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Sample records for zirconium alloy corrosion

  1. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  2. Electrochemical Study of Corrosion Phenomena in Zirconium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    required reaction rates [1.1]. Based predominantly on this fact, zirconium alloys were chosen to sheath, or clad, the fuel. With the increasing demand...cathode or anode. As the oxidation and reduction reactions occur, a galvanic cell is developed. The electrons on the anode are released from the metallic...matrix as the ions are released into the aqueous solution in the initial half-cell reaction . The second half-cell reaction , taking place on the

  3. The role of hydrogen in zirconium alloy corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensor, B.; Lucente, A. M.; Frederick, M. J.; Sutliff, J.; Motta, A. T.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrogen enters zirconium metal as a result of the corrosion process and forms hydrides when present in quantities above the solubility limit at a given temperature. Zircaloy-4 coupons of different thicknesses (0.4 mm-2.3 mm) but identical chemistry and processing were corroded in autoclave at 360 °C for various times up to 2800 days. Coupons were periodically removed and weighed to determine weight gain, which allows follow of the corrosion kinetics. Coupon thickness differences resulted in different volumetric concentrations of hydrogen, as quantified using hot vacuum extraction. The thinnest coupons, having the highest concentration of hydrogen, demonstrated acceleration in their corrosion kinetics and shorter transition times when compared to thicker coupons. Furthermore, it was seen that the post-transition corrosion rate was increased with increasing hydrogen concentration. Corrosion rates increased only after the terminal solid solubility (TSS) was exceeded for hydrogen in Zircaloy-4 at 360 °C. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the corrosion acceleration is caused by the formation of hydrides. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examinations of fractured oxide layers demonstrate the oxide morphology changed with hydrogen content, with more equiaxed oxide grains in the high hydrogen samples than in those with lower hydrogen content. Additionally, locations of advanced oxide growth were correlated with locations of hydrides in the metal. A hypothesis is proposed to explain the accelerated corrosion due to the presence of the hydrides, namely that the metal, locally, is less able to accommodate oxide growth stresses and this leads to earlier loss of oxide protectiveness in the form of more frequent oxide kinetic transitions.

  4. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  5. Zirconium alloys with small amounts of iron and copper or nickel show improved corrosion resistance in superheated steam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Youngdahl, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Heat treating various compositions of zirconium alloys improve their corrosion resistance to superheated steam at temperatures higher than 500 degrees C. This increases their potential as fuel cladding for superheated-steam nuclear-fueled reactors as well as in autoclaves operating at modest pressures.

  6. Influence of oxide microstructure on corrosion behavior of zirconium-based model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Marcelo Jose Gomes Da

    The extensive utilization of zirconium-based alloys in fuel cladding and other reactor internal components in the nuclear power industry has led to the continuous improvement of these alloys. At the present moment, demands for better performing nuclear fuel cladding materials are increasing. Also, new reactor designs have been proposed that would require the materials to withstand even more rigorous conditions. One of the factors that limit s fuel cladding utilization in nuclear reactors is uniform corrosion and the consequent hydriding of the fuel. In an attempt to develop mechanistic understanding of the role of alloying elements in the growth of a stable protective oxide, a series of model zirconium-based alloys was prepared (Zr-xFe-yCr, Zr-xCu-yMo, Zr-xNb-ySn, for various x and y, pure Zr and Zircaloy-4) and examined with advanced characterization techniques. The alloys were corrosion tested in autoclaves under three different conditions: 360°C water, 500°C steam and 500°C supercritical water in excess of 400 days. These autoclave testing conditions simulate nuclear reactor environment for both current designs (360°C water) and the new supercritical water reactor (500°C steam and 500°C supercritical water) proposed by the generation-IV initiative. The oxide films formed were systematically examined at the Advanced Photon Source using microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence of cross-sectional samples to determine the oxide phases present and their crystallographic texture as a function of distance from the metal/oxide interface. Also, the overall texture of the oxide layers was investigated using synchrotron radiation diffraction in frontal geometry. The corrosion kinetics is a function of the alloy system and showed a wide range of behaviors, from immediately unstable oxide growth to stable behavior. The corrosion weight gains from testing at high temperature are a factor of five higher than those measured at 360°C but the

  7. In situ Raman spectroscopic investigation of zirconium-niobium alloy corrosion under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslar, J. E.; Hurst, W. S.; Bowers, W. J.; Hendricks, J. H.

    2001-10-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was employed to investigate corrosion of a zirconium-niobium alloy in air-saturated water at a pressure of 15.5 MPa and temperatures ranging from 22 to 407 °C in an optically accessible flow cell. Monoclinic ZrO 2 (m-ZrO 2) was identified under all conditions after the coupon was heated to 255 °C for 19 h. Cubic ZrO 2 (c-ZrO 2) was tentatively identified in situ during heating at temperatures between 306 and 407 °C, but was not observed under any other conditions. Species tentatively identified as α-CrOOH and a Cr VI and/or Cr III/Cr VI compound were observed in situ during heating at temperatures between 255 and 407 °C, but were not observed under any other conditions. The chromium compounds were identified as corrosion products released from the optical cell and/or flow system.

  8. Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, R. E.; Sherman, A. H.

    1981-08-18

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer. 1 fig.

  9. Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.; Sherman, Anna H.

    1981-01-01

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer.

  10. Study of corrosion-related defects of zirconium alloys with slow positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhejie; Yao, Meiyi; Shi, Jianjian; Yao, Chunlong; Lu, Eryang; Cao, Xingzhong; Wang, Baoyi; Wu, Yichu

    2018-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of Zr-4 and N5 alloy specimens corroded in 0.01 mol/L LiOH aqueous solution at 360 °C/18.6 MPa and in super heated steam at 400 °C/10.3 MPa for 1, 3 and 14 days were investigated by slow positron beam based Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Results showed that there was an evident interfacial layer with pre-existed vacancies and voids in uncorroded Zr-4 specimens, while in uncorroded N5 specimen, the interfacial defect layer can not be identified or a thin interfacial layer was only contained. When the specimens were corroded in super heated steam at 400 °C/10.3 MPa for a few days, the existence of the interface layer in the Zr-4 specimen would delay the diffusion rate of the oxygen atoms and decelerated the oxidation rate of the corrosion process. However, at very early stage of the corrosion, as Zr-4 and N5 specimens were corrded in 0.01 mol/L LiOH aqueous solution at 360 °C/18.6 MPa, the effect of Li+ accelerated the diffusion rate of the oxygen atoms, while the effect of the interface defect layer became a minor effect.

  11. Mössbauer study of oxide films of Fe-, Sn-, Cr- doped zirconium alloys during corrosion in autoclave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, V. P.; Bateev, A. B.; Lauer, Yu. A.

    2016-12-01

    Mössbauer investigations were used to compare iron atom states in oxide films of binary Zr-Fe, ternary Zr-Fe-Cu and quaternary Zr-Fe-Cr-Sn alloys. Oxide films are received in an autoclave at a temperature of 350-360 °C and at pressure of 16.8 MPa. The corrosion process decomposes the intermetallic precipitates in alloys and forms metallic iron with inclusions of chromium atoms α-Fe(Cr), α-Fe(Cu), α-Fe 2O3 and Fe 3O4 compounds. Some iron ions are formed in divalent and in trivalent paramagnetic states. The additional doping influences on corrosion kinetics and concentration of iron compounds and phases formed in oxide films. It was shown the correlation between concentration of iron in different chemical states and corrosion resistance of alloys.

  12. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  13. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  14. Evaluation of dip and spray coating techniques in corrosion inhibition of AA2024 alloy using a silicon/zirconium sol-gel film as coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, R. B. R.; Silva, F. S.; Kawachi, E. Y.

    2017-02-01

    For corrosion protection of aluminum alloy AA2024 -T3 a silicon/zirconium films were obtained via sol-gel process, prepared from tetraethoxysilane and zirconium acetate, in acid medium with a 5 wt% of nonionic surfactant in order to replace the pre-treatment based on chromium conversion coatings. A homogeneous film was obtained and deposited, at low viscosity condition of the sol (˜10cP), by dip and spray coating techniques. The films morphology was evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and to know more about the used deposition methodology, the deposited mass and the film thickness were measured. The corrosion protection efficiency of deposited films was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization. The film deposition by both dip and spray coatings were effective for the deposition of a homogeneous film layer, and the results showed the thickness is directly related with the deposited mass, and the film deposited by spray technique presented the lower value. Potentiodynamic polarization indicated that the film deposited by spray coating apparently has a better inert ceramic film due the polarization resistance increased around 57% against 27 and 14% of dip coating samples (4 and 1 layer, respectively).

  15. Nanophase Nickel-Zirconium Alloys for Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, jay; Valdez, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Nanophase nickel-zirconium alloys have been investigated for use as electrically conductive coatings and catalyst supports in fuel cells. Heretofore, noble metals have been used because they resist corrosion in the harsh, acidic fuel cell interior environments. However, the high cost of noble metals has prompted a search for less-costly substitutes. Nickel-zirconium alloys belong to a class of base metal alloys formed from transition elements of widely different d-electron configurations. These alloys generally exhibit unique physical, chemical, and metallurgical properties that can include corrosion resistance. Inasmuch as corrosion is accelerated by free-energy differences between bulk material and grain boundaries, it was conjectured that amorphous (glassy) and nanophase forms of these alloys could offer the desired corrosion resistance. For experiments to test the conjecture, thin alloy films containing various proportions of nickel and zirconium were deposited by magnetron and radiofrequency co-sputtering of nickel and zirconium. The results of x-ray diffraction studies of the deposited films suggested that the films had a nanophase and nearly amorphous character.

  16. Hydrogen pickup mechanism of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couet, Adrien

    Although the optimization of zirconium based alloys has led to significant improvements in hydrogen pickup and corrosion resistance, the mechanisms by which such alloy improvements occur are still not well understood. In an effort to understand such mechanisms, a systematic study of the alloy effect on hydrogen pickup is conducted, using advanced characterization techniques to rationalize precise measurements of hydrogen pickup. The hydrogen pick-up fraction is accurately measured for a specially designed set of commercial and model alloys to investigate the effects of alloying elements, microstructure and corrosion kinetics on hydrogen uptake. Two different techniques to measure hydrogen concentrations were used: a destructive technique, Vacuum Hot Extraction, and a non-destructive one, Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis. The results indicate that hydrogen pickup varies not only from alloy to alloy but also during the corrosion process for a given alloy. For instance Zircaloy type alloys show high hydrogen pickup fraction and sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics whereas ZrNb alloys show lower hydrogen pickup fraction and close to parabolic oxidation kinetics. Hypothesis is made that hydrogen pickup result from the need to balance charge during the corrosion reaction, such that the pickup of hydrogen is directly related to (and indivisible of) the corrosion mechanism and decreases when the rate of electron transport or oxide electronic conductivity sigmao xe through the protective oxide increases. According to this hypothesis, alloying elements (either in solid solution or in precipitates) embedded in the oxide as well as space charge variations in the oxide would impact the hydrogen pick-up fraction by modifying sigmaox e, which drives oxidation and hydriding kinetics. Dedicated experiments and modelling were performed to assess and validate these hypotheses. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) experiments were performed on Zircaloy-4 tubes

  17. Development of Self-Healing Zirconium-Silicide Coatings for Improved Performance Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Cladding

    SciT

    Sridharan, Kumar; Mariani, Robert; Bai, Xianming

    Zirconium-alloy fuel claddings have been used successfully in Light Water Reactors (LWR) for over four decades. However, under high temperature accident conditions, zirconium-alloys fuel claddings exhibit profuse exothermic oxidation accompanied by release of hydrogen gas due to the reaction with water/steam. Additionally, the ZrO 2 layer can undergo monoclinic to tetragonal to cubic phase transformations at high temperatures which can induce stresses and cracking. These events were unfortunately borne out in the Fukushima-Daiichi accident in in Japan in 2011. In reaction to such accident, protective oxidation-resistant coatings for zirconium-alloy fuel claddings has been extensively investigated to enhance safety margins inmore » accidents as well as fuel performance under normal operation conditions. Such surface modification could also beneficially affect fuel rod heat transfer characteristics. Zirconium-silicide, a candidate coating material, is particularly attractive because zirconium-silicide coating is expected to bond strongly to zirconium-alloy substrate. Intermetallic compound phases of zirconium-silicide have high melting points and oxidation of zirconium silicide produces highly corrosion resistant glassy zircon (ZrSiO 4) and silica (SiO 2) which possessing self-healing qualities. Given the long-term goal of developing such coatings for use with nuclear reactor fuel cladding, this work describes results of oxidation and corrosion behavior of bulk zirconium-silicide and fabrication of zirconium-silicide coatings on zirconium-alloy test flats, tube configurations, and SiC test flats. In addition, boiling heat transfer of these modified surfaces (including ZrSi 2 coating) during clad quenching experiments is discussed in detail.« less

  18. Using ToF-SIMS and EIS to evaluate green pretreatment reagent: Corrosion protection of aluminum alloy by silica/zirconium/cerium hybrid coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Chao; Wang, Chiung-Chi; Wu, Chia-Wei; Liu, Shou-Ching; Mai, Fu-Der

    2008-12-01

    Increasing environmental concern has led to the restrictive use of chromate conversion coatings to protect Al-alloys from corrosion. Our research is under way to find environmentally compliant substitute coating such as Si/Zr/Ce hybrid coating. The corrosion protection effect of green pretreatment reagent consisted of Si-containing base solution, Ce- and Zr-containing sealing solutions on the corrosion protection of Al-alloys was studied with a 3.5% NaCl aqueous testing solution. The correlation between the corrosion resistance measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and surface chemical composition of the hybrid coating measured by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) was studied. The proposed green pretreatment reagent was found improve the corrosion protection of Al-alloys, presumably due to the formation of protective oxide film acting as an oxygen barrier.

  19. METHOD AND ALLOY FOR BONDING TO ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, F.D.; Misch, R.D.

    1960-04-19

    A brazing alloy can be used for bonding zirconium and its alloys to other metals, ceramics, and cermets, and consists of 6 to 9 wt.% Ni, 6 to 9 wn~.% Cr, Mo, or W, 0 to 7.5 wt.% Fe, and the balance Zr.

  20. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  1. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Li, H F; Zhou, F Y; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are <1%, much lower than 5%, the safe value for biomaterials according to ISO 10993-4 standard. Compared with conventional biomedical 316L stainless steel, Co-Cr alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)-1.29 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1) for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, ~3.5 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1), CP Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb, ~3.0 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)), and one-sixth that of Co-Cr alloys (Co-Cr-Mo, ~7.7 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)). Among the Zr-Ru alloy series, Zr-1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr-Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments.

  2. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Li, H.F.; Zhou, F.Y.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y.F.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are <1%, much lower than 5%, the safe value for biomaterials according to ISO 10993-4 standard. Compared with conventional biomedical 316L stainless steel, Co–Cr alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10−6 cm3·g−1–1.29 × 10−6 cm3·g−1 for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti–6Al–4V, ~3.5 × 10−6 cm3·g−1, CP Ti and Ti–6Al–7Nb, ~3.0 × 10−6 cm3·g−1), and one-sixth that of Co–Cr alloys (Co–Cr–Mo, ~7.7 × 10−6 cm3·g−1). Among the Zr–Ru alloy series, Zr–1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr–Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. PMID:27090955

  3. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  4. THE ANALYSIS OF URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    SciT

    Milner, G.W.C.; Skewies, A.F.

    1953-03-01

    A satisfactory procedure is described for the analysis of uranium-zirconium alloys containing up to 25% zirconium. It is based on the separation of the zirconium from the uranium by dissolving the cupferron complex of the former element into chloroform. After the evaporation of the solvent from the combined organic extracts, the residue is ignited to zirconium oxide. The latter is then re-dissolved and zirconium is separated from other elements co-extracted in the solvent extraction procedure by precipitation with mandelic acid. The zirconium mandelate is finally ignited to oxide at 960 deg C. The uranium is separated from the aqueous solutionmore » remaining from the cupferron extraction by precipitating with tannin at a pH of 8; the precipitate being removed by filtration and then ignited a t 800 deg C. The residue is dissolved in nitric acid and the uranium is finally determined by precipitating as ammonium diuranate and then igniting to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. (auth)« less

  5. TERNARY ALLOYS OF URANIUM, COLUMBIUM, AND ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Foote, F.G.

    1960-08-01

    Ternary alloys of uranium are described which are useful as neutron- reflecting materials in a fast neutron reactor. They are especially resistant to corrosion caused by oxidative processes of gascous or aqueous origin and comprise uranium as the predominant metal with zirconiunn and niobium wherein the total content of the minor alloying elements is between 2 and 8% by weight.

  6. Manufacturing process to reduce large grain growth in zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Rosecrans, P.M.

    1984-08-01

    It is an object of the present invention to provide a procedure for desensitizing zirconium-based alloys to large grain growth (LGG) during thermal treatment above the recrystallization temperature of the alloy. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a method for treating zirconium-based alloys which have been cold-worked in the range of 2 to 8% strain to reduce large grain growth. It is another object of the present invention to provide a method for fabricating a zirconium alloy clad nuclear fuel element wherein the zirconium clad is resistant to large grain growth.

  7. NEUTRON REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT UTILIZING ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.; Szumachowski, E.R.

    1957-11-12

    This patent relates to clad fuel elements for use in neutronic reactors and is drawn to such a fuel element which consists of a core of fissionable material, comprised of an alloy of zirconium and U/sup 235/ enriched uranium, encased in a jacket of a binary zirconium-tin alloy in which the tin content ranges between 1 and 15% by weight.

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF ANODIC AND CORROSION FILMS ON ZIRCONIUM

    SciT

    Misch, R.D.

    1960-05-01

    Zirconium anodizes similarly to tungsten in respect to the change of interference colors with applied voltage. However, the oxide layer on tungsten cannot reach as great a thickness. Hafnium does not anodize in the same way as zirconium but is similar to tantalum. By measuring the interference color and capacitative thicknesses on zirconium (Grades I and III) and a 2.5 wt.% tin ailoy, the film was found to grow less rapidly in terms of capacitance than in terms of iaterference colors. This was interpreted to mean that cracks develop in the oxide as it thickens. The effect was most pronouncedmore » on Grade III zirconium and least pronounced on the tin alloy. The reduction in capacitative thickness was especially noticeable when white oxide appeared. Comparative measurements on Grade I zirconium and 2.5 wt.% tin alloy indicated that the thickness of the oxide film on the tin alloy (after 16 hours in water) increased more rapidly with temperature than the film on zirconium. Tin is believed to act in ways to counteract the tendency of the oxide to form cracks, and to produce vacancies which promote ionic diffusion. (auth)« less

  9. METHOD OF IMPROVING CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Shannon, D.W.

    1961-03-28

    An improved intermediate rinse for zirconium counteracts an anomalous deposit that often results in crevices and outof-the-way places when ordinary water is used to rinse away a strong fluoride etching solution designed to promote passivation of the metal. The intermediate rinse, which is used after the etching solution and before the water, is characterized by a complexing agent for fluoride ions such as aluminum or zirconium nitrates or chlorides.

  10. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Schöllchen, Maximilian; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants. Methods: Zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line–distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. Results: While titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium–zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. Conclusions: MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting. PMID:27910719

  11. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Schöllchen, Maximilian; Gauer, Tobias; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants. Zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line-distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. While titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium-zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting.

  12. Preparation and Corrosion Resistance of Trivalent Chromium-Zirconium Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Z.

    2018-05-01

    Aluminum alloys are widely used in the various industries because of its superior advantages. However there will be a thin oxide layer on the surface of the pure aluminum to inhibit corrosion, when adding some other elements, the obtained aluminum alloy is easy to be corroded. Surface protection is an important means to improve the corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys. The formal research had already confirmed that the trivalent chromium conversion coating can significantly improve the corrosion resistance, and the usage of the zirconium solution can also protect the aluminum alloy from corrosion. In this study, we constructed the binary conversion coating with the Cr2(SO4)3 and the K2ZrF6. The optimum reaction conditions are as follows: 10g/L H3PO4, 2g/L K2ZrF6, 28g/L Cr2(SO4)3, pH=2.5∼3.5, temperature 40°C, and reaction time 10 min. Copper sulfate titration experiment confirmed that the corrosion resistance was significantly improved.

  13. Manufacturing process to reduce large grain growth in zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Rosecrans, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    A method of treating cold-worked zirconium alloys to reduce large grain gth during thermal treatment at temperatures above the recrystallization temperature of the alloy comprising heating the cold-worked alloy between about 1300.degree.-1350.degree. F. for 1 to 3 hours prior to treatment above its recrystallization temperature.

  14. Phase composition and corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, G. I.

    2008-03-01

    The effects of phase composition of castable experimental and commercial alloys based on the Mg-Al, Mg-Al-Mn, Mg-Al-Zn-Mn, and Mg-Zn-Zr systems and of the form of existence of iron and hydrogen admixtures on the rate of corrosion of the alloys in 3% solution of NaCl are studied. The roles of heat treatment in the processes of hydrogen charging and phase formation in alloy ML5pch and of hydrogen in the process of formation of zirconium hydrides and zinc zirconides in alloys of the Mg-Zn-Zr system and their effect on the corrosion and mechanical properties of alloy ML12 are discussed.

  15. Surface modification techniques for increased corrosion tolerance of zirconium fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, James Patrick, IV

    Corrosion is a major issue in applications involving materials in normal and severe environments, especially when it involves corrosive fluids, high temperatures, and radiation. Left unaddressed, corrosion can lead to catastrophic failures, resulting in economic and environmental liabilities. In nuclear applications, where metals and alloys, such as steel and zirconium, are extensively employed inside and outside of the nuclear reactor, corrosion accelerated by high temperatures, neutron radiation, and corrosive atmospheres, corrosion becomes even more concerning. The objectives of this research are to study and develop surface modification techniques to protect zirconium cladding by the incorporation of a specific barrier coating, and to understand the issues related to the compatibility of the coatings examined in this work. The final goal of this study is to recommend a coating and process that can be scaled-up for the consideration of manufacturing and economic limits. This dissertation study builds on previous accident tolerant fuel cladding research, but is unique in that advanced corrosion methods are tested and considerations for implementation by industry are practiced and discussed. This work will introduce unique studies involving the materials and methods for accident tolerant fuel cladding research by developing, demonstrating, and considering materials and processes for modifying the surface of zircaloy fuel cladding. This innovative research suggests that improvements in the technique to modify the surface of zirconium fuel cladding are likely. Three elements selected for the investigation of their compatibility on zircaloy fuel cladding are aluminum, silicon, and chromium. These materials are also currently being investigated at other labs as alternate alloys and coatings for accident tolerant fuel cladding. This dissertation also investigates the compatibility of these three elements as surface modifiers, by comparing their microstructural and

  16. Corrosion Studies on Titanium and Zirconium Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-12-01

    respectively 1.08 percent tantalum and 3.70 percent oolumbium. These alloys were in the cold rolled condition. The tantalum metal used was in the annealed ... vo2 iI 1’os th-, n 6 dr s Tal’ V17. C v"-" ’’ 4 Tesi,: s,.li tix , r - :.il s jer ce tr C..C. 73I 5 S1SO) + 5 ]r 0 s U.31 1.36 2, . O Ŗsf4 + 10 H 0...CDCD64 L O 1- V4. .06 14 ct-o to 400 toE La- LOr~ La 10 Go t O 0 d dojtc dtI- d. 0 . W0W44 .OC J 4 . 4d430 to0 0~e-0O ca 1.10t0 bQ 0a002t 0 OK 4140 to

  17. PROCESS FOR DISSOLVING BINARY URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM OR ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.; Barghusen, J.J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1962-08-14

    A process of dissolving uranium-- zirconium and zircaloy alloys, e.g. jackets of fuel elements, with an anhydrous hydrogen fluoride containing from 10 to 32% by weight of hydrogen chloride at between 400 and 450 deg C., preferably while in contact with a fluidized inert powder, such as calcium fluoride is described. (AEC)

  18. DISSOLUTION OF ZIRCONIUM AND ALLOYS THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, J.L.

    1961-07-11

    The dissolution of zirconium cladding in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate is described. The method finds particular utility in processing spent fuel elements for nuclear reactors. The zirconium cladding is first dissolved in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate; insoluble uranium and plutonium fiuorides formed by attack of the solvent on the fuel materiai of the fuel element are then separated from the solution, and the fuel materiai is dissolved in another solution.

  19. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples.

  20. Remanufacture of Zirconium-Based Conversion Coatings on the Surface of Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe; Jin, Guo; Song, Jiahui; Cui, Xiufang; Cai, Zhaobing

    2017-04-01

    Brush plating provides an effective method for creating a coating on substrates of various shapes. A corroded zirconium-based conversion coating was removed from the surface of a magnesium alloy and then replaced with new coatings prepared via brush plating. The structure and composition of the remanufactured coating were determined via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results revealed that the coatings consist of oxide, fluoride, and tannin-related organics. The composition of the coatings varied with the voltage. Furthermore, as revealed via potentiodynamic polarization spectroscopy, these coatings yielded a significant increase in the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy. The friction coefficient remained constant for almost 300s during wear resistance measurements performed under a 1-N load and dry sliding conditions, indicating that the remanufactured coatings provide effective inhibition to corrosion.

  1. Oxidation And Hot Corrosion Of ODS Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Report reviews oxidation and hot corrosion of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, intended for use at high temperatures. Classifies environmental resistances of such alloys by rates of growth of oxides, volatilities of oxides, spalling of oxides, and limitations imposed by hot corrosion. Also discusses environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. Concludes ODS NICrAl and FeCrAl alloys highly resistant to oxidation and corrosion and can be used uncoated.

  2. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  3. METHOD FOR ANNEALING AND ROLLING ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Picklesimer, M.L.

    1959-07-14

    A fabrication procedure is presented for alpha-stabilized zirconium-base alloys, and in particular Zircaloy-2. The alloy is initially worked at a temperature outside the alpha-plus-beta range (810 to 970 deg ), held at a temperature above 970 deg C for 30 minutes and cooled rapidly. The alloy is then cold-worked to reduce the size at least 20% and annealed at a temperature from 700 to 810 deg C. This procedure serves both to prevent the formation of stringers and to provide a randomly oriented crystal structure.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  5. Corrosion-electrochemical behavior of zirconium in molten alkali metal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion and electrochemical characteristics of zirconium during its interaction with molten lithium, sodium, and potassium carbonates containing from 1 to 5 wt % additives to the salt phase are studied in a temperature range of 500-800°C using gravimetry, corrosion potential measurement, and anodic polarization. The substances decreasing the corrosion losses due to the strengthening and thickening of an oxide film (lithium, sodium, potassium hydroxides) are used as passivators. Sodium chloride, fluoride, and sulfate serve as corrosion stimulators (activators).

