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Sample records for zirconia-magnesia inert matrix

  1. Zirconia-magnesia inert matrix fuel and waste form: Synthesis, characterization and chemical performance in an advanced fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliday, Kiel Steven

    There is a significant buildup in plutonium stockpiles throughout the world, because of spent nuclear fuel and the dismantling of weapons. The radiotoxicity of this material and proliferation risk has led to a desire for destroying excess plutonium. To do this effectively, it must be fissioned in a reactor as part of a uranium free fuel to eliminate the generation of more plutonium. This requires an inert matrix to volumetrically dilute the fissile plutonium. Zirconia-magnesia dual phase ceramic has been demonstrated to be a favorable material for this task. It is neutron transparent, zirconia is chemically robust, magnesia has good thermal conductivity and the ceramic has been calculated to conform to current economic and safety standards. This dissertation contributes to the knowledge of zirconia-magnesia as an inert matrix fuel to establish behavior of the material containing a fissile component. First, the zirconia-magnesia inert matrix is synthesized in a dual phase ceramic containing a fissile component and a burnable poison. The chemical constitution of the ceramic is then determined. Next, the material performance is assessed under conditions relevant to an advanced fuel cycle. Reactor conditions were assessed with high temperature, high pressure water. Various acid solutions were used in an effort to dissolve the material for reprocessing. The ceramic was also tested as a waste form under environmental conditions, should it go directly to a repository as a spent fuel. The applicability of zirconia-magnesia as an inert matrix fuel and waste form was tested and found to be a promising material for such applications.

  2. Reducing Actinide Production Using Inert Matrix Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Deinert, Mark

    2017-08-23

    The environmental and geopolitical problems that surround nuclear power stem largely from the longlived transuranic isotopes of Am, Cm, Np and Pu that are contained in spent nuclear fuel. New methods for transmuting these elements into more benign forms are needed. Current research efforts focus largely on the development of fast burner reactors, because it has been shown that they could dramatically reduce the accumulation of transuranics. However, despite five decades of effort, fast reactors have yet to achieve industrial viability. A critical limitation to this, and other such strategies, is that they require a type of spent fuel reprocessingmore » that can efficiently separate all of the transuranics from the fission products with which they are mixed. Unfortunately, the technology for doing this on an industrial scale is still in development. In this project, we explore a strategy for transmutation that can be deployed using existing, current generation reactors and reprocessing systems. We show that use of an inert matrix fuel to recycle transuranics in a conventional pressurized water reactor could reduce overall production of these materials by an amount that is similar to what is achievable using proposed fast reactor cycles. Furthermore, we show that these transuranic reductions can be achieved even if the fission products are carried into the inert matrix fuel along with the transuranics, bypassing the critical separations hurdle described above. The implications of these findings are significant, because they imply that inert matrix fuel could be made directly from the material streams produced by the commercially available PUREX process. Zirconium dioxide would be an ideal choice of inert matrix in this context because it is known to form a stable solid solution with both fission products and transuranics.« less

  3. Helium in inert matrix dispersion fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veen, A.; Konings, R. J. M.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2003-07-01

    The behaviour of helium, an important decay product in the transmutation chains of actinides, in dispersion-type inert matrix fuels is discussed. A phenomenological description of its accumulation and release in CERCER and CERMET fuel is given. A summary of recent He-implantation studies with inert matrix metal oxides (ZrO 2, MgAl 2O 4, MgO and Al 2O 3) is presented. A general picture is that for high helium concentrations helium and vacancy defects form helium clusters which convert into over-pressurized bubbles. At elevated temperature helium is released from the bubbles. On some occasions thermal stable nano-cavities or nano-pores remain. On the basis of these results the consequences for helium induced swelling and helium storage in oxide matrices kept at 800-1000 °C will be discussed. In addition, results of He-implantation studies for metal matrices (W, Mo, Nb and V alloys) will be presented. Introduction of helium in metals at elevated temperatures leads to clustering of helium to bubbles. When operational temperatures are higher than 0.5 melting temperature, swelling and helium embrittlement might occur.

  4. Inert matrix fuel in dispersion type fuel elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, A. M.; Vatulin, A. V.; Morozov, A. V.; Sirotin, V. L.; Dobrikova, I. V.; Kulakov, G. V.; Ershov, S. A.; Kostomarov, V. P.; Stelyuk, Y. I.

    2006-06-01

    The advantages of using inert matrix fuel (IMF) as a dispersion fuel in an aluminium alloy matrix are considered, in particular, low temperatures in the fuel centre, achievable high burn-ups, serviceability in transients and an environmentally friendly process of fuel rod fabrication. Two main versions of IMF are under development at A.A. Bochvar Institute, i.e. heterogeneous or isolated distribution of plutonium. The out-of-pile results on IMF loaded with uranium dioxide as plutonium simulator are presented. Fuel elements with uranium dioxide composition fabricated at A.A. Bochvar Institute are currently under MIR tests (RIAR, Dimitrovgrad). The fuel elements reached a burn-up of 88 MW d kg-1 (equivalent to the burn up of the standard uranium dioxide pelletized fuel) without loss of leak-tightness of the cladding. The feasibility of fabricating IMF of these particular types with plutonium dioxide is considered with a view to in-pile irradiation.

  5. Inert matrix fuel neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and transient behavior in a light water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, W. J.; Todosow, M.; Meyer, M. K.; Pasamehmetoglu, K. O.

    2006-06-01

    Currently, commercial power reactors in the United States operate on a once-through or open cycle, with the spent nuclear fuel eventually destined for long-term storage in a geologic repository. Since the fissile and transuranic (TRU) elements in the spent nuclear fuel present a proliferation risk, limit the repository capacity, and are the major contributors to the long-term toxicity and dose from the repository, methods and systems are needed to reduce the amount of TRU that will eventually require long-term storage. An option to achieve a reduction in the amount, and modify the isotopic composition of TRU requiring geological disposal is 'burning' the TRU in commercial light water reactors (LWRs) and/or fast reactors. Fuel forms under consideration for TRU destruction in light water reactors (LWRs) include mixed-oxide (MOX), advanced mixed-oxide, and inert matrix fuels. Fertile-free inert matrix fuel (IMF) has been proposed for use in many forms and studied by several researchers. IMF offers several advantages relative to MOX, principally it provides a means for reducing the TRU in the fuel cycle by burning the fissile isotopes and transmuting the minor actinides while producing no new TRU elements from fertile isotopes. This paper will present and discuss the results of a four-bundle, neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and transient analyses of proposed inert matrix materials in comparison with the results of similar analyses for reference UOX fuel bundles. The results of this work are to be used for screening purposes to identify the general feasibility of utilizing specific inert matrix fuel compositions in existing and future light water reactors. Compositions identified as feasible using the results of these analyses still require further detailed neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and transient analysis study coupled with rigorous experimental testing and qualification.

  6. Dissolution behavior of MgO based inert matrix fuel for the transmutation of minor actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühr-Ebert, E. L.; Lichte, E.; Bukaemskiy, A.; Finkeldei, S.; Klinkenberg, M.; Brandt, F.; Bosbach, D.; Modolo, G.

    2018-07-01

    This study explores the dissolution properties of magnesia-based inert matrix nuclear fuel (IMF) containing transuranium elements (TRU). Pure MgO pellets as well as MgO pellets containing CeO2, as surrogate for TRU oxides, and are considered as model systems for genuine magnesia based inert matrix fuel were fabricated. The aim of this study is to identify conditions at which the matrix material can be selectively dissolved during the head-end reprocessing step, allowing a separation of MgO from the actinides, whereas the actinides remain undissolved. The dissolution behavior was studied in macroscopic batch experiments as a function of nitric acid concentration, dissolution medium volume, temperature, stirring velocity, and pellet density (85, 90, 96, and 99%TD). To mimic pellets with various burn-ups the density of the here fabricated pellets was varied. MgO is soluble even under mild conditions (RT, 2.5 mol/L HNO3). The dissolution rates of MgO at different acid concentrations are rather similar, whereas the dissolution rate is strongly dependent on the temperature. Via a microscopic approach, a model was developed to describe the evolution of the pellet surface area during dissolution and determine a surface normalized dissolution rate. Moreover, dissolution rates of the inert matrix fuel containing CeO2 were determined as a function of the acid concentration and temperature. During the dissolution of MgO/CeO2 pellets the MgO dissolves completely, while CeO2 (>99%) remains undissolved. This study intends to provide a profound understanding of the chemical performance of magnesia based IMF containing fissile material. The feasibility of the dissolution of magnesia based IMF with nitric acid is discussed.

  7. Progress on inert matrix fuels for minor actinide transmutation in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnerot, Jean-Marc; Ferroud-Plattet, Marie-Pierre; Lamontagne, Jerome

    2007-07-01

    An extensive irradiation program has been devoted by CEA to the assessment of transmutation using minor actinide bearing inert support targets. A first irradiation experiment was performed in the fast neutron reactor Phenix, in parallel to other experiments carried out in the HFR and Siloe reactors, in order to assess the behavior under fast neutron flux of various materials intended as inert support matrix for transmutation targets. This experiment, which included the two steps MATINA 1 and MATINA 1A, was completed in 2004 and underwent complete post irradiation examinations (PIE) , whose results are presented in this paper. All themore » pure inert materials showed a satisfactory behavior under fast neutrons except Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - which exhibits a swelling close to 11 vol. % after irradiation. In presence of UO{sub 2} fissile particles, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} proved to be more stable in term of swelling as inert support than MgO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrices, under the same irradiation conditions. A second experiment ECRIX H in Phenix involving composite pellets with an MgO matrix and AmO{sub 2-x} particles was completed in 2006. The very first PIE results on ECRIX H are described in this paper. At the light of these first experiments, a second phase dedicated to the design optimization of the target was initiated and three new irradiation experiments - MATINA 2-3, CAMIX COCHIX in Phenix and HELIOS in HFR - were started in 2006 and 2007. (authors)« less

  8. Chromium liquid waste inertization in an inorganic alkali activated matrix: leaching and NMR multinuclear approach.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Chiara; Lancellotti, Isabella; Barbieri, Luisa; Spinella, Alberto; Saladino, Maria Luisa; Martino, Delia Chillura; Caponetti, Eugenio; Armetta, Francesco; Leonelli, Cristina

    2015-04-09

    A class of inorganic binders, also known as geopolymers, can be obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicate powders at room temperature. The process is affected by many parameters (curing time, curing temperature, relative humidity etc.) and leads to a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous waste. In this study an industrial liquid waste containing a high amount of chromium (≈ 2.3 wt%) in the form of metalorganic salts is inertized into a metakaolin based geopolymer matrix. One of the innovative aspects is the exploitation of the water contained in the waste for the geopolymerization process. This avoided any drying treatment, a common step in the management of liquid hazardous waste. The evolution of the process--from the precursor dissolution to the final geopolymer matrix hardening--of different geopolymers containing a waste amount ranging from 3 to 20%wt and their capability to inertize chromium cations were studied by: i) the leaching tests, according to the EN 12,457 regulation, at different curing times (15, 28, 90 and 540 days) monitoring releases of chromium ions (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) and the cations constituting the aluminosilicate matrix (Na, Si, Al); ii) the humidity variation for different curing times (15 and 540 days); iii) SEM characterization at different curing times (28 and 540 days); iv) the trend of the solution conductivity and pH during the leaching test; v) the characterization of the short-range ordering in terms of TOT bonds (where T is Al or Si) by (29)Si and (27)Al solid state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (ss MAS NMR) for geopolymers containing high amounts of waste (10-20%wt). The results show the formation of a stable matrix after only 15 days independently on the waste amount introduced; the longer curing times increase the matrices stabilities and their ability to immobilize chromium cations. The maximum amount of waste that can be inertized is around 10 wt% after a curing time of 28 days

  9. Preliminary fabrication and characterisation of inert matrix and thoria fuels for plutonium disposition in light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettraino, F.; Magnani, G.; La Torretta, T.; Marmo, E.; Coelli, S.; Luzzi, L.; Ossi, P.; Zappa, G.

    1999-08-01

    The plutonium disposition is presently acknowledged as a most urgent issue at the world level. Inert matrix and thoria fuel concepts for Pu burning in LWRs show good potential in providing effective and ultimate solutions to this issue. In non-fertile (U-free) inert matrix fuel, plutonium oxide is diluted within inert oxides such as stabilised ZrO 2, Al 2O 3, MgO or MgAl 2O 4. Thoria addition, which helps improve neutronic characteristics of inert fuels, appears as a promising variant of U-free fuel. In the context of an R&D activity aimed at assessing the feasibility of the fuel concept above, simulated fuel pellets have been produced both from dry-powder metallurgy and the sol-gel route. Results show that they can be fabricated by matching basic nuclear grade specifications such as the required geometry, density and microstructure. Some characterisation testing dealing with thermo-physical properties, ion irradiation damage and solubility also have been started. Results from thermo-physical measurements at room temperature have been achieved. A main feature stemming from solubility testing outcomes is a very high chemical stability which should render the fuel strongly diversion resistant and suitable for direct final disposal in deep geological repository (once-through solution).

  10. Oxidation and reduction behaviors of a prototypic MgO-PuO2-x inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Shuhei; Osaka, Masahiko

    2017-04-01

    Oxidation and reduction behaviors of prototypic MgO-based inert matrix fuels (IMFs) containing PuO2-x were experimentally investigated by means of thermogravimetry. The oxidation and reduction kinetics of the MgO-PuO2-x specimen were determined. The oxidation and reduction rates of the MgO-PuO2-x were found to be low compared with those of PuO2-x. It is note that the changes in O/Pu ratios of MgO-PuO2-x from stoichiometry were smaller than those of PuO2-x at high oxygen partial pressure.

  11. The feasibility of using molten carbonate corrosion for separating a nuclear surrogate for plutonium oxide from silicon carbide inert matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ting; Baney, Ronald H.; Tulenko, James

    2010-10-01

    Silicon carbide is one of the prime candidates as a matrix material in inert matrix fuels (IMF) being designed to reduce the plutonium inventories. Since complete fission and transmutation is not practical in a single in-core run, it is necessary to separate the non-transmuted actinide materials from the silicon carbide matrix for recycling. In this work, SiC was corroded in sodium carbonate (Na 2CO 3) and potassium carbonate (K 2CO 3), to form water soluble sodium or potassium silicate. Separation of the transuranics was achieved by dissolving the SiC corrosion product in boiling water. Ceria (CeO 2), which was used as a surrogate for plutonium oxide (PuO 2), was not corroded in these molten salt environments. The molten salt depth, which is a distance between the salt/air interface to the upper surface of SiC pellets, significantly affected the rate of corrosion. The corrosion was faster in K 2CO 3 than in Na 2CO 3 molten salt at 1050 °C, when the initial molten salt depths were kept the same for both salts.

  12. Neutronics calculations on the impact of burnable poisons to safety and non-proliferation aspects of inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistner, C.; Liebert, W.; Fujara, F.

    2006-06-01

    Inert matrix fuels (IMF) with plutonium may play a significant role to dispose of stockpiles of separated plutonium from military or civilian origin. For reasons of reactivity control of such fuels, burnable poisons (BP) will have to be used. The impact of different possible BP candidates (B, Eu, Er and Gd) on the achievable burnup as well as on safety and non-proliferation aspects of IMF are analyzed. To this end, cell burnup calculations have been performed and burnup dependent reactivity coefficients (boron worth, fuel temperature and moderator void coefficient) were calculated. All BP candidates were analyzed for one initial BP concentration and a range of different initial plutonium-concentrations (0.4-1.0 g cm-3) for reactor-grade plutonium isotopic composition as well as for weapon-grade plutonium. For the two most promising BP candidates (Er and Gd), a range of different BP concentrations was investigated to study the impact of BP concentration on fuel burnup. A set of reference fuels was identified to compare the performance of uranium-fuels, MOX and IMF with respect to (1) the fraction of initial plutonium being burned, (2) the remaining absolute plutonium concentration in the spent fuel and (3) the shift in the isotopic composition of the remaining plutonium leading to differences in the heat and neutron rate produced. In the case of IMF, the remaining Pu in spent fuel is unattractive for a would be proliferator. This underlines the attractiveness of an IMF approach for disposal of Pu from a non-proliferation perspective.

  13. Oriented Polar Molecules in a Solid Inert-Gas Matrix: A Proposed Method for Measuring the Electric Dipole Moment of the Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, A.; Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a very sensitive method for measuring the electric dipole moment of the electron using polar molecules embedded in a cryogenic solid matrix of inert-gas atoms. The polar molecules can be oriented in the $\\hat{\\rm{z}}$ direction by an applied electric field, as has recently been demonstrated by Park, et al. [Angewandte Chemie {\\bf 129}, 1066 (2017)]. The trapped molecules are prepared into a state which has its electron spin perpendicular to $\\hat{\\rm{z}}$, and a magnetic field along $\\hat{\\rm{z}}$ causes precession of this spin. An electron electric dipole moment $d_e$ would affect this precession due to the up to 100~GV/cm effective electric field produced by the polar molecule. The large number of polar molecules that can be embedded in a matrix, along with the expected long coherence times for the precession, allows for the possibility of measuring $d_e$ to an accuracy that surpasses current measurements by many orders of magnitude. Because the matrix can inhibit molecular rotations and lock the orientation of the polar molecules, it may not be necessary to have an electric field present during the precession. The proposed technique can be applied using a variety of polar molecules and inert gases, which, along with other experimental variables, should allow for careful study of systematic uncertainties in the measurement.

  14. Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Nd(x)Sc(y)Zr(1-x-y)O(2-δ) Materials Proposed for Inert Matrix Fuel Applications.

    PubMed

    Hayes, John R; Grosvenor, Andrew P; Saoudi, Mouna

    2016-02-01

    Inert matrix fuels (IMF) consist of transuranic elements (i.e., Pu, Am, Np, Cm) embedded in a neutron transparent (inert) matrix and can be used to "burn up" (transmute) these elements in current or Generation IV nuclear reactors. Yttria-stabilized zirconia has been extensively studied for IMF applications, but the low thermal conductivity of this material limits its usefulness. Other elements can be used to stabilize the cubic zirconia structure, and the thermal conductivity of the fuel can be increased through the use of a lighter stabilizing element. To this end, a series of Nd(x)Sc(y)Zr(1-x-y)O(2-δ) materials has been synthesized via a co-precipitation reaction and characterized by multiple techniques (Nd was used as a surrogate for Am). The long-range and local structures of these materials were studied using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, the stability of these materials over a range of temperatures has been studied by annealing the materials at 1100 and 1400 °C. It was shown that the Nd(x)Sc(y)Zr(1-x-y)O(2-δ) materials maintained a single cubic phase upon annealing at high temperatures only when both Nd and Sc were present with y ≥ 0.10 and x + y > 0.15.

  15. The evaluation of the pyrochemistry for the treatment of Gen IV nuclear fuels Inert matrix chlorination studies in the gas phase or molten chloride salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, S.; Péron, F.; Lacquement, J.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the fuels for the future Gen IV nuclear reactors will be totally different from those of PWR, especially for the GFR concept including a closed cycle. In these reactors, fissile materials (carbides or nitrides of actinides) should be surrounded by an inert matrix. In order to build a reprocessing process scheme, the behavior of the potential inert matrices (silicon carbide, titanium nitride, and zirconium carbide and nitride) was studied by hydro- and pyrometallurgy. This paper deals with the chlorination results at high temperature by pyrometallurgy. For the first time, the reactivity of the matrix towards chlorine gas was assessed in the gas phase. TiN, ZrN and ZrC are very reactive from 400 °C whereas it is necessary to be over 900 °C for SiC to be as fast. In molten chloride melts, the bubbling of chlorine gas is less efficient than in gas phase but it is possible to attack the matrices. Electrochemical methods were also used to dissolve the refractory materials, leading to promising results with TiN, ZrN and ZrC. The massive SiC samples used were not conductive enough to be studied and in this case specific SiC-coated carbon electrodes were used. The key point of these studies was to find a method to separate the matrix compounds from the fissile material in order to link the head to the core of the process (electrochemical separation or liquid-liquid reductive extraction in the case of a pyrochemical reprocessing).

  16. Investigation of Nd xY 0.25-xZr 0.75O 1.88 inert matrix fuel materials made by a co-precipitation synthetic route

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, John R.; Grosvenor, Andrew P.

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a material that we are considering in our inert matrix fuel nuclear reactors, but a complete characterization of these materials is required for them to be licensed for use. A series of NdxY0.25–xZr0.75O1.88 materials have been synthesized using a co-precipitation method, and the thermal stability of these materials has been studied by annealing them at 1400 and 1500 °C. (Nd was used as surrogate for Am.) The long-range and local structures of the materials were characterized via powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Zr K- and Ymore » K-edges. These results were compared with the previous characterization of Nd-YSZ materials synthesized using a ceramic method. Moreover, the results indicated that the ordering in the local metal–oxygen polyhedral remains relatively unaffected by the synthetic method, but there was increased long-range disorder in the materials prepared by the co-precipitation method. Further, it was found that the materials produced by the co-precipitation method were unexpectedly unstable when annealed at high temperature. This study highlights the importance of determining the effect of synthetic method on material properties and demonstrates how the co-precipitation route could be used to produce inert matrix fuels.« less

  17. Inert electrode connection

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, J.D.; Woods, R.W.; DeYoung, D.H.; Ray, S.P.

    1985-02-19

    An inert electrode connection is disclosed wherein a layer of inert electrode material is bonded to a layer of conductive material by providing at least one intermediate layer of material therebetween comprising a predetermined ratio of inert material to conductive material. In a preferred embodiment, the connection is formed by placing in a die a layer of powdered inert material, at least one layer of a mixture of powdered inert material and conductive material, and a layer of powdered conductive material. The connection is then formed by pressing the material at 15,000--20,000 psi to form a powder compact and then densifying the powder compact in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature of 1,200--1,500 C. 5 figs.

  18. Guidance Documents for Inert Ingredients

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These guidance documents provide information on various inert ingredient issues, including the general process for submitting petitions or requests, adding trade names to our database, and doing searches related to inert ingredients.

  19. Origins of inert Higgs doublets

    DOE PAGES

    Kephart, Thomas W.; Yuan, Tzu -Chiang

    2016-03-24

    Here, we consider beyond the standard model embedding of inert Higgs doublet fields. We argue that inert Higgs doublets can arise naturally in grand unified theories where the necessary associated Z 2 symmetry can occur automatically. Several examples are discussed.

  20. Inert Ingredients Overview and Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Web page provides information on inert ingredients approved for use in pesticide products and the guidance documents that are available to assist in obtaining approval for a new inert ingredient.

  1. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters considered for space propulsion systems were investigated. Electron diffusion across a magnetic field was examined utilizing a basic model. The production of doubly charged ions was correlated using only overall performance parameters. The use of this correlation is therefore possible in the design stage of large gas thrusters, where detailed plasma properties are not available. Argon hollow cathode performance was investigated over a range of emission currents, with the positions of the inert, keeper, and anode varied. A general trend observed was that the maximum ratio of emission to flow rate increased at higher propellant flow rates. It was also found that an enclosed keeper enhances maximum cathode emission at high flow rates. The maximum cathode emission at a given flow rate was associated with a noisy high voltage mode. Although this mode has some similarities to the plume mode found at low flows and emissions, it is encountered by being initially in the spot mode and increasing emission. A detailed analysis of large, inert-gas thruster performance was carried out. For maximum thruster efficiency, the optimum beam diameter increases from less than a meter at under 2000 sec specific impulse to several meters at 10,000 sec. The corresponding range in input power ranges from several kilowatts to megawatts.

  2. Inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inert gas performance with three types of 12 cm diameter magnetoelectrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters was tested. The types tested included: (1) a hemispherical shaped discharge chamber with platinum cobalt magnets; (2) three different lengths of the hemispherical chambers with samarium cobalt magnets; and (3) three lengths of the conical shaped chambers with aluminum nickel cobalt magnets. The best argon performance was produced by a 8.0 cm long conical chamber with alnico magnets. The best xenon high mass utilization performance was obtained with the same 8.0 cm long conical thruster. The hemispherical thruster obtained 75 to 87% mass utilization at 185 to 205 eV/ion of singly charged ion equivalent beam.

  3. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Some advances in component technology for inert gas thrusters are described. The maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar was increased 60-70% by the use of an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar, but without emissive oxide, was also obtained. A 30 cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages give double-ion measurements consistent with a double ion correlation developed previously using 15 cm thruster data. An attempt was made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The reason this attempt was unsuccessful is not yet clear. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration was evaluated. The ion impingement on the single grid accelerator was found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator was 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  4. THE INERT GAS PURIFIER

    SciTech Connect

    Grotowski, K.; Rapacki, H.; Slapa, M.

    1961-01-01

    A device used for purmfication of inert gases used nkn nuclear detectors such as grid ionization chambers, proportional, and gas scintillation counters is described. Gas to be purifnked cireulates in a svstem containing a column consisting of trays with Ca and Mg shavings, horizontal pipes, valves, and a detector to be filled with a pure gas. The device is designed to work at up to 10 atm. The apparatus ts out-gassed very carefully. lt is filled with argon, which ps cnkrculated for 5 hours and then pumped out. Operation is based on the thermal circulation principle. The process depends onmore » the filter temperature and purification time, which in turn, are function of the gas pressure and the chemical composition of the filter. The best resolution obtained for alpha particles from natural uranium at 4.20 and 4.76 Mev was 6%. Commercial argon at 6 atm was used. Curves obtained show that the filter temperature cannot be lower than 210 deg C and that the one containing calcium mixed with magnesium gives better results than that containing pure calcium only. (L.N.N.)« less

  5. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Inert gases are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole discharge chamber investigated was shown capable of low discharge chamber losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of optimization. Minimum discharge losses were 200 to 250 eV/ion for xenon and 300 to 350 eV/ion for argon, while flatness parameters in the plane of the accelerator grid were 0.85 to 0.95. The design used employs low magnetic field strengths, which permits the use of sheet-metal parts. The corner problem of the discharge chamber was resolved with recessed corner anodes, which approximately equalized both the magnetic field above the anodes and the electron currents to these anodes. Argon hollow cathodes were investigated at currents up to about 5 amperes using internal thermionic emitters. Cathode chamber diameter optimized in the 1.0 to 2.5 cm range, while orifices diameter optimized in the 0.5 to 5 mm range. The use of a bias voltage for the internal emitter extended the operating range and facilitated starting. The masses of 15 and 30 cm flight type thrusters were estimated at about 4.2 and 10.8 kg.

  6. Compressing the Inert Doublet Model

    DOE PAGES

    Blinov, Nikita; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Morrissey, David E.; ...

    2016-02-16

    The Inert Doublet Model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. We found that this stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. In conclusion, we derive new limits on the compressed Inert Doublet Model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  7. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  8. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo that...

  9. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo that...

  10. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo that...

  11. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo that...

  12. Mechanisms of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Experiments describing the mechanism of inert gas narcosis are reported. A strain of mice, genetically altered to increase susceptibility to botulin poisoning (synaptic response) appears to increase metabolic rates while breathing argon; this infers a genetically altered synaptic response to both botulin toxin and narcotic gases. Studies of metabolic depression in human subjects breathing either air or a 30% mixture of nitrous oxide indicate that nitrous oxide narcosis does not produce pronounced metabolic depression. Tests on mice for relative susceptibilities to narcosis and oxygen poisoning as a function of fatty membrane composition show that alteration of the fatty acid composition of phospholipids increases resistance to metabolically depressant effects of argon but bas no effect on nitrous oxide narcosis. Another study suggests that acclimatization to low tension prior to high pressure oxygen treatment enhances susceptibility of mice to convulsions and death; developing biochemical lesions cause CNS metabolite reductions and pulmonary damage.

  13. Inert-gas thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Trock, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to recent advances in component technology for inert-gas thrusters. It is noted that the maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar can be increased 60-70% by using an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar but without emissive oxide has also been attained. A 30-cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages is found to give double-ion measurements consistent with a double-ion correlation developed earlier on the basis of 15-cm thruster data. An attempt is made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration is assessed. The ion impingement on the single-grid accelerator is found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator is 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  14. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF... that: (1) Hold and interbarrier spaces on a vessel with full secondary barriers are inerted so that the... interbarrier spaces contain only dry air or inert gas on: (i) A vessel with partial secondary barriers; (ii) A...

  15. A dynamic inert metal anode.

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn, J. N.

    1998-11-09

    A new concept for a stable anode for aluminum electrowinning is described. The anode consists of a cup-shaped metal alloy container filled with a molten salt that contains dissolved aluminum. The metal alloy can be any of a number of alloys, but it must contain aluminum as a secondary alloying metal. A possible alloy composition is copper with 5 to 15 weight percent aluminum. In the presence of oxygen, aluminum on the metal anode's exterior surface forms a continuous alumina film that is thick enough to protect the anode from chemical attack by cryolite during electrolysis and thin enough tomore » maintain electrical conductivity. However, the alumina film is soluble in cryolite, so it must be regenerated in situ. Film regeneration is achieved by the transport of aluminum metal from the anode's molten salt interior through the metal wall to the anode's exterior surface, where the transported aluminum oxidizes to alumina in the presence of evolving oxygen to maintain the protective alumina film. Periodic addition of aluminum metal to the anode's interior keeps the aluminum activity in the molten salt at the desired level. This concept for an inert anode is viable as long as the amount of aluminum produced at the cathode greatly exceeds the amount of aluminum required to maintain the anode's protective film.« less

  16. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas system... the cargo area meeting paragraph (a) of this section; (c) Automatic and manual inert gas pressure...

  17. Inert gas transport in blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Baker, A Barry; Farmery, Andrew D

    2011-04-01

    This article establishes the basic mathematical models and the principles and assumptions used for inert gas transfer within body tissues-first, for a single compartment model and then for a multicompartment model. From these, and other more complex mathematical models, the transport of inert gases between lungs, blood, and other tissues is derived and compared to known experimental studies in both animals and humans. Some aspects of airway and lung transfer are particularly important to the uptake and elimination of inert gases, and these aspects of gas transport in tissues are briefly described. The most frequently used inert gases are those that are administered in anesthesia, and the specific issues relating to the uptake, transport, and elimination of these gases and vapors are dealt with in some detail showing how their transfer depends on various physical and chemical attributes, particularly their solubilities in blood and different tissues. Absorption characteristics of inert gases from within gas cavities or tissue bubbles are described, and the effects other inhaled gas mixtures have on the composition of these gas cavities are discussed. Very brief consideration is given to the effects of hyper- and hypobaric conditions on inert gas transport. © 2011 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 1:569-592, 2011.

  18. Kinetically inert Cu in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Megan B; Voelker, Bettina M

    2003-02-01

    Many studies have shown that Cu and other metals in natural waters are mostly bound by unidentified compounds interpreted to be strong ligands reversibly complexing a given metal. However, commonly applied analytical techniques are not capable of distinguishing strongly but reversibly complexed metal from metal bound in kinetically inert compounds. In this work, we use a modified competitive ligand exchange adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry method combined with size fractionation to show that most if not all of the apparently very strongly (log K > or = 13) bound Cu in samples from five New England coastal waters (1-18 nM, 10-60% of total Cu) is actually present as kinetically inert compounds. In three of the five samples examined by ultrafiltration, a significant portion of the 0.2-microm-filtrable inert Cu was retained by a 0.02-microm-pore size filter, suggesting that at least some of the Cu was kinetically inert because it was physically sequestered in colloidal material. The rest of the ambient Cu, and Cu added in titrations, were reversibly bound in complexes that could be modeled as having conditional stability constants of 10(10)-10(13). The Cu-binding ability of these complexes was equivalent to that of seawater containing reasonable concentrations of humic substances from terrestrial sources, approximately 0.15-0.45 mg of C/L. Both the inert compounds and the reversible ligands were important for determining [Cu2+] at ambient Cu levels in our samples.

  19. Inert gases in Sea of Fertility regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Zadorozhnyy, I. K.

    1974-01-01

    The content and isotopic composition were studied of inert gases -- He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe -- in samples of lunar regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. The samples were taken from depths of about 12 and 30 cm. The high concentrations of inert gases exceed by several orders their concentrations observed in ordinary stony meteorites. The gases in lunar regolith were a complex mixture of gases of different origins: Solar, cosmogenic, radiogenic, and so on. Solar wind gases predominated, distributed in the thin surficial layer of the regolith grains. The concentrations of these gases in the surficial layer is several cubic centimeters per gram. The isotopic composition of the inert gases of solar origin approaches their composition measured in gas-rich meteorites.

  20. Water in the presence of inert Lennard-Jones obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtjak, Mario; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-04-01

    Water confined by the presence of a 'sea' of inert obstacles was examined. In the article, freely mobile two-dimensional Mercedes-Benz (MB) water put to a disordered, but fixed, matrix of Lennard-Jones disks was studied by the Monte Carlo computer simulations. For the MB water molecules in the matrix of Lennard-Jones disks, we explored the structures, hydrogen-bond-network formation and thermodynamics as a function of temperature and size and density of matrix particles. We found that the structure of model water is perturbed by the presence of the obstacles. Density of confined water, which was in equilibrium with the bulk water, was smaller than the density of the bulk water and the temperature dependence of the density of absorbed water did not show the density anomaly in the studied temperature range. The behaviour observed as a consequence of confinement is similar to that of increasing temperature, which can for a matrix lead to a process similar to capillary evaporation. At the same occupancy of space, smaller matrix molecules cause higher destruction effect on the absorbed water molecules than the bigger ones. We have also tested the hypothesis that at low matrix densities the obstacles induce an increased ordering and 'hydrogen bonding' of the MB model molecules, relative to pure fluid, while at high densities the obstacles reduce MB water structuring, as they prevent the fluid to form good 'hydrogen-bonding' networks. However, for the size of matrix molecules similar to that of water, we did not observe this effect.

  1. Performance of an adjustable, threaded inertance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. J.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Nellis, G. F.; Liu, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler depends strongly on the design of the inertance tube. The phase angle produced by the inertance tube is very sensitive to its diameter and length. Recent developments are reported here regarding an adjustable inertance device that can be adjusted in real time. The inertance passage is formed by the root of a concentric cylindrical threaded device. The depth of the threads installed on the outer screw varies. In this device, the outer screw can be rotated four and half turns. At the zero turn position the length of the passage is 1.74 m and the hydraulic diameter is 7 mm. By rotating the outer screw, the inner threaded rod engages with additional, larger depth threads. Therefore, at its upper limit of rotation, the inertance passage includes both the original 1.74 m length with 7mm hydraulic diameter plus an additional 1.86 m length with a 10 mm hydraulic diameter. A phase shift change of 24° has been experimentally measured by changing the position of outer screw while operating the device at a frequency of 60 Hz. This phase angle shift is less than the theoretically predicted value due to the presence of a relatively large leak through the thread clearance. Therefore, the distributed component model of the inertance tube was modified to account for the leak path causing the data to agree with the model. Further, the application of vacuum grease to the threads causes the performance of the device to improve substantially.

  2. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  3. Inert gas effects on embryonic development.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, H. S.; Grimard, M.

    1972-01-01

    It had been found in previous investigations that hatchability of fertile chicken eggs is reduced to 50% or less of controls if incubation takes place in a low nitrogen atmosphere containing He. Although these results suggest some role for nitrogen in embryogenesis, it is possible that a requirement exists for an inert molecule closer in physical characteristics to nitrogen than is He. An investigation is conducted involving incubation at ground level pressure in a gas mixture in which the 79% inert component was either neon or argon. The effect of varying combinations of nitrogen, helium, and oxygen was also studied.

  4. Two systems developed for purifying inert atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Johnson, C. E.; Kyle, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Two systems, one for helium and one for argon, are used for purifying inert atmospheres. The helium system uses an activated charcoal bed at liquid nitrogen temperature to remove oxygen and nitrogen. The argon system uses heated titanium sponge to remove nitrogen and copper wool beds to remove oxygen. Both use molecular sieves to remove water vapor.

  5. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19...

  6. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19...

  7. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19...

  8. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19...

  9. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19...

  10. Portable spectrometer monitors inert gas shield in welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable spectrometer using photosensitive readouts, monitors the amount of oxygen and hydrogen in the inert gas shield of a tungsten-inert gas welding process. A fiber optic bundle transmits the light from the welding arc to the spectrometer.

  11. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried...

  12. Dynamic characteristics of stay cables with inerter dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiang; Zhu, Songye

    2018-06-01

    This study systematically investigates the dynamic characteristics of a stay cable with an inerter damper installed close to one end of a cable. The interest in applying inerter dampers to stay cables is partially inspired by the superior damping performance of negative stiffness dampers in the same application. A comprehensive parametric study on two major parameters, namely, inertance and damping coefficients, are conducted using analytical and numerical approaches. An inerter damper can be optimized for one vibration mode of a stay cable by generating identical wave numbers in two adjacent modes. An optimal design approach is proposed for inerter dampers installed on stay cables. The corresponding optimal inertance and damping coefficients are summarized for different damper locations and interested modes. Inerter dampers can offer better damping performance than conventional viscous dampers for the target mode of a stay cable that requires optimization. However, additional damping ratios in other vibration modes through inerter damper are relatively limited.

  13. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  14. Plasma processes in inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters, particularly with large diameters, have continued to be of interest for space propulsion applications. Two plasma processes are treated in this study: electron diffusion across magnetic fields and double ion production in inert-gas thrusters. A model is developed to describe electron diffusion across a magnetic field that is driven by both density and potential gradients, with Bohm diffusion used to predict the diffusion rate. This model has applications to conduction across magnetic fields inside a discharge chamber, as well as through a magnetic baffle region used to isolate a hollow cathode from the main chamber. A theory for double ion production is presented, which is not as complete as the electron diffusion theory described, but it should be a useful tool for predicting double ion sputter erosion. Correlations are developed that may be used, without experimental data, to predict double ion densities for the design of new and especially larger ion thrusters.

  15. A new understanding of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhang; Yi, Gao; Haiping, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetics are extremely important in modern surgery to greatly reduce the patient’s pain. The understanding of anesthesia at molecular level is the preliminary step for the application of anesthetics in clinic safely and effectively. Inert gases, with low chemical activity, have been found to cause anesthesia for centuries, but the mechanism is unclear yet. In this review, we first summarize the progress of theories about general anesthesia, especially for inert gas narcosis, and then propose a new hypothesis that the aggregated rather than the dispersed inert gas molecules are the key to trigger the narcosis to explain the steep dose-response relationship of anesthesia. Project supported by the Supercomputing Center of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China, the Shanghai Supercomputer Center, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21273268, 11290164, and 11175230), the Startup Funding from Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y290011011), “Hundred People Project” from Chinese Academy of Sciences, and “Pu-jiang Rencai Project” from Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 13PJ1410400).

  16. Inertance Tube Modeling and the Effects of Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    fluid dynamics. In one application in multistage cryocoolers , the performance of inertance tubes at the cryogenic temperatures is of interest. One... cryocoolers , the performance of inertance tubes at the cryogenic temperatures is of interest. One purpose of this paper is to understand how...acoustic power. KEYWORDS: Inertance tube, cryocoolers , pulse tube refrigerators, oscillating flow, computational fluid dynamics INTRODUCTION Pulse

  17. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49 °F...

  18. Inert Reassessment Document for Gluconic Acid and Sodium Salt

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Gluconic acid and D-gluconic acid are classified as List 3 inert ingredients, sodium gluconate is classified as a List 4B inert ingredient, and D-gluconic acid, sodium salt has not been categorized as to inert ingredient list classification status.

  19. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas system...

  20. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces must...

  1. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces must...

  2. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces must...

  3. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces must...

  4. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces must...

  5. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping must...

  6. Experimental study of the novel tuned mass damper with inerter which enables changes of inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeski, P.; Lazarek, M.; Perlikowski, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present the experimental verification of the novel tuned mass damper which enables changes of inertance. Characteristic feature of the proposed device is the presence of special type of inerter. This inerter incorporates a continuously variable transmission that enables stepless changes of inertance. Thus, it enables to adjust the parameters of the damping device to the current forcing characteristic. In the paper we present and describe the experimental rig that consists of the massive main oscillator forced kinematically and the prototype of the investigated damper. We perform a series of dedicated experiments to characterize the device and asses its damping efficiency. Moreover, we perform numerical simulations using the simple mathematical model of investigated system. Comparing the numerical results and the experimental data we legitimize the model and demonstrate the capabilities of the investigated tuned mass damper. Presented results prove that the concept of the novel type of tuned mass damper can be realized and enable to confirm its main advantages. Investigated prototype device offers excellent damping efficiency in a wide range of forcing frequencies.

  7. Leptogenesis, radiative neutrino masses and inert Higgs triplet dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wen-Bin; Gu, Pei-Hong

    2016-05-18

    We extend the standard model by three types of inert fields including Majorana fermion singlets/triplets, real Higgs singlets/triplets and leptonic Higgs doublets. In the presence of a softly broken lepton number and an exactly conserved Z{sub 2} discrete symmetry, these inert fields together can mediate a one-loop diagram for a Majorana neutrino mass generation. The heavier inert fields can decay to realize a successful leptogenesis while the lightest inert field can provide a stable dark matter candidate. As an example, we demonstrate the leptogenesis by the inert Higgs doublet decays. We also perform a systematic study on the inert Higgsmore » triplet dark matter scenario where the interference between the gauge and Higgs portal interactions can significantly affect the dark matter properties.« less

  8. Catalytic Reactor for Inerting of Aircraft Fuel Tanks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    Aluminum Panels After Triphase Corrosion Test 79 35 Inerting System Flows in Various Flight Modes 82 36 High Flow Reactor Parametric Data 84 37 System...AD/A-000 939 CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS George H. McDonald, et al AiResearch Manufacturing Company Prepared for: Air Force...190th Street 2b. GROUP Torrance, California .. REPORT TITLE CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS . OESCRIP TIVE NOTEs (Thpe of refpoft

  9. Mucosal Vaccination against Tuberculosis Using Inert Bioparticles

    PubMed Central

    Reljic, Rajko; Sibley, Laura; Huang, Jen-Min; Pepponi, Ilaria; Hoppe, Andreas; Hong, Huynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Needle-free, mucosal immunization is a highly desirable strategy for vaccination against many pathogens, especially those entering through the respiratory mucosa, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unfortunately, mucosal vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) is impeded by a lack of suitable adjuvants and/or delivery platforms that could induce a protective immune response in humans. Here, we report on a novel biotechnological approach for mucosal vaccination against TB that overcomes some of the current limitations. This is achieved by coating protective TB antigens onto the surface of inert bacterial spores, which are then delivered to the respiratory tract. Our data showed that mice immunized nasally with coated spores developed humoral and cellular immune responses and multifunctional T cells and, most importantly, presented significantly reduced bacterial loads in their lungs and spleens following pathogenic challenge. We conclude that this new vaccine delivery platform merits further development as a mucosal vaccine for TB and possibly also other respiratory pathogens. PMID:23959722

  10. Inerting Aircraft Fuel Systems Using Exhaust Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hehemann, David G.

    2002-01-01

    Our purpose in this proposal was to determine the feasibility of using carbon dioxide, possibly obtained from aircraft exhaust gases as a substance to inert the fuel contained in fuel tanks aboard aircraft. To do this, we decided to look at the effects carbon dioxide has upon commercial Jet-A aircraft fuel. In particular, we looked at the solubility of CO2 in Jet-A fuel, the pumpability of CO2-saturated Jet-A fuel, the flashpoint of Jet-A fuel under various mixtures of air and CO2, the static outgassing of CO2-Saturated Jet-A fuel and the dynamic outgassing of Jet-A fuel during pumping of Jet-A fuel.

  11. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  12. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using inert anodes

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A.

    2001-01-01

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The inert anodes used in the process preferably comprise a cermet material comprising ceramic oxide phase portions and metal phase portions.

  13. Comfort-oriented vehicle suspension design with skyhook inerter configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yinlong; Chen, Michael Z. Q.; Sun, Yonghui

    2017-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the comfort-oriented vehicle suspension design problem by using a skyhook inerter configuration. The rationale of the skyhook inerter is to use a grounded inerter to virtually increase the sprung mass of a vehicle, as it is analytically demonstrated that increasing the sprung mass can always improve the ride comfort performance. Semi-active means to realize the skyhook inerter configuration are investigated by using semi-active inerters. Three control laws, that is the on-off control, the anti-chatter on-off control, and the continuous control, are proposed for the semi-active inerter to approximate the skyhook inerter. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness and performances of these control laws. It is shown that the semi-active realizations of the skyhook inerter by using the proposed control laws can achieve over 10% improvement compared with the traditional strut, and similar performances are obtained for these control laws, with slight differences with respect to different static stiffnesses of the suspension system.

  14. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping must not pass through or terminate in an accommodation, service, or control space. ...

  15. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as..., service, or control space. (b) An inert gas generator that does not use flame burning equipment may be...

  16. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as...

  17. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using ceramic inert anodes

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Douglas A.; DiMilia, Robert A.; Dynys, Joseph M.; Phelps, Frankie E.; LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising ceramic inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The ceramic inert anodes used in the process may comprise oxides containing Fe and Ni, as well as other oxides, metals and/or dopants.

  18. Overcoming the Inert Knowledge Problem in Learning from Expository Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Nathalie

    Students often fail to store new information in memory in a way that is accessible or useful. The information they have acquired is inert. This paper examines the inert knowledge problem in the context of learning from informational expository text. Kintsch and van Dijk (1978) have suggested a framework for understanding learning from expository…

  19. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met, and...

  20. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume. ...

  1. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume. ...

  2. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume. ...

  3. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume. ...

  4. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume. ...

  5. Effect of inert propellant injection on Mars ascent vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, James E.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A Mars ascent vehicle is limited in performance by the propellant which can be brought from Earth. In some cases the vehicle performance can be improved by injecting inert gas into the engine, if the inert gas is available as an in-situ resource and does not have to be brought from Earth. Carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon are constituents of the Martian atmosphere which could be separated by compressing the atmosphere, without any chemical processing step. The effect of inert gas injection on rocket engine performance was analyzed with a numerical combustion code that calculated chemical equilibrium for engines of varying combustion chamber pressure, expansion ratio, oxidizer/fuel ratio, and inert injection fraction. Results of this analysis were applied to several candidate missions to determine how the required mass of return propellant needed in low Earth orbit could be decreased using inert propellant injection.

