent in the outer Solar System. Second, pure water is negatively buoyant with respect to pure water ice, which discourages eruption from the subsurface ocean to the surface. In contrast, the addition of ammonia to the water decreases its density, hence lessening this problem of negative buoyancy. A marginally positive buoyant ammonia-water mixture might allow effusive eruptions from a subsurface ocean. If the subsurface ocean were positively buoyant, all the ammonia would have been erupted very early in Titan's history. Contrary to this scenario, Cassini-Huygens has so far observed neither a global abundance nor a complete dearth of cryovolcanic features. Further, an ancient cryovolcanic epoch cannot explain the relative youth of Titan's surface. Crucial to invoking ammonia-water resurfacing as the source of the apparently recent geological activity is not how to make ammonia-water volcanism work (because the near neutral buoyancy of the ammonia-water mixture encourages an explanation), but rather how to prevent eruption from occurring so easily that cryovolcanic activity is over early on. Although cryovolcanism by ammonia-water has been proposed as a resurfacing process on Titan, few models have specifically dealt with the problem of how to transport ammonia-water liquid onto the surface. We proposed a model of cryovolcanism that involve cracking at the base of the ice shell and formation of ammonia-water pockets in the ice. While the ammonia-water pockets cannot easily become neutral buoyant and promote effusive eruptions

  20. Titan impacts and escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korycansky, D. G.; Zahnle, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on hydrodynamic calculations of impacts of large (multi-kilometer) objects on Saturn's moon Titan. We assess escape from Titan, and evaluate the hypothesis that escaping ejecta blackened the leading hemisphere of Iapetus and peppered the surface of Hyperion. We carried out two- and three-dimensional simulations of impactors ranging in size from 4 to 100 km diameter, impact velocities between 7 and 15 km s -1, and impact angles from 0° to 75° from the vertical. We used the ZEUSMP2 hydrocode for the calculations. Simulations were made using three different geometries: three-dimensional Cartesian, two-dimensional axisymmetric spherical polar, and two-dimensional plane polar. Three-dimensional Cartesian geometry calculations were carried out over a limited domain (e.g. 240 km on a side for an impactor of size di = 10 km), and the results compared to ones with the same parameters done by Artemieva and Lunine (2005); in general the comparison was good. Being computationally less demanding, two-dimensional calculations were possible for much larger domains, covering global regions of the satellite (from 800 km below Titan's surface to the exobase altitude 1700 km above the surface). Axisymmetric spherical polar calculations were carried out for vertical impacts. Two-dimensional plane-polar geometry calculations were made for both vertical and oblique impacts. In general, calculations among all three geometries gave consistent results. Our basic result is that the amount of escaping material is less than or approximately equal to the impactor mass even for the most favorable cases. Amounts of escaping material scaled most strongly as a function of velocity, with high-velocity impacts generating the largest amount, as expected. Dependence of the relative amount of escaping mass fesc = mesc/ Mi on impactor diameter di was weak. Oblique impacts (impact angle θi > 45°) were more effective than vertical or near-vertical impacts; ratios of mesc/ Mi ˜ 1-2 were

  1. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1998-02-03

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750 to about 950 C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 microns, and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 micron. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  2. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Raghubir P.; Gangwal, Santosh K.; Jain, Suresh C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 .mu., and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 .mu.. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  3. INMS Titan Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Niemann, H.; Yelle, R. V.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Cravens, T. E.; Luhmann, J. G.; McNutt, R. L.; Ip, W.-H.; De La Haye, V.; Ledvina, S.; Mueller-Wordarg, I.; Borggren, N.

    2005-08-01

    The Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) aboard the Cassini Orbiter has obtained the first in situ composition measurements of the neutral densities of molecular nitrogen, methane, hydrogen, argon, and a host of stable carbon-nitrile ion and neutral compounds in the first and sixth flybys of Titan. The bulk composition and thermal structure of the moon's upper atmosphere appear to vary with latitude and local time. The new data set provides strong evidence for atmospheric waves in the upper atmosphere and for the existence of a warm, chemically complex corona. Furthermore, the data set provides direct measurements of isotopes of nitrogen, carbon, and argon, which reveal interesting clues about the evolution of the atmosphere. The atmosphere likely formed from outgassing as planetesimals composed of silicates, water ice, clathrates of methane, and ammonia hydrates coalesced. Subsequent photochemistry and/or shock-induced chemistry likely converted the atmospheric nitrogen into molecular nitrogen, which is inferred by the absence (<0.6 ppm) of 36Ar in the INMS data. (Ice clathrate delivery of N2 would have presumably also delivered 36Ar to the proto Titan.) The decrease of the 14N to 15N isotopic ratio with respect to the terrestrial value allows us to suggest an early atmosphere >1.5 to 100 times more substantial that was lost via escape over the intervening 4.5 billion years. Carbon in the form of methane has continued to outgas over time from the interior (as inferred from the elevated 12C to 13C ratio as compared to terrestrial values) with much of its subsequent photolysis products being deposited in the form of complex hydrocarbons on the surface ( 5 x 1027 s-1 as estimated from the H2 escape rate of 6.1 ± 0.2 x 109 cm-2 s-1 measured by INMS). This talk will highlight the composition, vertical structure, wave processes, and escape of Titan's atmosphere.

  4. Titan's Radioactive Haze : Production and Fate of Radiocarbon On Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Jull, A. J. T.; Swindle, T. D.; Lunine, J. I.

    Just as cosmic rays interact with nitrogen atoms in the atmosphere of Earth to gener- ate radiocarbon (14C), the same process should occur in Titan`s nitrogen-rich atmo- sphere. Titan`s atmosphere is thick enough that cosmic ray flux, rather than nitrogen column depth, limits the production of 14 C. Absence of a strong magnetic field and the increased distance from the sun suggest production rates of 9 atom/cm2/s, approx- imately 4 times higher than Earth. On Earth the carbon is rapidly oxidised into CO2. The fate and detectability of 14C on Titan depends on the chemical species into which it is incorporated in Titan's reducing atmosphere : as methane it would be hopelessly diluted even in only the atmosphere (ignoring the other, much more massive carbon reservoirs likely to be present on Titan, like hydrocarbon lakes.) However, in the more likely case that the 14C attaches to the haze that rains out onto the surface (as tholin, HCN or acetylene and their polymers - a much smaller carbon reservoir) , haze in the atmosphere or recently deposited on the surface would therefore be quite intrinsically radioactive. Such activity may modify the haze electrical charging and hence its coag- ulation. Measurements with compact instrumentation on future in-situ missions could place useful constraints on the mass deposition rates of photochemical material on the surface and identify locations where surface deposits of such material are `freshest`.

  5. Titan Science Return Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisbin, Charles R.; Lincoln, William

    2014-01-01

    Each proposal for a NASA mission concept includes a Science Traceability Matrix (STM), intended to show that what is being proposed would contribute to satisfying one or more of the agency's top-level science goals. But the information traditionally provided cannot be used directly to quantitatively compare anticipated science return. We added numerical elements to NASA's STM and developed a software tool to process the data. We then applied this methodology to evaluate a group of competing concepts for a proposed mission to Saturn's moon, Titan.

  6. Titan Airship Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerzhanovich, V.; Yavrouian, A.; Cutts, J.; Colozza, A.; Fairbrother, D.

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan is considered to be one of the prime candidates for studying prebiotic materials - the substances that precede the formation of life but have disappeared from the Earth as a result of the evolution of life. A unique combination of a dense, predominantly nitrogen, atmosphere (more than four times that of the Earth), low gravity (six times less than on the Earth) and small temperature variations makes Titan the almost ideal planet for studies with lighter-than-air aerial platforms (aerobots). Moreover, since methane clouds and photochemical haze obscure the surface, low-altitude aerial platforms are the only practical means that can provide global mapping of the Titan surface at visible and infrared wavelengths. One major challenge in Titan exploration is the extremely cold atmosphere (approx. 90 K). However, current material technology the capability to operate aerobots at these very low temperatures. A second challenge is the remoteness from the Sun (10 AU) that makes the nuclear (radioisotopic) energy the only practical source of power. A third challenge is remoteness from the Earth (approx. 10 AU, two-way light-time approx. 160 min) which imposes restrictions on data rates and makes impractical any meaningful real-time control. A small-size airship (approx. 25 cu m) can carry a payload approximately 100 kg. A Stirling engine coupled to a radioisotope heat source would be the prime choice for producing both mechanical and electrical power for sensing, control, and communications. The cold atmospheric temperature makes Stirling machines especially effective. With the radioisotope power source the airship may fly with speed approximately 5 m/s for a year or more providing an excellent platform for in situ atmosphere measurements and a high-resolution remote sensing with unlimited access on a global scale. In a station-keeping mode the airship can be used for in situ studies on the surface by winching down an instrument package. Floating above the

  7. Ferroelectricity and tunneling electroresistance effect in asymmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, L. L.; Wang, J., E-mail: jianwang@hku.hk

    2016-06-14

    We report the investigation on the ferroelectricity and tunneling electroresistance (TER) effect in PbTiO{sub 3} (PTO)-based ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) using first-principles calculations. For symmetric FTJs, we have calculated the average polarizations of PTO film and effective screening lengths of different metal electrodes for a number of FTJs, which is useful for experimental research. For asymmetric FTJs, significant asymmetric ferroelectric displacements in PTO film are observed, which is attributed to the intrinsic field generated by the two dissimilar electrodes. Moreover, by performing quantum transport calculations on those asymmetric FTJs, a sizable TER effect is observed. It is found that themore » asymmetry of ferroelectric displacements in PTO barrier, which is determined by the difference of work functions of the electrodes, controls the observed TER effect. Our results will help unravel the TER mechanism of asymmetric FTJs in most experiments and will be useful for the designing of FTJ-based devices.« less

  8. Isotopic Composition of Oxygen in Lunar Zircons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Meyer, C.

    2005-01-01

    The recent discovery of heavy oxygen in zircons from the Jack Hills conglomerates Wilde et al. and Mojzsis et al. was interpreted as an indication of presence of liquid water on the surface of Early Earth. The distribution of ages of Jack Hills zircons and lunar zircons appears to be very similar and therefore analysis of oxygen in the lunar grains may provide a reference frame for further study of the early history of the Earth as well as give additional information regarding processes that operated on the Moon. In the present study we have analysed the oxygen isotopic composition of zircon grains from three lunar samples using the Swedish Museum of Natural History CAMECA 1270 ion microprobe. The samples were selected as likely tests for variations in lunar oxygen isotopic composition. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  9. Titan's Gravitational Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, G.; Anderson, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Titan's gravitational field is inferred from an analysis of archived radio Doppler data for six Cassini flybys. The analysis considers each flyby separately in contrast to the approach of lumping all the data together in a massive inversion. In this way it is possible to gain an improved understanding of the character of each flyby and its usefulness in constraining the gravitational coefficient C22 . Though our analysis is not yet complete and our final determination of C22 could differ from the result we report here by 1 or 2 sigma, we find a best-fit value of C22 equal to (13.21 × 0.17) × 10-6, significantly larger than the value of 10.0 × 10-6 obtained from an inversion of the lumped Cassini data. We also find no determination of the tidal Love number k2. The larger value of C22 implies a moment of inertia factor equal to 0.3819 × 0.0020 and a less differentiated Titan than is suggested by the smaller value. The larger value of C22 is consistent with an undifferentiated model of the satellite. While it is not possible to rule out either value of C22 , we prefer the larger value because its derivation results from a more hands on analysis of the data that extracts the weak hydrostatic signal while revealing the effects of gravity anomalies and unmodeled spacecraft accelerations on each of the six flybys.

  10. Touchdown on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Europe's Huygens probe is on target for a Dec. 25 separation from the Cassini Saturn orbiter that has carried it like a baby for more than seven years. The probe will spend three weeks coasting to a plunge into Titan's thick atmosphere on the morning of Jan. 14. If all goes as planned, the 349-kg. Huygens will spend more than 2 hr. descending by parachute to the mysterious surface of the planet-sized moon, and hopefully devote yet more time to broadcasting data after it lands. Before the day is over, Huygens is programmed to beam about 30 megabytes of data - including some 1,100 images-back to Earth through Cassini, a trip that will take some 75 min. to complete over the 1- billion-km. distance that separates the two planets. Within that data should be answers to questions that date back to 1655, when Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens found the moon with a homemade telescope and named it for the family of giants the ancient Greeks believed once ruled the earth. In the Solar System, there is no other world like Titan, with a nitrogen and methane atmospheric and a cold, hidden surface darker than Earth under the full Moon.

  11. Constitutive relations of ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu

    The objective of this thesis is to obtain a better understanding on the fundamental constitutive behavior of ferroelectric ceramics based on the physics of phase transition, micromechanics of heterogeneous materials, and principles of irreversible thermodynamics. Within this framework, a self-consistent model is developed to investigate the electromechanical responses of ferroelectric polycrystals under temperature change and electromechanical loading. Cooling of a paraelectric crystal below its curie temperature Tc would result in spontaneous polarization, whereas electromechanical loading on a poled crystal could lead to domain switch. Domain growth and reorientation inside ferroelectric crystals are studied in light of these phase transition and domain switch. In this process, the change of the effective elastic, dielectric and piezoelectric constants during the evolution of microstructures are examined. In addition, hysteresis loops for the electric displacement and other related phenomena are computed under cyclic electric load. On top of all methods implemented in this work, the kinetic equation derived from the irreversible thermodynamics is the key to study the domain evolution in ferroelectric crystals. The kinetic relation not only governs the growth of new domain in a ferroelectric crystal, but it also determines the onset of phase transition. This characteristic is used to study the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the shift of Curie temperature of a ferroelectric crystal. Based on the derived expressions, it is observed that the deriving force can increase or decrease upon applied hydrostatic mechanical loading, depending on the change of electromechanical moduli, eigenstrain and electro-polarization. Several typical cases are computed and it is found that the change of the electromechanical moduli during phase transformation plays the key role in the shift of Curie temperature. Since ferroelectric ceramics are in a polycrystal form, a self

  12. Mapping products of Titan's surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Karkoschka, Erich; Barnes, Jason W.; Tomasko, Martin G.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Le Corre, Lucille; Langhans, Mirjam; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Lorenz, Ralf D.; Perry, Jason; Brown, Robert H.; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing instruments aboard the Cassini spacecraft have been observed the surface of Titan globally in the infrared and radar wavelength ranges as well as locally by the Huygens instruments revealing a wealth of new morphological features indicating a geologically active surface. We present a summary of mapping products of Titan's surface derived from data of the remote sensing instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft (ISS, VIMS, RADAR) as well as the Huygens probe (DISR) that were achieved during the nominal Cassini mission including an overview of Titan's recent nomenclature.

  13. Properties of barium strontium titanate and niobate nanoparticles produced in gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyaka, Pavel; Kazaryan, Mishik; Pavlenko, Anatoly

    2018-03-01

    Dust particles produced in the gas-discharge plasma by barium-strontium titanate and niobate targets sputtering have been investigated in the paper. Particles shape, size and chemical composition were identified. It have been established by Raman scattering investigation and X-ray structure analysis that a part of the collected dust particles retained original crystal structure of the sputtering target. For electro-physical investigations two discs were formed by pressuring from produced particles, and electrodes were deposited on disc flat surface. Capacitance and dielectric loss temperature dependences measurement resulted in the frequency range proving the ferroelectric properties of assembled nanoparticles, similar to the sputtered material.

  14. Microwave assisted synthesis and characterization of barium titanate nanoparticles for multi layered ceramic capacitor applications.

    PubMed

    Thirumalai, Sundararajan; Shanmugavel, Balasivanandha Prabu

    2011-01-01

    Barium titanate is a common ferroelectric electro-ceramic material having high dielectric constant, with photorefractive effect and piezoelectric properties. In this research work, nano-scale barium titanate powders were synthesized by microwave assisted mechano-chemical route. Suitable precursors were ball milled for 20 hours. TGA studies were performed to study the thermal stability of the powders. The powders were characterized by XRD, SEM and EDX Analysis. Microwave and Conventional heating were performed at 1000 degrees C. The overall heating schedule was reduced by 8 hours in microwave heating thereby reducing the energy and time requirement. The nano-scale, impurity-free and defect-free microstructure was clearly evident from the SEM micrograph and EDX patterns. LCR meter was used to measure the dielectric constant and dielectric loss values at various frequencies. Microwave heated powders showed superior dielectric constant value with low dielectric loss which is highly essential for the fabrication of Multi Layered Ceramic Capacitors.

  15. Global Topographic Map of Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-15

    Using data from NASA Cassini spacecraft, scientists have created the first global topographic map of Saturn moon Titan, giving researchers a 3-D tool for learning more about one of the most Earthlike and interesting worlds in the solar system.

  16. Titan's greenhouse and antigreenhouse effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Courtin, Regis

    1992-01-01

    Thermal mechanisms active in Titan's atmosphere are discussed in a brief review of data obtained during the Voyager I flyby in 1980. Particular attention is given to the greenhouse effect (GHE) produced by atmospheric H2, N2, and CH4; this GHE is stronger than that on earth, with CH4 and H2 playing roles similar to those of H2O and CO2 on earth. Also active on Titan is an antigreenhouse effect, in which dark-brown and orange organic aerosols block incoming solar light while allowing IR radiation from the Titan surface to escape. The combination of GHE and anti-GHE leads to a surface temperature about 12 C higher than it would be if Titan had no atmosphere.

  17. Simulating Titan-Like Smog

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-03

    In a laboratory experiment at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., scientists simulate the atmosphere of Saturn moon Titan. In this picture, molecules of dicyanoacetylene are seen on a special film on a sapphire window.

  18. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turtle, E. P.; DelGenio, A. D.; Barbara, J. M.; Perry, J. E.; Schaller, E. L.; McEwen, A. S.; West, R. A.; Ray, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem has observed Titan for 1/4 Titan year, and we report here the first evidence of seasonal shifts in preferred locations of tropospheric methane clouds. South \\polar convective cloud activity, common in late southern summer, has become rare. North \\polar and northern mid \\latitude clouds appeared during the approach to the northern spring equinox in August 2009. Recent observations have shown extensive cloud systems at low latitudes. In contrast, southern mid \\latitude and subtropical clouds have appeared sporadically throughout the mission, exhibiting little seasonality to date. These differences in behavior suggest that Titan s clouds, and thus its general circulation, are influenced by both the rapid temperature response of a low \\thermal \\inertia surface and the much longer radiative timescale of Titan s cold thick troposphere. North \\polar clouds are often seen near lakes and seas, suggesting that local increases in methane concentration and/or lifting generated by surface roughness gradients may promote cloud formation. Citation

  19. The Story Titan Dunes Tell

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-10

    An intricate, fingerprint-like pattern of dunes is seen in this dramatic radar image of Saturn moon Titan captured by NASA Cassini spacecraft on May 21, 2009 from an altitude of 965 kilometers about 600 miles.

  20. A strong electro-optically active lead-free ferroelectric integrated on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Stefan; Stöferle, Thilo; Marchiori, Chiara; Rossel, Christophe; Rossell, Marta D.; Erni, Rolf; Caimi, Daniele; Sousa, Marilyne; Chelnokov, Alexei; Offrein, Bert J.; Fompeyrine, Jean

    2013-04-01

    The development of silicon photonics could greatly benefit from the linear electro-optical properties, absent in bulk silicon, of ferroelectric oxides, as a novel way to seamlessly connect the electrical and optical domain. Of all oxides, barium titanate exhibits one of the largest linear electro-optical coefficients, which has however not yet been explored for thin films on silicon. Here we report on the electro-optical properties of thin barium titanate films epitaxially grown on silicon substrates. We extract a large effective Pockels coefficient of reff=148 pm V-1, which is five times larger than in the current standard material for electro-optical devices, lithium niobate. We also reveal the tensor nature of the electro-optical properties, as necessary for properly designing future devices, and furthermore unambiguously demonstrate the presence of ferroelectricity. The integration of electro-optical active films on silicon could pave the way towards power-efficient, ultra-compact integrated devices, such as modulators, tuning elements and bistable switches.