  6. Finite element analysis of the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation during oxidation of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, P.; Frankel, P.; Gass, M.; Howells, R.; Preuss, M.

    2014-11-01

    Corrosion is a key limiting factor in the degradation of zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process offers a route towards improving safety and efficiency as demand increases for higher burn-up of fuel. Oxides formed on zirconium alloys are composed of both monoclinic and meta-stable tetragonal phases, and are subject to a number of potential mechanical degradation mechanisms. The work presented investigates the link between the tetragonal to monoclinic oxide phase transformation and degradation of the protective character of the oxide layer. To achieve this, Abaqus finite element analysis of the oxide phase transformation has been carried out. Study of the change in transformation strain energy shows how relaxation of oxidation induced stress and fast fracture at the metal-oxide interface could destabilise the tetragonal phase. Central to this is the identification of the transformation variant most likely to form, and understanding why twinning of the transformed grain is likely to occur. Development of transformation strain tensors and analysis of the strain components allows some separation of dilatation and shear effects. Maximum principal stress is used as an indication of fracture in the surrounding oxide layer. Study of the stress distributions shows the way oxide fracture is likely to occur and the differing effects of dilatation and shape change. Comparison with literature provides qualitative validation of the finite element simulations.

  7. Molten salt corrosion of heat resisting alloys

    SciT

    Wong-Moreno, A.; Salgado, R.I.M.; Martinez, L.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the corrosion behavior of eight high chromium alloys exposed to three different oil ash deposits with V/(Na+S) atomic ratios 0.58, 2.05 and 13.43, respectively. The alloys were exposed to ash deposits at 750 and 900 C; in this temperature range some deposit constituents have reached their melting point developing a molten salt corrosion process. The group of alloys tested included four Fe-Cr-Ni steels UNS specifications S304000, S31000, N08810 and N08330; two Fe-Cr alloys, UNS S44600 and alloy MA 956; and two Ni-base alloys, UNS N06333 and UNS N06601. The deposits and themore » exposed surfaces were characterized by chemical analysis, XRD, DTA, SEM and x-ray microanalysis. The oil-ash corrosion resistance of alloys is discussed in terms of the characteristics of corrosion product scales, which are determined by interaction between the alloy and the corrosive environment. All the alloys containing nickel exhibited sulfidation when were exposed at 750 C, but at 900 C only those without aluminum presented sulfidation or sulfidation and oxidation, while the alloys containing aluminum only exhibited internal oxidation. In spite of good resistance to corrosion by oil-ash deposits, 446-type alloy might not be suitable for temperatures higher than 750 C because of embrittlement caused by excessive sigma-phase precipitation. Alloy MA956 showed highest corrosion resistance at 900 C to oil-ash deposits with high vanadium content.« less

  8. Mechanical properties of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides predicted from density functional perturbation theory

    DOE PAGES

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Tikare, Veena; ...

    2015-10-13

    Here, the elastic properties and mechanical stability of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides have been investigated within the framework of density functional perturbation theory. Results show that the lowest-energy cubic Pn-3m with combining macron]m polymorph of δ-ZrH 1.5 does not satisfy all the Born requirements for mechanical stability, unlike its nearly degenerate tetragonal P4 2/ mcm polymorph. Elastic moduli predicted with the Voigt–Reuss–Hill approximations suggest that mechanical stability of α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates is limited by the shear modulus. According to both Pugh's and Poisson's ratios, α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates can be considered ductile. The Debyemore » temperatures predicted for γ-ZrH, δ-ZrH 1.5 and ε-ZrH 2 are θ D = 299.7, 415.6 and 356.9 K, respectively, while θ D = 273.6, 284.2, 264.1 and 257.1 K for the α-Zr, Zry-4, ZIRLO and M5 matrices, i.e. suggesting that Zry-4 possesses the highest micro-hardness among Zr matrices.« less

  9. Corrosion Behavior of Zirconium Treated Mild Steel with and Without Organic Coating: a Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Alireza; Attar, Mohammadreza Mohammadzade

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the anti-corrosion performance of phosphated and zirconium treated mild steel (ZTMS) with and without organic coating was evaluated using AC and DC electrochemical techniques. The topography and morphology of the zirconium treated samples were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) respectively. The results revealed that the anti-corrosion performance of the phosphate layer was superior to the zirconium conversion layer without an organic coating due to very low thickness and porous nature of the ZTMS. Additionally, the corrosion behavior of the organic coated substrates was substantially different. It was found that the corrosion protection performance of the phosphate steel and ZTMS with an organic coating is in the same order.

  10. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  11. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-11-30

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  12. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  13. Plasma electrolytic oxidation treatment mode influence on corrosion properties of coatings obtained on Zr-1Nb alloy in silicate-phosphate electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrakhov, R. G.; Mukaeva, V. R.; Fatkullin, A. R.; Gorbatkov, M. V.; Tarasov, P. V.; Lazarev, D. M.; Babu, N. Ramesh; Parfenov, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    This research is aimed at improvement of corrosion properties for Zr-1Nb alloy via plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO). The coatings obtained in DC, pulsed unipolar and pulsed bipolar modes were assessed using SEM, XRD, PDP and EIS techniques. It was shown that pulsed unipolar mode provides the PEO coatings having promising combination of the coating thickness, surface roughness, porosity, corrosion potential and current density, and charge transfer resistance, all contributing to corrosion protection of the zirconium alloy for advanced fuel cladding applications.

  14. Study of fluoride corrosion of nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, W. H.; Steindler, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report contains the results of an investigation of the corrosion resistance of nickel and nickel alloys exposed to fluorine, uranium hexafluoride, and volatile fission product fluorides at high temperatures. Survey of the unclassified literature on the subject is included.

  15. Zirconium behaviour during electrorefining of actinide-zirconium alloy in molten LiCl-KCl on aluminium cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Souček, P.; Malmbeck, R.; Krachler, M.; Rodrigues, A.; Claux, B.; Glatz, J.-P.; Fanghänel, Th.

    2016-04-01

    A pyrochemical electrorefining process for the recovery of actinides from metallic nuclear fuel based on actinide-zirconium alloys (An-Zr) in a molten salt is being investigated. In this process actinides are group-selectively recovered on solid aluminium cathodes as An-Al alloys using a LiCl-KCl eutectic melt at a temperature of 450 °C. In the present study the electrochemical behaviour of zirconium during electrorefining was investigated. The maximum amount of actinides that can be oxidised without anodic co-dissolution of zirconium was determined at a selected constant cathodic current density. The experiment consisted of three steps to assess the different stages of the electrorefining process, each of which employing a fresh aluminium cathode. The results indicate that almost a complete dissolution of the actinides without co-dissolution of zirconium is possible under the applied experimental conditions.

  16. The Deformation Mechanism of Fatigue Behaviour in a N36 Zirconium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingzhu

    2018-05-01

    Zirconium alloys are widely used as claddings in nuclear reactor. A N36 zirconium alloy has been deformed into a sheet with highly texture according to the result of electron back scatter diffraction test. Then this N36 zirconium alloy sheet has been cut into small beam samples with 12 x 3 x 3 mm3 in size. In this experiment, a three-point bending test was carried out to investigate the fatigue behaviour of N36 zirconium alloy. Cyclic loadings were applied on the top middle of the beam samples. The region of interest (ROI) is located at the middle bottom of the front face of the beam sample where slip band was observed in deformed beam sample due to strain concentration by using scanning electron microscopy. Twinning also plays an important role to accommodate the plastic deformation of N36 zirconium alloy in fatigue, which displays competition with slip.

  17. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  18. Conjoint corrosion and wear in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Williams, R L; Williams, D F

    1999-04-01

    When considering titanium alloys for orthopaedic applications it is important to examine the conjoint action of corrosion and wear. In this study we investigate the corrosion and wear behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-13Nb-13Zr in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), bovine albumin solutions in PBS and 10% foetal calf serum solutions in PBS. The tests were performed under four different conditions to evaluate the influence of wear on the corrosion and corrosion on the wear behaviour as follows: corrosion without wear, wear-accelerated corrosion, wear in a non-corrosive environment and wear in a corrosive environment. The corrosion behaviour was investigated using cyclic polarisation studies to measure the ability of the surface to repassivate following breakdown of the passive layer. The properties of the repassivated layer were evaluated by measuring changes in the surface hardness of the alloys. The amount of wear that had occurred was assessed from weight changes and measurement of the depth of the wear scar. It was found that in the presence of wear without corrosion the wear behaviour of Ti-13Nb-13Zr was greater than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V and that in the presence of proteins the wear of all three alloys is reduced. In the presence of corrosion without wear Ti-13Nb-13Zr was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-7Nb which was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-4V without proteins whereas in the presence of protein the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb was reduced and that of Ti-6Al-4V increased. In the presence of corrosion and wear the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is higher than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V in PBS but in the presence of proteins the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb are very similar but higher than that of Ti-6Al-4V. The wear of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is lower than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-6Al-4V with or without the presence of proteins in a corrosive environment. Therefore the overall

  19. The stability of alloying additions in Zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumley, S. C.; Murphy, S. T.; Burr, P. A.; Grimes, R. W.; Chard-Tuckey, P. R.; Wenman, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    The interactions of Cr, Fe, Nb, Ni, Sn, V and Y with Zr are simulated using density functional theory. Thermodynamic stabilities of various different Zr based intermetallic compounds, including multiple Laves phase structures and solutions of alloying additions in both α and β-Zr were investigated. The thermodynamic driving forces in this system can be correlated with trends in atomic radii and the relative electronegativities of the different species. Formation energies of Fe, Ni and Sn based intermetallic compounds were found to be negative, and the ZrFe and ZrNi intermetallics were metastable. Most elements displayed negative energies of solution in β-Zr but positive energies in the α-phase, with the exception of Sn (which was negative for both) and Y (which was positive for both). Solutions formed from intermetallics showed a similar trend. Cr -3s23p64s13d5. Fe -4s23d6. Nb -4s24p65s14d4. Ni -4s23d8. Sn -5s25p2. V -3s23p64s23d3. Y -4s24p65s24d1. Zr -4s24p65s24d2. The pseudopotential scheme used is "on-the-fly" generation, in which an isolated all-electron calculation is carried out before the main calculation and used as a starting point to generate a pseudopotential. This was carried out for all pseudopotentials except Cr and V, as the default on-the-fly pseudopotentials for these elements required a much higher cut-off energy. Instead, standard ultrasoft pseudopotentials, as found in the CASTEP pseudopotential library, were used for Cr and V. All pseudopotentials (both on-the-fly and library) are of the ultrasoft type [15], and so are compatible with each-other. Exchange-correlation was modelled using the Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof formalisation of the Generalised Gradient Approximation [16].A series of simulations were run to establish an appropriate basis set cut-off energy, and the density of sampling in the Brillouin zone. The results were converged to within two decimal places for a cut-off energy of 450 eV and a k-point spacing of 0.003 nm-1. The k

  20. A study into the impact of interface roughness development on mechanical degradation of oxides formed on zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, P.; Wedge, S.; Frankel, P.; Gass, M.; Howells, R.; Preuss, M.

    2015-04-01

    As a cladding material used to encapsulate nuclear fuel pellets, zirconium alloys are the primary barrier separating the fuel and a pressurised steam or lithiated water environment. Degradation mechanisms such as oxidation can be the limiting factor in the life-time of the fuel assembly. Key to controlling oxidation, and therefore allowing increased burn-up of fuel, is the development of a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process. In an autoclave, the oxidation kinetics for zirconium alloys are typically cyclical, with periods of accelerated kinetics being observed in steps of ∼2 μm oxide growth. These periods of accelerated oxidation are immediately preceded by the development of a layer of lateral cracks near the metal-oxide interface, which may be associated with the development of interface roughness. The present work uses scanning electron microscopy to carry out a statistical analysis of changes in the metal-oxide interface roughness between three different alloys at different stages of autoclave oxidation. The first two alloys are Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO™ for which analysis is carried out at stages before, during and after first transition. The third alloy is an experimental low tin alloy, which under the same oxidation conditions and during the same time period does not appear to go through transition. Assessment of the metal-oxide interface roughness is primarily carried out based on the root mean square of the interface slope known as the Rdq parameter. Results show clear trends with relation to transition points in the corrosion kinetics. Discussion is given to how this relates to the existing mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process, and the components required for possible future modelling approaches.

  1. A rapid stress-corrosion test for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfrich, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Stressed alloy specimens are immersed in a salt-dichromate solution at 60 degrees C. Because of the minimal general corrosion of these alloys in this solution, stress corrosion failures are detected by low-power microscopic examination.

  2. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  3. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  4. Titanium-Zirconium-Nickel Alloy Inside Marshall's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This Photo, which appeared on the July cover of `Physics Today', is of the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber allowing scientists to record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. Once inside the chamber, a laser heats the sample until it melts. The laser is then turned off and the sample cools, changing from a liquid drop to a solid sphere. In this particular shot, the ESL contains a solid metal sample of titanium-zirconium-nickel alloy. Since 1977, the ESL has been used at MSFC to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds. Materials created as a result of these tests include new optical materials, special metallic glasses, and spacecraft components.

  5. Titanium-Zirconium-Nickel Alloy Inside Marshall's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This is a close-up of a sample of titanium-zirconium-nickel alloy inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber allowing scientists to record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. Once inside the chamber, a laser heats the sample until it melts. The laser is then turned off and the sample cools, changing from a liquid drop to a solid sphere. Since 1977, the ESL has been used at MSFC to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds. Materials created as a result of these tests include new optical materials, special metallic glasses, and spacecraft components.

  6. Alloys For Corrosive, Hydrogen-Rich Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, William B.; Bhat, Biliyar N.; Chen, Po-Shou; Kuruvilla, A. K.; Panda, Binayak

    1993-01-01

    "NASA-23" denotes class of alloys resisting both embrittlement by hydrogen and corrosion. Weldable and castable and formed by such standard processes as rolling, forging, and wire drawing. Heat-treated to obtain desired combinations of strength and ductility in ranges of 100 to 180 kpsi yield strength, 120 to 200 kpsi ultimate tensile strength, and 10 to 30 percent elongation at break. Used in place of most common aerospace structural alloy, Inconel(R) 718.

  7. High temperature mechanical properties of a zirconium-modified, precipitation- strengthened nickel, 30 percent copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A precipitation-strengthened Monel-type alloy has been developed through minor alloying additions of zirconium to a base Ni-30Cu alloy. The results of this exploratory study indicate that thermomechanical processing of a solution-treated Ni-30Cu-0.2Zr alloy produced a dispersion of precipitates. The precipitates have been tentatively identified as a Ni5Zr compound. A comparison of the mechanical properties, as determined by testing in air, of the zirconium-modified alloy to those of a Ni-30Cu alloy reveals that the precipitation-strengthened alloy has improved tensile properties to 1200 K and improved stress-rupture properties to 1100 K. The oxidation characteristics of the modified alloy appeared to be equivalent to those of the base Ni-30Cu alloy.

  8. Corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography cites 118 articles from the international literature concerning corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Articles dealing with corrosion resistance, corrosion tests, intergranular corrosion, oxidation resistance, and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys are included.

  9. A simple spectrophotometric method for determination of zirconium or hafnium in selected molybdenum-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A simple analytical procedure is described for accurately and precisely determining the zirconium or hafnium content of molybdenum-base alloys. The procedure is based on the reaction of the reagent Arsenazo III with zirconium or hafnium in strong hydrochloric acid solution. The colored complexes of zirconium or hafnium are formed in the presence of molybdenum. Titanium or rhenium in the alloy have no adverse effect on the zirconium or hafnium complex at the following levels in the selected aliquot: Mo, 10 mg; Re, 10 mg; Ti, 1 mg. The spectrophotometric measurement of the zirconium or hafnium complex is accomplished without prior separation with a relative standard deviation of 1.3 to 2.7 percent.

  10. Microstructural Aspects of Localized Corrosion Behavior of Mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Peng-Wei

    Combining high specific strength and unique electrochemical properties, magnesium (Mg) alloys are promising lightweight materials for various applications from automotive, consumer electronics, biomedical body implant, to battery electrodes. Engineering solutions such as coatings have enabled the use of Mg alloys, despite their intrinsic low corrosion resistance. Consequently, the fundamental mechanisms responsible for the unique localized corrosion behavior of bare Mg alloys, the associated abnormal hydrogen evolution response, and the relationships between corrosion behavior and alloy microstructure are still unsolved. This thesis aims to uncover the specificities of Mg corrosion and the roles of alloy chemistry and microstructure. To this end, multiscale site-specific microstructure characterization techniques, including in situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam milling, and transmission electron microscopy, combined with electrochemical analysis and hydrogen evolution rate monitoring, were performed on pure Mg and selected Mg alloys under free corrosion and anodic polarization, revealing key new information on the propagation mode of localized corrosion and the role of alloy microstructures, thereby confirming or disproving the validity of previously proposed corrosion models. Uniform surface corrosion film on Mg alloys immersed in NaCl solution consisted a bi-layered structure, with a porous Mg(OH)2 outer layer on top of a MgO inner layer. Presence of fine scale precipitates in Mg alloys interacted with the corrosion reaction front, reducing the corrosion rate and surface corrosion film thickness. Protruding hemispherical dome-like corrosion products, accompanied by growing hydrogen bubbles, formed on top of the impurity particles in Mg alloys by deposition of Mg(OH)2 via a microgalvanic effect. Localized corrosion on Mg alloys under both free immersion and anodic polarization was found to be governed by a common mechanism

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  12. Electrochemical study of pre- and post-transition corrosion of Zr alloys in PWR coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macák, Jan; Novotný, Radek; Sajdl, Petr; Renčiuková, Veronika; Vrtílková, Věra

    Corrosion properties of Zr-Sn and Zr-Nb zirconium alloys were studied under simulated PWR conditions (or, more exactly, VVER conditions — boric acid, potassium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide) at temperatures up to 340°C and 15MPa using in-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization measurements. EIS spectra were obtained in a wide range of frequencies (typically 100kHz — 100μHz). It enabled to gain information of both dielectric properties of oxide layers developing on the Zr-alloys surface and of the kinetics of the corrosion process and the associated charge and mass transfer phenomena. Experiments were run for more than 380 days; thus, the study of all the corrosion stages (pre-transition, transition, post-transition) was possible.

  13. Corrosion evaluation of zirconium doped oxide coatings on aluminum formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bajat, Jelena; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna; Vasilić, Rastko; Stojadinović, Stevan

    2014-01-01

    The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of aluminum in sodium tungstate (Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O) and Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O doped with Zr was analyzed in order to obtain oxide coatings with improved corrosion resistance. The influence of current density in PEO process and anodization time was investigated, as well as the influence of Zr, with the aim to find out how they affect the chemical content, morphology, surface roughness, and corrosion stability of oxide coatings. It was shown that the presence of Zr increases the corrosion stability of oxide coatings for all investigated PEO times. Evolution of EIS spectra during the exposure to 3% NaCl, as a strong corrosive agent, indicated the highest corrosion stability for PEO coating formed on aluminum at 70 mA/cm(2) for 2 min in a zirconium containing electrolyte.

  14. Transport property correlations for the niobium-1% zirconium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senor, David J.; Thomas, J. Kelly; Peddicord, K. L.

    1990-10-01

    Correlations were developed for the electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity ( k), and hemispherical total emittance (ɛ) of niobium-1% zirconium as functions of temperature. All three correlations were developed as empirical fits to experimental data. ρ = 5.571 + 4.160 × 10 -2(T) - 4.192 × 10 -6(T) 2 μΩcm , k = 13.16( T) 0.2149W/ mK, ɛ = 6.39 × 10 -2 + 4.98 × 10 -5( T) + 3.62 × 10 -8( T) 2 - 7.28 × 10 -12( T) 3. The relative standard deviation of the electrical resistivity correlation is 1.72% and it is valid over the temperature range 273 to 2700 K. The thermal conductivity correlation has a relative standard deviation of 3.24% and is valid over the temperature range 379 to 1421 K. The hemispherical total emittance correlation was developed for smooth surface materials only and represents a conservative estimate of the emittance of the alloy for space reactor fuel element modeling applications. It has a relative standard deviation of 9.50% and is valid over the temperature range 755 to 2670 K.

  15. Fretting wear behavior of zirconium alloy in B-Li water at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lefu; Lai, Ping; Liu, Qingdong; Zeng, Qifeng; Lu, Junqiang; Guo, Xianglong

    2018-02-01

    The tangential fretting wear of three kinds of zirconium alloys tube mated with 304 stainless steel (SS) plate was investigated. The tests were conducted in an autoclave containing 300 °C pressurized B-Li water for tube-on-plate contact configuration. The worn surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and 3D microscopy. The cross-section of wear scar was examined with transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results indicated that the dominant wear mechanism of zirconium alloys in this test condition was delamination and oxidation. The oxide layer on the fretted area consists of outer oxide layer composed of iron oxide and zirconium oxide and inner oxide layer composed of zirconium oxide.

  16. Investigation into the Susceptibility of Corrosion Resistant Alloys to Biocorrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    Fro Bes AvialeC p INVESTIGATION INTO THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF CORROSION RESISTANT ALLOYS TO BIOCORROSION Dr. Clive R.Clayton Dept.of Materials Science...QUAW jjqMCMD 9 INVESTIGATION INTO THE SUSCEPTIBILTY OF CORROSION RESISTANT ALLOYS TO BIOCORROSION Dr.Clive R.Clayton Dept. of Materials Science & Engg...TITLE (Mmkude Secwty camuf*tigon Investigation into the Susceptibility of Corrosion ’Resistant Alloys to Biocorrosion IL. PERSONAL AUThOR(S) Clive R

  17. Corrosion in Magnesium and a Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akavipat, Sanay

    Magnesium and a magnesium alloy (AZ91C) have been ion implanted over a range of ions energies (50 to 150 keV) and doses (1 x 10('16) to 2 x 10('17) ions/cm('2)) to modify the corrosion properties of the metals. The corrosion tests were done by anodic polarization in chloride -free and chloride-containing aqueous solutions of a borated -boric acid with a pH of 9.3. Anodic polarization measurements showed that some implantations could greatly reduce the corrosion current densities at all impressed voltages and also increased slightly the pitting potential, which indicated the onset of the chloride attack. These improvements in corrosion resistance were caused by boron implantations into both types of samples. However, iron implantations were found to improve only the magnesium alloy. To study the corrosion in more detail, Scanning Auger Microprobe Spectrometer (SAM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an X-ray Energy Spectrometry (XES) attachment, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) measurements were used to analyze samples before, after, and at various corrosion stages. In both the unimplanted pure magnesium and AZ91C samples, anodic polarization results revealed that there were three active corrosion stages (Stages A, C, and E) and two passivating stages (Stages B and D). Examination of Stages A and B in both types of samples showed that only a mild, generalized corrosion had occurred. In Stage C of the TD samples, a pitting breakdown in the initial oxide film was observed. In Stage C of the AZ91C samples, galvanic and intergranular attack around the Mg(,17)Al(,12) intermetallic islands and along the matrix grain boundaries was observed. Stage D of both samples showed the formation of a thick, passivating oxygen containing, probably Mg(OH)(,2) film. In Stage E, this film was broken down by pits, which formed due to the presence of the chloride ions in both types of samples. Stages A through D of the unimplanted samples were not seen in the boron or iron

  18. Enhanced antibacterial properties, biocompatibility, and corrosion resistance of degradable Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; An, Zhiquan; Cheng, Mengqi; Wang, Qi; Cheng, Tao; Wang, Qiaojie; Wang, Jiaxing; Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Xianlong; Yuan, Guangyin

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg), a potential biodegradable material, has recently received increasing attention due to its unique antibacterial property. However, rapid corrosion in the physiological environment and potential toxicity limit clinical applications. In order to improve the corrosion resistance meanwhile not compromise the antibacterial activity, a novel Mg alloy, Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (Hereafter, denoted as JDBM), is fabricated by alloying with neodymium (Nd), zinc (Zn), zirconium (Zr). pH value, Mg ion concentration, corrosion rate and electrochemical test show that the corrosion resistance of JDBM is enhanced. A systematic investigation of the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial capability of JDBM is performed. The results of microbiological counting, CLSM, SEM in vitro, and microbiological cultures, histopathology in vivo consistently show JDBM enhanced the antibacterial activity. In addition, the significantly improved cytocompatibility is observed from JDBM. The results suggest that JDBM effectively enhances the corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and antimicrobial properties of Mg by alloying with the proper amount of Zn, Zr and Nd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Corrosion of titanium and zirconium in organic solutions

    SciT

    Clapp, R.A.; Saldanha, B.J.; Kvochak, J.J.

    1995-09-01

    Experiences of reactive metal corrosion in organic acids will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on anhydrous organic solutions, and organic acids containing halides which are often added as catalysts or promoters. The case examples will illustrate the importance of evaluating reactive metals under conditions that closely simulate actual process chemistry, type of exposure (vapor, liquid, condensate), and final fabricated form, to ensure that the material will provide predictable long-term service in a commercial facility.

  20. Corrosion-resistant high-entropy alloys: A review

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Yunzhu; Yang, Bin; Liaw, Peter

    2017-02-05

    Corrosion destroys more than three percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Therefore, the design of highly corrosion-resistant materials is urgently needed. By breaking the classical alloy-design philosophy, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) possess unique microstructures, which are solid solutions with random arrangements of multiple elements. The particular locally-disordered chemical environment is expected to lead to unique corrosion-resistant properties. In this review, the studies of the corrosion-resistant HEAs during the last decade are summarized. The corrosion-resistant properties of HEAs in various aqueous environments and the corrosion behavior of HEA coatings are presented. The effects of environments, alloying elements, and processing methods onmore » the corrosion resistance are analyzed in detail. Finally, the possible directions of future work regarding the corrosion behavior of HEAs are suggested.« less

  1. Corrosion-resistant high-entropy alloys: A review

    SciT

    Shi, Yunzhu; Yang, Bin; Liaw, Peter

    Corrosion destroys more than three percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Therefore, the design of highly corrosion-resistant materials is urgently needed. By breaking the classical alloy-design philosophy, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) possess unique microstructures, which are solid solutions with random arrangements of multiple elements. The particular locally-disordered chemical environment is expected to lead to unique corrosion-resistant properties. In this review, the studies of the corrosion-resistant HEAs during the last decade are summarized. The corrosion-resistant properties of HEAs in various aqueous environments and the corrosion behavior of HEA coatings are presented. The effects of environments, alloying elements, and processing methods onmore » the corrosion resistance are analyzed in detail. Finally, the possible directions of future work regarding the corrosion behavior of HEAs are suggested.« less

  2. Zirconium

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium is the 20th most abundant element in the Earth’s crust. It occurs in a variety of rock types and geologic environments but most often in igneous rocks in the form of zircon (ZrSiO4). Zircon is recovered as a coproduct of the mining and processing of heavy mineral sands for the titanium minerals ilmenite and rutile. The sands are formed by the weathering and erosion of rock containing zircon and titanium heavy minerals and their subsequent concentration in sedimentary systems, particularly in coastal environments. A small quantity of zirconium, less than 10 kt/a (11,000 stpy), compared with total world production of 1.4 Mt (1.5 million st) in 2012, was derived from the mineral baddeleyite (ZrO2), produced from a single source in Kovdor, Russia.