  6. Viking Helmet Corroles: Activating Inert Oxidometal Corroles.

    PubMed

    Schweyen, Peter; Brandhorst, Kai; Hoffmann, Martin; Wolfram, Benedikt; Zaretzke, Marc-Kevin; Bröring, Martin

    2017-10-09

    Chemically inert oxidometal(V) corrols of molybdenum and rhenium undergo clean ligand-exchange reactions upon the action of SiCl 4 . The resulting dichlorido complexes show trigonal prismatic coordination of the metal ion with the chlorine atoms residing in a cis configuration, and were studied by optical and resonance spectroscopy as well as DFT calculations. In situ reactivity studies with carbon nucleophiles indicate high reactivity for chlorine replacement. Treatment with sodium cyclopentadienide paves the way to robust molybdenum corrolocene half-sandwich complexes. These organometallic compounds are the first corrole species that stabilize an air-stable and diamagnetic low spin d 2 -Mo IV center. Structural, spectroelectrochemical, and chemical investigations prove a reversible Mo IV /Mo V redox couple close to the Fc/Fc + potential for these systems. The high stability of the compounds in both redox states calls for future applications in catalysis and as redox switch. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. GO1 Inert Test Article Captive Carry

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-10

    Generation Orbit Launch Services, Inc. (GO) completed the GO1 Inert Test Article captive carry flight test at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in December. Under a public-private partnership with NASA, GO developed the GO1-ITA, a mass properties and outer mold line simulator for the GO1 hypersonic flight testbed and earned NASA airworthiness approval for flight on NASA’s C-20a. NASA’s C-20a was originally modified to add a centerline hard point to carry the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) pod. Together with the NASA Armstrong team, a campaign of three flight tests was conducted, successfully completing all test objectives including clearing the operational flight envelope of the C-20a with the GO1-ITA mounted to the centerline hard point, and demonstrated the unique launch maneuver designed for air launch of the GO1 on operational flights starting in 2019. Data collected during the campaign will be used to validate models and inform the ongoing design and development of GO1.

  8. Computational Meso-Scale Study of Representative Unit Cubes for Inert Spheres Subject to Intense Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Cameron; Najjar, Fady; Stewart, D. Scott; Bdzil, John

    2012-11-01

    Modern-engineered high explosive (HE) materials can consist of a matrix of solid, inert particles embedded into an HE charge. When this charge is detonated, intense shock waves are generated. As these intense shocks interact with the inert particles, large deformations occur in the particles while the incident shock diffracts around the particle interface. We will present results from a series of 3-D DNS of an intense shock interacting with unit-cube configurations of inert particles embedded into nitromethane. The LLNL multi-physics massively parallel hydrodynamics code ALE3D is used to carry out high-resolution (4 million nodes) simulations. Three representative unit-cube configurations are considered: primitive cubic, face-centered and body-centered cubic for two particle material types of varying impedance ratios. Previous work has only looked at in-line particles configurations. We investigate the time evolution of the unit cell configurations, vorticity being generated by the shock interaction, as well as the velocity and acceleration of the particles until they reach the quasi-steady regime. LLNL-ABS-567694. CSS was supported by a summer internship through the HEDP program at LLNL. FMN's work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Apparatus For Metal/Inert-Gas Welding In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Metal/inert-gas welding-torch assembly operates in vacuum. Plasma generated in interior chamber and focused onto workpiece in vacuum. Pinch rollers feed wire to weld puddle. Controlled flow of plasma reduces dispersal in vacuum, preventing extinction.

  11. 114. SMALL ARMS (BUILDINGS 9798) AND INERT STOREHOUSE (BLDGS. 1031040) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. SMALL ARMS (BUILDINGS 97-98) AND INERT STOREHOUSE (BLDGS. 103-1040) PLAN AND ELEVATIONS, FULLER/SCOTT, MARCH 15, 1941. QP ACC 1791. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  12. Inert Reassessment Document for Alkyl (C8-C24)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Inert Ingredient Tolerance Reassessments: Two Exemptions from theRequirement of a Tolerance for Alkyl (C8-C24) Benzenesulfonic Acid and its Ammonium, Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Sodium, and Zinc Salts

  13. Inert Reassessment Document for Poly(oxyethylene)(5) sorbitan monooleate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The sorbitan fatty acid esters and polysorbates are inert ingredients used as surfactants, related adjuvants of surfactants, emulsifiers, buffering agents, and corrosion inhibitors in a variety of pesticide products.

  14. Safety analysis report for the SR-101 inert reservoir package

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-11-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) AL Weapons Surety Division (WSD) requires the SR-101 Inert Reservoir Package to : meet applicable hazardous material transportation requirements. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is based on : requirements in place at the ...

  15. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  16. Light weight polymer matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix is layed up, cured, and thermally aged at about 750.degree. F. in the presence of an inert gas. The heat treatment improves the structural integrity and alters the electrical conductivity of the materials. In the preferred embodiment PMR-15 polyimides and Celion-6000 graphite fibers are used.

  17. Method of making molten carbonate fuel cell ceramic matrix tape

    DOEpatents

    Maricle, Donald L.; Putnam, Gary C.; Stewart, Jr., Robert C.

    1984-10-23

    A method of making a thin, flexible, pliable matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described. The method comprises admixing particles inert in the molten carbonate environment with an organic polymer binder and ceramic particle. The composition is applied to a mold surface and dried, and the formed compliant matrix material removed.

  18. Inflation and dark matter in the inert doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandhya; Kumar, Abhass

    2017-11-01

    We discuss inflation and dark matter in the inert doublet model coupled non-minimally to gravity where the inert doublet is the inflaton and the neutral scalar part of the doublet is the dark matter candidate. We calculate the various inflationary parameters like n s , r and P s and then proceed to the reheating phase where the inflaton decays into the Higgs and other gauge bosons which are non-relativistic owing to high effective masses. These bosons further decay or annihilate to give relativistic fermions which are finally responsible for reheating the universe. At the end of the reheating phase, the inert doublet which was the inflaton enters into thermal equilibrium with the rest of the plasma and its neutral component later freezes out as cold dark matter with a mass of about 2 TeV.

  19. METAL SPRAYER FOR USE IN VACUUM OR INERT ATMOSPHERE

    DOEpatents

    Monroe, R.E.

    1958-10-14

    A metal sprayer is described for use in a vacuum or inert atmosphere with a straight line wire feed and variable electrode contact angle. This apparatus comprises two wires which are fed through straight tubes of two mechanisms positioned on opposite sides of a central tube to which an inert gas is fed. The two mechanisms and the wires being fed constitute electrodes to which electrical current is supplied so that the wires are melted by the electric are formed at their contacting region and sprayed by the gas supplied by the central tube. This apparatus is designed specifically to apply a zirconium coating to uranium in an inert atmosphere and without the use of an oxidizing flame.

  20. Nonchamber, Root-Side, Inert-Gas Purging During Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved apparatus distributes inert gas to protect against oxidation on root side of weld during welding and after welding while joint remains hot. Simple and lightweight; readily moved along weld path in synchronism with torch. Because it concentrates inert gas where needed, consumes gas at relatively low rate, and not necessary to monitor oxygen content of protective atmosphere. Apparatus does not obscure view of root side of weld. Used for full-penetration plasma-arc welding of such reactive metals as aluminum/lithium alloys and titanium.

  1. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  2. Inert Reassessment Document for D & C Green No. 6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Based upon the reasonable certainty of no harm safety findings, D&C Green No. 6, D&C Red No. 17, D&C Red No. 33, D&C Violet No. 2, and FD&C Yellow No. 6 Aluminum Lake can each be classified as L ist 4B inert ingredients.

  3. Model identification methodology for fluid-based inerters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofu; Jiang, Jason Zheng; Titurus, Branislav; Harrison, Andrew

    2018-06-01

    Inerter is the mechanical dual of the capacitor via the force-current analogy. It has the property that the force across the terminals is proportional to their relative acceleration. Compared with flywheel-based inerters, fluid-based forms have advantages of improved durability, inherent damping and simplicity of design. In order to improve the understanding of the physical behaviour of this fluid-based device, especially caused by the hydraulic resistance and inertial effects in the external tube, this work proposes a comprehensive model identification methodology. Firstly, a modelling procedure is established, which allows the topological arrangement of the mechanical networks to be obtained by mapping the damping, inertance and stiffness effects directly to their respective hydraulic counterparts. Secondly, an experimental sequence is followed, which separates the identification of friction, stiffness and various damping effects. Furthermore, an experimental set-up is introduced, where two pressure gauges are used to accurately measure the pressure drop across the external tube. The theoretical models with improved confidence are obtained using the proposed methodology for a helical-tube fluid inerter prototype. The sources of remaining discrepancies are further analysed.

  4. Determination of Ethane-1,2-diamine in Inert Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Graeme H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a procedure for determining ethane-1,2-diamine (EN) which is generally applicable for inert or labile complexes or for EN in its salts, although it cannot be used directly with ammonium or coordinated ammonia. It gives results with five percent accuracy or better and requires less than one hour laboratory time. (JN)

  5. Heaterless ignition of inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Heaterless inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes were investigated with the aim of reducing ion thruster complexity and increasing ion thruster reliability. Cathodes heated by glow discharges are evaluated for power requirements, flowrate requirements, and life limiting mechanisms. An accelerated cyclic life test is presented.

  6. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; (b) Has a pressure control system that: (1) Prevents the inert gas system from raising the cargo tank pressure to more than the relief valve setting; and (2) Maintains at least a 3.5 kPa gauge (approx. 0.5 psig) pressure within the containment system at all times, including cargo discharge; (c) Has storage...

  7. Development of inert density mock materials for HMX

    DOE PAGES

    Yeager, John D.; Higginbotham Duque, Amanda L.; Shorty, Marvin; ...

    2017-09-22

    Inert surrogates or mocks for high explosives are commonly used in place of the real material for complex experiments or in situations where safety is a concern. We tested several materials as potential mocks for HMX in terms of density, thermal stability, and processability. Selection criteria were developed and a literature search was conducted primarily using the Cambridge Structural Database. Moreover, out of over 200 potentially acceptable materials, six were chosen for crystallization experiments and a suite of analytical characterization. Of these six, 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine, N,N'-bis(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenyl)oxamide, and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzamide all were found to be thermally stable at 150°C, matched HMX density asmore » a pressed pellet, and could be crystallized to appropriate particle sizes. These three materials are considered suitable inert density mocks for HMX and will be the subject of future testing.« less

  8. Operation of the J-series thruster using inert gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1982-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters using inert gases are candidates for large space systems. The J-Series 30 cm diameter thruster, designed for operation up to 3 k-W with mercury, is at a state of technology readiness. The characteristics of operation with xenon, krypton, and argon propellants in a J-Series thruster with that obtained with mercury are compared. The performance of the discharge chamber, ion optics, and neutralizer and the overall efficiency as functions of input power and specific impulse and thruster lifetime were evaluated. As expected, the discharge chamber performance with inert gases decreased with decreasing atomic mass. Aspects of the J-Series thruster design which would require modification to provide operation at high power with insert gases were identified.

  9. Problem of nature of inert gases in lunar surface material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levskiy, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    The origin of isotopes of inert gases in lunar surface material was investigated from the standpoint of the isotopic two-component status of inert gases in the solar system. Helium and neon represent the solar wind component, while krypton and xenon are planetary gases. Type A gases are trapped by the material of the regolith in the early stages of the existence of the solar system and were brought to the lunar surface together with dust. The material of the regolith therefore cannot be considered as the product of the erosion of the crystalline rocks of the moon and in this sense are extralunar. The regolith material containing type A gases must be identified with the high temperature minerals of the carbonaceous chondrites.

  10. Significant gamma lines from inert Higgs dark matter.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Michael; Lundström, Erik; Bergström, Lars; Edsjö, Joakim

    2007-07-27

    One way to unambiguously confirm the existence of particle dark matter and determine its mass would be to detect its annihilation into monochromatic gamma-rays in upcoming telescopes. One of the most minimal models for dark matter is the inert doublet model, obtained by adding another Higgs doublet with no direct coupling to fermions. For a mass between 40 and 80 GeV, the lightest of the new inert Higgs particles can give the correct cosmic abundance of cold dark matter in agreement with current observations. We show that for this scalar dark matter candidate, the annihilation signal of monochromatic gammagamma and Zgamma final states would be exceptionally strong. The energy range and rates for these gamma-ray line signals make them ideal to search for with the soon upcoming GLAST satellite.

  11. Effect of Inert Gas Switching at Depth on Decompression Outcome in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Indcuae Security Classification) Effect Of inert gas switching at depth on decompression outcome in rats Liil RVRcCall1urn M~E 16. SUPPLEMENTARY...CLASSIrICATrIONOF TI PAGE All other edition% -ate obsfee UNCLASSIFIED Effect of inert gas switching at depth on decompression outcome in rats R. S... Effect of inert gas Although various models of inert gas transport in the switching at depth on decompression outcome in rats. J. Appl

  12. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  13. Passive and active vibration isolation systems using inerter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alujević, N.; Čakmak, D.; Wolf, H.; Jokić, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on passive and active vibration isolation schemes using inerter elements in a two degree of freedom (DOF) mechanical system. The aim of the work is to discuss basic capabilities and limitations of the vibration control systems at hand using simple and physically transparent models. Broad frequency band dynamic excitation of the source DOF is assumed. The purpose of the isolator system is to prevent vibration transmission to the receiving DOF. The frequency averaged kinetic energy of the receiving mass is used as the metric for vibration isolation quality. It is shown that the use of inerter element in the passive vibration isolation scheme can enhance the isolation effect. In the active case, a feedback disturbance rejection scheme is considered. Here, the error signal is the receiving body absolute velocity which is directly fed to a reactive force actuator between the source and the receiving bodies. In such a scheme, the so-called subcritical vibration isolation problems exist. These problems are characterised by the uncoupled natural frequency of the receiving body larger than the uncoupled natural frequency of the source body. In subcritical vibration isolation problems, the performance of the active control is limited by poor stability margins. This is because the stable feedback gain is restricted in a narrow range between a minimum and a maximum. However, with the inclusion of an inerter in the isolator, one of the two stability margins can be opened. This enables large, theoretically unlimited negative feedback gains and large active damping of the receiving body vibration. A simple expression for the required inertance is derived.

  14. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The master of a tank vessel having a COW system under § 157.10(e), § 157.10a(a)(2), or § 157.10c(b)(2) shall... less by volume at the locations under paragraph (a)(1) of this section. (4) During COW operations, the...

  15. 75 FR 7560 - Public Availability of Identities of Inert Ingredients in Pesticides; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... Availability of Identities of Inert Ingredients in Pesticides; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY... initiation of rulemaking to increase public availability of the identities of the inert ingredients in... of rulemaking to increase public availability of the identities of the inert ingredients in pesticide...

  16. Reduced temperature aluminum production in an electrolytic cell having an inert anode

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; Ray, Siba P.; Hosler, Robert B.; Kozarek, Robert L.; LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2000-01-01

    Aluminum is produced by electrolytic reduction of alumina in a cell having a cathode, an inert anode and a molten salt bath containing metal fluorides and alumina. The inert anode preferably contains copper, silver and oxides of iron and nickel. Reducing the molten salt bath temperature to about 900-950.degree. C. lowers corrosion on the inert anode constituents.

  17. Investigation on the Inertance Tubes of Pulse Tube Cryocooler Without Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. J.; Yang, L. W.; Liang, J. T.; Hong, G. T.

    2010-04-01

    Phase angle is of vital importance for high-efficiency pulse tube cryocoolers (PTCs). Inertance tube as the main phase shifter is useful for the PTCs to obtain appropriate phase angle. Experiments of inertance tube without reservoir under variable frequency, variable length and diameter of inertance tube and variable pressure amplitude are investigated respectively. In addition, the authors used DeltaEC, a computer program to predict the performance of low-amplitude thermoacoustic engines, to simulate the effects of inertance tube without reservoir. According to the comparison of experiments and theoretical simulations, DeltaEC method is feasible and effective to direct and improve the design of inertance tubes.

  18. Inerting of magnesium dust cloud with Ar, N2 and CO2.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Yuan, C M; Fu, Y; Zhong, Y P; Chen, B Z

    2009-10-15

    Experiments were conducted on the inerting of magnesium dust with N(2), CO(2), and Ar. Comparing the maximum explosion pressure, maximum rate of pressure rise, and limiting oxygen concentration with different inertants, it was determined that Ar is not the best inert gas under all conditions as commonly believed. N(2) was more effective than Ar as an inertant. CO(2) provided more inerting effect than either Ar and N(2) in low magnesium dust concentrations, although explosibility was increased at higher dust concentrations. Both N(2) and CO(2) as inerting agents showed higher LOC values than Ar. These results indicated that N(2) is a more economical inerting gas than Ar for the tested coarse magnesium dust.

  19. Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to

  20. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  1. Vector boson fusion in the inert doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Palacio, Guillermo; Restrepo, Diego; Ruiz-Álvarez, José D.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we probe the inert Higgs doublet model at the LHC using vector boson fusion (VBF) search strategy. We optimize the selection cuts and investigate the parameter space of the model and we show that the VBF search has a better reach when compared with the monojet searches. We also investigate the Drell-Yan type cuts and show that they can be important for smaller charged Higgs masses. We determine the 3 σ reach for the parameter space using these optimized cuts for a luminosity of 3000 fb-1 .

  2. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  3. Gamma inert sterilization: a solution to polyethylene oxidation?

    PubMed

    Medel, Francisco J; Kurtz, Steven M; Hozack, William J; Parvizi, Javad; Purtill, James J; Sharkey, Peter F; MacDonald, Daniel; Kraay, Matthew J; Goldberg, Victor; Rimnac, Clare M

    2009-04-01

    In the 1990s, oxidation was found to occur in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene total joint replacement components following gamma irradiation and prolonged shelf aging in air. Orthopaedic manufacturers developed barrier packaging to reduce oxidation during and after radiation sterilization. The present study explores the hypothesis that polyethylene components sterilized in a low-oxygen environment undergo similar in vivo oxidative mechanisms as inserts sterilized in air. In addition, the potential influence of the different sterilization processes on the wear performance of the polyethylene components was examined. An analysis of oxidation, wear, and surface damage was performed for forty-eight acetabular liners and 123 tibial inserts. The mean implantation time was 12.3+/-3.7 years for thirty-one acetabular liners that had been gamma sterilized in air and 4.0+/-2.5 years for the seventeen acetabular liners that had been gamma sterilized in inert gas. The mean implantation time was 11.0+/-3.2 years for the twenty-six tibial inserts that had been sterilized in air and 2.8+/-2.2 years for the ninety-seven tibial inserts that had been gamma sterilized in inert gas. Oxidation and hydroperoxide levels were characterized in loaded and unloaded regions of the inserts. Measurable oxidation and oxidation potential were observed in all cohorts. The oxidation and hydroperoxide levels were regional. Surfaces with access to body fluids were more heavily oxidized than protected bearing surfaces were. This variation appeared to be greater in historical (gamma-in-air-sterilized) components. Regarding wear performance, historical and conventional acetabular liners showed similar wear penetration rates, whereas a low incidence of delamination was confirmed for the conventional tibial inserts in the first decade of implantation. The present study explores the impact of industry-wide changes in sterilization practices for polyethylene. We found lower oxidation and oxidation

  4. Development of a large inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, G.

    1982-01-01

    A 30 cm inert gas electrostatic ion thruster has been developed, exhibiting excellent performance. In the development, the effective anode area was reduced by altering the magnetic field geometry to improve plasma containment, consistent with operational stability. The propellant introduction scheme has the effect of 'folding' the discharge chamber without the increased wall loss penalty associated with a longer chamber. These features contribute to a low discharge cost (eV/ion) versus mass utilization characteristic which remains relatively flat even to high mass utilizations.

  5. Re-derived overclosure bound for the inert doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, S.; Laine, M.

    2017-08-01

    We apply a formalism accounting for thermal effects (such as modified Sommerfeld effect; Salpeter correction; decohering scatterings; dissociation of bound states), to one of the simplest WIMP-like dark matter models, associated with an "inert" Higgs doublet. A broad temperature range T ˜ M/20 . . . M/104 is considered, stressing the importance and less-understood nature of late annihilation stages. Even though only weak interactions play a role, we find that resummed real and virtual corrections increase the tree-level overclosure bound by 1 . . . 18%, depending on quartic couplings and mass splittings.

  6. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : The Effect of Inert Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1928-01-01

    Attention is called in this report to previous investigations of gaseous explosive reactions carried out under constant volume conditions, where the effect of inert gases on the thermodynamic equilibrium was determined. The advantage of constant pressure methods over those of constant volume as applied to studies of the gaseous explosive reaction is pointed out and the possibility of realizing for this purpose a constant pressure bomb mentioned. The application of constant pressure methods to the study of gaseous explosive reactions, made possible by the use of a constant pressure bomb, led to the discovery of an important kinetic relation connecting the rate of propagation of the zone of explosive reaction within the active gases, with the initial concentrations of those gases: s = K(sub 1)(A)(sup n1)(B)(sup n2)(C)(sup n3)------. By a method analogous to that followed in determining the effect of inert gases on the equilibrium constant K, the present paper records an attempt to determine their kinetic effect upon the expression given above.

  7. Modeling the Dispersion of Inert Particles Using the SAQM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, R.; Fitzgerald, R. M.

    2005-12-01

    Cities throughout the U.S are subject to the emission of particulate matter (PM) into the atmosphere from a variety of sources. The impact of these emissions has been studied extensively in for regulatory compliance in the area of health effects, air quality and visibility. Little work has been done to study the fate and transport of the inert particulate matter within the El Paso-Juarez Airshed. The Environmental Physics Group at The University of Texas at El Paso has recently applied the SARMAP Air Quality Model (SAQM) to model the dispersion of inert particulate matter in the El Paso-Juarez Airshed. The meteorological data for the SAQM was created with the Penn State/NCAR meteorological modeling system, version 5 (MM5). The SAQM was used to simulate two common occurrences for large particulate emission and concentration. The first was periods of heavy traffic volume at the international bridges which cause large numbers of cars to sit, with engines running, for extended periods of time. The second was moderate to high wind events that cause large amounts of coarse particulate matter to become entrained in the atmosphere and transported into and around the region. Output from the MM5 was used as the meteorological driver for the SAQM. The MM5 was initialized with data from the NCAR reanalysis project. Meteorological data collected in the region by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and by EPA was used for Four Dimensional Data Assimilation. The MM5 was nudged with gridded, surface and observational data. Statistical analysis was done on the MM5 for the variables, wind speed, wind direction, temperature and mixing ratio. The statistics performed included RMSE, RMSEs, RMSEu and index of agreement SAQM was applied to the domain with grid cell sizes of 1.3 km per side. Temporal comparisons were done between EPA's PM2.5 to identify similarities in the evolution of the SAQM with observation. The experience gained in this work will facilitate further

  8. Unidentified Inert Ingredients in Pesticides: Implications for Human and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Caroline; Surgan, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background By statute or regulation in the United States and elsewhere, pesticide ingredients are divided into two categories: active and inert (sometimes referred to as other ingredients, adjuvants, or coformulants). Despite their name, inert ingredients may be biologically or chemically active and are labeled inert only because of their function in the formulated product. Most of the tests required to register a pesticide are performed with the active ingredient alone, not the full pesticide formulation. Inert ingredients are generally not identified on product labels and are often claimed to be confidential business information. Objectives In this commentary, we describe the shortcomings of the current procedures for assessing the hazards of pesticide formulations and demonstrate that inert ingredients can increase the toxicity of and potential exposure to pesticide formulations. Discussion Inert ingredients can increase the ability of pesticide formulations to affect significant toxicologic end points, including developmental neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, and disruption of hormone function. They can also increase exposure by increasing dermal absorption, decreasing the efficacy of protective clothing, and increasing environmental mobility and persistence. Inert ingredients can increase the phytotoxicity of pesticide formulations as well as the toxicity to fish, amphibians, and microorganisms. Conclusions Pesticide registration should require full assessment of formulations. Evaluations of pesticides under the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and similar statutes should include impact assessment of formulations. Environmental monitoring for pesticides should include inert ingredients. To enable independent research and risk assessment, inert ingredients should be identified on product labels. PMID:17185266

  9. Development of advanced inert-gas ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Inert gas ion thruster technology offers the greatest potential for providing high specific impulse, low thrust, electric propulsion on large, Earth orbital spacecraft. The development of a thruster module that can be operated on xenon or argon propellant to produce 0.2 N of thrust at a specific impulse of 3000 sec with xenon propellant and at 6000 sec with argon propellant is described. The 30 cm diameter, laboratory model thruster is considered to be scalable to produce 0.5 N thrust. A high efficiency ring cusp discharge chamber was used to achieve an overall thruster efficiency of 77% with xenon propellant and 66% with argon propellant. Measurements were performed to identify ion production and loss processes and to define critical design criteria (at least on a preliminary basis).

  10. Atomic dynamics and the problem of the structural stability of free clusters of solidified inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovtseva, É. T.; Gospodarev, I. A.; Grishaev, A. V.; Kovalenko, S. I.; Solnyshkin, D. D.; Syrkin, E. S.; Feodos'ev, S. B.

    2003-05-01

    The dependence of the rms amplitudes of atoms in free clusters of solidified inert gases on the cluster size is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Free clusters are produced by homogeneous nucleation in an adiabatically expanding supersonic stream. Electron diffraction is used to measure the rms amplitudes of the atoms; the Jacobi-matrix method is used for theoretical calculations. A series of distinguishing features of the atomic dynamics of microclusters was found. This was necessary to determine the character of the formation and the stability conditions of the crystal structure. It wass shown that for clusters consisting of less than N˜103 atoms, as the cluster size decreases, the rms amplitudes grow much more rapidly than expected from the increase in the specific contribution of the surface. It is also established that an fcc structure of a free cluster, as a rule, contains twinning defects (nuclei of an hcp phase). One reason for the appearance of such defects is the so-called vertex instability (anomalously large oscillation amplitudes) of the atoms in coordination spheres.

  11. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC 5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H 2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H 2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification processmore » caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  12. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; ...

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC 5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H 2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H 2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification processmore » caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  13. Matrix superpotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Anatoly G.; Karadzhov, Yuri

    2011-07-01

    We present a collection of matrix-valued shape invariant potentials which give rise to new exactly solvable problems of SUSY quantum mechanics. It includes all irreducible matrix superpotentials of the generic form W=kQ+\\frac{1}{k} R+P, where k is a variable parameter, Q is the unit matrix multiplied by a real-valued function of independent variable x, and P and R are the Hermitian matrices depending on x. In particular, we recover the Pron'ko-Stroganov 'matrix Coulomb potential' and all known scalar shape invariant potentials of SUSY quantum mechanics. In addition, five new shape invariant potentials are presented. Three of them admit a dual shape invariance, i.e. the related Hamiltonians can be factorized using two non-equivalent superpotentials. We find discrete spectrum and eigenvectors for the corresponding Schrödinger equations and prove that these eigenvectors are normalizable.

  14. Muco-inert nanoparticle probes and drug carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Mucus coats the exposed surfaces of the eyes and respiratory, gastrointestinal (GI) and cervicovaginal (CV) tracts, and protects mucosal tissues against pathogens and other foreign particulates. Most foreign particles are effectively trapped in mucus through steric and adhesive interactions, and are rapidly eliminated by different mucus clearance mechanisms. Nevertheless, mucus also immobilizes conventional drug and gene carriers, thereby precluding sustained and targeted drug delivery to mucosal sites. Synthetic particles engineered with muco-inert surfaces, and some viruses, can readily penetrate mucus gel, and may serve as useful probes to understand the biophysical barrier properties of mucus. Improved understanding of the mucus barrier could provide insights into methods to enhance drug and gene delivery at mucosal surfaces, as well as understanding the occasional failure of mucus to protect against infection or injury. Recently, muco-inert nanoparticles were developed by conjugating a dense layer of low MW polyethylene glycol to particle surfaces. Since they are slowed only by steric obstruction from the mucus mesh, various sized muco-inert nanoparticles can be used to probe the microstructure and microrheology of mucus. I applied this technique to determine whether the mucus barrier may be altered by exogenous factors, including the presence of detergent, pH changes and synthetic nanoparticles. I first studied the microrheology of native human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), and found that CVM behaves as a viscoelastic solid at length scales ≥ 1 microm (preventing large particles from diffusing through) but as a viscoelastic liquid at length scales up to at least 500 nm (allowing smaller particles to diffuse through low viscosity fluid-filled pores). Treating CVM with a nonionic detergent, N9, shifted the viscoelastic liquid-solid transition point to < 200 nm, suggesting hydrophobic interactions between mucin fibers play an important role in regulating the

  15. 3-D simulation of gases transport under condition of inert gas injection into goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao-Xi; Shi, Guo-Qing; Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Yan-Ming; Ma, Li-Yang

    2016-12-01

    To prevent coal spontaneous combustion in mines, it is paramount to understand O2 gas distribution under condition of inert gas injection into goaf. In this study, the goaf was modeled as a 3-D porous medium based on stress distribution. The variation of O2 distribution influenced by CO2 or N2 injection was simulated based on the multi-component gases transport and the Navier-Stokes equations using Fluent. The numerical results without inert gas injection were compared with field measurements to validate the simulation model. Simulations with inert gas injection show that CO2 gas mainly accumulates at the goaf floor level; however, a notable portion of N2 gas moves upward. The evolution of the spontaneous combustion risky zone with continuous inert gas injection can be classified into three phases: slow inerting phase, rapid accelerating inerting phase, and stable inerting phase. The asphyxia zone with CO2 injection is about 1.25-2.4 times larger than that with N2 injection. The efficacy of preventing and putting out mine fires is strongly related with the inert gas injecting position. Ideal injections are located in the oxidation zone or the transitional zone between oxidation zone and heat dissipation zone.

  16. Minimum Risk Pesticides - Inert Ingredient and Active Ingredient Eligibility under 40 CFR 152.25(f)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ingredients found on both the Minimum Risk Active Ingredient and List 4A Inert Ingredients of Minimal Concern lists may be used either as an active or an inert ingredient. Otherwise, it can only be used based on the list it appears on.

  17. Passive vibration suppression using inerters for a multi-storey building structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sara Ying; Jiang, Jason Zheng; Neild, Simon

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the use of inerters for vibration suppression of a multistorey building structure. The inerter was proposed as a two-terminal replacement for the mass element, with the property that the applied force is proportional to the relative acceleration across its terminals. It completes the force-current mechanical-electrical network analogy, providing the mechanical equivalent to a capacitor. Thus allows all passive mechanical impedances to be synthesised. The inerter has been used in Formula 1 racing cars and applications to various systems such as vehicle suspension have been identified. Several devices that incoporate inerter(s), as well as spring(s) and damper(s), have also been identified for vibration suppression of building structures. These include the tuned inerter damper (TID) and the tuned viscous mass damper (TVMD). In this paper, a three-storey building model with an absorber located at the bottom subjected to base excitation is studied. Four simple absorber layouts, in terms of how spring, damper and inerter components should be arranged, have been studied. In order to minimise the maximum relative displacement of the building, the optimum parameter values for each of the layouts have been obtained with respect to the inerter's size.

  18. Young Infants' Reasoning about Physical Events Involving Inert and Self-Propelled Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Yuyan; Kaufman, Lisa; Baillargeon, Renee

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined whether 5- to 6.5-month-old infants would hold different expectations about various physical events involving a box after receiving evidence that it was either inert or self-propelled. Infants were surprised if the inert but not the self-propelled box: reversed direction spontaneously (Experiment 1); remained…

  19. Inert-gas welding and brazing enclosure fabricated from sheet plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Custom-fabricated plastic bag maintains an inert-gas atmosphere for welding and brazing certain metals. The bag fits over part of the workpieces and the welding and brazing tools. It is also used for metal brazing and fusion plating which require an inert-gas atmosphere.

  20. Investigation of materials for inert electrodes in aluminum electrodeposition cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, J. S.; Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-09-01

    Work was divided into major efforts. The first was the growth and characterization of specimens; the second was Hall cell performance testing. Cathode and anode materials were the subject of investigation. Preparation of specimens included growth of single crystals and synthesis of ultra high purity powders. Special attention was paid to ferrites as they were considered to be the most promising anode materials. Ferrite anode corrosion rates were studied and the electrical conductivities of a set of copper-manganese ferrites were measured. Float Zone, Pendant Drop Cryolite Experiments were undertaken because unsatisfactory choices of candidate materials were being made on the basis of a flawed set of selection criteria applied to an incomplete and sometimes inaccurate data base. This experiment was then constructed to determine whether the apparatus used for float zone crystal growth could be adapted to make a variety of important based melts and their interactions with candidate inert anode materials. Compositions), driven by our perception that the basis for prior selection of candidate materials was inadequate. Results are presented.

  1. The diverse biological properties of the chemically inert noble gases.

    PubMed

    Winkler, David A; Thornton, Aaron; Farjot, Géraldine; Katz, Ira

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases represent an intriguing scientific paradox. They are extremely inert chemically but display a remarkable spectrum of clinically useful biological properties. Despite a relative paucity of knowledge of their mechanisms of action, some of the noble gases have been used successfully in the clinic. Studies with xenon have suggested that the noble gases as a class may exhibit valuable biological properties such as anaesthesia; amelioration of ischemic damage; tissue protection prior to transplantation; analgesic properties; and a potentially wide range of other clinically useful effects. Xenon has been shown to be safe in humans, and has useful pharmacokinetic properties such as rapid onset, fast wash out etc. The main limitations in wider use are that: many of the fundamental biochemical studies are still lacking; the lighter noble gases are likely to manifest their properties only under hyperbaric conditions, impractical in surgery; and administration of xenon using convectional gaseous anaesthesia equipment is inefficient, making its use very expensive. There is nonetheless a significant body of published literature on the biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical properties of noble gases but no comprehensive reviews exist that summarize their properties and the existing knowledge of their models of action at the molecular (atomic) level. This review provides such an up-to-date summary of the extensive, useful biological properties of noble gases as drugs and prospects for wider application of these atoms. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal Analysis of Solid Fuels in an Inert Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijo-Kleczkowska, Agnieszka; Szumera, Magdalena; Środa, Katarzyna

    2017-12-01

    The paper takes the analysis of thermal studies of different types of fuels. It allowed diversification of fuels depending on their composition and origin. Consideration of coal, biomass and waste (coal mule, sewage sludge) as fuel is nowadays an important aspect of energy in our country. It should be emphasized that Poland power engineering is based up to 95% on coal - the primary fuel. Mining industry, forced to deliver power engineering more and better fuel, must however, use a deeper cleaning of coal. This results in a continuous increase waste in the form of mule flotation. The best method of disposing these mule is combustion and co-combustion with other fuels. On the other hand, commonly increasing awareness state of the environment and the need to reduce CO2 emissions energy industry have committed to implement alternative solutions in order to gain power, through, i.a.: development technologies use of biomass, which is one of the most promising renewable energy sources in Poland. The paper presents the results of research TG-DTA fuels made in an inert atmosphere.

  3. Electron- and positron-impact ionization of inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campeanu, R. I.; Walters, H. R. J.; Whelan, Colm T.

    2018-06-01

    Triple-differential cross sections (TDCS) are presented for the electron and positron impact ionization of inert gas atoms in a range of geometries where a number of significant few body effects compete to define the shape of the TDCS. Using both positrons and electrons as projectiles has opened up the possibility of performing complementary studies which could effectively isolate competing interactions which cannot be separately detected in an experiment with a single projectile. A comparison is presented between theory and the recent experiments of [Gavin, deLucio, and DuBois, Phys. Rev. A 95, 062703 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.062703] for e± and contrasted with the results from earlier electron experiments. For the special case of xenon(5 p ), cross sections are presented for both electron- and positron-impact ionization in kinematics where the electron case appears well understood. The kinematics are then varied in order to focus on the possible role of distortion, exchange, and target wave-function effects.

  4. Determining inert content in coal dust/rock dust mixture

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Ward, Jr., Jack A.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the inert content of a coal dust and rock dust mixture uses a transparent window pressed against the mixture. An infrared light beam is directed through the window such that a portion of the infrared light beam is reflected from the mixture. The concentration of the reflected light is detected and a signal indicative of the reflected light is generated. A normalized value for the generated signal is determined according to the relationship .phi.=(log i.sub.c `log i.sub.co) / (log i.sub.c100 -log i.sub.co) where i.sub.co =measured signal at 0% rock dust i.sub.c100 =measured signal at 100% rock dust i.sub.c =measured signal of the mixture. This normalized value is then correlated to a predetermined relationship of .phi. to rock dust percentage to determine the rock dust content of the mixture. The rock dust content is displayed where the percentage is between 30 and 100%, and an indication of out-of-range is displayed where the rock dust percent is less than 30%. Preferably, the rock dust percentage (RD%) is calculated from the predetermined relationship RD%=100+30 log .phi.. where the dust mixture initially includes moisture, the dust mixture is dried before measuring by use of 8 to 12 mesh molecular-sieves which are shaken with the dust mixture and subsequently screened from the dust mixture.

  5. Inert Higgs Doublet Dark Matter in Type-II Seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Nomura, Takaaki

    2016-04-01

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) as a dark matter (DM) candidate is further inspired by recent AMS-02 data, which confirm the excess of positron fraction observed earlier by PAMELA and Fermi-LAT experiments. Additionally, the excess of positron+electron flux is still significant in the measurement of Fermi-LAT. For solving the problem of massive neutrinos and observed excess of cosmic-ray by DM annihilation, we study the model with an inert Higgs doublet (IHD) in the framework of type-II seesaw mechanism by imposing a Z2 symmetry on the IHD, where the lightest particle of IHD is the DM candidate while the neutrino masses origin from the Higgs triplet in type-II seesaw model. We calculate the cosmic-ray production in our model and find that if leptonic triplet decays are dominant, the observed excess of positron/electron flux could be explained well in normal ordered neutrino mass spectrum, when the constraints of DM relic density and comic-ray antiproton spectrum are taken into account.

  6. Inert dark matter in type-II seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Nomura, Takaaki

    2014-09-01

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) as a dark matter (DM) candidate is further inspired by recent AMS-02 data, which confirm the excess of positron fraction observed earlier by PAMELA and Fermi-LAT experiments. Additionally, the excess of positron+electron flux is still significant in the measurement of Fermi-LAT. For solving the problems of massive neutrinos and observed excess of cosmic-ray, we study the model with an inert Higgs doublet (IHD) in the framework of type-II seesaw model by imposing a Z 2 symmetry on the IHD, where the lightest particle of IHD is the DM candidate and the neutrino masses originate from the Yukawa couplings of Higgs triplet and leptons. We calculate the cosmic-ray production in our model by using three kinds of neutrino mass spectra, which are classified by normal ordering, inverted ordering and quasi-degeneracy. We find that when the constraints of DM relic density and comic-ray antiproton spectrum are taken into account, the observed excess of positron/electron flux could be explained well in normal ordered neutrino mass spectrum. Moreover, excess of comic-ray neutrinos is implied in our model. We find that our results on < σv> are satisfied with and close to the upper limit of IceCube analysis. More data from comic-ray neutrinos could test our model.

  7. Behavioural response of Phytoseiulus persimilisin inert materials for technical application.

    PubMed

    Wendorf, Dennis; Sermann, Helga; Katz, Peter; Lerche, Sandra; Büttner, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    A large scale application of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot for use in the biological control of spider mites in the field requires testing the behaviour of Phytoseiulus persimilis in inert materials, like millet pelts and Vermiculite (1-3 mm). In laboratory studies, the distribution of the individuals in such materials, the time of remaining in the material were proved. To examine the abiotic influences on the time of remaining in the material, the dampness of the materials was varied (0%, 5% and 10%). Moreover, the influence of attitude of materials was tested. The time of emigration from the material was noted for each individual. Emigration from all dry materials was completed 15 minutes at the latest after set up of the mites. The increase of dampness had an obvious effect on the time of remaining in the material. In this respect the material millet pelts showed the most favourable effect with 10% dampness. Increasing attitude of material the mobility of predatory mites will be influenced negatively above 75 cm. Up to 50 cm, mites have not a problem to move in the material and the time of remaining can be prolonged considerably.

  8. DNP System Output Volume Reduction Using Inert Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eric T; Gordon, Jeremy W; Erickson, Matthew G; Fain, Sean B; Rowland, Ian J

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To present a method for significantly increasing the concentration of a hyperpolarized compound produced by a commercial DNP polarizer, enabling the polarization process to be more suitable for pre-clinical applications. Materials and Methods Using a HyperSense® DNP polarizer, we have investigated the combined use of perfluorocarbon and water to warm and dissolve the hyperpolarized material from the polarization temperature of 1.4 K to produce material at temperatures suitable for injection. Results By replacing 75% of the water in the dissolution volume with a chemically and biologically inert liquid that is immiscible with water, the injection volume can be reduced fourfold Rapid separation of the water and perfluorocarbon mixture enables the aqueous layer containing polarized material to be easily and rapidly collected. Conclusion The approach provides a significantly increased concentration of compound in a volume for injection that is more appropriate for small animal studies. This is demonstrated for 13C labeled pyruvic acid and 13C labeled succinate, but may be applied to the majority of nuclei and compounds hyperpolarized by the DNP method. PMID:21448970

  9. Matrix thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  10. Experimental Study of an On-board Fuel Tank Inerting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fei; Lin, Guiping; Zeng, Yu; Pan, Rui; Sun, Haoyang

    2017-03-01

    A simulated aircraft fuel tank inerting system was established and experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of the system. The system uses hollow fiber membrane which is widely used in aircraft as the air separation device and a simplified 20% scale multi compartment fuel tank as the inerting object. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influences of different operating parameters on the inerting effectiveness of the system, including NEA (nitrogen-enriched air) flow rate, NEA oxygen concentration, NEA distribution, pressure of bleeding air and fuel load of the tank. Results showed that for the multi compartment fuel tank, concentrated flow washing inerting would cause great differences throughout the distribution of oxygen concentration in the fuel tank, and inerting dead zone would exist. The inerting effectiveness was greatly improved and the ullage oxygen concentration of the tank would reduce to 12% successfully when NEA entered three compartments evenly. The time span of a complete inerting process reduced obviously with increasing NEA flow rate and decreasing NEA concentration, but the trend became weaker gradually. However, the reduction of NEA concentration will decrease the utilization efficiency of the bleeding air. In addition, the time span can also be reduced by raising the pressure of bleeding air, which will improve the bleeding air utilization efficiency at the same time. The time span decreases linearly as the fuel load increases.

  11. The Production of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions in Inert Gas Matrices Doped with Alkali Metals. Electronic Absorption Spectra of the Pentacene Anion (C22H14(-))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The absorption spectra of pentacene (C22H14) and its radical cation (C22H14(+)) and anion (C22H14(-)) isolated in inert-gas matrices of Ne, Ar, and Kr are reported from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. The associated vibronic band systems and their spectroscopic assignments are discussed together with the physical and chemical conditions governing ion (and counterion) production in the solid matrix. In particular, the formation of isolated pentacene anions is found to be optimized in matrices doped with alkali metal (Na and K).

  12. Spectroscopy of Cosmic Carbon Analogs in Inert-Gas Matrices and in the Gas-Phase: Comparative Results and Perspectives for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies of the spectroscopy of large (up to approx. 50 carbon atoms) neutral and Ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Fullerenes isolated in inert gas matrices will be presented. The advantages and the limitations of matrix isolation spectroscopy for the study of the molecular spectroscopy of interstellar dust analogs will be discussed. The laboratory data will be compared to the astronomical spectra (the interstellar extinction, the diffuse interstellar bands). Finally, the spectra of PAH ions isolated in neon/argon matrices will be compared to the spectra obtained for PAH ion seeded in a supersonic expansion. The astrophysical implications and future perspectives will be discussed.

  13. The propulsive capability of explosives heavily loaded with inert materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, J.; Georges, W.; Frost, D. L.; Higgins, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of inert dilution on the accelerating ability of high explosives for both grazing and normal detonations was studied. The explosives considered were: (1) neat, amine-sensitized nitromethane (NM), (2) packed beds of glass, steel, or tungsten particles saturated with amine-sensitized NM, (3) NM gelled with PMMA containing dispersed glass microballoons, (4) NM gelled with PMMA containing glass microballoons and steel particles, and (5) C-4 containing varying mass fractions of glass or steel particles. Flyer velocity was measured via photonic Doppler velocimetry, and the results were analysed using a Gurney model augmented to include the influence of the diluent. Reduction in accelerating ability with increasing dilution for the amine-sensitized NM, gelled NM, and C-4 was measured experimentally. Variation of flyer terminal velocity with the ratio of flyer mass to charge mass (M/C) was measured for both grazing and normally incident detonations in gelled NM containing 10% microballoons by mass and for steel beads saturated with amine-sensitized NM. Finally, flyer velocity was measured in grazing versus normal loading for a number of explosive admixtures. The augmented Gurney model predicted the effect of dilution on accelerating ability and the scaling of flyer velocity with M/C for mixtures containing low-density diluents. The augmented Gurney model failed to predict the scaling of flyer velocity with M/C for mixtures heavily loaded with dense diluents. In all cases, normally incident detonations propelled flyers to higher velocity than the equivalent grazing detonations because of material velocity imparted by the incident shock wave and momentum/energy transfer from the slapper used to uniformly initiate the charge.

  14. The propulsive capability of explosives heavily loaded with inert materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, J.; Georges, W.; Frost, D. L.; Higgins, A. J.