  1. Photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, D. J.; Linz, A.; Jenssen, H. P.

    1982-01-01

    The ceramic structure was simulated in a form that is more tractable to correlation between experiment and theory. Single crystals (of barium titanate) were fabricated in a simple corrugated structure in which the pedestals of the corrugation simulated the grain while the intervening cuts could be filled with materials simulating the grain boundaries. The observed photovoltages were extremely small (100 mv).

  2. Chemistry in Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessis, S.; Carrasco, N.; Pernot, P.

    2009-04-01

    Modelling the chemical composition of Titan's ionosphere is a very challenging issue. Latest works perform either inversion of CASSINI's INMS mass spectra (neutral[1] or ion[2]), or design coupled ion-neutral chemistry models[3]. Coupling ionic and neutral chemistry has been reported to be an essential feature of accurate modelling[3]. Electron Dissociative Recombination (EDR), where free electrons recombine with positive ions to produce neutral species, is a key component of ion-neutral coupling. There is a major difficulty in EDR modelling: for heavy ions, the distribution of neutral products is incompletely characterized by experiments. For instance, for some hydrocarbon ions only the carbon repartition is measured, leaving the hydrogen repartition and thus the exact neutral species identity unknown[4]. This precludes reliable deterministic modelling of this process and of ion-neutral coupling. We propose a novel stochastic description of the EDR chemical reactions which enables efficient representation and simulation of the partial experimental knowledge. The description of products distribution in multi-pathways reactions is based on branching ratios, which should sum to unity. The keystone of our approach is the design of a probability density function accounting for all available informations and physical constrains. This is done by Dirichlet modelling which enables one to sample random variables whose sum is constant[5]. The specifics of EDR partial uncertainty call for a hierarchiral Dirichlet representation, which generalizes our previous work[5]. We present results on the importance of ion-neutral coupling based on our stochastic model. C repartition H repartition (measured) (unknown ) → C4H2 + 3H2 + H .. -→ C4 . → C4H2 + 7H → C3H8. + CH C4H+9 + e- -→ C3 + C .. → C3H3 + CH2 + 2H2 → C2H6 + C2H2 + H .. -→ C2 + C2 . → 2C2H2 + 2H2 + H (1) References [1] J. Cui, R.V. Yelle, V. Vuitton, J.H. Waite Jr., W.T. Kasprzak

  3. Life on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potashko, Oleksandr

    Volcanoes engender life on heavenly bodies; they are pacemakers of life. All planets during their period of formation pass through volcanism hence - all planets and their satellites pass through the life. Tracks of life If we want to find tracks of life - most promising places are places with volcanic activity, current or past. In the case of just-in-time volcanic activity we have 100% probability to find a life. Therefore the most perspective “search for life” are Enceladus, Io and comets, further would be Venus, Jupiter’s satellites, Saturn’s satellites and first of all - Titan. Titan has atmosphere. It might be result of high volcanic activity - from one side, from other side atmosphere is a necessary condition development life from procaryota to eucaryota. Existence of a planet means that all its elements after hydrogen formed just there inside a planet. The forming of the elements leads to the formation of mineral and organic substances and further to the organic life. Development of the life depends upon many factors, e.g. the distance from star/s. The intensity of the processes of the element formation is inversely to the distance from the star. Therefore we may suppose that the intensity of the life in Mercury was very high. Hence we may detect tracks of life in Mercury, particularly near volcanoes. The distance from the star is only one parameter and now Titan looks very active - mainly due to interior reason. Its atmosphere compounds are analogous to comet tail compounds. Their collation may lead to interesting result as progress occurs at one of them. Volcanic activity is as a source of life origin as well a reason for a death of life. It depends upon the thickness of planet crust. In the case of small thickness of a crust the probability is high that volcanoes may destroy a life on a planet - like Noachian deluge. Destroying of the life under volcano influences doesn’t lead to full dead. As result we would have periodic Noachian deluge or

  4. Methane rain on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Courtin, Regis; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    The atmosphere of Titan is characterized by means of model computations based on Voyager IRIS IR spectra and published data from laboratory determinations of absorption coefficients and cloud refractive indices. The results are presented in tables and graphs, and it is pointed out that the presence of Ar is not required in the model. Particular attention is given to the role of CH4, which is found to form patchy clouds (with particle radii of 50 microns or greater and visible/IR optical depths of 2-5) at altitudes up to about 30 km. The mechanisms by which such rain-sized particles could form are discussed, and it is suggested that the observed 500-600/cm spectrum is affected much less by the CH4 clouds than by H2 or variations in the temperature of the high-altitude haze.

  5. Heterogeneous Polarized States in Ferroelectric Inclusions in a Ferroelectric-Dielectric Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaev, V. N.; Viskovatykh, A. V.

    2018-06-01

    The behavior of the previously observed inhomogeneous polarized states in ferroelectric inclusions of the nanocomposite is analyzed in detail. The domain structure of ferroelectric particles depends on the temperature and nature of interaction with the dielectric matrix. The possibility of controlling the domain structure in ferroelectric particles using an external electric field is shown.

  6. From Titan's chemistry and exobiology to Titan's astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, François

    2015-04-01

    When the IDS proposal « Titan's chemistry and exobiology » was submitted to ESA 25 years ago, in the frame of what will become the Cassini-Huygens mission, Titan was already seen as a quite interesting planetary object in the solar system for Exobiology. Several organic compounds of prebiotic interest were identified in its atmosphere, which was thus was expected to be chemically very active, especially in term of organic processes. Atmospheric aerosols seemed to play a key role in this chemistry. Moreover, the presence of an internal aqueous ocean, compatible with life was suspected. A few years later, when astrobiology was (re)invented, Titan became one of the most interesting planetary target for this new (but very similar to exobiology) field. With the Cassini-Huygens mission, the exo/astrobiological interest of Titan has become more and more important. However, the mission has been providing a vision of Titan quite different from what it was supposed. Its atmospheric organic chemistry is very complex and starts in much higher zones than it was believed before, involving high molecular weight species in the ionosphere. Titan's surface appears to be far from homogeneous: instead of been covered by a global methane-ethane ocean, it is very diversified, with dunes, lakes, bright and dark areas, impact and volcanic craters with potential cryovolcanic activity. These various geological areas are continuously feeded by atmospheric aerosols, which represent an important step in the complexity of Titan's organic chemistry, but probably not the final one. Indeed, after being deposited on the surface, in the potential cryovolvanic zones, these particles may react with water ice and form compounds of exo/astrobiological interest, such as amino acids, purine and pyrimidine bases. Moreover, The Cassini-Huygens data strongly support the potential presence of an internal water ocean, which becomes less and less hypothetical and of great interest for exobiology. These

  7. Geochemical signatures and magmatic stability of terrestrial impact produced zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielicki, Matthew M.; Harrison, T. Mark; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the role of impacts on early Earth has major implications to near surface conditions, but the apparent lack of preserved terrestrial craters > 2 Ga does not allow a direct sampling of such events. Ion microprobe U-Pb ages, REE abundances and Ti-in-zircon thermometry for impact produced zircon are reported here. These results from terrestrial impactites, ranging in age from ~ 35 Ma to ~ 2 Ga, are compared with the detrital Hadean zircon population from Western Australia. Such comparisons may provide the only terrestrial constraints on the role of impacts during the Hadean and early Archean, a time predicted to have a high bolide flux. Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates an average of 773 °C for impact-produced zircon, ~ 100 °C higher than the average for Hadean zircon crystals. The agreement between whole-rock based zircon saturation temperatures for impactites and Ti-in-zircon thermometry (at aTiO2 = 1) implies that Ti-in-zircon thermometry record actual crystallization temperatures for impact melts. Zircon saturation modeling of Archean crustal rock compositions undergoing thermal excursions associated with the Late Heavy Bombardment predicts equally high zircon crystallization temperatures. The lack of such thermal signatures in the Hadean zircon record implies that impacts were not a dominant mechanism of producing the preserved Hadean detrital zircon record.

  8. Detrital Zircons Split Sibumasu in East Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Chung, S. L.

    2017-12-01

    It is widely accepted that Sibumasu developed as a united terrane and originated from NW Australian margin in East Gondwana. Here we report new detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopic data from Sumatra that, in combination with literature data, challenge and refute the above long-held view. In particular, the East and West Sumatra terranes share nearly identical Precambrian to Paleozoic detrital zircon age distributions and Hf isotopes, indicating a common provenance/origin for them. The Sumatra detrital zircons exhibit a prominent population of ca. 1170-1070 Ma, indistinguishable from those of the Lhasa and West Burma terranes, with detritus most probably sourcing from western Australia. By contrast, Sibuma (Sibumasu excluding Sumatra) detrital zircons display a prevailing population of ca. 980-935 Ma, strongly resembling those of the western Qiangtang terrane, with detrital materials most likely derived from Greater India and Himalayas. Such markedly distinct detrital zircon age profiles between Sumatra and Sibuma require disparate sources/origin for them, provoking disintegration of the widely-adopted, but outdated, term Sibumasu and thus inviting a new configuration of East Gondwana in the early Paleozoic, with Sumatra and West Burma lying outboard the Lhasa terrane in the NW Australian margin and Sibuma situated in the northern Greater Indian margin. More future investigations are needed to establish the precise rifting and drifting histories of Sumatra and Sibuma, as two separated terranes, during the breakup of Gondwana.

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis of barium strontium titanate and bismuth titanate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huiwen

    Hydrothermal processing facilitates the synthesis of crystalline ceramic materials of varying composition or complex crystal structure. The present work can be divided into two parts. First is to study the low temperature hydrothermal synthesis of bismuth titanate. Second is to study both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the hydrothermally synthesized barium strontium titanate. A chelating agent was used to form a Bi-Ti gel precursor. By hydrothermally treating the Bi-Ti gel, crystalline bismuth titanate has been synthesized at 160°C for the first time. Microstructural evolution during the low temperature synthesis of bismuth titanate can be divided into two stages, including condensation of Bi-Ti gel particles and crystallization of bismuth titanate. Crystallization of bismuth titanate occurred by an in situ transformation mechanism at an early stage followed by a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Phase separation was observed in hydrothermally synthesized barium strontium titanate (BST). By hydrothermally treating BST powders between 250°C--300°C, an asymmetrical miscibility gap was found in the BaTiO3-SrTiO 3 system at low temperatures (T ≤ 320°C). A subregular solid solution model was applied to calculate the equilibrium compositions and the Gibbs free energy of formation of BST solid solution at low temperatures (T ≤ 320°C). The Gibbs free energy of formation of Sr-rich BST phase is larger than that of Ba-rich BST phase. Kinetic studies of single phase BST solid solution at 80°C show that, compared to the BaTiO3 or Ba-rich BST, SrTiO3 and Sr-rich BST powders form at lower reaction rates.

  10. Percolation Magnetism in Ferroelectric Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovina, Iryna S.; Lemishko, Serhii V.; Morozovska, Anna N.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticles of potassium tantalate (KTaO3) and potassium niobate (KNbO3) were synthesized by oxidation of metallic tantalum in molten potassium nitrate with the addition of potassium hydroxide. Magnetization curves obtained on these ferroelectric nanoparticles exhibit a weak ferromagnetism, while these compounds are nonmagnetic in a bulk. The experimental data are used as a start point for theoretical calculations. We consider a microscopic mechanism that leads to the emerging of a ferromagnetic ordering in ferroelectric nanoparticles. Our approach is based on the percolation of magnetic polarons assuming the dominant role of the oxygen vacancies. It describes the formation of surface magnetic polarons, in which an exchange interaction between electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies is mediated by magnetic impurity Fe3+ ions. The dependences of percolation radius on concentration of the oxygen vacancies and magnetic defects are determined in the framework of percolation theory.

  11. Magnetospheric particle precipitation at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Emilie; Esposito, Larry; Crary, Frank; Wahlund, Jan-Erik

    2017-04-01

    Although solar XUV radiation is known to be the main source of ionization in Titan's upper atmosphere around 1100 km of altitude, magnetospheric particle precipitation can also account for about 10% of the ionization process. Magnetospheric particle precipitation is expected to be the most intense on the nightside of the satelllite and when Titan's orbital position around Saturn is the closest to Noon Saturn Local Time (SLT). In addition, on several occasion throughout the Cassini mission, Titan has been observed while in the magnetosheath. We are reporting here Ultraviolet (UV) observations of Titan airglow enhancements correlated to these magnetospheric changing conditions occurring while the spacecraft, and thus Titan, are known to have crossed Saturn's magnetopause and have been exposed to the magnetosheath environnment. Using Cassini-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observations of Titan around 12PM SLT as our primary set of data, we present evidence of Titan's upper atmosphere response to a fluctuating magnetospheric environment. Pattern recognition software based on 2D UVIS detector images has been used to retrieve observations of interest, looking for airglow enhancement of a factor of 2. A 2D UVIS detector image, created for each UVIS observation of Titan, displays the spatial dimension of the UVIS slit on the x-axis and the time on the y-axis. In addition, data from the T32 flyby and from April 17, 2005 from in-situ Cassini instruments are used. Correlations with data from simultaneous observations of in-situ Cassini instruments (CAPS, RPWS and MIMI) has been possible on few occasions and events such as electron burst and reconnections can be associated with unusual behaviors of the Titan airglow. CAPS in-situ measurements acquired during the T32 flyby are consistent with an electron burst observed at the spacecraft as the cause of the UV emission. Moreover, on April 17, 2005 the UVIS observation displays feature similar to what could be aTitan

  12. Correlation of Electric Field and Critical Design Parameters for Ferroelectric Tunable Microwave Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanyam, Guru; VanKeuls, Fred W.; Miranda, Felix A.; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2000-01-01

    The correlation of electric field and critical design parameters such as the insertion loss, frequency ability return loss, and bandwidth of conductor/ferroelectric/dielectric microstrip tunable K-band microwave filters is discussed in this work. This work is based primarily on barium strontium titanate (BSTO) ferroelectric thin film based tunable microstrip filters for room temperature applications. Two new parameters which we believe will simplify the evaluation of ferroelectric thin films for tunable microwave filters, are defined. The first of these, called the sensitivity parameter, is defined as the incremental change in center frequency with incremental change in maximum applied electric field (EPEAK) in the filter. The other, the loss parameter, is defined as the incremental or decremental change in insertion loss of the filter with incremental change in maximum applied electric field. At room temperature, the Au/BSTO/LAO microstrip filters exhibited a sensitivity parameter value between 15 and 5 MHz/cm/kV. The loss parameter varied for different bias configurations used for electrically tuning the filter. The loss parameter varied from 0.05 to 0.01 dB/cm/kV at room temperature.

  13. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, Stephen E.; Raber, Ellen; Naeser, Charles W.

    1983-04-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206Pb and 238U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.3 ± 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 ± 5.7 and 92.4 ± 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 ± 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.0 ± 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 ± 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 ± 59.6 and 705.5 ± 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption.

  14. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggerty, S.E.; Raber, E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206Pb and 238U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.3 ?? 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 ?? 5.7 and 92.4 ?? 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 ?? 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.0 ?? 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 ?? 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 ?? 59.6 and 705.5 ?? 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. ?? 1983.

  15. Mapping of Titan: Results from the first Titan radar passes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Lunine, J.I.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Lorenz, R.D.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.; Wall, S.; Elachi, C.; Soderblom, L.A.; Ostro, S.; Janssen, M.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Zebker, H.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Stiles, B.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2006-01-01

    The first two swaths collected by Cassini's Titan Radar Mapper were obtained in October of 2004 (Ta) and February of 2005 (T3). The Ta swath provides evidence for cryovolcanic processes, the possible occurrence of fluvial channels and lakes, and some tectonic activity. The T3 swath has extensive areas of dunes and two large impact craters. We interpret the brightness variations in much of the swaths to result from roughness variations caused by fracturing and erosion of Titan's icy surface, with additional contributions from a combination of volume scattering and compositional variations. Despite the small amount of Titan mapped to date, the significant differences between the terrains of the two swaths suggest that Titan is geologically complex. The overall scarcity of impact craters provides evidence that the surface imaged to date is relatively young, with resurfacing by cryovolcanism, fluvial erosion, aeolian erosion, and likely atmospheric deposition of materials. Future radar swaths will help to further define the nature of and extent to which internal and external processes have shaped Titan's surface. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Planetary science: Titan's lost seas found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    When the Cassini spacecraft found no methane ocean swathing Saturn's moon Titan, it was a blow to proponents of an Earth-like world. The discovery of northern lakes on Titan gives them reason for cheer.

  17. Outline of an Ancient Sea on Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-16

    This image from NASA Cassini spacecraft shows an ancient southern sea that used to sprawl out near the south pole of Saturn moon Titan. Within this basin is the largest present-day lake in Titan southern hemisphere, Ontario Lacus.

  18. Working Toward Seamless Infrared Maps of Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-24

    Each of these two montages shows four synthetic views of Titan created using data acquired by NASA Cassini spacecraft between 2004 and 2015. With each flyby, a brief opportunity to add small pieces to the overall mapping coverage of Titan.

  19. Extinct 244Pu in ancient zircons.

    PubMed

    Turner, Grenville; Harrison, T Mark; Holland, Greg; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Gilmour, Jamie

    2004-10-01

    We have found evidence, in the form of fissiogenic xenon isotopes, for in situ decay of 244Pu in individual 4.1- to 4.2-billion-year-old zircons from the Jack Hills region of Western Australia. Because of its short half-life, 82 million years, 244Pu was extinct within 600 million years of Earth's formation. Detrital zircons are the only known relics to have survived from this period, and a study of their Pu geochemistry will allow us to date ancient metamorphic events and determine the terrestrial Pu/U ratio for comparison with the solar ratio.

  20. The atmospheric temperature structure of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, J. B.; Courtin, Regis; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of various factors to the thermal structure of Titan's past and present atmosphere are discussed. A one dimensional model of Titan's thermal structure is summarized. The greenhouse effect of Titan's atmosphere, caused primarily by pressure induced opacity of N2, CH4, and H2, is discussed together with the antigreenhouse effect dominated by the haze which absorbs incident sunlight. The implications for the atmosphere of the presence of an ocean on Titan are also discussed.

  1. Flexible and tunable terahertz all-dielectric metasurface composed of ceramic spheres embedded in ferroelectric/ elastomer composite.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chuwen; Zhu, Di; Gao, Jiannan; Li, Bo; Gao, Zehua

    2018-04-30

    Terahertz (THz) all-dielectric metasurfaces made of high-index and low-loss resonators have attracted more and more attention due to their versatile properties. However, the all-dielectric metasurfaces in THz suffer from limited bandwidth and low tunability. Meanwhile, they are usually fabricated on flat and rigid substrates, and consequently their applications are restricted. Here, a simple approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to obtain a flexible and tunable THz all-dielectric metasurface. In this metasurface, micro ceramic spheres (ZrO 2 ) are embedded in a ferroelectric (strontium titanate) / elastomer (polydimethylsiloxane) composite. It is shown that the Mie resonances in micro ceramic spheres can be thermally and reversibly tuned resulting from the temperature dependent permittivity of the ferroelectric / PDMS composite. This metasurface characterized by flexibility and tunability is expected to have a more extensive application in active THz devices.