  3. Method for inhibiting corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    Nickel-containing alloys are protected against corrosion by contacting the alloy with a molten alkali metal having dissolved therein aluminum, silicon or manganese to cause the formation of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic layer. Components can be protected by applying the coating after an apparatus is assembled.

  4. Stress-corrosion characteristics of aluminum casting alloy M-45

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of the stress-corrosion characteristics of aluminum alloy M-45 shows that the most favorable artificial aging cycle for this alloy, with regard to optimum strength and stress-corrosion resistance, appears to be 400 degrees F for 12 hours.

  5. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin II Accelerated Corrosion Tests and the Behavior of High-Strength Aluminum Alloys of Different Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    The permanence, with respect to corrosion, of light aluminum alloy sheets of the duralumin type, that is, heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si is discussed. Alloys of this type are subject to surface corrosion and corrosion of the interior by intercrystalline paths. Results are given of accelerated corrosion tests, tensile tests, the effect on corrosion of various alloying elements and heat treatments, electrical resistance measurements, and X-ray examinations.

  6. Hot Corrosion of Cobalt-Base Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    Alloys 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revet -se tside lf necessary and identify by block number) ~ lThe sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion of cobalt and...Figures 12 and 13. The Na2 SO 4 was observed to form puddles on the oxide-covered specimen surface. An oxide slag was usually suspended in the... slag (black arrows) were suspended (30 sees at 1000°C in air). b) After washing the Na2SO 4 from the specimen, the exposed oxide surface was highly

  7. Plate-shaped transformation products in zirconium-base alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.; Dey, G. K.; Srivastava, D.; Ranganathan, S.

    1997-11-01

    Plate-shaped products resulting from martensitic, diffusional, and mixed mode transformations in zirconium-base alloys are compared in the present study. These alloys are particularly suitable for the comparison in view of the fact that the lattice correspondence between the parent β (bcc) and the product α (hcp) or γ-hydride (fct) phases are remarkably similar for different types of transformations. Crystallographic features such as orientation relations, habit planes, and interface structures associated with these transformations have been compared, with a view toward examining whether the transformation mechanisms have characteristic imprints on these experimental observables. Martensites exhibiting dislocated lath, internally twinned plate, and self-accommodating three-plate cluster morphologies have been encountered in Zr-2.5Nb alloy. Habit planes corresponding to all these morphologies have been found to be consistent with the predictions based on the invariant plane strain (IPS) criterion. Different morphologies have been found to reflect the manner in which the neighboring martensite variants are assembled. Lattice-invariant shears (LISs) for all these cases have been identified to be either {10 bar 11} α < bar 1123> α slip or twinning on {10 bar 11} α planes. Widmanstätten α precipitates, forming in a step-quenching treatment, have been shown to have a lath morphology, the α/β interface being decorated with a periodic array of < c + a> dislocations at a spacing of 8 to 10 nm. The line vectors of these dislocations are nearly parallel to the invariant lines. The α precipitates, forming in the retained β phase on aging, exhibit an internally twinned structure with a zigzag habit plane. Average habit planes for the morphologies have been found to lie near the {103} β — {113} β poles, which are close to the specific variant of the {112} β plane, which transforms into a prismatic plane of the type {1 bar 100} α . The crystallography of the

  8. Corrosion Studies of Wrought and Cast NASA-23 Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion studies were carried out for wrought and cast NASA-23 alloy using electrochemical methods. The scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR), and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed. These studies corroborate the findings of stress corrosion studies performed earlier, in that the material is highly resistant to corrosion.

  9. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    SciT

    Sindelar, R.; Louthan, M.; PNNL, B.

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history,more » residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed

  10. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  11. Corrosion of High-Density Sintered Tungsten Alloys. Part 2. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    REPORT MRL-R- 1145 CORROSION OF HIGH-DENSITY SINTERED TUNGSTEN ALLOYS PART 2: ACCELERATED CORROSION TESTING J.J. Batten and B.T. Moore I DTIC . *arit*fl...Commo,,wea°h 91 Avor,++.°_ DECEMBER 1988 012 rI DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORY REPORT MRL-R- 1145 CORROSION OF HIGH-DENSITY SINTERED...TUNGSTEN ALLOYS PART 2: ACCELERATED CORROSION TESTING J.J. Batten and B.T. Moore ABSTRACT As a consequence of corrosion during long-term storage in

  12. Corrosion of aluminum alloys by chlorinated hydrocarbon/methanol mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Forest, W. S.

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory investigations show that water-free mixtures of Freon MF /trichlorofluoromethane/ and methanol vigorously attack aluminum alloys which contain significant amounts of copper. Freon MF alone did not attack the aluminum alloys at room temperature. Pure methanol had only a slight corrosive effect on the alloy.

  13. Comparative Corrosion Behavior of Two Palladium Containing Titanium Alloys

    SciT

    Lian, T; Yashiki, T; Nakayama, T

    2006-02-05

    The ASTM standard B 265 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of titanium (Ti) alloys. It is planned to use corrosion resistant and high strength titanium alloys to fabricate the drip shield at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Titanium grade (Gr) 7 (R52400) and other Ti alloys are currently being characterized for this application. Ti Gr 7 contains 0.15% Palladium (Pd) to increase its corrosion performance. In this article we report results on the comparative short term corrosion behavior of Ti Gr 7 and a Ruthenium (Ru) containing alloy (Ti Gr 33). Ti Gr 33 also contains a smallmore » amount of Pd. Limited electrochemical testing such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic curves showed that both alloys have a similar corrosion behavior in the tested environments.« less

  14. COMPARATIVE CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF TWO PALLADIUM CONTAINING TITANIUM ALLOYS

    SciT

    T. Lian, T. Yashiki, T. Nakayama, T. Nakanishi, R. B. Rebak

    2006-07-23

    The ASTM standard B 265 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of titanium (Ti) alloys. It is planned to use corrosion resistant and high strength titanium alloys to fabricate the drip shield at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Titanium grade (Gr) 7 (R52400) and other Ti alloys are currently being characterized for this application. Ti Gr 7 contains 0.15% Palladium (Pd) to increase its corrosion performance. In this article we report results on the comparative short term corrosion behavior of Ti Gr 7 and a Ruthenium (Ru) containing alloy (Ti Gr 33). Ti Gr 33 also contains a smallmore » amount of Pd. Limited electrochemical testing such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic curves showed that both alloys have a similar corrosion behavior in the tested environments.« less

  15. Phase Transformation Temperatures and Solute Redistribution in a Quaternary Zirconium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, C.; Daymond, M. R.

    2018-05-01

    This study investigates the phase stability and redistribution of solute during heating and cooling of a quaternary zirconium alloy, Excel (Zr-3.2Sn-0.8Mo-0.8Nb). Time-of-flight neutron diffraction data are analyzed using a novel Vegard's law-based approach to determine the phase fractions and location of substitutional solute atoms in situ during heating from room temperature up to 1050 °C. It is seen that this alloy exhibits direct nucleation of the β Zr phase from martensite during tempering, and stable retention of the β Zr phase to high temperatures, unlike other two-phase zirconium alloys. The transformation strains resulting from the α \\leftrightarrow β transformation are shown to have a direct impact on the development of microstructure and crystallographic texture.

  16. Experimental studies of laser-ablated zirconium carbide plasma plumes: Fuel corrosion diagnostic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wantuck, P. J.; Butt, D. P.; Sappey, A. D.

    Understanding the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel materials, such as refractory carbides, in a high temperature hydrogen environment is critical for several proposed nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) concepts. Monitoring the fuel corrosion products is important not only for understanding corrosion characteristics, but to assess the performance of an actual, operating nuclear propulsion system as well. In this paper, we describe an experimental study initiated to develop, test, and subsequently utilize non-intrusive, laser-based diagnostics to characterize the gaseous product species which are expected to evolve during the exposure of representative fuel samples to hydrogen. Laser ablation is used to produce high temperature, vapor plumes from solid solution, uranium-free, zirconium carbide (ZrC) forms for probing by other laser diagnostic methods, predominantly laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). We discuss the laser ablation technique, results of plume emission measurements, as well as the use of planar LIF to image both the ZrC plumes and actual NTP fuel corrosion constituents.

  17. Corrosion behavior of Ti-39Nb alloy for dentistry.

    PubMed

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus-high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti-39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Laser Surface Alloying of Aluminum for Improving Acid Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay Gutu; Sankar, Mamilla Ravi; Dixit, Uday Shanker

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, laser surface alloying of aluminum with magnesium, manganese, titanium and zinc, respectively, was carried out to improve acid corrosion resistance. Laser surface alloying was conducted using 1600 and 1800 W power source using CO2 laser. Acid corrosion resistance was tested by dipping the samples in a solution of 2.5% H2SO4 for 200 h. The weight loss due to acid corrosion was reduced by 55% for AlTi, 41% for AlMg alloy, 36% for AlZn and 22% for AlMn alloy. Laser surface alloyed samples offered greater corrosion resistance than the aluminum substrate. It was observed that localized pitting corrosion was the major factor to damage the surface when exposed for a long time. The hardness after laser surface alloying was increased by a factor of 8.7, 3.4, 2.7 and 2 by alloying with Mn, Mg, Ti and Zn, respectively. After corrosion test, hardness was reduced by 51% for AlTi sample, 40% for AlMg sample, 41.4% for AlMn sample and 33% for AlZn sample.

  19. In vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of binary magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuenan; Zheng, Yufeng; Cheng, Yan; Zhong, Shengping; Xi, Tingfei

    2009-02-01

    As bioabsorbable materials, magnesium alloys are expected to be totally degraded in the body and their biocorrosion products not deleterious to the surrounding tissues. It's critical that the alloying elements are carefully selected in consideration of their cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility. In the present study, nine alloying elements Al, Ag, In, Mn, Si, Sn, Y, Zn and Zr were added into magnesium individually to fabricate binary Mg-1X (wt.%) alloys. Pure magnesium was used as control. Their mechanical properties, corrosion properties and in vitro biocompatibilities (cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility) were evaluated by SEM, XRD, tensile test, immersion test, electrochemical corrosion test, cell culture and platelet adhesion test. The results showed that the addition of alloying elements could influence the strength and corrosion resistance of Mg. The cytotoxicity tests indicated that Mg-1Al, Mg-1Sn and Mg-1Zn alloy extracts showed no significant reduced cell viability to fibroblasts (L-929 and NIH3T3) and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1); Mg-1Al and Mg-1Zn alloy extracts indicated no negative effect on viabilities of blood vessel related cells, ECV304 and VSMC. It was found that hemolysis and the amount of adhered platelets decreased after alloying for all Mg-1X alloys as compared to the pure magnesium control. The relationship between the corrosion products and the in vitro biocompatibility had been discussed and the suitable alloying elements for the biomedical applications associated with bone and blood vessel had been proposed.

  20. Corrosion performance of 7075 alloy under laser heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Su, Ruiming; Qu, Yingdong; Li, Rongde

    2018-05-01

    Microstructure, exfoliation corrosion (EXCO), intergranular corrosion (IGC) and potentidynamic polarization test of the 7075 aluminum alloy after retrogression and re-aging (RRA) treatment, and laser retrogression and re-aging (LRRA), respectively, were studied by using scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that after pre-aging, laser treatment (650 W, 2 mm s‑1) and re-aging a lot of matrix precipitates of alloy were precipitated again. The semi-continuous grain boundary precipitates and the wider precipitate-free zones (PFZ) improve the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The corrosion properties of the alloy after LRRA (650 W, 2 mm s‑1) treatment are better than that after RRA treatment.

  1. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  2. The Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Mitchell, M. L.; Torres, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion rates for bare and coated Magnesium alloy AZ31B have been measured. Two coatings, Dow-23(Trademark) and Tagnite(Trademark), have been tested by electrochemical methods and their effectiveness determined. Electrochemical methods employed were the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR) and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique (EIS). In addition, general corrosion and stress corrosion methods were employed to examine the effectiveness of the above coatings in 90 percent humidity. Results from these studies are presented.

  3. Characterization of deformation mechanisms in zirconium alloys: effect of temperature and irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Fei

    Zirconium alloys have been widely used in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor as core structural materials. Alloy such as Zircaloy-2 has been used for calandria tubes; fuel cladding; the pressure tube is manufactured from alloy Zr-2.5Nb. During in-reactor service, these alloys are exposed to a high flux of fast neutron at elevated temperatures. It is important to understand the effect of temperature and irradiation on the deformation mechanism of zirconium alloys. Aiming to provide experimental guidance for future modeling predictions on the properties of zirconium alloys this thesis describes the result of an investigation of the change of slip and twinning modes in Zircaloy-2 and Zr-2.5Nb as a function of temperature and irradiation. The aim is to provide scientific fundamentals and experimental evidences for future industry modeling in processing technique design, and in-reactor property change prediction of zirconium components. In situ neutron diffraction mechanical tests carried out on alloy Zircaloy-2 at three temperatures: 100¢ªC, 300¢ªC, and 500¢ªC, and described in Chapter 3. The evolution of the lattice strain of individual grain families in the loading and Poisson's directions during deformation, which probes the operation of slip and twinning modes at different stress levels, are described. By using the same type of in situ neutron diffraction technique, tests on Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material samples, in either the fast-neutron irradiated or un-irradiated condition, are reported in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, the measurement of dislocation density by means of line profile analysis of neutron diffraction patterns, as well as TEM observations of the dislocation microstructural evolution, is described. In Chapter 6 a hot-rolled Zr-2.5Nb with a larger grain size compared with the pressure tubing was used to study the development of dislocation microstructures with increasing plastic strain. In Chapter 7, in situ loading of heavy ion

  4. Self-repairing vanadium-zirconium composite conversion coating for aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Wu, Xiaosong; Jia, Yuyu; Liu, Yali

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, new self-repairing vanadium-zirconium composite conversion coating was prepared and investigated by Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS), Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. EIS results showed that V-Zr conversion coating with hydrogen peroxide modified (VZO) revealed an increasing corrosion resistance in corrosive media which meant a certain self-repairing effect. SEM comparison photos also disclosed that VZO treated with scratches was gradually ameliorated from the initial cracked configuration to fewer cracks and more fillers through an immersion of 3.5% NaCl solution. XPS results demonstrated that the content of vanadium on VZO increased and zirconium declined when immersed in the corrosive solution. This explained further that the self-repairing ability could be related to vanadium. From the above results, we inferred possible structures of VZO and proposed that self-repairing effect was achieved through a hydrolysis condensation polymerization process of vanadate in the localized corrosion area.

  5. Development in corrosion resistance by microstructural refinement in Zr-16 SS 304 alloy using suction casting technique

    SciT

    Das, N., E-mail: nirupamd@barc.gov.in; Sengupta, P.; Abraham, G.

    Highlights: • Grain refinement was made in Zr–16 wt.% SS alloy while prepared by suction casting process. • Distribution of Laves phase, e.g., Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Cr) was raised in suction cast (SC) Zr–16 wt.% SS. • Corrosion resistance was improved in SC alloy compared to that of arc-melt-cast alloy. • Grain refinement in SC alloy assisted for an increase in its corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Zirconium (Zr)-stainless steel (SS) hybrid alloys are being considered as baseline alloys for developing metallic-waste-form (MWF) with the motivation of disposing of Zr and SS base nuclear metallic wastes. Zr–16 wt.% SS, a MWF alloymore » optimized from previous studies, exhibit significant grain refinement and changes in phase assemblages (soft phase: Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Cr)/α-Zr vs. hard phase: Zr{sub 3}(Fe, Ni)) when prepared by suction casting (SC) technique in comparison to arc-cast-melt (AMC) route. Variation in Cr-distribution among different phases are found to be low in suction cast alloy, which along with grain refinement restricted Cr-depletion at the Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Cr)/Zr interfaces, prone to localized attack. Hence, SC alloy, compared to AMC alloy, showed lower current density, higher potential at the breakdown of passivity and higher corrosion potential during polarization experiments (carried out under possible geological repository environments, viz., pH 8, 5 and 1) indicating its superior corrosion resistance.« less

  6. Alloy Microstructure Dictates Corrosion Modes in THA Modular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Pourzal, Robin; Hall, Deborah J; Ehrich, Jonas; McCarthy, Stephanie M; Mathew, Mathew T; Jacobs, Joshua J; Urban, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) triggered by corrosion products from modular taper junctions are a known cause of premature THA failure. CoCrMo devices are of particular concern because cobalt ions and chromium-orthophosphates were shown to be linked to ALTRs, even in metal-on-polyethylene THAs. The most common categories of CoCrMo alloy are cast and wrought alloy, which exhibit fundamental microstructural differences in terms of grain size and hard phases. The impact of implant alloy microstructure on the occurring modes of corrosion and subsequent metal ion release is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether (1) the microstructure of cast CoCrMo alloy varies broadly between manufacturers and can dictate specific corrosion modes; and whether (2) the microstructure of wrought CoCrMo alloy is more consistent between manufacturers and has low implications on the alloy's corrosion behavior. The alloy microstructure of four femoral-stem and three femoral-head designs from four manufacturers was metallographically and electrochemically characterized. Three stem designs were made from cast alloy; all three head designs and one stem design were made from wrought alloy. Alloy samples were sectioned from retrieved components and then polished and etched to visualize grain structure and hard phases such as carbides (eg, M 23 C 6 ) or intermetallic phases (eg, σ phase). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) tests were conducted to determine the corrosion potential (E corr ), corrosion current density (I corr ), and pitting potential (E pit ) for each alloy. Four devices were tested within each group, and each measurement was repeated three times to ensure repeatable results. Differences in PDP metrics between manufacturers and between alloys with different hard phase contents were compared using one-way analysis of variance and independent-sample t-tests. Microstructural features such as twin boundaries and slip bands as well as corrosion

  7. THE DETERMINATION OF TRACES OF BORON IN ZIRCONIUM METAL AND ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    SciT

    Hayes, M.R.; Metcalfe, J.

    1962-01-01

    A general procedure is given for the determination of B, down to 0.2 ppm, in Zr and Zr alloys. Separation of the B is not necessary, the B-curcumin complex being formed directly in an aliquot of the metal sulfate solution. An interference effect has been noted when analyzing Zr alloys containing Sn. The interference is caused by an insoluble compound of curcumin which separates and has similar properties to the B-curcumin complex. This source of interference is, however, readily eliminated during the procedure for the determination of B. The procedure has been applied to the determination of B in puremore » Zr, zr--0.5% Cu-- 0.5% MO, and Zr--1.5% Sn--0.1% Fe--0.1% Cr--0.05% Ni alloys. Results are comparable with those obtained by methods requiring the separation of the B as methyl borate. (auth)« less

  8. Corrosion protection of aluminum alloys in contact with other metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Study establishes the quality of chemical and galvanized protection afforded by anodized and aldozided coatings applied to test panels of various aluminum alloys. The test panels, placed in firm contact with panels of titanium alloys, were subjected to salt spray tests and visually examined for corrosion effect.

  9. Galvanic Corrosion In (Graphite/Epoxy)/Alloy Couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.; Higgins, Ralph H.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of galvanic coupling between graphite/epoxy composite material, G/E, and D6AC steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, and Inconel(R) 718 nickel alloy in salt water described in report. Introductory section summarizes previous corrosion studies of G/E with other alloys. Details of sample preparation presented along with photographs of samples before and after immersion.

  10. Corrosion Studies of 2195 Al-Li Alloy and 2219 Al Alloy with Differing Surface Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion studies of 2195 Al-Li and 2219 Al alloys have been conducted using the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and the polarization resistance (PR) technique. The SRET was used to study corrosion mechanisms, while corrosion rate measurements were studied with the PR technique. Plates of Al203 blasted, soda blasted and conversion coated 2219 Al were coated with Deft primer and the corrosion rates studied with the EIS technique. Results from all of these studies are presented.

  11. Corrosion performance of Cr3C2-NiCr+0.2%Zr coated super alloys under actual medical waste incinerator environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Lalit; Mudgal, Deepa; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya

    2018-03-01

    Incineration techniques are widely used to dispose of various types of waste which lead to formation of very corrosive environment. Such corrosive environment leads to the degradation of the alloys used in these areas. To obviate this problem, zirconium modified Cr3C2-(NiCr) coating powder has been deposited on three superalloys namely Superni 718, Superni 600 and Superco 605 using Detonation gun technique. Corrosion test was conducted in actual medical waste incinerator environment. The samples were hung inside the secondary chamber operated at 1050°C for 1000h under cyclic condition. Corrosion kinetics was monitored using the weight gain measurements and thickness loss. Corrosion products were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. It was observed that coating is found to be successful in impeding the corrosion problem in superalloys.

  12. Bio-Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys for Orthopaedic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Emily K.; Ehrensberger, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    Three Mg alloys, Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn (MCZ), Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn–0.2% Sr (MCZS), and Mg–2% Sr (MS), were examined to understand their bio-corrosion behavior. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization scans were performed after 6 days of immersion in cell culture medium, and ion release and changes in media pH were tracked over a 28 day time period. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of alloy microstructure was performed to help interpret the results of the electrochemical testing. Results indicate that corrosion resistance of the alloys is as follows: MCZ > MCZS > MS. PMID:28862647

  13. Corrosion behavior and microstructures of experimental Ti-Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu; Okabe, Toru

    2004-06-01

    Anodic polarization was performed in 0.9% NaCl and 1% lactic acid solutions to characterize the relationship between the corrosion behavior and microstructures of cast Ti-Au (5-40%) alloys. An abrupt increase in the current density occurred at approximately 0.6 V vs. SCE for the 30% and 40% Au alloys in the 0.9% NaCl solution. The microstructures after corrosion testing indicated that this breakdown may have been caused by the preferential dissolution of the Ti3Au. However, the potential for preferential dissolution was higher than the breakdown potential of stainless steel or Co-Cr alloy, which meant that the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was superior. In 1% lactic acid solution, the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was excellent, with no breakdown at any composition. In the present test solutions, the Ti-Au alloys up to 20% Au had good corrosion resistance comparable to that for pure titanium.

  14. Corrosion Evaluation of Stellite Alloys 12 and 712

    SciT

    Mickalonis, J.I.

    2000-10-30

    The High Level Waste Division requested the Materials Technology Section (MTS) to evaluate the use of Waukesha Metal 88 (WM88) and Stellite alloys 12 (S12) and 712 (S712) as materials of construction for slurry pumps. As candidate materials, WM88 was chosen for the tilt pad column bearings and S12 and S712 were selected for the impeller bearings. The Stellite alloys are cobalt-based alloys typically used for their resistance to both corrosion and wear. WM88 is noted for resistance to galling and seizing. These materials, however, had not been evaluated for use in high level radioactive waste, which have a highmore » pH. A series of electrochemical corrosion tests were performed in support of this evaluation to determine the general corrosion rate and corrosion characteristics of these alloys. The tests were conducted at room temperature in simulated three waste tank environments. For WM88, the test solution was inhibited water, which is commonly used in the tank farm. For S12 and S712, the test solutions were a simulated Tank 8 waste solution and a 3 M sodium hydroxide solution. The general corrosion rates of all alloys in these solutions were less than 0.1 mils per year (mpy). The alloys displayed passive behavior in these solutions due to the protective nature of their oxides.« less

  15. Alloying effect of copper concentration on the localized corrosion of aluminum alloy for heat exchanger tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Min-Sung; Park, In-Jun; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the alloying effect of Cu content on the localized corrosion properties of Al alloy in synthetic acid rain containing 200 ppm of Cl- ion. In aluminum alloy tubes, a small amount of Cu is contained as the additive to improve the mechanical strength or as the impurity. The Cu-containing intermetallic compound, Al2Cu can cause galvanic corrosion because it has more noble potential than Al matrix. Therefore aluminum tube could be penetrated by localized corrosion attack. The results were obtained from electrochemical test, scanning electron microscopy, and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) mapping. Severe localized corrosion was occurred on the Al-0.03 wt% Cu alloy. The negative effect of Cu on the pitting corrosion was attributed to the presence of the Al2Cu precipitates.

  16. Gas-deposit-alloy corrosion interactions in simulated combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luer, Kevin Raymond

    High temperature corrosion in aggressive coal combustion environments involves simultaneous corrosion reactions between combustion gases, ash deposits, and alloys. This research investigated the behavior of a ferritic steel (SA387-Gr11) and three weld claddings (309L SS, Alloy 72, and Alloy 622) in five combustion environments beneath solid deposits at 500°C for up to 1000 hours. The synthetic gases consisted of N2-CO-CO-H2-H2O-H 2S-SO2 mixtures that simulated a range of fuel-rich or fuel-lean combustion environments with a constant sulfur content. The synthetic deposits contained FeS2, FeS, Fe3O4 and/or carbon. Reaction kinetics was studied in individual gas-metal, gas deposit, and deposit-alloy systems. A test method was developed to investigate simultaneous gas-deposit-metal corrosion reactions. The results showed reaction kinetics varied widely, depending on the gas-alloy system and followed linear, parabolic, and logarithmic rate laws. Under reducing conditions, the alloys exhibited a range of corrosion mechanisms including carburization-sulfidation, sulfidation, and sulfidation-oxidation. Most alloys were not resistant to the highly reducing gases but offered moderate resistance to mixed oxidation-sulfidation by demonstrating parabolic or logarithmic behavior. Under oxidizing conditions, all of the alloys were resistant. Under oxidizing-sulfating conditions, alloys with high Fe or Cr contents sulfated whereas an alloy containing Mo and W was resistant. In the gas-deposit-metal tests, FeS2-bearing deposits were extremely corrosive to low alloy steel under both reducing and oxidizing conditions but they had little influence on the weld claddings. Accelerated corrosion was attributed to rapid decomposition or oxidation of FeS2 particles that generated sulfur-rich gases above the alloy surface. In contrast, FeS-type deposits had no influence under reducing conditions but they were aggressive to low alloy steel under oxidizing conditions. The extent of damage

  17. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barret, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate-coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000, and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni, Ni-50 at.% Cr, and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. From these equations corrosion isopleths were prepared. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  18. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000 and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni; Ni-50 at.% Cr; and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. Corrosion isopleths were prepared from these equations. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  19. Method to predict relative hydriding within a group of zirconium alloys under nuclear irradiation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Levy, I.S.; Trimble, D.J.; Lanning, D.D.; Gerber, F.S.