    2018-07-01

    The effect of inert dilution on the accelerating ability of high explosives for both grazing and normal detonations was studied. The explosives considered were: (1) neat, amine-sensitized nitromethane (NM), (2) packed beds of glass, steel, or tungsten particles saturated with amine-sensitized NM, (3) NM gelled with PMMA containing dispersed glass microballoons, (4) NM gelled with PMMA containing glass microballoons and steel particles, and (5) C-4 containing varying mass fractions of glass or steel particles. Flyer velocity was measured via photonic Doppler velocimetry, and the results were analysed using a Gurney model augmented to include the influence of the diluent. Reduction in accelerating ability with increasing dilution for the amine-sensitized NM, gelled NM, and C-4 was measured experimentally. Variation of flyer terminal velocity with the ratio of flyer mass to charge mass ( M/ C) was measured for both grazing and normally incident detonations in gelled NM containing 10% microballoons by mass and for steel beads saturated with amine-sensitized NM. Finally, flyer velocity was measured in grazing versus normal loading for a number of explosive admixtures. The augmented Gurney model predicted the effect of dilution on accelerating ability and the scaling of flyer velocity with M/ C for mixtures containing low-density diluents. The augmented Gurney model failed to predict the scaling of flyer velocity with M/ C for mixtures heavily loaded with dense diluents. In all cases, normally incident detonations propelled flyers to higher velocity than the equivalent grazing detonations because of material velocity imparted by the incident shock wave and momentum/energy transfer from the slapper used to uniformly initiate the charge.

  15. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A broad group of fibers and matrices were combined to create a wide range of composite properties. Primary material fabrication procedures were developed which readily permit the fabrication of flat plate and shaped composites. Composite mechanical properties were measured under a wide range of test conditions. Tensile, flexure mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance were evaluated. Selected fiber-matrix combinations were shown to maintain their strength at up to 1300 K when tested in an inert atmosphere. Composite high temperature mechanical properties were shown to be limited primarily by the oxidation resistance of the graphite fibers. Composite thermal dimensional stability was measured and found to be excellent.

  16. Composition suitable for use as inert electrode having good electrical conductivity and mechanical properties

    DOEpatents

    Ray, S.P.; Rapp, R.A.

    1984-06-12

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metals or metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily. 8 figs.

  17. Composition suitable for use as inert electrode having good electrical conductivity and mechanical properties

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metals or metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily.

  18. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  19. For cermet inert anode containing oxide and metal phases useful for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Douglas A.

    2002-01-01

    A cermet inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a ceramic phase including an oxide of Ni, Fe and M, where M is at least one metal selected from Zn, Co, Al, Li, Cu, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Ta, W, Mo, Hf and rare earths, preferably Zn and/or Co. Preferred ceramic compositions comprise Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3, NiO and ZnO or CoO. The cermet inert anode also comprises a metal phase such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. A preferred metal phase comprises Cu and Ag. The cermet inert anodes may be used in electrolytic reduction cells for the production of commercial purity aluminum as well as other metals.

  20. Inert Reassessment Document for Propylene glycol alginate - CAS No. 9005-37-2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As an inert pesticide ingredient, propylene glycol alginate is exempt from the requirement for a tolerance when used as a deforming agent in pesticide formulations applies to growing crops, or to raw agricultural commodities after harvest.

  1. Inert Reassessment Document for Methyl Alcohol - CAS No. 67-56-1

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Methyl Alcohol is used as an inert ingredient in agricultural and residential-use pesticides. It is also found in a wide-array of consumer products including paints, cleaning products, adhesives, and alternative fuels.

  2. Inert Reassessment Document for -n-Propanol - CAS No. 71-23-8

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Overall, the major use of n-propanol is as a solvent. In terms of pesticides, n-propanol is used as an inert ingredient only; there are no registeredpesticide products containing n-propanol as an active ingredient.

  3. Inert Reassessment Document for Dimethyl Ether - CAS No. 115-10-6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The existing dimethyl ether exemption from the requirement of a tolerance under 40 CFR 180.930 is for use on animals only. Dimethyl ether is used as an inert ingredient in a variety of livestock insect sprays and foggers.

  4. Protection of Proprietary Data Rights for Data Used to Support Tolerance Exemptions for Inert Ingredients

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The FFDCA provides both exclusive use and data compensation protections for data that inert ingredient manufacturers submit to EPA to establish or maintain tolerances or tolerance exemptions for these ingredients. Find information about these protections.

  5. Leakage effect analysis on the performance of a cylindrical adjustable inertance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenjie; Pfotenhauer, John M.; Zhi, Xiaoqin

    2018-04-01

    The inertance tube plays a significant role in improving the performance of the Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler by providing the desired phase angle between the mass flow and pressure wave. The phase angle is highly depended on the inertance tube geometry, such as diameter and length. A cylindrical threaded root device with variable thread depth on the outer screw and inner screw creates an adjustable inertance tube whose diameter and length can be adjusted in the real time. However, due to its geometry imperfectness, the performance of this threaded inertance tube is reduced by the leaks through the roots between the two screws. Its phase angle shift ability is decreased by 30% with the leakage clearance thickness of 15.5 μm according to both the theoretical prediction and the experimental verification.

  6. Inert Reassessment Document for Acetone - CAS No. 67-64-1

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Acetone is a highly volatile chemical that is used as an inert ingredient, a solvent/co-solvent, in a variety of pesticide products (including outdoor yard, garden and turf products, and agricultural crop products).

  7. Inert anode containing oxides of nickel iron and cobalt useful for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A.

    2002-01-01

    An inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode includes a ceramic oxide material preferably made from NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and CoO. The inert anode composition may comprise the following mole fractions of NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and CoO: 0.15 to 0.99 NiO; 0.0001 to 0.85 Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; and 0.0001 to 0.45 CoO. The inert anode may optionally include other oxides and/or at least one metal phase, such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. The Ni--Fe--Co--O ceramic material exhibits very low solubility in Hall cell baths used to produce aluminum.

  8. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  9. Inert anode containing oxides of nickel, iron and zinc useful for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A.; Liu, Xinghua

    2002-01-01

    An inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode includes a ceramic oxide material preferably made from NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and ZnO. The inert anode composition may comprise the following mole fractions of NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and ZnO: 0.2 to 0.99 NiO; 0.0001 to 0.8 Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; and 0.0001 to 0.3 ZnO. The inert anode may optionally include other oxides and/or at least one metal phase, such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. The Ni--Fe--Co--O ceramic material exhibits very low solubility in Hall cell baths used to produce aluminum.

  10. The role of "inert" surface chemistry in marine biofouling prevention.

    PubMed

    Rosenhahn, Axel; Schilp, Sören; Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen; Grunze, Michael

    2010-05-07

    The settlement and colonization of marine organisms on submerged man-made surfaces is a major economic problem for many marine industries. The most apparent detrimental effects of biofouling are increased fuel consumption of ships, clogging of membranes and heat exchangers, disabled underwater sensors, and growth of biofoulers in aquaculture systems. The presently common-but environmentally very problematic-way to deal with marine biofouling is to incorporate biocides, which use biocidal products in the surface coatings to kill the colonizing organisms, into the surface coatings. Since the implementation of the International Maritime Organization Treaty on biocides in 2008, the use of tributyltin (TBT) is restricted and thus environmentally benign but effective surface coatings are required. In this short review, we summarize the different strategies which are pursued in academia and industry to better understand the mechanisms of biofouling and to develop strategies which can be used for industrial products. Our focus will be on chemically "inert" model surface coatings, in particular oligo- and poly(ethylene glycol) (OEG and PEG) functionalized surface films. The reasons for choosing this class of chemistry as an example are three-fold: Firstly, experiments on spore settlement on OEG and PEG coatings help to understand the mechanism of non-fouling of highly hydrated interfaces; secondly, these studies defy the common assumption that surface hydrophilicity-as measured by water contact angles-is an unambiguous and predictive tool to determine the fouling behavior on the surface; and thirdly, choosing this system is a good example for "interfacial systems chemistry": it connects the behavior of unicellular marine organisms with the antifouling properties of a hydrated surface coating with structural and electronic properties as derived from ab initio quantum mechanical calculations using the electronic wave functions of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon. This short

  11. Bio-inert interfaces via biomimetic anchoring of a zwitterionic copolymer on versatile substrates.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Gian Vincent; Chou, Ying-Nien; Yeh, Lu-Chen; Venault, Antoine; Huang, James; Chang, Yung

    2018-05-22

    Bio-inert biomaterial design is vital for fields like biosensors, medical implants, and drug delivery systems. Bio-inert materials are generally hydrophilic and electrical neutral. One limitation faced in the design of bio-inert materials is that most of the modifiers used are specific to their substrate. In this work, we synthesized a novel zwitterionic copolymer containing a catechol group, a non-substrate dependent biomimetic anchoring segment, that can form a stable coating on various materials. No previous study was conducted using a grafting-to approach and determined the critical amount of catechol groups needed to effectively modify a material. The synthesized copolymers of sulfobetaine acrylamide (SBAA) and dopamine methacrylamide (DMA) in this work contains varying numbers of catechol groups, in which the critical number of catechol groups that had effectively modified substrates to have the bio-inert property was determined. The bio-inert property and capability to do coating on versatile substrates were evaluated in contact with human blood by coating different material groups such as ceramic, metallic, and polymeric groups. The novel structure and the simple grafting-to approach provides bio-inert property on various materials, giving them non-specific adsorption and attachment of biomolecules such as plasma proteins, erythrocytes, thrombocytes, bacteria, and tissue cells (85-95% reduction). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Porous SiO2 nanofiber grafted novel bioactive glass-ceramic coating: A structural scaffold for uniform apatite precipitation and oriented cell proliferation on inert implant.

    PubMed

    Das, Indranee; De, Goutam; Hupa, Leena; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-05-01

    A composite bioactive glass-ceramic coating grafted with porous silica nanofibers was fabricated on inert glass to provide a structural scaffold favoring uniform apatite precipitation and oriented cell proliferation. The coating surfaces were investigated thoroughly before and after immersion in simulated body fluid. In addition, the proliferation behavior of fibroblast cells on the surface was observed for several culture times. The nanofibrous exterior of this composite bioactive coating facilitated homogeneous growth of flake-like carbonated hydroxyapatite layer within a short period of immersion. Moreover, the embedded porous silica nanofibers enhanced hydrophilicity which is required for proper cell adhesion on the surface. The cells proliferated well following a particular orientation on the entire coating by the assistance of nanofibrous scaffold-like structural matrix. This newly engineered composite coating was effective in creating a biological structural matrix favorable for homogeneous precipitation of calcium phosphate, and organized cell growth on the inert glass surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inert Welding/Brazing Gas Filters and Dryers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudy, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The use of hybridized carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) fabric to reinforce ceramic matrix composite face sheets and the integration of such face sheets with a foam core creates a sandwich structure capable of withstanding high-heat-flux environments (150 W/sq cm) in which the core provides a temperature drop of 1,000 C between the surface and the back face without cracking or delamination of the structure. The composite face sheet exhibits a bilinear response, which results from the SiC matrix not being cracked on fabrication. In addition, the structure exhibits damage tolerance under impact with projectiles, showing no penetration to the back face sheet. These attributes make the composite ideal for leading-edge structures and control surfaces in aerospace vehicles, as well as for acreage thermal protection systems and in high-temperature, lightweight stiffened structures. By tailoring the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a carbon fiber containing ceramic matrix composite (CMC) face sheet to match that of a ceramic foam core, the face sheet and the core can be integrally fabricated without any delamination. Carbon and SiC are woven together in the reinforcing fabric. Integral densification of the CMC and the foam core is accomplished with chemical vapor deposition, eliminating the need for bond-line adhesive. This means there is no need to separately fabricate the core and the face sheet, or to bond the two elements together, risking edge delamination during use. Fibers of two or more types are woven together on a loom. The carbon and ceramic fibers are pulled into the same "pick" location during the weaving process. Tow spacing may be varied to accommodate the increased volume of the combined fiber tows while maintaining a target fiber volume fraction in the composite. Foam pore size, strut thickness, and ratio of face sheet to core thickness can be used to tailor thermal and mechanical properties. The anticipated CTE for the hybridized composite is

  14. Matrix pentagons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multi-particle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unraveled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4) matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  15. Mechanism of Gaseous Detonation Propagation Through Reactant Layers Bounded by Inert Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houim, Ryan

    2017-11-01

    Vapor cloud explosions and rotating detonation engines involve the propagation of gaseous detonations through a layer of reactants that is bounded by inert gas. Mechanistic understanding of how detonations propagate stably or fail in these scenarios is incomplete. Numerical simulations were used to investigate mechanisms of gaseous detonation propagation through reactant layers bounded by inert gas. The reactant layer was a stoichiometric mixture of C2H4/O2 at 1 atm and 300K and is 4 detonation cells in height. Cases where the inert gas temperature was 300, 1500, and 3500 K will be discussed. The detonation failed for the 300 K case and propagated marginally for the 1500 K case. Surprisingly, the detonation propagated stably for the 3500 K case. A shock structure forms that involves a detached shock in the inert gas and a series of oblique shocks in the reactants. A small local explosion is triggered when the Mach stem of a detonation cell interacts with the compressed reactants behind one of these oblique shocks. The resulting pressure wave produces a new Mach stem and a new triple point that leads to a stable detonation. Preliminary results on the influence of a deflagration at the inert/reactant interface on the stability of a layered detonation will be discussed.

  16. Biosafe inertization of municipal solid waste incinerator residues by COSMOS technology.

    PubMed

    Guarienti, Michela; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Bontempi, Elza; Moscoso Cardozo, Sdenka; Borgese, Laura; Zizioli, Daniela; Mitola, Stefania; Depero, Laura E; Presta, Marco

    2014-08-30

    Municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) residues can generate negative environmental impacts when improperly handled. The COlloidal Silica Medium to Obtain Safe inert (COSMOS) technology represents a new method to stabilize MSWI residues and to produce inert safe material. Here we report the results about aquatic biotoxicity of lixiviated MSWI fly ash and the corresponding inertized COSMOS material using a zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo toxicity test. Quantitative assessment of waste biotoxicity included evaluation of mortality rate and of different morphological and teratogenous endpoints in zebrafish embryos exposed to tested materials from 3 to 72h post-fertilization. The results demonstrate that lixiviated MSWI fly ash exerts a dose-dependent lethal effect paralleled by dramatic morphological/teratogenous alterations and apoptotic events in the whole embryo body. Similar effects were observed following MSWI fly ash stabilization in classical concrete matrices, demonstrating that the obtained materials are not biologically safe. On the contrary, no significant mortality and developmental defects were observed in zebrafish embryos exposed to COSMOS inert solution. Our results provide the first experimental in vivo evidence that, in contrast with concrete stabilization procedure, COSMOS technology provides a biologically safe inert. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inert electrode composition having agent for controlling oxide growth on electrode made therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.

    1986-01-01

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily. The electrode composition further includes a metal compound dopant which will aid in controlling the thickness of a protective oxide layer on at least the bottom portion of an electrode made therefrom during use.

  18. Inert electrode composition having agent for controlling oxide growth on electrode made therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Ray, S.P.

    1986-04-15

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily. The electrode composition further includes a metal compound dopant which will aid in controlling the thickness of a protective oxide layer on at least the bottom portion of an electrode made therefrom during use. 12 figs.

  19. Thermodynamic stability and kinetic inertness of a Gd-DTPA bisamide complex grafted onto gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mogilireddy, Vijetha; Déchamps-Olivier, Isabelle; Alric, Christophe; Laurent, Gautier; Laurent, Sophie; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert; Bazzi, Rana; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier; Chuburu, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles coated by gadolinium (III) chelates (Au@DTDTPA) where DTDTPA is a dithiolated bisamide derivative of diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid (DTPA), constituted contrast agents for both X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In an MRI context, highly stable Gd(3+) complexes are needed for in vivo applications. Thus, knowledge of the thermodynamic stability and kinetic inertness of these chelates, when grafted onto gold nanoparticles, is crucial since bisamide DTPA chelates are usually less suited for Gd(3+) coordination than DTPA. Therefore, these parameters were evaluated by means of potentiometric titrations and relaxivity measurements. The results showed that, when the chelates were grafted onto the nanoparticle, not only their thermodynamic stability but also their kinetic inertness were improved. These positive effects were correlated to the chelate packing at the nanoparticle surface that stabilized the corresponding Gd(3+) complexes and greatly enhanced their kinetic inertness. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Carborundum, a bulk similar to dietary fibers but chemically inert, does not decrease colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Corpet, D E; Taché, S; Peiffer, G

    1997-03-19

    Dietary fibers might lower the risk of colorectal cancer, maybe because of their bulking effect. We tested the protection afforded by an inert bulk against carcinogenesis. Thirty rats received an azoxymethane injection and were allocated to a control diet, or to a diet supplemented with 10% carborundum. After 100 days the colons were scored for aberrant crypt foci. Compared to controls, the fecal weight was doubled in carborundum-fed rats (P < 0.001), but the aberrant crypt foci multiplicity was not changed (P = 0.92). The results do not support the hypothesis that intestinal dilution by an inert bulk can protect against colon cancer.

  1. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1997-12-30

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area. 3 figs.

  2. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, Steve H.; Pigott, William R.

    1997-01-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  3. A steam inerting system for hydrogen disposal for the Vandenberg Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belknap, Stuart B.

    1988-01-01

    A two-year feasibility and test program to solve the problem of unburned confined hydrogen at the Vandenberg Space Launch Complex Six (SLC-6) during Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) firings is discussed. A novel steam inerting design was selected for development. Available sound suppression water is superheated to flash to steam at the duct entrance. Testing, analysis, and design during 1987 showed that the steam inerting system (SIS) solves the problem and meets other flight-critical system requirements. The SIS design is complete and available for installation at SLC-6 to support shuttle or derivative vehicles.

  4. Using rapid infrared forming to control interfaces in titanium-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warrier, Sunil G.; Lin, Ray Y.

    1993-01-01

    Control of the fiber-matrix reaction during composite fabrication is commonly achieved by shortening the processing time, coating the reinforcement with relatively inert materials, or adding alloying elements to retard the reaction. To minimize the processing time, a rapid IR forming (RIF) technique for metal-matrix composite fabrication has been developed. Experiments have shown that the RIF technique is a quick, simple, and low-cost process to fabricate titanium-alloy matrix composites reinforced with either silicon carbide or carbon fibers. Due to short processing times (typically on the order of 1-2 minutes in an inert atmosphere for composites with up to eight-ply reinforcements), the interfacial reaction is limited and well controlled. Composites fabricated by this technique have mechanical properties that are comparable to (in several cases, superior to) those made with conventional diffusion-bonding techniques.

  5. Using rapid infrared forming to control interfaces in titanium-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Warrier, S.G.; Lin, R.Y.

    1993-03-01

    Control of the fiber-matrix reaction during composite fabrication is commonly achieved by shortening the processing time, coating the reinforcement with relatively inert materials, or adding alloying elements to retard the reaction. To minimize the processing time, a rapid IR forming (RIF) technique for metal-matrix composite fabrication has been developed. Experiments have shown that the RIF technique is a quick, simple, and low-cost process to fabricate titanium-alloy matrix composites reinforced with either silicon carbide or carbon fibers. Due to short processing times (typically on the order of 1-2 minutes in an inert atmosphere for composites with up to eight-ply reinforcements), themore » interfacial reaction is limited and well controlled. Composites fabricated by this technique have mechanical properties that are comparable to (in several cases, superior to) those made with conventional diffusion-bonding techniques. 21 refs.« less

  6. Controlling particle properties in {{YBa}}_{2}{{Cu}}_{3}{{\\rm{O}}}_{7-\\delta } nanocomposites by combining PLD with an inert gas condensation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparing, M.; Reich, E.; Hänisch, J.; Gottschall, T.; Hühne, R.; Fähler, S.; Rellinghaus, B.; Schultz, L.; Holzapfel, B.

    2017-10-01

    The critical current density {J}{{c}} in {{YBa}}2{{Cu}}3{{{O}}}7-δ thin films, which limits their application in external magnetic fields, can be enhanced by the introduction of artificial pinning centers such as non-superconducting nanoparticles inducing additional defects and local strain in the superconducting matrix. To understand the correlation between superconductivity, defect structures and particles, a controlled integration of particles with adjustable properties is essential. A powerful technique for the growth of isolated nanoparticles in the range of 10 nm is dc-magnetron sputtering in an inert gas flow. The inert gas condensation (IGC) of particles allows for an independent control of both the particle diameter distribution and the areal density. We report on the integration of such gas-phase-condensed {{HfO}}2 nanoparticles into pulsed laser deposited (PLD) {{YBa}}2{{Cu}}3{{{O}}}7-δ thin film multilayers with a combined PLD-IGC system. The particles and the structure of the multilayers are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy on cross-sectional FIB lamellae. As a result of the IGC particle implementation, randomly as well as biaxially oriented {{BaHfO}}3 precipitates are formed in the {{YBa}}2{{Cu}}3{{{O}}}7-δ thin films. With as few as three interlayers of nanoparticles, the pinning force density is enhanced in the low-field region.

  7. Novel mechatronic solutions incorporating inerters for railway vehicle vertical secondary suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matamoros-Sanchez, Alejandra Z.; Goodall, Roger M.

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the effects of inerter-based passive networks in the design of novel mechatronic solutions for improving the vertical performance of a bogied railway vehicle. Combinations of inerter-based structures and active suspensions comprise distinct novel mechatronic solutions for the vertical secondary suspension of the vehicle. The parameters of the active and passive parts of the overall configuration are optimised so that a synergy arises to enhance the vehicle vertical performance and simplify common mechatronic suspension design conflicts. The study is performed by combining inerter-based suspensions with well-established active control (output-based and model-based) strategies for ride quality enhancement. Also, a novel nonlinear control strategy, here called 'Adaptive Stiffness', is incorporated for suspension deflection regulation to complement the well-known local implementation of skyhook damping. This would complete a significant set of control strategies to produce general conclusions. The vehicle performance is assessed through the vertical accelerations of the vehicle body as an initial investigation. Attained results show the potential of the inerter concept for innovating mechatronic technologies to achieve substantial improvements in railway vehicle vertical ride quality with reduced actuator force.

  8. The ethics of placebo-controlled trials: a comparison of inert and active placebo controls.

    PubMed

    Edward, Sarah J L; Stevens, Andrew J; Braunholtz, David A; Lilford, Richard J; Swift, Teresa

    2005-05-01

    Because of the recent and controversial example of sham surgery for the evaluation of fetal tissue transplants for Parkinson's disease, there is renewed interest in the ethics of using "active" placebos in surgical trials, where otherwise there are no inert procedures available, and in pharmacological trials, where there are inert substances, but where patients may guess to which arm they have been allocated. This paper seeks to clarify the ethical arguments surrounding the use of active placebos in trials, and to set up a notation for assessing the ethics of trials more generally. We first establish an framework by which ethics committees can analyze such trials. We examine (1) the scientific value of the research; (2) the expected risks and benefits to individual patients, and (3) the voluntary nature of consent. We then contrast the implications of this framework for inert and active placebo-controlled trials, respectively. In particular, we analyze their relative expected utility using three main utility factors, namely, treatment effects, placebo effects, and altruism. We conclude that, when the intervention is already widely available, active placebo trials rely more heavily on altruism than do inert placebo trials and, when the intervention is restricted, this excess reliance may not be needed. What our analysis provides is the explicit justification for the apparent caution of Institutional Review Boards or ethics committees when reviewing sham operations, especially when the expected harm is not trivial and the risk of exploitation is high.

  9. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  10. Highly sensitive solids mass spectrometer uses inert-gas ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Mass spectrometer provides a recorded analysis of solid material surfaces and bulk. A beam of high-energy inert-gas ions bombards the surface atoms of a sample and converts a percentage into an ionized vapor. The mass spectrum analyzer separates the vapor ionic constituents by mass-to-charge ratio.

  11. Diving under the influence: issues in researching personality and inert gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Van Wijk, Charles H; Martin, Jarred H; Meintjes, Willem A J

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between measures of personality and mood states, and susceptibility to inert gas narcosis. It briefly reviews the topics of inert gas narcosis affecting personality, and personality affecting the susceptibility to inert gas narcosis. There appears to be is a theoretical argument for a possible relationship between measures of personality, mood states, and susceptibility to narcosis. Practically, such a relationship may speak to issues in selection, training and preparation, risk assessments, and even accident investigation in the diving and/or hyperbaric environment. Twenty one divers completed measures of personality and mood states, and were then compressed to 709 kPa (equivalent to 60 msw) in a dry compression chamber, where they completed a task measuring speed of information processing, and a scale measuring subjective narcosis. The main finding was the absence of any significant correlations between measures of personality traits and mood, and susceptibility to inert gas narcosis. Although the study found no evidence of any major relationship, it is presented as a case study to highlight some of the issues and pitfalls involved in such research. The lessons learned - including the careful defining and describing of concepts, and choosing of samples and measurements - are used to discuss some of the methodological and conceptual issues and future directions for researchers to consider.

  12. Method, Philosophy of Education and the Sphere of the Practico-Inert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2009-01-01

    This essay discusses a conception of the relation of philosophy to education that has come to be widely held in both general philosophy and philosophy of education. This view is approached here through the employment of Jean-Paul Sartre's notion of the "practico-inert" as the realm of consolidated social objects, part of which is the institution…

  13. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall be...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall be...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall be...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall be...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall be...

  18. Method of enhanced lithiation of doped silicon carbide via high temperature annealing in an inert atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Hersam, Mark C.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Karmel, Hunter J; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2014-05-27

    A method for enhancing the lithium-ion capacity of a doped silicon carbide is disclosed. The method utilizes heat treating the silicon carbide in an inert atmosphere. Also disclosed are anodes for lithium-ion batteries prepared by the method.

  19. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17 Section 194.15-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory and...

  20. 40 CFR 180.950 - Tolerance exemptions for minimal risk active and inert ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... inert or an active ingredient in a pesticide chemical formulation, including antimicrobial pesticide..., cloves, and red pepper. (iii) Herbs such as basil, anise, or fenugreek. (2) Excluded from the term...

  1. 40 CFR 180.950 - Tolerance exemptions for minimal risk active and inert ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... inert or an active ingredient in a pesticide chemical formulation, including antimicrobial pesticide..., cloves, and red pepper. (iii) Herbs such as basil, anise, or fenugreek. (2) Excluded from the term...

  2. 40 CFR 180.950 - Tolerance exemptions for minimal risk active and inert ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... inert or an active ingredient in a pesticide chemical formulation, including antimicrobial pesticide..., cloves, and red pepper. (iii) Herbs such as basil, anise, or fenugreek. (2) Excluded from the term...

  3. 40 CFR 180.950 - Tolerance exemptions for minimal risk active and inert ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... inert or an active ingredient in a pesticide chemical formulation, including antimicrobial pesticide..., cloves, and red pepper. (iii) Herbs such as basil, anise, or fenugreek. (2) Excluded from the term...

  4. Improved design of dynamic vibration absorber by using the inerter and its application in vehicle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yujie; Chen, Long; Yang, Xiaofeng; Shi, Dehua; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Inerter is a recently proposed mechanical element with two terminals. The novelty of this paper is to present the improved design which aims to add traditional dynamic vibration absorber to the vehicle body by using the inerter. Based on this background, a new vehicle suspension structure called ISD suspension, including the inerter, spring and damper has been created. A dual-mass vibration model including the ISD suspension is considered in this study. Parameters are obtained by using the genetic optimizing algorithm. The frequency-domain simulation confirms that the ISD suspension can effectively improve the damping performance of the suspension system, especially at the offset frequency of the vehicle body, which is consistent with the feature of the dynamic vibration absorber added to the vehicle body mass. At last, a prototype ball screw inerter has been designed and the bench test of a quarter-car model has been undertaken. Under the conditions of the random road input, the vehicle ride comfort evaluation of body acceleration RMS value decreases by 4% at most, the suspension deflection RMS value decreases by 16% at most, the tire dynamic load RMS value decreases by 6% at most. Power spectral density results also indicate that the ISD suspension has superior damping performance than passive suspension which proves that the proposed ISD suspension is deemed effective.

  5. Improved scaling laws for stage inert mass of space propulsion systems. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Summarized is a study which satisfies the need for improved scaling laws for stage inert mass of space propulsion systems. The resulting laws are applicable to current and future vehicle systems and designs for a comprehensive spectrum of anticipated planetary missions.

  6. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17 Section 194.15-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory and...

  7. Inert gases in a terra sample - Measurements in six grain-size fractions and two single particles from Lunar 20.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Lakatos, S.; Walton, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of inert gas measurements performed on six grain-size fractions and two single particles from four samples of Luna 20 material. Presented and discussed data include the inert gas contents, element and isotope systematics, radiation ages, and Ar-36/Ar-40 systematics.

  8. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  9. Comparison of three inert markers in measuring apparent nutrient digestibility of juvenile abalone under different culture condition and temperature regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, K. U.; Adams, L.; Stone, D.; Savva, N.; Adams, M.

    2018-03-01

    A comparative research using three inert markers, chromic oxide, yttrium and ytterbium to measure the apparent nutrient digestibility of experimental feed in juvenile Hybrid abalone (Haliotis rubra X H. laevigata) and Greenlip abalone (H.laevigata) revealed that apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP) measured using yttrium and ytterbium in hybrid abalone were significantly different across the treatments. Protein digestibility measured in experimental tanks was higher than those measured in indoor and outdoor commercial tanks, regardless of inert marker used. Chromic oxide led to overestimated ADCP compared to when measured using yttrium and ytterbium. There were no significant interactions between temperature and inert markers when measuring ADCP and apparent digestibility of gross energy (ADGE). However, there was a significant difference of ADCP amongst inert markers when measured in greenlip abalone cultured at two temperatures. While measurements of ADge calculated using three inert markers shared the same value.

  10. Provisional matrix: A role for versican and hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Wight, Thomas N

    2017-07-01

    Hyaluronan and versican are extracellular matrix (ECM) components that are enriched in the provisional matrices that form during the early stages of development and disease. These two molecules interact to create pericellular "coats" and "open space" that facilitate cell sorting, proliferation, migration, and survival. Such complexes also impact the recruitment of leukocytes during development and in the early stages of disease. Once thought to be inert components of the ECM that help hold cells together, it is now quite clear that they play important roles in controlling cell phenotype, shaping tissue response to injury and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Conversion of hyaluronan-/versican-enriched provisional matrix to collagen-rich matrix is a "hallmark" of tissue fibrosis. Targeting the hyaluronan and versican content of provisional matrices in a variety of diseases including, cardiovascular disease and cancer, is becoming an attractive strategy for intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. BASIC Matrix Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digital Equipment Corp., Maynard, MA.

    The curriculum materials and computer programs in this booklet introduce the idea of a matrix. They go on to discuss matrix operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication by a scalar, and matrix multiplication. The last section covers several contemporary applications of matrix multiplication, including problems of communication…

  12. Distribution of inert gases in fines from the Cayley-Descartes region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. R.; Lakatos, S.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    The inert gases in 14 different fines and in one sample of 2 to 4 mm fines from Apollo 16 were measured by mass spectroscopy with respect to trapped solar wind gases, cosmogenic gases, and 'parentless' Ar-40. Such studies are helpful for the understanding of regolith evolution, of transport of regolith fines, and of the lunar atmosphere. The Apollo 16 soils are unique because they represent, after Luna 20, the second and much more extensive record from the lunar highlands. The landing site presents the problem of materials from the Cayley Formation vs those from the Descartes Formation. There are two large, relatively fresh craters in the area, North Ray and South Ray, whose ejecta patterns may be recognized in the inert-gas record.

  13. Determination of Heritage SSME Pogo Suppressor Resistance and Inertance from Waterflow Pulse Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougal, Chris; Eberhart, Chad; Lee, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Waterflow tests of a heritage Space Shuttle Main Engine pogo suppressor were performed to experimentally quantify the resistance and inertance provided by the suppressor. Measurements of dynamic pressure and flow rate in response to pulsing flow were made throughout the test loop. A unique system identification methodology combined all sensor measurements with a one-dimensional perturbational flow model of the complete water flow loop to spatially translate physical measurements to the device under test. Multiple techniques were then employed to extract the effective resistance and inertance for the pogo suppressor. Parameters such as steady flow rate, perturbational flow rate magnitude, and pulse frequency were investigated to assess their influence on the behavior of the pogo suppressor dynamic response. These results support validation of the RS-25 pogo suppressor performance for use on the Space Launch System Core Stage.

  14. Method for retarding dye fading during archival storage of developed color photographic film. [inert atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B.; Rhodes, C. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Dye fading during archival storage of developed color photographic film is retarded by placing the film in a sealed, opaque vault, introducing a dry, pressurized inert gas into the vault while the latter is vented, and sealing the vault after the air within the vault has been purged and replaced by the inert gas. Preferably, the gas is nitrogen; and the vault is stored at a temperature below room temperature to preserve the color photographic emulsions on the film contained within the vault. For short-term storage, sodium thiocyanate pads charged with water are placed within the vault. For long term storage, the interior of the vault is kept at a low relative humidity.

  15. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  16. Inert gases in fines at three levels of the trench at Van Serg Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. L.; Heymann, D.

    1975-01-01

    Inert-gas measurements were conducted with three soil samples collected from a trench of about 17 cm depth which had been dug at Station 9, approximately 60-m southeast of the rim of Van Serg Crater on the moon. The particular trench is interesting because it is located in the continuous ejecta blanket of a relatively young crater. The results of the inert-gas measurements are presented in a table. They confirm an earlier conclusion reported by Heymann et al. (1974) that fines from Station 9 are among the most gas rich in the whole landing site. The three fines are agglutinate rich and most of the trapped gas is contained in the constructional particles. Agglutinate contents of fines tend to decrease rapidly for particles greater than about 250 micrometers.

  17. Detonation Velocity-Diameter Relation in Gelled Explosive with Inert Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Andrew; Loiseau, Jason; Mi, Xiaocheng

    2017-06-01

    The detonation velocity is measured in a gelled explosive that has been sensitized via the addition of glass microballoons (GMBs) and additionally diluted via the inclusion of large scale (300-700 micron) inert inclusions. The base explosive is nitromethane that has been gelled via the addition of poly(methyl methacrylate) and then sensitized via hot-spot inducing glass microballoons. Inert inclusions (e.g., glass, steel beads) are then added to the explosive to make a heterogeneous explosive with heterogeneities that are at a scale disparate from those of the microballoons. This system has the potential to be a synthetic explosive that can be tuned to have the properties of more complex commercial blasting agents. The velocity-diameter relation is studied using weak confinement (polyvinyl chloride) and time-of-arrival gages. The results are also used to further explore the phenomenon of anomalous scaling between axisymmetric charges (cylinders) and two-dimensional (slab) charges.

  18. Research on inert gas narcosis and air velocity effects on metabolic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The effects of air velocity on metabolic performance are studied by using high forced airflow in a closed environment as a mechanism to control the concentration of volatile animal wastes. Air velocities between 100 and 200 ft/min are without significant effects on the metabolism of rats. At velocities of 200 ft/min and above, oxygen consumption and CO2 production as well as food consumption increase. In most instances, the changes are on the order of 5-10%. At the same time, the RQ for the animals increases slightly and generally correlates well with oxygen consumption and CO2 production. Experiments on the nature of inert gas narcosis show that halothane and methoxyflurane are rather potent inhibitors of the NADH:O2 oxidoreductase system in rats. These experiments suggest that the mechanism of inert gas narcosis is not mandatorily related to a membrane surface phenomenon.

  19. Composite catalyst surfaces: Effect of inert and active heterogeneities on pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.; Bangia, A.K.; Kevrekidis, I.G.

    1996-12-05

    Spatiotemporal dynamics in reaction-diffusion systems can be altered through the properties (reactivity, diffusivity) of the medium in which they occur. We construct active heterogeneous media (composite catalytic surfaces with inert as well as active illusions) using microelectronics fabrication techniques and study the spatiotemporal dynamics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions on these catalysts. In parallel, we perform simulations as well as numerical stability and bifurcation analysis of these patterns using mechanistic models. At the limit of large heterogeneity `grain size` (compared to the wavelength of spontaneously arising structures) the interaction patterns with inert or active boundaries dominates (e.g., pinning, transmission, and boundarymore » breakup of spirals, interaction of pulses with corners, `pacemaker` effects). At the opposite limit of very small or very finely distributed heterogeneity, effective behavior is observed (slight modulation of pulses, nearly uniform oscillations, effective spirals). Some representative studies of transitions between the two limits are presented. 48 refs., 11 figs.« less

  20. Growth and development in inert non-aqueous liquids. [of higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    A preview is presented of the survival and growth capabilities of higher plants in non-aqueous, inert liquids. The two media which were used are mineral (white) oil and fluorochemical inert liquid FC-75. Both liquids dissolve oxygen and carbon dioxide readily, but are insoluble in water. Consequently, plants submerged in these liquids are capable of gas exchange with the atmosphere, but possess a water impermeable coating the dimensions of which are determined by the size of the liquid holding container. In a sense, growing plants in a tank of mineral oil imparts on them a cuticle. Plants plus prescribed volumes of water were innoculated into mineral oil. Organisms with minimal water supplied could then be observed. Also, submersed plants covered with an oil slick were shown to be capable of growth in dessicating atmospheres.

  1. Radiative neutrino mass and Majorana dark matter within an inert Higgs doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahriche, Amine; Jueid, Adil; Nasri, Salah

    2018-05-01

    We consider an extension of the standard model (SM) with an inert Higgs doublet and three Majorana singlet fermions to address both origin and the smallness of neutrino masses and dark matter (DM) problems. In this setup, the lightest Majorana singlet fermion plays the role of DM candidate and the model parameter space can be accommodated to avoid different experimental constraints such as lepton flavor violating processes and electroweak precision tests. The neutrino mass is generated at one-loop level a la Scotogenic model and its smallness is ensured by the degeneracy between the C P -odd and C P -even scalar members of the inert doublet. Interesting signatures at both leptonic and hadronic colliders are discussed.

  2. Effect of milk replacer and rumen inert fat on growth and reproduction of Malpura ram lambs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D; Bhatt, R S; Karim, S A; Naqvi, S M K

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of milk replacer and rumen inert fat on growth, testicular development, puberty, semen production and sperm motion characteristics of ram lambs reared under intensive management in semi-arid climatic conditions. Seven-day-old male lambs of Malpura breed (n=20) were divided equally into two groups. Up to weaning, the lambs in G1 group (control) were fed concentrate, green khejri (Prosopis cineraria) leaves and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) hay along with suckling of dams, whereas lambs in G2 group were fed reconstituted milk at 17 g/lamb per day for the 1st week and at 34 g/lamb per day from 2nd week in addition to the feed inputs given in G1. During post weaning, lambs in the G1 group were given control concentrate, whereas in G2 the control concentrate supplemented with 40 g rumen inert fat per kg of feed was offered along with dry pala (Zizyphus nummularia) and ardu (Ailanthus excelsa) leaves. BWs of lambs were recorded weekly up to 6 months of age. Ram lambs of both the groups were trained for semen collection at a weekly interval from the age of 5 months and simultaneously testicular measurements were recorded fortnightly. The feeding of milk replacer and rumen inert fat had positive (P<0.05) effects on BW, testicular length, testicular volume, semen volume, sperm concentration, mass motility, % motility, % rapid, medium or slow motile spermatozoa. However, no significant effect was observed on testicular breadth, scrotal circumference, age of puberty, sperm velocities and other CASA-derived parameters. The results of this study indicate that higher plane of nutrition in the form of milk-replacer feeding during preweaning and rumen inert fat-supplemented feed during the postweaning period to growing ram lambs enhances their growth, testicular development and semen quality.

  3. ENERGETICS AND CHEMICAL KINETICS OF POLYSTYRENE SURFACE DEGRADATION IN INERT AND CHEMICALLY REACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    gases were passed to emerge at the heated surface, permitted these data to be gathered in chemically reactive environments. Correlation of all these data...in both inert and chemically reactive environments, was possible both on the basis of an energy balance struck at the regressing surface and an...Arrhenius type of chemical kinetic description of the surface degradation process. Although expected, this represents the first demonstration that both

  4. Peripheral substitution of pheophorbides and bacteriopheophorbides to promote inclusion into inert carrier systems for PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrs, Susanne; Ruebner-Heuermann, Anja; Hartwich, G.; Scheer, H.; Moser, Joerg G.

    1996-01-01

    Pheophorbide a ethyl ester, pyropheophorbide a ethyl ester, and bacteriopheophorbide ethyl ester were substituted in 31-position with tert.butyl phenoxy or tert.butyl benzoic acid ester groups resp. in order to enhance affinity to (beta) -cyclodextrin dimers which form inclusion complexes with these photosensitizing drugs. This is a first step to construct inert transport complexes in order to photosensitize specifically cancer cells.

  5. The development of an inert simulant for HNS/teflon explosive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elban, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    The report describes the development and evaluation of an inert simulant for the thermally stable, heat-resistant plastic-bonded explosive HNS/Teflon. The simulant is made by dry blending vinylidene fluoride, melamine and Teflon which when compared has a pressed density and thermal properties corresponding closely to the explosive. In addition, the machinability and handling characteristics of the simulant are similar to the explosive.

  6. Inert gas clearance from tissue by co-currently and counter-currently arranged microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y.; Michel, C. C.

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the clearance of dissolved inert gas from tissues, we have developed numerical models of gas transport in a cylindrical block of tissue supplied by one or two capillaries. With two capillaries, attention is given to the effects of co-current and counter-current flow on tissue gas clearance. Clearance by counter-current flow is compared with clearance by a single capillary or by two co-currently arranged capillaries. Effects of the blood velocity, solubility, and diffusivity of the gas in the tissue are investigated using parameters with physiological values. It is found that under the conditions investigated, almost identical clearances are achieved by a single capillary as by a co-current pair when the total flow per tissue volume in each unit is the same (i.e., flow velocity in the single capillary is twice that in each co-current vessel). For both co-current and counter-current arrangements, approximate linear relations exist between the tissue gas clearance rate and tissue blood perfusion rate. However, the counter-current arrangement of capillaries results in less-efficient clearance of the inert gas from tissues. Furthermore, this difference in efficiency increases at higher blood flow rates. At a given blood flow, the simple conduction-capacitance model, which has been used to estimate tissue blood perfusion rate from inert gas clearance, underestimates gas clearance rates predicted by the numerical models for single vessel or for two vessels with co-current flow. This difference is accounted for in discussion, which also considers the choice of parameters and possible effects of microvascular architecture on the interpretation of tissue inert gas clearance. PMID:22604885

  7. Thermodynamic stability, kinetic inertness and relaxometric properties of monoamide derivatives of lanthanide(III) DOTA complexes.

    PubMed

    Tei, Lorenzo; Baranyai, Zsolt; Gaino, Luca; Forgács, Attila; Vágner, Adrienn; Botta, Mauro

    2015-03-28

    A complete thermodynamic and kinetic solution study on lanthanide(III) complexes with monoacetamide (DOTAMA, L1) and monopropionamide (DOTAMAP, L2) derivatives of DOTA (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) was undertaken with the aim to elucidate their stability and inertness in aqueous media. The stability constants of GdL1 and GdL2 are comparable, whereas a more marked difference is found in the kinetic inertness of the two complexes. The formation of the Eu(III) and Ce(III) complexes takes place via the formation of the protonated intermediates which can deprotonate and transform into the final complex through a OH(-) assisted pathway. GdL2 shows faster rates of acid catalysed decomplexation with respect to GdL1, which has a kinetic inertness comparable to GdDOTA. Nevertheless, GdL2 is one order of magnitude more inert than GdDO3A. A novel DOTAMAP-based bifunctional chelating ligand and its deoxycholic acid derivative (L5) were also synthesized. Since the coordinated water molecule in GdL2 is characterized by an exchange rate ca. two orders of magnitude greater than in GdL1, the relaxivity of the macromolecular derivatives of L5 should not be limited by the slow water exchange process. The relaxometric properties of the supramolecular adduct of GdL5 with human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated in aqueous solution by measuring the magnetic field dependence of the (1)H relaxivity which, at 20 MHz and 298 K, shows a 430% increase over that of the unbound GdL5 chelate. Thus, Gd(III) complexes with DOTAMAP macrocyclic ligands can represent good candidates for the development of stable and highly effective bioconjugate systems for molecular imaging applications.

  8. Process and apparatus for igniting a burner in an inert atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Coolidge, Dennis W.; Rinker, Franklin G.

    1994-01-01

    According to this invention there is provided a process and apparatus for the ignition of a pilot burner in an inert atmosphere without substantially contaminating the inert atmosphere. The process includes the steps of providing a controlled amount of combustion air for a predetermined interval of time to the combustor then substantially simultaneously providing a controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and to a flame generator. The controlled mixture of fuel and air to the flame generator is then periodically energized to produce a secondary flame. With the secondary flame the controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and the combustion air is ignited to produce a pilot burner flame. The pilot burner flame is then used to ignited a mixture of main fuel and combustion air to produce a main burner flame. The main burner flame then is used to ignite a mixture of process derived fuel and combustion air to produce products of combustion for use as an inert gas in a heat treatment process.

  9. Combining stakeholder analysis and spatial multicriteria evaluation to select and rank inert landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Geneletti, Davide

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a method based on the combination of stakeholder analysis and spatial multicriteria evaluation (SMCE) to first design possible sites for an inert landfill, and then rank them according to their suitability. The method was tested for the siting of an inert landfill in the Sarca's Plain, located in south-western Trentino, an alpine region in northern Italy. Firstly, stakeholder analysis was conducted to identify a set of criteria to be satisfied by new inert landfill sites. SMCE techniques were then applied to combine the criteria, and obtain a suitability map of the study region. Subsequently, the most suitable sites were extracted by taking into account also thresholds based on size and shape. These sites were then compared and ranked according to their visibility, accessibility and dust pollution. All these criteria were assessed through GIS modelling. Sensitivity analyses were performed on the results to assess the stability of the ranking with respect to variations in the input (criterion scores and weights). The study concluded that the three top-ranking sites are located close to each other, in the northernmost sector of the study area. A more general finding was that the use of different criteria in the different stages of the analysis allowed to better differentiate the suitability of the potential landfill sites.

  10. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Somnath, E-mail: sghosh@aero.iitkgp.ernet.in; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-15

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. Themore » filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.« less

  11. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  12. Inert dusts and their effects on the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae).