  2. Role of flexoelectric coupling in polarization rotations at the a-c domain walls in ferroelectric perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ye; Chen, Long-Qing; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    Ferroelectric and ferroelastic domain walls play important roles in ferroelectric properties. However, their couplings with flexoelectricity have been less understood. Here, we applied phase-field simulation to investigate the flexoelectric coupling with ferroelectric a/c twin structures in lead ziconate titanate thin films. Local stress gradients were found to exist near twin walls that created both lateral and vertical electric fields through the flexoelectric effect, resulting in polarization inclinations from either horizontal or normal orientation, polarization rotation angles deviated from 90°, and consequently highly asymmetric a/c twin walls. Furthermore, by tuning the flexoelectric strengths in a reasonable range from first-principles calculations, wemore » found that the transverse flexoelectric coefficient has a larger influence on the polarization rotation than longitudinal and shear coefficients. And as polar rotations that commonly occur at compositional morphotropic phase boundaries contribute to the piezoelectric enhancement, this work calls for further exploration of alternative strain-engineered polar rotations via flexoelectricity in ferroelectric thin films.« less

  3. Role of flexoelectric coupling in polarization rotations at the a-c domain walls in ferroelectric perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Ye; Chen, Long-Qing; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-05-16

    Ferroelectric and ferroelastic domain walls play important roles in ferroelectric properties. However, their couplings with flexoelectricity have been less understood. Here, we applied phase-field simulation to investigate the flexoelectric coupling with ferroelectric a/c twin structures in lead ziconate titanate thin films. Local stress gradients were found to exist near twin walls that created both lateral and vertical electric fields through the flexoelectric effect, resulting in polarization inclinations from either horizontal or normal orientation, polarization rotation angles deviated from 90°, and consequently highly asymmetric a/c twin walls. Furthermore, by tuning the flexoelectric strengths in a reasonable range from first-principles calculations, wemore » found that the transverse flexoelectric coefficient has a larger influence on the polarization rotation than longitudinal and shear coefficients. And as polar rotations that commonly occur at compositional morphotropic phase boundaries contribute to the piezoelectric enhancement, this work calls for further exploration of alternative strain-engineered polar rotations via flexoelectricity in ferroelectric thin films.« less

  4. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    Processing of thin films introduces strict limits on the thermal budget due to substrate stability and thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Barium titanate serves as a model system for the difficulty in producing high quality thin films because of sensitivity to stress, scale, and crystal quality. Thermal budget restriction leads to reduced crystal quality, density, and grain growth, depressing ferroelectric and nonlinear dielectric properties. Processing of barium titanate is typically performed at temperatures hundreds of degrees above compatibility with metalized substrates. In particular integration with silicon and other low thermal expansion substrates is desirable for reductions in costs and wider availability of technologies. In bulk metal and ceramic systems, sintering behavior has been encouraged by the addition of a liquid forming second phase, improving kinetics and promoting densification and grain growth at lower temperatures. This approach is also widespread in the multilayer ceramic capacitor industry. However only limited exploration of flux processing with refractory thin films has been performed despite offering improved dielectric properties for barium titanate films at lower temperatures. This dissertation explores physical vapor deposition of barium titanate thin films with addition of liquid forming fluxes. Flux systems studied include BaO-B2O3, Bi2O3-BaB2O 4, BaO-V2O5, CuO-BaO-B2O3, and BaO-B2O3 modified by Al, Si, V, and Li. Additions of BaO-B2O3 leads to densification and an increase in average grain size from 50 nm to over 300 nm after annealing at 900 °C. The ability to tune permittivity of the material improved from 20% to 70%. Development of high quality films enables engineering of ferroelectric phase stability using residual thermal expansion mismatch in polycrystalline films. The observed shifts to TC match thermodynamic calculations, expected strain from the thermal expansion coefficients, as well as x-ray diffract measurements

  5. Titan Global Map - June 2015

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-09

    This global digital map of Saturn's moon Titan was created using images taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft's imaging science subsystem (ISS). The map was produced in June 2015 using data collected through Cassini's flyby on April 7, 2014, known as "T100." The images were taken using a filter centered at 938 nanometers, allowing researchers to examine variations in albedo (or inherent brightness) across the surface of Titan. Because of the scattering of light by Titan's dense atmosphere, no topographic shading is visible in these images. The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) per pixel. Actual resolution varies greatly across the map, with the best coverage (close to the map scale) along the equator near the center of the map at 180 degrees west longitude. The lowest resolution coverage can be seen in the northern mid-latitudes on the sub-Saturn hemisphere. Mapping coverage in the northern polar region has greatly improved since the previous version of this map in 2011 (see PIA14908). Large dark areas, now known to be liquid-hydrocarbon-filled lakes and seas, have since been documented at high latitudes. Titan's north pole was not well illuminated early in Cassini's mission, because it was winter in the northern hemisphere when the spacecraft arrived at Saturn. Cassini has been better able to observe northern latitudes in more recent years due to seasonal changes in solar illumination. This map is an update to the previous versions released in April 2011 and February 2009 (see PIA11149). Data from the past four years (the most recent data in the map is from April 2014) has completely filled in missing data in the north polar region and replaces the earlier imagery of the Xanadu region with higher quality data. A data gap of about 3 to 5 percent of Titan's surface still remains, located in the northern mid-latitudes on the sub-Saturn hemisphere of Titan. The uniform gray area in the northern hemisphere indicates a gap in the

  6. Organic chemistry on Titan: Surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of Titan's organic sediments with the surface (solubility in nonpolar fluids) is discussed. How Titan's sediments can be exposed to an aqueous medium for short, but perhaps significant, periods of time is also discussed. Interactions with hydrocarbons and with volcanic magmas are considered. The alteration of Titan's organic sediments over geologic time by the impacts of meteorites and comets is discussed.

  7. Titan South Polar Cloud Burst

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-03

    This infrared image of Saturn's moon Titan shows a large burst of clouds in the moon's south polar region. These clouds form and move much like those on Earth, but in a much slower, more lingering fashion, new results from NASA's Cassini Spacecraft show. This image is a color composite, with red shown at a 5-micron wavelength, green at 2.7 microns, and blue at 2 microns. An infrared color mosaic is also used as a background image (red at 5 microns, green at 2 microns, blue at 1.3 microns). The images were taken by Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer during a flyby of Titan on March 26, 2007, known as T27. For a similar view see PIA12004. Titan's southern hemisphere still shows a very active meteorology (the cloud appears in white-reddish tones) even in 2007. According to climate models, these clouds should have faded out since 2005. Scientists have monitored Titan's atmosphere for three-and-a-half years, between July 2004 and December 2007, and observed more than 200 clouds. The way these clouds are distributed around Titan matches scientists' global circulation models. The only exception is timing—clouds are still noticeable in the southern hemisphere while fall is approaching. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12005

  8. Structure of Titan's evaporites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.; Cornet, T.; Barnes, J. W.; MacKenzie, S. M.; Le Bahers, T.; Nna-Mvondo, D.; Rannou, P.; Ferreira, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    Numerous geological features that could be evaporitic in origin have been identified on the surface of Titan. Although they seem to be water-ice poor, their main properties - chemical composition, thickness, stratification - are essentially unknown. In this paper, which follows on a previous one focusing on the surface composition (Cordier, D., Barnes, J.W., Ferreira, A.G. [2013b]. Icarus 226(2),1431-1437), we provide some answers to these questions derived from a new model. This model, based on the up-to-date thermodynamic theory known as ;PC-SAFT;, has been validated with available laboratory measurements and specifically developed for our purpose. 1-D models confirm the possibility of an acetylene and/or butane enriched central layer of evaporitic deposit. The estimated thickness of this acetylene-butane layer could explain the strong RADAR brightness of the evaporites. The 2-D computations indicate an accumulation of poorly soluble species at the deposit's margin. Among these species, HCN or aerosols similar to tholins could play a dominant role. Our model predicts the existence of chemically trimodal ;bathtub rings; which is consistent with what it is observed at the south polar lake Ontario Lacus. This work also provides plausible explanations to the lack of evaporites in the south polar region and to the high radar reflectivity of dry lakebeds.

  9. Structure-Function Relationships of Ferroelectric Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlopoulou, Eleni; Maiz, Jon; Spampinato, Nicoletta; Maglione, Mario; Hadziioannou, Georges

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride), PVDF, and its copolymers with trifluoroethylene, P(VDF-co-TrFE) have been long appreciated for their excellent ferroelectric properties. Although they have been mainly studied in the 80s and 90s, understanding their performance is still lacking. Yet the increasing use of P(VDF-co-TrFE) thin films in organic electronic devices during the last ten years revives the need for apprehending the function of these materials. In this work we investigate the structure of P(VDF-co-TrFE) films and correlate it to their ferroelectric properties. Our results show that ferroelectric performance is solely driven by the fraction of polymer that has been crystallized in the ferroelectric phases of PVDF. The relations between remnant polarization, coercive field and dipole switching rate of P(VDF-co-TrFE) with the ferroelectric crystallinity are demonstrated. The French Research Agency (ANR), the Aquitaine Region, Arkema and STMicroelectronics are kindly acknowledged for financial support.

  10. Room temperature ferroelectricity in fluoroperovskite thin films.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Kc, Amit; Garcia-Castro, A C; Borisov, Pavel; Bousquet, E; Lederman, David; Romero, Aldo H; Cen, Cheng

    2017-08-03

    The NaMnF 3 fluoride-perovskite has been found, theoretically, to be ferroelectric under epitaxial strain becoming a promising alternative to conventional oxides for multiferroic applications. Nevertheless, this fluoroperovskite has not been experimentally verified to be ferroelectric so far. Here we report signatures of room temperature ferroelectricity observed in perovskite NaMnF 3 thin films grown on SrTiO 3 . Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we studied the evolution of ferroelectric polarization in response to external and built-in electric fields. Density functional theory calculations were also performed to help understand the strong competition between ferroelectric and paraelectric phases as well as the profound influences of strain. These results, together with the magnetic order previously reported in the same material, pave the way to future multiferroic and magnetoelectric investigations in fluoroperovskites.

  11. Widespread morning drizzle on Titan.

    PubMed

    Adámkovics, Máté; Wong, Michael H; Laver, Conor; de Pater, Imke

    2007-11-09

    Precipitation is expected in Titan's atmosphere, yet it has not been directly observed, and the geographical regions where rain occurs are unknown. Here we present near-infrared spectra from the Very Large Telescope and W. M. Keck Observatories that reveal an enhancement of opacity in Titan's troposphere on the morning side of the leading hemisphere. Retrieved extinction profiles are consistent with condensed methane in clouds at an altitude near 30 kilometers and concomitant methane drizzle below. The moisture encompasses the equatorial region over Titan's brightest continent, Xanadu. Diurnal temperature gradients that cause variations in methane relative humidity, winds, and topography may each be a contributing factor to the condensation mechanism. The clouds and precipitation are optically thin at 2.0 micrometers, and models of "subvisible" clouds suggest that the droplets are 0.1 millimeter or larger.

  12. Diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Cravens, T. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-06-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1000 and 1300 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from eight close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Although there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ˜700 cm-3 below ˜1300 km. Such a plateau is a combined result of significant depletion of light ions and modest depletion of heavy ones on Titan's nightside. We propose that the distinctions between the diurnal variations of light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through “fast” ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through “slow” electron dissociative recombination. The strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes suggests a scenario in which the ions created on Titan's dayside may survive well to the nightside. The observed asymmetry between the dawn and dusk ion density profiles also supports such an interpretation. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effect of ion survival associated with solid body rotation alone as well as superrotating horizontal winds. For long-lived ions, the predicted diurnal variations have similar general characteristics to those observed. However, for short-lived ions, the model densities on the nightside are significantly lower than the observed values. This implies that electron precipitation from Saturn's magnetosphere may be an additional and important contributor to the densities of the short-lived ions observed on Titan's nightside.

  13. Ti-in-zircon thermometry: applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bin; Page, F. Zeb; Cavosie, Aaron J.; Fournelle, John; Kita, Noriko T.; Lackey, Jade Star; Wilde, Simon A.; Valley, John W.

    2008-08-01

    The titanium concentrations of 484 zircons with U-Pb ages of ˜1 Ma to 4.4 Ga were measured by ion microprobe. Samples come from 45 different igneous rocks (365 zircons), as well as zircon megacrysts (84) from kimberlite, Early Archean detrital zircons (32), and zircon reference materials (3). Samples were chosen to represent a large range of igneous rock compositions. Most of the zircons contain less than 20 ppm Ti. Apparent temperatures for zircon crystallization were calculated using the Ti-in-zircon thermometer (Watson et al. 2006, Contrib Mineral Petrol 151:413-433) without making corrections for reduced oxide activities (e.g., TiO2 or SiO2), or variable pressure. Average apparent Ti-in-zircon temperatures range from 500° to 850°C, and are lower than either zircon saturation temperatures (for granitic rocks) or predicted crystallization temperatures of evolved melts (˜15% melt residue for mafic rocks). Temperatures average: 653 ± 124°C (2 standard deviations, 60 zircons) for felsic to intermediate igneous rocks, 758 ± 111°C (261 zircons) for mafic rocks, and 758 ± 98°C (84 zircons) for mantle megacrysts from kimberlite. Individually, the effects of reduced a_{TiO2} or a_{SiO2}, variable pressure, deviations from Henry’s Law, and subsolidus Ti exchange are insufficient to explain the seemingly low temperatures for zircon crystallization in igneous rocks. MELTs calculations show that mafic magmas can evolve to hydrous melts with significantly lower crystallization temperature for the last 10-15% melt residue than that of the main rock. While some magmatic zircons surely form in such late hydrous melts, low apparent temperatures are found in zircons that are included within phenocrysts or glass showing that those zircons are not from evolved residue melts. Intracrystalline variability in Ti concentration, in excess of analytical precision, is observed for nearly all zircons that were analyzed more than once. However, there is no systematic change in Ti

  14. Thin layer composite unimorph ferroelectric driver and sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Jalink, Jr., Antony (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor); Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for forming ferroelectric wafers is provided. A prestress layer is placed on the desired mold. A ferroelectric wafer is placed on top of the prestress layer. The layers are heated and then cooled, causing the ferroelectric wafer to become prestressed. The prestress layer may include reinforcing material and the ferroelectric wafer may include electrodes or electrode layers may be placed on either side of the ferroelectric layer. Wafers produced using this method have greatly improved output motion.

  15. Thin Layer Composite Unimorph Ferroelectric Driver and Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor); Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for forming ferroelectric wafers is provided. A prestress layer is placed on the desired mold. A ferroelectric wafer is placed on top of the prestress layer. The layers are heated and then cooled, causing the ferroelectric wafer to become prestressed. The prestress layer may include reinforcing material and the ferroelectric wafer may include electrodes or electrode layers may be placed on either side of the ferroelectric layer. Wafers produced using this method have greatly improved output motion.

  16. Sulfur in zircons: A new window into melt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Bell, E. A.; Boehnke, P.; Barboni, M.; Harrison, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of sulfur are important tools for exploring the photochemistry of the atmosphere, the thermal history of mantle and igneous rocks, and ancient metabolic processes on the early Earth. Because the oldest terrestrial samples are zircons, we developed a new in-situ procedure to analyze the sulfur content of zircons using the CAMECA ims 1290 at UCLA. We analyzed zircons from three metaluminous/I-type granites (reduced and oxidized Peninsular range and Elba), which exhibit low sulfur abundance with the average of 0.5ppm, and one peraluminous/S-type zircon (Strathbogie Range), which shows an elevated sulfur level with the average of 1.5ppm. Additionally, we found that sulfur content ranges between 0.4 and 2.3 ppm in young volcanic zircons (St. Lucia). Our analyses of zircons from the Jack Hills, Western Australia, whose ages range between 3.4 and 4.1 Ga, show a variety of sulfur contents. Three out of the ten zircons are consistent with the sulfur contents of S-type zircons; the rest have low sulfur contents, which are similar to those of I-type zircons. The high sulfur content in some of these Jack Hills zircons can be interpreted as indicating their origin in either a S-type granite or a volcanic reservoir. We favor the former interpretation since the Ti-in-zircon temperatures of our Jack Hills zircons is lower than those of volcanic zircons. Future work will be undertaken to develop a systematic understanding of the relationship between melt volatile content, melt chemistry, and zircon sulfur content.

  17. Titan's chemical complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, Veronique

    2012-04-01

    We review here our current knowledge of Titan's gas phase chemistry. We base our discussion on photochemical models as well as on laboratory experiments. We identify the lower mass positive [1,2] and negative [3] ions detected in the upper atmosphere and we show that their formation is a direct consequence of the presence of heavy neutrals. We demonstrate that the observed densities of CO, CO2 and H2O can be explained by a combination of exogenous O, and OH/H2O input [4]. We argue that benzene [5] and ammonia [6] are created in the upper atmosphere through complex chemical processes involving both neutral and ion chemistry. These species diffuse downward where they are at the origin of heavier aromatics and amines, respectively. Finally, we discuss the impact on hydrocarbon densities of recent theoretical calculations of the rate constants of association reactions [7]. [1] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle and V. G. Anicich, Astrophys. J., 647, L175 (2006). [2] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle and M. J. McEwan, Icarus, 191, 722 (2007). [3] V. Vuitton, P. Lavvas, R. V. Yelle, M. Galand, A. Wellbrock, G. R. Lewis, A. J. Coates and J.-E. Wahlund, Planet. Space Sci., 57, 1558 (2009). [4] S. M. Hörst, V. Vuitton, and R. V. Yelle, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E10006 (2008). [5] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle and J. Cui, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E05007 (2008). [6] R. V. Yelle, V. Vuitton, P. Lavvas, S. J. Klippenstein, M. A. Smith, S. M. Hörst and J. Cui, Faraday Discuss., 147, 31 (2010). [7] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle, S. J. Klippenstein and P. Lavvas, Astrophys. J., in press.

  18. Calligraphic Poling of Ferroelectric Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Adrey; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Calligraphic poling is a technique for generating an arbitrary, possibly complex pattern of localized reversal in the direction of permanent polarization in a wafer of LiNbO3 or other ferroelectric material. The technique is so named because it involves a writing process in which a sharp electrode tip is moved across a surface of the wafer to expose the wafer to a polarizing electric field in the desired pattern. The technique is implemented by use of an apparatus, denoted a calligraphic poling machine (CPM), that includes the electrode and other components as described in more detail below.

  19. Crustal Zircons from the Podiform Chromitites in Luobusa Ophiolite, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Komiya, T.; Maruyama, S.

    2004-12-01

    For the past decade, diamonds and unusual mineral asemblages were reported in podiform chromitites of the Luobusa ophiolite, southern Tibet, China (Bai 1993, Bai 2000, Yan 2001) by heavy mineral separation. These include (1) native elements, (2) alloys, (3) carbide, (4) platinium group elements (PGE) and arsenides, (5) silicates (6) oxide, (7) carbonates, (8) minerals with unusual compositons. Despite many questions as to these minerals above still remain open, these mineral inclusions would provide us the important infomation on the formation of the podiform chromitites. In this study, over 100 zircons were discovered by heavy mineral separation of podiform chromitite in Luobusa ophiolite. The discovery of accessory zircons in chromitites allowed us to date the formation of the chromitite and history of tectonic evolutions. Here we report the U-Pb age and mineral inclusions of zircons and discuss with unusually old age zircons. 20 zircon grains in chromitites from No. 1 site were analyzed. Zircons from the chromitites in Luobusa ophiolite are usually euhedral-subhedral and some are rounded. Cathodoluminescence images of these zircons indicate that some zircons have clear oscillatory zoning, whereas other zircons show apparent homogeneous overgrowth. U-Pb dating of these zircons by LA-ICP-MS yielded two different ages. One group has relatively younger age, 107-534Ma, which plots nearly on a concordia line. Another group has older age 1460-1822Ma, which plots off the concordia line. There is insignificant difference of apparent ages within a single zircon grain. For example, a zircon has 1650 Ma in the core, whereas does 1654 Ma in the rim. We identified several mineral inclusions, quartz, feldspar, mica, apatite, within both yonger and older zircons using laser-Raman spectrometry and EPMA. No high-pressure minerals or mantle minerals were identified. This means that these unusually old zircons were formed in low-pressure crustal emvironment. Where did the zircons

  20. Effect of ultraviolet light on fatigue of lead zirconate titanate thin-film capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Esayan, S.; Safari, A.; Ramesh, R.