    1990-04-10

    An out-of-reactor method for screening to predict relative in-reactor hydriding behavior of zirconium-based materials is disclosed. Samples of zirconium-based materials having different compositions and/or fabrication methods are autoclaved in a relatively concentrated (0.3 to 1.0M) aqueous lithium hydroxide solution at constant temperatures within the water reactor coolant temperature range (280 to 316 C). Samples tested by this out-of-reactor procedure, when compared on the basis of the ratio of hydrogen weight gain to oxide weight gain, accurately predict the relative rate of hydriding for the same materials when subject to in-reactor (irradiated) corrosion. 1 figure.

  20. Improvements to the strength and corrosion resistance of aluminum-magnesium-manganese alloys of near-AA5083 chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Mark Christopher

    Aluminum alloys of the 5000 series (AI-Mg-Mn) are extremely popular in a wide range of applications that call for a balance of moderately high strength, good corrosion resistance, and light weight, all at a moderate cost. One of the most popular 5000 series alloys is designated A1-5083, containing, in addition to aluminum, approximately 4 wt% magnesium and 0.7 wt% manganese. In order to increase the range of versatility of this particular alloy, a number of modifications have been examined that will potentially improve the strength and corrosion resistance characteristics while maintaining a chemical composition that is very close to the proven 5083 alloy. The strength of the 5083-based alloys under study are investigated with two goals in mind---to maximize the potential strength characteristics in a "standard" 5083 form through changes in minor processing parameters or through minor alloying additions. Increasing the standard alloy's potential is possible through improved efficiency of "preprocessing" heat treatments that maximize the homogeneous dispersion of secondary manganese-based particles. For the modified alloy study, additions of scandium and zirconium are shown to improve strength not only by forming secondary particles in the alloy, but also through substitutional solid solution strengthening, even when added at very small levels. Corrosion resistance of these 5083-based alloys is investigated once again through minor alloying additions; specifically zinc, copper, and silver. Zinc is particularly effective in that it changes the corrosion-susceptible binary aluminum-magnesium phase that would otherwise form on grain boundaries following exposure to moderately elevated temperatures for extended periods of time to a ternary aluminum-magnesium-zinc phase. This chemical composition of this ternary phase that forms following zinc additions can be further altered through minor additions of copper and silver. By determining threshold levels for these

  1. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. D.; Williams, D. N.; Wood, R. A.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of alloy composition on the aqueous stress corrosion of titanium alloys were studied with emphasis on determining the interrelations among composition, phase structure, and deformation and fracture properties of the alpha phase in alpha-beta alloys. Accomplishments summarized include the effects of alloy composition on susceptibility, and metallurgical mechanisms of stress-corrosion cracking.

  2. Corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 and Alloy 693 in simulated nuclear high level waste medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samantaroy, Pradeep Kumar; Suresh, Girija; Paul, Ranita; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-11-01

    Nickel based alloys are candidate materials for the storage of high level waste (HLW) generated from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In the present investigation Alloy 690 and Alloy 693 are assessed by potentiodynamic anodic polarization technique for their corrosion behavior in 3 M HNO 3, 3 M HNO 3 containing simulated HLW and in chloride medium. Both the alloys were found to possess good corrosion resistance in both the media at ambient condition. Microstructural examination was carried out by SEM for both the alloys after electrolytic etching. Compositional analysis of the passive film formed on the alloys in 3 M HNO 3 and 3 M HNO 3 with HLW was carried out by XPS. The surface of Alloy 690 and Alloy 693, both consists of a thin layer of oxide of Ni, Cr, and Fe under passivation in both the media. The results of investigation are presented in the paper.

  3. Effect of DC Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on Surface Characteristics and Corrosion Resistance of Zirconium

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Maciej

    2018-01-01

    Zr is a valve metal, the biocompatibility of which is at least on par with Ti. Recently, numerous attempts of the formation of bioactive coatings on Zr by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in solutions that were based on calcium acetate and calcium β-glycerophosphate were made. In this study, the direct current (DC) PEO of commercially pure zirconium in the solutions that contained Ca(H2PO2)2, Ca(HCOO)2, and Mg(CH3COO)2 was investigated. The treatment was conducted at 75 mA/cm2 up to 200, 300, or 400 V. Five process stages were discerned. The treatment at higher voltages resulted in the formation of oxide layers that had Ca/P or (Mg+Ca)/P ratios that were close to that of hydroxyapatite (Ca/P = 1.67), determined by SEM/EDX. The corrosion resistance studies were performed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and DC polarization methods. R(Q[R(QR)]) circuit model was used to fit the EIS data. In general, the coatings that were obtained at 200 V were the most corrosion resistant, however, they lacked the porous structure, which is typical for PEO coatings, and is sought after in the biomedical applications. The treatment at 400 V resulted in the formation of the coatings that were more corrosion resistant than those that were obtained at 300 V. This was determined mainly by the prevailing plasma regime at the given process voltage. The pitting resistance of Zr was also improved by the treatment, regardless of the applied process conditions. PMID:29751530

  4. Numerical Simulations on the Laser Spot Welding of Zirconium Alloy Endplate for Nuclear Fuel Bundle Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, G.; Narayana, K. L.; Boggarapu, Nageswara Rao

    2018-03-01

    In the nuclear industry, a critical welding process is joining of an end plate to a fuel rod to form a fuel bundle. Literature on zirconium welding in such a critical operation is limited. A CFD model is developed and performed for the three-dimensional non-linear thermo-fluid analysis incorporating buoyancy and Marnangoni stress and specifying temperature dependent properties to predict weld geometry and temperature field in and around the melt pool of laser spot during welding of a zirconium alloy E110 endplate with a fuel rod. Using this method, it is possible to estimate the weld pool dimensions for the specified laser power and laser-on-time. The temperature profiles will estimate the HAZ and microstructure. The adequacy of generic nature of the model is validated with existing experimental data.

  5. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum Alloys in Acidic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Rosliza; Seoh, S. Y.; Nik, W. B. Wan; Senin, H. B.

    2007-05-01

    The corrosion inhibition of Al and its alloys are the subject of tremendous technological importance due to the increased industrial applications of these materials. This study will report the results of weight loss, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements on the corrosion inhibition of AA6061 and AA6063 aluminum alloys in acidic media using sodium benzoate as an inhibitor. The results showed that addition of sodium benzoate retards the rate of dissolution and hence inhibits the corrosion of the aluminum alloy in acidic media. The inhibition efficiency increases with the increase of immersion time in acetic acid however it displays a different behavior in sulfuric acid. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits well with the experimental data. EIS studies showed that there was a significant increase in overall resistance after addition of sodium benzoate, when compared to the case without inhibitor. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits well with the experimental data.

  6. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  7. Evaluation and control of environmental corrosion for aluminum and steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion protection systems for aerospace application and the effects of surface treatments and methods of controlling stress corrosion are evaluated. Chromate pigmented systems were found to be most effective for aluminum alloys; zinc-rich coatings gave the greatest protection to steel alloys. Various steel and aluminum alloys are rated for stress corrosion resistance.

  8. Corrosion Behavior of Alloys in Molten Fluoride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guiqiu

    The molten fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature nuclear reactor (FHR) has been proposed as a candidate Generation IV nuclear reactor. This reactor combines the latest nuclear technology with the use of molten fluoride salt as coolant to significantly enhance safety and efficiency. However, an important challenge in FHR development is the corrosion of structural materials in high-temperature molten fluoride salt. The structural alloys' degradation, particularly in terms of chromium depletion, and the molten salt chemistry are key factors that impact the lifetime of nuclear reactors and the development of future FHR designs. In support of materials development for the FHR, the nickel base alloy of Hastelloy N and iron-chromium base alloy 316 stainless steel are being actively considered as critical structural alloys. Enriched 27LiF-BeF2 (named as FLiBe) is a promising coolant for the FHR because of its neutronic properties and heat transfer characteristics while operating at atmospheric pressure. In this study, the corrosion behavior of Ni-5Cr and Ni-20Cr binary model alloys, and Hastelloy N and 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe with and without graphite were investigated through various microstructural analyses. Based on the understanding of the corrosion behavior and data of above four alloys in molten FLiBe, a long-term corrosion prediction model has been developed that is applicable specifically for these four materials in FLiBe at 700ºC. The model uses Cr concentration profile C(x, t) as a function of corrosion distance in the materials and duration fundamentally derived from the Fick's diffusion laws. This model was validated with reasonable accuracy for the four alloys by fitting the calculated profiles with experimental data and can be applied to evaluate corrosion attack depth over the long-term. The critical constant of the overall diffusion coefficient (Deff) in this model can be quickly calculated from the experimental measurement of alloys' weight

  9. Corrosion resistance tests on NiTi shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, G

    1996-10-01

    The corrosion performances of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) in human body simulating fluids were evaluated in comparison with other implant materials. As for the passivity current in potentiostatic conditions, taken as an index of ion release, the values are about three times higher for NiTi than for Ti6Al4V and austenitic stainless steels. Regarding the localized corrosion, while plain potentiodynamic scans indicated for NiTi alloy good resistance to pitting attack similar to Ti6Al4V, tests in which the passive film is abruptly damaged (i.e. potentiostatic scratch test and modified ASTM F746) pointed out that the characteristics of the passive film formed on NiTi alloy (whose strength can be related to the alloy's biocompatibility) are not as good as those on Ti6Al4V but are comparable or inferior to those on austenitic stainless steels.

  10. Corrosion fatigue of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, V. C.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue studies were conducted on bare, chemical conversion coated, and anodized 2219-T87 aluminum alloy. These tests were performed using a rotating beam machine running at a velocity of 2500 rpm. The corrosive environments tested were distilled water, 100 ppm NaCl, and 3.5 percent NaCl. Results were compared to the endurance limit in air. An evaluation of the effect of protective coatings on corrosion fatigue was made by comparing the fatigue properties of specimens with coatings to those without.

  11. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  12. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (less than 35 microns) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500X) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% NaCl environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  13. High-intensity low energy titanium ion implantation into zirconium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, A. I.; Kashkarov, E. B.; Pushilina, N. S.; Syrtanov, M. S.; Shevelev, A. E.; Korneva, O. S.; Sutygina, A. N.; Lider, A. M.

    2018-05-01

    This research describes the possibility of ultra-high dose deep titanium ion implantation for surface modification of zirconium alloy Zr-1Nb. The developed method based on repetitively pulsed high intensity low energy titanium ion implantation was used to modify the surface layer. The DC vacuum arc source was used to produce metal plasma. Plasma immersion titanium ions extraction and their ballistic focusing in equipotential space of biased electrode were used to produce high intensity titanium ion beam with the amplitude of 0.5 A at the ion current density 120 and 170 mA/cm2. The solar eclipse effect was used to prevent vacuum arc titanium macroparticles from appearing in the implantation area of Zr sample. Titanium low energy (mean ion energy E = 3 keV) ions were implanted into zirconium alloy with the dose in the range of (5.4-9.56) × 1020 ion/cm2. The effect of ion current density, implantation dose on the phase composition, microstructure and distribution of elements was studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, respectively. The results show the appearance of Zr-Ti intermetallic phases of different stoichiometry after Ti implantation. The intermetallic phases are transformed from both Zr0.7Ti0.3 and Zr0.5Ti0.5 to single Zr0.6Ti0.4 phase with the increase in the implantation dose. The changes in phase composition are attributed to Ti dissolution in zirconium lattice accompanied by the lattice distortions and appearance of macrostrains in intermetallic phases. The depth of Ti penetration into the bulk of Zr increases from 6 to 13 μm with the implantation dose. The hardness and wear resistance of the Ti-implanted zirconium alloy were increased by 1.5 and 1.4 times, respectively. The higher current density (170 mA/cm2) leads to the increase in the grain size and surface roughness negatively affecting the tribological properties of the alloy.

  14. Boron and Zirconium from Crucible Refractories in a Complex Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1958-01-01

    In a laboratory study of the factors involved in the influence of induction vacuum melting on 55ni-20cr-15co-4mo-3ti-3al heat resistant alloy, it was found that the major factor was the type of ceramic used as the crucible. The study concluded that trace amounts of boron or zirconium derived from reaction of the melt with the crucible refactories improved creep-rupture properties at 1,600 degrees F. Boron was most effective and, in addition, markedly improved hot-workability.

  15. Continuum model for hydrogen pickup in zirconium alloys of LWR fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Zheng, Ming-Jie; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2017-04-01

    A continuum model for calculating the time-dependent hydrogen pickup fractions in various Zirconium alloys under steam and pressured water oxidation has been developed in this study. Using only one fitting parameter, the effective hydrogen gas partial pressure at the oxide surface, a qualitative agreement is obtained between the predicted and previously measured hydrogen pickup fractions. The calculation results therefore demonstrate that H diffusion through the dense oxide layer plays an important role in the hydrogen pickup process. The limitations and possible improvement of the model are also discussed.

  16. Evaluation of steam corrosion and water quenching behavior of zirconium-silicide coated LWR fuel claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Hwasung; Lockhart, Cody; Mariani, Robert; Xu, Peng; Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates steam corrosion of bulk ZrSi2, pure Si, and zirconium-silicide coatings as well as water quenching behavior of ZrSi2 coatings to evaluate its feasibility as a potential accident-tolerant fuel cladding coating material in light water nuclear reactor. The ZrSi2 coating and Zr2Si-ZrSi2 coating were deposited on Zircaloy-4 flats, SiC flats, and cylindrical Zircaloy-4 rodlets using magnetron sputter deposition. Bulk ZrSi2 and pure Si samples showed weight loss after the corrosion test in pure steam at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 72 h. Silicon depletion on the ZrSi2 surface during the steam test was related to the surface recession observed in the silicon samples. ZrSi2 coating (∼3.9 μm) pre-oxidized in 700 °C air prevented substrate oxidation but thin porous ZrO2 formed on the coating. The only condition which achieved complete silicon immobilization in the oxide scale in aqueous environments was the formation of ZrSiO4 via ZrSi2 coating oxidation in 1400 °C air. In addition, ZrSi2 coatings were beneficial in enhancing quenching heat transfer - the minimum film boiling temperature increased by 6-8% in the three different environmental conditions tested. During repeated thermal cycles (water quenching from 700 °C to 85 °C for 20 s) performed as a part of quench tests, no spallation and cracking was observed and the coating prevented oxidation of the underlying Zircaloy-4 substrate.

  17. The corrosivity and passivity of sputtered Mg-Ti alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Guang -Ling; Unocic, Kinga A.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; ...

    2015-11-30

    Our study explored the possibility of forming a “stainless” Mg–Ti alloy. The electrochemical behavior of magnetron-sputtered Mg–Ti alloys was measured in a NaCl solution, and the surface films on the alloys were examined by XPS, SEM and TEM. Increased corrosion resistance was observed with increased Ti content in the sputtered Mg–Ti alloys, but passive-like behavior was not reached until the Ti level (atomic %) was higher than the Mg level. Moreover, the surface film that formed on sputtered Mg–Ti based alloys in NaCl solution was thick, discontinuous and non-protective, whereas a thin, continuous and protective Mg and Ti oxide filmmore » was formed on a sputtered Ti–Mg based alloy.« less

  18. Determination of very low concentrations of hydrogen in zirconium alloys by neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, N. L.; Santisteban, J. R.; Tartaglione, A.; Marín, J.; Barrow, L.; Daymond, M. R.; Schulz, M.; Grosse, M.; Tremsin, A.; Lehmann, E.; Kaestner, A.; Kelleher, J.; Kabra, S.

    2018-05-01

    Zr-based alloys are used in nuclear power plants because of a unique combination of very low neutron absorption and excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at operating conditions. However, Hydrogen (H) or Deuterium ingress due to waterside corrosion during operation can embrittle these materials. In particular, Zr alloys are affected by Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), a stress-corrosion cracking mechanism operating at very low H content (∼100-300 wt ppm), which involves the diffusion of H to the crack tip. H content in Zr alloys is commonly determined by destructive techniques such as inert gas fusion and vacuum extraction. In this work, we have used neutron imaging to non-destructively quantify the spatial distribution of H in Zr alloys specimens with a resolution of ∼5 wt ppm, an accuracy of ∼10 wt ppm and a spatial resolution of ∼25 μm × 5 mm x 10 mm. Non-destructive experiments performed on a comprehensive set of calibrated specimens of Zircaloy-2 and Zr2.5%Nb at four neutron facilities worldwide show the typical precision and repeatability of the technique. We have observed that the microstructure of the alloy plays an important role on the homogeneity of H across a specimen. We propose several strategies for performing H determinations without calibrated specimens, with the most precise results for neutrons having wavelengths longer than 5.7 Å.

  19. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  20. Hot corrosion and high temperature corrosion behavior of a new gas turbine material -- alloy 603GT

    SciT

    Agarwal, D.C.; Brill, U.; Klower, J.

    1998-12-31

    Salt deposits encountered in a variety of high temperature processes have caused premature failures in heat exchangers and superheater tubes in pulp and paper recovery boilers, waste incinerators and coal gasifiers. Molten salt corrosion studies in both land based and air craft turbines have been the subject of intense study by many researchers. This phenomenon referred to as ``hot corrosion`` has primarily been attributed to corrosion by alkali sulfates, and there is somewhat general agreement in the literature that this is caused by either basic or acidic dissolution (fluxing) of the protective metal oxide layers by complex salt deposits containingmore » both sulfates and chlorides. This paper describes experimental studies conducted on the hot corrosion behavior of a new Ni-Cr-Al alloy 603GT (UNS N06603) in comparison to some commercially established alloys used in gas turbine components.« less

  1. Corrosion fatigue of biomedical metallic alloys: mechanisms and mitigation.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2012-03-01

    Cyclic stresses are often related to the premature mechanical failure of metallic biomaterials. The complex interaction between fatigue and corrosion in the physiological environment has been subject of many investigations. In this context, microstructure, heat treatments, plastic deformation, surface finishing and coatings have decisive influence on the mechanisms of fatigue crack nucleation and growth. Furthermore, wear is frequently present and contributes to the process. However, despite all the effort at elucidating the mechanisms that govern corrosion fatigue of biomedical alloys, failures continue to occur. This work reviews the literature on corrosion-fatigue-related phenomena of Ti alloys, surgical stainless steels, Co-Cr-Mo and Mg alloys. The aim was to discuss the correlation between structural and surface aspects of these materials and the onset of fatigue in the highly saline environment of the human body. By understanding such correlation, mitigation of corrosion fatigue failure may be achieved in a reliable scientific-based manner. Different mitigation methods are also reviewed and discussed throughout the text. It is intended that the information condensed in this article should be a valuable tool in the development of increasingly successful designs against the corrosion fatigue of metallic implants. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  3. Effect of oxidation on transport properties of zirconium-1% niobium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peletsky, V. E.; Musayeva, Z. A.

    1995-11-01

    The thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of zirconium-1 wt% niobium samples were measured before and after the process of their oxidation in air. A special procedure was used to dissolve the gas and to smooth out its concentration in the alloy. The basic experiments were performed under high vacuum under steady-state temperature conditions. The temperature range was 300 1600 K. for the pure alloy and 300 1100 K for the samples containing oxygen. It was found that the thermal conductivity—oxygen concentration relation reverses its sign from negative at low and middle temperatures to positive at temperatures above 900 K. The relation between the electrical resistivity and the oxygen content does not show this feature. The Lorenz function was found to have an anomalous temperature dependence.

  4. Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete [2009

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-04-01

    Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for four-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focus...

  5. Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete [2007

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-07-01

    Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for 4-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focused ...

  6. Mechanical Characterization and Corrosion Testing of X608 Al Alloy

    SciT

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stephens, Elizabeth V.

    2016-02-07

    This paper describes the mechanical characterization and corrosion testing of X608 Al alloy that is being considered for A-pillar covers for heavy-duty truck applications. Recently, PNNL developed a thermo-mechanical process to stamp A-pillar covers at room temperature using this alloy, and the full-size prototype was successfully stamped by a tier-1 supplier. This study was conducted to obtain additional important information related to the newly developed forming process, and to further improve its mechanical properties. The solutionization temperature, pre-strain and paint-bake heat-treatment were found to influence the alloy’s fabricability and mechanical properties. Natural aging effect on the formability was investigated bymore » limiting dome height (LDH) tests. Preliminary corrosion experiments showed that the employed thermo-mechanical treatments did not significantly affect the corrosion behavior of Al X608.« less

  7. Effect of Cu content on exfoliation corrosion and electrochemical corrosion of A7N01 aluminum alloy in EXCO solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yaling; Wang, Xiaomin; Hu, Jie; Zhou, Qiang; Chen, Hui

    2017-07-01

    The exfoliation corrosion (EXCO) sensitivities and electrochemical corrosions of A7N01 aluminum (Al) alloys with 0.074% and 0.136% Cu contents were investigated in EXCO solution. The exfoliation corrosion developed more rapidly for the alloy with 0.136% Cu by expressing higher exfoliation rate and deeper corrosion pits as observed by SEM and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM). In EXCO solution, the alloy with 0.136% Cu content showed lower open-circuit potential (OCP) than the alloy with 0.074% Cu content. The alloy with 0.136% Cu content had bigger “hysteresis loop” in cyclic polarization curve which meant lower self-passivation ability. In electrochemical impedance spectroscopy plot, its curvature radius and capacitance index were lower. The electrochemical test results revealed that the alloy with 0.136% Cu content showed more severe electrochemical corrosion than the alloy with 0.074% Cu content, consistent with the exfoliation corrosion results. The microstructures of two alloys were observed through optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The continuous distribution of the equilibrium precipitate η-MgZn2 on grain boundaries, the decreasing of the width of precipitate-free zone (PFZ) and the coarse Cu-Fe-Si-rich phase were responsible for the higher corrosion sensitivity of the Al alloy with 0.136% Cu than that of Al alloy with 0.074% Cu content in EXCO solution.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of laser-cleaned AA7024 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F. D.; Liu, H.; Suebka, C.; Liu, Y. X.; Liu, Z.; Guo, W.; Cheng, Y. M.; Zhang, S. L.; Li, L.

    2018-03-01

    Laser cleaning has been considered as a promising technique for the preparation of aluminium alloy surfaces prior to joining and welding and has been practically used in the automotive industry. The process is based on laser ablation to remove surface contaminations and aluminium oxides. However the change of surface chemistry and oxide status may affect corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloys. Until now, no work has been reported on the corrosion characteristics of laser cleaned metallic surfaces. In this study, we investigated the corrosion behaviour of laser-cleaned AA7024-T4 aluminium alloy using potentiodynamic polarisation, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET). The results showed that the laser-cleaned surface exhibited higher corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution than as-received hot-rolled alloy, with significant increase in impedance and decrease in capacitance, while SVET revealed that the active anodic points appeared on the as-received surface were not presented on the laser-cleaned surfaces. Such corrosion behaviours were correlated to the change of surface oxide status measured by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was suggested that the removal of the original less protective oxide layer consisting of MgO and MgAl2O4 on the as-received surfaces and the newly formed more protective oxide layer containing mainly Al2O3 and MgO by laser cleaning were responsible for the improvement of the corrosion performance.

  9. Effects of hot-salt stress corrosion on titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Susceptibility of titanium alloys to hot-salt stress-corrosion cracking increased as follows: Ti-2Al-11Sn-5Zr-1Mo-0.2Si (679), Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo (6242), Ti-6Al-4V (64), Ti-6Al-4V-3Co (643), Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V (811), and Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al (13-11-3). The Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.25Si (5621S) alloy was both the least and most susceptible, depending on heat treatment. Such rankings can be drastically altered by heat-to-heat variations and processing conditions. Residual compressive stresses reduce susceptibility to stress-corrosion. Detection of substantial concentrations of hydrogen in all corroded alloys confirmed the generality of a previously proposed hydrogen embrittlement mechanism.

  10. Galvanic corrosion behavior of orthodontic archwire alloys coupled to bracket alloys.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Endo, Kazuhiko; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Ohno, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kazuo; Kakizaki, Mitsugi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a quantitative assessment of galvanic corrosion behavior of orthodontic archwire alloys coupled to orthodontic bracket alloys in 0.9% NaCl solution and to study the effect of surface area ratios. Two common bracket alloys, stainless steels and titanium, and four common wire alloys, nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy, beta-titanium (beta-Ti) alloy, stainless steel, and cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy, were used. Three different area ratios, 1:1, 1:2.35, and 1:3.64, were used; two of them assumed that the multibracket appliances consists of 14 brackets and 0.016 inch of round archwire or 0.016 x 0.022 inch of rectangular archwire. The galvanic current was measured for 3 successive days using zero-impedance ammeter. When the NiTi alloy was coupled with Ti (1:1, 1:2.35, and 1:3.64 of the surface area ratio) or beta-Ti alloy was coupled with Ti (1:2.35 and 1:3.64 of the surface area ratio), Ti initially was the anode and corroded. However, the polarity reversed in 1 hour, resulting in corrosion of the NiTi or beta-Ti. The NiTi alloy coupled with SUS 304 or Ti exhibited a relatively large galvanic current density even after 72 hours. It is suggested that coupling SUS 304-NiTi and Ti-NiTi may remarkably accelerate the corrosion of NiTi alloy, which serves as the anode. The different anode-cathode area ratios used in this study had little effect on galvanic corrosion behavior.

  11. Effect of alloying elements Al and Ca on corrosion resistance of plasma anodized Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anawati, Asoh, Hidetaka; Ono, Sachiko

    2016-04-01

    Plasma anodizing is a surface treatment used to form a ceramic-type oxide film on Mg alloys by the application of a high anodic voltage to create intense plasma near the metal surface. With proper selection of the process parameters, the technique can produce high quality oxide with superior adhesion, corrosion resistance, micro-hardness, wear resistance and strength. The effect of alloying element Al on plasma anodizing process of Mg alloys was studied by comparing the anodizing curves of pure Mg, AZ31, and AZ61 alloys while the effect of Ca were studied on AZ61 alloys containing 0, 1, and 2 wt% Ca. Anodizing was performed in 0.5 M Na3PO4 solution at a constant current density of 200 Am-2 at 25°C. Anodic oxide films with lava-like structure having mix composition of amorphous and crystal were formed on all of the alloys. The main crystal form of the oxide was Mg3(PO4)2 as analyzed by XRD. Alloying elements Al and Ca played role in modifying the plasma lifetime during anodization. Al tended to extend the strong plasma lifetime and therefore accelerated the film thickening. The effect of Ca on anodizing process was still unclear. The anodic film thickness and chemical composition were altered by the presence of Ca in the alloys. Electrochemical corrosion test in 0.9% NaCl solution showed that the corrosion behavior of the anodized specimens depend on the behavior of the substrate. Increasing Al and Ca content in the alloys tended to increase the corrosion resistance of the specimens. The corrosion resistance of the anodized specimens improved significantly about two orders of magnitude relative to the bare substrate.