    PubMed

    Kilpinen, Ole; Steenberg, Tove

    2009-06-01

    The haematophagous poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) is the most important pest of egg laying hens in many parts of the world. Control has often relied on chemical pesticides, but inert dusts, which are thought to kill target hosts primarily by desiccation, have become one of the most commonly applied alternative control methods for poultry red mite in Europe. This development has occurred despite a lack of knowledge of the efficacy of the different types of inert dusts and how this is affected by environmental parameters, e.g. the high relative humidity found in poultry houses. In this laboratory study the efficacy of different commercial inert dust products against D. gallinae is compared. All tested compounds killed mites, but there was a clear ranking of efficacy (measured as weight loss after 24 h and as time until 50% mortality), particularly at 75% relative humidity (RH). At 85% RH the efficacy was significantly lower for all tested compounds (P < 0.001). Weight changes over time followed an exponential evaporation model until the mites started dying whereafter the rate of evaporation increased again and followed a slightly different exponential evaporation model. A tarsal test showed that 24 h exposure to surfaces treated with doses much lower than those recommended by the producers is sufficient to kill mites as fast as when they were dusted with massive doses. These data emphasise the need for thorough treatment of all surfaces in a poultry house in order to combat D. gallinae.

  13. Numerical analysis of inertance pulse tube cryocooler with a modified reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Derick; Damu, C.; Kuzhiveli, Biju T.

    2017-12-01

    Pulse tube cryocoolers are used for cooling applications, where very high reliability is required as in space applications. These cryocoolers require a buffer volume depending on the temperature to be maintained and cooling load. A miniature single stage coaxial Inertance Pulse Tube Cryocooler is proposed which operates at 80 K to provide a cooling effect of at least 2 W. In this paper a pulse tube cryocooler, with modified reservoir is suggested, where the reverse fluctuation in compressor case is used instead of a steady pressure in the reservoir to bring about the desired phase shift between the pressure and the mass flow rate in the cold heat exchanger. Therefore, the large reservoir of the cryocooler is replaced by the crank volume of the hermetically sealed linear compressor, and hence the cryocooler is simplified and compact in size. The components of the cryocooler consist of a connecting tube, aftercooler, regenerator, cold heat exchanger, flow straightener, pulse tube, warm heat exchanger, inertance tube and the modified reservoir along with the losses were designed and analyzed. Each part of the cryocooler was analysed using SAGE v11 and verified with ANSYS Fluent. The simulation results clearly show that there is 50% reduction in the reservoir volume for the modified Inertance pulse tube cryocooler.

  14. Method of making composition suitable for use as inert electrode having good electrical conductivity and mechanical properties

    DOEpatents

    Ray, S.P.; Rapp, R.A.

    1986-04-22

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metals or metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily. 8 figs.

  15. Method of making composition suitable for use as inert electrode having good electrical conductivity and mechanical properties

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metals or metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily.

  16. Bench-to-bedside review: Molecular pharmacology and clinical use of inert gases in anesthesia and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade there has been a resurgence of interest in the clinical use of inert gases. In the present paper we review the use of inert gases as anesthetics and neuroprotectants, with particular attention to the clinical use of xenon. We discuss recent advances in understanding the molecular pharmacology of xenon and we highlight specific pharmacological targets that may mediate its actions as an anesthetic and neuroprotectant. We summarize recent in vitro and in vivo studies on the actions of helium and the other inert gases, and discuss their potential to be used as neuroprotective agents. PMID:20836899

  17. Matrix completion by deep matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jicong; Cheng, Jieyu

    2018-02-01

    Conventional methods of matrix completion are linear methods that are not effective in handling data of nonlinear structures. Recently a few researchers attempted to incorporate nonlinear techniques into matrix completion but there still exists considerable limitations. In this paper, a novel method called deep matrix factorization (DMF) is proposed for nonlinear matrix completion. Different from conventional matrix completion methods that are based on linear latent variable models, DMF is on the basis of a nonlinear latent variable model. DMF is formulated as a deep-structure neural network, in which the inputs are the low-dimensional unknown latent variables and the outputs are the partially observed variables. In DMF, the inputs and the parameters of the multilayer neural network are simultaneously optimized to minimize the reconstruction errors for the observed entries. Then the missing entries can be readily recovered by propagating the latent variables to the output layer. DMF is compared with state-of-the-art methods of linear and nonlinear matrix completion in the tasks of toy matrix completion, image inpainting and collaborative filtering. The experimental results verify that DMF is able to provide higher matrix completion accuracy than existing methods do and DMF is applicable to large matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Stability and Oxidation Resistance of Iron- and Cobalt-Based Magnetic Nanoparticle Fluids Fabricated by Inert-Gas Condensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    imaging, drug delivery, and hyperthermia treatment for cancer . Ideal magnetic nanoparticle fluids have well-separated, biocompatible nanoparticles with a...Based Magnetic Nanoparticle Fluids Fabricated by Inert-Gas Condensation DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper...Oxidation Resistance of Iron- and Cobalt-Based Magnetic Nanoparticle Fluids Fabricated by Inert-Gas Condensation Nguyen H. Hail, Raymond Lemoine’, Shaina

  19. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Study of a volume discharge in inert-gas halides without preionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2008-04-01

    The energy characteristics of radiation of halides of inert gases excited by a volume discharge without additional preionisation are studied. The pressures of working mixtures and relations between the inert gas and halogen optimal for obtaining the maximum pulsed power and radiation efficiency are determined. The peak UV radiation power density achieved 5 kW cm-2 and the radiation efficiency was ≈5.5%. The pulse FWHM was 30—40 ns.

  20. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1996-12-03

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

  1. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  2. Matrix differentiation formulas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usikov, D. A.; Tkhabisimov, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    A compact differentiation technique (without using indexes) is developed for scalar functions that depend on complex matrix arguments which are combined by operations of complex conjugation, transposition, addition, multiplication, matrix inversion and taking the direct product. The differentiation apparatus is developed in order to simplify the solution of extremum problems of scalar functions of matrix arguments.

  3. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  4. Experimental investigations of the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of inert and combustible dust cloud mixtures.

    PubMed

    Addai, Emmanuel Kwasi; Gabel, Dieter; Krause, Ulrich

    2016-04-15

    The risks associated with dust explosions still exist in industries that either process or handle combustible dust. This explosion risk could be prevented or mitigated by applying the principle of inherent safety (moderation). This is achieved by adding an inert material to a highly combustible material in order to decrease the ignition sensitivity of the combustible dust. The presented paper deals with the experimental investigation of the influence of adding an inert dust on the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of the combustible/inert dust mixtures. The experimental investigation was done in two laboratory scale equipment: the Hartmann apparatus and the Godbert-Greenwald furnace for the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature test respectively. This was achieved by mixing various amounts of three inert materials (magnesium oxide, ammonium sulphate and sand) and six combustible dusts (brown coal, lycopodium, toner, niacin, corn starch and high density polyethylene). Generally, increasing the inert materials concentration increases the minimum ignition energy as well as the minimum ignition temperatures until a threshold is reached where no ignition was obtained. The permissible range for the inert mixture to minimize the ignition risk lies between 60 to 80%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of airway gas exchange on the multiple inert gas elimination technique: theory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, VA/Q, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Qbr. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: (1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and (2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of VA/Q and Qbr. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean VA, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed VA distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected.

  6. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    DOEpatents

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  7. Optimal dual-fuel propulsion for minimum inert weight or minimum fuel cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical investigation of single-stage vehicles with multiple propulsion phases has been conducted with the phasing optimized to minimize a general cost function. Some results are presented for linearized sizing relationships which indicate that single-stage-to-orbit, dual-fuel rocket vehicles can have lower inert weight than similar single-fuel rocket vehicles and that the advantage of dual-fuel vehicles can be increased if a dual-fuel engine is developed. The results also indicate that the optimum split can vary considerably with the choice of cost function to be minimized.

  8. Inertization of heavy metals present in galvanic sludge by DC thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Leal Vieira Cubas, Anelise; de Medeiros Machado, Marília; de Medeiros Machado, Marina; Gross, Frederico; Magnago, Rachel Faverzani; Moecke, Elisa Helena Siegel; Gonçalvez de Souza, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Galvanic sludge results from the treatment of effluents generated by the industrial metal surface treatment of industrial material, which consists in the deposition of a metal on a surface or a metal surface attack, for example, electrodeposition of conductors (metals) and non conductive, phosphate, anodizing, oxidation and/or printed circuit. The treatment proposed here is exposure of the galvanic sludge to the high temperatures provided by thermal plasma, a process which aims to vitrify the galvanic sludge and render metals (iron, zinc, and chromium) inert. Two different plasma reactors were assembled: with a DC transferred arc plasma torch and with a DC nontransferred arc plasma torch. In this way it was possible to verify which reactor was more efficient in the inertization of the metals and also to investigate whether the addition of quartzite sand to the sludge influences the vitrification of the material. Quantification of water content and density of the galvanic raw sludge were performed, as well as analyzes of total organic carbon (TOC) and identify the elements that make up the raw sludge through spectroscopy X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The chemical composition and the form of the pyrolyzed and vitrified sludge were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) analysis, which it is a analysis that shows the chemical of the sample surface. The inertization of the sludge was verified in leaching tests, where the leachate was analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The results of water content and density were 64.35% and 2.994 g.cm(-3), respectively. The TOC analysis determined 1.73% of C in the sample of galvanic raw sludge, and XRF analysis determined the most stable elements in the sample, and showed the highest peaks (higher stability) were Fe, Zn, and Cr. The efficiency of the sludge inertization was 100% for chromium, 99% for zinc, and 100% for iron. The results also showed that the most

  9. Ruthenium-based, inert oxide electrodes for impregnating active materials in nickel plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, R.; Uma, M.

    Titanium electrodes coated with mixed ruthenium-iridium-titanium oxides are tested as inert counter electrodes for impregnating active materials in porous nickel plaques. The latter are to be used as the positive electrodes in nickel/cadmium cells. Weight losses and variations in bath voltage have been monitored while using these electrodes in the impregnation bath. A 2.85 Ah nickel/cadmium cell has been constructed using nickel electrodes developed by employing the coated electrodes of this study. The performances of these coated electrodes are compared with those of platinum electrodes that are currently employed by nickel/cadmium battery manufacturers. The results are found to be satisfactory.

  10. Using fumarolic inert gas composition to investigate magma dynamics at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.; Caliro, S.; Paonita, A.; Cardellini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2000 the Campi Flegrei caldera sited in Neapolitan area (Italy), has showed signs of reactivation, marked by ground uplift, seismic activity, compositional variations of fumarolic effluents from La Solfatara, an increase of the fumarolic activity as well as of soil CO2 fluxes. Comparing long time series of geochemical signals with ground deformation and seismicity, we show that these changes are at least partially caused by repeated injections of magmatic fluid into the hydrothermal system. The frequency of these degassing episodes has increased in the last years, causing pulsed uplift episodes and swarms of low magnitude earthquakes. We focus here in the inert gas species (CO2-He-Ar-N2) of Solfatara fumaroles which displayed in the time spectacular and persistent variation trends affecting all the monitored vents. The observed variations, which include a continuous decrease of both N2/He and N2/CO2 ratios since 1985, paralleled by an increase of He/CO2, can not be explained neither with changes in processes of boiling-condensation in the local hydrothermal system nor with changes in the mixing proportions between a magmatic vapour and hydrothermal fluids. Consequently we investigated the possibility that the trends of inert gas species are governed by changes in the conditions controlling magma degassing at depth. We applied a magma degassing model, with the most recent updates for inert gas solubilities, after to have included petrologic constraints from the ranges of melt composition and reservoir pressure at Campi Flegrei. The model simulations for mafic melts (trachybasalt and shoshonite) show a surprising agreement with the measured data. Both decompressive degassing of an ascending magma and mixing between magmatic fluids exsolved at various levels along the ascent path can explain the long-time geochemical changes. Our work highlights that, in caldera systems where the presence of hydrothermal aquifers commonly masks the magmatic signature of reactive

  11. Automated measurement of respiratory gas exchange by an inert gas dilution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    A respiratory gas analyzer (RGA) has been developed wherein a mass spectrometer is the sole transducer required for measurement of respiratory gas exchange. The mass spectrometer maintains all signals in absolute phase relationships, precluding the need to synchronize flow and gas composition as required in other systems. The RGA system was evaluated by comparison with the Douglas bag technique. The RGA system established the feasibility of the inert gas dilution method for measuring breath-by-breath respiratory gas exchange. This breath-by-breath analytical capability permits detailed study of transient respiratory responses to exercise.

  12. Regenerable mixed copper-iron-inert support oxygen carriers for solid fuel chemical looping combustion process

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Tian, Hanjing

    2016-12-20

    The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier for a chemical looping cycle, such as the chemical looping combustion of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, coke, coal and biomass char, and the like. The oxygen carrier is comprised of at least 24 weight % (wt %) CuO, at least 10 wt % Fe2O3, and an inert support, and is typically a calcine. The oxygen carrier exhibits a CuO crystalline structure and an absence of iron oxide crystalline structures under XRD crystallography, and provides an improved and sustained combustion reactivity in the temperature range of 600.degree. C.-1000.degree. C. particularly for solid fuels such as carbon and coal.

  13. Modelling the transient behaviour of pulsed current tungsten-inert-gas weldpools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Zheng, W.; Wu, L.

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional model is established to simulate the pulsed current tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) welding process. The goal is to analyse the cyclic variation of fluid flow and heat transfer in weldpools under periodic arc heat input. To this end, an algorithm, which is capable of handling the transience, nonlinearity, multiphase and strong coupling encountered in this work, is developed. The numerical simulations demonstrate the transient behaviour of weldpools under pulsed current. Experimental data are compared with numerical results to show the effectiveness of the developed model.

  14. Crystal separation from mother solution and conservation under microgravity conditions using inert liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regel, L. L.; Vedernikov, A. A.; Queeckers, P.; Legros, J.-C.

    1991-12-01

    The problem of the separation of crystals from their feeding solutions and their conservation at the end of the crystallization under microgravity is investigated. The goal to be reached is to propose an efficient and simple system. This method has to be applicable for an automatic separation on board a spacecraft, without using a centrifuge. The injection of an immiscible and inert liquid into the cell is proposed to solve the problem. The results of numerical modeling, earth simulation tests and experiments under short durations of weightlessness (using aircraft parabolic flights) are described.

  15. Tracheal volume in the pupa of the Saturniid moth Hyalophora cecropia determined with inert gases.

    PubMed

    Bridges, C R; Kestler, P; Scheid, P

    1980-06-01

    Tracheal volume (VTr) was measured in pupae of the Giant silkworm moth Hyalophora cecropia (Saturniidae, Lepidoptera, Insecta) using inert gas wash-out techniques. The animal was placed in a small vessel that was continuously ventilated (rate, V) by a gas mixture containing 20% O2 in N2; the inflowing (F1) and outflowing gas fractions (FE) of the vessel could be continuously measured by a respiratory mass spectrometer. At the onset of a spiracular constriction period, which was evidenced from the FECO2 trace, the mixture was rapidly replaced by pure Ar. At the subsequent burst, the amount of N2 emerging from the animal, MN2, was calculated from V and the difference (FE--F1)N2. VTr was calculated from MN2 and the N2 concentration in the tracheal system before constriction (assumed to equal that in the ventilating gas before replacement by Ar). Measurements were repeated with N2 and Ar replacing each other. VTr average 48 microliter . g-1 (range 39 to 59) for animals of 5.8 g average body weight (range 3.4 to 9.9), when inert gas solubility in body fluids was accounted for. Both size and stage in pupal development appear to affect VTr. These values show reasonable agreement with literature data, mostly obtained by emptying the tracheal gas space by mechanical compression.

  16. New viable region of an inert Higgs doublet dark matter model with scotogenic extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Debasish; Gupta, Aritra

    2017-12-01

    We explore the intermediate dark matter mass regime of the inert Higgs doublet model, approximately between 400 and 550 GeV, which is allowed by latest constraints from direct and indirect detection experiments, but the thermal relic abundance remains suppressed. We extend the model by three copies of right-handed neutrinos, odd under the built-in Z2 symmetry of the model. This discrete Z2 symmetry of the model allows these right-handed neutrinos to couple to the usual lepton doublets through the inert Higgs doublet allowing the possibility of radiative neutrino mass in the scotogenic fashion. Apart from generating nonzero neutrino mass, such an extension can also revive the intermediate dark matter mass regime. The late decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino to dark matter makes it possible for the usual thermally underabundant dark matter in this intermediate mass regime to satisfy the correct relic abundance limit. The revival of this wide intermediate mass range can have relevance not only for direct and indirect search experiments but also for neutrino experiments as the long lifetime of the lightest right-handed neutrino also results in almost vanishing lightest neutrino mass.

  17. Development of a mass spectrometer system for the measurement of inert gases in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palma, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the inert gases in meteorites has provided many clues as to the origin and evolution of the solar system. Particularly crucial and complex are the gases krypton and xenon. To accurately measure the isotopic compositions of these gases requires a mass spectrometer of high sensitivity and resolution. A previously unused and largely untested mass spectrometer system was brought to the point where it was ready for routine sample analyses. This involved, among other things, focusing the ion beam for optimal peak shape and sensitivity, documenting the instrument's response to a series of characteristic tests such as multplier gain checks, and interfacing the instrument to a computer to run the sample analyses. Following this testing and setting up, three iron meteorite samples were to be analyzed for argon, krypton, and xenon. The three samples were shown in prior work to possibly contain primordial heavy inert gases. Although these analyses have not yet been carried out, it is anticipated that they will be completed in the near future.

  18. Probing Toluene and Ethylbenzene Stable Glass Formation using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; May, Robert A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    Inert gas permeation is used to investigate the formation of stable glasses of toluene and ethylbenzene. The effect of deposition temperature (Tdep) on the kinetic stability of the vapor deposited glasses is determined using Kr desorption spectra from within sandwich layers of either toluene or ethylbenzene. The results for toluene show that the most stable glass is formed at Tdep = 0.92 Tg, although glasses with a kinetic stability within 50% of the most stable glass were found with deposition temperatures from 0.85 to 0.95 Tg. Similar results were found for ethylbenzene, which formed its most stable glass at 0.91more » Tg and formed stable glasses from 0.81 to 0.96 Tg. These results are consistent with recent calorimetric studies and demonstrate that the inert gas permeation technique provides a direct method to observe the onset of molecular translation motion that accompanies the glass to supercooled liquid transition.« less

  19. Design and validation of inert homemade explosive simulants for ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderGaast, Brian W.; McFee, John E.; Russell, Kevin L.; Faust, Anthony A.

    2015-05-01

    The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) identified a requirement for inert simulants to act as improvised, or homemade, explosives (IEs) when training on, or evaluating, ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems commonly used in the detection of buried landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). In response, Defence R and D Canada (DRDC) initiated a project to develop IE simulant formulations using commonly available inert materials. These simulants are intended to approximate the expected GPR response of common ammonium nitrate-based IEs, in particular ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO) and ammonium nitrate/aluminum (ANAl). The complex permittivity over the range of electromagnetic frequencies relevant to standard GPR systems was measured for bulk quantities of these three IEs that had been fabricated at DRDC Suffield Research Centre. Following these measurements, published literature was examined to find benign materials with both a similar complex permittivity, as well as other physical properties deemed desirable - such as low-toxicity, thermal stability, and commercial availability - in order to select candidates for subsequent simulant formulation. Suitable simulant formulations were identified for ANFO, with resulting complex permittivities measured to be within acceptable limits of target values. These IE formulations will now undergo end-user trials with CAF operators in order to confirm their utility. Investigations into ANAl simulants continues. This progress report outlines the development program, simulant design, and current validation results.

  20. An in vitro lung model to assess true shunt fraction by multiple inert gas elimination.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Balamurugan; Vogt, Andreas; Hartwich, Volker; Vasireddy, Rakesh; Consiglio, Jolanda; Hugi-Mayr, Beate; Eberle, Balthasar

    2017-01-01

    The Multiple Inert Gas Elimination Technique, based on Micropore Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry, (MMIMS-MIGET) has been designed as a rapid and direct method to assess the full range of ventilation-to-perfusion (V/Q) ratios. MMIMS-MIGET distributions have not been assessed in an experimental setup with predefined V/Q-distributions. We aimed (I) to construct a novel in vitro lung model (IVLM) for the simulation of predefined V/Q distributions with five gas exchange compartments and (II) to correlate shunt fractions derived from MMIMS-MIGET with preset reference shunt values of the IVLM. Five hollow-fiber membrane oxygenators switched in parallel within a closed extracorporeal oxygenation circuit were ventilated with sweep gas (V) and perfused with human red cell suspension or saline (Q). Inert gas solution was infused into the perfusion circuit of the gas exchange assembly. Sweep gas flow (V) was kept constant and reference shunt fractions (IVLM-S) were established by bypassing one or more oxygenators with perfusate flow (Q). The derived shunt fractions (MM-S) were determined using MIGET by MMIMS from the retention data. Shunt derived by MMIMS-MIGET correlated well with preset reference shunt fractions. The in vitro lung model is a convenient system for the setup of predefined true shunt fractions in validation of MMIMS-MIGET.

  1. THE USE OF Y$sup 91$ AS AN INERT INDICATOR IN INTESTINAL ABSORPTION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Maisterrena, J.A.; Murphy, C.A.; Tovar, E.

    The use of Y/sup 91/ as an inert-indicator in the studies of the intestinal absorption of I/sup 131/-labeled substances is reported, emphasis being given to its clinical advantages. The Y/sup 91/ is not absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract, since recovery in the feces in 22 cases was 96 plus or minus 6.7% (S.D.) of the amount given. The Y/sup 91/ and the I/sup 131/-labeled substances are homogeneously distributed throughout any given stool sample but their rate of excretion is not always parallel. A close correlation was found between the amount of I/sup 131/ excreted as obtained from the complete fecalmore » collection method and that of Y/sup 91/-indicator method in a group of 20 subjects under special supervision. The value of the Y/sup 91/ inert-indicator method where the completeness of the stool collection is doubtful is shown in 23 cases. (auth)« less

  2. [Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and inert gases in cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Chhor, V; Canini, F; De Rudnicki, S; Dahmani, S; Gressens, P; Constantin, P

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral ischemia is a common thread of acute cerebral lesions, whether vascular or traumatic origin. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) improves tissue oxygenation and may prevent impairment of reversible lesions. In experimental models of cerebral ischemia or traumatic brain injury, HBO has neuroprotective effects which are related to various mechanisms such as modulation of oxidative stress, neuro-inflammation or cerebral and mitochondrial metabolism. However, results of clinical trials failed to prove any neuroprotective effects for cerebral ischemia and remained to be confirmed for traumatic brain injury despite preliminary encouraging results. The addition of inert gases to HBO sessions, especially argon or xenon which show neuroprotective experimental effects, may provide an additional improvement of cerebral lesions. Further multicentric studies with a strict methodology and a better targeted definition are required before drawing definitive conclusions about the efficiency of combined therapy with HBO and inert gases in acute cerebral lesions. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Size-controlled synthesis of nanocrystalline CdSe thin films by inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Jeewan; Singh, Randhir; Kumar, Akshay; Singh, Tejbir; Agrawal, Paras; Thakur, Anup

    2018-02-01

    Size, shape and structure are considered to have significant influence on various properties of semiconducting nanomaterials. Different properties of these materials can be tailored by controlling the size. Size-controlled CdSe crystallites ranging from ˜ 04 to 95 nm were deposited by inert gas-condensation technique (IGC). In IGC method, by controlling the inert gas pressure in the condensation chamber and the substrate temperature or both, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with desired size. Structure and crystallite size of CdSe thin films were determined from Hall-Williamson method using X-ray diffraction data. The composition of CdSe samples was estimated by X-ray microanalysis. It was confirmed that CdSe thin film with different nanometer range crystallite sizes were synthesized with this technique, depending upon the synthesis conditions. The phase of deposited CdSe thin films also depend upon deposition conditions and cubic to hexagonal phase transition was observed with increase in substrate temperature. The effect of crystallite size on optical and electrical properties of these films was also studied. The crystallite size affects the optical band gap, electrical conductivity and mobility activation of nanocrystalline CdSe thin films. Mobility activation study suggested that there is a quasi-continuous linear distribution of three different trap levels below the conduction band.

  4. Biofilm Matrix Proteins.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jiunn N C; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-04-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins, and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this article, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation.

  5. Matrix Interdiction Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasiviswanathan, Shiva Prasad; Pan, Feng

    In the matrix interdiction problem, a real-valued matrix and an integer k is given. The objective is to remove a set of k matrix columns that minimizes in the residual matrix the sum of the row values, where the value of a row is defined to be the largest entry in that row. This combinatorial problem is closely related to bipartite network interdiction problem that can be applied to minimize the probability that an adversary can successfully smuggle weapons. After introducing the matrix interdiction problem, we study the computational complexity of this problem. We show that the matrix interdiction problem is NP-hard and that there exists a constant γ such that it is even NP-hard to approximate this problem within an n γ additive factor. We also present an algorithm for this problem that achieves an (n - k) multiplicative approximation ratio.

  6. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  7. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manjula, E-mail: manjula.physics@gmail.com; Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased bymore » 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries.« less

  8. Contribution of multiple inert gas elimination technique to pulmonary medicine. 1. Principles and information content of the multiple inert gas elimination technique.

    PubMed Central

    Roca, J.; Wagner, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    This introductory review summarises four different aspects of the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET). Firstly, the historical background that facilitated, in the mid 1970s, the development of the MIGET as a tool to obtain more information about the entire spectrum of VA/Q distribution in the lung by measuring the exchange of six gases of different solubility in trace concentrations. Its principle is based on the observation that the retention (or excretion) of any gas is dependent on the solubility (lambda) of that gas and the VA/Q distribution. A second major aspect is the analysis of the information content and limitations of the technique. During the last 15 years a substantial amount of clinical research using the MIGET has been generated by several groups around the world. The technique has been shown to be adequate in understanding the mechanisms of hypoxaemia in different forms of pulmonary disease and the effects of therapeutic interventions, but also in separately determining the quantitative role of each extrapulmonary factor on systemic arterial PO2 when they change between two conditions of MIGET measurement. This information will be extensively reviewed in the forthcoming articles of this series. Next, the different modalities of the MIGET, practical considerations involved in the measurements and the guidelines for quality control have been indicated. Finally, a section has been devoted to the analysis of available data in healthy subjects under different conditions. The lack of systematic information on the VA/Q distributions of older healthy subjects is emphasised, since it will be required to fully understand the changes brought about by diseases that affect the older population. PMID:8091330

  9. The inert doublet model in the light of Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data: a global fit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiteneuer, Benedikt; Goudelis, Andreas; Heisig, Jan

    2017-09-01

    We perform a global fit within the inert doublet model taking into account experimental observables from colliders, direct and indirect dark matter searches and theoretical constraints. In particular, we consider recent results from searches for dark matter annihilation-induced gamma-rays in dwarf spheroidal galaxies and relax the assumption that the inert doublet model should account for the entire dark matter in the Universe. We, moreover, study in how far the model is compatible with a possible dark matter explanation of the so-called Galactic center excess. We find two distinct parameter space regions that are consistent with existing constraints and can simultaneously explain the excess: One with dark matter masses near the Higgs resonance and one around 72 GeV where dark matter annihilates predominantly into pairs of virtual electroweak gauge bosons via the four-vertex arising from the inert doublet's kinetic term. We briefly discuss future prospects to probe these scenarios.

  10. Comparison of inert-gas-fusion and modified Kjeldahl techniques for determination of nitrogen in niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, E. J.; Graab, J. W.; Davis, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    This report compares results obtained for the determination of nitrogen in a selected group of niobium-base alloys by the inert-gas-fusion and the Kjeldahl procedures. In the inert-gas-fusion procedure the sample is heated to approximately 2700 C in a helium atmosphere in a single-use graphite crucible. A platinum flux is used to facilitate melting of the sample. The Kjeldahl method consisted of a rapid decomposition with a mixture of hydrofluoric acid, phosphoric acid, and potassium chromate; distillation in the presence of sodium hydroxide; and highly sensitive spectrophotometry with nitroprusside-catalyzed indophenol. In the 30- to 80-ppm range, the relative standard deviation was 5 to 7 percent for the inert-gas-fusion procedure and 2 to 8 percent for the Kjeldahl procedure. The agreement of the nitrogen results obtained by the two techniques is considered satisfactory.

  11. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 1; Aircraft System Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Bailey, Delbert B.; Lewinski, Daniel F.; Roseburg, Conrad M.; Palaszewski, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technology assessment is to define a multiphase research study program investigating Onboard Inert Gas Generation Systems (OBIGGS) and Onboard Oxygen Generation Systems (OBOGS) that would identify current airplane systems design and certification requirements (Subtask 1); explore state-of-the-art technology (Subtask 2); develop systems specifications (Subtask 3); and develop an initial system design (Subtask 4). If feasible, consideration may be given to the development of a prototype laboratory test system that could potentially be used in commercial transport aircraft (Subtask 5). These systems should be capable of providing inert nitrogen gas for improved fire cargo compartment fire suppression and fuel tank inerting and emergency oxygen for crew and passenger use. Subtask I of this research study, presented herein, defines current production aircraft certification requirements and design objectives necessary to meet mandatory FAA certification requirements and Boeing design and performance specifications. These requirements will be utilized for baseline comparisons for subsequent OBIGGS/OBOGS application evaluations and assessments.

  12. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit.more » In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.« less

  13. Magnetotransport of Monolayer Graphene with Inert Gas Adsorption in the Quantum Hall Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, A.; Terasawa, D.; Fujimoto, A.; Kanai, Y.; Matsumoto, K.

    2018-03-01

    The surface of graphene is easily accessible from outside, and thus it is a suitable material to study the effects of molecular adsorption on the electric transport properties. We investigate the magnetotransport of inert-gas-adsorbed monolayer graphene at a temperature of 4.4 K under a magnetic field ranging from 0 to 7 T. We introduce 4He or Ar gas at low temperature to graphene kept inside a sample cell. The magnetoresistance change ΔRxx and Hall resistance change ΔRxy from the pristine graphene are measured as a function of gate voltage and magnetic field for one layer of adsorbates. ΔRxx and ΔRxy show oscillating patterns related to the constant filling factor lines in a Landau-fan diagram. Magnitudes of these quantities are relatively higher around a charge neutral point and may be mass-sensitive. These conditions could be optimized for development of a highly sensitive gas sensor.

  14. Inert gases in twelve particles and one 'dust' sample from Luna 16.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Lakatos, S.; Yaniv, A.

    1972-01-01

    The inert gases were measured mass-spectrometrically in 12 fragments and one dust sample from Luna 16. The fragments were classified petrologically by microscopic inspection. The major petrologic types were breccias and basalts. The He-4/Ne-20 ratio of the breccias (average 49) was systematically smaller than that of the basalts (average 78), probably because of He-Ne fractionation during or after the formation of the breccias. We suggest that the He-4/Ne-20 ratios of bulk fines in general may reflect the proportions of basaltic and breccia (plus cindery glasses) fragments in the fines. Exposure ages of four fragments are several hundred million years. The Ar-40/Ar-36 slopes of breccias and basalts are identical: 0.65.

  15. Green spherules from Apollo 15 - Inferences about their origin from inert gas measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakatos, S.; Yaniv, A.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    Green spherules from the 'clod' 15426 and from fines 15421 contain about 100 times less trapped inert gases than normal bulk fines from Apollo 15. These spherules have apparently never been directly exposed to the solar wind. Spherules from other fines contain about 10 times more trapped gas than those from the 'clod.' The gas in the former is surface correlated. However, spherules from fines 15401 are exceptionally gas-poor. The trapped gases can be of solar-wind origin, but this origin requires a two-stage model for the spherules from the clods. Another possibility is that the gases were absorbed from an ambient gas phase. The trapped gases may also be assumed to represent primordial lunar gas. The composition of this gas is then similar to the 'solar' or 'unfractionated' component of gas-rich meteorites, but unlike that in most of the carbonaceous chondrites.

  16. Inert gases in twelve particles and one 'dust' specimen from the Lunar-16 sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Yaniv, A.; Lakatos, S.

    1974-01-01

    Mass spectrography was used to measure inert gases in lunar breccia and basalt particles. The He-4/Ne-20 ratio (mean value of 49) in the breccia was systematically lower than in basalt (mean value of 78). Possibly, this may be due to fractionation of He and Ne during and after breccia formation. Pronounced differences observed in the He-4/Ne-3 ratio are attributed to the presence of variable quantities of cosmogenic He-3. This means that either the solar wind intensity varied in time, or that small-ratio particles were exposed to solar radiation rich in He-3 and/or H-3. The exposure ages of four particles are several hundred million years. The Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio is 0.65 for breccia and basalts.

  17. Influence of Dense Inert Additives (W and Pb) on Detonation Conditions and Regime of Condensed Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imkhovik, Nikolay A.

    2010-10-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical studies of the unusual detonation properties of mixtures of high explosives (HEs) with high-density inert additives W and Pb were analyzed and systematized. Typical examples of the nonideal detonation of composite explosives for which the measured detonation pressure is substantially lower and the detonation velocity is higher than the values calculated within the framework of the hydrodynamic model, with the specific heat ratio for the detonation products of ∼6-8, are presented. Mechanisms of formation of anomalous pressure and mass velocity profiles, which explain the correlation between the Chapman-Jouguet pressure for HE-W and HE-Pb mixtures, the velocity of the free surface of duralumin target, and the depth of the dent imprinted in steel witness plates, are described.

  18. A simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Jeffery D.; Knaur, James A.; Moore, Truman W., Jr.; Shumpert, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Details of a simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles, motors, and explosive components are described. The test facility is designed to simulate the high current, continuing current, and high rate-of-rise current components of an idealized direct strike lightning waveform. The Lightning Test Facility was in operation since May, 1988, and consists of: 3 separate capacitor banks used to produce the lightning test components; a permanently fixed large steel safety cage for retaining the item under test (should it be ignited during testing); an earth covered bunker housing the control/equipment room; a charge/discharge building containing the charging/discharging switching; a remotely located blockhouse from which the test personnel control hazardous testing; and interconnecting cables.

  19. Copper-nickel superalloys as inert alloy anodes for aluminum electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhongning; Xu, Junli; Qiu, Zhuxian; Wang, Zhaowen; Gao, Bingliang

    2003-11-01

    The superalloys Cu-Ni-Al, Cu-Ni-Fe, and Cu-Ni-Cr were studied as anodes for aluminum electrolysis. The alloys were tested for corrosion in acidic electrolyte molten salt and for oxidation in both air and oxygen. The results showed that the Cu-Ni-Al anodes possess excellent resistance to oxidation and corrosion, and the oxidation rates of Cu-Ni-Fe and Cu-Ni-Al anodes were slower than those of pure copper or nickel. During electrolysis, the cell voltage of the Cu-Ni-Al anode was affected most by the concentration of alumina in cryolite molten salt. The Cu-Ni-Fe anode exhibited corrosion resistance in electrolyte molten salt. Comparatively, the Cu-Ni-Cr anode showed poor resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The testing found that further study is warranted on the use of Cu-Ni-Al and Cu-Ni-Fe as inert alloy anodes.

  20. Methodological approach towards the definition of new storage conditions for inert wastes.

    PubMed

    Perrodin, Y; Méhu, J; Grelier-Volatier, L; Charbonnierb, P; Baranger, P; Thoraval, L

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the French Ministry of Environment launched studies aiming to define a specific regulation concerning inert waste disposal in order to limit potential impact of such facilities on the environment by fixing minimum requirements. A model (chemical model/hydrodynamic model) was developed to determine dumping conditions. This model was then applied on two defined scenarios (landfill surface, effective rainfalls...) in order to study the sulphate concentrations in aquifer system immediately downstream from the storage facility. Results allow us to determine in which conditions the sulphates concentrations are compatibles with the potentially drinkable character of the groundwater. They more specifically concern the nature of the waste disposed of, the efficient rainfalls and the landfill area.

  1. Toward a comprehensive theory for the sweeping of trapped radiation by inert orbiting matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, Walker

    1988-01-01

    There is a need to calculate loss rates when trapped Van Allen radiation encounters inert orbiting material such as planetary rings and satellites. An analytic expression for the probability of a hit in a bounce encounter is available for all cases where the absorber is spherical and the particles are gyrotropically distributed on a cylindrical flux tube. The hit probability is a function of the particle's pitch angle, the size of the absorber, and the distance between the flux tube and the absorber when distances are scaled to the gyroradius of a particle moving perpendicular to the magnetic field. Using this expression, hit probabilities in drift encounters were computed for all regimes of particle energies and absorber sizes.

  2. Toward a comprehensive theory for the sweeping of trapped radiation by inert orbiting matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, Walker

    1988-01-01

    There is a need to calculate loss rates when trapped Van Allen radiation encounters inert orbiting material such as planetary rings and satellites. An analytic expression for the probability of a hit in a bounce encounter is available for all cases where the absorber is spherical and the particles are gyrotropically distributed on a cylindrical flux tube. The hit probability is a function of the particle's pitch angle, the size of the absorber, and the distance between flux tube and absorber, when distances are scaled to the gyroradius of a particle moving perpendicular to the magnetic field. Using this expression, hit probabilities have been computed in drift encounters for all regimes of particle energies and absorber sizes. This technique generalizes the approach to sweeping lifetimes, and is particularly suitable for attacking the inverse problem, where one is given a sweeping signature and wants to deduce the properties of the absorber(s).

  3. Pesticide Risk Indicators: Unidentified Inert Ingredients Compromise Their Integrity and Utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surgan, Michael; Condon, Madison; Cox, Caroline

    2010-04-01

    Pesticide Risk Indicators (PRIs) are widely used to evaluate and compare the potential health and environmental risks of pesticide use and to guide pest control policies and practices. They are applied to agricultural, landscape and structural pest management by governmental agencies, private institutions and individuals. PRIs typically assess only the potential risks associated with the active ingredients because, with few exceptions, pesticide manufacturers disclose only the identity of the active ingredients which generally comprise only a minor portion of pesticide products. We show that when inert ingredients are identified and assessed by the same process as the active ingredient, the product specific risk can be much greater than that calculated for the active ingredient alone. To maintain transparency in risk assessment, all those who develop and apply PRIs or make decisions based on their output, should clearly disclose and discuss the limitations of the method.

  4. Stepwise Internal Energy Control for Protonated Methanol Clusters by Using the Inert Gas Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamori, Takuto; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    Preferred isomer structures of hydrogen-bonded clusters should depend on their temperature because of the entropy term in the free energy. To observe such temperature dependence, we propose a new approach to control the internal energy (vibrational temperature) of protonated clusters in the gas phase. We performed IR spectroscopy of protonated methanol clusters, H+ (CH{_3}OH) {_n}, n= 5 and 7, with the tagging by various inert gas species (Ar, CO{_2}, CO, CS{_2}, C{_2}H{_2}, and C{_6}H{_6}). We found that vibrational temperature of the tagged clusters raises with increase of the interaction energy with the tag species, and the observed cluster structures follow the theoretical prediction of the temperature dependence of the isomer population.

  5. Note: development of fast heating inert gas annealing apparatus operated at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Das, S C; Majumdar, A; Shripathi, T; Hippler, R

    2012-04-01

    Here, we report the development of a simple, small, fast heating, and portable, homemade, inert gas (Ar) atmospheric annealing setup. Instead of using a conventional heating element, a commercial soldering rod having an encapsulated fast heating heater is used here. The sample holder is made of a block of stainless steel. It takes 200 s to reach 700 °C, and 10 min to cool down. The probability of oxidation or surface contamination has been examined by means of x ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample after annealing at 600 °C. In addition, we compare the annealing of a hydrogenated carbon nitride film (HCN(x)) in both a conventional vacuum and our newly developed ambient Ar atmosphere setup. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  6. Note: Development of fast heating inert gas annealing apparatus operated at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. C.; Majumdar, A.; Shripathi, T.; Hippler, R.

    2012-04-01

    Here, we report the development of a simple, small, fast heating, and portable, homemade, inert gas (Ar) atmospheric annealing setup. Instead of using a conventional heating element, a commercial soldering rod having an encapsulated fast heating heater is used here. The sample holder is made of a block of stainless steel. It takes 200 s to reach 700 °C, and 10 min to cool down. The probability of oxidation or surface contamination has been examined by means of x ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample after annealing at 600 °C. In addition, we compare the annealing of a hydrogenated carbon nitride film (HCNx) in both a conventional vacuum and our newly developed ambient Ar atmosphere setup.

  7. Transport properties of high quality heterostructures from unstable 2D crystals prepared in inert atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Geliang; Yang, Cao; Khestanova, Ekaterina; Mishchenko, Artem; Kretinin, Andy; Gorbachev, Roman; Novoselov, Konstantin; Andre, Geim; Manchester Group Team

    Many layered materials can be cleaved down to individual atomic planes, similar to graphene, but only a small minority of them are stable under ambient conditions. The rest reacts and decomposes in air, which has severely hindered their investigation and possible uses. Here we introduce a remedial approach based on cleavage, transfer, alignment and encapsulation of airsensitive crystals, all inside a controlled inert atmosphere. To illustrate the technology, we choose two archetypal two-dimensional crystals unstable in air: black phosphorus and niobium diselenide. Our field-effect devices made from their monolayers are conductive and fully stable under ambient conditions, in contrast to the counterparts processed in air. NbSe2 remains superconducting down to the monolayer thickness. Starting with a trilayer, phosphorene devices reach sufficiently high mobilities to exhibit Landau quantization. The approach offers a venue to significantly expand the range of experimentally accessible two-dimensional crystals and their heterostructures.

  8. Interpretation of standard leaching test BS EN 12457-2: is your sample hazardous or inert?

    PubMed

    Zandi, Mohammad; Russell, Nigel V; Edyvean, Robert G J; Hand, Russell J; Ward, Philip

    2007-12-01

    A slag sample from a lead refiner has been obtained and given to two analytical laboratories to determine the release of trace elements from the sample according to BS EN 12457-2. Samples analysed by one laboratory passed waste acceptance criteria, leading it to be classified as an inert material; samples of the same material analysed by the other laboratory failed waste acceptance criteria and were classified as hazardous. It was found that the sample preparation procedure is the critical step in the leaching analysis and that the effects of particle size on leachability should be taken into account when using this standard. The purpose of this paper is to open a debate on designing a better defined standard leaching test and making current waste acceptance criteria more flexible.

  9. Characterization of landfill leachates by molecular size distribution, biodegradability, and inert chemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Míriam C S; Ferreira, Cynthia F A; Lange, Liséte Celina; Aquino, Sérgio F

    2009-05-01

    This work presents results from a detailed characterization of landfill leachates of different ages from a landfill in a major Brazilian city. This characterization consists of determining the molecular size distribution and the inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the biodegradability of both aerobic and anaerobic processes. Results show that leachate with a high COD concentration leachate has low biodegradability. A significant fraction of the COD is not characterized as protein, carbohydrate, or lipids, which reinforces the hypothesis that the remaining fraction was present in all leachate fractions (less than 1 kDa; between 1 and 10 kDa; between 10 and 100 kDa; and greater than 100 kDa) and is refractory. These results suggest that leachates with such characteristics require treatment systems that use physical-chemical processes as a pre- or post-treatment step to biological processes.

  10. Effect of Inert, Reducing, and Oxidizing Atmospheres on Friction and Wear of Metals to 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1961-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in inert, reducing, and oxidizing atmospheres to determine their influence on the friction and wear properties of various metals. Nitrogen, argon, forming gas (10 volume percent H2, 90 volume percent N2), and various concentrations of oxygen in nitrogen were used. A 3/16-inch-radius hemispherical rider under a load of 1000 grams contacted the flat surface of a rotating disk. The surface speed employed was 35 feet per minute. The presence of surface oxides is vitally important to the protection of metals in sliding contact. Extremely high friction and excessive wear were encountered in the absence of these oxides. In some instances (electrolytically pure copper), the removal of the surface oxides resulted in mass welding of the specimens in sliding contact. Extremely small quantities of oxygen are sufficient to provide protection of metal surfaces; for example, with 440-C stainless steel, 0.03 volume percent oxygen was found to be adequate.

  11. Detailed Studies on Flame Extinction by Inert Particles in Normal- and Micro-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andac, M. G.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Campbell, C. S.

    2001-01-01

    The combustion of dusty flows has been studied to lesser extent than pure gas phase flows and sprays. Particles can have a strong effect by modifying the dynamic response and detailed structure of flames through the dynamic, thermal, and chemical couplings between the two phases. A rigorous understanding of the dynamics and structure of two-phase flows can be attained in stagnation flow configurations, which have been used by others to study spray combustion as well as reacting dusty flows. In earlier studies on reacting dusty flows, the thermal coupling between the two phases as well as the effect of gravity on the flame response were not considered. However, in Ref. 6, the thermal coupling between chemically inert particles and the gas was addressed in premixed flames. The effects of gravity was also studied showing that it can substantially affect the profiles of the particle velocity, number density, mass flux, and temperature. The results showed a strong dynamic and thermal dependence of reacting dusty flows to particle number density. However, the work was only numerical and limited to twin-flames, stagnation, premixed flames. In Ref. 7 the effects of chemically inert particle clouds on the extinction of strained premixed and non-premixed flames were studied both experimentally and numerically at 1-g. It was shown and explained that large particles can cause more effective flame cooling compared to smaller particles. The effects of flame configuration and particle injection orientation were also addressed. The complexity of the coupling between the various parameters in such flows was demonstrated and it was shown that it was impossible to obtain a simple and still meaningful scaling that captured all the pertinent physics.

  12. Effects of rumen-inert fat on lactation, reproduction, and health of high producing Holstein herds.

    PubMed

    Scott, T A; Shaver, R D; Zepeda, L; Yandell, B; Smith, T R

    1995-11-01

    Two hundred twenty of 443 cows freshening between June 1989 and March 1990 in five commercial Holstein herds were fed .45 kg/d of rumen-inert fat from calving until 200 DIM. Control diets were fed as TMR and contained, on average, 3.7 to 4.8% supplemental fat (DM basis). Test herds had rolling herd averages of 9300 to 13,250 kg of milk. Production of 4% FCM and milk increased 1.01 (3.3%) and 1.50 kg/d (4.6%), respectively, for primiparous cows fed additional fat. Multiparous cows from four herds demonstrated no response; multiparous cows in one herd increased production of 4% FCM by 2.88 kg/d (8.2%), milk by 2.45 kg/d (6.4%), and milk fat by .14kg/d (10.6%) in response to additional fat. An explanation of response differences among herd for multiparous cows was not possible. For primiparous and multiparous cows, increased genetic potential increased treatment response. Increased body condition score at calving influenced treatment response of multiparous cows. Thinner cows produced more milk and less milk fat in response to additional dietary fat than did fatter cows. Most reproductive indices were unaffected by treatment. Cows receiving additional fat had lower, but nonsignificantly lower, incidences of most health disorders. Responses to rumen-inert fat by cows receiving high concentrations of dietary fat were marginal and were affected by body condition score at calving and by genetic potential.