    1994-07-01

    Fatigue of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) thin-film capacitors was studied under UV light (He-Cd laser, λ=325 nm). The remanent polarization of the PZT film capacitors increased upon light illumination. Fatigue resistance was also improved under UV light. During fatigue test, the change in polarization of PZT films upon UV light illumination increased gradually with cycling. These results were examined within the framework of the polarization screening model, which is suggested as an essential process for fatigue. This leads to a conclusion that more charged defects are involved in the fatigue process through internal screening of polarization.

  1. Processing Method for Creating Ultra-Thin Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Films Via Chemical Solution Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    n-propoxide and titanium isopropoxide , were measured with a graduated auto pipet and combined with 45 mL of 2-MOE in a 125 mL flask. The solution...nitrogen (N2). This anneal procedure was used to remove trapped hydrogen from the thin film. Following the anneal, a bi-layer of titanium (Ti) and...dioxide Ti titanium 10 NO. OF COPIES ORGANIZATION 1 ADMNSTR ELEC DEFNS TECHL INFO CTR ATTN DTIC OCP 8725 JOHN J KINGMAN RD STE

  2. Growth and properties of gradient free sol-gel lead zirconate titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calame, F.; Muralt, P.

    2007-02-01

    Pb(Zrx,Ti1-x)O3 thin films of homogeneous composition were synthesized by means of a modified sol-gel route on Pt(111)/TiOx/SiO2/Si substrates. The gradient in B-site composition as obtained by standard routes could be lowered, reducing Zr concentration fluctuations form ±12to±2.5at.%. The 2μm thick, dense and crack-free films exhibited a {100}-texture index of 98.4%. Grain diameters increased by 50%. Dielectric and piezoelectric properties were remarkably improved. The relative dielectric constant ɛ33,f was obtained as 1620, and the remanent transverse piezoelectric coefficient e31,f was measured as -17.7Cm2.

  3. Polarization recovery in lead zirconate titanate thin films deposited on nanosheets-buffered Si (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Anuj; Bayraktar, Muharrem; Nijland, Maarten; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Bijkerk, Fred; Rijnders, Guus

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue behavior of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) films is one of the deterrent factors that limits the use of these films in technological applications. Thus, understanding and minimization of the fatigue behavior is highly beneficial for fabricating reliable devices using PZT films. We have investigated the fatigue behavior of preferentially oriented PZT films deposited on nanosheets-buffered Si substrates using LaNiO3 bottom and top electrodes. The films show fatigue of up to 10% at 100 kHz, whereas no fatigue has been observed at 1 MHz. This frequency dependence of the fatigue behavior is found to be in accordance with Dawber-Scott fatigue model that explains the origin of the fatigue as migration of oxygen vacancies. Interestingly, a partial recovery of remnant polarization up to ˜97% of the maximum value is observed after 4×109 cycles which can be further extended to full recovery by increasing the applied electric field. This full recovery is qualitatively explained using kinetic approach as a manifestation of depinning of domains walls. The understanding of the fatigue behavior and polarization recovery that is explained in this paper can be highly useful in developing more reliable PZT devices.

  4. Accounting for the various contributions to pyroelectricity in lead zirconate titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrahan, B.; Espinal, Y.; Neville, C.; Rudy, R.; Rivas, M.; Smith, A.; Kesim, M. T.; Alpay, S. P.

    2018-03-01

    An understanding of the pyroelectric coefficient and particularly its relationship with the applied electric field is critical to predicting the device performance for infrared imaging, energy harvesting, and solid-state cooling devices. In this work, we compare direct measurements of the pyroelectric effect under pulsed heating to the indirect extraction of the pyroelectric coefficient from adiabatic hysteresis loops and predictions from Landau-Devonshire theory for PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT 52/48) on platinized silicon substrates. The differences between these measurements are explained through a series of careful measurements that quantify the magnitude and direction of the secondary and field-induced pyroelectric effects. The indirect measurement is shown to be up to 25% of the direct measurement at high fields, while the direct measurements and theoretical predictions converge at high fields as the film approaches a mono-domain state. These measurements highlight the importance of directly measuring the pyroelectric response in thin films, where non-intrinsic effects can be a significant proportion of the total observed pyroelectricity. Material and operating conditions are also discussed which could simultaneously maximize all contributions to pyroelectricity.

  5. Multiscale Simulations of Dynamics of Ferroelectric Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi

    Ferroelectrics with switchable polarization have many important technological applications, which heavily rely on the interactions between the polarization and external perturbations. Understanding the dynamical response of ferroelectric materials is crucial for the discovery and development of new design principles and engineering strategies for optimized and breakthrough applications of ferroelectrics. We developed a multiscale computational approach that combines methods at different length and time scales to elucidate the connection between local structures, domain dynamics, and macroscopic finite-temperature properties of ferroelectrics. We started from first-principles calculations of ferroelectrics to build a model interatomic potential, enabling large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The atomistic insights of nucleation and growth at the domain wall obtained from MD were then incorporated into a continuum model within the framework of Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory. This progressive theoretical framework allows for the first time an efficient and accurate estimation of macroscopic properties such as the coercive field for a broad range of ferroelectrics from first-principles. This multiscale approach has also been applied to explore the effect of dipolar defects on ferroelectric switching and to understand the origin of giant electro-strain coupling. ONR, NSF, Carnegie Institution for Science.

  6. Negative capacitance in multidomain ferroelectric superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, Pavlo; Wojdeł, Jacek C.; Hadjimichael, Marios; Fernandez-Pena, Stéphanie; Sené, Anaïs; Luk'Yanchuk, Igor; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    The stability of spontaneous electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is fundamental to many of their current applications, which range from the simple electric cigarette lighter to non-volatile random access memories. Research on nanoscale ferroelectrics reveals that their behaviour is profoundly different from that in bulk ferroelectrics, which could lead to new phenomena with potential for future devices. As ferroelectrics become thinner, maintaining a stable polarization becomes increasingly challenging. On the other hand, intentionally destabilizing this polarization can cause the effective electric permittivity of a ferroelectric to become negative, enabling it to behave as a negative capacitance when integrated in a heterostructure. Negative capacitance has been proposed as a way of overcoming fundamental limitations on the power consumption of field-effect transistors. However, experimental demonstrations of this phenomenon remain contentious. The prevalent interpretations based on homogeneous polarization models are difficult to reconcile with the expected strong tendency for domain formation, but the effect of domains on negative capacitance has received little attention. Here we report negative capacitance in a model system of multidomain ferroelectric-dielectric superlattices across a wide range of temperatures, in both the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases. Using a phenomenological model, we show that domain-wall motion not only gives rise to negative permittivity, but can also enhance, rather than limit, its temperature range. Our first-principles-based atomistic simulations provide detailed microscopic insight into the origin of this phenomenon, identifying the dominant contribution of near-interface layers and paving the way for its future exploitation.

  7. Hubble Observes Surface of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Scientists for the first time have made images of the surface of Saturn's giant, haze-shrouded moon, Titan. They mapped light and dark features over the surface of the satellite during nearly a complete 16-day rotation. One prominent bright area they discovered is a surface feature 2,500 miles across, about the size of the continent of Australia.

    Titan, larger than Mercury and slightly smaller than Mars, is the only body in the solar system, other than Earth, that may have oceans and rainfall on its surface, albeit oceans and rain of ethane-methane rather than water. Scientists suspect that Titan's present environment -- although colder than minus 289 degrees Fahrenheit, so cold that water ice would be as hard as granite -- might be similar to that on Earth billions of years ago, before life began pumping oxygen into the atmosphere.

    Peter H. Smith of the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory and his team took the images with the Hubble Space Telescope during 14 observing runs between Oct. 4 - 18. Smith announced the team's first results last week at the 26th annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society Division for Planetary Sciences in Bethesda, Md. Co-investigators on the team are Mark Lemmon, a doctoral candidate with the UA Lunar and Planetary Laboratory; John Caldwell of York University, Canada; Larry Sromovsky of the University of Wisconsin; and Michael Allison of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York City.

    Titan's atmosphere, about four times as dense as Earth's atmosphere, is primarily nitrogen laced with such poisonous substances as methane and ethane. This thick, orange, hydrocarbon haze was impenetrable to cameras aboard the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft that flew by the Saturn system in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The haze is formed as methane in the atmosphere is destroyed by sunlight. The hydrocarbons produced by this methane destruction form a smog similar to that found over large cities, but is much

  8. Titan's gas and plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Podolak, M.

    1983-01-01

    The implications of the Voyager observations for a steady state model of a torus of hydrogen and nitrogen neutral gas and plasma are assessed. Constraints are placed on the nitrogen neutral density, the neutral hydrogen and nitrogen escape fluxes (from Titan), and the diffusion rate in terms of observed or inferred quantities. The results obtained are consistent with the Voyager observations.

  9. Titan: Putting it all Together

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-01

    Three of Titan major surface features-dunes, craters and the enigmatic Xanadu-appear in this radar image from NASA Cassini spacecraft. The hazy bright area at the left that extends to the lower center of the image marks the northwest edge of Xanadu.

  10. GCM Simulations of Titan's Paleoclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, Juan M.; Lunine, Jonathan; Russell, Joellen; Hayes, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The hemispheric asymmetry observed in the distribution of Titan's lakes and seas has been suggested to be the result of asymmetric seasonal forcing, where a relative moistening of the north occurs in the current epoch due to its longer and less intense summers. General circulation models (GCMs) of present-day Titan have also shown that the atmosphere transports methane away from the equator. In this work, we use a Titan GCM to investigate the effects that changes in Titan's effective orbital parameters have had on its climate in recent geologic history. The simulations show that the climate is relatively insensitive to changes in orbital parameters, with persistently dry low latitudes and wet polar regions. The amount of surface methane that builds up over either pole depends on the insolation distribution, confirming the influence of orbital forcing on the distribution of surface liquids. The evolution of the orbital forcing implies that the surface reservoir must be transported on timescales of ~30 kyr, in which case the asymmetry reverses with a period of ~125 kyr. Otherwise, the orbital forcing is insufficient for generating the observed dichotomy.

  11. A Last Look at Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-15

    As it glanced around the Saturn system one final time, NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured this view of the planet's giant moon Titan. Interest in mysterious Titan was a major motivating factor to return to Saturn with Cassini-Huygens following the Voyager mission flybys of the early 1980s. Cassini and its Huygens probe, supplied by European Space Agency, revealed the moon to be every bit as fascinating as scientists had hoped. These views were obtained by Cassini's narrow-angle camera on Sept. 13, 2017. They are among the last images Cassini sent back to Earth. This natural color view, made from images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters, shows Titan much as Voyager saw it -- a mostly featureless golden orb, swathed in a dense atmospheric haze. An enhanced-color view (Figure 1) adds to this color a separate view taken using a spectral filter (centered at 938 nanometers) that can partially see through the haze. The views were acquired at a distance of 481,000 miles (774,000 kilometers) from Titan. The image scale is about 3 miles (5 kilometers) per pixel. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21890

  12. Organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory photochemical simulations and other types of chemical simulations are discussed. The chemistry of methane, which is the major known constituent of Titan's atmosphere was examined with stress on what can be learned from photochemistry and particle irradiation. The composition of dust that comprises the haze layer was determined. Isotope fractionation in planetary atmospheres is also discussed.

  13. The organic aerosols of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Arakawa, E. T.; Suits, F.; Calcott, T. A.; Williams, M. W.; Shrader, S.; Ogino, H.; Willingham, T. O.

    1986-01-01

    A dark reddish organic solid, called tholin, is synthesized from simulated Titanian atmospheres by irradiation with high energy electrons in a plasma discharge. The visible reflection spectrum of this tholin is found to be similar to that of high altitude aerosols responsible for the albedo and reddish color of Titan. The real (n) and imaginary (k) parts of the complex refractive index of thin films of Titan prepared by continuous dc discharge through a 0.9 N2/0.1 CH4 gas mixture at 0.2 mb is determined from X-ray to microwave frequencies. Values of n (approx. 1.65) and k (approx. 0.004 to 0.08) in the visible are consistent with deductions made by groundbased and spaceborne observations of Titan. Many infrared absorption features are present in k(lambda), including the 4.6 micrometer nitrile band. Molecular analysis of the volatile components of this tholin was performed by sequential and nonsequential pyrolytic gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. More than one hundred organic compounds are released; tentative identifications include saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, substituted polycylic aromatics, nitriles, amines, pyrroles, pyrazines, pyridines, pyrimidines, and the purine, adenine. In addition,acid hydrolysis produces a racemic mixture of biological and nonbiological amino acids. Many of these molecules are implicated in the origin of life on Earth, suggesting Titan as a contemporary laboratory environment for prebiological organic chemistry on a planetary scale.

  14. Titan Aeromony and Climate Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bézard, Bruno; Lavvas, Panayotis; Rannou, Pascal; Sotin, Christophe; Strobel, Darrell; West, Robert A.; Yelle, Roger

    2016-06-01

    The observations of the Cassini spacecraft since 2004 revealed that Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, has an active climate cycle with a cloud cover related to the large scale atmospheric circulation, lakes of methane and hyrdrocarbons with variable depth, a dried fluvial system witnessing a past wetter climate, dunes, and deep changes in the weather and atmospheric structure as Titan went through the North Spring equinox. Moreover, the upper atmosphere is now considered the cradle of complex chemistry leading to aerosol formation, as well as the manifestation place of atmospheric waves. However, as the Cassini mission comes to its end, many fundamental questions remain unresolved... The objective of the workshop is to bring together international experts from different fields of Titan's research in order to have an overview of the current understanding, and to determine the remaining salient scientific issues and the actions that could be implemented to address them. PhD students and post-doc researchers are welcomed to present their studies. This conference aims to be a brainstorming event leaving abundant time for discussion during oral and poster presentations. Main Topics: - Atmospheric seasonal cycles and coupling with dynamics. - Composition and photochemistry of the atmosphere. - Formation and evolution of aerosols and their role in the atmosphere. - Spectroscopy, optical properties, and radiative transfer modeling of the atmosphere. - Surface composition, liquid reservoirs and interaction with atmosphere. - Evolution of the atmosphere. - Titan after Cassini, open questions and the path forward.

  15. Towards multicaloric effect with ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Guangzu; Li, Qi; Bellaiche, Laurent; Scott, James F.; Dkhil, Brahim; Wang, Qing

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing thermal changes in solid-state materials strategically offers caloric-based alternatives to replace current vapor-compression technology. To make full use of multiple forms of the entropy and achieve higher efficiency for designs of cooling devices, the multicaloric effect appears as a cutting-edge concept encouraging researchers to search for multicaloric materials with outstanding caloric properties. Here we report the multicaloric effect in BaTi O3 single crystals driven simultaneously by mechanical and electric fields and described via a thermodynamic phenomenological model. It is found that the multicaloric behavior is mainly dominated by the mechanical field rather than the electric field, since the paraelectric-to-ferroelectric transition is more sensitive to mechanical field than to electric field. The use of uniaxial stress competes favorably with pressure due to its much higher caloric strength and negligible elastic thermal change. It is revealed that multicaloric response can be significantly larger than just the sum of mechanocaloric and electrocaloric effects in temperature regions far above the Curie temperature but cannot exceed this limit near the Curie temperature. Our results also show the advantage of the multicaloric effect over the mechanically mediated electrocaloric effect or electrically mediated mechanocaloric effect. Our findings therefore highlight the importance of ferroelectric materials to develop multicaloric cooling.

  16. Implementation of Ferroelectric Memories for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpy, Stephen C.; Derbenwick, Gary F.; Kamp, David A.; Isaacson, Alan F.

    2000-01-01

    Ferroelectric random access semiconductor memories (FeRAMs) are an ideal nonvolatile solution for space applications. These memories have low power performance, high endurance and fast write times. By combining commercial ferroelectric memory technology with radiation hardened CMOS technology, nonvolatile semiconductor memories for space applications can be attained. Of the few radiation hardened semiconductor manufacturers, none have embraced the development of radiation hardened FeRAMs, due a limited commercial space market and funding limitations. Government funding may be necessary to assure the development of radiation hardened ferroelectric memories for space applications.

  17. Ferroelectric ceramics in a pyroelectric accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shchagin, A. V., E-mail: shchagin@kipt.kharkov.ua; Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015; Miroshnik, V. S.

    2015-12-07

    The applicability of polarized ferroelectric ceramics as a pyroelectric in a pyroelectric accelerator is shown by experiments. The spectra of X-ray radiation of energy up to tens of keV, generated by accelerated electrons, have been measured on heating and cooling of the ceramics in vacuum. It is suggested that curved layers of polarized ferroelectric ceramics be used as elements of ceramic pyroelectric accelerators. Besides, nanotubes and nanowires manufactured from ferroelectric ceramics are proposed for the use in nanometer-scale ceramic pyroelectric nanoaccelerators for future applications in nanotechnologies.

  18. Static Characteristics of the Ferroelectric Transistor Inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Cody; Laws, crystal; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    The inverter is one of the most fundamental building blocks of digital logic, and it can be used as the foundation for understanding more complex logic gates and circuits. This paper presents the characteristics of an inverter circuit using a ferroelectric field-effect transistor. The voltage transfer characteristics are analyzed with respect to varying parameters such as supply voltage, input voltage, and load resistance. The effects of the ferroelectric layer between the gate and semiconductor are examined, and comparisons are made between the inverters using ferroelectric transistors and those using traditional MOSFETs.

  19. Solitons in thin-film ferroelectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudoue Hubert, Malwe; Justin, Mibaile; Kudryashov, Nikolai A.; Betchewe, Gambo; Douvagai; Doka, Serge Y.

    2018-07-01

    Through the Landau–Ginzburg–Devonshire mean field theory, the equation governing the behavior of the polarization field in ferroelectric material is derived. Ferroelectric material is subjected to a standing electric field which inhibits remanent polarization and facilitates the access to the instantaneous polarization. Some transformations turn the equation into a well-known ordinary differential equation. As a result, dark soliton and cnoidal waves, which have not yet been observed in ferroelectrics, are obtained. Also, a bright soliton is found. It exists in a given range of temperatures and has an amplitude and a width which vary inversely with temperature.

  20. General Nonlinear Ferroelectric Model v. Beta

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Wen; Robbins, Josh

    2017-03-14

    The purpose of this software is to function as a generalized ferroelectric material model. The material model is designed to work with existing finite element packages by providing updated information on material properties that are nonlinear and dependent on loading history. The two major nonlinear phenomena this model captures are domain-switching and phase transformation. The software itself does not contain potentially sensitive material information and instead provides a framework for different physical phenomena observed within ferroelectric materials. The model is calibrated to a specific ferroelectric material through input parameters provided by the user.

  1. Fabrication and modeling of bismuth titanate-PZT ceramic transducers for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, B.; Searfass, C.; Cyphers, R.; Sinding, K.; Pheil, C.; Tittmann, B.