  12. Performance assessment of femoral knee components made from cobalt-chromium alloy and oxidized zirconium.

    PubMed

    Brandt, J-M; Guenther, L; O'Brien, S; Vecherya, A; Turgeon, T R; Bohm, E R

    2013-12-01

    The surface characteristics of the femoral component affect polyethylene wear in modular total knee replacements. In the present retrieval study, the surface characteristics of cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloy and oxidized zirconium (OxZr) femoral components were assessed and compared. Twenty-six retrieved CoCr alloy femoral components were matched with twenty-six retrieved OxZr femoral components for implantation period, body-mass index, patient gender, implant type, and polyethylene insert thickness. The surface damage on the retrieved femoral components was evaluated using a semi-quantitative assessment method, scanning electron microscopy, and contact profilometry. The retrieved CoCr alloy femoral components showed less posterior surface gouging than OxZr femoral components; however, at a higher magnification, the grooving damage features on the retrieved CoCr alloy femoral components confirmed an abrasive wear mechanism. The surface roughness values Rp, Rpm, and Rpk for the retrieved CoCr alloy femoral components were found to be significantly higher than those of the retrieved OxZr femoral components (p≤0.031). The surface roughness values were higher on the medial condyles than on the lateral condyles of the retrieved CoCr alloy femoral components; such a difference was not observed on the retrieved OxZr femoral components. The surface roughness of CoCr alloy femoral components increased while the surface roughness of the OxZr femoral components remained unchanged after in vivo service. Therefore, the OxZr femoral components' resistance to abrasive wear may enable lower polyethylene wear and ensure long-term durability in vivo. Level IV. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunhui; Zheng, Yuanli; Zhong, Qun

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS) containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1) and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) species (Solution 2) was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR) equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR))) circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces.

  14. Biofunctionalized anti-corrosive silane coatings for magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Yue, Zhilian; Romeo, Tony; Weber, Jan; Scheuermann, Torsten; Moulton, Simon; Wallace, Gordon

    2013-11-01

    Biodegradable magnesium alloys are advantageous in various implant applications, as they reduce the risks associated with permanent metallic implants. However, a rapid corrosion rate is usually a hindrance in biomedical applications. Here we report a facile two step procedure to introduce multifunctional, anti-corrosive coatings on Mg alloys, such as AZ31. The first step involves treating the NaOH-activated Mg with bistriethoxysilylethane to immobilize a layer of densely crosslinked silane coating with good corrosion resistance; the second step is to impart amine functionality to the surface by treating the modified Mg with 3-amino-propyltrimethoxysilane. We characterized the two-layer anticorrosive coating of Mg alloy AZ31 by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, static contact angle measurement and optical profilometry, potentiodynamic polarization and AC impedance measurements. Furthermore, heparin was covalently conjugated onto the silane-treated AZ31 to render the coating haemocompatible, as demonstrated by reduced platelet adhesion on the heparinized surface. The method reported here is also applicable to the preparation of other types of biofunctional, anti-corrosive coatings and thus of significant interest in biodegradable implant applications. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chunhui; Zheng, Yuanli; Zhong, Qun

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS) containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1) and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) species (Solution 2) was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR) equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR))) circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces. PMID:28350880

  16. Environmental and alloying effects on corrosion of metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dong

    2009-12-01

    In the first part of this project, corrosion studies were carried out on 304L stainless steel samples welded with Cr-free consumables, which were developed to minimize the concentration of chromate species in the weld fume. The corrosion properties of Ni-Cu and Ni-Cu-Pd Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welds and Shielded Metal Arc (SMA) welds are comparable to those of welds fabricated with SS308L consumable, which is the standard consumable for welding 304L. Although the breakdown potentials of the new welds from both welding processes are lower than that of the SS308L weld, the repassivation potential of these new welds is much higher. Generally, the repassivation potential is a more conservative measure of susceptibility to localized corrosion. Our studies showed that the Ni-Cu and Ni-Cu-Pd welds are more resistant to crevice corrosion than SS308L welds, which is related to the high repassivation potential. Also, addition of Pd improved the corrosion resistance of the new welds, which is consistent with previous studies from button samples and bead-on-plate samples. Other corrosion studies such as creviced and uncreviced long time immersion, atmospheric exposure, and slow strain rate testing suggest that Ni-Cu-Pd welds can be a qualified substitute for SS308 weld. In the second part of this project, efforts are put on the connection between lab and field exposure tests because sometimes the correspondence between lab atmospheric corrosion tests (ASTM B117) and field exposures is poor as a result of differences in the critical conditions controlling chemical and electrochemical reactions on surfaces. Recent studies in atmospheric chemistry revealed the formation of extremely reactive species from interactions between UV light, chloride aerosols above oceans and oxidizing agents such as ozone or peroxide. Atmospheric corrosion of metals can be affected by these species which might be transported long distances in the atmosphere to locations far from oceans. However, these

  17. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  18. Oxidation behaviour of zirconium alloys and their precipitates - A mechanistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proff, C.; Abolhassani, S.; Lemaignan, C.

    2013-01-01

    The precipitate oxidation behaviour of binary zirconium alloys containing 1 wt.% Fe, Ni, Cr or 0.6 wt.% Nb was characterised in TEM on FIB prepared transverse sections of the oxide and reported in previous studies [1,2]. In the present study the following alloys: Zr1%Cu, Zr0.5%Cu0.5%Mo and pure Zr are analysed to add to the available information. In all cases, the observed precipitate oxidation behaviour in the oxide close to the metal-oxide interface could be described either with delayed oxidation with respect to the matrix or simultaneous oxidation as the surrounding zirconium matrix. Attempt was made to explain these observations, with different parameters such as precipitate size and structure, composition and thermodynamic properties. It was concluded that the thermodynamics with the new approach presented could explain most precisely their behaviour, considering the precipitate stoichiometry and the free energy of oxidation of the constituting elements. The surface topography of the oxidised materials, as well as the microstructure of the oxide presenting microcracks have been examined. A systematic presence of microcracks above the precipitates exhibiting delayed oxidation has been found; the height of these crack calculated using the Pilling-Bedworth ratios of different phases present, can explain their origin. The protrusions at the surface in the case of materials containing large precipitates can be unambiguously correlated to the presence of these latter, and the height can be correlated to the Pilling-Bedworth ratios of the phases present as well as the diffusion of the alloying elements to the surface and their subsequent oxidation. This latter behaviour was much more considerable in the case of Fe and Cu with Fe showing systematically diffusion to the outer surface.

  19. Corrosion resistance investigation of vanadium alloys in liquid lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovitskaya, I. V.; Lyublinskiy, I. E.; Bondarenko, G. G.; Paramonova, V. V.; Korshunov, S. N.; Mansurova, A. N.; Lyakhovitskiy, M. M.; Zharkov, M. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    A major concern in using vanadium alloys for first wall/blanket systems in fusion reactors is their activity with regard to nonmetallic impurities in the coolants. This paper presents the results of studying the corrosion resistance in high-purity liquid lithium (with the nitrogen and carbon content of less than 10-3 wt %) of vanadium and vanadium alloys (V-1.86Ga, V-3.4Ga-0.62Si, V-4.81Ti-4.82Cr) both in the initial state and preliminarily irradiated with Ar+ ions with energy of 20 keV to a dose of 1022 m-2 at an irradiation temperature of 400°C. The degree of corrosion was estimated by measuring the changes in the weight and microhardness. Corrosion tests were carried out under static isothermal conditions at a temperature of 600°C for 400 h. The identity of corrosion mechanisms of materials both irradiated with Ar ions and not irradiated, which consisted in an insignificant penetration of nitrogen into the materials and a substantial escape of oxygen from the materials, causing the formation of a zone with a reduced microhardness near the surface, was established. The influence of the corrosive action of lithium on the surface morphology of the materials under study was found, resulting in the manifestation of grain boundaries and slip lines on the sample surface, the latter being most clearly observed in the case of preliminary irradiation with Ar ions.

  20. Coatings for Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Protection of Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, Jim; Gabb, Tim; Draper, Sue; Miller, Bob; Locci, Ivan; Sudbrack, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Increasing temperatures in aero gas turbines is resulting in oxidation and hot corrosion attack of turbine disks. Since disks are sensitive to low cycle fatigue (LCF), any environmental attack, and especially hot corrosion pitting, can potentially seriously degrade the life of the disk. Application of metallic coatings are one means of protecting disk alloys from this environmental attack. However, simply the presence of a metallic coating, even without environmental exposure, can degrade the LCF life of a disk alloy. Therefore, coatings must be designed which are not only resistant to oxidation and corrosion attack, but must not significantly degrade the LCF life of the alloy. Three different Ni-Cr coating compositions (29, 35.5, 45wt. Cr) were applied at two thicknesses by Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering (PEMS) to two similar Ni-based disk alloys. One coating also received a thin ZrO2 overcoat. The coated samples were also given a short oxidation exposure in a low PO2 environment to encourage chromia scale formation. Without further environmental exposure, the LCF life of the coated samples, evaluated at 760C, was less than that of uncoated samples. Hence, application of the coating alone degraded the LCF life of the disk alloy. Since shot peening is commonly employed to improve LCF life, the effect of shot peening the coated and uncoated surface was also evaluated. For all cases, shot peening improved the LCF life of the coated samples. Coated and uncoated samples were shot peened and given environmental exposures consisting of 500 hrs of oxidation followed by 50 hrs of hot corrosion, both at 760C). The high-Cr coating showed the best LCF life after the environmental exposures. Results of the LCF testing and post-test characterization of the various coatings will be presented and future research directions discussed.

  1. Changes in the state of iron atoms in Zr alloys during corrosion tests in an autoclave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, V. P.; Bateev, A. B.; Lauer, Yu. A.; Kargin, N. I.; Petrov, V. I.

    2014-04-01

    Mössbauerinvestigations were carried out on oxide films formed on specimens of zirconium alloys Zr-1.0 %wtFe-1.2 %wtSn-0.5 %wtCr subjected to corrosion in steam-water environment at a temperature of 360 °C and at a pressure of 16.8 MPa with lithium and boron additions, and on Zr-1.4 %wtFe-0.7 %wtCr corroded in steam-water environment at 350 °C and 16.8 MPa as well as in steam-water environment at 500 °C and 10 MPa. In the metal part of the samples, under the oxide film, the iron atoms are in form of intermetallic precipitates of Zr(Fe, Cr)2. The corrosion process decomposes the intermetallic precipitates and particles are formed of metallic iron with inclusions of chromium atoms -Fe(Cr), α-Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 compounds. Part of the iron ions are in divalent and part in trivalent paramagnetic states. It is proposed that some part of the iron containing oxide precipitates in the oxide film may be in the form of nanoparticles which pass from the superparamagnetic to the ferromagnetic state with decreasing temperature.

  2. In-Vitro Corrosion Studies of Bioabsorbable Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, P.; Munroe, N.

    Magnesium alloys have inspired a significant amount of attention from researchers all over the world for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications due to their light weight, mechanical integrity and degradation behavior. In this investigation, cast manufactured binary, ternary and quaternary magnesium alloys were studied for their degradation behavior by potentiodynamic polarization tests in phosphate buffer saline solution (PBS) and PBS containing amino acids (cysteine, C and tryptophan, W) at 37 °C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were performed to determine the charge transfer resistance and immersion tests were performed to assess corrosion rate and hydrogen evolution from the alloys. Furthermore, the surface morphology and surface chemistry of the alloys were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  3. Microstructure Instability of Candidate Fuel Cladding Alloys: Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yinan; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, David; Kish, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    This paper addresses some of the overarching aspects of microstructure instability expected from both high temperature and radiation exposure that could affect the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of the candidate austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys being considered for the fuel cladding of the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) concept. An overview of the microstructure instability expected by both exposures is presented prior to turning the focus onto the implications of such instability on the corrosion and SCC resistance. Results from testing conducted using pre-treated (thermally-aged) Type 310S stainless steel to shed some light on this important issue are included to help identify the outstanding corrosion resistance assessment needs.

  4. Corrosion resistance of titanium ion implanted AZ91 magnesium alloy

    SciT

    Liu Chenglong; Xin Yunchang; Tian Xiubo

    2007-03-15

    Degradable metal alloys constitute a new class of materials for load-bearing biomedical implants. Owing to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, magnesium alloys are promising in degradable prosthetic implants. The objective of this study is to improve the corrosion behavior of surgical AZ91 magnesium alloy by titanium ion implantation. The surface characteristics of the ion implanted layer in the magnesium alloys are examined. The authors' results disclose that an intermixed layer is produced and the surface oxidized films are mainly composed of titanium oxide with a lesser amount of magnesium oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the oxide has threemore » layers. The outer layer which is 10 nm thick is mainly composed of MgO and TiO{sub 2} with some Mg(OH){sub 2}. The middle layer that is 50 nm thick comprises predominantly TiO{sub 2} and MgO with minor contributions from MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and TiO. The third layer from the surface is rich in metallic Mg, Ti, Al, and Ti{sub 3}Al. The effects of Ti ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of the magnesium alloys are investigated in simulated body fluids at 37{+-}1 deg. C using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit potential techniques. Compared to the unimplanted AZ91 alloy, titanium ion implantation significantly shifts the open circuit potential (OCP) to a more positive potential and improves the corrosion resistance at OCP. This phenomenon can be ascribed to the more compact surface oxide film, enhanced reoxidation on the implanted surface, as well as the increased {beta}-Mg{sub 12}Al{sub 17} phase.« less

  5. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  6. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-10

    Hossain and B. J, O’Toole: Stress Corrosion Cracking of Martensitic Stainless Steel for Transmutation Application, Presented at 2003 International...SCC of marternsitic stainless steel by Roy,[12] and learn the annealing effect on SCC of carbon steel by Haruna.[13] The application of slow...observations. In his study on SCC of AISI 304 stainless steel , Roychowdhury[3] detected no apparent SCC in solutions containing 1 ppm thiosulfate and

  8. Atomistic modeling of high temperature uranium-zirconium alloy structure and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. P.; Beeler, B.; Deo, C.; Baskes, M. I.; Okuniewski, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A semi-empirical Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) potential is developed for application to the high temperature body-centered-cubic uranium-zirconium alloy (γ-U-Zr) phase and employed with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the high temperature thermo-physical properties of U-Zr alloys. Uranium-rich U-Zr alloys (e.g. U-10Zr) have been tested and qualified for use as metallic nuclear fuel in U.S. fast reactors such as the Integral Fast Reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactors, and are a common sub-system of ternary metallic alloys like U-Pu-Zr and U-Zr-Nb. The potential was constructed to ensure that basic properties (e.g., elastic constants, bulk modulus, and formation energies) were in agreement with first principles calculations and experimental results. After which, slight adjustments were made to the potential to fit the known thermal properties and thermodynamics of the system. The potentials successfully reproduce the experimental melting point, enthalpy of fusion, volume change upon melting, thermal expansion, and the heat capacity of pure U and Zr. Simulations of the U-Zr system are found to be in good agreement with experimental thermal expansion values, Vegard's law for the lattice constants, and the experimental enthalpy of mixing. This is the first simulation to reproduce the experimental thermodynamics of the high temperature γ-U-Zr metallic alloy system. The MEAM potential is then used to explore thermodynamics properties of the high temperature U-Zr system including the constant volume heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, adiabatic index, and the Grüneisen parameters.

  9. Corrosion resistance of zirconium oxynitride coatings deposited via DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering and spray pyrolysis-nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, G. I.; Bethencourt, M.; Olaya, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    ZrOxNy/ZrO2 thin films were deposited on stainless steel using two different methods: ultrasonic spray pyrolysis-nitriding (SPY-N) and the DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (UBMS). Using the first method, ZrO2 was initially deposited and subsequently nitrided in an anhydrous ammonia atmosphere at 1023 K at atmospheric pressure. For UBMS, the film was deposited in an atmosphere of air/argon with a Φair/ΦAr flow ratio of 3.0. Structural analysis was carried out through X-ray diffraction (XRD), and morphological analysis was done through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Chemical analysis was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). ZrOxNy rhombohedral polycrystalline film was produced with spray pyrolysis-nitriding, whereas using the UBMS technique, the oxynitride films grew with cubic Zr2ON2 crystalline structures preferentially oriented along the (2 2 2) plane. Upon chemical analysis of the surface, the coatings exhibited spectral lines of Zr3d, O1s, and N1s, characteristic of zirconium oxynitride/zirconia. SEM analysis showed the homogeneity of the films, and AFM showed morphological differences according to the deposition technique of the coatings. Zirconium oxynitride films enhanced the stainless steel's resistance to corrosion using both techniques. The protective efficacy was evaluated using electrochemical techniques based on linear polarization (LP). The results indicated that the layers provide good resistance to corrosion when exposed to chloride-containing media.

  10. Theoretical aspects of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Kwon; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2018-05-01

    Theoretical aspects of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22 in contact with saturated NaCl solution are explored in terms of the Coupled Environment Fracture Model (CEFM), which was calibrated upon available experimental crack growth rate data. Crack growth rate (CGR) was then predicted as a function of stress intensity, electrochemical potential, solution conductivity, temperature, and electrochemical crack length (ECL). From the dependence of the CGR on the ECL and the evolution of a semi-elliptical surface crack in a planar surface under constant loading conditions it is predicted that penetration through the 2.5-cm thick Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer of the waste package (WP) could occur 32,000 years after nucleation. Accordingly, the crack must nucleate within the first 968,000 years of storage. However, we predict that the Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer will not be penetrated by SCC within the 10,000-year Intermediate Performance Period, even if a crack nucleates immediately upon placement of the WP in the repository.

  11. Review and Study of Physics Driven Pitting Corrosion Modeling in 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0218 REVIEW AND STUDY OF PHYSICS DRIVEN PITTING CORROSION MODELING IN 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) Lingyu...2014 – 1 April 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE REVIEW AND STUDY OF PHYSICS DRIVEN PITTING CORROSION MODELING IN 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) 5a...18 Review and Study of Physics Driven Pitting Corrosion Modeling in 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys Lingyu Yu 1*, Kumar V. Jata2 1Mechanical Engineering

  12. Corrosion Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Aluminum Alloys in Tropical Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosliza, R.; Senin, H. B.

    2008-05-01

    The corrosion inhibition of aluminum and its alloys is the subject of remarkable technological importance due to their increased industrial applications. This paper reports the results of the corrosion inhibition properties of AA6061 and AA6063 aluminum alloys in tropical seawater using sodium benzoate as an inhibitor. It was found that the corrosion inhibition occurred through the adsorption on the surfactant on the metal surface without modifying the mechanism of corrosion processes.

  13. Influence of graphite-alloy interactions on corrosion of Ni-Mo-Cr alloy in molten fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Hua; Hou, Juan; Ye, Xiang-Xi; Zeng, Chao Liu; Sun, Hua; Li, Xiaoyun; Yu, Guojun; Zhou, Xingtai; Wang, Jian-Qiang

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the effects of graphite-alloy interaction on corrosion of Ni-Mo-Cr alloy in molten FLiNaK salt were investigated. The corrosion tests of Ni-Mo-Cr alloys were conducted in graphite crucibles, to examine the differences of test specimens in conditions of electric contact and isolated with graphite, respectively. The corrosion attack is severer with more weight loss and deeper Cr depletion layer in samples electric contact with graphite than those isolated with graphite. The occurrence of galvanic corrosion between alloy specimens and graphite container was confirmed by electrochemical measurement. The corrosion is controlled by nonelectric transfer in isolated test while electrochemical reaction accelerated corrosion in electric contact test.

  14. General Corrosion Resistance Assessments of AA7085, AA7129, and Other High-Performance Aluminum Alloys for Department of Defense (DOD) Systems UsingLaboratory Based Accelerated Corrosion Methods and Electrochemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    laboratory should play a role in the final design decision process. Integration factors such as conversion coatings , primers, topcoats, and their...Cyclic Accelerated Corrosion Analysis of Nonchromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminum Alloys 2024, 2219, 5083, and 7075 Using DoD Paint Systems; ARL...Titanium 0.08 0.10 max 0.10 max 0.15 max 0.08 max 0.05 max Zirconium 0.05 – 0.15 0.05 – 0.15 - 0.10 – 0.25 0.05 – 0.15 - Vanadium - - - - - 0.05 max

  15. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  16. Biocorrosion resistance of coated magnesium alloy by microarc oxidation in electrolyte containing zirconium and calcium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-Ming; Guo, Jun-Wei; Wu, Yun-Feng; Liu, Yan; Cao, Jian-Yun; Zhou, Yu; Jia, De-Chang

    2014-09-01

    The key to use magnesium alloys as suitable biodegradable implants is how to adjust their degradation rates. We report a strategy to prepare biocompatible ceramic coating with improved biocorrosion resistance property on AZ91D alloy by microarc oxidation (MAO) in a silicate-K2ZrF6 solution with and without Ca(H2PO4)2 additives. The microstructure and biocorrosion of coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM, as well as electrochemical and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). The results show that the coatings are mainly composed of MgO, Mg2SiO4, m-ZrO2 phases, further Ca containing compounds involve the coating by Ca(H2PO4)2 addition in the silicate-K2ZrF6 solution. The corrosion resistance of coated AZ91D alloy is significantly improved compared with the bare one. After immersing in SBF for 28 d, the Si-Zr5-Ca0 coating indicates a best corrosion resistance performance.

  17. Numerical assessment of bone remodeling around conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kıvanç; Eser, Atılım; Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Çehreli, Murat Cavit

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants by three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Three-dimensional model of a dental implant was created and a thread area was established as a region of interest in trabecular bone to study a localized part of the global model with a refined mesh. The peri-implant tissues around conventionally loaded (model 1) and early loaded (model 2) implants were implemented and were used to explore principal stresses, displacement values, and equivalent strains in the peri-implant region of titanium and titanium-zirconium implants under static load of 300 N with or without 30° inclination applied on top of the abutment surface. Under axial loading, principal stresses in both models were comparable for both implants and models. Under oblique loading, principal stresses around titanium-zirconium implants were slightly higher in both models. Comparable stress magnitudes were observed in both models. The displacement values and equivalent strain amplitudes around both implants and models were similar. Peri-implant bone around titanium and titanium-zirconium implants experiences similar stress magnitudes coupled with intraosseous implant displacement values under conventional loading and early loading simulations. Titanium-zirconium implants have biomechanical outcome comparable to conventional titanium implants under conventional loading and early loading.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. C.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study (1) the basic electrochemical behavior of titanium in acid chloride solutions and (2) the response of the metal to dynamic straining in the same evironment. The aim of this group of experiments was to simulate, as nearly as possible, the actual conditions which exist at the tip of a crack. One of the foremost theories proposed to explain the propagation of stress corrosion cracks is a hydrogen embrittlement theory involving the precipitation of embrittling titanium hydrides inside the metal near the crack tip. An initial survey of the basic electrochemical literature indicated that surface hydrides play a critical role in the electrochemistry of titanium in acid solutions. A comprehensive analysis of the effect of surface films, particularly hydrides, on the electrochemical behavior of titanium in these solution is presented.

  19. Influence of bovine serum albumin in Hanks' solution on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of a magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Banerjee, Parama Chakraborty; Easton, Christopher D; Singh Raman, R K

    2017-11-01

    It is essential for any temporary implant to possess adequate strength to maintain their mechanical integrity under the synergistic effects of mechanical loading characteristics of human body and the corrosive physiological environment. Such synergistic effects can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to Hanks' solution in corrosion and SCC susceptibility of AZ91D magnesium alloy. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results indicated that the addition of BSA increased corrosion resistance of the alloy during the first 48h of immersion and then decreased it rapidly. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses indicated adsorption of BSA on the alloy surface during initial hours of immersion. However, with the increasing immersion time, BSA chelated with the corrosion products causing disruption of the protective film; thus, it accelerated the corrosion of the alloy. Both the mechanical data and fractographic evidence have confirmed susceptibility of the alloy to SCC. However, in the presence of BSA, the alloy suffered greater SCC which was attributed to its increased susceptibility towards localized corrosion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Effects of Alloying Element Ca on the Corrosion Behavior and Bioactivity of Anodic Films Formed on AM60 Mg Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Anawati, Anawati; Asoh, Hidetaka; Ono, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Effects of alloying element Ca on the corrosion behavior and bioactivity of films formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on AM60 alloys were investigated. The corrosion behavior was studied by conducting electrochemical tests in 0.9% NaCl solution while the bioactivity was evaluated by soaking the specimens in simulated body fluid (SBF). Under identical anodization conditions, the PEO film thicknesses increased with increasing Ca content in the alloys, which enhanced the corrosion resistance in NaCl solution. Thicker apatite layers grew on the PEO films of Ca-containing alloys because Ca was incorporated into the PEO film and because Ca was present in the alloys. Improvement of corrosion resistance and bioactivity of the PEO-coated AM60 by alloying with Ca may be beneficial for biodegradable implant applications. PMID:28772371

  1. Effect of Sensitization on Corrosion-Fatigue Cracking in Al 5083 Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-21

    Report Corrosion-fatigue Stress-corrosion cracking Aluminum alloys Sensitization October 2011 – September 2014 63-2634-A4 Unclassified Unlimited... alloy 5083-H131 is an armor-grade aluminum alloy that is non-heat-treatable and derives its strength from magnesium solute hardening and strain hardening...marine environments (references1-2). Even though the damaging effect of grain boundary β and sensitization on SCC in 5 -series aluminum alloys is

  2. Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1992-11-17

    An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9--30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000--1100 C. 7 figs.

  3. Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Krishnamurti

    1992-01-01

    An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9-30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.

  4. Correlation between the oxide impedance and corrosion behavior of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Myung-Ho; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Jung, Youn-Ho

    2004-12-01

    The correlation between the oxide impedance and corrosion behavior of two series of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys was evaluated. Corrosion tests were performed in a 70 ppm LiOH aqueous solution at 360°C for 300 days. The results of the corrosion tests revealed that the corrosion behavior of the alloys depended on the Nb and Sn content. The impedance characteristics for the pre- and post-transition oxide layers formed on the surface of the alloys were investigated in sulfuric acid at room temperature. From the results, a pertinent equivalent circuit model was preferably established, explaining the properties of double oxide layers. The impedance of the oxide layers correlated with the corrosion behavior; better corrosion resistance always showed higher electric resistance for the inner layers. It is thus concluded that a pertinent equivalent circuit model would be useful for evaluating the long-term corrosion behavior of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys.