  13. Crystallization and growth of Ni-Si alloy thin films on inert and on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimberg, I.; Weiss, B. Z.

    1995-04-01

    The crystallization kinetics and thermal stability of NiSi2±0.2 alloy thin films coevaporated on two different substrates were studied. The substrates were: silicon single crystal [Si(100)] and thermally oxidized silicon single crystal. In situ resistance measurements, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy were used. The postdeposition microstructure consisted of a mixture of amorphous and crystalline phases. The amorphous phase, independent of the composition, crystallizes homogeneously to NiSi2 at temperatures lower than 200 °C. The activation energy, determined in the range of 1.4-2.54 eV, depends on the type of the substrate and on the composition of the alloyed films. The activation energy for the alloys deposited on the inert substrate was found to be lower than for the alloys deposited on silicon single crystal. The lowest activation energy was obtained for nonstoichiometric NiSi2.2, the highest for NiSi2—on both substrates. The crystallization mode depends on the structure of the as-deposited films, especially the density of the existing crystalline nuclei. Substantial differences were observed in the thermal stability of the NiSi2 compound on both substrates. With the alloy films deposited on the Si substrate, only the NiSi2 phase was identified after annealing to temperatures up to 800 °C. In the films deposited on the inert substrate, NiSi and NiSi2 phases were identified when the Ni content in the alloy exceeded 33 at. %. The effects of composition and the type of substrate on the crystallization kinetics and thermal stability are discussed.

  14. Neutrophils Generate Microparticles during Exposure to Inert Gases Due to Cytoskeletal Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Stephen R.; Bhopale, Veena M.; Yang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    This investigation was to elucidate the mechanism for microparticle (MP) formation triggered by exposures to high pressure inert gases. Human neutrophils generate MPs at a threshold of ∼186 kilopascals with exposures of 30 min or more. Murine cells are similar, but MP production occurs at a slower rate and continues for ∼4 h, whether or not cells remain under pressure. Neutrophils exposed to elevated gas but not hydrostatic pressure produce MPs according to the potency series: argon ≃ nitrogen > helium. Following a similar pattern, gases activate type-2 nitric-oxide synthase (NOS-2) and NADPH oxidase (NOX). MP production does not occur with neutrophils exposed to a NOX inhibitor (Nox2ds) or a NOS-2 inhibitor (1400W) or with cells from mice lacking NOS-2. Reactive species cause S-nitrosylation of cytosolic actin that enhances actin polymerization. Protein cross-linking and immunoprecipitation studies indicate that increased polymerization occurs because of associations involving vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, focal adhesion kinase, the H+/K+ ATPase β (flippase), the hematopoietic cell multidrug resistance protein ABC transporter (floppase), and protein-disulfide isomerase in proximity to short actin filaments. Using chemical inhibitors or reducing cell concentrations of any of these proteins with small inhibitory RNA abrogates NOS-2 activation, reactive species generation, actin polymerization, and MP production. These effects were also inhibited in cells exposed to UV light, which photoreverses S-nitrosylated cysteine residues and by co-incubations with the antioxidant ebselen or cytochalasin D. The autocatalytic cycle of protein activation is initiated by inert gas-mediated singlet O2 production. PMID:24867949

  15. Multi-objective parametric optimization of Inertance type pulse tube refrigerator using response surface methodology and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Sachindra K.; Choudhury, Balaji K.; Sahoo, Ranjit K.; Sarangi, Sunil K.

    2014-07-01

    The modeling and optimization of a Pulse Tube Refrigerator is a complicated task, due to its complexity of geometry and nature. The aim of the present work is to optimize the dimensions of pulse tube and regenerator for an Inertance-Type Pulse Tube Refrigerator (ITPTR) by using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and Non-Sorted Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA II). The Box-Behnken design of the response surface methodology is used in an experimental matrix, with four factors and two levels. The diameter and length of the pulse tube and regenerator are chosen as the design variables where the rest of the dimensions and operating conditions of the ITPTR are constant. The required output responses are the cold head temperature (Tcold) and compressor input power (Wcomp). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to model and solve the ITPTR. The CFD results agreed well with those of the previously published paper. Also using the results from the 1-D simulation, RSM is conducted to analyse the effect of the independent variables on the responses. To check the accuracy of the model, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method has been used. Based on the proposed mathematical RSM models a multi-objective optimization study, using the Non-sorted genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) has been performed to optimize the responses.

  16. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  17. Quantifying matrix product state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Amandeep Singh; Kumar, Ajay

    2018-03-01

    Motivated by the concept of quantum finite-state machines, we have investigated their relation with matrix product state of quantum spin systems. Matrix product states play a crucial role in the context of quantum information processing and are considered as a valuable asset for quantum information and communication purpose. It is an effective way to represent states of entangled systems. In this paper, we have designed quantum finite-state machines of one-dimensional matrix product state representations for quantum spin systems.

  18. Faces of matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    2012-08-01

    Partition functions of eigenvalue matrix models possess a number of very different descriptions: as matrix integrals, as solutions to linear and nonlinear equations, as τ-functions of integrable hierarchies and as special-geometry prepotentials, as result of the action of W-operators and of various recursions on elementary input data, as gluing of certain elementary building blocks. All this explains the central role of such matrix models in modern mathematical physics: they provide the basic "special functions" to express the answers and relations between them, and they serve as a dream model of what one should try to achieve in any other field.

  19. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  20. 3D-Printing inside the Glovebox: A Versatile Tool for Inert-Gas Chemistry Combined with Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lederle, Felix; Kaldun, Christian; Namyslo, Jan C; Hübner, Eike G

    2016-04-01

    3D-Printing with the well-established 'Fused Deposition Modeling' technology was used to print totally gas-tight reaction vessels, combined with printed cuvettes, inside the inert-gas atmosphere of a glovebox. During pauses of the print, the reaction flasks out of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene were filled with various reactants. After the basic test reactions to proof the oxygen tightness and investigations of the influence of printing within an inert-gas atmosphere, scope and limitations of the method are presented by syntheses of new compounds with highly reactive reagents, such as trimethylaluminium, and reaction monitoring via UV/VIS, IR, and NMR spectroscopy. The applicable temperature range, the choice of solvents, the reaction times, and the analytical methods have been investigated in detail. A set of reaction flasks is presented, which allow routine inert-gas syntheses and combined spectroscopy without modifications of the glovebox, the 3D-printer, or the spectrometers. Overall, this demonstrates the potential of 3D-printed reaction cuvettes to become a complementary standard method in inert-gas chemistry.

  1. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA) enzyme...

  2. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA) enzyme...

  3. Beyond "Inert" Ideas to Teaching General Chemistry from Rich Contexts: Visualizing the Chemistry of Climate Change (VC3)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahaffy, Peter G.; Holme, Thomas A.; Martin-Visscher, Leah; Martin, Brian E.; Versprille, Ashley; Kirchhoff, Mary; McKenzie, Lallie; Town, Marcy

    2017-01-01

    As one approach to moving beyond transmitting "inert" ideas to chemistry students, we use the term "teaching from rich contexts" to describe implementations of case studies or context-based learning based on systems thinking that provide deep and rich opportunities for learning crosscutting concepts through contexts. This…

  4. 40 CFR 180.1122 - Inert ingredients of semiochemical dispensers; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1122 Inert ingredients of semiochemical... (including the monomers, plasticizers, dispersing agents, antioxidants, UV protectants, stabilizers, and... commodity (RAC) or processed foods/feeds derived from the commodity by virtue of its proximity to the RAC or...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1122 - Inert ingredients of semiochemical dispensers; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1122 Inert ingredients of semiochemical... (including the monomers, plasticizers, dispersing agents, antioxidants, UV protectants, stabilizers, and... commodity (RAC) or processed foods/feeds derived from the commodity by virtue of its proximity to the RAC or...

  6. Matrix computations in MACSYMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Facilities built into MACSYMA for manipulating matrices with numeric or symbolic entries are described. Computations will be done exactly, keeping symbols as symbols. Topics discussed include how to form a matrix and create other matrices by transforming existing matrices within MACSYMA; arithmetic and other computation with matrices; and user control of computational processes through the use of optional variables. Two algorithms designed for sparse matrices are given. The computing times of several different ways to compute the determinant of a matrix are compared.

  7. Hacking the Matrix.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, Michael; Spence, Jason R

    2017-01-05

    Recently in Nature, Gjorevski et al. (2016) describe a fully defined synthetic hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix to support in vitro growth of intestinal stem cells and organoids. The hydrogel allows exquisite control over the chemical and physical in vitro niche and enables identification of regulatory properties of the matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Exopolysaccharide Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Koo, H.; Falsetta, M.L.; Klein, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Many infectious diseases in humans are caused or exacerbated by biofilms. Dental caries is a prime example of a biofilm-dependent disease, resulting from interactions of microorganisms, host factors, and diet (sugars), which modulate the dynamic formation of biofilms on tooth surfaces. All biofilms have a microbial-derived extracellular matrix as an essential constituent. The exopolysaccharides formed through interactions between sucrose- (and starch-) and Streptococcus mutans-derived exoenzymes present in the pellicle and on microbial surfaces (including non-mutans) provide binding sites for cariogenic and other organisms. The polymers formed in situ enmesh the microorganisms while forming a matrix facilitating the assembly of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures that encompass a series of microenvironments and are firmly attached to teeth. The metabolic activity of microbes embedded in this exopolysaccharide-rich and diffusion-limiting matrix leads to acidification of the milieu and, eventually, acid-dissolution of enamel. Here, we discuss recent advances concerning spatio-temporal development of the exopolysaccharide matrix and its essential role in the pathogenesis of dental caries. We focus on how the matrix serves as a 3D scaffold for biofilm assembly while creating spatial heterogeneities and low-pH microenvironments/niches. Further understanding on how the matrix modulates microbial activity and virulence expression could lead to new approaches to control cariogenic biofilms. PMID:24045647

  9. Recovery of glass from the inert fraction refused by MBT plants in a pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Dias, Nilmara; Garrinhas, Inés; Maximo, Angela; Belo, Nuno; Roque, Paulo; Carvalho, M Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Selective collection is a common practice in many countries. However, even in some of those countries there are recyclable materials, like packaging glass, erroneously deposited in the Mixed Municipal Solid Waste (MMSW). In the present paper, a solution is proposed to recover glass from the inert reject of Mechanical and Biological Treatment (MBT) plants treating MMSW aiming at its recycling. The inert reject of MBT (MBTr) plants is characterized by its small particle size and high heterogeneity. The study was made with three real samples of diverse characteristics superimposed mainly by the different upstream MBT. One of the samples (VN) had a high content in organics (approximately 50%) and a particle size smaller than 16 mm. The other two were coarser and exhibited similar particle size distribution but one (RE) was rich in glass (almost 70%) while the other (SD) contained about 40% in glass. A flowsheet was developed integrating drying, to eliminate moisture related with organic matter contamination; magnetic separation, to separate remaining small ferrous particles; vacuum suction, to eliminate light materials; screening, to eliminate the finer fraction that has a insignificant content in glass, and to classify the >6mm fraction in 6-16 mm and >16 mm fractions to be processed separately; separation by particle shape, in the RecGlass equipment specifically designed to eliminate stones; and optical sorting, to eliminate opaque materials. A pilot plant was built and the tests were conducted with the three samples separately. With all samples, it was possible to attain approximately 99% content in glass in the glass products, but the recovery of glass was related with the feed particle size. The finer the feed was, the lower the percentage of glass recovered in the glass product. The results show that each one of the separation processes was needed for product enrichment. The organic matter recovered in the glass product was high, ranging from 0.76% to 1

  10. Regularized matrix regression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Li, Lexin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Modern technologies are producing a wealth of data with complex structures. For instance, in two-dimensional digital imaging, flow cytometry and electroencephalography, matrix-type covariates frequently arise when measurements are obtained for each combination of two underlying variables. To address scientific questions arising from those data, new regression methods that take matrices as covariates are needed, and sparsity or other forms of regularization are crucial owing to the ultrahigh dimensionality and complex structure of the matrix data. The popular lasso and related regularization methods hinge on the sparsity of the true signal in terms of the number of its non-zero coefficients. However, for the matrix data, the true signal is often of, or can be well approximated by, a low rank structure. As such, the sparsity is frequently in the form of low rank of the matrix parameters, which may seriously violate the assumption of the classical lasso. We propose a class of regularized matrix regression methods based on spectral regularization. A highly efficient and scalable estimation algorithm is developed, and a degrees-of-freedom formula is derived to facilitate model selection along the regularization path. Superior performance of the method proposed is demonstrated on both synthetic and real examples. PMID:24648830

  11. Detection of water molecules in inert gas based plasma by the ratios of atomic spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskiy, A. V.; Ochkin, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    A new approach is considered to detect the water leaks in inert plasma-forming gas present in the reactor chamber. It is made up of the intensity ratio of D α and H α spectral lines in combination with O, Ar and Xe lines intensity. The concentrations of H2O, O, H and D particles have been measured with high sensitivity. At the D2 admixture pressure {{p}{{\\text{D}\\text{2}}}}   =  0.025 mbar, we used the acquisition time of 10 s to measure the rate of water molecules injected from the outside, Γ0  =  1.4 · 10-9 mbar · m3 · s-1, and the incoming water molecules to plasma, Γ  =  5 ·10-11 mbar · m3 · s-1. The scaling proves that at small D2 admixtures (10-4 mbar), the leaks with the rates Γ0  ≈  6 · 10-12 mbar · m3 · s-1 and Γ  ≈  2 · 10-13 mbar · m3 · s-1 can be detected and measured. The difference between Γ0 and Γ values is due to the high degree of H2O dissociation, which can be up to 97-98%.

  12. Host Soluble Mediators: Defying the Immunological Inertness of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sarah Sze Wah; Aimanianda, Vishukumar

    2017-12-24

    Aspergillus fumigatus produce airborne spores (conidia), which are inhaled in abundant quantity. In an immunocompromised population, the host immune system fails to clear the inhaled conidia, which then germinate and invade, leading to pulmonary aspergillosis. In an immunocompetent population, the inhaled conidia are efficiently cleared by the host immune system. Soluble mediators of the innate immunity, that involve the complement system, acute-phase proteins, antimicrobial peptides and cytokines, are often considered to play a complementary role in the defense of the fungal pathogen. In fact, the soluble mediators are essential in achieving an efficient clearance of the dormant conidia, which is the morphotype of the fungus upon inhalation by the host. Importantly, harnessing the host soluble mediators challenges the immunological inertness of the dormant conidia due to the presence of the rodlet and melanin layers. In the review, we summarized the major soluble mediators in the lung that are involved in the recognition of the dormant conidia. This knowledge is essential in the complete understanding of the immune defense against A. fumigatus .

  13. Application of inert wastes in the construction, operation and closure of landfills: Calculation tool.

    PubMed

    Colomer Mendoza, Francisco J; Esteban Altabella, Joan; Gallardo Izquierdo, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Waste from construction and demolition activities represents one of the highest volumes of waste in Europe. 500 million tonnes are produced throughout the whole EU every year. In some EU members like Spain, approximately 83 per cent of such waste is disposed in landfills. The remaining part is classified and processed in treatment facilities so that it can later be used as recycled aggregates in the construction sector (sand, gravel, aggregates, etc.) but without much commercial success. The aim of this study is to use recycled aggregates from inert wastes (IW) in the different phases of a landfill (construction, operation and closure) with the aid of a new computer tool called LABWASTE.14. This tool incorporates the mathematical relationship among the activities of the landfill and provides as a result the economic viability of using recycled aggregates compared to aggregates from quarries. Therefore, knowing the needs of aggregates in landfills (dams, drainage layers, covering layers, collection wells, etc.) may determine the amount of IW that could be recovered. These calculations can be obtained from some of the data that is introduced (population, land physiography, etc.). Furthermore, the use of LABWASTE.14 makes it possible to reduce the demand for aggregates from quarries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Adhesion of Bacillus spores and Escherichia coli cells to inert surfaces: role of surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Faille, Christine; Jullien, Celine; Fontaine, Francoise; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noelle; Slomianny, Christian; Benezech, Thierry

    2002-08-01

    The ability of bacterial spores and vegetative cells to adhere to inert surfaces was investigated by means of the number of adherent spores (Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis spores) and Escherichia coli cells and their resistance to cleaning or rinsing procedures (adhesion strength). Six materials (glass, stainless steel, polyethylene high density (PEHD), polyamide-6, polyvinyl chloride, and Teflon) were tested. Slight differences in the number of adherent spores (less than 1 log unit) were observed between materials, but a higher number of adherent E. coli cells was found on the hydrophobic materials PEHD and Teflon. Conversely, the resistance of both B. cereus and B. subtilis spores to a cleaning procedure was significantly affected by the material. Hydrophobic materials were harder to clean. The topography parameter derived from the Abbott-Firestone curve, RVK, and, to a lesser extent, the widely used roughness parameters RA (average roughness) and Rz (maximal roughness), were related to the number of adherent cells. Lastly, the soiling level as well as the adhesion strength were shown to depend largely on the microorganism. The number of adhering B. cereus hydrophobic spores and their resistance to a cleaning procedure were found to be 10 times greater than those of the B. subtilis hydrophilic spores. Escherichia coli was loosely bound to all the materials tested, even after 24 h biofilm formation.

  15. Formation of inorganic electride thin films via site-selective extrusion by energetic inert gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Masashi; Toda, Yoshitake; Hayashi, Katsuro; Hirano, Masahiro; Kamiya, Toshio; Matsunami, Noriaki; Hosono, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Inert gas ion implantation (acceleration voltage 300kV) into polycrystalline 12CaO.7Al2O3 (C12A7) films was investigated with fluences from 1×1016 to 1×1017cm-2 at elevated temperatures. Upon hot implantation at 600°C with fluences greater than 1×1017cm-2, the obtained films were colored and exhibited high electrical conductivity in the as-implanted state. The extrusion of O2- ions encaged in the crystallographic cages of C12A7 crystal, which leaves electrons in the cages at concentrations up to ˜1.4×1021cm-3, may cause the high electrical conductivity. On the other hand, when the fluence is less than 1×1017cm-2, the as-implanted films are optically transparent and electrically insulating. The conductivity is enhanced and the films become colored by irradiating with ultraviolet light due to the formation of F +-like centers. The electrons forming the F+-like centers are photo released from the encaged H- ions, which are presumably derived from the preexisting OH- groups. The induced electron concentration is proportional to the calculated displacements per atom, which suggests that nuclear collision effects of the implanted ions play a dominant role in forming the electron and H- ion in the films. The hot ion implantation technique provides a nonchemical process for preparing electronic conductive C12A7 films.

  16. Evaluation of anodic behavior of commercially pure titanium in tungsten inert gas and laser welds.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Iara Augusta; Raimundo, Larica B; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Nóbilo, Mauro Antonio de Arruda; Kuri, Sebastião E; Rovere, Carlos Alberto D; Pagnano, Valeria Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the resistance to corrosion in welds made with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) in comparison with laser welds. A total of 15 circular specimens (10-mm diameter, 2-mm thick) were fabricated and divided into two groups: control group-cp Ti specimens (n = 5); experimental group-cp Ti specimens welded with TIG (n = 5) and with laser (n = 5). They were polished mechanically, washed with isopropyl alcohol, and dried with a drier. In the anodic potentiodynamic polarization assay, measurements were taken using a potentiostat/galvanostat in addition to CorrWare software for data acquisition and CorrView for data visualization and treatment. Three curves were made for each working electrode. Corrosion potential values were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. Statistical analysis showed that corrosion potentials and passive current densities of specimens welded with TIG are similar to those of the control group, and had lower values than laser welding. TIG welding provided higher resistance to corrosion than laser welding. Control specimens welded with TIG were more resistant to local corrosion initiation and propagation than those with laser welding, indicating a higher rate of formation and growth of passive film thickness on the surfaces of these alloys than on specimens welded with laser, making it more difficult for corrosion to occur. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10(exp -3)sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  18. Non-universal tracer diffusion in crowded media of non-inert obstacles.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Surya K; Cherstvy, Andrey G; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-01-21

    We study the diffusion of a tracer particle, which moves in continuum space between a lattice of excluded volume, immobile non-inert obstacles. In particular, we analyse how the strength of the tracer-obstacle interactions and the volume occupancy of the crowders alter the diffusive motion of the tracer. From the details of partitioning of the tracer diffusion modes between trapping states when bound to obstacles and bulk diffusion, we examine the degree of localisation of the tracer in the lattice of crowders. We study the properties of the tracer diffusion in terms of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements, the trapping time distributions, the amplitude variation of the time averaged mean squared displacements, and the non-Gaussianity parameter of the diffusing tracer. We conclude that tracer-obstacle adsorption and binding triggers a transient anomalous diffusion. From a very narrow spread of recorded individual time averaged trajectories we exclude continuous type random walk processes as the underlying physical model of the tracer diffusion in our system. For moderate tracer-crowder attraction the motion is found to be fully ergodic, while at stronger attraction strength a transient disparity between ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements occurs. We also put our results into perspective with findings from experimental single-particle tracking and simulations of the diffusion of tagged tracers in dense crowded suspensions. Our results have implications for the diffusion, transport, and spreading of chemical components in highly crowded environments inside living cells and other structured liquids.

  19. Association effects in the {methanol + inert solvent} system via Monte Carlo simulations. II. Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Álvarez, Paula; Romaní, Luis; González-Salgado, Diego

    2013-05-01

    Mixtures containing associated substances show a singular thermodynamic behaviour that has attracted to scientific community during the last century. Particularly, binary systems composed of an associating fluid and an inert solvent, where association occurs only between molecules of the same kind, have been extensively studied. A number of theoretical approaches were used in order to gain insights into the effect of the association on the macroscopic behaviour, especially on the second-order thermodynamic derivatives (or response functions). Curiously, to our knowledge, molecular simulations have not been used to that end despite describing the molecules and their interactions in a more complete and realistic way than theoretical models. With this in mind, a simple methodology developed in the framework of Monte Carlo molecular simulation is used in this work to quantify the association contribution to a wide set of thermodynamic properties for the {methanol + Lennard Jones} specific system under room conditions and throughout the composition range. Special attention was paid to the response functions and their respective excess properties, for which a detailed comparison with selected previous works in the field has been established.

  20. Effects of Energetic and Inert Nano Particles on Burning Liquid Ethanol Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia, Miguel; Sim, Hyung Sub; Vargas, Andres; Smith, Owen; Karagozian, Ann

    2017-11-01

    This study explores the effects of nano particulate additives on ethanol fuel droplet combustion in a quiescent environment. Two different types of droplet combustion experiments were performed: one involving the classic single droplet suspended from a quartz fiber and the other involving a burning droplet that has continual fuel delivery via a quartz capillary. Two alternative nano particles were explored here to demonstrate the effect of energetic additives: reactive nano aluminum (nAl) and inert nano silicon dioxide (nSiO2), each with average diameter 80 nm. Simultaneous high speed visible and OH* chemiluminescence images were taken to determine burning rate constants (K) and to study flame and droplet characteristics with varying particulate concentrations. Particle/vapor ejections were seen in continuously fed droplet experiments, while rod-suspended burning droplets showed limited particle ejection. The nSiO2 -laden, rod-suspended droplets formed a porous, shell-like structure resembling the shape of a droplet at higher nSiO2 concentrations, in contrast to smaller residue structures for nAl-laden droplets. Changes in K depended on concentrations of nAl and nSiO2 as well as the method of droplet formation, and TEM images of particle residue revealed additional insights. Supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-15-1-0339.

  1. Diel changes in stream periphyton extracellular enzyme activity throughout community development on inert and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rier, S. T.; Francoeur, S. N.; Kuehn, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that algal photosynthesis in stream periphyton communities would influence the activities of extracellular enzymes produced by associated heterotrophic bacteria and fungi to acquire organic compounds and inorganic nutrients. We approached this question by looking for diurnal variation in activities of four extracellular enzymes in periphyton communities that were grown on either inert (glass fiber filters) or organic (leaves) substrata that there were incubated in stream-side channels that were either open to full sun or shaded. Substrata were subsampled for β-glucosidase, alkaline phosphotase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phenol oxidase activities at 3-5 hr. intervals over two consecutive diurnal cycles that were repeated at an early and later stage of periphyton community development. Activities of all enzymes displayed diurnal periodicity but the strength of the diurnal effects depended largely on the substrate type and stage of community development. The most consistent diurnal change was observed with phenol oxidase activity with significantly greater (p<0.05) activities being observed in during the day for both stages of community development and for both substrate types. It is likely that oxygen produced by algal photosynthesis is driving the activity of this oxidative enzyme and that algae might indirectly influence the decomposition of phenolic compounds.

  2. Physicochemical effects on uncontaminated kaolinite due to electrokinetic treatment using inert electrodes.

    PubMed

    Liaki, Christina; Rogers, Christopher D F; Boardman, David I

    2008-07-01

    To determine the consequences of applying electrokinetics to clay soils, in terms of mechanisms acting and resulting effects on the clay, tests were conducted in which an electrical gradient was applied across controlled specimens of English China Clay (ECC) using 'inert' electrodes and a 'Reverse Osmosis' water feed to the electrodes (i.e., to mimic electrokinetic stabilisation without the stabiliser added or electrokinetic remediation without the contaminant being present). The specimens in which electromigration was induced over time periods of 3, 7, 14 and 28 days were subsequently tested for Atterberg Limits, undrained shear strength using a hand shear vane, water content, pH, conductivity and zeta potential. Water flowed through the system from anode to cathode and directly affected the undrained shear strength of the clay. Acid and alkali fronts were created around the anode and cathode, respectively, causing changes in the pH, conductivity and zeta potential of the soil. Variations in zeta potential were linked to flocculation and dispersion of the soil particles, thus raising or depressing the Liquid Limit and Plastic Limit, and influencing the undrained shear strength. Initial weakening around the anode and cathode was replaced by a regain of strength at the anode once acidic conditions had been created, while highly alkaline conditions at the cathode induced a marked improvement in strength. A novel means of indicating strength improvement by chemical means, i.e., free from water content effects, is presented to assist in interpretation of the results.

  3. Modelling responses of the inert-gas washout and MRI to bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Foy, Brody H; Kay, David; Bordas, Rafel

    2017-01-01

    Many lung diseases lead to an increase in ventilation heterogeneity (VH). Two clinical practices for the measurement of patient VH are in vivo imaging, and the inert gas multiple breath washout (MBW). In this study computational modelling was used to compare the responses of MBW indices LCI and s cond and MRI measured global and local ventilation indices, σ r and σ local , to constriction of airways in the conducting zone of the lungs. The simulations show that s cond , LCI and σ r behave quite similarly to each other, all being sensitive to increases in the severity of constriction, while exhibiting little sensitivity to the depth at which constriction occurs. In contrast, the local MRI index σ local shows strong sensitivity to depth of constriction, but lowered sensitivity to constriction severity. We finish with an analysis of the sensitivity of MRI indices to grid sizes, showing that results should be interpreted with reference to the image resolution. Overall we conclude that the application of both local and global VH measures may help to classify different types of bronchoconstriction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of inert cover gas on performance of radioisotope Stirling space power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, R.; Kumar, V.; Or, C.; Schock, A.

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes an updated Orbital design of a radioisotope Stirling power system and its predicted performance at the beginning and end of a six-year mission to the Jovian moon Europa. The design is based on General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules identical to those previously developed and safety-qualified by the Department of Energy (DOE) which were successfully launched on missions to Jupiter and Saturn by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In each generator, the heat produced by the decay of the Pu-238 isotope is converted to electric power by two free-piston Stirling engines and linear alternators developed by Stirling Technology Company (STC), and their rejected waste heat is transported to radiators by heat pipes. The principal difference between the proposed system design and previous Orbital designs (Or et al., 2000) is the thermal insulation between the heat source and the generator's housing. Previous designs had employed multifoil insulation, whereas the design described here employs Min-K-1800 thermal insulation. Such insulation had been successfully used by Teledyne and GE in earlier RTGs (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators). Although Min-K is a much poorer insulator than multifoil in vacuum and requires a substantially greater thickness for equivalent performance, it offers compensating advantages. Specifically it makes it possible to adjust the generator's BOM temperatures by filling its interior volume with inert cover gas. This makes it possible to meet the generator's BOM and EOM performance goals without exceeding its allowable temperature at the beginning of the mission. .

  5. Searches for Dark Matter via Mono-W Production in Inert Doublet Model at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Neng; Li, Niu; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Huan; Zhao, Min-Fu; Song, Mao; Li, Gang; Guo, Jian-You

    2018-05-01

    The Inert Doublet Model (IDM) is one of the many beyond Standard Model scenarios with an extended scalar sector, which provide a suitable dark matter particle candidate. Dark matter associated visible particle production at high energy colliders provides a unique way to determine the microscopic properties of the dark matter particle. In this paper, we investigate that the mono-W + missing transverse energy production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where W boson decay to a lepton and a neutrino. We perform the analysis for the signal of mono-W production in the IDM and the Standard Model (SM) backgrounds, and the optimized criteria employing suitable cuts are chosen in kinematic variables to maximize signal significance. We also investigate the discovery potential in several benchmark scenarios at the 14 TeV LHC. When the light Z2 odd scalar higgs of mass is about 65 GeV, charged Higgs is in the mass range from 120 GeV to 250 GeV, it provides the best possibility with a signal significance of about 3σ at an integrated luminosity of about 3000 fb‑1. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11205003, 11305001, 11575002, the Key Research Foundation of Education Ministry of Anhui Province of China under Grant Nos. KJ2017A032, KJ2016A749, KJ2013A260, and Natural Science Foundation of West Anhui University under Grant No. WXZR201614

  6. Design and validation of inert homemade explosive simulants for X-ray-based inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.; Nacson, Sabatino; Koffler, Bruce; Bourbeau, Éric; Gagne, Louis; Laing, Robin; Anderson, C. J.

    2014-05-01

    Transport Canada (TC), the Canadian Armed Forces, and other public security agencies have an interest in the assessment of the potential utility of advanced explosives detection technologies to aid in the detection and interdiction of commercial grade, military grade, and homemade or improvised explosives (HME or IE). The availability of suitable, non-hazardous, non-toxic, explosive simulants is of concern when assessing the potential utility of such detection systems. Lack of simulants limits the training opportunities, and ultimately the detection probability, of security personnel using these systems. While simulants for commercial and military grade explosives are available for a wide variety of detection technologies, the design and production of materials to simulate improvised explosives has not kept pace with this emerging threat. Funded by TC and the Canadian Safety and Security Program, Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC), Visiontec Systems, and Optosecurity engaged in an effort to develop inert, non-toxic Xray interrogation simulants for IE materials such as ammonium nitrate, potassium chlorate, and triacetone triperoxide. These simulants were designed to mimic key X-ray interrogation-relevant material properties of real improvised explosives, principally their bulk density and effective atomic number. Different forms of the simulants were produced and tested, simulating the different explosive threat formulations that could be encountered by front line security workers. These simulants comply with safety and stability requirements, and as best as possible match form and homogeneity. This paper outlines the research program, simulant design, and validation.

  7. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations.

  8. Ultrasmooth, Polydopamine Modified Surfaces for Block Copolymer Nanopatterning on Inert and Flexible Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Reika; Cho, Joon Hee; Zhou, Sunshine; Kim, Chae Bin; Dulaney, Austin; Janes, Dustin; Ellison, Christopher

    Nature has engineered universal, catechol-containing adhesives that can be synthetically mimicked in the form of polydopamine (PDA). We exploited PDA to enable block copolymer (BCP) nanopatterning on a variety of soft material surfaces in a way that can potentially be applied to flexible electrical devices. Applying BCP nanopatterning to soft substrates is challenging because soft substrates are often chemically inert and possess incompatible low surface energies. In this study, we exploited PDA to enable the formation of BCP nanopatterns on a variety of surfaces such as Teflon, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and Kapton. While previous studies produced a PDA coating layer too rough for BCP nanopatterning, we succeeded in fabricating conformal and ultra-smooth surfaces of PDA by engineering the PDA coating process and post-sonication procedure. This chemically functionalized, biomimetic thin film (3 nm thick) served as a reactive platform for subsequently grafting a surface treatment to perpendicularly orient a lamellae-forming BCP layer. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a perfectly nanopatterned PDA-PET substrate can be bent without distorting or damaging the nanopattern in conditions that far exceeds typical bending curvatures in roll-to-roll manufacturing.

  9. The quantitative studies on gas explosion suppression by an inert rock dust deposit.

    PubMed

    Song, Yifan; Zhang, Qi

    2018-07-05

    The traditional defence against propagating gas explosions is the application of dry rock dust, but not much quantitative study on explosion suppression of rock dust has been made. Based on the theories of fluid dynamics and combustion, a simulated study on the propagation of premixed gas explosion suppressed by deposited inert rock dust layer is carried out. The characteristics of the explosion field (overpressure, temperature, flame speed and combustion rate) at different deposited rock dust amounts are investigated. The flame in the pipeline cannot be extinguished when the deposited rock dust amount is less than 12 kg/m 3 . The effects of suppressing gas explosion become weak when the deposited rock dust amount is greater than 45 kg/m 3 . The overpressure decreases with the increase of the deposited rock dust amounts in the range of 18-36 kg/m 3 and the flame speed and the flame length show the same trends. When the deposited rock dust amount is 36 kg/m 3 , the overpressure can be reduced by 40%, the peak flame speed by 50%, and the flame length by 42% respectively, compared with those of the gas explosion of stoichiometric mixture. In this model, the effective raised dust concentrations to suppress explosion are 2.5-3.5 kg/m 3 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental investigations of tungsten inert gas assisted friction stir welding of pure copper plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, M. A.; Boșneag, A.; Nitu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Welding copper and its alloys is usually difficult to join by conventional fusion welding processes because of high thermal diffusivity of the copper, alloying elements, necessity of using a shielding gas and a clean surface. To overcome this inconvenience, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state joining process that relies on frictional heating and plastic deformation, is used as a feasible welding process. In order to achieve an increased welding speed and a reduction in tool wear, this process is assisted by another one (WIG) which generates and adds heat to the process. The aim of this paper is to identify the influence of the additional heat on the process parameters and on the welding joint properties (distribution of the temperature, hardness and roughness). The research includes two experiments for the FSW process and one experiment for tungsten inert gas assisted FSW process. The outcomes of the investigation are compared and analysed for both welding variants. Adding a supplementary heat source, the plates are preheated and are obtain some advantages such as reduced forces used in process and FSW tool wear, faster and better plasticization of the material, increased welding speed and a proper weld quality.

  11. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of the molecular dynamics of N2O in inert solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouillon, R.

    The influence of the rotational motion of the N2O molecule on its own vibrational motion does not noticeably affect the widths of v1 and v3 isotropic spectra of this molecule in inert solvents (SF6 and CCl4). The pure vibrational dephasing plays a predominant role on this band broadening as shown by comparing the experimental vibrational relaxation time with the calculated vibrational dephasing time deduced from either the binary collision (Fischer-Laubereau) or hydrodynamic model (Metiu-Oxtoby), provided the anharmonicity of the intermolecular potential, as regards the former, and the quadratic coupling terms between vibrator and bath, as regards the latter, are taken into account. Examination of the vibrational correlation functions in the framework of the Rothschild model allows a better understanding of the influence of the instantaneous distribution of vibrational frequencies and of the decay of the perturbation on the shape of the isotropic spectra and confirms that the modulation of the N2O vibration by its environment is rather rapid.

  12. Instrumented Pressing of HE and Inert Materials to Study the Effect of Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stull, Jamie; Woznick, Caitlin; Deluca, Racci; Patterson, Brain; Thompson, Darla Graff

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that detonation and mechanical properties of high explosives (HE) depend on density. Computationally it has been shown that specific particle-size distributions will lead to better pressed parts. Theoretically this should improve moderate compaction conditions, uniform density and strength. There are many other powder characteristics that are important such as crystal shape and strength. We are interested to explore the role of HE powder characteristics on compaction properties and pellet integrity. We have used an instrumented compaction instrument to press inert and HE powders such as TATB and HMX, which have very different crystal structures. The force and displacement measurements from the instrumented press provide information on the quality of compaction of the specimen in the form of Heckel plots, etc. We have evaluated the thermal and mechanical integrity of resultant pellets by measuring the coefficient of thermal expansion and the compressive strength and strain at failure. We have employed micro x-ray computed tomography (CT) to characterize the microstructure and to quantify the number, the size, and the location of voids. The lack of binder in these specimens greatly simplifies the microstructure analysis and makes the data more amenable to modeling and interpretation.

  13. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Ni-rich NiTi plates: functional behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Barbosa, D.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Miranda, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    It is often reported that, to successfully join NiTi shape memory alloys, fusion-based processes with reduced thermal affected regions (as in laser welding) are required. This paper describes an experimental study performed on the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of 1.5 mm thick plates of Ni-rich NiTi. The functional behavior of the joints was assessed. The superelasticity was analyzed by cycling tests at maximum imposed strains of 4, 8 and 12% and for a total of 600 cycles, without rupture. The superelastic plateau was observed, in the stress-strain curves, 30 MPa below that of the base material. Shape-memory effect was evidenced by bending tests with full recovery of the initial shape of the welded joints. In parallel, uniaxial tensile tests of the joints showed a tensile strength of 700 MPa and an elongation to rupture of 20%. The elongation is the highest reported for fusion-welding of NiTi, including laser welding. These results can be of great interest for the wide-spread inclusion of NiTi in complex shaped components requiring welding, since TIG is not an expensive process and is simple to operate and implement in industrial environments.

  14. Deposition of Size-Selected Cu Nanoparticles by Inert Gas Condensation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanometer size-selected Cu clusters in the size range of 1–5 nm have been produced by a plasma-gas-condensation-type cluster deposition apparatus, which combines a grow-discharge sputtering with an inert gas condensation technique. With this method, by controlling the experimental conditions, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with a strict control in size. The structure and size of Cu nanoparticles were determined by mass spectroscopy and confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron transmission microscopy (STEM) measurements. In order to preserve the structural and morphological properties, the energy of cluster impact was controlled; the energy of acceleration of the nanoparticles was in near values at 0.1 ev/atom for being in soft landing regime. From SEM measurements developed in STEM-HAADF mode, we found that nanoparticles are near sized to those values fixed experimentally also confirmed by AFM observations. The results are relevant, since it demonstrates that proper optimization of operation conditions can lead to desired cluster sizes as well as desired cluster size distributions. It was also demonstrated the efficiency of the method to obtain size-selected Cu clusters films, as a random stacking of nanometer-size crystallites assembly. The deposition of size-selected metal clusters represents a novel method of preparing Cu nanostructures, with high potential in optical and catalytic applications. PMID:20652132

  15. Phenomenology of U(1)F extension of inert-doublet model with exotic scalars and leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhargyal, Lobsang

    2018-02-01

    In this work we will extend the inert-doublet model (IDM) by adding a new U(1)F gauge symmetry to it, under which, a Z2 even scalar (φ 2) and Z2 odd right handed component of two exotic charged leptons (F_{eR}, F_{μ R}), are charged. We also add one Z2 even real scalar (φ 1) and one complex scalar (φ ), three neutral Majorana right handed fermions (N1, N2, N3), two left handed components of the exotic charged leptons (F_{eL}, F_{μ L}) as well as F_{τ } are all odd under the Z2, all of which are not charged under the U(1)F. With these new particles added to the IDM, we have a model which can give two scalar DM candidates, together they can explain the present DM relic density as well as the muon (g-2) anomaly simultaneously. Also in this model the neutrino masses are generated at one loop level. One of the most peculiar feature of this model is that non-trivial solution to the axial gauge anomaly free conditions lead to the prediction of a stable very heavy partner to the electron (Fe), whose present collider limit (13 TeV LHC) on its mass should be around m_{Fe} ≥ few TeV.

  16. Production and characterization of para-hydrogen gas for matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, K.; Sankaran, K.; Ramanathan, N.; Gopi, R.

    2016-08-01

    Normal hydrogen (n-H2) has 3:1 ortho/para ratio and the production of enriched para-hydrogen (p-H2) from normal hydrogen is useful for many applications including matrix isolation experiments. In this paper, we describe the design, development and fabrication of the ortho-para converter that is capable of producing enriched p-H2. The p-H2 thus produced was probed using infrared and Raman techniques. Using infrared measurement, the thickness and the purity of the p-H2 matrix were determined. The purity of p-H2 was determined to be >99%. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of trimethylphosphate (TMP) and acetylene (C2H2) were studied in p-H2 and n-H2 matrices and the results were compared with the conventional inert matrices.

  17. Compressive Properties of Metal Matrix Syntactic Foams in Free and Constrained Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbulov, Imre Norbert; Májlinger, Kornél

    2014-06-01

    Metal matrix syntactic foam (MMSF) blocks were produced by an inert gas-assisted pressure infiltration technique. MMSFs are advanced hollow sphere reinforced-composite materials having promising application in the fields of aviation, transport, and automotive engineering, as well as in civil engineering. The produced blocks were investigated in free and constrained compression modes, and besides the characteristic mechanical properties, their deformation mechanisms and failure modes were studied. In the tests, the chemical composition of the matrix material, the size of the reinforcing ceramic hollow spheres, the applied heat treatment, and the compression mode were considered as investigation parameters. The monitored mechanical properties were the compressive strength, the fracture strain, the structural stiffness, the fracture energy, and the overall absorbed energy. These characteristics were strongly influenced by the test parameters. By the proper selection of the matrix and the reinforcement and by proper design, the mechanical properties of the MMSFs can be effectively tailored for specific and given applications.

  18. Tendon Functional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Screen, H.R.C.; Birk, D.E.; Kadler, K.E.; Ramirez, F; Young, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    This article is one of a series, summarising views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the “Functional Extracellular Matrix” stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely-varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, ageing and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. PMID:25640030

  19. Matrix metabolism rate differs in functionally distinct tendons.

    PubMed

    Birch, Helen L; Worboys, Sarah; Eissa, Sabry; Jackson, Brendan; Strassburg, Sandra; Clegg, Peter D

    2008-04-01

    Tendon matrix integrity is vital to ensure adequate mechanical properties for efficient function. Although historically tendon was considered to be relatively inert, recent studies have shown that tendon matrix turnover is active. During normal physiological activities some tendons are subjected to stress and strains much closer to their failure properties than others. Tendons with low safety margins are those which function as energy stores such as the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) and human Achilles tendon (AT). We postulate therefore that energy storing tendons suffer a higher degree of micro-damage and thus have a higher rate of matrix turnover than positional tendons. The hypothesis was tested using tissue from the equine SDFT and common digital extensor tendon (CDET). Matrix turnover was assessed indirectly by a combination of measurements for matrix age, markers of degradation, potential for degradation and protein expression. Results show that despite higher cellularity, the SDFT has lower relative levels of mRNA for collagen types I and III. Non-collagenous proteins, although expressed at different levels per cell, do not appear to differ between tendon types. Relative levels of mRNA for MMP1, MMP13 and both pro-MMP3 and MMP13 protein activity were significantly higher in the CDET. Correspondingly levels of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) were higher in the CDET and tissue fluorescence lower suggesting more rapid turnover of the collagenous component. Reduced or inhibited collagen turnover in the SDFT may account for the high level of degeneration and subsequent injury compared to the CDET.

  20. Visualizing Matrix Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugulis, Peteris; Sondore, Anita

    2018-01-01

    Efficient visualizations of computational algorithms are important tools for students, educators, and researchers. In this article, we point out an innovative visualization technique for matrix multiplication. This method differs from the standard, formal approach by using block matrices to make computations more visual. We find this method a…

  1. Constructing the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John

    2012-09-01

    As part of our 'toolkit' for analysing an extraterrestrial signal, the facility for calculating structural affinity to known phenomena must be part of our core capabilities. Without such a resource, we risk compromising our potential for detection and decipherment or at least causing significant delay in the process. To create such a repository for assessing structural affinity, all known systems (language parameters) need to be structurally analysed to 'place' their 'system' within a relational communication matrix. This will need to include all known variants of language structure, whether 'living' (in current use) or ancient; this must also include endeavours to incorporate yet undeciphered scripts and non-human communication, to provide as complete a picture as possible. In creating such a relational matrix, post-detection decipherment will be assisted by a structural 'map' that will have the potential for 'placing' an alien communication with its nearest known 'neighbour', to assist subsequent categorisation of basic parameters as a precursor to decipherment. 'Universal' attributes and behavioural characteristics of known communication structure will form a range of templates (Elliott, 2001 [1] and Elliott et al., 2002 [2]), to support and optimise our attempt at categorising and deciphering the content of an extraterrestrial signal. Detection of the hierarchical layers, which comprise intelligent, complex communication, will then form a matrix of calculations that will ultimately score affinity through a relational matrix of structural comparison. In this paper we develop the rationales and demonstrate functionality with initial test results.

  2. The extracellular matrix remodeled

    PubMed Central

    Kirmse, Robert; Otto, Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Membrane Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP, MMP-14) is regarded as the prototype of a membrane- tethered protease. It drives fundamental biological processes ranging from embryogenesis to cancer metastasis. The proteolytic cleavage of proteins by MT1-MMP can rapidly alter the biophysical properties of a cell’s microenvironment. Cell’s must thus be able to sense and react to these alterations and transduce these effectively in biochemical signals and cell responses. Although many cells react as acutely to such physical stimuli as they do to chemical ones, the regulatory effects of these have been less extensively explored. In order to investigate a possible interdependency of proteolytic matrix cleavage by MT1-MMP and the generation and sensing of force by cells, a model system was established which exploits the properties of a matrix array of parallel collagen-I fibers. The resulting an-isotropy of the matrix with high tensile strength along the fibers and high mobility perpendicular to it allows the convenient detection of bundling and cleavage of the collagen fibers, as well as spreading and durotaxis of the cells. In summary, we have demonstrated that cell adhesion, force generation, and force sensing are vital for the regulation of MT1-MMP for efficient cleavage of collagen-I. PMID:22482015

  3. Matrix Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of NASA in the area of composite material synthesis; evaluation techniques; prediction analysis techniques; solvent-resistant tough composite matrix; resistance to paint strippers; acceptable processing temperature and pressure for thermoplastics; and the role of computer modeling and fiber interface improvement were discussed.