    2013-01-01

    Utilization of a spray-on deposition technique of ferroelectric bismuth titanate (Bi4Ti3O12) composites has a competitive advantage to standard ultrasonic transducers. These can conform to curved surfaces, can operate at high temperature (Curie-Weiss temperature 685 °C) and are mechanically well-coupled to a substrate. However, an issue with many high temperature transducers such as bismuth titanate ceramics is that they have relatively low transduction efficiency, i.e. d33 is about 12-14 pC/F in Bi4Ti3O12 versus 650 pC/F in PZT-5H. It is a common conception that high-temperature capability comes at the cost of electro-mechanical coupling. It will be shown that the high temperature capability of bismuth-titanate-PZT composite transducers using the spray-on deposition technique previously developed, improves the electro-mechanical coupling while maintaining the high temperature performance and mechanical coupling. This material could provide advantages in harsh environments where high signal-to-noise ratios are needed.

  2. Temperate Lakes Discovered on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Wilson, Paul

    2012-04-01

    We have discovered two temperate lakes on Titan using Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Three key features help to identify these surface features as lakes: morphology, albedo, and specular reflection. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes mean liquid can accumulate and remain stable outside of the poles. We first identify a lake surface by looking for possible shorelines with a lacustrine morphology. Then, we apply a simple atmospheric correction that produces an approximate surface albedo. Next, we prepare cylindrical projection maps of the brightness of the sky as seen from any points on the surface to identify specular reflections. Our techniques can then be applied to other areas, such as Arrakis Planitia, to test for liquid. Currently, all the known lakes on Titan are concentrated at the poles. Lakes have been suggested in the tropic zone by Griffith et al. Our discovery of non-transient, temperate lakes has important implications for Titan's hydrologic cycle. Clouds have been recorded accumulating in the mid-latitudes and areas have been darkened by rainfall but later brightened after evaporation (Turtle et al. 2011). Stable temperate lakes would affect total rainfall, liquid accumulation, evaporation rates, and infiltration. Polaznik Macula (Figure 1) is a great candidate for lake filling, evaporation rates, and stability. References: Griffith, C., et al.: "Evidence for Lakes on Titan's Tropical Surface". AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts #42, Vol. 42, pp. 1077, 2010. Turtle, E. P., et al.: "Rapid and Extensive Surface Changes Near Titan's Equator: Evidence of April Showers". Science, Vol. 331, pp. 1414-, 2011. Figure 1: Polaznik Macula is the large, dark area central to the figure. The encircled dark blue areas represent positively identified lake regions in the T66 flyby. The light blue areas represent lake candidates still under analysis. The green circle marks a non-lake surface feature enclosed by a

  3. Bismuth Titanate Fabricated by Spray-on Deposition and Microwave Sintering For High-Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Searfass, Clifford T; Pheil, C; Sinding, K; Tittmann, B R; Baba, A; Agrawal, D K

    2016-01-01

    Thick films of ferroelectric bismuth titanate (Bi4Ti3O12) have been fabricated by spray-on deposition in conjunction with microwave sintering for use as high-temperature ultrasonic transducers. The elastic modulus, density, permittivity, and conductivity of the films were characterized. Electro-mechanical properties of the films were estimated with a commercial d33 meter which gave 16 pC/N. This value is higher than typically reported for bulk bismuth titanate; however, these films withstand higher field strengths during poling which is correlated with higher d33 values. Films were capable of operating at 650 °C for roughly 5 min before depoling and can operate at 600 °C for at least 7 days.

  4. Cavity resonator for dielectric measurements of high-ɛ, low loss materials, demonstrated with barium strontium zirconium titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marksteiner, Quinn R.; Treiman, Michael B.; Chen, Ching-Fong; Haynes, William B.; Reiten, M. T.; Dalmas, Dale; Pulliam, Elias

    2017-06-01

    A resonant cavity method is presented which can measure loss tangents and dielectric constants for materials with dielectric constant from 150 to 10 000 and above. This practical and accurate technique is demonstrated by measuring barium strontium zirconium titanate bulk ferroelectric ceramic blocks. Above the Curie temperature, in the paraelectric state, barium strontium zirconium titanate has a sufficiently low loss that a series of resonant modes are supported in the cavity. At each mode frequency, the dielectric constant and loss tangent are obtained. The results are consistent with low frequency measurements and computer simulations. A quick method of analyzing the raw data using the 2D static electromagnetic modeling code SuperFish and an estimate of uncertainties are presented.

  5. Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2011-03-30

    Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emissionmore » of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.« less

  6. Spontaneous vortex nanodomain arrays at ferroelectric heterointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher T; Winchester, Benjamin; Zhang, Yi; Kim, Sung-Joo; Melville, Alexander; Adamo, Carolina; Folkman, Chad M; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Eom, Chang-Beom; Schlom, Darrell G; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2011-02-09

    The polarization of the ferroelectric BiFeO(3) sub-jected to different electrical boundary conditions by heterointerfaces is imaged with atomic resolution using a spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. Unusual triangular-shaped nanodomains are seen, and their role in providing polarization closure is understood through phase-field simulations. Heterointerfaces are key to the performance of ferroelectric devices, and this first observation of spontaneous vortex nanodomain arrays at ferroelectric heterointerfaces reveals properties unlike the surrounding film including mixed Ising-Néel domain walls, which will affect switching behavior, and a drastic increase of in-plane polarization. The importance of magnetization closure has long been appreciated in multidomain ferromagnetic systems; imaging this analogous effect with atomic resolution at ferroelectric heterointerfaces provides the ability to see device-relevant interface issues. Extension of this technique to visualize domain dynamics is envisioned.

  7. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-02-01

    The tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valued non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing.

  8. Negative capacitance in a ferroelectric capacitor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asif Islam; Chatterjee, Korok; Wang, Brian; Drapcho, Steven; You, Long; Serrao, Claudy; Bakaul, Saidur Rahman; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2015-02-01

    The Boltzmann distribution of electrons poses a fundamental barrier to lowering energy dissipation in conventional electronics, often termed as Boltzmann Tyranny. Negative capacitance in ferroelectric materials, which stems from the stored energy of a phase transition, could provide a solution, but a direct measurement of negative capacitance has so far been elusive. Here, we report the observation of negative capacitance in a thin, epitaxial ferroelectric film. When a voltage pulse is applied, the voltage across the ferroelectric capacitor is found to be decreasing with time--in exactly the opposite direction to which voltage for a regular capacitor should change. Analysis of this 'inductance'-like behaviour from a capacitor presents an unprecedented insight into the intrinsic energy profile of the ferroelectric material and could pave the way for completely new applications.

  9. Solution-Processed Flexible Organic Ferroelectric Phototransistor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Hanlin; Jiang, Lang; Zhen, Yonggang; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2017-12-20

    In this article, we demonstrate ferroelectric insulator, P(VDF-TrFE), can be integrated with red light sensitive polymeric semiconductor, P(DPP-TzBT), toward ferroelectric organic phototransistors (OPTs). This ferroelectricity-modulated phototransistor possesses different nonvolatile and tunable dark current states due to P(VDF-TrFE)'s remnant polarization. As a result, the OPT is endowed with a tunable dark current level ranging from 1 nA to 100 nA. Once the OPT is programmed or electrically polarized, its photo-to-dark (signal-to-noise) ratio can be "flexible" during photodetection process, without gate bias application. This kind of organic ferroelectric phototransistor has great potential in detecting wide ranges of light signals with good linearity. Moreover, its tuning mechanism discussed in this work can be helpful to understand the operation mechanism of organic phototransistor (OPT). It can be promising for novel photodetection application in plastic electronic devices.

  10. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    DOE PAGES

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-02-08

    Here, the tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valuedmore » non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing.« less

  11. Ferroelectric memory evaluation and development system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondurant, David W.

    Attention is given to the Ramtron FEDS-1, an IBM PC/AT compatible single-board 16-b microcomputer with 8-kbyte program/data memory implemented with nonvolatile ferroelectric dynamic RAM. This is the first demonstration of a new type of solid state nonvolatile read/write memory, the ferroelectric RAM (FRAM). It is suggested that this memory technology will have a significant impact on avionics system performance and reliability.

  12. Nitrogen Chemistry in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    In Titan's upper atmosphere N2 is dissociated to N by solar UV and high energy electrons. This flux of N provides for interesting organic chemistry in the lower atmosphere of Titan. Previously the main pathway for the loss of this N was thought to be the formation of HCN, followed by diffusion of this HCN to lower altitudes leading ultimately to condensation. However, recent laboratory simulations of organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere suggest that formation of the organic haze may be an important sink for atmospheric N. Because estimates of the eddy diffusion profile on Titan have been based on the HCN profile, inclusion of this additional sink for N will affect estimates for all transport processes in Titan's atmosphere. This and other implications of this sink for the N balance on Titan are considered.

  13. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface’s magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. In this paper, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZr 0.2Ti 0.8O 3/La 0.8Sr 0.2MnO 3(PZT/LSMO)] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deterioratedmore » and such magnetic deterioration can be greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0μ B/f.u., a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. Finally, these compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.« less

  14. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria; ...

    2016-11-21

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface’s magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. In this paper, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZr 0.2Ti 0.8O 3/La 0.8Sr 0.2MnO 3(PZT/LSMO)] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deterioratedmore » and such magnetic deterioration can be greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0μ B/f.u., a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. Finally, these compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.« less

  15. Three perimeter effects in ferroelectric nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruediger, Andreas; Peter, Frank; Waser, Rainer

    2006-03-01

    As the lateral size of ferroelectric nanoislands is now well below 50 nm, the question of size effects becomes increasingly relevant. Three independent techniques provided data of pronounced ferroelectric features along the perimeter: impedance spectroscopy [1], piezoelectric force microscopy [2] and pyroelectric current sensing [3]. However, as we can show, all three observations are related to the measurement technique that interferes with the lateral confinement and still there is no direct evidence of a lateral size effect in ferroelectric nanostructures. We discuss some scenarios of further downscaling and possible consequences. [1]M.Dawber, D.J. Jung, J.F. Scott, “Perimeter effect in very small ferroelectrics“,Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 436 (2003) [2 ]F. Peter, A. Ruediger, R. Dittmann, R. Waser, K. Szot, B. Reichenberg, K. Prume, “Analysis of shape effects on the piezoresponse in ferroelectric nanograins with and without adsorbates”, Applied Physics Letters, 87, 082901 (2005) [3] B.W. Peterson, S. Ducharme, V.M. Fridkin, “Mapping surface Polarization in thin films of the ferroelectric polymer P(VDF-TrFE)”,Ferroelectrics, 304, 51 (2004)

  16. Amino acidis derived from Titan tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Sagan, Carl; Ogino, Hiroshi; Nagy, Bartholomew; Er, Cevat

    1986-01-01

    The production of amino acids by acid treatment of Titan tholin is experimentally investigated. The synthesis of Titan tholin and the derivatization of amino acids to N-trifluoroacetyl isopropyl esters are described. The gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis of the Titan tholins reveals the presence of glycine, alpha and beta alainine, and aspartic acid, and the total yield of amino acids is about 0.01.

  17. Role of zircon in tracing crustal growth and recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compston, W.; Williams, I. S.; Armstrong, R. A.; Claoue-Long, J. C.; Kinny, P. D.; Foster, J. J.; Kroener, A.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Myers, J. S.

    Single crystal ion probe ages of zircons is discussed, which allow much better time resolution compared to other geochronological methods, although the technique is not without problems. Rocks from two areas that contain composite zircon populations, including true magmatic zircons as well as a variety of xenocrystic types are described. It is often difficult to distinguish these; xenocrystic zircons, for example, cannot always be identified on the basis of morphology alone. Additional evidence is needed before making age interpretations. Evidence is also presented of zircon growth long after the original time of crystallization, in some cases apparently at temperatures less than 300 C. The spectacular discovery of 4.1 to 4.2 Ga detrital zircons in metaquartzites from the Mount Narryer area of Western Australia is described. Similar zircons with ages as old as 4276 Ma have been found in the nearby Jack Hills area. The source areas or parent lithologies of these zircons have not yet been determined, but the author expects that they may be unrecognized or buried antecedents of the K rich Narryer gneisses. U or Th concentrations of zircon cannot be used to discriminate between felsic and mafic source rocks.

  18. Oxygen isotopic composition and U-Pb discordance in zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, A.L.; Kolodny, Y.; Chamberlain, C.P.; McWilliams, M.; Schmitt, A.K.; Wooden, J.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated U-Pb discordance and oxygen isotopic composition of zircon using high-spatial resolution ??18O measurement by ion microprobe. ??18O in both concordant and discordant zircon grains provides an indication of the relationship between fluid interaction and discordance. Our results suggest that three characteristics of zircon are interrelated: (1) U-Pb systematics and concomitant age discordance, (2) ??18O and the water-rock interactions implied therein, and (3) zircon texture, as revealed by cathodoluminescence and BSE imaging. A key observation is that U-Pb-disturbed zircons are often also variably depleted in 18O, but the relationship between discordance and ??18O is not systematic. ??18O values of discordant zircons are generally lighter but irregular in their distribution. Textural differences between zircon grains can be correlated with both U-Pb discordance and ??18O. Discordant grains exhibit either a recrystallized, fractured, or strongly zoned CL texture, and are characteristic of 18O depletion. We interpret this to be a result of metamictization, leading to destruction of the zircon lattice and an increased susceptibility to lead loss. Conversely, grains that are concordant have less-expressed zoning and a smoother CL texture and are enriched in 18O. From this it is apparent that various stages of water-rock interaction, as evidenced by systematic variations in ??18O, leave their imprint on both the texture and U-Pb systematics of zircon. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Role of zircon in tracing crustal growth and recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compston, W.; Williams, I. S.; Armstrong, R. A.; Claoue-Long, J. C.; Kinny, P. D.; Foster, J. J.; Kroener, A.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Myers, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystal ion probe ages of zircons is discussed, which allow much better time resolution compared to other geochronological methods, although the technique is not without problems. Rocks from two areas that contain composite zircon populations, including true magmatic zircons as well as a variety of xenocrystic types are described. It is often difficult to distinguish these; xenocrystic zircons, for example, cannot always be identified on the basis of morphology alone. Additional evidence is needed before making age interpretations. Evidence is also presented of zircon growth long after the original time of crystallization, in some cases apparently at temperatures less than 300 C. The spectacular discovery of 4.1 to 4.2 Ga detrital zircons in metaquartzites from the Mount Narryer area of Western Australia is described. Similar zircons with ages as old as 4276 Ma have been found in the nearby Jack Hills area. The source areas or parent lithologies of these zircons have not yet been determined, but the author expects that they may be unrecognized or buried antecedents of the K rich Narryer gneisses. U or Th concentrations of zircon cannot be used to discriminate between felsic and mafic source rocks.

  20. Annealing effects on cathodoluminescence of zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Nishido, H.; Noumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    U-Pb zircon dating (e. g., SHRIMP) is an important tool to interpret a history of the minerals at a micrometer-scale, where cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging allows us to recognize internal zones and domains with different chemical compositions and structural disorder at high spatial resolution. The CL of zircon is attributed by various types of emission centers, which are extrinsic ones such as REE impurities and intrinsic ones such as structural defects. Metamictization resulted from radiation damage to the lattice by alpha particles from the decay of U and Th mostly causes an effect on the CL features of zircon as a defect center. However, slightly radiation-damaged zircon, which is almost nondetectable by XRD, has not been characterized using CL method. In this study, annealing effects on CL of zircon has been investigated to clarify a recovery process of the damaged lattice at low radiation dose. A single crystal of zircon from Malawi was selected for CL measurements. It contains HfO2: 2.30 w.t %, U: 241 ppm and Th: 177 ppm. Two plate samples perpendicular to c and a axes were prepared for annealing experiments during 12 hours from room temperature to 1400 degree C. Color CL images were captured using a cold-cathode microscope (Luminoscope: Nuclide ELM-3R). CL spectral measurements were conducted using an SEM (JEOL: JSM-5410) combined with a grating monochromator (Oxford: Mono CL2) to measure CL spectra ranging from 300 to 800 nm in 1 nm steps with a temperature controlled stage. The dispersed CL was collected by a photoncounting method using a photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu: R2228) and converted to digital data. All CL spectra were corrected for the total instrumental response. Spectral analysis reveals an anisotropy of the CL emission bands related to intrinsic defect center in blue region, radiation-induced defect center from 500 to 700 nm, and trivalent Dy impurity center at 480 and 580 nm, but their relative intensities are almost constant. CL on the

  1. Ferroelectric thin-film capacitors and piezoelectric switches for mobile communication applications.

    PubMed

    Klee, Mareike; van Esch, Harry; Keur, Wilco; Kumar, Biju; van Leuken-Peters, Linda; Liu, Jin; Mauczok, Rüdiger; Neumann, Kai; Reimann, Klaus; Renders, Christel; Roest, Aarnoud L; Tiggelman, Mark P J; de Wild, Marco; Wunnicke, Olaf; Zhao, Jing

    2009-08-01

    Thin-film ferroelectric capacitors have been integrated with resistors and active functions such as ESD protection into small, miniaturized modules, which enable a board space saving of up to 80%. With the optimum materials and processes, integrated capacitors with capacitance densities of up to 100 nF/mm2 for stacked capacitors combined with breakdown voltages of 90 V have been achieved. The integration of these high-density capacitors with extremely high breakdown voltage is a major accomplishment in the world of passive components and has not yet been reported for any other passive integration technology. Furthermore, thin-film tunable capacitors based on barium strontium titanate with high tuning range and high quality factor at 1 GHz have been demonstrated. Finally, piezoelectric thin films for piezoelectric switches with high switching speed have been realized.

  2. Fe modified BaTiO{sub 3}: Influence of doping on ferroelectric property

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Bisen, Supriya, E-mail: sbisen.sop@gmail.com; Jarabana, Kanaka Mahalakshmi

    2015-06-24

    We have investigate the ferroelectric property of Fe modified Barium Titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) with possible tetragonal structure via solid state route was prepared. Modified sample of BaTi{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0.01, 0.02) were structural characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) using a Bruker D8 Advance XRD instruments, the value of 2θ is in between 20° to 80°. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) using a Bruker, vertex instruments has been performs to obtain Ti-O bonding in the modified sample; the region of wavenumber is from 4000 cm{sup −1} to 400 cm{sup −1}. P-E hysteresis loop measurements have been traced for different applied voltage- 100V,more » 300V and 500V.« less

  3. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; ...

    2016-05-31

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphologicalmore » roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. Finally, this demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale.« less

  4. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    PubMed Central

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphological roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. This demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale. PMID:27240997

  5. The Global Energy Balance of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Liming; Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Smith, Mark A.; Gorius, Nicolas J. P.; Jiang, Xun; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Flasar, F. Michael; hide

    2011-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the global emitted power of Titan. Longterm (2004-2010) observations conducted by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard Cassini reveal that the total emitted power by Titan is (2.84 plus or minus 0.01) x 10(exp 8) watts. Together with previous measurements of the global absorbed solar power of Titan, the CIRS measurements indicate that the global energy budget of Titan is in equilibrium within measurement error. The uncertainty in the absorbed solar energy places an upper limit on the energy imbalance of 5.3%.

  6. The bulk composition of Titan's atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of the physical constraints for Titan's atmosphere leads to a model which describes the bulk composition of the atmosphere in terms of observable parameters. Intermediate-resolution photometric scans of both Saturn and Titan, including scans of the Q branch of Titan's methane band, constrain these parameters in such a way that the model indicates the presence of another important atmospheric gas, namely, another bulk constituent or a significant thermal opacity. Further progress in determining the composition and state of Titan's atmosphere requires additional observations to eliminate present ambiguities. For this purpose, particular observational targets are suggested.

  7. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S. G.; Chen, X.; Levard, T.; Diglio, P. J.; Gorny, L. J.; Rahn, C. D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-06-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly.