  5. Corrosion resistance investigation of vanadium alloys in liquid lithium

    SciT

    Borovitskaya, I. V., E-mail: symp@imet.ac.ru; Lyublinskiy, I. E.; Bondarenko, G. G.

    A major concern in using vanadium alloys for first wall/blanket systems in fusion reactors is their activity with regard to nonmetallic impurities in the coolants. This paper presents the results of studying the corrosion resistance in high-purity liquid lithium (with the nitrogen and carbon content of less than 10{sup –3} wt %) of vanadium and vanadium alloys (V–1.86Ga, V–3.4Ga–0.62Si, V–4.81Ti–4.82Cr) both in the initial state and preliminarily irradiated with Ar+ ions with energy of 20 keV to a dose of 10{sup 22} m{sup –2} at an irradiation temperature of ~400°C. The degree of corrosion was estimated by measuring the changesmore » in the weight and microhardness. Corrosion tests were carried out under static isothermal conditions at a temperature of 600°C for 400 h. The identity of corrosion mechanisms of materials both irradiated with Ar ions and not irradiated, which consisted in an insignificant penetration of nitrogen into the materials and a substantial escape of oxygen from the materials, causing the formation of a zone with a reduced microhardness near the surface, was established. The influence of the corrosive action of lithium on the surface morphology of the materials under study was found, resulting in the manifestation of grain boundaries and slip lines on the sample surface, the latter being most clearly observed in the case of preliminary irradiation with Ar ions.« less

  6. Enhancement of wear and corrosion resistance of beta titanium alloy by laser gas alloying with nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Lee, Seunghwan; Smith, Graham; Sarri, Gianluca; Ng, Chi-Ho; Sharba, Ahmed; Man, Hau-Chung

    2016-03-01

    The relatively high elastic modulus coupled with the presence of toxic vanadium (V) in Ti6Al4V alloy has long been a concern in orthopaedic applications. To solve the problem, a variety of non-toxic and low modulus beta-titanium (beta-Ti) alloys have been developed. Among the beta-Ti alloy family, the quaternary Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta (TNZT) alloys have received the highest attention as a promising replacement for Ti6Al4V due to their lower elastic modulus and outstanding long term stability against corrosion in biological environments. However, the inferior wear resistance of TNZT is still a problem that must be resolved before commercialising in the orthopaedic market. In this work, a newly developed laser surface treatment technique was employed to improve the surface properties of Ti-35.3Nb-7.3Zr-5.7Ta alloy. The surface structure and composition of the laser-treated TNZT surface were examined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The wear and corrosion resistance were evaluated by pin-on-plate sliding test and anodic polarisation test in Hanks' solution. The experimental results were compared with the untreated (or base) TNZT material. The research findings showed that the laser surface treatment technique reported in this work can effectively improve the wear and corrosion resistance of TNZT.

  7. Calcium and zirconium as texture modifiers during rolling and annealing of magnesium–zinc alloys

    SciT

    Bohlen, Jan, E-mail: jan.bohlen@hzg.de; Wendt, Joachim; Nienaber, Maria

    2015-03-15

    Rolling experiments were carried out on a ternary Mg–Zn–Ca alloy and its modification with zirconium. Short time annealing of as-rolled sheets is used to reveal the microstructure and texture development. The texture of the as-rolled sheets can be characterised by basal pole figures with split peak towards the rolling direction (RD) and a broad transverse angular spread of basal planes towards the transverse direction (TD). During annealing the RD split peaks as well as orientations in the sheet plane vanish whereas the distribution of orientations tilted towards the TD remains. It is shown in EBSD measurements that during rolling bandsmore » of twin containing structures form. During subsequent annealing basal orientations close to the sheet plane vanish based on a grain nucleation and growth mechanism of recrystallisation. Orientations with tilt towards the TD remain in grains that do not undergo such a mechanism. The addition of Zr delays texture weakening. - Highlights: • Ca in Mg–Zn-alloys contributes to a significant texture weakening during rolling and annealing. • Grain nucleation and growth in structures consisting of twins explain a texture randomisation during annealing. • Grains with transverse tilt of basal planes preferentially do not undergo a grain nucleation and growth mechanism. • Zr delays the microstructure and texture development.« less

  8. Method for improving the mechanical properties of uranium-1 to 3 wt % zirconium alloy

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.C.

    1983-11-22

    A uranium-1 to 3 wt % zirconium alloy characterized by high strength, high ductility and stable microstructure is fabricated by an improved thermal mechanical process. A homogenous ingot of the alloy which has been reduced in thickness of at least 50% in the two-step forging operation, rolled into a plate with a 75% reduction and then heated in vacuum at a temperature of about 750 to 850/sup 0/C and then quenched in water, is subjected to further thermal-mechanical operation steps to increase the compressive yield strength approximately 30%, stabilize the microstructure, and decrease the variations in mechanical properties throughout the plate is provided. These thermal-mechanical steps are achieved by cold rolling the quenchd plate to reduce the thickness thereof about 8 to 12%, aging the cold rolled plate at a first temperature of about 325 to 375/sup 0/C for five to six hours and then aging the plate at a higher temperature ranging from 480 to 500/sup 0/C for five to six hours prior to cooling the billet to ambient conditions and sizing the billet or plate into articles provides the desired increase in mechanical properties and phase stability throughout the plate.

  9. The Role of Stress in the Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion IGSCC Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking NAMLT Nitric Acid Mass Loss Test SCC Stress Corrosion Cracking TGSCC Transgranular Stress...solution at a nitric acid mass loss test (NAMLT) value of 49 mg/cm 2 with an applied voltage of 0.73 VSCE. They also showed that the amount of corrosion ...for determining the susceptibility to intergranualr corrosion of 5XXX series aluminum alloys by mass loss after exposure to nitric acid ," vol.

  10. A high-specific-strength and corrosion-resistant magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wanqiang; Birbilis, Nick; Sha, Gang; Wang, Yu; Daniels, John E.; Xiao, Yang; Ferry, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Ultra-lightweight alloys with high strength, ductility and corrosion resistance are desirable for applications in the automotive, aerospace, defence, biomedical, sporting and electronic goods sectors. Ductility and corrosion resistance are generally inversely correlated with strength, making it difficult to optimize all three simultaneously. Here we design an ultralow density (1.4 g cm-3) Mg-Li-based alloy that is strong, ductile, and more corrosion resistant than Mg-based alloys reported so far. The alloy is Li-rich and a solute nanostructure within a body-centred cubic matrix is achieved by a series of extrusion, heat-treatment and rolling processes. Corrosion resistance from the environment is believed to occur by a uniform lithium carbonate film in which surface coverage is much greater than in traditional hexagonal close-packed Mg-based alloys, explaining the superior corrosion resistance of the alloy.

  11. A high-specific-strength and corrosion-resistant magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanqiang; Birbilis, Nick; Sha, Gang; Wang, Yu; Daniels, John E; Xiao, Yang; Ferry, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Ultra-lightweight alloys with high strength, ductility and corrosion resistance are desirable for applications in the automotive, aerospace, defence, biomedical, sporting and electronic goods sectors. Ductility and corrosion resistance are generally inversely correlated with strength, making it difficult to optimize all three simultaneously. Here we design an ultralow density (1.4 g cm(-3)) Mg-Li-based alloy that is strong, ductile, and more corrosion resistant than Mg-based alloys reported so far. The alloy is Li-rich and a solute nanostructure within a body-centred cubic matrix is achieved by a series of extrusion, heat-treatment and rolling processes. Corrosion resistance from the environment is believed to occur by a uniform lithium carbonate film in which surface coverage is much greater than in traditional hexagonal close-packed Mg-based alloys, explaining the superior corrosion resistance of the alloy.

  12. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; McKamey, Claudette G.; Tortorelli, Peter F.; David, Stan A.

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium.

  13. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.; McKamey, C.G.; Tortorelli, P.F.; David, S.A.

    1994-06-14

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium. 9 figs.

  14. The Effect of Homogenization on the Corrosion Behavior of Al-Mg Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Hung, Yuanchun; Du, Zhiyong; Xiao, Zhengbing; Jia, Guangze

    2018-04-01

    The effect of homogenization on the corrosion behavior of 5083-O aluminum alloy is presented in this paper. The intergranular corrosion and exfoliation corrosion were used to characterize the discussed corrosion behavior of 5083-O aluminum alloy. The variations in the morphology, the kind and distribution of the precipitates, and the dislocation configurations in the samples after the homogenization were evaluated using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of the highly active grain boundary character distribution and the types of constituent particles on the corrosion are discussed on the basis of experimental observations. The results indicated that the corrosion behavior of 5083-O alloy was closely related to the microstructure obtained by the heat treatment. Homogenization carried out after casting had the optimal effect on the overall corrosion resistance of the material. Nevertheless, all samples could satisfy the requirements of corrosion resistance in marine applications.

  15. Thermal Stabilization and Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystalline Iron-Nickel-Zirconium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotan, Hasan

    Ultrafine grained and nanostructured materials are promising for structural applications because of the high strength compared to coarse grained counterparts. However, their widespread application is limited by an inherently high driving force for thermally induced grain growth, even at low temperatures. Accordingly, the understanding of and control over grain growth in nanoscale materials is of great technological and scientific importance as many physical properties (i.e. mechanical properties) are functions of the average grain size and the grain size distribution within the microstructure. Here, we investigate the microstructural evolution and grain growth in Fe-Ni alloys with Zr addition and differentiate the stabilization mechanisms acting on grain boundaries. Fe-Ni alloys are chosen for stability investigations since they are important for understanding the behavior of many steels and other ferrous alloys. Zirconium is proven to be an effective grain size stabilizer in pure Fe and Fe-base systems. In this study, nanocrystalline alloys were prepared by high energy ball milling. In situ and ex situ experiments were utilized to directly follow grain growth and microstructural evolution as a function of temperature and composition. The information obtained from these experiments enables the real time observation of microstructural evolution and phase transformation and provides a unique view of dynamic reactions as they occur. The knowledge of the thermal stability will exploit the potential high temperature applications and the consolidation conditions (i.e. temperature and pressure) to obtain high dense materials for advanced mechanical tests. Our investigations reveal that the grain growth of Fe-Ni alloys is not affected by Ni content but strongly inhibited by the addition of 1 at% Zr up to about 700 °C. The microstructural stability is lost due to the bcc-to-fcc transformation (occurring at 700°C) by the sudden appearance of abnormally grown fcc grains

  16. Chemically activated nanodiamonds for aluminum alloy corrosion protection and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannstein, Inga; Adler, Anne-Katrin; Lapina, Victoria; Osipov, Vladimir; Opitz, Jörg; Schreiber, Jürgen; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, a smart coating for light metal alloys was developed and investigated. Chemically activated nanodiamonds (CANDiT) were electrophoretically deposited onto anodized aluminum alloy AA2024 substrates in order to increase corrosion resistance, enhance bonding properties and establish a means of corrosion monitoring based on the fluorescence behavior of the particles. In order to create stable aqueous CANDiT dispersions suitable for electrophoretic deposition, mechanical milling had to be implemented under specific chemical conditions. The influence of the CANDiT volume fraction and pH of the dispersion on the electrochemical properties of the coated samples was investigated. Linear voltammetry measurements reveal that the chemical characteristics of the CANDiT dispersion have a distinct influence on the quality of the coating. The fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence excitation spectra of the samples show that corrosion can be easily detected by optical means. Furthermore, an optimization on the basis of "smart" - algorithms for the data processing of a surface analysis by the laser-speckle-method is presented.

  17. The effect of copper, chromium, and zirconium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.; Shenoy, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of the systematic variation of copper, chromium, and zirconium contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 7000-type aluminum alloy. Fracture toughness and tensile properties are evaluated for each alloy in both the peak aging, T8, and the overaging, T73, conditions. Results show that dimpled rupture essentially characterize the fracture process in these alloys. In the T8 condition, a significant loss of toughness is observed for alloys containing 2.5 pct Cu due to the increase in the quantity of Al-Cu-Mg-rich S-phase particles. An examination of T8 alloys at constant Cu levels shows that Zr-bearing alloys exhibit higher strength and toughness than the Cr-bearing alloys. In the T73 condition, Cr-bearing alloys are inherently tougher than Zr-bearing alloys. A void nucleation and growth mechanism accounts for the loss of toughness in these alloys with increasing copper content.

  18. Ca2+-exchange in layered zirconium orthophosphate, α-ZrP: Chemical study and potential application for zinc corrosion inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouali, Imane; Rocca, Emmanuel; Veys-Renaux, Delphine; Rhouta, Benaissa; Khalil, Aziza; Aït Aghzzaf, Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon occurring at the metal interface requires the development of new non-toxic anticorrosion additives. For this purpose, zirconium orthophosphate compounds (Zr(HPO4)2,H2O noted α-ZrP) were synthesized by both hydrothermal and refluxing methods The Ca2+-cationic exchange in the layered structure is kinetically favoured by low crystallinity of α-ZrP synthesized by refluxing process, and leads to the formation of CaZr(PO4)2,4H2O, noted Ca2+-ZrP. The H+/Ca2+ exchange mechanism is mainly triggered by acid-base considerations, and especially the pKa of α-ZrP/Ca2+-ZrP acid-base couple (evaluated to 2.5). Both compounds are acidic compounds by internal exchangeable H+ for α-ZrP and surface protons for Ca2+-ZrP, and can be used as potential inhibitors of zinc corrosion. Electrochemical measurements show that Ca2+-ZrP compounds dispersed in the NaCl electrolyte buffer the pH value over a long time and therefore allow controlling the corrosion rate of zinc.

  19. Corrosion of Candidate High Temperature Alloys in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Curtis J.

    The corrosion resistance of three candidate alloys is tested in supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) at different levels of temperature and pressure for up to 3000 hours. The purpose of the testing is to evaluate the compatibility of different engineering alloys in S-CO2 for use in a S-CO 2 Brayton cycle. The three alloys used are austenitic stainless steel 316, iron-nickel-base superalloy 718, and nickel-base superalloy 738. Each alloy is exposed to four combinations of temperature and pressure, consisting of either 550°C or 700°C at either 15 or 25 MPa for up to 1500 hours. At each temperature, an additional sample set is tested for 3000 hours and experienced an increase in pressure from 15 MPa to 25 MPa after 1500 hours of testing. All three alloys are successful in producing a protective oxide layer at the lower temperature of 550°C based on the logarithmic weight gain trends. At the higher temperature of 700°C, 316SS exhibits unfavourable linear weight gain trends at both pressures of 15 and 25 MPa. In comparison, IN-718 and IN-738 performs similarly in producing a protective oxide layer illustrated through a power weight gain relation. The effect of pressure is most pronounced at the operating temperature of 700°C, where the higher pressure of 25 MPa results in an increased rate of oxide formation. SEM analysis exposes a thin film oxide for both IN-718 and IN-738 but severe intergranular corrosion is exhibited by IN-738. Based on the testing conducted, both alloys show favourable characteristics for use in S-CO 2 conditions up to 700°C, but further testing is required to characterize the effect of the intergranular corrosion on the stability of oxide in IN-738. 316SS provided favourable results for use in temperatures of 550°C, but the protective oxide deteriorated at an operating temperature of 700°C.

  20. Fabrication of Titanium-Niobium-Zirconium-Tantalium Alloy (TNZT) Bioimplant Components with Controllable Porosity by Spark Plasma Sintering

    PubMed Central

    Rechtin, Jack; Torresani, Elisa; Ivanov, Eugene; Olevsky, Eugene

    2018-01-01

    Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) is used to fabricate Titanium-Niobium-Zirconium-Tantalum alloy (TNZT) powder—based bioimplant components with controllable porosity. The developed densification maps show the effects of final SPS temperature, pressure, holding time, and initial particle size on final sample relative density. Correlations between the final sample density and mechanical properties of the fabricated TNZT components are also investigated and microstructural analysis of the processed material is conducted. A densification model is proposed and used to calculate the TNZT alloy creep activation energy. The obtained experimental data can be utilized for the optimized fabrication of TNZT components with specific microstructural and mechanical properties suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:29364165

  1. Corrosion behaviour of Nitinol alloy coated with alkylsilanes and polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Flamini, D O; Saidman, S B

    2014-11-01

    Nitinol (equiatomic Ni and Ti alloy (NiTi)) substrate was modified using a coating system formed by a self-assembled film of alkylsilane compounds (propyltrichlorosilane (C3H7SiCl3) or octadecyltrichlorosilane (C18H37SiCl3)) and polypyrrole (PPy) doped with sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or AOT). The combination of alkylsilanes and the presence of a voluminous molecule like AOT entrapped into the PPy films improve the pitting corrosion resistance of the substrate in chloride solution. The best performance was achieved with the longest alkylsilane chains, where the PPy film remains adhered to the underlying coating after a pitting corrosion test. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, Jackson H.; Selle, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

  3. Alloy 690 qualification: Corrosion under prototypic heat flux and temperature conditions. Final report

    SciT

    Baum, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this program was to perform qualification tests of industrial heats of thermally treated alloy 690 steam generator tubing under heat transfer conditions. Primary emphasis was focused on testing of alternate tube to tubesheet expansion processes. In addition, a background report was written to document the evolution of the alloy 690 process specification and the supporting qualification testing. While the testing was able to produce some localized corrosion of alloy 690 in the tube to tubesheet joint transition regions under highly alkaline conditions, the corrosion rates were between two and three orders of magnitude lower than the comparablemore » rates in mill annealed alloy 600 tubing. The corrosion morphology was a combination of intergranular and general corrosion, rather than the stress corrosion cracking typically found in mill annealed alloy 600 tubing.« less

  4. Corrosion Performance of New Generation Aluminum-Lithium Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, James P.; Bovard, Francine S.; Chrzan, James D.; Vandenburgh, Peter

    Over the past several years, a new generation of aluminum-lithium alloys has been developed. These alloys are characterized by excellent strength, low density, and high modulus of elasticity and are therefore of interest for lightweight structural materials applications particularly for construction of current and future aircraft. These new alloys have also demonstrated significant improvements in corrosion resistance when compared with the legacy and incumbent alloys. This paper documents the superior corrosion resistance of the current commercial tempers of these materials and also discusses the corrosion performance as a function of the degree of artificial aging. Results from laboratory corrosion tests are compared with results from exposures in a seacoast atmosphere to assess the predictive capability of the laboratory tests. The correlations that have been developed between the laboratory tests and the seacoast exposures provide confidence that a set of available methods can provide an accurate assessment of the corrosion performance of this new generation of alloys.

  5. Study made of corrosion resistance of stainless steel and nickel alloys in nuclear reactor superheaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Hart, R. K.; Lee, R. H.; Ruther, W. E.; Schlueter, R. R.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments performed under conditions found in nuclear reactor superheaters determine the corrosion rate of stainless steel and nickel alloys used in them. Electropolishing was the primary surface treatment before the corrosion test. Corrosion is determined by weight loss of specimens after defilming.

  6. Effect of ageing time and temperature on corrosion behaviour of aluminum alloy 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadpale, Vikas; Banjare, Pragya N.; Manoj, Manoranjan Kumar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloy 2014 were studied by potentiodynamic polarization in 1 mole of NaCl solution of aged sample. The experimental testing results concluded that, corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloy 2014 degraded with the increasing the temperature (150°C & 200°C) and time of ageing. Corroded surface of the aged specimens was tested under optical microscopes for microstructures for phase analysis. Optical micrographs of corroded surfaces showed general corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion resistance of lower ageing temperature and lower ageing time is higher because of its fine distribution of precipitates in matrix phase.

  7. Effect of processing parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir processed AA 2219 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surekha, K.; Murty, B. S.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of processing parameters (rotation speed and traverse speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir processed high strength precipitation hardenable AA 2219-T87 alloy was investigated. The results indicate that the rotation speed has a major influence in determining the rate of corrosion, which is attributed to the breaking down and dissolution of the intermetallic particles. Corrosion resistance of friction stir processed alloy was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, salt spray and immersion tests.

  8. Corrosion and Corrosion-Fatigue Behavior of 7075 Aluminum Alloys Studied by In Situ X-Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannard, Tyler

    7XXX Aluminum alloys have high strength to weight ratio and low cost. They are used in many critical structural applications including automotive and aerospace components. These applications frequently subject the alloys to static and cyclic loading in service. Additionally, the alloys are often subjected to aggressive corrosive environments such as saltwater spray. These chemical and mechanical exposures have been known to cause premature failure in critical applications. Hence, the microstructural behavior of the alloys under combined chemical attack and mechanical loading must be characterized further. Most studies to date have analyzed the microstructure of the 7XXX alloys using two dimensional (2D) techniques. While 2D studies yield valuable insights about the properties of the alloys, they do not provide sufficiently accurate results because the microstructure is three dimensional and hence its response to external stimuli is also three dimensional (3D). Relevant features of the alloys include the grains, subgrains, intermetallic inclusion particles, and intermetallic precipitate particles. The effects of microstructural features on corrosion pitting and corrosion fatigue of aluminum alloys has primarily been studied using 2D techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) surface analysis along with post-mortem SEM fracture surface analysis to estimate the corrosion pit size and fatigue crack initiation site. These studies often limited the corrosion-fatigue testing to samples in air or specialized solutions, because samples tested in NaCl solution typically have fracture surfaces covered in corrosion product. Recent technological advancements allow observation of the microstructure, corrosion and crack behavior of aluminum alloys in solution in three dimensions over time (4D). In situ synchrotron X-Ray microtomography was used to analyze the corrosion and cracking behavior of the alloy in four dimensions to elucidate crack initiation at corrosion pits

  9. In situ monitored in-pile creep testing of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozar, R. W.; Jaworski, A. W.; Webb, T. W.; Smith, R. W.

    2014-01-01

    The experiments described herein were designed to investigate the detailed irradiation creep behavior of zirconium based alloys in the HALDEN Reactor spectrum. The HALDEN Test Reactor has the unique capability to control both applied stress and temperature independently and externally for each specimen while the specimen is in-reactor and under fast neutron flux. The ability to monitor in situ the creep rates following a stress and temperature change made possible the characterization of creep behavior over a wide stress-strain-rate-temperature design space for two model experimental heats, Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-2 + 1 wt%Nb, with only 12 test specimens in a 100-day in-pile creep test program. Zircaloy-2 specimens with and without 1 wt% Nb additions were tested at irradiation temperatures of 561 K and 616 K and stresses ranging from 69 MPa to 455 MPa. Various steady state creep models were evaluated against the experimental results. The irradiation creep model proposed by Nichols that separates creep behavior into low, intermediate, and high stress regimes was the best model for predicting steady-state creep rates. Dislocation-based primary creep, rather than diffusion-based transient irradiation creep, was identified as the mechanism controlling deformation during the transitional period of evolving creep rate following a step change to different test conditions.

  10. Use of multiscale zirconium alloy deformation models in nuclear fuel behavior analysis

    SciT

    Montgomery, Robert; Tomé, Carlos; Liu, Wenfeng

    Accurate prediction of cladding mechanical behavior is a key aspect of modeling nuclear fuel behavior, especially for conditions of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Current approaches to fuel performance modeling rely on empirical models for cladding creep, growth and plastic deformation, which are limited to the materials and conditions for which the models were developed. CASL has endeavored to improve upon this approach by incorporating a microstructurally-based, atomistically-informed, zirconium alloy mechanical deformation analysis capability into the BISON-CASL engineering scale fuel performance code. Specifically, the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity modeling approach, developed bymore » Lebensohn and Tome´ [2], has been coupled with BISON-CASL to represent the mechanistic material processes controlling the deformation behavior of the cladding. A critical component of VPSC is the representation of the crystallographic orientation of the grains within the matrix material and the ability to account for the role of texture on deformation. The multiscale modeling of cladding deformation mechanisms allowed by VPSC far exceed the functionality of typical semi-empirical constitutive models employed in nuclear fuel behavior codes to model irradiation growth and creep, thermal creep, or plasticity. This paper describes the implementation of an interface between VPSC and BISON-CASL and provides initial results utilizing the coupled functionality.« less

  11. Biodegradable magnesium alloys for orthopaedic applications: A review on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sankalp; Curtin, James; Duffy, Brendan; Jaiswal, Swarna

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been extensively explored as potential biodegradable implant materials for orthopaedic applications (e.g. Fracture fixation). However, the rapid corrosion of Mg based alloys in physiological conditions has delayed their introduction for therapeutic applications to date. The present review focuses on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications of biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Initially, the corrosion behaviour of Mg alloys and the effect of alloying elements on corrosion and biocompatibility is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of polymeric deposit coatings, namely sol-gel, synthetic aliphatic polyesters and natural polymers on corrosion and biological performance of Mg and its alloy for orthopaedic applications are presented. It was found that inclusion of alloying elements such as Al, Mn, Ca, Zn and rare earth elements provides improved corrosion resistance to Mg alloys. It has been also observed that sol-gel and synthetic aliphatic polyesters based coatings exhibit improved corrosion resistance as compared to natural polymers, which has higher biocompatibility due to their biomimetic nature. It is concluded that, surface modification is a promising approach to improve the performance of Mg-based biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma surface tantalum alloying on titanium and its corrosion behavior in sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, D. B.; Chen, X. H.; Zhang, P. Z.; Ding, F.; Li, F. K.; Yao, Z. J.

    2018-05-01

    An anti-corrosion Ti-Ta alloy coating was prepared on pure titanium surface by double glow plasma surface alloying technology. Electrochemical corrosion test was applied to test the anti-corrosion property of Ti-Ta alloy layer. The microstructure and the phase composition of Ti-Ta alloy coating were detected before and after corrosion process by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the Ta-Ti alloy layer has a thickness of about 13-15 μm, which is very dense without obvious defects such as pores or cracks. The alloy layer is composed mainly of β-Ta and α-Ti. The Ta alloy layer improves the anti-corrosion property of pure titanium. A denser and more durable TiO2 formed on the surface Ta-Ti alloy layer after immersing in strong corrosive media may account for the excellent corrosion resistant.