  4. Crash-Fire Protection System for T-56 Turbopropeller Engine Using Water as Cooling and Inerting Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, Arthur M.; Campbell, John A.

    1959-01-01

    A crash-fire protection system to suppress the ignition of crash-spilled fuel that may be ingested by a T-56 turbopropeller engine is described. This system includes means for rapidly extinguishing the combustor flame and means for cooling and inerting with water the hot engine parts likely to ignite engine-ingested fuel. Combustion-chamber flames were extinguished in 0.07 second at the engine fuel manifold. Hot engine parts were inerted and cooled by 52 pounds of water discharged at ten engine stations. Performance trials of the crash-fire prevention system were conducted by bringing the engine up to takeoff temperature, stopping the normal fuel flow to the engine, starting the water discharge, and then spraying fuel into the engine to simulate crash-ingested fuel. No fires occurred during these trials, although fuel was sprayed into the engine from 0.3 second to 15 minutes after actuating the crash-fire protection system.

  5. Dispersion Modeling of Inert Particulate Matter in the El Paso, TX- Cd. Juarez, MX Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, R.; Fitzgerald, R.

    2005-05-01

    The El Paso, TX-Cd. Juarez, MX region is subject to the emission of inert particulate matter (PM) into the atmosphere, from a variety of sources. The impact of these emissions has been studied extensively in for regulatory compliance in the area of health effects, air quality and visibility. Little work has been done to study the fate and transport of the particulate matter within the region. The Environmental Physics Group at The University of Texas at El Paso has recently applied the SARMAP Air Quality Model (SAQM) to model the dispersion of inert particulate matter in the region. The meteorological data for the SAQM was created with the Penn State/NCAR meteorological modeling system, version 5 (MM5). The SAQM was used to simulate three common occurrences for large particulate emission and concentration. The first was times of heavy traffic volume at the international bridges which cause large numbers of cars to sit, with engines running, for extended periods of time. The second was moderate to high wind events that cause large amounts of coarse particulate matter to become entrained in the atmosphere and transported into and around the region. The third is a temperature inversion which traps the particulate matter at the surface during morning rush hour. The initial conditions for particulate matter, for the two cases involving mobile emissions, were derived from the 1999 version 3 national emissions inventory (NEI) mobile, on-road data from the EPA. Output from the MM5 was used to as the meteorological driver for the SAQM. The MM5 was initialized with data from the NCAR reanalysis project. Meteorological data collected in the region bye the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and the EPA was used for Four Dimensional Data Assimilation. The MM5 was nudged with gridded, surface and observational data. Statistical analysis was done on the MM5 for the variables, wind speed, wind direction, temperature and mixing ratio. The statistics performed included

  6. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY CONCEPTUAL FACILTY DESIGN DESCRIPTION FOR THE INERT GAS CELL EXAMINATION FACILITY NO. 71

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1968-12-12

    The purpose of this Conceptual Facility Design Description (CFDD) is to provide a technical description of the Inert Gas Cell Examination Facility such that agreement with RDT on a Conceptual Design can be reached . The CFDD also serves to establish a common understanding of the facility concept among all responsible FFTF Project parties including the Architect Engineer and Reactor Designer. Included are functions and design requirements, a physical description of the facility, safety considerations, principles of operation, and maintenance principles.

  7. Multiple inert gas elimination technique by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry--a comparison with reference gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Schilling, Thomas; Vogt, Andreas; Rothen, Hans Ulrich; Borges, João Batista; Hachenberg, Thomas; Larsson, Anders; Baumgardner, James E; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2013-10-15

    The mismatching of alveolar ventilation and perfusion (VA/Q) is the major determinant of impaired gas exchange. The gold standard for measuring VA/Q distributions is based on measurements of the elimination and retention of infused inert gases. Conventional multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) uses gas chromatography (GC) to measure the inert gas partial pressures, which requires tonometry of blood samples with a gas that can then be injected into the chromatograph. The method is laborious and requires meticulous care. A new technique based on micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MMIMS) facilitates the handling of blood and gas samples and provides nearly real-time analysis. In this study we compared MIGET by GC and MMIMS in 10 piglets: 1) 3 with healthy lungs; 2) 4 with oleic acid injury; and 3) 3 with isolated left lower lobe ventilation. The different protocols ensured a large range of normal and abnormal VA/Q distributions. Eight inert gases (SF6, krypton, ethane, cyclopropane, desflurane, enflurane, diethyl ether, and acetone) were infused; six of these gases were measured with MMIMS, and six were measured with GC. We found close agreement of retention and excretion of the gases and the constructed VA/Q distributions between GC and MMIMS, and predicted PaO2 from both methods compared well with measured PaO2. VA/Q by GC produced more widely dispersed modes than MMIMS, explained in part by differences in the algorithms used to calculate VA/Q distributions. In conclusion, MMIMS enables faster measurement of VA/Q, is less demanding than GC, and produces comparable results.

  8. Improved scaling laws for stage inert mass of space propulsion systems. Volume 2: System modeling and weight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Technical models and analytical approaches used to develop the weight data for vehicle system concepts using advanced technology are reported. Weight data are supplied for the following major system elements: engine, pressurization, propellant containers, structural shells and secondary structure, and environmental protection shields for the meteoroid and thermal design requirements. Scaling laws, improved and a simplified set, are developed from the system weight data. The laws consider the implications of the major design parameters and mission requirements on the stage inert mass.

  9. Phosphatase-inert glucosamine 6-phosphate mimics serve as actuators of the glmS riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xiang; Holmes, Thomas; Diddle, Julianna; Hintz, Lauren; Delaney, Dan; Stock, Alex; Renner, Danielle; McDevitt, Molly; Berkowitz, David B; Soukup, Juliane K

    2014-12-19

    The glmS riboswitch is unique among gene-regulating riboswitches and catalytic RNAs. This is because its own metabolite, glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P), binds to the riboswitch and catalytically participates in the RNA self-cleavage reaction, thereby providing a novel negative feedback mechanism. Given that a number of pathogens harbor the glmS riboswitch, artificial actuators of this potential RNA target are of great interest. Structural/kinetic studies point to the 2-amino and 6-phosphate ester functionalities in GlcN6P as being crucial for this actuation. As a first step toward developing artificial actuators, we have synthesized a series of nine GlcN6P analogs bearing phosphatase-inert surrogates in place of the natural phosphate ester. Self-cleavage assays with the Bacillus cereus glmS riboswitch give a broad SAR. Two analogs display significant activity, namely, the 6-deoxy-6-phosphonomethyl analog (5) and the 6-O-malonyl ether (13). Kinetic profiles show a 22-fold and a 27-fold higher catalytic efficiency, respectively, for these analogs vs glucosamine (GlcN). Given their nonhydrolyzable phosphate surrogate functionalities, these analogs are arguably the most robust artificial glmS riboswitch actuators yet reported. Interestingly, the malonyl ether (13, extra O atom) is much more effective than the simple malonate (17), and the "sterically true" phosphonate (5) is far superior to the chain-truncated (7) or chain-extended (11) analogs, suggesting that positioning via Mg coordination is important for activity. Docking results are consistent with this view. Indeed, the viability of the phosphonate and 6-O-malonyl ether mimics of GlcN6P points to a potential new strategy for artificial actuation of the glmS riboswitch in a biological setting, wherein phosphatase-resistance is paramount.

  10. Inert gas narcosis has no influence on thermo-tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, Miroljub; Vidmar, Gaj; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2012-05-01

    Contribution of skin thermal sensors under inert gas narcosis to the raising hypothermia is not known. Such information is vital for understanding the impact of narcosis on behavioural thermoregulation, diver safety and judgment of thermal (dis)comfort in the hyperbaric environment. So this study aimed at establishing the effects of normoxic concentration of 30% nitrous oxide (N(2)O) on thermo-tactile threshold sensation by studying 16 subjects [eight females and eight males; eight sensitive (S) and eight non-sensitive (NS) to N(2)O]. Their mean (SD) age was 22.1 (1.8) years, weight 72.8 (15.3) kg, height 1.75 (0.10) m and body mass index 23.8 (3.8) kg m(-2). Quantitative thermo-tactile sensory testing was performed on forearm, upper arm and thigh under two experimental conditions: breathing air (air trial) and breathing normoxic mixture of 30% N(2)O (N(2)O trial) in the mixed sequence. Difference in thermo-tactile sensitivity thresholds between two groups of subjects in two experimental conditions was analysed by 3-way mixed-model analysis of covariance. There were no statistically significant differences in thermo-tactile thresholds either between the Air and N(2)O trials, or between S and NS groups, or between females and males, or with respect to body mass index. Some clinically insignificant lowering of thermo-tactile thresholds occurred only for warm thermo-tactile thresholds on upper arm and thigh. The results indicated that normoxic mixture of 30% N(2)O had no influence on thermo-tactile sensation in normothermia.

  11. Use of inert gas jets to measure the forces required for mechanical gene transfection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transferring genes and drugs into cells is central to how we now study, identify and treat diseases. Several non-viral gene therapy methods that rely on the mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane have been proposed, but the success of these methods has been limited due to a lack of understanding of the mechanical parameters that lead to cell membrane permeability. Methods We use a simple jet of inert gas to induce local transfection of plasmid DNA both in vitro (HeLa cells) and in vivo (chicken chorioallantoic membrane). Five different capillary tube inner diameters and three different gases were used to treat the cells to understand the dependency of transfection efficiency on the dynamic parameters. Results The simple setup has the advantage of allowing us to calculate the forces acting on cells during transfection. We found permeabilization efficiency was related to the dynamic pressure of the jet. The range of dynamic pressures that led to transfection in HeLa cells was small (200 ± 20 Pa) above which cell stripping occurred. We determined that the temporary pores allow the passage of dextran up to 40 kDa and reclose in less than 5 seconds after treatment. The optimized parameters were also successfully tested in vivo using the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. Conclusions The results show that the number of cells transfected with the plasmid scales with the dynamic pressure of the jet. Our results show that mechanical methods have a very small window in which cells are permeabilized without injury (200 to 290 Pa). This simple apparatus helps define the forces needed for physical cell transfection methods. PMID:22963645

  12. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Po-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO2 leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al2O3. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO2, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO2 has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al2O3 does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO2 uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al2O3 results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides. PMID:28788704

  13. Ventilation/perfusion ratios measured by multiple inert gas elimination during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, E K; Duenges, B; Boehme, S; Szczyrba, M; Liu, T; Klein, K U; Baumgardner, J E; Markstaller, K; David, M

    2014-09-01

    During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) the ventilation/perfusion distribution (VA /Q) within the lung is difficult to assess. This experimental study examines the capability of multiple inert gas elimination (MIGET) to determine VA /Q under CPR conditions in a pig model. Twenty-one anaesthetised pigs were randomised to three fractions of inspired oxygen (1.0, 0.7 or 0.21). VA/ Q by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry-derived MIGET was determined at baseline and during CPR following induction of ventricular fibrillation. Haemodynamics, blood gases, ventilation distribution by electrical impedance tomography and return of spontaneous circulation were assessed. Intergroup differences were analysed by non-parametric testing. MIGET measurements were feasible in all animals with an excellent correlation of measured and predicted arterial oxygen partial pressure (R(2)  = 0.96, n = 21 for baseline; R(2)  = 0.82, n = 21 for CPR). CPR induces a significant shift from normal VA /Q ratios to the high VA /Q range. Electrical impedance tomography indicates a dorsal to ventral shift of the ventilation distribution. Diverging pulmonary shunt fractions induced by the three inspired oxygen levels considerably increased during CPR and were traceable by MIGET, while 100% oxygen most negatively influenced the VA /Q. Return of spontaneous circulation were achieved in 52% of the animals. VA /Q assessment by MIGET is feasible during CPR and provides a novel tool for experimental purposes. Changes in VA /Q caused by different oxygen fractions are traceable during CPR. Beyond pulmonary perfusion deficits, these data imply an influence of the inspired oxygen level on VA /Q. Higher oxygen levels significantly increase shunt fractions and impair the normal VA /Q ratio. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Effects of inert dust on olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf physiological para.

    PubMed

    Nanos, George D; Ilias, Ilias F

    2007-05-01

    Cement factories are major pollutants for the surrounding areas. Inert dust deposition has been found to affect photosynthesis, stomatal functioning and productivity. Very few studies have been conducted on the effects of cement kiln dust on the physiology of perennial fruit crops. Our goal was to study some cement dust effects on olive leaf physiology.effects on olive leaf physiology. On Cement kiln dust has been applied periodically since April 2003 onto olive leaves. Cement dust accumulation and various leaf physiological parameters were evaluated early in July 2003. Measurements were also taken on olive trees close to the cement factory. Leaf dry matter content and specific leaf weight increased with leaf age and dust content. Cement dust decreased leaf total chlorophyll content and chlorophyll a/chlorophyll b ratio. As a result, photosynthetic rate and quantum yield decreased. In addition, transpiration rate slightly decreased, stomatal conductance to H2O and CO2 movement decreased, internal CO2 concentration remained constant and leaf temperature increased. The changes in chlorophyll are possibly due to shading and/or photosystem damage. The changes in stomatal functioning were possibly due to dust accumulation between the peltates or othe effects on stomata. Dust (in this case from a cement kiln) seems to cause substantial changes to leaf physiology, possibly leading to reduced olive productivity. Avoidance of air contamination from cement factories by using available technology should be examined together with any possible methodologies to reduce plant tissue contamination from cement dust. Longterm effects of dust (from cement kiln or other sources) on olive leaf, plant productivity and nutritional quality of edible parts could be studied for conclusive results on dust contamination effects to perennial crops.

  15. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm−3, with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  16. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm(-3), with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  17. Dynamics and Structure of Dusty Reacting Flows: Inert Particles in Strained, Laminar, Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed numerical study was conducted on the dynamics and thermal response of inert, spherical particles in strained, laminar, premixed hydrogen/air flames. The modeling included the solution of the steady conservation equations for both the gas and particle phases along and around the stagnation streamline of an opposed-jet configuration, and the use of detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport, For the gas phase, the equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are considered, while for the particle phase, the model is based on conservation equations of the particle momentum balance in the axial and radial direction, the particle number density, and the particle thermal energy equation. The particle momentum equation includes the forces as induced by drag, thermophoresis, and gravity. The particle thermal energy equation includes the convective/conductive heat exchange between the two phases, as well as radiation emission and absorption by the particle. A one-point continuation method is also included in the code that allows for the description of turning points, typical of ignition and extinction behavior. As expected, results showed that the particle velocity can be substantially different than the gas phase velocity, especially in the presence of large temperature gradients and large strain rates. Large particles were also found to cross the gas stagnation plane, stagnate, and eventually reverse as a result of the opposing gas phase velocity. It was also shown that the particle number density varies substantially throughout the flowfield, as a result of the straining of the flow and the thermal expansion. Finally, for increased values of the particle number density, substantial flame cooling to extinction states and modification of the gas phase fluid mechanics were observed. As also expected, the effect of gravity was shown to be important for low convective velocities and heavy particles. Under such conditions, simulations

  18. Dynamics and Structure of Dusty Reacting Flows: Inert Particles in Strained, Laminar, Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.; Wu, Ming-Shin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A detailed numerical study was conducted on the dynamics and thermal response of inert spherical particles in strained, laminar, premixed hydrogen/air flames. The modeling included the solution of the steady conservation equations for both the gas and particle phases along and around the stagnation streamline of an opposed-jet configuration, and the use of detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport. For the gas phase, the equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are considered, while for the particle phase, the model is based on conservation equations of the particle momentum balance in the axial and radial direction, the particle number density, and the particle thermal energy equation. The particle momentum equation includes the forces as induced by drag, thermophoresis, and gravity. The particle thermal energy equation includes the convective/conductive heat exchange between the two phases, as well as radiation emission and absorption by the particle. A one-point continuation method is also included in the code that allows for the description of turning points, typical of ignition and extinction behavior. As expected, results showed that the particle velocity can be substantially different than the gas phase velocity, especially in the presence of large temperature gradients and large strain rates. Large particles were also found to cross the gas stagnation plane, stagnate, and eventually reverse as a result of the opposing gas phase velocity. It was also shown that the particle number density varies substantially throughout the flowfield, as a result of the straining of the flow and the thermal expansion. Finally, for increased values of the particle number density, substantial flame cooling to extinction states and modification of the gas phase fluid mechanics were observed. As also expected, the effect of gravity was shown to be important for low convective velocities and heavy particles. Under such conditions, simulations

  19. Clinical application of inert gas Multiple Breath Washout in children and adolescents with asthma.

    PubMed

    Zwitserloot, Annelies; Fuchs, Susanne I; Müller, Christina; Bisdorf, Kornelia; Gappa, Monika

    2014-09-01

    Children with asthma often have normal spirometry despite significant disease. The pathology of the small airways in asthma may be assessed using Multiple Breath Washout (MBW) and calculating the Lung Clearance Index (LCI). There are only few studies using MBW in children with asthma and existing data regarding bronchodilator effect are contradictory. The aim of the present pilot study was to compare LCI in asthma and controls and assess the effect of salbutamol in children with asthma on the LCI. Unselected patients with a diagnosis of asthma visiting the outpatient department of our hospital between 04-2010 and 03-2011 were recruited and compared to a healthy control group. MBW was performed as inert gas MBW using sulfurhexafluorid (SF6) as the tracer gas. Clinical data were documented and spirometry and MBW (EasyOne Pro, MBW module, NDD Switzerland) were performed before and after the use of salbutamol (200-400 μg). Healthy controls performed baseline MBW only. 32 children diagnosed with asthma (4.7-17.4 years) and 42 controls (5.3-20.8) were included in the analysis. LCI differed between patients and controls, with a mean LCI (SD) of 6.48 (0.48) and 6.21 (0.38) (P = 0.008). Use of salbutamol had no significant effect on LCI for the group. These pilot data show that clinically stable asthma patients and controls both have a LCI in the normal range. However, in patients the LCI is significantly higher indicating that MBW may have a role in assessing small airways disease in asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Inert gas narcosis and the encoding and retrieval of long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Wendy; Hobbs, Malcolm

    2013-12-01

    Prior research has indicated that inert gas narcosis (IGN) causes decrements in free recall memory performance and that these result from disruption of either encoding or self-guided search in the retrieval process. In a recent study we provided evidence, using a Levels of Processing approach, for the hypothesis that IGN affects the encoding of new information. The current study sought to replicate these results with an improved methodology. The effect of ambient pressure (111.5-212.8 kPa/1-11 msw vs. 456-516.8 kPa/35-41 msw) and level of processing (shallow vs. deep) on free recall memory performance was measured in 34 divers in the context of an underwater field experiment. Free recall was significantly worse at high ambient pressure compared to low ambient pressure in the deep processing condition (low pressure: M = 5.6; SD = 2.7; high pressure: M = 3.3; SD = 1.4), but not in the shallow processing condition (low pressure: M = 3.9; SD = 1.7; high pressure: M = 3.1; SD = 1.8), indicating IGN impaired memory ability in the deep processing condition. In the shallow water, deep processing improved recall over shallow processing but, significantly, this effect was eliminated in the deep water. In contrast to our earlier study this supported the hypothesis that IGN affects the self-guided search of information and not encoding. It is suggested that IGN may affect both encoding and self-guided search and further research is recommended.

  1. Inert gas narcosis disrupts encoding but not retrieval of long term memory.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Malcolm; Kneller, Wendy

    2015-05-15

    Exposure to increased ambient pressure causes inert gas narcosis of which one symptom is long-term memory (LTM) impairment. Narcosis is posited to impair LTM by disrupting information encoding, retrieval (self-guided search), or both. The effect of narcosis on the encoding and retrieval of LTM was investigated by testing the effect of learning-recall pressure and levels of processing (LoP) on the free-recall of word lists in divers underwater. All participants (n=60) took part in four conditions in which words were learnt and then recalled at either low pressure (1.4-1.9atm/4-9msw) or high pressure (4.4-5.0atm/34-40msw), as manipulated by changes in depth underwater: low-low (LL), low-high(LH), high-high (HH), and high-low (HL). In addition, participants were assigned to either a deep or shallow processing condition, using LoP methodology. Free-recall memory ability was significantly impaired only when words were initially learned at high pressure (HH & HL conditions). When words were learned at low pressure and then recalled at low pressure (LL condition) or high pressure (LH condition) free-recall was not impaired. Although numerically superior in several conditions, deeper processing failed to significantly improve free-recall ability in any of the learning-recall conditions. This pattern of results support the hypothesis that narcosis disrupts encoding of information into LTM, while retrieval appears to be unaffected. These findings are discussed in relation to similar effects reported by some memory impairing drugs and the practical implications for workers in pressurised environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Po-Yu

    2014-06-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO₂ and Al₂O₃ were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO₂ leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al₂O₃. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO₂, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO₂ has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al₂O₃ does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO₂ uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al₂O₃ results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  3. A study of thorium exposure during tungsten inert gas welding in an airline engineering population.

    PubMed

    McElearney, N; Irvine, D

    1993-07-01

    To investigate the theoretic possibility of excessive exposure to thorium during the process of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using thoriated rods we carried out a cross-sectional study of TIG welders and an age- and skill-matched group. We measured the radiation doses from inhaled thorium that was retained in the body and investigated whether any differences in health or biologic indices could have been attributable to the welding and tip-grinding process. Sixty-four TIG welders, 11 non-TIG welders, and 61 control subjects from an airline engineering population participated. All of the subjects were interviewed for biographic, occupational history and morbidity details. All of the welders and eight control subjects carried out large-volume urine sampling to recover thorium 232 and thorium 228; this group also had chest radiographs. All of the subjects had a blood sample taken to estimate liver enzymes, and they provided small-volume urine samples for the estimation of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin. We found no excess of morbidity among the TIG or non-TIG welding groups, and the levels of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin were the same for both groups. There was a higher aspartate aminotransferase level in the control group. The internal radiation doses were estimated at less than an annual level of intake in all cases, and considerably less if the exposure (as was the case) was assumed to be chronic over many years. Some additional precautionary measures are suggested to reduce further any potential hazard from this process.

  4. Effect of Inert Cover Gas on Performance of Radioisotope Stirling Space Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Robert; Kumar, V; Ore, C

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an updated Orbital design of a radioisotope Stirling power system and its predicted performance at the beginning and end of a six-year mission to the Jovian moon Europa. The design is based on General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules identical to those previously developed and safety-qualified by the Department of Energy (DOE) which were successfully launched to Jupiter and Saturn by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In each generator, the heat produced by the decay of the Pu-238 isotope is converted to electric power by two free-piston Stirling engines and linear alternators developed by Stirling Technology Companymore » (STC), and their rejected waste heat is transported to radiators by heat pipes. The principal difference between the proposed system design and previous Orbital designs (Or et al. 2000) is the thermal insulation between the heat source and the generator's housing. Previous designs had employed multifoil insulation, whereas the design described here employs Min-K-1800 thermal insulation. Such insulation had been successfully used by Teledyne and GE in earlier RTGs (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators). Although Min-K is a much poorer insulator than multifoil in vacuum and requires a substantially greater thickness for equivalent performance, it offers compensating advantages. Specifically it makes it possible to adjust the generator's BOM temperatures by filling its interior volume with inert cover gas. This makes it possible to meet the generator's BOM and EOM performance goals without exceeding its allowable temperature at the beginning of the mission.« less

  5. Electrodeposition of Mg-Li-Al-La Alloys on Inert Cathode in Molten LiCl-KCl Eutectic Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Chen, Qiong; Sun, Yi; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Milin

    2011-12-01

    Electrochemical preparation of Mg-Li-Al-La alloys on inert electrodes was investigated in LiCl-KCl melt at 853 K (580 °C). Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) and square wave voltammograms (SWVs) show that the existence of AlCl3 or AlF3 could promote La deposition on an active Al substrate, which is predeposited on inert electrodes. All electrochemical tests show that the reduction of La3+ is a one-step reduction process with three electrons exchanged. The reduction of La(III)→La(0) occurred at -2.04 V, and the underpotential deposition (UPD) of La was detected at -1.55 V ( vs Ag/AgCl). The same phenomena concerning La UPD were observed on two inert cathodes, W and Mo. In addition, Mg-Li-Al-La alloys were obtained by galvanostatic electrolysis on the W cathode from La2O3 in LiCl-KCl-MgCl2-KF melts with aluminum as the anode. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that various phases like the Al2La, Al12Mg17, and βLi phase (LiMg/Li3Mg7) existed in the Mg-Li-Al-La alloys. The distribution of Mg, Al, and La in Mg-Li-Al-La alloys from the analysis of a scan electron micrograph (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) indicated that the elements Mg, Al, and La distributed homogeneously in the alloys.

  6. Mobility of Supercooled liquid Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Benzene near their Glass Transition Temperatures Investigated using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg and as a result the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function ofmore » the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 K to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across five orders of magnitude (~10-14 to 10-9 cm2/s). These data are compared to viscosity measurements and used to determine the low temperature fractional Stokes-Einstein exponent. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.« less

  7. Effect of inert gas and prefermentative treatment with polyvinylpolypyrrolidone on the phenolic composition of Chilean Sauvignon blanc wines.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Mella, Alejandro; Peña-Neira, Álvaro; Parraguez, Jenny; López-Solís, Remigio; Laurie, V Felipe; Canals, Joan Miquel

    2013-06-01

    Sauvignon blanc wines are produced under a wide variety of winemaking conditions, some of which include different fruit-ripening levels, cold soaks and the use of fining agents and inert gases. Anecdotal evidence suggests that sensory variations among these wines may have to do with their phenolic composition and concentration. Therefore the aim of this work was to study the effects of different winemaking conditions typically used in Chile on the phenolic composition and concentration of Sauvignon blanc wines. The use of an inert gas (CO2) in winemaking produced differences in the proportion of proanthocyanidin fractions. A higher concentration of flavan-3-ol monomers resulted from winemaking in the presence of inert gas. This condition also produced a higher content of total phenols and low-molecular-weight phenolic compounds. Low doses of polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) in the prefermentative treatments produced wines with a higher content of phenolic compounds. Under these conditions a higher content of polymeric proanthocyanidins was observed. Different winemaking conditions modified the concentration and proportion of proanthocyanidin fractions and the global phenolic composition of the resulting white wines. This should be taken into account by the wineries producing these wines. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Preparing ultrafine PbS powders from the scrap lead-acid battery by sulfurization and inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Huipeng; Zhan, Lu; Xie, Bing

    2017-02-01

    A novel method for preparing ultrafine PbS powders involving sulfurization combined with inert gas condensation is developed in this paper, which is applicable to recycle Pb from lead paste of spent lead-acid batteries. Initially, the effects of the evaporation and condensation temperature, the inert gas pressure, the condensation distance and substrate on the morphology of as-obtained PbS ultrafine particles are intensively investigated using sulfur powders and lead particles as reagents. Highly dispersed and homogeneous PbS nanoparticles can be prepared under the optimized conditions which are 1223 K heating temperature, 573 K condensation temperature, 100 Pa inert gas pressure and 60 cm condensation distance. Furthermore, this method is successfully applied to recycle Pb from the lead paste of spent lead acid battery to prepare PbS ultrafine powders. This work does not only provide the theoretical fundamental for PbS preparation, but also provides a novel and efficient method for recycling spent lead-acid battery with high added-value products.

  9. Minimum ignition energy of nano and micro Ti powder in the presence of inert nano TiO₂ powder.

    PubMed

    Chunmiao, Yuan; Amyotte, Paul R; Hossain, Md Nur; Li, Chang

    2014-06-15

    The inerting effect of nano-sized TiO2 powder on ignition sensitivity of nano and micro Ti powders was investigated with a Mike 3 apparatus. "A little is not good enough" is also suitable for micro Ti powders mixed with nano-sized solid inertants. MIE of the mixtures did not significantly increase until the TiO2 percentage exceeded 50%. Nano-sized TiO2 powders were ineffective as an inertant when mixed with nano Ti powders, especially at higher dust loadings. Even with 90% nano TiO2 powder, mixtures still showed high ignition sensitivity because the statistic energy was as low as 2.1 mJ. Layer fires induced by ignited but unburned metal particles may occur for micro Ti powders mixed with nano TiO2 powders following a low level dust explosion. Such layer fires could lead to a violent dust explosion after a second dispersion. Thus, additional attention is needed to prevent metallic layer fires even where electric spark potential is low. In the case of nano Ti powder, no layer fires were observed because of less flammable material involved in the mixtures investigated, and faster flame propagation in nanoparticle clouds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A matrix contraction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Michael; Grant, John

    2018-03-01

    We consider a stochastic process in which independent identically distributed random matrices are multiplied and where the Lyapunov exponent of the product is positive. We continue multiplying the random matrices as long as the norm, ɛ, of the product is less than unity. If the norm is greater than unity we reset the matrix to a multiple of the identity and then continue the multiplication. We address the problem of determining the probability density function of the norm, \

  11. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, Ruel H.; Imbriale, William A.; Jacobi, Nathan; Liewer, Paulett C.; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Lyons, James R.; Manshadi, Farzin; Patterson, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    A major objective of the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is to investigate the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large-scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Three scattering analysis codes are being implemented and assessed on a JPL/California Institute of Technology (Caltech) Mark 3 Hypercube. The codes, which utilize different underlying algorithms, give a means of evaluating the general applicability of this parallel architecture. The three analysis codes being implemented are a frequency domain method of moments code, a time domain finite difference code, and a frequency domain finite elements code. These analysis capabilities are being integrated into an electromagnetics interactive analysis workstation which can serve as a design tool for the construction of antennas and other radiating or scattering structures. The first two years of work on the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort is summarized. It includes both new developments and results as well as work previously reported in the Hypercube Matrix Computation Task: Final Report for 1986 to 1987 (JPL Publication 87-18).

  12. Extracellular matrix structure.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Geometric control of capillary architecture via cell-matrix mechanical interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Jamilpour, Nima; Wang, Fei-Yue; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-03-01

    Capillary morphogenesis is a multistage, multicellular activity that plays a pivotal role in various developmental and pathological situations. In-depth understanding of the regulatory mechanism along with the capability of controlling the morphogenic process will have direct implications on tissue engineering and therapeutic angiogenesis. Extensive research has been devoted to elucidate the biochemical factors that regulate capillary morphogenesis. The roles of geometric confinement and cell-matrix mechanical interactions on the capillary architecture, nevertheless, remain largely unknown. Here, we show geometric control of endothelial network topology by creating physical confinements with microfabricated fences and wells. Decreasing the thickness of the matrix also results in comparable modulation of the network architecture, supporting the boundary effect is mediated mechanically. The regulatory role of cell-matrix mechanical interaction on the network topology is further supported by alternating the matrix stiffness by a cell-inert PEG-dextran hydrogel. Furthermore, reducing the cell traction force with a Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor diminishes the boundary effect. Computational biomechanical analysis delineates the relationship between geometric confinement and cell-matrix mechanical interaction. Collectively, these results reveal a mechanoregulation scheme of endothelial cells to regulate the capillary network architecture via cell-matrix mechanical interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The evolution of the temperature field during cavity collapse in liquid nitromethane. Part I: inert case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, L.; Nikiforakis, N.

    2018-02-01

    This work is concerned with the effect of cavity collapse in non-ideal explosives as a means of controlling their sensitivity. The main objective is to understand the origin of localised temperature peaks (hot spots) which play a leading order role at the early stages of ignition. To this end, we perform two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations of shock-induced single gas-cavity collapse in liquid nitromethane. Ignition is the result of a complex interplay between fluid dynamics and exothermic chemical reaction. In order to understand the relative contribution between these two processes, we consider in this first part of the work the evolution of the physical system in the absence of chemical reactions. We employ a multi-phase mathematical formulation which can account for the large density difference across the gas-liquid material interface without generating spurious temperature peaks. The mathematical and physical models are validated against experimental, analytic, and numerical data. Previous inert studies have identified the impact of the upwind (relative to the direction of the incident shock wave) side of the cavity wall to the downwind one as the main reason for the generation of a hot spot outside of the cavity, something which is also observed in this work. However, it is also apparent that the topology of the temperature field is more complex than previously thought and additional hot spot locations exist, which arise from the generation of Mach stems rather than jet impact. To explain the generation mechanisms and topology of the hot spots, we carefully follow the complex wave patterns generated in the collapse process and identify specifically the temperature elevation or reduction generated by each wave. This enables tracking each hot spot back to its origins. It is shown that the highest hot spot temperatures can be more than twice the post-incident shock temperature of the neat material and can thus lead to ignition. By comparing two

  15. Noninvasive Cardiac Output Estimation by Inert Gas Rebreathing in Mechanically Ventilated Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Perak, Amanda M; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Walsh, Brian K; Esch, Jesse J; DiNardo, James A; Kussman, Barry D; Porras, Diego; Rhodes, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    To assess the feasibility and accuracy of inert gas rebreathing (IGR) pulmonary blood flow (Qp) estimation in mechanically ventilated pediatric patients, potentially providing real-time noninvasive estimates of cardiac output. In mechanically ventilated patients in the pediatric catheterization laboratory, we compared IGR Qp with Qp estimates based upon the Fick equation using measured oxygen consumption (VO2) (FickTrue); for context, we compared FickTrue with a standard clinical short-cut, replacing measured with assumed VO2 in the Fick equation (FickLaFarge, FickLundell, FickSeckeler). IGR Qp and breath-by-breath VO2 were measured using the Innocor device. Sampled pulmonary arterial and venous saturations and hemoglobin concentration were used for Fick calculations. Qp estimates were compared using Bland-Altman agreement and Spearman correlation. The final analysis included 18 patients aged 4-23 years with weight >15 kg. Compared with the reference FickTrue, IGR Qp estimates correlated best and had the least systematic bias and narrowest 95% limits of agreement (results presented as mean bias ±95% limits of agreement): IGR -0.2 ± 1.1 L/min, r = 0.90; FickLaFarge +0.7 ± 2.2 L/min, r = 0.80; FickLundell +1.6 ± 2.9 L/min, r = 0.83; FickSeckeler +0.8 ± 2.5 L/min, r = 0.83. IGR estimation of Qp is feasible in mechanically ventilated patients weighing >15 kg, and agreement with FickTrue Qp estimates is better for IGR than for other Fick Qp estimates commonly used in pediatric catheterization. IGR is an attractive option for bedside monitoring of Qp in mechanically ventilated children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Size-controlled, magnetic, and core-shell nanoparticles synthesized by inert-gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, Mark A.

    Interest in nanoparticles (2 to 100 nm in diameter) and clusters of atoms (0.5 to 2 nm in diameter) has heightened over the past two and a half decades on both fundamental and functional levels. Nanoparticles and clusters of atoms are an exciting branch of materials science because they do not behave like normal bulk matter, nor do they act like molecules. They can have shockingly different physical, chemical, optical, or magnetic properties from the same material at a larger scale. In the case of nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio can change fundamental properties like melting temperature, binding energy, or electron affinity. The definitions of markers used to distinguish between metallic, semiconducting, and insulating bulk condensed matter, such as the band gap and polarizability, can even be blurred or confused on the nanoscale. Similarly, clusters of atoms can form in structures that are only stable at finite sizes, and do not translate to bulk condensed matter. Thermodynamics of finite systems changes dramatically in nanovolumes such as wires, rods, cubes, and spheres, which can lead to complex core-shell and onion-like nanostructures. Consequently, these changes in properties and structure have led to many new possibilities in the field of materials engineering. Inert-gas condensation (IGC) is a well-established method of producing nanoparticles that condense from the gas phase. Its first use dates back to the early 1990s, and it has been used to fabricate nanoparticles both commercially and in research and development for applications in magnetism, biomedicine, and catalysts. In this dissertation, IGC was used to produce a wide variety of nanoparticles. First, control over the size distributions of Cu nanoparticles and how it relates to the plasma properties inside the nucleation chamber was investigated. Next, the formation of phase pure WFe2 nanoparticles revealed that this Laves phase is ferromagnetic instead of non-magnetic. Finally, core

  17. Matrix Theory of Small Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavda, L. K.

    1978-01-01

    A complete matrix formulation of the theory of small oscillations is presented. Simple analytic solutions involving matrix functions are found which clearly exhibit the transients, the damping factors, the Breit-Wigner form for resonances, etc. (BB)

  18. On the Matrix Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Shui-Hung; Hou, Edwin; Pang, Wan-Kai

    2006-01-01

    A novel and simple formula for computing the matrix exponential function is presented. Specifically, it can be used to derive explicit formulas for the matrix exponential of a general matrix A satisfying p(A) = 0 for a polynomial p(s). It is ready for use in a classroom and suitable for both hand as well as symbolic computation.

  19. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  20. Matrix isolation apparatus with extended sample collection capability

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Gerald T.

    1987-01-01

    A gas-sample collection device provides for the matrix isolation of increased amounts of a sample material for spectrographic analysis from a gas chromatographic separation. The device includes an evacuated sample collection chamber containing a disc-like specular carousel having a generally circular lateral surface upon which the sample is deposited in an inert gas matrix for infrared (IR) spectral analysis. The evacuated sample chamber is mounted in a fixed manner and is coupled to and supports a rotating cryostatic coupler which, in turn, supports the specular carousel within the collection chamber. A rotational drive system connected to the cryostatic coupler provides for its rotational displacement as well as that of the sample collecting carousel. In addition, rotation of the cryostatic coupler effects vertical displacement of the carousel to permit the collection of an extended sample band in a helical configuration on the entire lateral surface of the carousel. The various components of the carousel's angular/linear displacement drive system are located exterior to the cryostatic coupler for easy access and improved operation. The cryostatic coupler includes a 360.degree. rotary union assembly for permitting the delivery of a high pressure working fluid to the cryostatic coupler in a continuous flow manner for maintaining the specular carousel at a low temperature, e.g., 10.degree.-20.degree. K., for improved uninterrupted gas sample collection and analysis.

  1. Comprehensive Genetic Analysis of Early Host Body Reactions to the Bioactive and Bio-Inert Porous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Ehashi, Tomo; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Minowa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    To design scaffolds for tissue regeneration, details of the host body reaction to the scaffolds must be studied. Host body reactions have been investigated mainly by immunohistological observations for a long time. Despite of recent dramatic development in genetic analysis technologies, genetically comprehensive changes in host body reactions are hardly studied. There is no information about host body reactions that can predict successful tissue regeneration in the future. In the present study, porous polyethylene scaffolds were coated with bioactive collagen or bio-inert poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB) and were implanted subcutaneously and compared the host body reaction to those substrates by normalizing the result using control non-coat polyethylene scaffold. The comprehensive analyses of early host body reactions to the scaffolds were carried out using a DNA microarray assay. Within numerous genes which were expressed differently among these scaffolds, particular genes related to inflammation, wound healing, and angiogenesis were focused upon. Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 are important cytokines in tissue responses to biomaterials because IL-1β promotes both inflammation and wound healing and IL-10 suppresses both of them. IL-1β was up-regulated in the collagen-coated scaffold. Collagen-specifically up-regulated genes contained both M1- and M2-macrophage-related genes. Marked vessel formation in the collagen-coated scaffold was occurred in accordance with the up-regulation of many angiogenesis-inducible factors. The DNA microarray assay provided global information regarding the host body reaction. Interestingly, several up-regulated genes were detected even on the very bio-inert PMB-coated surfaces and those genes include inflammation-suppressive and wound healing-suppressive IL-10, suggesting that not only active tissue response but also the inert response may relates to these genetic regulations. PMID:24454803

  2. Influence of inert gases on the reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering process of carbon-nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Susann; Czigany, Zsolt; Greczynski, Grzegorz

    2013-01-15

    The influence of inert gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) on the sputter process of carbon and carbon-nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films was studied using reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). Thin solid films were synthesized in an industrial deposition chamber from a graphite target. The peak target current during HiPIMS processing was found to decrease with increasing inert gas mass. Time averaged and time resolved ion mass spectroscopy showed that the addition of nitrogen, as reactive gas, resulted in less energetic ion species for processes employing Ne, whereas the opposite was noticed when Ar or Kr were employed as inertmore » gas. Processes in nonreactive ambient showed generally lower total ion fluxes for the three different inert gases. As soon as N{sub 2} was introduced into the process, the deposition rates for Ne and Ar-containing processes increased significantly. The reactive Kr-process, in contrast, showed slightly lower deposition rates than the nonreactive. The resulting thin films were characterized regarding their bonding and microstructure by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Reactively deposited CN{sub x} thin films in Ar and Kr ambient exhibited an ordering toward a fullerene-like structure, whereas carbon and CN{sub x} films deposited in Ne atmosphere were found to be amorphous. This is attributed to an elevated amount of highly energetic particles observed during ion mass spectrometry and indicated by high peak target currents in Ne-containing processes. These results are discussed with respect to the current understanding of the structural evolution of a-C and CN{sub x} thin films.« less

  3. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-01-01

    Method using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen therefrom at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate.

  4. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-04-29

    A method is disclosed using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen from the red blood cells at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate. 4 figs.

  5. Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    MM Hall

    2006-01-31

    A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing.

  6. Apparatus for purifying arsine, phosphine, ammonia, and inert gases to remove Lewis acid and oxidant impurities therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1991-01-08

    An apparatus for purifying a gaseous mixture comprising arsine, phosphine, ammonia, and/or inert gases, to remove Lewis acid and/or oxidant impurities therefrom, comprising a vessel containing a bed of a scavenger, the scavenger including a support having associated therewith an anion which is effective to remove such impurities, such anion being selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) carbanions whose corresponding protonated compounds have a pK.sub.a value of from about 22 to about 36; and (ii) anions formed by reaction of such carbanions with the primary component of the mixture.

  7. Inert-Gas Condensed Co-W Nanoclusters: Formation, Structure and Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar-Fard, Farhad Reza

    Rare-earth permanent magnets are used extensively in numerous technical applications, e.g. wind turbines, audio speakers, and hybrid/electric vehicles. The demand and production of rare-earth permanent magnets in the world has in the past decades increased significantly. However, the decrease in export of rare-earth elements from China in recent time has led to a renewed interest in developing rare-earth free permanent magnets. Elements such as Fe and Co have potential, due to their high magnetization, to be used as hosts in rare-earth free permanent magnets but a major challenge is to increase their magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K1, which largely drives the coercivity. Theoretical calculations indicate that dissolving the 5d transition metal W in Fe or Co increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The challenge, though, is in creating a solid solution in hcp Co or bcc Fe, which under equilibrium conditions have negligible solubility. In this dissertation, the formation, structure, and magnetic properties of sub-10 nm Co-W clusters with W content ranging from 4 to 24 atomic percent were studied. Co-W alloy clusters with extended solubility of W in hcp Co were produced by inert gas condensation. The different processing conditions such as the cooling scheme and sputtering power were found to control the structural state of the as-deposited Co-W clusters. For clusters formed in the water-cooled formation chamber, the mean size and the fraction crystalline clusters increased with increasing power, while the fraction of crystalline clusters formed in the liquid nitrogen-cooled formation chamber was not as affected by the sputtering power. For the low W content clusters, the structural characterization revealed clusters predominantly single crystalline hcp Co(W) structure, a significant extension of W solubility when compared to the equilibrium solubility, but fcc Co(W) and Co3W structures were observed in very small and large clusters, respectively. At high

  8. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  9. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  10. Google matrix of Twitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, K. M.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    We construct the Google matrix of the entire Twitter network, dated by July 2009, and analyze its spectrum and eigenstate properties including the PageRank and CheiRank vectors and 2DRanking of all nodes. Our studies show much stronger inter-connectivity between top PageRank nodes for the Twitter network compared to the networks of Wikipedia and British Universities studied previously. Our analysis allows to locate the top Twitter users which control the information flow on the network. We argue that this small fraction of the whole number of users, which can be viewed as the social network elite, plays the dominant role in the process of opinion formation on the network.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinases outside vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Marino-Puertas, Laura; Goulas, Theodoros; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2017-11-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family belongs to the metzincin clan of zinc-dependent metallopeptidases. Due to their enormous implications in physiology and disease, MMPs have mainly been studied in vertebrates. They are engaged in extracellular protein processing and degradation, and present extensive paralogy, with 23 forms in humans. One characteristic of MMPs is a ~165-residue catalytic domain (CD), which has been structurally studied for 14 MMPs from human, mouse, rat, pig and the oral-microbiome bacterium Tannerella forsythia. These studies revealed close overall coincidence and characteristic structural features, which distinguish MMPs from other metzincins and give rise to a sequence pattern for their identification. Here, we reviewed the literature available on MMPs outside vertebrates and performed database searches for potential MMP CDs in invertebrates, plants, fungi, viruses, protists, archaea and bacteria. These and previous results revealed that MMPs are widely present in several copies in Eumetazoa and higher plants (Tracheophyta), but have just token presence in eukaryotic algae. A few dozen sequences were found in Ascomycota (within fungi) and in double-stranded DNA viruses infecting invertebrates (within viruses). In contrast, a few hundred sequences were found in archaea and >1000 in bacteria, with several copies for some species. Most of the archaeal and bacterial phyla containing potential MMPs are present in human oral and gut microbiomes. Overall, MMP-like sequences are present across all kingdoms of life, but their asymmetric distribution contradicts the vertical descent model from a eubacterial or archaeal ancestor. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  13. Evaluation of soil C-14 data for estimating inert organic matter in the RothC model

    SciTech Connect

    Rethemeyer, J.; Grootes, P.M.; Brodowski, S.