  8. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Lu, S G; Chen, X; Levard, T; Diglio, P J; Gorny, L J; Rahn, C D; Zhang, Q M

    2015-06-16

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly.

  9. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays

    PubMed Central

    Lu, S. G.; Chen, X.; Levard, T.; Diglio, P. J.; Gorny, L. J.; Rahn, C. D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly. PMID:26079628

  10. Fatigue in artificially layered Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ferroelectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, A. Q.; Scott, J. F.; Dawber, M.; Wang, C.

    2002-12-01

    We have performed fatigue tests on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) multilayers having stacks of Pb(Zr0.8Ti0.2)O3/Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 with repeated distances of 12 formula groups. The results are compared with single-layer n-type (0.5 at. % Ta-doped) PZT films. We conclude that fatigue is dominated by space-charge layers in each case, but that in the multilayer such space charge accumulates at the layer interfaces, rather than at the electrode-dielectric interface. The model, which includes both drift and diffusion, is quantitative and yields a rate-limiting mobility of 6.9±0.9×10-12 cm2/V s, in excellent agreement with the oxygen vacancy mobility for perovskite oxides obtained from Zafar et al.

  11. Titan's geoid and hydrology: implications for Titan's geological evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Seignovert, Benoit; Lawrence, Kenneth; MacKenzie, Shannon; Barnes, Jason; Brown, Robert

    2014-05-01

    A 1x1 degree altitude map of Titan is constructed from the degree 4 gravity potential [1] and Titan's shape [2] determined by the Radio Science measurements and RADAR observations of the Cassini mission. The amplitude of the latitudinal altitude variations is equal to 300 m compared to 600 m for the amplitude of the latitudinal shape variations. The two polar caps form marked depressions with an abrupt change in topography at exactly 60 degrees at both caps. Three models are envisaged to explain the low altitude of the polar caps: (i) thinner ice crust due to higher heat flux at the poles, (ii) fossil shape acquired if Titan had higher spin rate in the past, and (iii) subsidence of the crust following the formation of a denser layer of clathrates as ethane rain reacts with the H2O ice crust [3]. The later model is favored because of the strong correlation between the location of the cloud system during the winter season and the latitude of the abrupt change in altitude. Low altitude polar caps would be the place where liquids would run to and eventually form large seas. Indeed, the large seas of Titan are found at the deepest locations at the North Pole. However, the lakes and terrains considered to be evaporite candidates due to their spectral characteristics in the infrared [4,5] seem to be perched. Lakes may have been filled during Titan's winter and then slowly evaporated leaving material on the surface. Interestingly, the largest evaporite deposits are located at the equator in a deep depression 150 m below the altitude of the northern seas. This observation seems to rule out the presence of a global subsurface hydrocarbon reservoir unless the evaporation rate at the equator is faster than the transport of fluids from the North Pole to the equator. This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. [1] Iess L. et al. (2012) Science, doi 10.1126/science.1219631. [2] Lorenz R.D. (2013

  12. Cassini Imaging Results at Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, A.; Turtle, E.; Perry J.; Fussner, S.; Porco, C.; West, R.; Johnson, T.; Collins, G.; DelGenio, T.; Barbara, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images show striking albedo markings on the surface of Titan. In equatorial regions the albedo patterns have high contrast and exhibit prominent lineaments and linear/angular boundaries suggestive of tectonic influences or fracturing of brittle surficial materials. There are intriguing dark curving lines near the south pole. Here we present several working hypotheses to explain these patterns. We also briefly summarize atmospheric science results.

  13. Cassini's Final Titan Radar Swath

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-11

    During its final targeted flyby of Titan on April 22, 2017, Cassini's radar mapper got the mission's last close look at the moon's surface. On this 127th targeted pass by Titan (unintuitively named "T-126"), the radar was used to take two images of the surface, shown at left and right. Both images are about 200 miles (300 kilometers) in width, from top to bottom. Objects appear bright when they are tilted toward the spacecraft or have rough surfaces; smooth areas appear dark. At left are the same bright, hilly terrains and darker plains that Cassini imaged during its first radar pass of Titan, in 2004. Scientists do not see obvious evidence of changes in this terrain over the 13 years since the original observation. At right, the radar looked once more for Titan's mysterious "magic island" (PIA20021) in a portion of one of the large hydrocarbon seas, Ligeia Mare. No "island" feature was observed during this pass. Scientists continue to work on what the transient feature might have been, with waves and bubbles being two possibilities. In between the two parts of its imaging observation, the radar instrument switched to altimetry mode, in order to make a first-ever (and last-ever) measurement of the depths of some of the lakes that dot the north polar region. For the measurements, the spacecraft pointed its antenna straight down at the surface and the radar measured the time delay between echoes from the lakes' surface and bottom. A graph is available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21626

  14. The Xanadu Annex on Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-07

    This synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) image was obtained by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on July 25, 2016, during its "T-121" pass over Titan's southern latitudes. The image shows an area nicknamed the "Xanadu annex" by members of the Cassini radar team, earlier in the mission. This area had not been imaged by until now, but measurements of its brightness temperature from Cassini's microwave radiometer were quite similar to that of the large region on Titan named Xanadu (see PIA20713), which lies just to the north. Cassini's radiometer is essentially a very sensitive thermometer, and brightness temperature is a measure of the intensity of microwave radiation received from a feature by the instrument. Radar team members predicted at the time that, if this area were ever imaged, it would be similar in appearance to Xanadu. That earlier hunch appears to have been borne out, as features in this scene bear a strong similarity to the mountainous terrains Cassini's radar has imaged in Xanadu. Xanadu -- and now perhaps its annex -- remains something of a mystery. First imaged in 1994 by the Hubble Space Telescope (just three years before Cassini's launch from Earth), Xanadu was the first surface feature to be recognized on Titan. Once thought to be a raised plateau, the region is now understood to be slightly tilted, but not higher than, the darker surrounding regions. It blocks the formation of sand dunes, which otherwise extend all the way around Titan at its equator. The area shown here is illuminated by the radar from the bottom at a 30-degree incidence angle. It measures about 155 by 310 miles (250 by 500 kilometers) and is centered at about 30 degrees south latitude, 60 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20712

  15. Properties of barium strontium titanate at millimeter wave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Nurul; Free, Charles

    2015-04-24

    The trend towards using higher millimetre-wave frequencies for communication systems has created a need for accurate characterization of materials to be used at these frequencies. Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) is a ferroelectric material whose permittivity is known to change as a function of applied electric field and have found varieties of application in electronic and communication field. In this work, new data on the properties of BST characterize using the free space technique at frequencies between 145 GHz and 155 GHz for both thick film and bulk samples are presented. The measurement data provided useful information on effective permittivity and loss tangentmore » for all the BST samples. Data on the material transmission, reflection properties as well as loss will also be presented. The outcome of the work shows through practical measurement, that BST has a high permittivity with moderate losses and the results also shows that BST has suitable properties to be used as RAM for high frequency application.« less

  16. Electronic and structural reconstruction in titanate heterostructures from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Andrew T.; Fennie, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in transition metal oxide heterostructures have opened new routes to create materials with novel functionalities and properties. One direction has been to combine a Mott insulating perovskite with an electronic d1 configuration, such as LaTiO3, with a band insulating d0 perovskite, such as SrTiO3. An exciting recent development is the demonstration of interfacial conductivity in GdTiO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures that display a complex structural motif of octahedral rotations and ferromagnetic properties similar to bulk GdTiO3. In this talk we present our first principles investigation of the interplay of structural, electronic, magnetic, and orbital degrees of freedom for a wide range of d1/d0 titanate heterostructures. We find evidence for both rotation driven ferroelectricity and a symmetry breaking electronic reconstruction with a concomitant structural distortion at the interface. We argue that these materials represent an ideal platform to realize novel functionalities such as the electric field control of electronic and magnetic properties.

  17. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Fatin Adila, E-mail: fatinadilaismail@gmail.com; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat, E-mail: rozana@unimap.edu.my; Frontier Materials Research, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis

    2016-07-19

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO{sub 3} (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO{sub 3} downshifted the Curie temperature (T{sub C}). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, T{sub C} where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-dopedmore » BaTiO{sub 3}, Er-doped BaTiO{sub 3}, Sm-doped BaTiO{sub 3}, Nd-doped BaTiO{sub 3} and Ce-doped BaTiO{sub 3} had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as T{sub C} also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO{sub 3} except for Er-doped BaTiO{sub 3}.« less

  18. Testing the reliability of information extracted from ancient zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielman, Ross; Whitehouse, Martin; Nemchin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Studies combining zircon U-Pb chronology, trace element distribution as well as O and Hf isotope systematics are a powerful way to gain understanding of the processes shaping Earth's evolution, especially in detrital populations where constraints from the original host are missing. Such studies of the Hadean detrital zircon population abundant in sedimentary rocks in Western Australia have involved analysis of an unusually large number of individual grains, but also highlighted potential problems with the approach, only apparent when multiple analyses are obtained from individual grains. A common feature of the Hadean as well as many early Archaean zircon populations is their apparent inhomogeneity, which reduces confidence in conclusions based on studies combining chemistry and isotopic characteristics of zircon. In order to test the reliability of information extracted from early Earth zircon, we report results from one of the first in-depth multi-method study of zircon from a relatively simple early Archean magmatic rock, used as an analogue to ancient detrital zircon. The approach involves making multiple SIMS analyses in individual grains in order to be comparable to the most advanced studies of detrital zircon populations. The investigated sample is a relatively undeformed, non-migmatitic ca. 3.8 Ga tonalite collected a few kms south of the Isua Greenstone Belt, southwest Greenland. Extracted zircon grains can be combined into three different groups based on the behavior of their U-Pb systems: (i) grains that show internally consistent and concordant ages and define an average age of 3805±15 Ma, taken to be the age of the rock, (ii) grains that are distributed close to the concordia line, but with significant variability between multiple analyses, suggesting an ancient Pb loss and (iii) grains that have multiple analyses distributed along a discordia pointing towards a zero intercept, indicating geologically recent Pb-loss. This overall behavior has

  19. (De)coupled zircon metamictization, radiation damage, and He diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. K.; Guenthner, W.; Reiners, P. W.; Moser, A. C.; Miller, G. H.; Refsnider, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    We develop and apply a new protocol for targeting crystals for the zircon (U-Th)/He (He) thermochronometry to maximize effective U (eU) and corresponding closure temperature variability to develop zircon He date-eU correlations observed in some datasets. Our approach exploits visual proxies for radiation damage accumulation (metamictization) during zircon selection. We show that by purposefully targeting a spectrum of zircon textures from pristine to metamict grains, it is possible to generate broad eU variation in suites of zircon from a single sample and zircon He date-eU-metamictization trends that can be exploited to resolve increasingly complex thermal histories. We present plane light photographs, eU concentration, and zircon He results from 59 individual zircons from nine crystalline rock samples. Six of the nine samples come from exposed Proterozoic granitoids on SE Baffin Island, Canada; Boulder Creek, CO; Sandia Mountains, NM; and Mecca Hills, CA. We report data from three Archean Baffin samples to compare with the Proterozoic Baffin sample date-eU-metamictization trend. In each Proterozoic sample, target zircons display a spectrum of metamictization from pristine, transparent crystals to purple-brown, translucent grains. Progressive loss of transparency and increase in discoloration consistently corresponds to an increase in eU in all samples. Individual zircon eU varies from 89-1885 ppm and, within each sample, the total eU spread is 538 ppm to 1374 ppm. For any given eU value, the Archean zircon appear comparatively more metamict than the Proterozoic Baffin grains and samples collectively define a 1681 ppm range in eU, with more restrictive intrasample eU spreads (199-1120 ppm). Proterozoic samples from Baffin, Sandia, and Front Range yield negative zircon He date-eU correlations with intrasample date ranges of 90-783 Ma. Increasing eU and younger dates correspond with increasing metamictization. In contrast, all three Proterozoic Mecca Hills samples

  20. Study of the structure and ferroelectric behavior of BaBi4-xLaxTi4O15 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, Anita; Goyal, Parveen K.; Thakur, O. P.; Sreenivas, K.

    2015-06-01

    The structure and ferroelectric properties of Lanthanum substituted barium bismuth titanate BaBi4-xLaxTi4O15 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) ceramics prepared by solid-state reaction method have been investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms the formation of a single phase material. The distribution of lanthanum into the perovskite layers and (Bi2O2)2+ layers of BaBi4Ti4O15 ceramics have been revealed through Raman spectroscopy. At lower value of x, it is seen that La3+ ions prefer to substitute A-site Bi3+ ions in the perovskite layers while for higher x values, La3+ ions get incorporated into the (Bi2O2)2+ layers. A critical La content of x ˜ 0.2 in BaBi4-xLaxTi4O15 is seen to exhibit a large remnant polarization (Pr) with low coercive field (Ec). The improvement in the ferroelectric properties of La substituted BaBi4Ti4O15 ceramics has been explained in terms of changing oxygen vacancy concentration and structural relaxation. Tunable ferroelectric materials can be obtained by manipulating the doping amount of lanthanum ion.

  1. Study of the structure, dielectric and ferroelectric behavior of BaBi4+δTi4O15 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, Anita; Goyal, Parveen K.; Thakur, O. P.; Sreenivas, K.

    2016-05-01

    The structure and ferroelectric properties of excess bismuth doped barium bismuth titanate BaBi4+δTi4O15 (δ = 2 - 10 wt.%)) ceramics prepared by solid-state reaction method have been investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms the formation of a single phase material with a change in the orthorhombic distortion with varying excess of bismuth content. There is no change in the phase transition temperature (Tm) while the relaxor behaviour has been modified significantly with excess of bismuth doping. Saturated hysteresis loops with high remnant polarization (Pr ~ 12.5 µC/cm2), low coercive fields (Ec ~ 26 kV/cm) are measured and a high piezoelectric coefficient (d33 ~ 29 pC/N) is achieved in poled BaBi4Ti4O15 ceramics prepared with up to 8 wt.% of excess bismuth oxide. The improvement in the ferroelectric properties with increase in the excess bismuth content in BaBi4Ti4O15 ceramics has been explained in terms of changing oxygen vacancy concentration and structural relaxation. Tunable ferroelectric materials can be obtained by manipulating the doping amount of excess bismuth.

  2. Watching Summer Clouds on Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-04

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft watched clouds of methane moving across the far northern regions of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, on Oct. 29 and 30, 2016. Several sets of clouds develop, move over the surface and fade during the course of this movie sequence, which spans 11 hours, with one frame taken every 20 minutes. Most prominent are long cloud streaks that lie between 49 and 55 degrees north latitude. While the general region of cloud activity is persistent over the course of the observation, individual streaks appear to develop then fade. These clouds are measured to move at a speed of about 14 to 22 miles per hour (7 to 10 meters per second). There are also some small clouds over the region of small lakes farther north, including a bright cloud between Neagh Lacus and Punga Mare, which fade over the course of the movie. This small grouping of clouds is moving at a speed of about 0.7 to 1.4 miles per hour (1 to 2 meters per second). Time-lapse movies like this allow scientists to observe the dynamics of clouds as they develop, move over the surface and fade. A time-lapse movie can also help to distinguish between noise in images (for example from cosmic rays hitting the detector) and faint clouds or fog. In 2016, Cassini has intermittently observed clouds across the northern mid-latitudes of Titan, as well as within the north polar region -- an area known to contain numerous methane/ethane lakes and seas see PIA19657 and PIA17655. However, most of this year's observations designed for cloud monitoring have been short snapshots taken days, or weeks, apart. This observation provides Cassini's best opportunity in 2016 to study short-term cloud dynamics. Models of Titan's climate have predicted more cloud activity during early northern summer than what Cassini has observed so far, suggesting that the current understanding of the giant moon's changing seasons is incomplete. The mission will continue monitoring Titan's weather around the 2017 summer solstice in Titan

  3. Dimensional scaling of perovskite ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keech, Ryan R.

    Dimensional size reduction has been the cornerstone of the exponential improvement in silicon based logic devices for decades. However, fundamental limits in the device physics were reached ˜2003, halting further reductions in clock speed without significant penalties in power consumption. This has motivated the research into next generation transistors and switching devices to reinstate the scaling laws for clock speed. This dissertation aims to support the scaling of devices that are based on ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity and to provide a roadmap for the corresponding materials performance. First, a scalable growth process to obtain highly {001}-oriented lead magnesium niobate - lead titanate (PMN-PT) thin films was developed, motivated by the high piezoelectric responses observed in bulk single crystals. It was found that deposition of a 2-3 nm thick PbO buffer layer on {111} Pt thin film bottom electrodes, prior to chemical solution deposition of PMN-PT reduces the driving force for Pb diffusion from the PMN-PT to the bottom electrode, and facilitates nucleation of {001}-oriented perovskite grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy demonstrated that up to 10% of the Pb from a PMN-PT precursor solution may diffuse into the bottom electrode. PMN-PT grains with a mixed {101}/{111} orientation in a matrix of Pb-deficient pyrochlore phase were then promoted near the interface. When this is prevented, phase pure films with {001} orientation with Lotgering factors of 0.98-1.0, can be achieved. The resulting films of only 300 nm in thickness exhibit longitudinal effective d33,f coefficients of ˜90 pm/V and strain values of ˜1% prior to breakdown. 300 nm thick epitaxial and polycrystalline lead magnesium niobate - lead titanate (70PMN-30PT) blanket thin films were studied for the relative contributions to property thickness dependence from interfacial and grain boundary low permittivity layers. Epitaxial PMN-PT films were grown on SrRuO 3 /(001)SrTiO3, while

  4. Strategies for gallium removal after focused ion beam patterning of ferroelectric oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, A.; Adams, T.; Bowman, R. M.; Gregg, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a study into the properties of ferroelectric single crystals at nanoscale dimensions, the effects that focused ion beam (FIB) processing can have, in terms of structural damage and ion implantation, on perovskite oxide materials has been examined, and a post-processing procedure developed to remove such effects. Single crystal material of the perovskite ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO3) has been patterned into thin film lamellae structures using a FIB microscope. Previous work had shown that FIB patterning induced gallium impregnation and associated creation of amorphous layers in a surface region of the single crystal material some 20 nm thick, but that both recrystallization and expulsion of gallium could be achieved through thermal annealing in air. Here we confirm this observation, but find that thermally induced gallium expulsion is associated with the formation of gallium-rich platelets on the surface of the annealed material. These platelets are thought to be gallium oxide. Etching using nitric and hydrochloric acids had no effect on the gallium-rich platelets. Effective platelet removal involved thermal annealing at 700 °C for 1 h in a vacuum followed by 1 h in oxygen, and then a post-annealing low-power plasma clean in an Ar/O atmosphere. Similar processing is likely to be necessary for the full recovery of post FIB-milled nanostructures in oxide ceramic systems in general.

  5. Extinct Plutonium Geochemistry of Ancient Hadean Zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, G.; Gilmour, J.; Crowther, S.; Busfield, A.; Mojzsis, S.; Harrison, M.