  13. DIMENSIONALLY STABLE, CORROSION RESISTANT NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Kittel, J.H.

    1963-10-31

    A method of making a uranium alloy of improved corrosion resistance and dimensional stability is described. The alloy contains from 0-9 weight per cent of an additive of zirconium and niobium in the proportions by weight of 5 to 1 1/ 2. The alloy is cold rolled, heated to two different temperatures, air-cooled, heated to a third temperature, and quenched in water. (AEC)

  14. Chemical conversion coating for protecting magnesium alloys from corrosion

    SciT

    Bhargava, Gaurang; Allen, Fred M.; Skandan, Ganesh

    A chromate-free, self-healing conversion coating solution for magnesium alloy substrates, composed of 10-20 wt. % Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2.6H.sub.2O, 1-5 wt. % Al(NO.sub.3).sub.3.9H.sub.2O, and less than 1 wt. % of [V.sub.10O.sub.28].sup.6- or VO.sub.3.sup.- dissolved in water. The corrosion resistance offered by the resulting coating is in several hundreds of hours in salt-spray testing. This prolonged corrosion protection is attributed to the creation of a unique structure and morphology of the conversion coating that serves as a barrier coating with self-healing properties. Hydroxoaluminates form the backbone of the barrier protection offered while the magnesium hydroxide domains facilitate the "slow release" of vanadium compounds asmore » self-healing moieties to defect sites, thus providing active corrosion protection.« less

  15. [Study on corrosion resistance of three non-noble porcelain alloys].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhikai; Xu, Sheng; Li, Wei; Teng, Jin; Li, Ning

    2011-10-01

    To study the electrochemical corrosion behavior of Co-Cr, Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be based porcelain alloys in NaCl solution. Five samples of each alloy were made respectively, electric polarization curve of each alloy was obtained using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Self-corrosion potential (E(corr)), self-corrosion current density (I(corr), passive region and transpassivation potential were tested. Microstructure and constituent was examined using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Co-Cr alloy possessed the most desirable corrosion resistance because of its integrated, homogeneous and compact passive film. The poor compactness of Ni-Cr alloy's passive film decreased its corrosion resistance. Ni-Cr-Be alloy exhibited the worst corrosion resistance due to the Cr and Mo depleted Ni-Be eutectic phases in the alloy. Taking biological security into consideration, it is necessary to avoid the application of porcelain alloys with Be element. Co-Cr alloy with better biocompatibility possesses much broader prospect in the field of dental restoration.

  16. In Vitro Corrosion Study of Friction Stir Processed WE43 Magnesium Alloy in a Simulated Body Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Genghua; Zhang, Datong; Zhang, Weiwen; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of friction stir processing (FSP) WE43 alloy in a simulated body fluid (SBF) was investigated. Micro-galvanic corrosion was the dominated corrosion behavior, and the corrosion resistance of FSP WE43 alloy was improved compared to the cast counterpart. Furthermore, due to the fine-grained and homogeneous microstructure, uniform corrosion morphology was observed on FSP WE43 alloy. According to the tensile properties of specimens with different immersion time intervals, FSP WE43 alloy shows better performance to maintain the mechanical integrity in SBF as compared to the as-cast alloy. PMID:28773664

  17. Study of localized corrosion in aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in 2219-T87 aluminum (Al) alloy, 2195 aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy, and welded 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 filler) have been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique (SRET). Anodic sites are more frequent and of greater strength in the 2195 Al-Li alloy than in the 2219-T87 Al alloy, indicating a greater tendency toward pitting for the latter. However, the overall corrosion rates are about the same for these two alloys, as determined using the polarization resistance technique. In the welded 2195 Al-Li alloy, the weld bean is entirely cathodic, with rather strongly anodic heat affected zones (HAZ) bordering both sides, indicating a high probability of corrosion in the HAZ parallel to the weld bead.

  18. On the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of palladium-based dental alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Desheng

    Palladium-based alloys have been used as dental restorative materials for about two decades with good clinical history. But there have been clinical case reports showing possible allergy effects from these alloys. The aim of this study was to characterize the corrosion behavior and mechanisms of several palladium-based dental alloys by potentiodynamic polarization methods, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy/atomic force microscopy (SKPFM/AFM), and to evaluate their biocompatibility by a cell culture technique and an animal model. Using SKPFM/AFM and scanning electron microscopy, the Ru-enriched phase from the use of ruthenium as a grain-refining element was identified as being slightly more noble than the palladium solid solution matrix in a high-palladium alloy. Other secondary precipitates that exist in the microstructures of these high-palladium alloys have minimal differences in Volta potential compared to the matrix. For high-palladium alloys, corrosion is generally uniform due to the predominant palladium content in the different phases. Potentiodynamic polarization and EIS have shown that representative palladium-silver alloys have low corrosion tendency and high corrosion resistance, which are equivalent to a well-known high-noble gold-palladium alloy in simulated body fluid and oral environments. The palladium-silver alloys tested are resistant to chloride ion corrosion. Passivation and dealloying have been identified for all of the tested palladium-silver alloys. The great similarity in corrosion behavior among the palladium-silver alloys is attributed to their similar chemical compositions. The variation in microstructures of palladium-silver alloys tested does not cause significant difference in corrosion behavior. The corrosion resistance of these palladium-silver alloys at elevated potentials relevant to oral environment is still satisfactory. The release of elements from representative dental

  19. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    SciT

    Olvera, S.; Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid; Sánchez-Marcos, J.

    2014-07-01

    CoNi alloys including Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70}, Co{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Co{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment ismore » approximately 1.05 μ{sub B}/atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni{sub x}Co{sub 100-x} alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions.« less

  20. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Stewart, James C.

    1981-01-01

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  1. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking is described. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  2. An investigation of the initiation stage of hot corrosion in Ni-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. T.; Meier, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The commercial nickel base alloy, IN-738, and high purity laboratory alloys were prepared to simulate the effects of the major elements in IN-738. Results indicate that the initiation of hot corrosion attack of IN-738 and other similar alloys is the result of local penetration of molten salt through the protective oxide scale.

  3. Aqueous sodium chloride induced intergranular corrosion of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Daeschner, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Two methods have been explored to assess the susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys to intergranular corrosion in aqueous sodium chloride solution. They are: (1) constant extension rate testing with and without alternate-immersion preexposure and (2) metallographic examination after exposure to a NaCl-H2O2 corrosive solution per Mil-H-6088F. Intergranular corrosion was found to occur in both powder and ingot metallurgy alloys of similar composition, using both methods. Underaging rendered the alloys most susceptible. The results correlate to stress-corrosion data generated in conventional time-to-failure and crack growth-rate tests. Alternate-immersion preexposure may be a reliable means to assess stress corrosion susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys.

  4. Zirconium, calcium, and strontium contents in magnesium based biodegradable alloys modulate the efficiency of implant-induced osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Mushahary, Dolly; Sravanthi, Ragamouni; Li, Yuncang; Kumar, Mahesh J; Harishankar, Nemani; Hodgson, Peter D; Wen, Cuie; Pande, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Development of new biodegradable implants and devices is necessary to meet the increasing needs of regenerative orthopedic procedures. An important consideration while formulating new implant materials is that they should physicochemically and biologically mimic bone-like properties. In earlier studies, we have developed and characterized magnesium based biodegradable alloys, in particular magnesium-zirconium (Mg-Zr) alloys. Here we have reported the biological properties of four Mg-Zr alloys containing different quantities of strontium or calcium. The alloys were implanted in small cavities made in femur bones of New Zealand White rabbits, and the quantitative and qualitative assessments of newly induced bone tissue were carried out. A total of 30 experimental animals, three for each implant type, were studied, and bone induction was assessed by histological, immunohistochemical and radiological methods; cavities in the femurs with no implants and observed for the same period of time were kept as controls. Our results showed that Mg-Zr alloys containing appropriate quantities of strontium were more efficient in inducing good quality mineralized bone than other alloys. Our results have been discussed in the context of physicochemical and biological properties of the alloys, and they could be very useful in determining the nature of future generations of biodegradable orthopedic implants. PMID:23976848

  5. Effectivity of fluoride treatment on hydrogen and corrosion product generation in temporal implants for different magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Trinidad, Javier; Arruebarrena, Gurutze; Marco, Iñigo; Hurtado, Iñaki; Sáenz de Argandoña, Eneko

    2013-12-01

    The increasing interest on magnesium alloys relies on their biocompatibility, bioabsorbility and especially on their mechanical properties. Due to these characteristics, magnesium alloys are becoming a promising solution to be used, as temporary implants. However, magnesium alloys must overcome their poor corrosion resistance. This article analyses the corrosion behaviour in phosphate-buffered saline solution of three commercial magnesium alloys (AZ31B, WE43 and ZM21) as well as the influence of fluoride treatment on their corrosion behaviour. It is shown that the corrosion rate of all the alloys is decreased by fluoride treatment. However, fluoride treatment affects each alloy differently.

  6. The Effect of High Temperature Corrosion on Mechanical Behavior of a GAMMA-TiAl Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenyue; Ma, Yue; Gong, Shengkai

    The mechanical properties of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy were discussed after the high temperature corrosion tests carried out with salt mixture of 75wt. % Na2SO4 and 25wt. % NaCl at 800°C. The microstructure of the alloy after corrosion was observed by SEM and the fracture behavior of the corroded and uncorroded alloys was investigated by means of the three-point bending tests. It has been shown that the corrosion path was mainly along the lamellar structure and rough surface with a large number of corrosion pits formed during the high temperature corrosion. The experimental results also indicated that the bearing capacity of bending fracture descended evidently due to the molten salt corrosion at high temperature, which only had remarkable effects on the surface state of the alloy. The microcracks inside the alloy always propagated along the phase interfaces and grain boundaries while the corrosion pits on salt-deposited surface became the main crack initiation location in corroded alloy. The stress concentration caused by corrosion was considered as the essential reason of the property reduction, which decreased the energy barrier of crack nucleation and shortened the incubation period.

  7. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Based Alloys in Simulated Oxy-Fuel Environment

    SciT

    Zeng, Zuotao; Natesan, Ken; Cai, Zhonghou

    The long-term corrosion of Fe-based alloys in simulated oxy-fuel environment at 1023 K (750 A degrees C) was studied. Detailed results are presented on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, microstructural characteristics of the corrosion products, and the cracking of scales for the alloys after exposure at 1023 K (750 A degrees C) for up to 3600 hours. An incubation period during which the corrosion rate was low was observed for the alloys. After the incubation period, the corrosion accelerated, and the corrosion process followed linear kinetics. Effects of alloy, CaO-containing ash, and gas composition on the corrosion rate weremore » also studied. In addition, synchrotron nanobeam X-ray analysis was employed to determine the phase and chemical composition of the oxide layers on the alloy surface. Results from these studies are being used to address the long-term corrosion performance of Fe-based alloys in various coal-ash combustion environments and to develop methods to mitigate high-temperature ash corrosion.« less

  8. Layer Protecting the Surface of Zirconium Used in Nuclear Reactors.

    PubMed

    Ashcheulov, Petr; Skoda, Radek; Skarohlíd, Jan; Taylor, Andrew; Fendrych, Frantisek; Kratochvílová, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Zirconium alloys have very useful properties for nuclear facilities applications having low absorption cross-section of thermal electrons, high ductility, hardness and corrosion resistance. However, there is also a significant disadvantage: it reacts with water steam and during this (oxidative) reaction it releases hydrogen gas, which partly diffuses into the alloy forming zirconium hydrides. A new strategy for surface protection of zirconium alloys against undesirable oxidation in nuclear reactors by polycrystalline diamond film has been patented- Czech patent 305059: Layer protecting the surface of zirconium alloys used in nuclear reactors and PCT patent: Layer for protecting surface of zirconium alloys (Patent Number: WO2015039636-A1). The zirconium alloy surface was covered by polycrystalline diamond layer grown in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition apparatus with linear antenna delivery system. Substantial progress in the description and understanding of the polycrystalline diamond/ zirconium alloys interface and material properties under standard and nuclear reactors conditions (irradiation, hot steam oxidation experiments and heating-quenching cycles) was made. In addition, process technology for the deposition of protective polycrystalline diamond films onto the surface of zirconium alloys was optimized. Zircaloy2 nuclear fuel pins were covered by 300 nm thick protective polycrystalline diamond layer (PCD) using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition apparatus with linear antenna delivery system. The polycrystalline diamond layer protects the zirconium alloy surface against undesirable oxidation and consolidates its chemical stability while preserving its functionality. PCD covered Zircaloy2 and standard Zircaloy2 pins were for 30 min. oxidized in 1100°C hot steam. Under these conditions α phase of zirconium changes to β phase (more opened for oxygen/hydrogen diffusion). PCD anticorrosion protection of Zircaloy nuclear fuel assemblies can

  9. Evaluation on the Corrosion of the Three Ni-Cr Alloys with Different Composition

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Srinivasa B.; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Dental casting alloys are widely used in contact with oral tissue for many years now. With the development of new dental alloys over the past 15 years, many questions remain unanswered about their biologic safety. Concepts and current issues concerning the response to the biologic effects of dental casting alloys are presented. In this paper, samples of three commercially available nickel-chrome (Ni-cr) casting alloys (Dentaurum, Bego, Sankin) were taken to assess their corrosion behavior, using potentiodynamic polarization method (electrochemical method) with fusayama artificial saliva as an electrolyte medium to check for their biocompatibility. The parameters for corrosion rate and corrosion resistance were obtained from computer-controlled corrosion schematic instrument, namely, potentiostat through corrosion software (power CV). The results obtained were analyzed by classic Tafel analysis. Statistical analysis was done by Student's t-test and ANOVA test. It was concluded that Dentarum and Bego showed satisfactory corrosive behavior, with exception of Sankin which depicted higher corrosion rate and least resistance to corrosion. Thus, the selection of an alloy should be made on the basis of corrosion resistance and biologic data from dental manufactures. PMID:21461232

  10. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  11. Corrosion properties of zirconium-based ceramic coatings for micro-bearing and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, J.; Zavaleyev, V.; Dobruchowska, E.; Murzynski, D.; Donkov, N.; Zykova, A.; Safonov, V.; Yakovin, S.

    2016-03-01

    Ceramic oxide ZrO2 and oxynitride ZrON coatings are widely used as protective coatings against diffusion and corrosion. The enhancement of the coatings' mechanical properties, as well as their wear and corrosion resistance, is very important for their tribological performance. In this work, ZrO2 and ZrON coatings were deposited by magnetron sputtering on stainless steel (AISI 316) substrates. The adhesion, hardness and elastic properties were evaluated by standard methods. The surface structure of the deposited coatings was observed by electron scanning microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The composition of the coatings was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The corrosion resistance properties were evaluated using the potentiodynamic method. The results show that the corrosion parameters are significantly increased in the cases of both oxynitride and oxide coatings in comparison with the stainless steel (AISI 316) substrates.

  12. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high Ti content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of Ti and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of Ti alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is presented.

  13. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60wt%Ni, 40wt%Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high titanium content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of titanium and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of titanium alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is studied.

  14. A review on the effect of welding on the corrosion of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, N. S.; Alias, J.

    2017-10-01

    Welding is an important joining technique for lightweight alloys with their increasing applications in aerospace, aircraft, automotive, electronics and other industries. The applications of lightweight alloys particularly magnesium alloys increased rapidly due to their beneficial properties such as low density, high strength-to-mass ratio, good dimensional stability, electromagnetic shielding and good recyclability. The effect of welding on the corrosion of magnesium alloys are reviewed in this paper, which closely related to the developed microstructure by the welding process. The paper focuses particularly on friction stir and laser welding. The basic principles of friction stir and laser welding are discussed, to present the likelihood of defects which significantly affect the corrosion of magnesium alloy. The finding in corrosion demonstrated the morphology of corrosion occurrence on each welded region, and observation on the potential and current values are also included.

  15. Effect of mechanical treatment on intergranular corrosion of 6064 alloy bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sláma, P.; Nacházel, J.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminium Al-Mg-Si-type alloys (6xxx-series) exhibit good mechanical properties, formability, weldability and good corrosion resistance in various environments. They often find use in automotive industry and other applications. Some alloys, however, particularly those with higher copper levels, show increased susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Intergranular corrosion (IGC) is typically related to the formation of microgalvanic cells between cathodic, more noble phases and depleted (precipitate-free) zones along grain boundaries. It is encountered mainly in AlMgSi alloys containing Cu, where it is thought to be related to the formation Q-phase precipitates (Al4Mg8Si7Cu2) along grain boundaries. The present paper describes the effects of mechanical working (extrusion, drawing and straightening) and artificial aging on intergranular corrosion in rods of the 6064 alloy. The resistance to intergranular corrosion was mapped using corrosion tests according to EN ISO 11846, method B. Corrosion tests showed dependence of corrosion type on mechanical processing of the material. Intergranular, pitting and transgranular corrosion was observed. Artificial ageing influenced mainly the depth of the corrosion.

  16. Corrosion Behaviour in Human Stimulation Media of a High Entropy Titan-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiban, B.; Popescu, G.; Lazar, C.; Rosu, L.; Constantin, I.; Olaru, M.; Carlan, B.

    2018-06-01

    The paper presents results on the corrosion behavior of high entropy alloys, commonly called BIOHEA in human physiological simulating media, respectively in the NaCl infusion solution and Ringer’s lactate infusion solution. Corrosion tests were performed by potendiodinamic test using AUTOLAB type potentiostat equipped with specialized corrosion software including the PGSTAT302N, BA and SCAN250 modules. Three entropy alloy systems were investigated: FeTa0.5Nb0.5Ti1.5Zr0.5 (BIOHEA 1), FeMnNb0.5TiZr0.5 (BIOHEA 3), FeTa0.5Nb0.5TiZr0.5 (BIOHEA 4), and BIOHEA alloy 2 was obtained by remelting BIOHEA 1. A comparison of the results obtained in the present tests and the data from the literature shows, on the one hand, that the global results can be compared with the different results from the literature, and, on the other hand, the results are new, in the sense that in any work there are no combinations of alloys studied here or human simulating medians used for testing. The conclusion of the experimental investigations in the present paper is the fact that regardless of the simulation test environment, all the alloys experimental alloys have similar behaviors, there is a difference between the chemical composition of the experimental alloy and the displacement of the corrosion potential values at electropositive values, decreasing of corrosion current, and corrosion rates. The experimental results allow the corrosion resistance of the investigated alloys, alloy BIOHEA 2 having the best corrosion behavior in both test media, with very low corrosion rates (respectivelly 0.067 μm/year in NaCl infusion solution, and 0.021 μm / year in Ringer’s lactate infusion solution).

  17. Lead-induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and 690 in high temperature water

    SciT

    Sakai, T.; Senjuh, T.; Aoki, K.

    1992-12-31

    Lead is one of the potential contributing impurities to the degradation of PWR steam generator tubing. Recent laboratory testing has shown that lead is a corrosive material for Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. However, it is still unknown how lead influences the corrosion of steam generator tubing, including the effect of lead concentration, solution pH, stress level and material characteristics. In this study, two kinds of experiments were performed. One was to investigate the thin film characteristic and selectively dissolved base metal elements of Alloy 600MA in high temperature solutions of different lead concentrations and pH. The other investigated themore » dependency of degradation of Alloy 600MA and Alloy 690TT on lead concentration and stress level in mild acidic environment, at 340{degrees}C for 2500 hrs. It was firstly demonstrated that lead-enhanced selective dissolution of nickel from alloy base metal, as a result of electrochemical reaction between lead and nickel, might cause the initiation and propagation of corrosion. Secondly, we showed that Alloy 690TT, generally very corrosion resistant material, also suffered from Pb-induced corrosion. The difference of the lead-induced stress corrosion morphology of Alloy 600MA and Alloy 690TT was also clarified.« less

  18. Hot corrosion of the B2 nickel aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The hot corrosion behavior of the B2 nickel aluminides was studied to determine the inherent hot corrosion resistance of the beta nickel aluminides and to develop a mechanism for the hot corrosion of the beta nickel aluminides. The effects of the prior processing of the material, small additions of zirconium, stoichiometry of the materials, and preoxidation of the samples were also examined. Additions of 2, 5, and 15 w/o chromium were used to determine the effect of chromium on the hot corrosion of the beta nickel aluminides and the minimum amount of chromium necessary for good hot corrosion resistance. The results indicate that the beta nickel aluminides have inferior inherent hot corrosion resistance despite their excellent oxidation resistance. Prior processing and zirconium additions had no discernible effect on the hot corrosion resistance of the alloys. Preoxidation extended the incubation period of the alloys only a few hours and was not considered to be an effective means of stopping hot corrosion. Stoichiometry was a major factor in determining the hot corrosion resistance of the alloys with the higher aluminum alloys having a definitely superior hot corrosion resistance. The addition of chromium to the alloys stopped the hot corrosion attack in the alloys tested. From a variety of experimental results, a complex hot corrosion mechanism was proposed. During the early stages of the hot corrosion of these alloys the corrosion is dominated by a local sulphidation/oxidation form of attack. During the intermediate stages of the hot corrosion, the aluminum depletion at the surface leads to a change in the oxidation mechanism from a protective external alumina layer to a mixed nickel-aluminum spinel and nickel oxide that can occur both externally and internally. The material undergoes extensive cracking during the later portions of the hot corrosion.

  19. The Effects of Alloy Chemistry on Localized Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiro, David O.

    This study investigated localized corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels under stressed and unstressed conditions, as well as corrosion of metallic thin films. While austenitic stainless steels are widely used in corrosive environments, they are vulnerable to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC), particularly in chloride-containing environments. The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels is closely tied to the alloying elements chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Polarization curves were measured for five commercially available austenitic stainless steels of varying chromium, nickel, and molybdenum content in 3.5 wt.% and 25 wt.% NaCl solutions. The alloys were also tested in tension at slow strain rates in air and in a chloride environment under different polarization conditions to explore the relationship between the extent of pitting corrosion and SCC over a range of alloy content and environment. The influence of alloy composition on corrosion resistance was found to be consistent with the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) under some conditions, but there were also conditions under which the model did not hold for certain commercial alloy compositions. Monotonic loading was used to generate SCC in in 300 series stainless steels, and it was possible to control the failure mode through adjusting environmental and polarization conditions. Metallic thin film systems of thickness 10-200 nm are being investigated for use as corrosion sensors and protective coatings, however the corrosion properties of ferrous thin films have not been widely studied. The effects of film thickness and substrate conductivity were examined using potentiodynamic polarization and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) on iron thin films. Thicker films undergo more corrosion than thinner films in the same environment, though the corrosion mechanism is the same. Conductive substrates encourage general corrosion, similar to that of bulk iron

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking Study of Aluminum Alloys Using Electrochemical Noise Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, R. C.; Sapate, S. G.; Raman, R.; Rathod, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking studies of aluminum alloys AA2219, AA8090, and AA5456 in heat-treated and non heat-treated condition were carried out using electrochemical noise technique with various applied stresses. Electrochemical noise time series data (corrosion potential vs. time) was obtained for the stressed tensile specimens in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution at room temperature (27 °C). The values of drop in corrosion potential, total corrosion potential, mean corrosion potential, and hydrogen overpotential were evaluated from corrosion potential versus time series data. The electrochemical noise time series data was further analyzed with rescaled range ( R/ S) analysis proposed by Hurst to obtain the Hurst exponent. According to the results, higher values of the Hurst exponents with increased applied stresses showed more susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking as confirmed in case of alloy AA 2219 and AA8090.

  1. Effect of Preexisting Corrosion on Fatigue Cracking of Aluminum Alloys 2024-T3 and 7075-T6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-01

    alloys 2024 -T3 and 7075-T6. It was determined that preexisting corrosion has a detrimental effect on the fatigue life of aluminum alloys 2024 -T3 and...following conclusions were drawn: 1. Preexisting corrosion has a detrimental effect on the fatigue life of aluminum alloys 2024 -T3 and 7075-T6. The...corrosion has a detrimental effect on the fatigue life of aluminum alloys

  2. Comparison of corrosion behavior between coarse grained and nano/ultrafine grained alloy 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Ting, Guo

    2016-01-01

    The effect of grain refinement on corrosion resistance of alloy 690 was investigated. The electron work function value of coarse grained alloy 690 was higher than that of nano/ultrafine grained one. The grain refinement reduced the electron work function of alloy 690. The passive films formed on coarse grained and nano/ultrafine grained alloy 690 in borate buffer solution were studied by potentiodynamic curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of alloy 690. This was attributed to the fact that grain refinement promoted the enrichment of Cr2O3 and inhibited Cr(OH)3 in the passive film. More Cr2O3 in passive film could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the nano/ultrafine grained alloy 690.

  3. Corrosion behaviour of Al-Fe-Ti-V medium entropy alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodunrin, M. O.; Obadele, B. A.; Chown, L. H.; Olubambi, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Alloys containing up to four multi-principal elements in equiatomic ratios are referred to as medium entropy alloys (MEA). These alloys have attracted the interest of many researchers due to the superior mechanical properties it offers over the traditional alloys. The design approach of MEA often results to simple solid solution with either body centered cubic; face centered cubic structures or both. As the consideration for introducing the alloys into several engineering application increases, there have been efforts to study the corrosion behaviour of these alloys. Previous reports have shown that some of these alloys are more susceptible to corrosion when compared with traditional alloys due to lack of protective passive film. In this research, we have developed AlFeTiV medium entropy alloys containing two elements (Ti and Al) that readily passivate when exposed to corrosive solutions. The alloys were produced in vacuum arc furnace purged with high purity argon. Open circuit potential and potentiodynamic polarisation tests were used to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of the as-cast AlFeTiV alloy in 3.5 wt% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4. The corrosion performance of the alloy was compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested under similar conditions. The results show that unlike in Ti-6Al-4V alloy, the open circuit potential of the AlFeTiV alloy move towards the negative values in both 3.5 wt% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4 solutions indicating that self-activation occurred rapidly on immersion. Anodic polarisation of the alloys showed that AlFeTiV alloy exhibited a narrow range of passivity in both solutions. In addition, the alloys exhibited lower Ecorr and higher Icorr when compared with traditional Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The traditional Ti-6Al-4V alloy showed superior corrosion resistant to the AlFeTiV alloy in both 3.5 wt.% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4 solutions.