    2007-07-01

    Changes in soil organic carbon stocks were simulated with the Rothamsted carbon (RothC) model. We evaluated the calculation of a major input variable, the amount of inert organic matter (IOM), using measurable data. Three different approaches for quantifying IOM were applied to soils with mainly recent organic matter and with carbon contribution from fossil fuels: 1) IOM estimation via total soil organic carbon (SOC); 2) through bulk soil radiocarbon and a mass balance; and 3) by quantifying the portion of black carbon via a specific marker. The results were highly variable in the soil containing lignite-derived carbon and ranged frommore » 8% to 52% inert carbon of total SOC, while nearly similar amounts of 5% to 8% were determined in the soil with mainly recent organic matter. We simulated carbon dynamics in both soils using the 3 approaches for quantifying IOM in combination with carbon inputs derived from measured crop yields. In the soil with recent organic matter, all approaches gave a nearly similar good agreement between measured and modeled data, while in the soil with a fossil carbon admixture, only the C-14 approach was successful in matching the measured data. Although C-14 was useful for initializing RothC, care should be taken when interpreting SOC dynamics in soils containing carbon from fossil fuels, since these reflect the contribution from both natural and anthropogenic carbon sources.« less

  14. Krogh-cylinder and infinite-domain models for washout of an inert diffusible solute from tissue.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Timothy W

    2015-01-01

    Models based on the Krogh-cylinder concept are developed to analyze the washout from tissue by blood flow of an inert diffusible solute that permeates blood vessel walls. During the late phase of washout, the outflowing solute concentration decays exponentially with time. This washout decay rate is predicted for a range of conditions. A single capillary is assumed to lie on the axis of a cylindrical tissue region. In the classic "Krogh-cylinder" approach, a no-flux boundary condition is applied on the outside of the cylinder. An alternative "infinite-domain" approach is proposed that allows for solute exchange across the boundary, but with zero net exchange. Both models are analyzed, using finite-element and analytical methods. The washout decay rate depends on blood flow rate, tissue diffusivity and vessel permeability of solute, and assumed boundary conditions. At low blood flow rates, the washout rate can exceed the value for a single well-mixed compartment. The infinite-domain approach predicts slower washout decay rates than the Krogh-cylinder approach. The infinite-domain approach overcomes a significant limitation of the Krogh-cylinder approach, while retaining its simplicity. It provides a basis for developing methods to deduce transport properties of inert solutes from observations of washout decay rates. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The organic matrix of gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Sutor, D. June; Wooley, Susan E.

    1974-01-01

    Dissolution of gallstones consisting of cholesterol, calcium carbonate, or calcium phosphate in different solvents left an amorphous organic gel-like substance (the matrix). Matrix from cholesterol stones could be colourless but was usually orange, yellow, or brown while that from calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate stones was almost invariably coloured black or dark brown. These pigments were also shown to be organic and amorphous. The amount of matrix present and its structure varied with the texture of the crystalline material. Irrespective of their composition, laminated pieces of material yielded compact laminated matrix of the same shape as the original piece and areas of loose crystalline material gave small pieces of non-cohesive matrix. Only large cholesterol crystals which usually radiate from the stone nucleus had no associated matrix. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5 PMID:4854981

  16. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    DOEpatents

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  17. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, R.; Imbriale, W.; Liewer, P.; Lyons, J.; Manshadi, F.; Patterson, J.

    1987-01-01

    The Hypercube Matrix Computation (Year 1986-1987) task investigated the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Two existing electromagnetic scattering codes were selected for conversion to the Mark III Hypercube concurrent computing environment. They were selected so that the underlying numerical algorithms utilized would be different thereby providing a more thorough evaluation of the appropriateness of the parallel environment for these types of problems. The first code was a frequency domain method of moments solution, NEC-2, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The second code was a time domain finite difference solution of Maxwell's equations to solve for the scattered fields. Once the codes were implemented on the hypercube and verified to obtain correct solutions by comparing the results with those from sequential runs, several measures were used to evaluate the performance of the two codes. First, a comparison was provided of the problem size possible on the hypercube with 128 megabytes of memory for a 32-node configuration with that available in a typical sequential user environment of 4 to 8 megabytes. Then, the performance of the codes was anlyzed for the computational speedup attained by the parallel architecture.

  18. Glass matrix armor

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1991-01-01

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  19. Hybridized polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Hoggatt, J. T.; Symonds, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The extent to which graphite fibers are released from resin matrix composites that are exposed to fire and impact conditions was determined. Laboratory simulations of those conditions that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation were evaluated. The effectiveness of various hybridizing concepts in preventing this release of graphite fibers were also evaluated. The baseline (i.e., unhybridized) laminates examined were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy, graphite/polyimide, and graphite/phenolic materials. Hybridizing concepts investigated included resin fillers, laminate coatings, resin blending, and mechanical interlocking of the graphite reinforcement. The baseline and hybridized laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, were also compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that several hybrid concepts eliminated this fiber release. Isothermal and humidity aging did not appear to alter the fiber release tendencies.

  20. A method for determining optimum phasing of a multiphase propulsion system for a single-stage vehicle with linearized inert weight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A general analytical treatment is presented of a single-stage vehicle with multiple propulsion phases. A closed-form solution for the cost and for the performance and a derivation of the optimal phasing of the propulsion are included. Linearized variations in the inert weight elements are included, and the function to be minimized can be selected. The derivation of optimal phasing results in a set of nonlinear algebraic equations for optimal fuel volumes, for which a solution method is outlined. Three specific example cases are analyzed: minimum gross lift-off weight, minimum inert weight, and a minimized general function for a two-phase vehicle. The results for the two-phase vehicle are applied to the dual-fuel rocket. Comparisons with single-fuel vehicles indicate that dual-fuel vehicles can have lower inert weight either by development of a dual-fuel engine or by parallel burning of separate engines from lift-off.

  1. Synthetic Division and Matrix Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barabe, Samuel; Dubeau, Franc

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic division is viewed as a change of basis for polynomials written under the Newton form. Then, the transition matrices obtained from a sequence of changes of basis are used to factorize the inverse of a bidiagonal matrix or a block bidiagonal matrix.

  2. How to Study a Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kauffman, Douglas F.; Zhao, Ruomeng

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how best to study a matrix. Fifty-three participants studied a matrix topically (1 column at a time), categorically (1 row at a time), or in a unified way (all at once). Results revealed that categorical and unified study produced higher: (a) performance on relationship and fact tests, (b) study material satisfaction, and…

  3. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeya Sharma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  4. Biological Activation of Inert Ceramics: Recent Advances Using Tailored Self-Assembled Monolayers on Implant Ceramic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Böke, Frederik; Schickle, Karolina; Fischer, Horst

    2014-01-01

    High-strength ceramics as materials for medical implants have a long, research-intensive history. Yet, especially on applications where the ceramic components are in direct contact with the surrounding tissue, an unresolved issue is its inherent property of biological inertness. To combat this, several strategies have been investigated over the last couple of years. One promising approach investigates the technique of Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAM) and subsequent chemical functionalization to create a biologically active tissue-facing surface layer. Implementation of this would have a beneficial impact on several fields in modern implant medicine such as hip and knee arthroplasty, dental applications and related fields. This review aims to give a summarizing overview of the latest advances in this recently emerging field, along with thorough introductions of the underlying mechanism of SAMs and surface cell attachment mechanics on the cell side. PMID:28788687

  5. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    PubMed

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied.

  6. Simultaneous organic matter removal and nitrification of an inert self-supporting immersed media to upgrade aerated lagoons.

    PubMed

    Boutet, E; Baillargeon, S; Patry, B; Lessard, P

    2018-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate the potential of an inert self-supported immersed fixed film media to upgrade aerated lagoons. Simultaneous organic matter removal and nitrification was assessed under different loading rates and temperatures (near 0 °C) using 12 laboratory-scale reactors operated in parallel. Test results showed that both the temperature and the load have an influence on organic matter effluent concentrations. Effluent quality seemed related to the observed biofilm thickness. Thicker biofilm is believed to have contributed to biomass detachment and increased particulate organic matter concentrations in the effluent. Simultaneous organic removal and nitrification was obtained at loads above 5 g CBOD 5 /m 2 ·d. The highest nitrification rate at 0.4 °C was obtained for the smallest load, which showed a nitrification limitation close to freezing point.

  7. Substrate Selection for Fundamental Studies of Electrocatalysts and Photoelectrodes: Inert Potential Windows in Acidic, Neutral, and Basic Electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Gorlin, Yelena; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    The selection of an appropriate substrate is an important initial step for many studies of electrochemically active materials. In order to help researchers with the substrate selection process, we employ a consistent experimental methodology to evaluate the electrochemical reactivity and stability of seven potential substrate materials for electrocatalyst and photoelectrode evaluation. Using cyclic voltammetry with a progressively increased scan range, we characterize three transparent conducting oxides (indium tin oxide, fluorine-doped tin oxide, and aluminum-doped zinc oxide) and four opaque conductors (gold, stainless steel 304, glassy carbon, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in three different electrolytes (sulfuric acid, sodium acetate, and sodium hydroxide). We determine the inert potential window for each substrate/electrolyte combination and make recommendations about which materials may be most suitable for application under different experimental conditions. Furthermore, the testing methodology provides a framework for other researchers to evaluate and report the baseline activity of other substrates of interest to the broader community. PMID:25357131

  8. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Arc-Melt Interaction in Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Liu, Lichao; Motoyama, Yuichi

    2017-04-01

    The present work develops a multi-region dynamic coupling model for fluid flow, heat transfer and arc-melt interaction in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using the dynamic mesh technique. The arc-weld pool unified model is developed on basis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and the interface is tracked using the dynamic mesh method. The numerical model for arc is firstly validated by comparing the calculated temperature profiles and essential results with the former experimental data. For weld pool convection solution, the drag, Marangoni, buoyancy and electromagnetic forces are separately validated, and then taken into account. Moreover, the model considering interface deformation is adopted in a stationary TIG welding process with SUS304 stainless steel and the effect of interface deformation is investigated. The depression of weld pool center and the lifting of pool periphery are both predicted. The results show that the weld pool shape calculated with considering the interface deformation is more accurate.

  9. The effects of alloying elements on microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ80 magnesium alloys joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Jiansheng; Ding, Rongrong

    2017-11-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the macrostructures, microstructures and tensile strength of AZ80 Mg alloy weldments were studied in the present study. The results indicate that with the decrease of Al element content of filler wire, the welding defects of seam are gradually eliminated and the β-Mg17Al12 phases at α-Mg boundaries are refined and become discontinuous, which are beneficial to the improvement of tensile strength. With AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire, the maximum tensile strength of AZ80 weldment is 220 MPa and fracture occurs at the welding seam of joint. It is experimentally proved that robust AZ80 Mg alloy joints can be obtained by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire. However, further study is required to improve the microstructures and reduce welding defects of joint in order to further improve the joining strength of AZ80 Mg alloy joint.

  10. Parameter optimization of an inerter-based isolator for passive vibration control of Michelangelo's Rondanini Pietà

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siami, A.; Karimi, H. R.; Cigada, A.; Zappa, E.; Sabbioni, E.

    2018-01-01

    Preserving cultural heritage against earthquake and ambient vibrations can be an attractive topic in the field of vibration control. This paper proposes a passive vibration isolator methodology based on inerters for improving the performance of the isolation system of the famous statue of Michelangelo Buonarroti Pietà Rondanini. More specifically, a five-degree-of-freedom (5DOF) model of the statue and the anti-seismic and anti-vibration base is presented and experimentally validated. The parameters of this model are tuned according to the experimental tests performed on the assembly of the isolator and the structure. Then, the developed model is used to investigate the impact of actuation devices such as tuned mass-damper (TMD) and tuned mass-damper-inerter (TMDI) in vibration reduction of the structure. The effect of implementation of TMDI on the 5DOF model is shown based on physical limitations of the system parameters. Simulation results are provided to illustrate effectiveness of the passive element of TMDI in reduction of the vibration transmitted to the statue in vertical direction. Moreover, the optimal design parameters of the passive system such as frequency and damping coefficient will be calculated using two different performance indexes. The obtained optimal parameters have been evaluated by using two different optimization algorithms: the sequential quadratic programming method and the Firefly algorithm. The results prove significant reduction in the transmitted vibration to the structure in the presence of the proposed tuned TMDI, without imposing a large amount of mass or modification to the structure of the isolator.

  11. Effects of Inert Dust Clouds on the Extinction of Strained, Laminar Flames at Normal and Micro Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andac, M. Gurhan; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.; Lauvergne, Romain; Wu, Ming-Shin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A combined experimental and detailed numerical study was conducted on the interaction between chemically inert solid particles and strained, atmospheric methane/air and propane/air laminar flames, both premixed and non-premixed. Experimentally, the opposed jet configuration was used with the addition of a particle seeder capable of operating in conditions of varying gravity. The particle seeding system was calibrated under both normal and micro gravity and a noticeable gravitational effect was observed. Flame extinction experiments were conducted at normal gravity by seeding inert particles at various number densities and sizes into the reacting gas phase. Experimental data were taken for 20 and 37 (mu) nickel alloy and 25 and 60 (mu) aluminum oxide particles. The experiments were simulated by solving along the stagnation streamline the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation for both phases, with detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics, molecular transport, and thermal radiation. The experimental data were compared with numerical simulations, and insight was provided into the effects on extinction of the fuel type, equivalence ratio, flame configuration, strain rate. particle type. particle size. particle mass, delivery rate. the orientation of particle injection with respect to the flame and gravity. It was found that for the same injected solid mass, larger particles can result in more effective flame cooling compared to smaller particles, despite the fact that equivalent masses of the larger particles have smaller total surface area to volume ratio. This counter-intuitive finding resulted from the fact that the heat exchange between the two phases is controlled by the synergistic effect of the total contact area and the temperature difference between the two phases. Results also demonstrate that meaningful scaling of interactions between the two phases may not be possible due to the complexity of the couplings between the

  12. Vertical Transport Processes for Inert and Scavenged Species: TRACE-A Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Chan, K. Roland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The TRACE-A mission of the NASA DC-8 aircraft made a large-scale survey of the tropical and subtropical atmosphere in September and October of 1992. Both In-situ measurements of CO (G. Sachsen NASA Langley) and aerosol size (J. Browell group, NASA Langley) provide excellent data sets with which to constrain vertical transport by planetary boundary layer mixing and deep-cloud cumulus convection. Lidar profiles of aerosol-induced scattering and ozone (also by Bremen) are somewhat require more subtle interpretation as tracers, but the vertical information on layering largely compensates for these complexities. The reason this DC-8 dataset is so useful is that very large areas of biomass burning over Africa and South America provide surface sources of appropriate sizes with which to characterize vertical and horizontal motions; the major limitation of our source description is that biomass burning patterns move considerably every few days, and daily burning inventories are a matter of concurrent, intensive research. We use the Penn State / NCAR MM5 model in an assimilation mode on the synoptic and intercontinental scale, and assess the success it shows in vertical transport descriptions. We find that the general level of emissions suggested by the climatological approach (Will. Has, U. of Montana) appears to be approximately correct, possibly a bit low, for this October, 1992, time period. Vertical transport in planetary boundary layer mixing to 5.5 kin was observed and reproduced in our simulations. Furthermore we find evidence that Blackader "transilient" or matrix-transport scheme is needed, but may require some adaptation in our tracer model: CO seems to exhibit very high values at the top of the planetary boundary layer, a process that stretches the eddy-diffusion parameterization. We will report on progress in improving the deep convective transport of carbon monoxide: the Grail scheme as we used it at 100 kin resolution did not transport enough material to the

  13. Tetragonal zirconia quantum dots in silica matrix prepared by a modified sol-gel protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surbhi; Rani, Saruchi; Kumar, Sushil

    2018-05-01

    Tetragonal zirconia quantum dots (t-ZrO2 QDs) in silica matrix with different compositions ( x)ZrO2-(100 - x)SiO2 were fabricated by a modified sol-gel protocol. Acetylacetone was added as a chelating agent to zirconium propoxide to avoid precipitation. The powders as well as thin films were given thermal treatment at 650, 875 and 1100 °C for 4 h. The silica matrix remained amorphous after thermal treatment and acted as an inert support for zirconia quantum dots. The tetragonal zirconia embedded in silica matrix transformed into monoclinic form due to thermal treatment ≥ 1100 °C. The stability of tetragonal phase of zirconia is found to enhance with increase in silica content. A homogenous dispersion of t-ZrO2 QDs in silica matrix was indicated by the mapping of Zr, Si and O elements obtained from scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analyser. The transmission electron images confirmed the formation of tetragonal zirconia quantum dots embedded in silica. The optical band gap of zirconia QDs (3.65-5.58 eV) was found to increase with increase in zirconia content in silica. The red shift of PL emission has been exhibited with increase in zirconia content in silica.

  14. The matrix of inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlmann, Dietmar; Ohlmann, Odile M.; Danzebrink, Hans U.

    2005-04-01

    perform this exchange, as a matrix, understood as source, of new ideas.

  15. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  16. Bacterial swimmers that infiltrate and take over the biofilm matrix

    PubMed Central

    Houry, Ali; Gohar, Michel; Deschamps, Julien; Tischenko, Ekaterina; Aymerich, Stéphane; Gruss, Alexandra; Briandet, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria grow in either planktonic form or as biofilms, which are attached to either inert or biological surfaces. Both growth forms are highly relevant states in nature and of paramount scientific focus. However, interchanges between bacteria in these two states have been little explored. We discovered that a subpopulation of planktonic bacilli is propelled by flagella to tunnel deep within a biofilm structure. Swimmers create transient pores that increase macromolecular transfer within the biofilm. Irrigation of the biofilm by swimmer bacteria may improve biofilm bacterial fitness by increasing nutrient flow in the matrix. However, we show that the opposite may also occur (i.e., swimmers can exacerbate killing of biofilm bacteria by facilitating penetration of toxic substances from the environment). We combined these observations with the fact that numerous bacteria produce antimicrobial substances in nature. We hypothesized and proved that motile bacilli expressing a bactericide can also kill a heterologous biofilm population, Staphylococcus aureus in this case, and then occupy the newly created space. These findings identify microbial motility as a determinant of the biofilm landscape and add motility to the complement of traits contributing to rapid alterations in biofilm populations. PMID:22773813

  17. A simple water model in the presence of inert Lennard-Jones obstacles II: the hydrophobic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtjak, Mario; Urbic, Tomaz

    2015-04-01

    Using Monte Carlo computer simulations, hydrophobic effect for a non-polar particle with the diameter of a water molecule was studied in water, confined within a disordered matrix. Freely mobile two-dimensional Mercedes-Benz water was put in a disordered, but fixed, matrix of Lennard-Jones disks. Influence of temperature and matrix properties on the thermodynamic quantities of a non-polar solute solvation was studied. The hydrophobic effect is changed by the presence of the obstacles. Smaller matrix particles change the solute-water structure and thermodynamics drastically, as it was also observed for the properties of pure confined water. The study is bringing new scientific important observations in understanding the role of hydrophobic forces under confinement.

  18. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R.

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  19. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R

    2016-07-07

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  20. Stochastic determination of matrix determinants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Sebastian; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2015-07-01

    Matrix determinants play an important role in data analysis, in particular when Gaussian processes are involved. Due to currently exploding data volumes, linear operations—matrices—acting on the data are often not accessible directly but are only represented indirectly in form of a computer routine. Such a routine implements the transformation a data vector undergoes under matrix multiplication. While efficient probing routines to estimate a matrix's diagonal or trace, based solely on such computationally affordable matrix-vector multiplications, are well known and frequently used in signal inference, there is no stochastic estimate for its determinant. We introduce a probing method for the logarithm of a determinant of a linear operator. Our method rests upon a reformulation of the log-determinant by an integral representation and the transformation of the involved terms into stochastic expressions. This stochastic determinant determination enables large-size applications in Bayesian inference, in particular evidence calculations, model comparison, and posterior determination.

  1. Stochastic determination of matrix determinants.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Sebastian; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2015-07-01

    Matrix determinants play an important role in data analysis, in particular when Gaussian processes are involved. Due to currently exploding data volumes, linear operations-matrices-acting on the data are often not accessible directly but are only represented indirectly in form of a computer routine. Such a routine implements the transformation a data vector undergoes under matrix multiplication. While efficient probing routines to estimate a matrix's diagonal or trace, based solely on such computationally affordable matrix-vector multiplications, are well known and frequently used in signal inference, there is no stochastic estimate for its determinant. We introduce a probing method for the logarithm of a determinant of a linear operator. Our method rests upon a reformulation of the log-determinant by an integral representation and the transformation of the involved terms into stochastic expressions. This stochastic determinant determination enables large-size applications in Bayesian inference, in particular evidence calculations, model comparison, and posterior determination.

  2. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from the...

  3. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from the...

  4. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from the...

  5. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from the...

  6. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from the...

  7. Effect of TiO2 Addition on Grain Growth, Anodic Bubble Evolution and Anodic Overvoltage of NiFe2O4-Based Composite Inert Anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Du, Jinjing; Liu, Yihan; Fang, Zhao; Hu, Ping

    2017-11-01

    A two-step powder compaction and sintering process was employed to fabricate TiO2-doped NiFe2O4 ceramic-based inert anodes. Grain growth during isothermal sintering was analyzed using Brook grain growth model. The bubble behavior of NiFe2O4 ceramic-based inert anodes was investigated in a two-compartment see-through quartz cell for aluminum electrolysis process. Anodic overvoltage and potential decay curves of the inert anodes were measured by using the steady state and current interruption technique. The results showed that the kinetic index of grain growth decreased with an increase in temperature. The average activation energy of grain growth for 1.0 wt.% TiO2-doped NiFe2O4 ceramic samples with a sintering temperature range from 1373 to 1673 K dropped from 675.30 to 183.47 kJ/mol. The diameter size of bubbles before releasing from the bottom surface of the anodes was reduced with increasing the current density, and the larger average releasing bubble size for carbon anode at the same current density could be obtained, which was compared to the NiFe2O4 inert anodes. Besides, the cell voltage of carbon anodes fluctuated much more violently under the same experimental conditions. After adding small amount of TiO2, a minor reduction in anodic overvoltage of NiFe2O4-based anodes can be observed.

  8. High Temperature Mechanical Characterization of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature mechanical characterization laboratory has been assembled at NASA Lewis Research Center. One contribution of this work is to test ceramic matrix composite specimens in tension in environmental extremes. Two high temperature tensile testing systems were assembled. The systems were assembled based on the performance and experience of other laboratories and meeting projected service conditions for the materials in question. The systems use frames with an electric actuator and a center screw. A PC based data acquisition and analysis system is used to collect and analyze the data. Mechanical extensometers are used to measure specimen strain. Thermocouples, placed near the specimen, are used to measure the specimen gage section temperature. The system for testing in air has a resistance element furnace with molybdenum disilicide elements and pneumatic grips with water cooling attached to hydraulic alignment devices. The system for testing in an inert gas has a graphite resistance element furnace in a chamber with rigidly mounted, water cooled, hydraulically actuated grips. Unidirectional SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 and triaxially woven, two dimensional, SiC fiber reinforced enhanced SiC composites were tested in unidirectional tension. Theories for predicting the Young's modulus, modulus near the ultimate strength, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate strength were applied and evaluated for suitability in predicting the mechanical behavior of SiC/RBSN and enhanced SiC/SiC composites. The SiC/RBSN composite exhibited pseudo tough behavior (increased area under the stress/strain curve) from 22 C to 1500 C. The rule of mixtures provides a good estimate of the Young's modulus of the SiC/RBSN composite using the constituent properties from room temperature to 1440 C for short term static tensile tests in air or nitrogen. The rule of mixtures significantly overestimates the secondary modulus near the ultimate strength. The ACK theory

  9. Staggered chiral random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, James C.

    2011-02-01

    We present a random matrix theory for the staggered lattice QCD Dirac operator. The staggered random matrix theory is equivalent to the zero-momentum limit of the staggered chiral Lagrangian and includes all taste breaking terms at their leading order. This is an extension of previous work which only included some of the taste breaking terms. We will also present some results for the taste breaking contributions to the partition function and the Dirac eigenvalues.

  10. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  11. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix matrials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  12. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  13. Flammability limits of lithium-ion battery thermal runaway vent gas in air and the inerting effects of halon 1301

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Matthew Eugene

    Lithium-ion (rechargeable) and lithium-metal (non-rechargeable) battery cells put aircraft at risk of igniting and fueling fires. Lithium batteries can be packed in bulk and shipped in the cargo holds of freighter aircraft; currently lithium batteries are banned from bulk shipment on passenger aircraft [1]. The federally regulated Class C cargo compartment extinguishing system's utilization of a 5 %vol Halon 1301 knockdown concentration and a sustained 3 %vol Halon 1301 may not be sufficient at inerting lithium-ion battery vent gas and air mixtures [2]. At 5 %vol Halon 1301 the flammability limits of lithium-ion premixed battery vent gas (Li-Ion pBVG) in air range from 13.80 %vol to 26.07 %vol Li-Ion pBVG. Testing suggests that 8.59 %vol Halon 1301 is required to render all ratios of the Li-Ion pBVG in air inert. The lower flammability limit (LFL) and upper flammability limit (UFL) of hydrogen and air mixtures are 4.95 %vol and 76.52 %vol hydrogen, respectively. With the addition of 10 %vol and 20 %vol Halon 1301 the LFL is 9.02 %vol and 11.55 %vol hydrogen, respectively, and the UFL is 45.70 %vol and 28.39 %vol hydrogen, respectively. The minimum inerting concentration (MIC) of Halon 1301 in hydrogen and air mixtures is 26.72 %vol Halon 1301 at 16.2 %vol hydrogen. The LFL and UFL of Li-Ion pBVG and air mixtures are 7.88 %vol and 37.14 %vol Li-Ion pBVG, respectively. With the addition of 5 %vol, 7 %vol, and 8 %vol Halon 1301 the LFL is 13.80 %vol, 16.15 %vol, and 17.62 % vol Li-Ion pBVG, respectively, and the UFL is 26.07 %vol, 23.31 %vol, and 21.84 %vol Li- Ion pBVG, respectively. The MIC of Halon 1301 in Li-Ion pBVG and air mixtures is 8.59 %vol Halon 1301 at 19.52 %vol Li-Ion pBVG. Le Chatelier's mixing rule has been shown to be an effective measure for estimating the flammability limits of Li-Ion pBVGes. The LFL has a 1.79 % difference while the UFL has a 4.53 % difference. The state of charge (SOC) affects the flammability limits in an apparent parabolic

  14. Method and apparatus for fabricating a composite structure consisting of a filamentary material in a metal matrix

    DOEpatents

    Banker, J.G.; Anderson, R.C.

    1975-10-21

    A method and apparatus are provided for preparing a composite structure consisting of filamentary material within a metal matrix. The method is practiced by the steps of confining the metal for forming the matrix in a first chamber, heating the confined metal to a temperature adequate to effect melting thereof, introducing a stream of inert gas into the chamber for pressurizing the atmosphere in the chamber to a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure, confining the filamentary material in a second chamber, heating the confined filamentary material to a temperature less than the melting temperature of the metal, evacuating the second chamber to provide an atmosphere therein at a pressure, placing the second chamber in registry with the first chamber to provide for the forced flow of the molten metal into the second chamber to effect infiltration of the filamentary material with the molten metal, and thereafter cooling the metal infiltrated-filamentary material to form said composite structure.

  15. Analysis of essential oils and fragrances with a new generation of highly inert gas chromatographic columns coated with ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Cagliero, Cecilia; Bicchi, Carlo; Cordero, Chiara; Liberto, Erica; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Sgorbini, Barbara

    2017-04-28

    In the fields of essential oils and fragrances, samples often consist of mixtures of compounds with similar structural and physical characteristics (e.g. mono- and sesquiterpenoids), whose correct identification closely depends on the synergic combination of chromatographic and mass spectral data. This sample complexity means that new GC stationary phases with different selectivities are continually being investigated. Ionic liquids (ILs) are of great interest as GC stationary phases in this field because of their selectivity (significantly different than that of currently phases) and their high temperature stability. A first generation of IL GC columns was found to be competitive when applied to these field, in terms of selectivity and efficiency, compared to conventional columns (polydimethylsiloxane, (e.g. OV-1), methyl-polysiloxane 5%-phenyl (e.g. SE-52), 7%-cyanopropyl, 7%-phenyl polysiloxane (e.g. OV-1701), and polyethylen glycol (e.g. PEG-20M). However, these columns showed significant activity towards polar or active analytes, which primarily affected their quantitative performance. A new generation of highly-inactive columns coated with three of the most widely-used ionic liquid GC stationary phases has recently been introduced; these phases are SLB-IL60i (1,12-di(tripropylphosphonium) dodecane bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide [NTf 2 ], SLB-IL76i (tri-(tripropylphosphonium-hexanamido)-triethylamine [NTf 2 ]), and SLB-IL111i (1,5-di (2,3-dimethyllimidazolium) pentane [NTf 2 ]). This study carefully tested the new inert IL columns, in view of their routine application in the fragrance and essential oil fields. They were found to have unusually high selectivity, comparable to that of first-generation IL columns, while their inertness and efficiency were competitive with those of currently-used conventional columns. The IL column performance of first and second generations was compared, through the quali-quantitative analysis of components in a group of

  16. Synthesis of Dibenzo[hi,st]ovalene and Its Amplified Spontaneous Emission in a Polystyrene Matrix.

    PubMed

    Paternò, Giuseppe M; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Ye; Liu, Junzhi; Motti, Silvia G; Petrozza, Annamaria; Feng, Xinliang; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Müllen, Klaus; Narita, Akimitsu; Scotognella, Francesco

    2017-06-06

    A large number of graphene molecules, or large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), have been synthesized and display various optoelectronic properties. Nevertheless, their potential for application in photonics has remained largely unexplored. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a highly luminescent and stable graphene molecule, namely a substituted dibenzo[hi,st]ovalene (DBO 1), with zigzag edges and elucidate its promising optical-gain properties by means of ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. Upon incorporation of DBO into an inert polystyrene matrix, amplified stimulated emission can be observed with a relatively low power threshold (ca. 60 μJ cm -2 ), thus highlighting its high potential for lasing applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Treatment of vocal fold scarring: rheological and histological measures of homologous collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Kriesel, Kevin J; Thiebault, Susan L; Chan, Roger W; Suzuki, Tatsutoshi; VanGroll, Patrick J; Bless, Diane M; Ford, Charles N

    2002-10-01

    The current treatment options for dysphonia secondary to vocal fold scarring are limited. Few studies address changes in the lamina propria, which is critical to vocal fold biomechanical properties and voice production. Using rheological and histological measures of homologous collagen matrix (HCM)-injected vocal folds, we assessed HCM's potential for providing bulk and restoring biomechanical performance. Twenty rabbits underwent bilateral vocal fold scarring. After 10 weeks of scar maturation, the rabbits had unilateral injections of HCM or saline solution. Ten weeks after the injections, histological studies revealed well-defined collagen globules distributed throughout the lamina propria and underlying muscular tissue. Significantly more procollagen was observed in the HCM-treated group. No significant differences in elastic shear modulus or dynamic viscosity were found between the treatment groups. This study demonstrates that HCM is an inert, relatively stable injectate that may serve well for medialization but does not appear to improve the dynamic properties of the lamina propria.

  18. The Astrobiology Matrix and the "Drake Matrix" in Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizser, A.; Kereszturi, A.

    2003-01-01

    We organized astrobiology lectures in the Eotvos Lorand University of Sciences and the Polaris Observatory in 2002. We present here the "Drake matrix" for the comparison of the astrobiological potential of different bodies [1], and astrobiology matrix for the visualization of the interdisciplinary connections between different fields of astrobiology. Conclusion: In Hungary it is difficult to integrate astrobiology in the education system but the great advantage is that it can connect different scientific fields and improve the view of students. We would like to get in contact with persons and organizations who already have experience in the education of astrobiology.

  19. Fractography and oxidative analysis of gamma inert sterilized posterior-stabilized tibial insert post fractures: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Farzana; Chang, Jennifer; Huddleston, James; Van Citters, Douglas; Ries, Michael; Pruitt, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    Highly crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has shown success in reducing wear in hip arthroplasty but there remains skepticism about its use in Total Knee Replacement (TKR) inserts that are known to experience fatigue loading and higher local cyclic contact stresses. Two Legacy Posterior-Stabilized (LPS) Zimmer NexGen tibial implants sterilized by gamma irradiation in an inert environment with posts that fractured in vivo were analyzed. Failure mechanisms were determined using optical and scanning electron microscopy along with oxidative analysis via Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy. Micrographs of one retrieval revealed fatigue crack initiation on opposite sides of the post and quasi-brittle micromechanisms of crack propagation. FTIR of this retrieval revealed no oxidation. The fracture surface image of the second retrieval indicated a brittle fracture process and FTIR revealed oxidation in the explant. These two cases suggest that crosslinking of UHMWPE as a manufacturing process or sterilization method in conjunction with designs that incorporate high stress concentrations, such as the tibial post, may reduce material strength. Moreover, free radicals generated from ionizing radiation can render the polymer susceptible to oxidative embrittlement. Our findings suggest that tibial post fractures may be the results of in vivo oxidation and low level crosslinking. These and previous reports of fractured crosslinked UHMWPE devices implores caution when used with high stress concentrations, particularly when considering the potential for in vivo oxidation in TKR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Otosclerosis- or the loss of the natural variant of inertness ( of the labyrinth capsule)].

    PubMed

    Kiselev, A S

    2012-01-01

    The author suggests an original hypothesis of otosclerosis based on the analyses of the literature publications for many years and his personal clinical observations. The normal labyrinth capsule is considered to be bradytrophic, i.e. inert and showing an extremely low level of metabolic processes. The disturbance of bradytrophicity under the action of individual factors and/or especially their combination make it involved in the maintenance of calcium homeostasis in the body. The validity of this conjecture is confirmed by the results of histological investigations, viz. the appearance of diquide or xplasma-like, bone in the labyrinth of the patients suffering otosclerosis. Such bone resorption is known to occur in other parts of the bony skeletontoo and should be regarded as a normal physiological process contributing to the replenishment of blood calcium deficiency.The subsequent reorganization (remodeling) of any part of the bony skeleton is physiologically neutral. In the labyrinth capsule,with its small size and delicate structure, such reorganization induces the otosclerotic process responsible for dysfunction of the membranaceous labyrinth. The surgical treatment of the patients presenting with otosclerosis should be supplemented by conservative treatment intended to slow down the otosclerotic reorganization and to restore bradytrophicity of the labyrinth capsule.

  1. Electrolysis of metal oxides in MgCl2 based molten salts with an inert graphite anode.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yating; Li, Wei; Chen, Hualin; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo; Chen, George Z

    2016-08-15

    Electrolysis of solid metal oxides has been demonstrated in MgCl2-NaCl-KCl melt at 700 °C taking the electrolysis of Ta2O5 as an example. Both the cathodic and anodic processes have been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, and potentiostatic and constant voltage electrolysis, with the cathodic products analysed by XRD and SEM and the anodic products by GC. Fast electrolysis of Ta2O5 against a graphite anode has been realized at a cell voltage of 2 V, or a total overpotential of about 400 mV. The energy consumption was about 1 kW h kgTa(-1) with a nearly 100% Ta recovery. The cathodic product was nanometer Ta powder with sizes of about 50 nm. The main anodic product was Cl2 gas, together with about 1 mol% O2 gas and trace amounts of CO. The graphite anode was found to be an excellent inert anode. These results promise an environmentally-friendly and energy efficient method for metal extraction by electrolysis of metal oxides in MgCl2 based molten salts.

  2. Aqueous Solution-Phase Selenized CuIn(S,Se)2 Thin Film Solar Cells Annealed under Inert Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yunjung; Yang, Wooseok; Kim, Jimin; Woo, Kyoohee; Moon, Jooho

    2015-10-14

    A nonvacuum solution-based approach can potentially be used to realize low cost, roll-to-roll fabrication of chalcopyrite CuIn(S,Se)2 (CISSe) thin film solar cells. However, most solution-based fabrication methods involve highly toxic solvents and inevitably require sulfurization and/or postselenization with hazardous H2S/H2Se gases. Herein, we introduce novel aqueous-based Cu-In-S and Se inks that contain an amine additive for producing a high-quality absorber layer. CISSe films were fabricated by simple deposition of Cu-In-S ink and Se ink followed by annealing under an inert atmosphere. Compositional and phase analyses confirmed that our simple aqueous ink-based method facilitated in-site selenization of the CIS layer. In addition, we investigated the molecular structures of our aqueous inks to determine how crystalline chalcopyrite absorber layers developed without sulfurization and/or postselenization. CISSe thin film solar cells annealed at 550 °C exhibited an efficiency of 4.55% under AM 1.5 illumination. The low-cost, nonvacuum method to deposit chalcopyrite absorber layers described here allows for safe and simple processing of thin film solar cells.

  3. Hydrological performance of dual-substrate-layer green roofs using porous inert substrates with high sorption capacities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoou; Tian, Yimei; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Chenrui

    2017-06-01

    Given that the common medium in existing green roofs is a single layer composed of organic and inorganic substrates, seven pilot-scale dual-substrate-layer extensive green roofs (G1-G7), which include nutrition and adsorption substrate layers, were constructed in this study. The effectiveness of porous inert substrates (activated charcoal, zeolite, pumice, lava, vermiculite and expanded perlite) used as the adsorption substrate for stormwater retention was investigated. A single-substrate-layer green roof (G8) was built for comparison with G1-G7. Despite the larger total rainfall depth (mm) of six types of simulated rains (43.2, 54.6, 76.2, 87.0, 85.2 and 86.4, respectively), the total percent retention of G1-G7 varied between 14% and 82% with an average of 43%, exhibiting better runoff-retaining capacity than G8 based on the maximum potential rainfall storage depth per unit height of adsorption substrate. Regression analysis showed that there was a logarithmic relationship between cumulative rainfall depth with non-zero runoff and stormwater retention for G1-G4 and a linear relationship for G5-G8. To enhance the water retention capacity and extend the service life of dual-substrate-layer extensive green roofs, the mixture of activated charcoal and/or pumice with expanded perlite and/or vermiculite is more suitable as the adsorption substrate than the mixture containing lava and/or zeolite.

  4. Effect of sonication on particle dispersion, administered dose and metal release of non-functionalized, non-inert metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sulena; Hedberg, Jonas; Blomberg, Eva; Wold, Susanna; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we elucidate the effect of different sonication techniques to efficiently prepare particle dispersions from selected non-functionalized NPs (Cu, Al, Mn, ZnO), and corresponding consequences on the particle dose, surface charge and release of metals. Probe sonication was shown to be the preferred method for dispersing non-inert, non-functionalized metal NPs (Cu, Mn, Al). However, rapid sedimentation during sonication resulted in differences between the real and the administered doses in the order of 30-80 % when sonicating in 1 and 2.56 g/L NP stock solutions. After sonication, extensive agglomeration of the metal NPs resulted in rapid sedimentation of all particles. DLVO calculations supported these findings, showing the strong van der Waals forces of the metal NPs to result in significant NP agglomeration. Metal release from the metal NPs was slightly increased by increased sonication. The addition of a stabilizing agent (bovine serum albumin) had an accelerating effect on the release of metals in sonicated solutions. For Cu and Mn NPs, the extent of particle dissolution increased from <1.6 to ~5 % after sonication for 15 min. A prolonged sonication time (3-15 min) had negligible effects on the zeta potential of the studied NPs. In all, it is shown that it is of utmost importance to carefully investigate how sonication influences the physico-chemical properties of dispersed metal NPs. This should be considered in nanotoxicology investigations of metal NPs.

  5. A thermodynamics model for morphology prediction of aluminum nano crystals fabricated by the inert gas condensation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yu; Xia, Dehong

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide scientific guidance for the morphological control of nanoparticle synthesis using the gas phase method. A universal thermodynamics model is developed to predict the morphology of nanoparticles fabricated using the inert gas condensation method. By using this model, the morphologies of aluminum nanocrystals are predicted under various preparation conditions. There are two types of energy that jointly determine the formation of nanoparticle morphology—Gibbs free energy for nanoparticles and energy variation during the process. The results show that energy variation dominates morphology formation when the cooling rate is less than 2 × 1011 K s-1 in the aluminum nanocrystal production process. At the beginning of the nanoparticle growth, the most stable morphology is predicted to be spherical, but the energetically preferred morphology becomes cubic as the particle grows. The turning point in the particle size at which spherical morphology is no longer the most stable morphology is exhibited as a function of pressure in a condensation chamber for different cooling rates. In this paper, we focus on the need for morphology prediction based on preparation conditions. It is concluded that nanoparticles with various morphologies could be obtained by adjusting the cooling rate and pressure in the condensation chamber.

  6. Development and application of a hybrid inert/organic packing material for the biofiltration of composting off-gases mimics.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jerónimo; Prado, Oscar J; Almarcha, Manuel; Lafuente, Javier; Gabriel, David

    2010-06-15

    The performance of three biofilters (BF1-BF3) packed with a new hybrid (inert/organic) packing material that consists of spherical argyle pellets covered with compost was examined in different operational scenarios and compared with a biofilter packed with pine bark (BF4). BF1, BF2 and BF4 were inoculated with an enriched microbial population, while BF3 was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant. A gas mixture containing ammonia and six VOCs was fed to the reactors with N-NH(3) loads ranging from 0 to 10 g N/m(3)h and a VOCs load of around 10 g C/m(3)h. A profound analysis of the fate of nitrogen was performed in all four reactors. Results show that the biofilters packed with the hybrid packing material and inoculated with the microbial pre-adapted population (BF1 and BF2) achieved the highest nitrification rates and VOCs removal efficiencies. In BF3, nitratation was inhibited during most of the study, while only slight evidence of nitrification could be observed in BF4. All four reactors were able to treat the VOCs mixture with efficiencies greater than 80% during the entire experimental period, regardless of the inlet ammonia load. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Substrate Selection for Fundamental Studies of Electrocatalysts and Photoelectrodes: Inert Potential Windows in Acidic, Neutral, and Basic Electrolyte

    DOE PAGES

    Benck, Jesse D.; Pinaud, Blaise A.; Gorlin, Yelena; ...

    2014-10-30

    The selection of an appropriate substrate is an important initial step for many studies of electrochemically active materials. In order to help researchers with the substrate selection process, we employ a consistent experimental methodology to evaluate the electrochemical reactivity and stability of seven potential substrate materials for electrocatalyst and photoelectrode evaluation. Using cyclic voltammetry with a progressively increased scan range, we characterize three transparent conducting oxides (indium tin oxide, fluorine-doped tin oxide, and aluminum-doped zinc oxide) and four opaque conductors (gold, stainless steel 304, glassy carbon, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in three different electrolytes (sulfuric acid, sodium acetate, andmore » sodium hydroxide). Here, we determine the inert potential window for each substrate/electrolyte combination and make recommendations about which materials may be most suitable for application under different experimental conditions. Furthermore, the testing methodology provides a framework for other researchers to evaluate and report the baseline activity of other substrates of interest to the broader community.« less

  8. Ignition of steel alloys by impact of low-velocity iron/inert particles in gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Frank J.; Mcilroy, Kenneth; Williams, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    The ignition of carbon steel and 316 and 304 stainless steels caused by the impact of low-velocity particles (a standard mixture consisting of 2 g of iron and 3 g of inert materials) in gaseous oxygen was investigated using NASA/White Sands Test Facility for the ignition test, and a subsonic particle impact chamber to accelerate the particles that were injected into flowing oxygen upstream of the target specimen. It was found that the oxygen velocities required to ignite the three alloys were the same as that required to ignite the particle mixture. Ignition occurred at oxygen velocities greater than 45 m/sec at 20 to 24 MPa and was found to be independent of pressure between 2 and 30 MPa. Comparison of the present results and the past results from Wegener (1964) with the Compressed Gas Association (CGA) oxygen velocity limits for safe operations indicates that the CGA limits may be excessively conservative at high pressures and too liberal at low pressures.

  9. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M.; Marques, J.-L.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned.

  10. In situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of chemical compositions in stainless steels during tungsten inert gas welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taparli, Ugur Alp; Jacobsen, Lars; Griesche, Axel; Michalik, Katarzyna; Mory, David; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was combined with a bead-on-plate Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process for the in situ measurement of chemical compositions in austenitic stainless steels during welding. Monitoring the weld pool's chemical composition allows governing the weld pool solidification behavior, and thus enables the reduction of susceptibility to weld defects. Conventional inspection methods for weld seams (e.g. ultrasonic inspection) cannot be performed during the welding process. The analysis system also allows in situ study of the correlation between the occurrence of weld defects and changes in the chemical composition in the weld pool or in the two-phase region where solid and liquid phase coexist. First experiments showed that both the shielding Ar gas and the welding arc plasma have a significant effect on the selected Cr II, Ni II and Mn II characteristic emissions, namely an artificial increase of intensity values via unspecific emission in the spectra. In situ investigations showed that this artificial intensity increase reached a maximum in presence of weld plume. Moreover, an explicit decay has been observed with the termination of the welding plume due to infrared radiation during sample cooling. Furthermore, LIBS can be used after welding to map element distribution. For austenitic stainless steels, Mn accumulations on both sides of the weld could be detected between the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base material.

  11. Matrix Formalism of Synchrobetatron Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC

    In this paper we present a complete linear synchrobetatron coupling formalism by studying the transfer matrix which describes linear horizontal and longitudinal motions. With the technique established in the linear horizontal-vertical coupling study [D. Sagan and D. Rubin, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 074001 (1999)], we found a transformation to block diagonalize the transfer matrix and decouple the betatron motion and the synchrotron motion. By separating the usual dispersion term from the horizontal coordinate first, we were able to obtain analytic expressions of the transformation under reasonable approximations. We also obtained the perturbations to the betatron tune and themore » Courant-Snyder functions. The closed orbit changes due to finite energy gains at rf cavities and radiation energy losses were also studied by the 5 x 5 extended transfer matrix with the fifth column describing kicks in the 4-dimension phase space.« less

  12. Shrinkage estimation of the realized relationship matrix

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The additive relationship matrix plays an important role in mixed model prediction of breeding values. For genotype matrix X (loci in columns), the product XX' is widely used as a realized relationship matrix, but the scaling of this matrix is ambiguous. Our first objective was to derive a proper ...