    2005-12-01

    The abundance of 244Pu in the early solar system has important implications for r-process nucleosynthesis and models of noble gas transport within the Earth's mantle. Our recent discovery(1) of xenon isotopes from the in-situ decay of 244Pu in ancient Jack Hills zircons promises to provide a new time-sensitive window on the first 500 Ma of Earth history. We have extended this initial work by the use of resonance ioniisation mass spectrometry to analyse xenon released by stepped heating from 17 individual zircons with Pb-Pb ages in the range 3.95 to 4.18 Ga. Our immediate objectives are to determine the causes of variations in the inferred Pu/U ratios and in the longer term to determine the initial Pu/U ratio of the Earth. The Pu/U ratios calculated for individual zircons may be expected to vary as a result of igneous fractionation and also from differential loss of Pu and U fission xenon in the last 4 Ga. We have studied the effects of xenon loss by irradiating the zircons with thermal neutrons to generate xenon from 235U neutron fission in order to determine U/Xe ratios and apparent ages. 131Xe/134Xe and 132Xe/134Xe ratios can be used to calculate the relative contributions from 244Pu and 238U spontaneous fission and 235U neutron fission. The measured Pu/U ratios (back calculated to 4.56 Ga on the basis of the individual Pb-Pb ages) range from zero to 0.012. The highest ratio in our initial study was 0.008 (note that the published ratio has been revised upwards on the basis of improved decay parameters for 238U spontaneous fission). Comparison of Pb-Pb and U-Xe ages indicate varying amounts of xenon loss, over 50% in some cases. While this accounts for some of the variability in the inferred Pu/U, igneous fractionation may also play a part, and we are currently attempting to investigate this by a comparison with REE abundances. Reference: (1) Turner et al. (2004) Science, 306, 89-91.

  6. Atomistic Simulation of Displacement Cascades in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Corrales, Louis R.

    2002-05-06

    Low energy displacement cascades in zircon (ZrSiO4) initiated by a Zr primary knock-on atom have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations using a Coulombic model for long-range interactions, Buckingham potential for short-range interactions and Ziegler-Biersack potentials for close pair interactions. Displacements were found to occur mainly in the O sublattice, and O replacements by a ring mechanism were predominant. Clusters containing Si interstitials bridged by O interstitials, vacancy clusters and anti-site defects were found to occur. This Si-O-Si bridging is considerable in quenched liquid ZrSiO4.

  7. Zircon age-temperature-compositional spectra in plutonic rocks

    DOE PAGES

    Samperton, Kyle M.; Bell, Elizabeth A.; Barboni, Mélanie; ...

    2017-08-23

    We present that geochronology can resolve dispersed zircon dates in plutonic rocks when magma cooling time scales exceed the temporal precision of individual U-Pb analyses; such age heterogeneity may indicate protracted crystallization between the temperatures of zircon saturation (T sat) and rock solidification (T solid). Diffusive growth models predict asymmetric distributions of zircon dates and crystallization temperatures in a cooling magma, with volumetrically abundant old, hot crystallization at T sat decreasing continuously to volumetrically minor young, cold crystallization at T solid. We present integrated geochronological and geochemical data from Bergell Intrusion tonalites (Central Alps, Europe) that document zircon compositional changemore » over hundreds of thousands of years at the hand-sample scale, indicating melt compositional evolution during solidification. Ti-in-zircon thermometry, crystallization simulation using MELTS software, and U-Pb dates produce zircon mass-temperature-time distributions that are in excellent agreement with zircon growth models. In conclusion, these findings provide the first quantitative validation of longstanding expectations from zircon saturation theory by direct geochronological investigation, underscoring zircon’s capacity to quantify supersolidus cooling rates in magmas and resolve dynamic differentiation histories in the plutonic rock record.« less

  8. Zircons as a Probe of Early Luanr History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, C. A.; McKeegan, K. D.; Gilmour, J. D.; Crowther, S. A.; Talor, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    Zircons are ideal for investigating the early lunar bombardment because we can measure both U-Pb crystallization ages and fissiongenic Xe degassing ages for the same crystal. We report U-Pb, Pb-Pb and U-Xe ages for three lunar zircons.

  9. Zircons as a Probe of Early Lunar Impact History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, C. A.; McKeegan, K. D.; Gilmour, J. D.; Crowther, S. A.; Taylor, D. J.

    2013-08-01

    Zircons are ideal for investigating the early lunar bombardment because we can measure both U-Pb crystallization ages and fissiongenic Xe degassing ages for the same crystal. We report U-Pb, Pb-Pb and U-Xe ages for two lunar zircons.

  10. Zircon age-temperature-compositional spectra in plutonic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Samperton, Kyle M.; Bell, Elizabeth A.; Barboni, Mélanie

    We present that geochronology can resolve dispersed zircon dates in plutonic rocks when magma cooling time scales exceed the temporal precision of individual U-Pb analyses; such age heterogeneity may indicate protracted crystallization between the temperatures of zircon saturation (T sat) and rock solidification (T solid). Diffusive growth models predict asymmetric distributions of zircon dates and crystallization temperatures in a cooling magma, with volumetrically abundant old, hot crystallization at T sat decreasing continuously to volumetrically minor young, cold crystallization at T solid. We present integrated geochronological and geochemical data from Bergell Intrusion tonalites (Central Alps, Europe) that document zircon compositional changemore » over hundreds of thousands of years at the hand-sample scale, indicating melt compositional evolution during solidification. Ti-in-zircon thermometry, crystallization simulation using MELTS software, and U-Pb dates produce zircon mass-temperature-time distributions that are in excellent agreement with zircon growth models. In conclusion, these findings provide the first quantitative validation of longstanding expectations from zircon saturation theory by direct geochronological investigation, underscoring zircon’s capacity to quantify supersolidus cooling rates in magmas and resolve dynamic differentiation histories in the plutonic rock record.« less

  11. Ferroelectric Thin-Film Capacitors As Ultraviolet Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita

    1995-01-01

    Advantages include rapid response, solar blindness, and relative invulnerability to ionizing radiation. Ferroelectric capacitor made to function as photovoltaic detector of ultraviolet photons by making one of its electrodes semitransparent. Photovoltaic effect exploited more fully by making Schottky barrier at illuminated semitransparent-electrode/ferroelectric interface taller than Schottky barrier at other electrode/ferroelectric interface.

  12. Titania bound sodium titanate ion exchanger

    DOEpatents

    DeFilippi, Irene C. G.; Yates, Stephen Frederic; Shen, Jian-Kun; Gaita, Romulus; Sedath, Robert Henry; Seminara, Gary Joseph; Straszewski, Michael Peter; Anderson, David Joseph

    1999-03-23

    This invention is method for preparing a titania bound ion exchange composition comprising admixing crystalline sodium titanate and a hydrolyzable titanium compound and, thereafter drying the titania bound crystalline sodium titanate and subjecting the dried titania bound ion exchange composition to optional compaction and calcination steps to improve the physical strength of the titania bound composition.

  13. Seasonal Change in Titan's Cloud Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.; Brown, M. E.; Roe, H. G.

    2006-12-01

    We have acquired whole disk spectra of Titan on nineteen nights with IRTF/SpeX over a three-month period in the spring of 2006 and will acquire data on ~50 additional nights between September and December 2006. The data encompass the spectral range of 0.8 to 2.4 microns at a resolution of 375. These disk- integrated spectra allow us to determine Titan's total fractional cloud coverage and altitudes of clouds present. We find that Titan had less than 0.15% fractional cloud coverage on all but one of the nineteen nights. The near lack of cloud activity in these spectra is in sharp contrast to nearly every spectrum taken from 1995-1999 with UKIRT by Griffith et al. (1998 &2000) who found rapidly varying clouds covering ~0.5% of Titan's disk. The differences in these two similar datasets indicate a striking seasonal change in the behavior of Titan's clouds. Observations of the latitudes, magnitudes, altitudes, and frequencies of Titan's clouds as Titan moves toward southern autumnal equinox in 2009 will help elucidate when and how Titan's methane hydrological cycle changes with season.

  14. Dynamic amplification of light signals in photorefractive ferroelectric liquid crystal blends containing photoconductive chiral dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Hafuri, M.; Suda, T.; Nakano, M.; Funada, K.; Ohta, M.; Terazono, T.; Le, K. V.; Naka, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Effect of ferroelectricity on the photorefractive effect of ferroelectric liquid crystal blends was investigated. The photorefractive effect of ferroelectric liquid crystal blends strongly depend on the ferroelectricity of the blend. We have prepared a series of ferroelectric liquid crystal blends that contains several concentrations of a chiral compound while keeping a constant concentration of a photoconductive moiety. The photorefractive properties of the ferroelectric liquid crystal blends were discussed with relations to the ferroelectric properties of the blends.

  15. Mechanical switching of ferroelectric domains beyond flexoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijin; Liu, Jianyi; Ma, Lele; Liu, Linjie; Jiang, G. L.; Zheng, Yue

    2018-02-01

    The resurgence of interest in flexoelectricity has prompted discussions on the feasibility of switching ferroelectric domains 'non-electrically'. In this work, we perform three-dimensional thermodynamic simulations in combination with ab initio calculations and effective Hamiltonian simulations to demonstrate the great effects of surface screening and surface bonding on ferroelectric domain switching triggered by local tip loading. A three-dimensional simulation scheme has been developed to capture the tip-induced domain switching behavior in ferroelectric thin films by adequately taking into account the surface screening effect and surface bonding effect of the ferroelectric film, as well as the finite elastic stiffness of the substrate and the electrode layers. The major findings are as follows. (i) Compared with flexoelectricity, surface effects can be overwhelming and lead to much more efficient mechanical switching caused by tip loading. (ii) The surface-assisted mechanical switching can be bi-directional without the necessity of reversing strain gradients. (iii) A mode transition from local to propagating domain switching occurs when the screening below a critical value. A ripple effect of domain switching appears with the formation of concentric loop domains. (iv) The ripple effect can lead to 'domain interference' and a deterministic writing of confined loop domain patterns by local excitations. Our study reveals the hidden switching mechanisms of ferroelectric domains and the possible roles of surface in mechanical switching. The ripple effect of domain switching, which is believed to be general in dipole systems, broadens our current knowledge of domain engineering.

  16. Flexible graphene-PZT ferroelectric nonvolatile memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonho; Kahya, Orhan; Toh, Chee Tat; Ozyilmaz, Barbaros; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2013-11-29

    We report the fabrication of a flexible graphene-based nonvolatile memory device using Pb(Zr0.35,Ti0.65)O3 (PZT) as the ferroelectric material. The graphene and PZT ferroelectric layers were deposited using chemical vapor deposition and sol–gel methods, respectively. Such PZT films show a high remnant polarization (Pr) of 30 μC cm−2 and a coercive voltage (Vc) of 3.5 V under a voltage loop over ±11 V. The graphene–PZT ferroelectric nonvolatile memory on a plastic substrate displayed an on/off current ratio of 6.7, a memory window of 6 V and reliable operation. In addition, the device showed one order of magnitude lower operation voltage range than organic-based ferroelectric nonvolatile memory after removing the anti-ferroelectric behavior incorporating an electrolyte solution. The devices showed robust operation in bent states of bending radii up to 9 mm and in cycling tests of 200 times. The devices exhibited remarkable mechanical properties and were readily integrated with plastic substrates for the production of flexible circuits.

  17. Impact induced depolarization of ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vinamra; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

    2018-06-01

    We study the large deformation dynamic behavior and the associated nonlinear electro-thermo-mechanical coupling exhibited by ferroelectric materials in adiabatic environments. This is motivated by a ferroelectric generator which involves pulsed power generation by loading the ferroelectric material with a shock, either by impact or a blast. Upon impact, a shock wave travels through the material inducing a ferroelectric to nonpolar phase transition giving rise to a large voltage difference in an open circuit situation or a large current in a closed circuit situation. In the first part of this paper, we provide a general continuum mechanical treatment of the situation assuming a sharp phase boundary that is possibly charged. We derive the governing laws, as well as the driving force acting on the phase boundary. In the second part, we use the derived equations and a particular constitutive relation that describes the ferroelectric to nonpolar phase transition to study a uniaxial plate impact problem. We develop a numerical method where the phase boundary is tracked but other discontinuities are captured using a finite volume method. We compare our results with experimental observations to find good agreement. Specifically, our model reproduces the observed exponential rise of charge as well as the resistance dependent Hugoniot. We conclude with a parameter study that provides detailed insight into various aspects of the problem.

  18. Size and shape of Saturn's moon Titan.

    PubMed

    Zebker, Howard A; Stiles, Bryan; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randolph L; Lunine, Jonathan

    2009-05-15

    Cassini observations show that Saturn's moon Titan is slightly oblate. A fourth-order spherical harmonic expansion yields north polar, south polar, and mean equatorial radii of 2574.32 +/- 0.05 kilometers (km), 2574.36 +/- 0.03 km, and 2574.91 +/- 0.11 km, respectively; its mean radius is 2574.73 +/- 0.09 km. Titan's shape approximates a hydrostatic, synchronously rotating triaxial ellipsoid but is best fit by such a body orbiting closer to Saturn than Titan presently does. Titan's lack of high relief implies that most--but not all--of the surface features observed with the Cassini imaging subsystem and synthetic aperture radar are uncorrelated with topography and elevation. Titan's depressed polar radii suggest that a constant geopotential hydrocarbon table could explain the confinement of the hydrocarbon lakes to high latitudes.

  19. Interaction of Titan's ionosphere with Saturn's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Coates, Andrew J

    2009-02-28

    Titan is the only Moon in the Solar System with a significant permanent atmosphere. Within this nitrogen-methane atmosphere, an ionosphere forms. Titan has no significant magnetic dipole moment, and is usually located inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Atmospheric particles are ionized both by sunlight and by particles from Saturn's magnetosphere, mainly electrons, which reach the top of the atmosphere. So far, the Cassini spacecraft has made over 45 close flybys of Titan, allowing measurements in the ionosphere and the surrounding magnetosphere under different conditions. Here we review how Titan's ionosphere and Saturn's magnetosphere interact, using measurements from Cassini low-energy particle detectors. In particular, we discuss ionization processes and ionospheric photoelectrons, including their effect on ion escape from the ionosphere. We also discuss one of the unexpected discoveries in Titan's ionosphere, the existence of extremely heavy negative ions up to 10000amu at 950km altitude.

  20. Size and shape of Saturn's moon Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zebker, Howard A.; Stiles, Bryan; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lunine, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Cassini observations show that Saturn's moon Titan is slightly oblate. A fourth-order spherical harmonic expansion yields north polar, south polar, and mean equatorial radii of 2574.32 ± 0.05 kilometers (km), 2574.36 ± 0.03 km, and 2574.91 ± 0.11 km, respectively; its mean radius is 2574.73 ± 0.09 km. Titan's shape approximates a hydrostatic, synchronously rotating triaxial ellipsoid but is best fit by such a body orbiting closer to Saturn than Titan presently does. Titan's lack of high relief implies that most—but not all—of the surface features observed with the Cassini imaging subsystem and synthetic aperture radar are uncorrelated with topography and elevation. Titan's depressed polar radii suggest that a constant geopotential hydrocarbon table could explain the confinement of the hydrocarbon lakes to high latitudes.

  1. The Lakes and Seas of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alexander G.

    2016-06-01

    Analogous to Earth's water cycle, Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle supports standing bodies of liquid and drives processes that result in common morphologic features including dunes, channels, lakes, and seas. Like lakes on Earth and early Mars, Titan's lakes and seas preserve a record of its climate and surface evolution. Unlike on Earth, the volume of liquid exposed on Titan's surface is only a small fraction of the atmospheric reservoir. The volume and bulk composition of the seas can constrain the age and nature of atmospheric methane, as well as its interaction with surface reservoirs. Similarly, the morphology of lacustrine basins chronicles the history of the polar landscape over multiple temporal and spatial scales. The distribution of trace species, such as noble gases and higher-order hydrocarbons and nitriles, can address Titan's origin and the potential for both prebiotic and biotic processes. Accordingly, Titan's lakes and seas represent a compelling target for exploration.

  2. Magnetic enhancement of ferroelectric polarization in a self-grown ferroelectric-ferromagnetic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Narayan, Bastola; Pachat, Rohit; Ranjan, Rajeev

    2018-02-01

    Ferroelectric-ferromagnetic multiferroic composites are of great interest both from the scientific and technological standpoints. The extent of coupling between polarization and magnetization in such two-phase systems depends on how efficiently the magnetostrictive and electrostrictive/piezoelectric strain gets transferred from one phase to the other. This challenge is most profound in the easy to make 0-3 ferroelectric-ferromagnetic particulate composites. Here we report a self-grown ferroelectric-ferromagnetic 0-3 particulate composite through controlled spontaneous precipitation of ferrimagnetic barium hexaferrite phase (BaF e12O19 ) amid ferroelectric grains in the multiferroic alloy system BiFe O3-BaTi O3 . We demonstrate that a composite specimen exhibiting merely ˜1% hexaferrite phase exhibits ˜34% increase in saturation polarization in a dc magnetic field of ˜10 kOe. Using modified Rayleigh analysis of the polarization field loop in the subcoercive field region we argue that the substantial enhancement in the ferroelectric switching is associated with the reduction in the barrier heights of the pinning centers of the ferroelectric-ferroelastic domain walls in the stress field generated by magnetostriction in the hexaferrite grains when the magnetic field is turned on. Our study proves that controlled precipitation of the magnetic phase is a good strategy for synthesis of 0-3 ferroelectric-ferromagnetic particulate multiferroic composite as it not only helps in ensuring a good electrical insulating character of the composite, enabling it to sustain high enough electric field for ferroelectric switching, but also the factors associated with the spontaneity of the precipitation process ensure efficient transfer of the magnetostrictive strain/stress to the surrounding ferroelectric matrix making domain wall motion easy.

  3. Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor Model Using Partitioned Ferroelectric Layer and Partial Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2004-01-01

    A model of an n-channel ferroelectric field effect transistor has been developed based on both theoretical and empirical data. The model is based on an existing model that incorporates partitioning of the ferroelectric layer to calculate the polarization within the ferroelectric material. The model incorporates several new aspects that are useful to the user. It takes into account the effect of a non-saturating gate voltage only partially polarizing the ferroelectric material based on the existing remnant polarization. The model also incorporates the decay of the remnant polarization based on the time history of the FFET. A gate pulse of a specific voltage; will not put the ferroelectric material into a single amount of polarization for that voltage, but instead vary with previous state of the material and the time since the last change to the gate voltage. The model also utilizes data from FFETs made from different types of ferroelectric materials to allow the user just to input the material being used and not recreate the entire model. The model also allows the user to input the quality of the ferroelectric material being used. The ferroelectric material quality can go from a theoretical perfect material with little loss and no decay to a less than perfect material with remnant losses and decay. This model is designed to be used by people who need to predict the external characteristics of a FFET before the time and expense of design and fabrication. It also allows the parametric evaluation of quality of the ferroelectric film on the overall performance of the transistor.

  4. Are there impact-formed zircons in the Hadean record?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielicki, M. M.; Lu, X.; Bell, E. A.; Schmitt, A. K.; Harrison, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    Detrital Hadean zircons from the Jack Hills, Western Australia, show a remarkable cluster of crystallization temperatures at 680±25°C. This is particularly surprising as a simple model relating rock composition and Zr concentration predicts that a very broad spectrum of crystallization temperatures (ca. 650°C to 1000°C) with a median value of 780°C, would result from impact melting of the Earth's surface. Magmatic fractionation would tend to increase the aforementioned values. Given the predicted high rate of impacts during the Hadean, the absence of such a population in the Jack Hills zircons could signal a profound sampling problem, a hint of a history much different than previously supposed, or our lack of understanding of zircon formation due to impact related processes. We have begun to examine the latter issue by investigating the crystallization temperatures of zircons formed in melt sheets preserved in the geologic record. The Sudbury Igneous Complex, formed at 1850±3 Ma within the second largest impact crater on Earth, includes two igneous units termed the Black and Felsic Norites. Examination of zircons from each by SIMS confirms their crystallization age at 1847.3±2.2 Ma and yields Ti-in-zircon temperatures of 720°C and 750°C, respectively. This is consistent with that predicted from zircon saturation systematics. A statistical test indicates that the combined norite population is distinct from the Hadean temperature distribution. Thus the question arises: where are the Hadean zircons expected to have formed at >780°C via impact processes? Similar analysis is being pursued for zircons from the Vredefort Impact Structure, South Africa, which should provide further information on impact-formed zircon temperature spectra.