  13. Polymer-based metal nano-coated disposable target for matrix-assisted and matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bugovsky, Stefan; Winkler, Wolfgang; Balika, Werner; Koranda, Manfred; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-07-15

    The ideal MALDI/LDI mass spectrometry sample target for an axial TOF instrument possesses a variety of properties. Primarily, it should be chemically inert to the sample, i.e. analyte, matrix and solvents, highly planar across the whole target, without any previous chemical contact and provide a uniform surface to facilitate reproducible measurements without artifacts from previous sample or matrix compounds. This can be hard to achieve with a metal target, which has to be extensively cleaned every time after use. Any cleaning step may leave residues behind, may change the surface properties due to the type of cleaning method used or even cause microscopic scratches over time hence altering matrix crystallization behavior. Alternatively, use of disposable targets avoids these problems. As each possesses the same surface they therefore have the potential to replace the conventional full metal targets so commonly employed. Furthermore, low cost single-use targets with high planarity promise an easier compliance with GLP guidelines as they alleviate the problem of low reproducibility due to inconsistent sample/matrix crystallization and changes to the target surface properties. In our tests, polymeric metal nano-coated targets were compared to a stainless steel reference. The polymeric metal nano-coated targets exhibited all the performance characteristics for a MALDI MS sample support, and even surpassed the - in our lab commonly used - reference in some aspects like limit of detection. The target exhibits all necessary features such as electrical conductivity, vacuum, laser and solvent compatibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Matrix Treatment of Ray Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quon, W. Steve

    1996-01-01

    Describes a method to combine two learning experiences--optical physics and matrix mathematics--in a straightforward laboratory experiment that allows engineering/physics students to integrate a variety of learning insights and technical skills, including using lasers, studying refraction through thin lenses, applying concepts of matrix…

  15. Polarimeter based on video matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Andrey; Kontantinov, Oleg; Shmirko, Konstantin; Zubko, Evgenij

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present a new measurement tool - polarimeter, based on video matrix. Polarimetric measure- ments are usefull, for example, when monitoring water areas pollutions and atmosphere constituents. New device is small enough to mount on unmanned aircraft vehicles (quadrocopters) and stationary platforms. Device and corresponding software turns it into real-time monitoring system, that helps to solve some research problems.

  16. Metal Matrix Composites Directionally Solidified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Alicia Esther; Schvezov, Carlos Enrique

    The present work is focus on studying the dendritic solidification of metal matrix composites, MMCs, (using zinc-aluminum, ZA, alloys as matrix and the addition of SiC and Al2O3 particles). The compounds were obtained by as-cast solidification, under continuous stirring and in a second stage were directionally solidified in order to obtain different dendritic growth (columnar, equiaxed and columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET)). The results in MMCs were compared with those obtained in directional solidification of ZA alloys, primarily with regard to structural parameters. The size and evolution of microstructure, according to the size of the MMCs particles and the variation of the thermal parameters was analyzing. In general it was found that the size of the microstructure (secondary dendritic spacing) decreases with the increase of particles in the matrix. When cooling rate increases, particle size decreases, and a higher cooling rate causes finer and more homogeneous dendrites Also, the segregation which was found in the matrix of the composites was significantly less than in the case of ZA alloys.

  17. Switching Matrix For Optical Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed matrix of electronically controlled shutters switches signals in optical fibers between multiple input and output channels. Size, weight, and power consumption reduced. Device serves as building block for small, low-power, broad-band television- and data-signal-switching systems providing high isolation between nominally disconnected channels.

  18. Analysis of air-, moisture- and solvent-sensitive chemical compounds by mass spectrometry using an inert atmospheric pressure solids analysis probe.

    PubMed

    Mosely, Jackie A; Stokes, Peter; Parker, David; Dyer, Philip W; Messinis, Antonis M

    2018-02-01

    A novel method has been developed that enables chemical compounds to be transferred from an inert atmosphere glove box and into the atmospheric pressure ion source of a mass spectrometer whilst retaining a controlled chemical environment. This innovative method is simple and cheap to implement on some commercially available mass spectrometers. We have termed this approach inert atmospheric pressure solids analysis probe ( iASAP) and demonstrate the benefit of this methodology for two air-/moisture-sensitive chemical compounds whose characterisation by mass spectrometry is now possible and easily achieved. The simplicity of the design means that moving between iASAP and standard ASAP is straightforward and quick, providing a highly flexible platform with rapid sample turnaround.

  19. Features of motivation of the crewmembers in an enclosed space at atmospheric pressure changes during breathing inert gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarevcev, Sergey

    Since the 1960s, our psychologists are working on experimenting with small groups in isolation .It was associated with the beginning of spaceflight and necessity to study of human behaviors in ways different from the natural habitat of man .Those, who study human behavior especially in isolation, know- that the behavior in isolation markedly different from that in the natural situations. It associated with the development of new, more adaptive behaviors (1) What are the differences ? First of all , isolation is achieved by the fact ,that the group is in a closed space. How experiments show - the crew members have changed the basic personality traits, such as motivation Statement of the problem and methods. In our experimentation we were interested in changing the features of human motivation (strength, stability and direction of motivation) in terms of a closed group in the modified atmosphere pressure and breathing inert gases. Also, we were interested in particular external and internal motivation of the individual in the circumstances. To conduct experimentation , we used an experimental barocomplex GVK -250 , which placed a group of six mans. A task was to spend fifteen days in isolation on barokomplex when breathing oxigen - xenon mixture of fifteen days in isolation on the same complex when breathing oxygen- helium mixture and fifteen days of isolation on the same complex when breathing normal air All this time, the subjects were isolated under conditions of atmospheric pressure changes , closer to what you normally deal divers. We assumed that breathing inert mixtures can change the strength and stability , and with it , the direction and stability of motivation. To check our results, we planned on using the battery of psychological techniques : 1. Schwartz technique that measures personal values and behavior in society, DORS procedure ( measurement of fatigue , monotony , satiety and stress ) and riffs that give the test once a week. Our assumption is

  20. Use of inerter devices for weight reduction of tuned mass-dampers for seismic protection of multi-story building: the Tuned Mass-Damper-Interter (TMDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaralis, Agathoklis; Marian, Laurentiu

    2016-04-01

    This paper explores the practical benefits of the recently proposed by the authors tuned mass-damper-inerter (TMDI) visà- vis the classical tuned mass-damper (TMD) for the passive vibration control of seismically excited linearly building structures assumed to respond linearly. Special attention is focused on showcasing that the TMDI requires considerably reduced attached mass/weight to achieve the same vibration suppression level as the classical TMD by exploiting the mass amplification effect of the ideal inerter device. The latter allows for increasing the inertial property of the TMDI without a significant increase to its physical weight. To this end, novel numerical results pertaining to a seismically excited 3-storey frame building equipped with optimally designed TMDIs for various values of attached mass and inertance (i.e., constant of proportionality of the inerter resisting force in mass units) are furnished. The seismic action is modelled by a non-stationary stochastic process compatible with the elastic acceleration response spectrum of the European seismic code (Eurocode 8), while the TMDIs are tuned to minimize the mean square top floor displacement. It is shown that the TMDI achieves the same level of performance as an unconventional "large mass" TMD for seismic protection (i.e., more than 10% of attached mass of the total building mass), by incorporating attached masses similar to the ones used for controlling wind-induced vibrations via TMDs (i.e., 1%-5% of the total building mass). Moreover, numerical data from response history analyses for a suite of Eurocode 8 compatible recorded ground motions further demonstrate that optimally tuned TMDIs for top floor displacement minimization achieve considerable reductions in terms of top floor acceleration and attached mass displacement (stroke) compared to the classical TMD with the same attached mass.

  1. Dose dependence of nano-hardness of 6H-SiC crystal under irradiation with inert gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yitao; Zhang, Chonghong; Su, Changhao; Ding, Zhaonan; Song, Yin

    2018-05-01

    Single crystal 6H-SiC was irradiated by inert gas ions (He, Ne, Kr and Xe ions) to various damage levels at room temperature. Nano-indentation test was performed to investigate the hardness change behavior with damage. The depth profile of nano-hardness for 6H-SiC decreased with increasing depth for both the pristine and irradiated samples, which was known as indentation size effect (ISE). Nix-Gao model was proposed to determine an asymptotic value of nano-hardness by taking account of ISE for both the pristine and irradiated samples. In this study, nano-hardness of the irradiated samples showed a strong dependence on damage level and showed a weak dependence on ions species. From the dependence of hardness on damage, it was found that the change of hardness demonstrated three distinguishable stages with damage: (I) The hardness increased with damage from 0 to 0.2 dpa and achieved a maximum of hardening fraction ∼20% at 0.2 dpa. The increase of hardness in this damage range was contributed to defects produced by ion irradiation, which can be described well by Taylor relation. (II) The hardness reduced rapidly with large decrement in the damage range from 0.2 to 0.5 dpa, which was considered to be from the covalent bond breaking. (III) The hardness reduced with small decrement in the damage range from 0.5 to 2.2 dpa, which was induced by extension of the amorphous layer around damage peak.

  2. Subsurface dynamics of reactive and inert gases in the context of noble gases as environmental tracers in groundwater hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Simon; Jenner, Florian; Aeschbach, Werner

    2017-04-01

    Applications of inert gases in groundwater hydrology require a profound understanding of underlying biogeochemical processes. Some of these processes are, however, not well understood and therefore require further investigation. This is the first study simultaneously investigating soil air and groundwater in the context of noble gas tracer applications, accounting for seasonal effects in different climate regions. The sampled data confirm a general reliability of common assumptions proposed in the literature. In particular, a solubility-controlled description of excess air formation and of groundwater degassing can be confirmed. This study identifies certain effects which need to be taken into account to reliably evaluate noble gas patterns. First, long-term samplings suggest a permanent temperature-driven equilibration of shallow groundwater with entrapped air bubbles, even some years after recharge. Second, minor groundwater degassing is found to challenge existing excess air model approaches, depending on the amount and the fractionation of excess air. Third, soil air composition data of this study imply a potential bias of noble gas temperatures by up to about 2℃ due to microbial oxygen depletion and a reduced sum value of O2+CO2. This effect causes systematically lower noble gas temperatures in tropical groundwater samples and in shallow mid-latitude groundwater samples after strong recharge during the warm season. However, a general bias of noble gas temperatures in mid-latitudes is probably prevented by a predominant recharge during the cold season, accompanied by nearly atmospheric noble gas mixing ratios in the soil air. Findings of this study provide a remarkable contribution to the reliability of noble gas tracer applications in hydrology, in particular with regard to paleoclimate reconstructions and an understanding of subsurface gas dynamics.

  3. The effect of detonation wave incidence angle on the acceleration of flyers by explosives heavily laden with inert additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, Jason; Georges, William; Frost, David L.; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    The incidence angle of a detonation wave in a conventional high explosive influences the acceleration and terminal velocity of a metal flyer by increasing the magnitude of the material velocity imparted by the transmitted shock wave as the detonation is tilted towards normal loading. For non-ideal explosives heavily loaded with inert additives, the detonation velocity is typically subsonic relative to the flyer sound speed, leading to shockless accelerations when the detonation is grazing. Further, in a grazing detonation the particles are initially accelerated in the direction of the detonation and only gain velocity normal to the initial orientation of the flyer at later times due to aerodynamic drag as the detonation products expand. If the detonation wave in a non-ideal explosive instead strikes the flyer at normal incidence, a shock is transmitted into the flyer and the first interaction between the particle additives and the flyer occurs due to the imparted material velocity from the passage of the detonation wave. Consequently, the effect of incidence angle and additive properties may play a more prominent role in the flyer acceleration. In the present study we experimentally compared normal detonation loadings to grazing loadings using a 3-mm-thick aluminum slapper to impact-initiate a planar detonation wave in non-ideal explosive-particle admixtures, which subsequently accelerated a second 6.4-mm-thick flyer. Flyer acceleration was measured with heterodyne laser velocimetry (PDV). The explosive mixtures considered were packed beds of glass or steel particles of varying sizes saturated with sensitized nitromethane, and gelled nitromethane mixed with glass microballoons. Results showed that the primary parameter controlling changes in flyer velocity was the presence of a transmitted shock, with additive density and particle size playing only secondary roles. These results are similar to the grazing detonation experiments, however under normal loading the

  4. Inerting and atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carhart, Homer W.

    1987-01-01

    It is argued that fires are dependent primarily on the concentration of oxygen, whereas life is dependent on the partial pressure of oxygen. It follows that in an inhabited capsule it should be possible to exercise a certain amount of willful control over fire and still maintain habitability by proper selection of the composition of the atmosphere. This leads to two concepts in the control of fires in confined spaces by controlling atmospheric composition: the first, to lower the overall potential hazard by maintaining the percent of oxygen in the capsule below that of air, and second, to provide for the emergency extinguishment of a fire by sudden flooding with nitrogen. Several relevant charts and graphs are presented.

  5. Isobaric Inert Gas Counterdiffusion,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    solubility coefficient . Helium is 0.006 and nitrogen is about 0.012. Q. Are those lipid solubilities? A. Those are aqueous . Here is theN 2 into helium...was aqueous rather than fat. We did:’t, worry about solubility coefficients , either -- if they play a part, it will only be to make bubbles come more...reflection coefficient , sometimes interpreted as the fraction of the solute molecules which are reflected upon striking the barrier. Assuming that tissue

  6. Sulfate and organic matter concentration in relation to hydrogen sulfide generation at inert solid waste landfill site - Limit value for gypsum.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    In order to suggest a limit value for gypsum (CaSO4) for the suppression of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation at an inert solid waste landfill site, the relationship between raw material (SO4 and organic matter) for H2S generation and generated H2S concentration, and the balance of raw material (SO4) and product (H2S) considering generation and outflow were investigated. SO4 concentration should be less than approximately 100mg-SO4/L in order to suppress H2S generation to below 2000ppm. Total organic carbon (TOC) concentration should be less than approximately 200mg-C/L assuming a high SO4 concentration. The limit value for SO4 in the ground is 60mg-SO4/kg with 0.011wt% as gypsum dihydrate, i.e., approximately 1/10 of the limit value in inert waste as defined by the EU Council Decision (560mg-SO4/kg-waste). The limit value for SO4 in inert waste as defined by the EU Council Decision is high and TOC is strictly excluded. The cumulative amount of SO4 outflow through the liquid phase is much larger than that through the gas phase. SO4 concentration in pore water decreases with time, reaching half the initial concentration around day 100. SO4 reduction by rainfall can be expected in the long term. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Minimum ignition temperature of nano and micro Ti powder clouds in the presence of inert nano TiO2 powder.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chunmiao; Amyotte, Paul R; Hossain, Md Nur; Li, Chang

    2014-06-30

    Minimum ignition temperature (MIT) of micro Ti powder increased gradually with increases in nano-sized TiO2 employed as an inertant. Solid TiO2 inertant significantly reduced ignition hazard of micro Ti powder in contact with hot surfaces. The MIT of nano Ti powder remained low (583 K), however, even with 90% TiO2. The MIT of micro Ti powder, when mixed with nano Ti powder at concentrations as low as 10%, decreased so dramatically that its application as a solid fuel may be possible. A simple MIT model was proposed for aggregate particle size estimation and better understanding of the inerting effect of nano TiO2 on MIT. Estimated particle size was 1.46-1.51 μm larger than that in the 20-L sphere due to poor dispersion in the BAM oven. Calculated MITs were lower than corresponding empirically determined values for micro Ti powder because nano-sized TiO2 coated the micro Ti powder, thereby decreasing its reaction kinetics. In the case of nano Ti powder, nano-sized TiO2 facilitated dispersion of nano Ti powder which resulted in a calculated MIT that was greater than the experimentally determined value. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced Upconversion Luminescence in Yb3+/Tm3+-Codoped Fluoride Active Core/Active Shell/Inert Shell Nanoparticles through Directed Energy Migration

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hailong; Yang, Chunhui; Shao, Wei; Damasco, Jossana; Wang, Xianliang; Ågren, Hans; Prasad, Paras N.; Chen, Guanying

    2014-01-01

    The luminescence efficiency of lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles is of particular importance for their embodiment in biophotonic and photonic applications. Here, we show that the upconversion luminescence of typically used NaYF4:Yb3+30%/Tm3+0.5% nanoparticles can be enhanced by ~240 times through a hierarchical active core/active shell/inert shell (NaYF4:Yb3+30%/Tm3+0.5%)/NaYbF4/NaYF4 design, which involves the use of directed energy migration in the second active shell layer. The resulting active core/active shell/inert shell nanoparticles are determined to be about 11 times brighter than that of well-investigated (NaYF4:Yb3+30%/Tm3+0.5%)/NaYF4 active core/inert shell nanoparticles when excited at ~980 nm. The strategy for enhanced upconversion in Yb3+/Tm3+-codoped NaYF4 nanoparticles through directed energy migration might have implications for other types of lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles. PMID:28348285

  9. The impact of whole human blood on the kinetic inertness of platinum(iv) prodrugs - an HPLC-ICP-MS study.

    PubMed

    Theiner, Sarah; Grabarics, Márkó; Galvez, Luis; Varbanov, Hristo P; Sommerfeld, Nadine S; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2018-04-17

    The potential advantage of platinum(iv) complexes as alternatives to classical platinum(ii)-based drugs relies on their kinetic stability in the body before reaching the tumor site and on their activation by reduction inside cancer cells. In this study, an analytical workflow has been developed to investigate the reductive biotransformation and kinetic inertness of platinum(iv) prodrugs comprising different ligand coordination spheres (respectively, lipophilicity and redox behavior) in whole human blood. The distribution of platinum(iv) complexes in blood pellets and plasma was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after microwave digestion. An analytical approach based on reversed-phase (RP)-ICP-MS was used to monitor the parent compound and the formation of metabolites using two different extraction procedures. The ligand coordination sphere of the platinum(iv) complexes had a significant impact on their accumulation in red blood cells and on their degree of kinetic inertness in whole human blood. The most lipophilic platinum(iv) compound featuring equatorial chlorido ligands showed a pronounced penetration into blood cells and a rapid reductive biotransformation. In contrast, the more hydrophilic platinum(iv) complexes with a carboplatin- and oxaliplatin-core exerted kinetic inertness on a pharmacologically relevant time scale with notable amounts of the compound accumulated in the plasma fraction.

  10. Enhanced Upconversion Luminescence in Yb3+/Tm3+-Codoped Fluoride Active Core/Active Shell/Inert Shell Nanoparticles through Directed Energy Migration.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hailong; Yang, Chunhui; Shao, Wei; Damasco, Jossana; Wang, Xianliang; Ågren, Hans; Prasad, Paras N; Chen, Guanying

    2014-01-03

    The luminescence efficiency of lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles is of particular importance for their embodiment in biophotonic and photonic applications. Here, we show that the upconversion luminescence of typically used NaYF₄:Yb 3+ 30%/Tm 3+ 0.5% nanoparticles can be enhanced by ~240 times through a hierarchical active core/active shell/inert shell (NaYF₄:Yb 3+ 30%/Tm 3+ 0.5%)/NaYbF₄/NaYF₄ design, which involves the use of directed energy migration in the second active shell layer. The resulting active core/active shell/inert shell nanoparticles are determined to be about 11 times brighter than that of well-investigated (NaYF₄:Yb 3+ 30%/Tm 3+ 0.5%)/NaYF₄ active core/inert shell nanoparticles when excited at ~980 nm. The strategy for enhanced upconversion in Yb 3+ /Tm 3+ -codoped NaYF₄ nanoparticles through directed energy migration might have implications for other types of lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles.

  11. Omentin-1 prevents cartilage matrix destruction by regulating matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Liu, Baoyi; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, BenJie; Liu, Yupeng; Zhang, Yao; Li, Borui; Tian, Fengde

    2017-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix and pathological progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Omentin-1 is a newly identified anti-inflammatory adipokine. Little information regarding the protective effects of omentin-1 in OA has been reported before. In the current study, our results indicated that omentin-1 suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 induced by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at both the mRNA and protein levels in human chondrocytes. Importantly, administration of omentin-1 abolished IL-1β-induced degradation of type II collagen (Col II) and aggrecan, the two major extracellular matrix components in articular cartilage, in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, omentin-1 ameliorated the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) by blocking the JAK-2/STAT3 pathway. Our results indicate that omentin-1 may have a potential chondroprotective therapeutic capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increasedmore » with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.« less

  13. Sapphire reinforced alumina matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Setlock, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectionally reinforced A1203 matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing. Approximately 30 volume % of either coated or uncoated sapphire fiber was used as reinforcement. Unstabilized ZrO2 was applied as the fiber coating. Composite mechanical behavior was analyzed both after fabrication and after additional heat treatment. The results of composite tensile tests were correlated with fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths determined from fiber push-out tests. Substantially higher strength and greater fiber pull-out were observed for the coated fiber composites for all processing conditions studied. The coated fiber composites retained up to 95% and 87% of their as-fabricated strength when heat treated at 14000C for 8 or 24 hours, respectively. Electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed extensive fiber pull-out both before and after heat treatment.

  14. Structural properties of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Bode, W; Fernandez-Catalan, C; Tschesche, H; Grams, F; Nagase, H; Maskos, K

    1999-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in extracellular matrix degradation. Their proteolytic activity must be precisely regulated by their endogenous protein inhibitors, the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Disruption of this balance results in serious diseases such as arthritis, tumour growth and metastasis. Knowledge of the tertiary structures of the proteins involved is crucial for understanding their functional properties and interference with associated dysfunctions. Within the last few years, several three-dimensional MMP and MMP-TIMP structures became available, showing the domain organization, polypeptide fold and main specificity determinants. Complexes of the catalytic MMP domains with various synthetic inhibitors enabled the structure-based design and improvement of high-affinity ligands, which might be elaborated into drugs. A multitude of reviews surveying work done on all aspects of MMPs have appeared in recent years, but none of them has focused on the three-dimensional structures. This review was written to close the gap.

  15. Interstellar problems and matrix solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the matrix isolation technique to interstellar problems is described. Following a brief discussion of the interstellar medium (ISM), three areas are reviewed in which matrix experiments are particularly well suited to contribute the information which is sorely needed to further understanding of the ISM. The first involves the measurement of the spectroscopic properties of reactive species. The second is the determination of reaction rates and the elucidation of reaction pathways involving atoms, radicals, and ions which are likely to interact on grain surfaces and in grain mantles. The third entails the determiantion of the spectroscopic, photochemical, and photophysical properties of interstellar and cometary ice analogs. Significant, but limited, progress has been made in these three areas, and a tremendous amount of work is required to fully address the variety of unique chemical and spectroscopic questions posed by the astronomical observations.

  16. Tough high performance composite matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is a semi-interpentrating polymer network which includes a high performance thermosetting polyimide having a nadic end group acting as a crosslinking site and a high performance linear thermoplastic polyimide. Provided is an improved high temperature matrix resin which is capable of performing in the 200 to 300 C range. This resin has significantly improved toughness and microcracking resistance, excellent processability, mechanical performance, and moisture and solvent resistances.

  17. MALDI Matrix Research for Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Matrices are necessary materials for ionizing analytes in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The choice of a matrix appropriate for each analyte controls the analyses. Thus, in some cases, development or improvement of matrices can become a tool for solving problems. This paper reviews MALDI matrix research that the author has conducted in the recent decade. It describes glycopeptide, carbohydrate, or phosphopeptide analyses using 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium (TMG) salts of p-coumaric acid (CA) (G3CA), 3-aminoquinoline (3-AQ)/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) (3-AQ/CHCA) or 3-AQ/CA and gengeral peptide, peptide containing disulfide bonds or hydrophobic peptide analyses using butylamine salt of CHCA (CHCAB), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN), octyl 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (alkylated dihydroxybenzoate, ADHB), or 1-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)octan-1-one (alkylated trihydroxyacetophenone, ATHAP). PMID:26819908

  18. Mechanical reliability of porous low-k dielectrics for advanced interconnect: Study of the instability mechanisms in porous low-k dielectrics and their mediation through inert plasma induced re-polymerization of the backbone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yoonki

    Continuous scaling down of critical dimensions in interconnect structures requires the use of ultralow dielectric constant (k) films as interlayer dielectrics to reduce resistance-capacitance delays. Porous carbon-doped silicon oxide (p-SiCOH) dielectrics have been the leading approach to produce these ultralow-k materials. However, embedding of porosity into dielectric layer necessarily decreases the mechanical reliability and increases its susceptibility to adsorption of potentially deleterious chemical species during device fabrication process. Among those, exposure of porous-SiCOH low-k (PLK) dielectrics to oxidizing plasma environment causes the increase in dielectric constant and their vulnerability to mechanical instability of PLKs due to the loss of methyl species and increase in moisture uptake. These changes in PLK properties and physical stability have been persisting challenges for next-generation interconnects because they are the sources of failure in interconnect integration as well as functional and physical failures appearing later in IC device manufacturing. It is therefore essential to study the fundamentals of the interactions on p-SiCOH matrix induced by plasma exposure and find an effective and easy-to-implement way to reverse such changes by repairing damage in PLK structure. From these perspectives, the present dissertation proposes 1) a fundamental understanding of structural transformation occurring during oxidative plasma exposure in PLK matrix structure and 2) its restoration by using silylating treatment, soft x-ray and inert Ar-plasma radiation, respectively. Equally important, 3) as an alternative way of increasing the thermo-mechanical reliability, PLK dielectric film with an intrinsically robust structure by controlling pore morphology is fabricated and investigated. Based on the investigations, stability of PLK films studied by time-dependent ball indentation tester under the elevated temperature, variation in film thickness and

  19. Biomarkers of exposure to stainless steel tungsten inert gas welding fumes and the effect of exposure on exhaled breath condensate.

    PubMed

    Riccelli, Maria Grazia; Goldoni, Matteo; Andreoli, Roberta; Mozzoni, Paola; Pinelli, Silvana; Alinovi, Rossella; Selis, Luisella; Mutti, Antonio; Corradi, Massimo

    2018-08-01

    The respiratory tract is the main target organ of the inhaled hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) and nickel (Ni) contained in stainless steel (SS) welding fumes (WFs). The aim of this study was to investigate the Cr and Ni content of the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of SS tungsten inert gas (TIG) welders, and relate their concentrations with oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers. EBC and urine from 100 SS TIG welders were collected pre-(T 0 ) and post-shift (T 1 ) on a Friday, and pre-shift (T 2 ) on the following Monday morning. Both EBC and urinary Cr concentrations were higher at T 1 (0.08 μg/L and 0.71 μg/g creatinine) and T 0 (0.06 μg/L and 0.74 μg/g creatinine) than at T 2 (below the limit of detection [LOD] and 0.59 μg/g creatinine), and EBC Ni concentrations generally remained

  20. Scaling a Conditional Proximity Matrix to Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Joseph; Brown, Morton

    1979-01-01

    Two least squares procedures for symmetrization of a conditional proximity matrix are derived. The solutions provide multiplicative constants for scaling the rows or columns of the matrix to maximize symmetry. (Author/JKS)

  1. Fast polar decomposition of an arbitrary matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higham, Nicholas J.; Schreiber, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    The polar decomposition of an m x n matrix A of full rank, where m is greater than or equal to n, can be computed using a quadratically convergent algorithm. The algorithm is based on a Newton iteration involving a matrix inverse. With the use of a preliminary complete orthogonal decomposition the algorithm can be extended to arbitrary A. How to use the algorithm to compute the positive semi-definite square root of a Hermitian positive semi-definite matrix is described. A hybrid algorithm which adaptively switches from the matrix inversion based iteration to a matrix multiplication based iteration due to Kovarik, and to Bjorck and Bowie is formulated. The decision when to switch is made using a condition estimator. This matrix multiplication rich algorithm is shown to be more efficient on machines for which matrix multiplication can be executed 1.5 times faster than matrix inversion.

  2. Metal-matrix composites: Status and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Applications of metal matrix composites for air frames and jet engine components are discussed. The current state of the art in primary and secondary fabrication is presented. The present and projected costs were analyzed to determine the cost effectiveness of metal matrix composites. The various types of metal matrix composites and their characteristics are described.

  3. Teaching Tip: When a Matrix and Its Inverse Are Stochastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, J.; Rhee, N. H.

    2013-01-01

    A stochastic matrix is a square matrix with nonnegative entries and row sums 1. The simplest example is a permutation matrix, whose rows permute the rows of an identity matrix. A permutation matrix and its inverse are both stochastic. We prove the converse, that is, if a matrix and its inverse are both stochastic, then it is a permutation matrix.

  4. Optimal development of matrix elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Majkut, Stephanie; Idema, Timon; Swift, Joe; Krieger, Christine; Liu, Andrea; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In development and differentiation, morphological changes often accompany mechanical changes [1], but it is unclear if or when cells in embryos sense tissue elasticity. The earliest embryo is uniformly pliable while adult tissues vary widely in mechanics from soft brain and stiff heart to rigid bone [2], but the sensitivity of cells to microenvironment elasticity is debated [3]. Regenerative cardiology provides strong motivation because rigid post-infarct regions limit pumping by the adult heart [4]. Here we focus on embryonic heart and isolated cardiomyocytes, which both beat spontaneously. Tissue elasticity, Et, increases daily for heart to 1-2 kiloPascal by embryonic day-4 (E4), and although this is ∼10-fold softer than adult heart, the beating contractions of E4-cardiomyocytes prove optimal at ∼Et,E4 both in vivo and in vitro. Proteomics reveals daily increases in a small subset of proteins, namely collagen plus cardiac-specific excitation-contraction proteins. Rapid softening of the heart's matrix with collagenase or stiffening it with enzymatic crosslinking suppresses beating. Sparsely cultured E4-cardiomyocytes on collagen-coated gels likewise show maximal contraction on matrices with native E4 stiffness, highlighting cell-intrinsic mechanosensitivity. While an optimal elasticity for striation proves consistent with the mathematics of force-driven sarcomere registration, contraction wave-speed is linear in Et as theorized for Excitation-Contraction Coupled to Matrix Elasticity. Mechanosensitive stem cell cardiogenesis helps generalize tissue results, which demonstrate how myosin-II organization and contractile function is optimally matched to the load presented by matrix elasticity. PMID:24268417

  5. Nuclear localization of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Mannello, Ferdinando; Medda, Virginia

    2012-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were originally identified as matrixin proteases that act in the extracellular matrix. Recent works have uncovered nontraditional roles for MMPs in the extracellular space as well as in the cytosol and nucleus. There is strong evidence that subspecialized and compartmentalized matrixins participate in many physiological and pathological cellular processes, in which they can act as both degradative and regulatory proteases. In this review, we discuss the transcriptional and translational control of matrixin expression, their regulation of intracellular sorting, and the structural basis of activation and inhibition. In particular, we highlight the emerging roles of various matrixin forms in diseases. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases is regulated at several levels, including enzyme activation, inhibition, complex formation and compartmentalization. Most MMPs are secreted and have their function in the extracellular environment. MMPs are also found inside cells, both in the nucleus, cytosol and organelles. The role of intracellular located MMPs is still poorly understood, although recent studies have unraveled some of their functions. The localization, activation and activity of MMPs are regulated by their interactions with other proteins, proteoglycan core proteins and / or their glycosaminoglycan chains, as well as other molecules. Complexes formed between MMPs and various molecules may also include interactions with noncatalytic sites. Such exosites are regions involved in substrate processing, localized outside the active site, and are potential binding sites of specific MMP inhibitors. Knowledge about regulation of MMP activity is essential for understanding various physiological processes and pathogenesis of diseases, as well as for the development of new MMP targeting drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Silver metal nano-matrixes as high efficiency and versatile catalytic reactors for environmental remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumée, Ludovic F.; Yi, Zhifeng; Tardy, Blaise; Merenda, Andrea; Des Ligneris, Elise; Dagastine, Ray R.; Kong, Lingxue

    2017-03-01

    Nano-porous metallic matrixes (NMMs) offer superior surface to volume ratios as well as enhanced optical, photonic, and electronic properties to bulk metallic materials. Such behaviours are correlated to the nano-scale inter-grain metal domains that favour the presence of electronic vacancies. In this work, continuous 3D NMMs were synthesized for the first time through a simple diffusion-reduction process whereby the aerogel matrix was functionalized with (3-Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane. The surface energy of the silica monolith templates was tuned to improve the homogeneity of the reduction process while thiol functionalization facilitated the formation of a high density of seeding points for metal ions to reduce. The diameter of NMMs was between 2 and 1000 nm, corresponding to a silver loading between 1.23 and 41.16 at.%. A rates of catalytic degradation kinetics of these NMMS which is three orders of magnitude higher than those of the non-functionalized silver-silica structures. Furthermore, the enhancement in mechanical stability at nanoscale which was evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy force measurements, electronic density and chemical inertness was assessed and critically correlated to their catalytic potential. This strategy opens up new avenues for design of complex architectures of either single or multi-metal alloy NMMs with enhanced surface properties for various applications.

  7. Silver metal nano-matrixes as high efficiency and versatile catalytic reactors for environmental remediation

    PubMed Central

    Dumée, Ludovic F.; Yi, Zhifeng; Tardy, Blaise; Merenda, Andrea; des Ligneris, Elise; Dagastine, Ray R.; Kong, Lingxue

    2017-01-01

    Nano-porous metallic matrixes (NMMs) offer superior surface to volume ratios as well as enhanced optical, photonic, and electronic properties to bulk metallic materials. Such behaviours are correlated to the nano-scale inter-grain metal domains that favour the presence of electronic vacancies. In this work, continuous 3D NMMs were synthesized for the first time through a simple diffusion-reduction process whereby the aerogel matrix was functionalized with (3-Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane. The surface energy of the silica monolith templates was tuned to improve the homogeneity of the reduction process while thiol functionalization facilitated the formation of a high density of seeding points for metal ions to reduce. The diameter of NMMs was between 2 and 1000 nm, corresponding to a silver loading between 1.23 and 41.16 at.%. A rates of catalytic degradation kinetics of these NMMS which is three orders of magnitude higher than those of the non-functionalized silver-silica structures. Furthermore, the enhancement in mechanical stability at nanoscale which was evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy force measurements, electronic density and chemical inertness was assessed and critically correlated to their catalytic potential. This strategy opens up new avenues for design of complex architectures of either single or multi-metal alloy NMMs with enhanced surface properties for various applications. PMID:28332602

  8. Random Matrix Theory and Econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenow, Bernd

    2000-03-01

    Random Matrix Theory (RMT) [1] is used in many branches of physics as a ``zero information hypothesis''. It describes generic behavior of different classes of systems, while deviations from its universal predictions allow to identify system specific properties. We use methods of RMT to analyze the cross-correlation matrix C of stock price changes [2] of the largest 1000 US companies. In addition to its scientific interest, the study of correlations between the returns of different stocks is also of practical relevance in quantifying the risk of a given stock portfolio. We find [3,4] that the statistics of most of the eigenvalues of the spectrum of C agree with the predictions of RMT, while there are deviations for some of the largest eigenvalues. We interpret these deviations as a system specific property, e.g. containing genuine information about correlations in the stock market. We demonstrate that C shares universal properties with the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. Furthermore, we analyze the eigenvectors of C through their inverse participation ratio and find eigenvectors with large ratios at both edges of the eigenvalue spectrum - a situation reminiscent of localization theory results. This work was done in collaboration with V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, T. Guhr, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E Stanley and is related to recent work of Laloux et al.. 1. T. Guhr, A. Müller Groeling, and H.A. Weidenmüller, ``Random Matrix Theories in Quantum Physics: Common Concepts'', Phys. Rep. 299, 190 (1998). 2. See, e.g. R.N. Mantegna and H.E. Stanley, Econophysics: Correlations and Complexity in Finance (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, 1999). 3. V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, B. Rosenow, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E. Stanley, ``Universal and Nonuniversal Properties of Cross Correlations in Financial Time Series'', Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1471 (1999). 4. V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, T. Guhr, B. Rosenow, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E. Stanley, ``Random Matrix Theory

  9. Matrix management for aerospace 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The martix management approach to program management is an organized effort for attaining program objectives by defining and structuring all elements so as to form a single system whose parts are united by interaction. The objective of the systems approach is uncompromisingly complete coverage of the program management endeavor. Starting with an analysis of the functions necessary to carry out a given program, a model must be defined; a matrix of responsibility assignment must be prepared; and each operational process must be examined to establish how it is to be carried out and how it relates to all other processes.

  10. Regenerator matrix physical property data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Among several cellular ceramic structures manufactured by various suppliers for regenerator application in a gas turbine engine, three have the best potential for achieving durability and performance objectives for use in gas turbines, Stirling engines, and waste heat recovery systems: (1) an aluminum-silicate sinusoidal flow passage made from a corrugated wate paper process; (2) an extruded isosceles triangle flow passage; and (3) a second generation matrix incorporating a square flow passage formed by an embossing process. Key physical and thermal property data for these configurations presented include: heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics, compressive strength, tensile strength and elasticity, thermal expansion characteristics, chanical attack, and thermal stability.

  11. Matrix management in hospitals: testing theories of matrix structure and development.

    PubMed

    Burns, L R

    1989-09-01

    A study of 315 hospitals with matrix management programs was used to test several hypotheses concerning matrix management advanced by earlier theorists. The study verifies that matrix management involves several distinctive elements that can be scaled to form increasingly complex types of lateral coordinative devices. The scalability of these elements is evident only cross-sectionally. The results show that matrix complexity is not an outcome of program age, nor does matrix complexity at the time of implementation appear to influence program survival. Matrix complexity, finally, is not determined by the organization's task diversity and uncertainty. The results suggest several modifications in prevailing theories of matrix organization.

  12. Influence of Ni-P Coated SiC and Laser Scan Speed on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of IN625 Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sateesh, N. H.; Kumar, G. C. Mohan; Krishna, Prasad

    2015-12-01

    Nickel based Inconel-625 (IN625) metal matrix composites (MMCs) were prepared using pre-heated nickel phosphide (Ni-P) coated silicon carbide (SiC) reinforcement particles by Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing process under inert nitrogen atmosphere to obtain interface influences on MMCs. The distribution of SiC particles and microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron micrographs, and the mechanical behaviours were thoroughly examined. The results clearly reveal that the interface integrity between the SiC particles and the IN625 matrix, the mixed powders flowability, the SiC ceramic particles and laser beam interaction, and the hardness, and tensile characteristics of the DMLS processed MMCs were improved effectively by the use of Ni-P coated SiC particles.

  13. Extracellular Matrix and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Varela-Rey, Marta; Pérez de Obanos, María Pilar; Leung, Tung Ming; Lopategi, Aritz; Benedicto, Aitor; Abraham-Enachescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic microenvironment that undergoes continuous remodeling, particularly during injury and wound healing. Chronic liver injury of many different etiologies such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, drug-induced liver injury, obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM proteins in response to persistent liver damage. Critical Issues: This review describes the main collagenous and noncollagenous components from the ECM that play a significant role in pathological matrix deposition during liver disease. We define how increased myofibroblasts (MF) from different origins are at the forefront of liver fibrosis and how liver cell-specific regulation of the complex scarring process occurs. Recent Advances: Particular attention is paid to the role of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and newly identified matricellular proteins in the regulation of fibrillar type I collagen, a field to which our laboratory has significantly contributed over the years. We compile data from recent literature on the potential mechanisms driving fibrosis resolution such as MF’ apoptosis, senescence, and reversal to quiescence. Future Directions: We conclude with a brief description of how epigenetics, an evolving field, can regulate the behavior of MF and of how new “omics” tools may advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which the fibrogenic response to liver injury occurs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1078–1097. PMID:24219114

  14. Characterization of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Chun, H. J.; Karalekas, D.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental methods were developed, adapted, and applied to the characterization of a metal matrix composite system, namely, silicon carbide/aluminim (SCS-2/6061 Al), and its constituents. The silicon carbide fiber was characterized by determining its modulus, strength, and coefficient of thermal expansion. The aluminum matrix was characterized thermomechanically up to 399 C (750 F) at two strain rates. The unidirectional SiC/Al composite was characterized mechanically under longitudinal, transverse, and in-plane shear loading up to 399 C (750 F). Isothermal and non-isothermal creep behavior was also measured. The applicability of a proposed set of multifactor thermoviscoplastic nonlinear constitutive relations and a computer code was investigated. Agreement between predictions and experimental results was shown in a few cases. The elastoplastic thermomechanical behavior of the composite was also described by a number of new analytical models developed or adapted for the material system studied. These models include the rule of mixtures, composite cylinder model with various thermoelastoplastic analyses and a model based on average field theory. In most cases satisfactory agreement was demonstrated between analytical predictions and experimental results for the cases of stress-strain behavior and thermal deformation behavior at different temperatures. In addition, some models yielded detailed three-dimensional stress distributions in the constituents within the composite.

  15. Uniform-burning matrix burner

    DOEpatents

    Bohn, Mark S.; Anselmo, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

  16. Enhanced Ga2O3-photocatalyzed and photochemical degradation of the Fipronil insecticide by UVC irradiation in mixed aqueous/organic media under an inert atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Hisao; Tsukamoto, Tohru; Mitsutsuka, Yoshihiro; Oyama, Toshiyuki; Serpone, Nick

    2015-05-01

    Agrochemicals such as the insecticide Fipronil that bear fluoro groups are generally fat-soluble and nearly insoluble in water, so that their photodegradation in a heterogeneous aqueous gallium oxide dispersion presents some challenges. This article examined the photodegradation of this insecticide by solubilizing it through the addition of organic solvents (EtOH, MeOH, THF, 1,4-dioxane and ethylene glycol) to an aqueous medium and then subjecting the insecticide to 254 nm UVC radiation under photocatalytically inert (Ga2O3/N2) and air-equilibrated (Ga2O3/O2) conditions, as well as photochemically in the absence of Ga2O3 but also under inert and air-equilibrated conditions. Defluorination, dechlorination, desulfonation and denitridation of Fipronil were examined in mixed aqueous/organic media (10, 25 and 50 vol% in organic solvent). After 3 h of UVC irradiation (50 vol% mixed media) defluorination with Ga2O3/N2 was ∼65% greater than in aqueous media, and ca. 80% greater than the direct photolysis of Fipronil under inert (N2) conditions; under air-equilibrated conditions both Ga2O3-photocatalyzed and photochemical defluorination were significantly lower than in aqueous media. Dechlorination of Fipronil was ∼160% (Ga2O3/N2) and 140% (photochemically, N2) greater than in aqueous media; under air-equilibrated conditions, both photocatalyzed and photochemical formation of Cl(-) ions in mixed media fell rather short relative to aqueous media. The photocatalyzed (Ga2O3/N2) and photochemical (N2) conversion of the sulfur group in Fipronil to SO4(2(-)) ions was ca. 20% and 30% greater, respectively, in mixed media, while under air-equilibrated conditions photocatalyzed desulfonation was nearly twofold less than in the aqueous phase; direct photolysis showed little variations in mixed media. Denitridation of the nitrogens in Fipronil occurred mostly through the formation of ammonia (as NH4(+)) under all conditions with negligible quantities of NO3(-); again mixed media

  17. Dipole, quadrupole, and octupole terms in the long-range hyperfine frequency shift for hydrogen in the presence of inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, W. G.; Tang, K. T.

    1987-03-01

    The R-6, R-8, and R-10 terms in the long-range expansion for the hyperfine frequency shift are calculated for hydrogen in the presence of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The R-6 terms are based on the dipole oscillator strength sums. For helium, the R-8 and R-10 terms are based on quadrupole and octupole oscillator strength sums. For the heavier inert gases, the results for the R-8 and R-10 terms are obtained from the sum rules and the static polarizabilities. Upper bounds are also determined for the R-8 and R-10 terms.

  18. The nuclear matrix prepared by amine modification

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Katherine M.; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.; Krockmalnic, Gabriela; Penman, Sheldon

    1999-01-01

    The nucleus is spatially ordered by attachments to a nonchromatin nuclear structure, the nuclear matrix. The nuclear matrix and chromatin are intimately connected and integrated structures, and so a major technical challenge in nuclear matrix research has been to remove chromatin while retaining a native nuclear matrix. Most methods for removing chromatin require first a nuclease digestion and then a salt extraction to remove cut chromatin. We have hypothesized that cut chromatin is held in place by charge interactions involving nucleosomal amino groups. We have tested this hypothesis by chemically modifying amino groups after nuclease digestion. By using this protocol, chromatin could be effectively removed at physiological ionic strength. We compared the ultrastructure and composition of this nuclear matrix preparation with the traditional high-salt nuclear matrix and with the third nuclear matrix preparation that we have developed from which chromatin is removed after extensive crosslinking. All three matrix preparations reveal internal nuclear matrix structures that are built on a network of branched filaments of about 10 nm diameter. That such different chromatin-removal protocols reveal similar principles of nuclear matrix construction increases our confidence that we are observing important architectural elements of the native structure in the living cell. PMID:9927671

  19. Bayes linear covariance matrix adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Darren J.

    1995-12-01

    In this thesis, a Bayes linear methodology for the adjustment of covariance matrices is presented and discussed. A geometric framework for quantifying uncertainties about covariance matrices is set up, and an inner-product for spaces of random matrices is motivated and constructed. The inner-product on this space captures aspects of our beliefs about the relationship between covariance matrices of interest to us, providing a structure rich enough for us to adjust beliefs about unknown matrices in the light of data such as sample covariance matrices, exploiting second-order exchangeability and related specifications to obtain representations allowing analysis. Adjustment is associated with orthogonal projection, and illustrated with examples of adjustments for some common problems. The problem of adjusting the covariance matrices underlying exchangeable random vectors is tackled and discussed. Learning about the covariance matrices associated with multivariate time series dynamic linear models is shown to be amenable to a similar approach. Diagnostics for matrix adjustments are also discussed.

  20. Continuous analogues of matrix factorizations

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Alex; Trefethen, Lloyd N.

    2015-01-01

    Analogues of singular value decomposition (SVD), QR, LU and Cholesky factorizations are presented for problems in which the usual discrete matrix is replaced by a ‘quasimatrix’, continuous in one dimension, or a ‘cmatrix’, continuous in both dimensions. Two challenges arise: the generalization of the notions of triangular structure and row and column pivoting to continuous variables (required in all cases except the SVD, and far from obvious), and the convergence of the infinite series that define the cmatrix factorizations. Our generalizations of triangularity and pivoting are based on a new notion of a ‘triangular quasimatrix’. Concerning convergence of the series, we prove theorems asserting convergence provided the functions involved are sufficiently smooth. PMID:25568618