  5. Cation vacancies in ferroelectric PbTiO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 : A positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, D. J.; Singh, S.; Mackie, R. A.; Morozov, M.; McGuire, S.; Damjanovic, D.

    2007-10-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy measurements identify A - and B -site cation vacancies in ferroelectric perovskite oxides (ABO3) . Crystal PbTiO3 and ceramic lead zirconium titanate (PZT) were studied and gave consistent values for the lifetime resulting from positron localization at lead vacancies VPb . Positron trapping to B -site vacancies was inferred in PZT. Temperature dependent studies showed that the defect specific trapping rate was higher for VB compared to VPb , consistent with the larger negative charge. Doping PZT with Fe increased the fraction positron trapping to VB compared to VPb -type defects.

  6. Toward self-assembled ferroelectric random access memories: hard-wired switching capacitor arrays with almost Tb/in.(2) densities.

    PubMed

    Evans, Paul R; Zhu, Xinhau; Baxter, Paul; McMillen, Mark; McPhillips, John; Morrison, Finlay D; Scott, James F; Pollard, Robert J; Bowman, Robert M; Gregg, J Marty

    2007-05-01

    We report on the successful fabrication of arrays of switchable nanocapacitors made by harnessing the self-assembly of materials. The structures are composed of arrays of 20-40 nm diameter Pt nanowires, spaced 50-100 nm apart, electrodeposited through nanoporous alumina onto a thin film lower electrode on a silicon wafer. A thin film ferroelectric (both barium titanate (BTO) and lead zirconium titanate (PZT)) has been deposited on top of the nanowire array, followed by the deposition of thin film upper electrodes. The PZT nanocapacitors exhibit hysteresis loops with substantial remnant polarizations, while although the switching performance was inferior, the low-field characteristics of the BTO nanocapacitors show dielectric behavior comparable to conventional thin film heterostructures. While registration is not sufficient for commercial RAM production, this is nevertheless an embryonic form of the highest density hard-wired FRAM capacitor array reported to date and compares favorably with atomic force microscopy read-write densities.

  7. Titan as the Abode of Life.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher P

    2016-02-03

    Titan is the only world we know, other than Earth, that has a liquid on its surface. It also has a thick atmosphere composed of nitrogen and methane with a thick organic haze. There are lakes, rain, and clouds of methane and ethane. Here, we address the question of carbon-based life living in Titan liquids. Photochemically produced organics, particularly acetylene, in Titan's atmosphere could be a source of biological energy when reacted with atmospheric hydrogen. Light levels on the surface of Titan are more than adequate for photosynthesis, but the biochemical limitations due to the few elements available in the environment may lead only to simple ecosystems that only consume atmospheric nutrients. Life on Titan may make use of the trace metals and other inorganic elements produced by meteorites as they ablate in its atmosphere. It is conceivable that H₂O molecules on Titan could be used in a biochemistry that is rooted in hydrogen bonds in a way that metals are used in enzymes by life on Earth. Previous theoretical work has shown possible membrane structures, azotosomes, in Titan liquids, azotosomes, composed of small organic nitrogen compounds, such as acrylonitrile. The search for a plausible information molecule for life in Titan liquids remains an open research topic-polyethers have been considered and shown to be insoluble at Titan temperatures. Possible search strategies for life on Titan include looking for unusual concentrations of certain molecules reflecting biological selection. Homochirality is a special and powerful example of such biology selection. Environmentally, a depletion of hydrogen in the lower atmosphere may be a sign of metabolism. A discovery of life in liquid methane and ethane would be our first compelling indication that the universe is full of diverse and wondrous life forms.

  8. Titan as the Abode of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Christopher P.

    2016-02-01

    Titan is the only world we know, other than Earth, that has a liquid on its surface. It also has a thick atmosphere composed of nitrogen and methane with a thick organic haze. There are lakes, rain, and clouds of methane and ethane. Here, we address the question of carbon-based life living in Titan liquids. Photochemically produced organics, particularly acetylene, in Titan's atmosphere could be a source of biological energy when reacted with atmospheric hydrogen. Light levels on the surface of Titan are more than adequate for photosynthesis, but the biochemical limitations due to the few elements available in the environment may lead only to simple ecosystems that only consume atmospheric nutrients. Life on Titan may make use of the trace metals and other inorganic elements produced by meteorites as they ablate in its atmosphere. It is conceivable that H2O molecules on Titan could be used in a biochemistry that is rooted in hydrogen bonds in a way that metals are used in enzymes by life on Earth. Previous theoretical work has shown possible membrane structures, azotosomes, in Titan liquids, azotosomes, composed of small organic nitrogen compounds, such as acrylonitrile. The search for a plausible information molecule for life in Titan liquids remains an open research topic - polyethers have been considered and shown to be insoluble at Titan temperatures. Possible search strategies for life on Titan include looking for unusual concentrations of certain molecules reflecting biological selection. Homochirality is a special and powerful example of such biology selection. Environmentally, a depletion of hydrogen in the lower atmosphere may be a sign of metabolism. A discovery of life in liquid methane and ethane would be our first compelling indication that the universe is full of diverse and wondrous life forms.

  9. Titan as the Abode of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Titan is the only world we know other than Earth that has a liquid on its surface. It has a thick atmosphere composed of nitrogen and methane with a thick organic haze. There are lakes, rain, and clouds of methane and ethane. Here, we address the question of carbon-based life living in Titan liquids. Photochemically produced organics, particularly acetylene, in Titan's atmosphere could be a source of biological energy when reacted with atmospheric hydrogen. Light levels on the surface of Titan are more than adequate for photosynthesis but the biochemical limitations due to the few elements available in the environment may lead only to simple ecosystems that only consume atmospheric nutrients. Life on Titan may make use of the trace metals and other inorganic elements produced by meteorites as they ablate in the atmosphere. It is conceivable that H2O molecules on Titan could be used in a biochemistry that is rooted in hydrogen bonds in a way that metals are used in enzymes by life on Earth. Previous theoretical work has shown possible membrane structures in Titan liquids, azotosomes, composed of small organic nitrogen compounds, such as acrylonitrile. The search for a plausible information molecule for life in Titan liquids remains an open research topic - polyethers have been considered and shown to be insoluble at Titan temperatures. Possible search strategies for life on Titan include looking for unusual concentrations of certain molecules reflecting biological selection. Homochirality is a special and powerful example of such biology selection. Environmentally, a depletion of hydrogen in the lower atmosphere may be a sign of metabolism. A discovery of life in liquid methane and ethane would be our first compelling indication that the Universe is full of diverse and wondrous life forms.

  10. Ferroelectric nanotraps for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Giedke, G.

    2018-02-01

    We propose and analyze an electrostatic-optical nanoscale trap for cold diatomic polar molecules. The main ingredient of our proposal is a square array of ferroelectric nanorods with alternating polarization. We show that, in contrast to electrostatic traps using the linear Stark effect, a quadratic Stark potential supports long-lived trapped states. The molecules are kept at a fixed height from the nanorods by a standing-wave optical dipole trap. For the molecules and materials considered, we find nanotraps with trap frequency up to 1 MHz, ground-state width ˜20 nm with lattice periodicity of ˜200 nm . Analyzing the loss mechanisms due to nonadiabaticity, surface-induced radiative transitions, and laser-induced transitions, we show the existence of trapped states with lifetime ˜1 s , competitive with current traps created via optical mechanisms. As an application we extend our discussion to a one-dimensional (1D) array of nanotraps to simulate a long-range spin Hamiltonian in our structure.

  11. Crystalline Structure, Defect Chemistry and Room Temperature Colossal Permittivity of Nd-doped Barium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiaomei; Gu, Qilin; Zhu, Kongjun; Jin, Rongying; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Jinhao

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric materials with high permittivity are strongly demanded for various technological applications. While polarization inherently exists in ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO3), its high permittivity can only be achieved by chemical and/or structural modification. Here, we report the room-temperature colossal permittivity (~760,000) obtained in xNd: BaTiO3 (x = 0.5 mol%) ceramics derived from the counterpart nanoparticles followed by conventional pressureless sintering process. Through the systematic analysis of chemical composition, crystalline structure and defect chemistry, the substitution mechanism involving the occupation of Nd3+ in Ba2+ -site associated with the generation of Ba vacancies and oxygen vacancies for charge compensation has been firstly demonstrated. The present study serves as a precedent and fundamental step toward further improvement of the permittivity of BaTiO3-based ceramics.

  12. Crystalline Structure, Defect Chemistry and Room Temperature Colossal Permittivity of Nd-doped Barium Titanate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiaomei; Gu, Qilin; Zhu, Kongjun; Jin, Rongying; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Jinhao

    2017-02-13

    Dielectric materials with high permittivity are strongly demanded for various technological applications. While polarization inherently exists in ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO 3 ), its high permittivity can only be achieved by chemical and/or structural modification. Here, we report the room-temperature colossal permittivity (~760,000) obtained in xNd: BaTiO 3 (x = 0.5 mol%) ceramics derived from the counterpart nanoparticles followed by conventional pressureless sintering process. Through the systematic analysis of chemical composition, crystalline structure and defect chemistry, the substitution mechanism involving the occupation of Nd 3+ in Ba 2+ -site associated with the generation of Ba vacancies and oxygen vacancies for charge compensation has been firstly demonstrated. The present study serves as a precedent and fundamental step toward further improvement of the permittivity of BaTiO 3 -based ceramics.

  13. An in vitro study of electrically active hydroxyapatite-barium titanate ceramics using Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Frances R; Turner, Irene G; Bowen, Christopher R; Gittings, Jonathan P; Chaudhuri, Julian B

    2009-08-01

    Electrically active ceramics are of interest as bone graft substitute materials. This study investigated the ferroelectric properties of hydroxyapatite-barium titanate (HABT) composites and the behaviour of osteoblast-like cells seeded on their surfaces. A piezoelectric coefficient (d(33)) of 57.8 pCN(-1) was observed in HABT discs prepared for cell culture. The attachment, proliferation, viability, morphology and metabolic activity of cells cultured on unpoled HABT were comparable to those observed on commercially available hydroxyapatite at all time points. No indication of the cytotoxicity of HABT was detected. At one day after seeding, cell attachment was modified on both the positive and negative surfaces of poled HABT. After longer incubations, all parameters observed were comparable on poled and unpoled ceramics. The results indicate that HABT ceramics are biocompatible in the short term in vitro and that further investigation of cell responses to these materials under mechanical load and at longer incubation times is warranted.

  14. 0.8 V nanogenerator for mechanical energy harvesting using bismuth titanate-PDMS nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abinnas, N.; Baskaran, P.; Harish, S.; Ganesh, R. Sankar; Navaneethan, M.; Nisha, K. D.; Ponnusamy, S.; Muthamizhchelvan, C.; Ikeda, H.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel, low-cost approach to fabricate piezoelectric nanogenerators using Bismuth titanate (BiT)/Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanocomposite. The nanogenerator has the advantage of the simple process of fabrication and is eco-friendly. This simple device was fabricated to harvest the energy released from finger tapping. This device generated an output of 0.8 V. The BiT samples were synthesized by wet chemical method. The structural, dielectric and ferroelectric properties of the samples were analyzed. Phase analysis using X-ray diffraction indicated that the phase structure was orthorhombic. The FESEM images of the sample calcined at 700 °C exhibited sheet-like morphology. Further characterizations like XPS, Raman studies, TEM were done.

  15. Crystalline Structure, Defect Chemistry and Room Temperature Colossal Permittivity of Nd-doped Barium Titanate

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiaomei; Gu, Qilin; Zhu, Kongjun; Jin, Rongying; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Jinhao

    2017-01-01

    Dielectric materials with high permittivity are strongly demanded for various technological applications. While polarization inherently exists in ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO3), its high permittivity can only be achieved by chemical and/or structural modification. Here, we report the room-temperature colossal permittivity (~760,000) obtained in xNd: BaTiO3 (x = 0.5 mol%) ceramics derived from the counterpart nanoparticles followed by conventional pressureless sintering process. Through the systematic analysis of chemical composition, crystalline structure and defect chemistry, the substitution mechanism involving the occupation of Nd3+ in Ba2+ -site associated with the generation of Ba vacancies and oxygen vacancies for charge compensation has been firstly demonstrated. The present study serves as a precedent and fundamental step toward further improvement of the permittivity of BaTiO3-based ceramics. PMID:28205559

  16. Implications of Bishop Tuff zircon U-Pb ages for rates of zircon growth and magma accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. R.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Rates of geologic processes obtained from natural studies rely on accurate geochronologic information. An important benchmark in geochronology as well as a valuable source of insights into the evolution of voluminous explosive eruptions is the >600 km3 Bishop Tuff (BT). A recently determined weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 767.1±0.9 ka for a BT zircon population [1] is indistinguishable from the recalibrated 40Ar/39Ar sanidine date of 767.4±2.2 ka [2], potentially providing a key intercalibration point between astronomical and radio-isotopic dating approaches. Consequences of these results are linear zircon growth rates of >1×10-14 cm/sec and magma accumulation rates of >200 km3/ka. In contrast, spatially selective SIMS U-Pb dating of BT zircons yielded mean pre-eruption ages of 850 ka [3], a difference that raises questions about the validity of intercalibration between U-Pb and K-Ar dating methods and the history of magma accumulation. We obtained new SIMS analyses of the BT zircons using more spatially and analytically sensitive methods and verifying our accuracy against the TIMS dated Quaternary zircon 61.308A (2.488±0.002 Ma). Analyses were performed on zircon rims and on oriented cross-sections exposed during optical interferometry-calibrated serial sectioning removing the outermost ~31 μm. Sputtering by a 100 nA ion beam versus the normally employed 10-12 nA beam resulted in enhanced radiogenic Pb yields and analytical uncertainties for Quaternary zircon approaching the U-Pb age reproducibility of the primary zircon standard (~1-2 % for AS3). Ages obtained at ~31 μm depth (representing <5% of crystal growth in most cases) average 892±26ka (MSWD=0.29), corroborating previous evidence for residence times of several tens of ka. Rim ages average 781±22 ka (MSWD=0.61), overlapping Ar/Ar determinations of eruption age and corroborating the importance of near-eruption aged zircon growth. Our results confirm the presence of BT zircon domains that predate

  17. Gravity waves in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedson, A. James

    1994-01-01

    Scintillations (high frequency variations) observed in the radio signal during the occultation of Voyager 1 by Titan (Hinson and Tyler, 1983) provide information concerning neutral atmospheric density fluctuations on scales on hundreds of meters to a few kilometers. Those seen at altitudes higher than 25 km above the surface were interpreted by Hinson and Tyler as being caused by linear, freely propagating (energy-conserving) gravity waves, but this interpretation was found to be inconsistent with the scintillation data below the 25-km altitude level. Here an attempt is made to interpret the entire scintillation profile between the surface and the 90-km altitude level in terms of gravity waves generated at the surface. Numerical calculations of the density fluctuations caused by two-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, finite-amplitude gravity waves propagating vertically through Titan's atmosphere are performed to produce synthetic scintillation profiles for comparison with the observations. The numerical model accurately treats the effects of wave transience, nonlinearity, and breakdown due to convective instability in the overturned part of the wave. The high-altitude scintillation data were accurately recovered with a freely propagating wave solution, confirming the analytic model of Hinson and Tyler. It is found that the low-altitude scintillation data can be fit by a model where a component of the gravity waves becomes convectively unstable and breaks near the 15 km level. The large-scale structure of the observed scintillation profile in the entire altitude range between 5 and 85 km can be simulated by a model where the freely propagating and breaking waves are forced at the surface simultaneously. Further analysis of the Voyager 1 Titan low-altitude scintillation data, using inversion theory appropriate for strong scattering, could potentially remove some of the ambiguities remaining in this analysis and allow a better determination of the strength and source of

  18. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. © 2012 The Author. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Spectral Characteristics of Titan's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Turner, Jake D.; Penteado, Paulo; Khamsi, Tymon B.; Soderblom, Jason M.

    2014-11-01

    Cassini/Huygens and ground-based measurements of Titan reveal an eroded surface, with lakes, dunes, and sinuous washes. These features, coupled with measurements of clouds and rain, indicate the transfer of methane between Titan’s surface and atmosphere. The presence of methane-damp lowlands suggests further that the atmospheric methane (which is continually depleted through photolysis) may be supplied by sub-surface reservoirs. The byproducts of methane photolysis condense onto the surface, leaving layers of organic sediments that record Titan’s past atmospheres.Thus knowledge of the source and history of Titan's atmosphere requires measurements of the large scale compositional makeup of Titan's surface, which is shrouded by a thick and hazy atmosphere. Towards this goal, we analyzed roughly 100,000 spectra recorded by Cassini’s Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Our study is confined to the latitude region (20S—20N) surrounding the landing site of the Huygens probe (at 10S, 192W), which supplied only measurement of the vertical profiles of the methane abundance and haze scattering characteristics. VIMS near-IR spectral images indicate subtle latitudinal and temporal variations in the haze characteristics in the tropics. We constrain these small changes with full radiative transfer analyses of each of the thousands of VIMS spectra, which were recorded of different terrains and at different lighting conditions. The resulting models of Titan’s atmosphere as a function of latitude and year indicate the seasonal migration of Titan’s tropical haze and enable the derivation of Titan’s surface albedo at 8 near-IR wavelength regions where Titan’s atmosphere is transparent enough to allow visibility to the surface. The resultant maps of Titan’s surface indicate a number of terrain types with distinct spectral characteristics that are suggestive of atmospheric and surficial processes, including the deposition of organic material, erosion of

  20. Continental crustal history in SE Asia: Insights from zircon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevastjanova, I.; Hall, R.; Gunawan, I.; Ferdian, F.; Decker, J.

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that SE Asia is underlain mostly by continental crust derived from Gondwana. However, there are still many uncertainties about the ages of protoliths, origin, arrival ages and history of different blocks, because much of the basement is unexposed. We have compiled previously published and new zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotope data from SE Asia. Our data set currently contains over 8400 U-Pb ages and over 600 Hf isotope analyses from sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous rocks and work is continuing to increase its size and the area covered. Zircons range in age from 3.4 Ga to near-zero. Archean zircons (>2.5 Ga) are rare in SE Asia and significant Archean populations (particularly zircons >2.8 Ga) are found only in East Java and the Sibumasu block of the Malay Peninsula. The presence of Archean zircons strongly suggests that the East Java and Sibumasu blocks were once situated near present-day Western Australia. Detrital Paleoproterozoic (ca. 1.9-1.8 Ga) zircons are abundant in many parts of SE Asia. In Sundaland (Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, West Java, Borneo) the most likely source for these zircons is the tin belt basement, but a north Australian source is more likely for eastern Indonesian samples. An early Mesoproterozoic (ca. 1.6-1.5 Ga) zircon population, particularly common in eastern Indonesia, is interpreted to be derived from central or northern Australia. Mesoproterozoic zircons, ca. 1.4 Ga, are common only on fragments that are now attached to or were previously part of the north Australian margin, such as the Bird's Head of New Guinea, Timor, Seram, Sulawesi and SW Borneo. Hf isotope characteristics of zircons from Seram are similar to those of zircons from eastern Australia. This supports the suggestion that Seram was part of the Australian margin. Late Meso- and early Neoproterozoic zircons (ca. 1.2-1.1 Ga, 900 Ma, and 600 Ma) are present, but not abundant, in SE Asia. Dominant Phanerozoic populations are Permian-Triassic, Cretaceous, and