  4. Use of multiscale zirconium alloy deformation models in nuclear fuel behavior analysis

    SciT

    Montgomery, Robert, E-mail: robert.montgomery@pnnl.gov; Tomé, Carlos, E-mail: tome@lanl.gov; Liu, Wenfeng, E-mail: wenfeng.liu@anatech.com

    Accurate prediction of cladding mechanical behavior is a key aspect of modeling nuclear fuel behavior, especially for conditions of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Current approaches to fuel performance modeling rely on empirical constitutive models for cladding creep, growth and plastic deformation, which are limited to the materials and conditions for which the models were developed. To improve upon this approach, a microstructurally-based zirconium alloy mechanical deformation analysis capability is being developed within the United States Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Specifically, the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC)more » polycrystal plasticity modeling approach, developed by Lebensohn and Tomé [1], has been coupled with the BISON engineering scale fuel performance code to represent the mechanistic material processes controlling the deformation behavior of light water reactor (LWR) cladding. A critical component of VPSC is the representation of the crystallographic nature (defect and dislocation movement) and orientation of the grains within the matrix material and the ability to account for the role of texture on deformation. A future goal is for VPSC to obtain information on reaction rate kinetics from atomistic calculations to inform the defect and dislocation behavior models described in VPSC. The multiscale modeling of cladding deformation mechanisms allowed by VPSC far exceed the functionality of typical semi-empirical constitutive models employed in nuclear fuel behavior codes to model irradiation growth and creep, thermal creep, or plasticity. This paper describes the implementation of an interface between VPSC and BISON and provides initial results utilizing the coupled functionality.« less

  5. Use of multiscale zirconium alloy deformation models in nuclear fuel behavior analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Robert; Tomé, Carlos; Liu, Wenfeng; Alankar, Alankar; Subramanian, Gopinath; Stanek, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of cladding mechanical behavior is a key aspect of modeling nuclear fuel behavior, especially for conditions of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Current approaches to fuel performance modeling rely on empirical constitutive models for cladding creep, growth and plastic deformation, which are limited to the materials and conditions for which the models were developed. To improve upon this approach, a microstructurally-based zirconium alloy mechanical deformation analysis capability is being developed within the United States Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Specifically, the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity modeling approach, developed by Lebensohn and Tomé [1], has been coupled with the BISON engineering scale fuel performance code to represent the mechanistic material processes controlling the deformation behavior of light water reactor (LWR) cladding. A critical component of VPSC is the representation of the crystallographic nature (defect and dislocation movement) and orientation of the grains within the matrix material and the ability to account for the role of texture on deformation. A future goal is for VPSC to obtain information on reaction rate kinetics from atomistic calculations to inform the defect and dislocation behavior models described in VPSC. The multiscale modeling of cladding deformation mechanisms allowed by VPSC far exceed the functionality of typical semi-empirical constitutive models employed in nuclear fuel behavior codes to model irradiation growth and creep, thermal creep, or plasticity. This paper describes the implementation of an interface between VPSC and BISON and provides initial results utilizing the coupled functionality.

  6. Microstructure and mechanical properties of zirconium doped NiAl/Cr(Mo) hypoeutectic alloy prepared by injection casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, L. Y.; Du, B. N.; Guo, J. T.

    2017-01-01

    NiAl based materials has been considered as most potential candidate of turbine blade, due to its excellent high-temperature properties. However the bad room-temperature properties handicap its application. In the present paper, the zirconium doped NiAl/Cr(Mo) hypoeutectic alloy is fabricated by conventional casting and injection casting technology to improve its room-temperature properties. The microstructure and compressive properties at different temperatures of the conventionally-cast and injection-cast were investigated. The results exhibit that the conventionally-cast alloy comprises coarse primary NiAl phase and eutectic cell, which is dotted with irregular Ni2AlZr Heusler phase. Compared with the conventionally-cast alloy, the injection-cast alloy possesses refined the primary NiAl, eutectic cell and eutectic lamella. In addition, the Ni2AlZr Heusler phase become smaller and distribute uniformly. Moreover, the injection casting decrease the area fraction of primary NiAl phase at the cell interior or cell boundaries. The compressive ductility and yield strength of the injection-cast alloy at room temperature increase by about 100% and 35% over those of conventionally-cast alloy, which should be ascribed to the microstructure optimization.

  7. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Bibb, Albert E.

    1984-01-01

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  8. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  9. Study on corrosion resistance of high - entropy alloy in medium acid liquid and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, I.; Buluc, G.; Florea, R. M.; Soare, V.; Carcea, I.

    2015-11-01

    High-entropy alloy is a new alloy which is different from traditional alloys. The high entropy alloys were started in Tsing Hua University of Taiwan since 1995 by Yeh et al. Consisting of a variety of elements, each element occupying a similar compared with other alloy elements to form a high entropy. We could define high entropy alloys as having approximately equal concentrations, made up of a group of 5 to 11 major elements. In general, the content of each element is not more than 35% by weight of the alloy. During the investigation it turned out that this alloy has a high hardness and is also corrosion proof and also strength and good thermal stability. In the experimental area, scientists used different tools, including traditional casting, mechanical alloying, sputtering, splat-quenching to obtain the high entropy alloys with different alloying elements and then to investigate the corresponding microstructures and mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electronic performances. The present study is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance in a different medium acid and try to put in evidence the mechanical properties. Forasmuch of the wide composition range and the enormous number of alloy systems in high entropy alloys, the mechanical properties of high entropy alloys can vary significantly. In terms of hardness, the most critical factors are: hardness/strength of each composing phase in the alloy, distribution of the composing phases. The corrosion resistance of an high entropy alloy was made in acid liquid such as 10%HNO3-3%HF, 10%H2SO4, 5%HCl and then was investigated, respectively with weight loss experiment. Weight loss test was carried out by put the samples into the acid solution for corrosion. The solution was maintained at a constant room temperature. The liquid formulations used for tests were 3% hydrofluoric acid with 10% nitric acid, 10% sulphuric acid, 5% hydrochloric acid. Weight loss of the samples was measured by electronic scale.

  10. Effect of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in 40% NaOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. P.; Hwang, S. S.; Lim, Y. S.; Kuk, I. H.; Kim, J. S.

    2001-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and the Ni-10Cr-10Fe alloy have been studied using a C-ring in 40% NaOH solution at 315°C. The current density of Alloy 690 in polarization curves was higher at 200 mV above corrosion potential than that of Alloy 600. SCC resistance increased with Cr content for the chromium carbide free alloys, probably due to facilitation of SCC crack tip blunting with an increase in Cr content. Both thermally treated Alloy 600 and sensitized Alloy 600 have a comparable amount of intergranular carbide. But the former is more resistant to SCC than the latter, which might be attributed to the presence of the slight Cr depletion around the grain boundary in the former one. Sensitized Alloy 600 showed higher SCC resistance than the solution annealed one due to intergranular carbide in sensitized Alloy 600. This implies that the beneficial effect of intergranular carbide overrides the harmful effects of Cr depletion for sensitized Alloy 600. SCC resistance of Alloy 600 increased with grain size.

  11. Physical and Mechanical Metallurgy of Zirconium Alloys for Nuclear Applications: A Multi-Scale Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazoff, Michael Vasily

    In the post-Fukushima world, thermal and structural stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for the safety of nuclear reactors. Because the nuclear industry will continue using zirconium (Zr) cladding for the foreseeable future, it becomes critical to gain a fundamental understanding of several interconnected problems. First, what are the thermodynamic and kinetic factors affecting oxidation and hydrogen pick-up by these materials at normal, off-normal conditions, and in long-term storage? Secondly, what protective coatings could be used in order to gain valuable time at off-normal conditions (temperature exceeds ~1200°C (2200°F)? Thirdly, the kinetics of the coating's oxidation must be understood. Lastly, one needs automated inspection algorithms allowing identifying cladding's defects. This work attempts to explore the problem from a computational perspective, utilizing first principles atomistic simulations, computational thermodynamics, plasticity theory, and morphological algorithms of image processing for defect identification. It consists of the four parts dealing with these four problem areas preceded by the introduction. In the 1st part, computational thermodynamics and ab initio calculations were used to shed light upon the different stages of zircaloy oxidation and hydrogen pickup, and microstructure optimization to increase thermal stability. The 2 nd part describes the kinetic theory of oxidation of the several materials considered to be perspective coatings for Zr alloys: SiC and ZrSiO4. The 3rd part deals with understanding the respective roles of the two different plasticity mechanisms in Zr nuclear alloys: twinning (at low T) and crystallographic slip (higher T's). For that goal, an advanced plasticity model was proposed. In the 4th part projectional algorithms for defect identification in zircaloy coatings are described. Conclusions and recommendations are presented in the 5th part. This integrative approach's value

  12. Physical and mechanical metallurgy of zirconium alloys for nuclear applications: a multi-scale computational study

    SciT

    Glazoff, Michael Vasily

    2014-10-01

    In the post-Fukushima world, the stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for the safety of nuclear reactors. Because the nuclear industry is going to continue using advanced zirconium cladding materials in the foreseeable future, it become critical to gain fundamental understanding of the several interconnected problems. First, what are the thermodynamic and kinetic factors affecting the oxidation and hydrogen pick-up by these materials at normal, off-normal conditions, and in long-term storage? Secondly, what protective coatings (if any) could be used in order to gain extremely valuable time at off-normal conditions, e.g., when temperature exceeds the criticalmore » value of 2200°F? Thirdly, the kinetics of oxidation of such protective coating or braiding needs to be quantified. Lastly, even if some degree of success is achieved along this path, it is absolutely critical to have automated inspection algorithms allowing identifying defects of cladding as soon as possible. This work strives to explore these interconnected factors from the most advanced computational perspective, utilizing such modern techniques as first-principles atomistic simulations, computational thermodynamics of materials, diffusion modeling, and the morphological algorithms of image processing for defect identification. Consequently, it consists of the four parts dealing with these four problem areas preceded by the introduction and formulation of the studied problems. In the 1st part an effort was made to employ computational thermodynamics and ab initio calculations to shed light upon the different stages of oxidation of ziraloys (2 and 4), the role of microstructure optimization in increasing their thermal stability, and the process of hydrogen pick-up, both in normal working conditions and in long-term storage. The 2nd part deals with the need to understand the influence and respective roles of the two different plasticity mechanisms in Zr nuclear alloys

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Corrosion resistance and durability of superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Masuda, Yoshitake; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2011-04-19

    The corrosion resistant performance and durability of the superhydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution were investigated using electrochemical and contact angle measurements. The durability of the superhydrophobic surface in corrosive 5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution was elucidated. The corrosion resistant performance of the superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy was estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The EIS measurements and appropriate equivalent circuit models revealed that the superhydrophobic surface considerably improved the corrosion resistant performance of magnesium alloy AZ31. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D 3359-02 cross cut tape test was performed to investigate the adhesion of the superhydrophobic film to the magnesium alloy surface. The corrosion formation mechanism of the superhydrophobic surface formed on the magnesium alloy was also proposed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Quantitative Correlation of 7B04 Aluminum Alloys Pitting Corrosion Morphology Characteristics with Stress Concentration Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Yan, Guangyao; Mu, Zhitao; Li, Xudong

    2018-01-01

    The accelerated pitting corrosion test of 7B04 aluminum alloy specimen was carried out according to the spectrum which simulated airport environment, and the corresponding pitting corrosion damage was obtained and was defined through three parameters A and B and C which respectively denoted the corrosion pit surface length and width and corrosion pit depth. The ratio between three parameters could determine the morphology characteristics of corrosion pits. On this basis the stress concentration factor of typical corrosion pit morphology under certain load conditions was quantitatively analyzed. The research shows that the corrosion pits gradually incline to be ellipse in surface and moderate in depth, and most value of B/A and C/A lies in 1 between 4 and few maximum exceeds 4; The stress concentration factor Kf of corrosion pits is obviously affected by the its morphology, the value of Kf increases with corrosion pits depth increasement under certain corrosion pits surface geometry. Also, the value of Kf decreases with surface width increasement under certain corrosion pits depth. The research conclusion can set theory basis for corrosion fatigue life analysis of aircraft aluminum alloy structure.

  16. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of sputter-deposited titanium-chromium alloy coatings

    SciT

    Landolt, D.; Robyr, C.; Mettraux, P.

    1998-10-01

    Titanium, chromium, and titanium-chromium alloy coatings were sputter-deposited to study their corrosion behaviors in relation to microstructure and composition. Silicon substrates were used to study the effect of alloying on intrinsic corrosion resistance of the coating materials, and brass substrates were used to study the effect of alloying on the penetrating porosity of the coatings. Corrosion behavior was characterized using linear sweep voltammetry. The crystal structure of the coatings was examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to estimate the real surface area of the coatings. Results showedmore » alloying of titanium with chromium greatly influenced microstructure of the coatings. Alloying led to deposits of higher apparent density and, in some cases, to an x-ray amorphous structure. Alloy coatings showed significantly lower corrosion currents than the constituting metals. The effect was attributed to a smoother surface topography. When corrected of differences in real surface area, the intrinsic corrosion rate of the alloy coatings did not differ significantly from that of the constituting metals. Alloy coatings deposited on brass exhibited a lower porosity than titanium or chromium metal coatings produced under identical conditions.« less

  17. Influence of the casting processing route on the corrosion behavior of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Rocha, Luis Augusto; Faria, Adriana Claudia; Silveira, Renata Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2014-12-01

    Casting in the presence of oxygen may result in an improvement of the corrosion performance of most alloys. However, the effect of corrosion on the casting without oxygen for dental materials remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the casting technique and atmosphere (argon or oxygen) on the corrosion behavior response of six different dental casting alloys. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by electrochemical measurements performed in artificial saliva for the different alloys cast in two different conditions: arc melting in argon and oxygen-gas flame centrifugal casting. A slight decrease in open-circuit potential for most alloys was observed during immersion, meaning that the corrosion tendency of the materials increases due to the contact with the solution. Exceptions were the Co-based alloys prepared by plasma, and the Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-4Ti alloys processed by oxidized flame, in which an increase in potential was observed. The amount of metallic ions released into the artificial saliva solution during immersion was similar for all specimens. Considering the pitting potential, a parameter of high importance when considering the fluctuating conditions of the oral environment, Co-based alloys show the best performance in comparison with the Ni-based alloys, independent of the processing route. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro corrosion of magnesium alloy AZ31 — a synergetic influence of glucose and Tris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling-Yu; Liu, Bin; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen; Zou, Yu-Hong; Jiang, Hongwei George; Chen, Xiao-Bo; Guan, Shao-Kang; Liu, Qing-Yun

    2018-05-01

    Biodegradable Mg alloys have generated great interest for biomedical applications. Accurate predictions of in vivo degradation of Mg alloys through cost-effective in vivo evaluations require the latter to be conducted in an environment close to that of physiological scenarios. However, the roles of glucose and buffering agents in regulating the in vivo degradation performance of Mg alloys has not been elucidated. Herein, degradation behavior of AZ31 alloy is investigated by hydrogen evolution measurements, pH monitoring and electrochemical tests. Results indicate that glucose plays a content-dependent role in degradation of AZ31 alloy in buffer-free saline solution. The presence of a low concentration of glucose, i.e. 1.0 g/L, decreases the corrosion rate of Mg alloy AZ31, whereas the presence of 2.0 and 3.0 g/L glucose accelerates the corrosion rate during long term immersion in saline solution. In terms of Tris-buffered saline solution, the addition of glucose increases pH value and promotes pitting corrosion or general corrosion of AZ31 alloy. This study provides a novel perspective to understand the bio-corrosion of Mg alloys in buffering agents and glucose containing solutions.

  19. In vitro corrosion of magnesium alloy AZ31 — a synergetic influence of glucose and Tris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling-Yu; Liu, Bin; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen; Zou, Yu-Hong; Jiang, Hongwei George; Chen, Xiao-Bo; Guan, Shao-Kang; Liu, Qing-Yun

    2018-06-01

    Biodegradable Mg alloys have generated great interest for biomedical applications. Accurate predictions of in vivo degradation of Mg alloys through cost-effective in vivo evaluations require the latter to be conducted in an environment close to that of physiological scenarios. However, the roles of glucose and buffering agents in regulating the in vivo degradation performance of Mg alloys has not been elucidated. Herein, degradation behavior of AZ31 alloy is investigated by hydrogen evolution measurements, pH monitoring and electrochemical tests. Results indicate that glucose plays a content-dependent role in degradation of AZ31 alloy in buffer-free saline solution. The presence of a low concentration of glucose, i.e. 1.0 g/L, decreases the corrosion rate of Mg alloy AZ31, whereas the presence of 2.0 and 3.0 g/L glucose accelerates the corrosion rate during long term immersion in saline solution. In terms of Tris-buffered saline solution, the addition of glucose increases pH value and promotes pitting corrosion or general corrosion of AZ31 alloy. This study provides a novel perspective to understand the bio-corrosion of Mg alloys in buffering agents and glucose containing solutions.

  20. Studies of localized corrosion in welded aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Nunes, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in welded samples of 2219-T87 Al alloy (2319 filler), 2090 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers), and 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers) has been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique. The weld beads are cathodic in all cases, leading to reduced anode/cathode ratios. A reduction in anode/cathode ratio leads to an increase in the corrosion rates of the welded metals, in agreement with results obtained in previous electrochemical and stress corrosion studies involving the overall corrosion rates of welded samples. The cathodic weld beads are bordered on both sides by strong anodic regions, with high propensity for corrosion.

  1. The Corrosion Behavior of Ni3(Si,Nb) Alloys in Boiling 70 wt.% Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Hsien; Larson, Christopher M.; Newkirk, Joseph W.; Brow, Richard K.; Zhang, San-Hong

    2016-02-01

    Corrosion-resistant Ni3(Si,Nb) alloys are promising materials of construction for hydrogen-production systems based on the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle. In this work, the corrosion rates of three different Ni3(Si,Nb) alloys were measured in boiling 70 wt.% sulfuric acid and a three-stage corrosion mechanism was identified, based on the composition and morphology of surface scale that developed. The α(Ni) + β(Ni3Si) eutectic constituent of the alloy microstructure was selectively attacked by acid and, when present, is detrimental to corrosion resistance. The G-phase (Ni16Si17Nb6) is more passive than the β-matrix and seems to contribute to a lower steady-state corrosion rate.

  2. 3D study of intermetallics and their effect on the corrosion morphology of rheocast aluminium alloy

    SciT

    Mingo, B.; Arrabal, R., E-mail: rarrabal@ucm.es; Pardo, A.

    In the present study, the effect of heat treatment T6.1 on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour of rheocast aluminium alloy A356 is investigated on the basis of 2D/3D characterization techniques and electrochemical and SKPFM measurements. Heat treatment strengthens the α-Al matrix, modifies the intermetallic particles and spheroidizes eutectic Si. These changes do not modify significantly the corrosion behaviour of the alloy. 3D SEM-Tomography clearly shows that the corrosion advances in the shape of narrow paths between closely spaced intermetallics without a major influence of eutectic Si. - Highlights: • T6.1 spheroidizes Si, strengthens the matrix and modifies the intermetallics. •more » Electrochemical behaviour of untreated and heat-treated alloys is similar. • 3D SEM-Tomography provides additional information on the corrosion morphology. • Corrosion advances as paths between intermetallics with little influence of Si.« less

  3. Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Richard W.

    1980-01-01

    Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

  4. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  5. Estimation of Atmospheric Corrosion of High-Strength, Low-Alloy Steels

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-05-01

    This data analysis was undertaken to investigate the weatherability of steels whose compositions do not fall in the range of ASTM Standard G101, Estimating the Atmospheric Corrosion Resistance of Low-Alloy Steels.

  6. Corrosion of Aluminum Alloys in the Presence of Fire-Retardant Aircraft Interior Materials

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-10-01

    This research project was to evaluate the potential for fire-retardant materials used in aircraft interiors to cause corrosion of aluminum structural alloys. Service Difficulty Reports (SDR's) were reviewed for several aircraft types, and the most fr...

  7. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  8. Corrosion assessment and enhanced biocompatibility analysis of biodegradable magnesium-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, Luis Enrique

    Magnesium alloys have raised immense interest to many researchers because of its evolution as a new third generation material. Due to their biocompatibility, density, and mechanical properties, magnesium alloys are frequently reported as prospective biodegradable implant materials. Moreover, magnesium based alloys experience a natural phenomena to biodegrade in aqueous solutions due to its corrosive activity, which is excellent for orthopedic and cardiovascular applications. However, major concerns with such alloys are fast and non-uniform corrosion degradation. Controlling the degradation rate in the physiological environment determines the success of an implant. In this investigation, three grades of magnesium alloys: AZ31B, AZ91E and ZK60A were studied for their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and contact angle meter are used to study surface morphology, chemistry, roughness and wettability, respectively. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the leached metal ions was evaluated by a tetrazolium based bio-assay, MTS.

  9. [Effect of porcelain firing cycle on microstructure and corrosion resistance of 4 metal ceramic alloys].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Cai, Hui; Xu, Guo-fu; Fang, Chang-yun

    2006-06-01

    To determine the effect of porcelain firing cycle on microstructure of 4 metal ceramic alloys, and to analyze the changes of their corrosion resistance in the artificial saliva. We simulated the process of firing and repolishing when fabricating porcelain-fused-to-metal restoration in clinic,and then observed the microstructures of Ni-Cr, Ni-Cr-Ti, Co-Cr alloys and high gold alloy by field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of alloys in artificial saliva was analyzed by polarization curves and corrview 2 corrosion analysis software. The data of self-corrosion potential and transpassive potential were obtained and analyzed. After the porcelain firing cycle, the surface composition changed slightly, and the morphological in the 3 predominate base metal alloys also changed. The self-corrosion potential turned to more negative, and the transpassive potential declined. The procedure of porcelain firing cycle can affect the surface microstructure and increase the corrosion of 4 metal-ceramic alloys.

  10. The corrosion protection of several aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion protection afforded 7075-T6, 7075-T3, 6061-T6, and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing was examined using electrochemical techniques. From these studies, it is concluded that sulfuric acid anodizing provides superior corrosion protection compared to chromic acid anodizing.

  11. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  12. ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPLIANT CORROSION-ACTIVATED INHIBITOR SYSTEM FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The federal government is estimated to spend $1 billion on painting/repainting aircraft annually. Aircraft have surfaces composed of aluminum alloys that are highly susceptible to corrosion and must be protected with corrosion-preventative treatments that typically conta...

  13. Structure and Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Alloy 1151 in Marine Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulo, A. V.; Yakushin, B. F.; Puchkov, Yu. A.

    2017-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of joints formed by TIG and IMIG welding from clad sheets of heat-hardenable aluminum alloy 1151 of the Al - Cu - Mg system is studied. The corrosion tests are performed in an aqueous solution of NaCl in a salt-spray chamber. The welded joints are subjected to a metallographic analysis.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  15. Effect of Chromate and Chromate-Free Organic Coatings on Corrosion Fatigue of an Aluminum Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-20

    Investigations of alloy AA7075 corrosion in acid rain solution, inhibited by chromate-free blends of zinc phosphate with bentonite, zeolite and calcium...with solution components. Single use of zinc phosphate and these ion exchanged pigments for corrosion inhibition do not provide desired effect...primer performance against corrosion fatigue cracking under a commercial polyurethane topcoat. As a control , they used samples of chromated AA2024

  16. ZIRCONIUM-CLADDING OF THORIUM

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.

    1961-11-21

    A method of cladding thorium with zirconium is described. The quality of the bond achieved between thorium and zirconium by hot-rolling is improved by inserting and melting a thorium-zirconium alloy foil between the two materials prior to rolling. (AEC)

  17. Mechanical and corrosion properties of newly developed biodegradable Zn-based alloys for bone fixation.

    PubMed

    Vojtěch, D; Kubásek, J; Serák, J; Novák, P

    2011-09-01

    In the present work Zn-Mg alloys containing up to 3wt.% Mg were studied as potential biodegradable materials for medical use. The structure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of these alloys were investigated and compared with those of pure Mg, AZ91HP and casting Zn-Al-Cu alloys. The structures were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile and hardness testing were used to characterize the mechanical properties of the alloys. The corrosion behavior of the materials in simulated body fluid with pH values of 5, 7 and 10 was determined by immersion tests, potentiodynamic measurements and by monitoring the pH value evolution during corrosion. The surfaces of the corroded alloys were investigated by SEM, energy-dispersive spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that a maximum strength and elongation of 150MPa and 2%, respectively, were achieved at Mg contents of approximately 1wt.%. These mechanical properties are discussed in relation to the structural features of the alloys. The corrosion rates of the Zn-Mg alloys were determined to be significantly lower than those of Mg and AZ91HP alloys. The former alloys corroded at rates of the order of tens of microns per year, whereas the corrosion rates of the latter were of the order of hundreds of microns per year. Possible zinc doses and toxicity were estimated from the corrosion behavior of the zinc alloys. It was found that these doses are negligible compared with the tolerable biological daily limit of zinc. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Effect of chloride ion on corrosion of two commonly used dental alloys].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weidan; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the eff ect of chloride concentration on the corrosion of Co-Cr alloy and pure Ti in a simulated oral environment. The electrochemical corrosion tests of pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy were carried out in neutral artificial saliva solutions with different NaCl concentrations (0.9%, 2.0%, and 3.0%). Th e morphologies of corroded surface for pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Th e changes in the self-corrosion potentials (Ecorr) for pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy in three kinds of artificial saliva solutions was not obvious. However, the self-corrosion current densities (Icorr) of pure Ti were much lower than those of Co-Cr. The Icorr of Co-Cr alloy increased in a concentration-dependent manner of NaCl, whereas the breakdown potential (Eb) of Co-Cr alloy decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. Th e potential ranged for the breakdown of oxide film (Ev) was shortened in a concentration-dependent manner of NaCl. There was no obvious difference in the Icorr of pure Ti with different concentrations of NaCl. The breakdown potential was not seen according to the polarization curves. In a certain range, the increase of the concentration of Cl- leads to accelerate the corrosion behavior of Co-Cr alloy, but it does not affect pure Ti.

  19. Burner Rig Hot Corrosion of Five Ni-Base Alloys Including Mar-M247

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Helmink, R.; Harris, K.; Erickson, G.

    2000-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of four new Ni-base superalloys was compared to that of Mar-M247 by testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at 900 C for 300 1-hr cycles. While the Al content was held the same as in the Mar-M247, the Cr and Co levels in the four new alloys were decreased while other strengthening elements (Re, Ta) were increased. Surprisingly, despite their lower Cr and Co contents, the hot corrosion behavior of all four new alloys was superior to that of the Mar-M247 alloy. The Mar-M247 alloy began to lose weight almost immediately whereas the other four alloys appeared to undergo an incubation period of 50-150 1-hr cycles. Examination of the cross-sectional microstructures showed regions of rampant corrosion attack (propagation stage) in all five alloys after 300 1-hr cycles . This rampant corrosion morphology was similar for each of the alloys with Ni and Cr sulfides located in an inner subscale region. The morphology of the attack suggests a classic "Type I", or high temperature, hot corrosion attack.

  20. Microstructure and Corrosion Characterization of Squeeze Cast AM50 Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, Deepika; Tiwari, Shashank; Sundarraj, Suresh; Luo, Alan A.

    2010-12-01

    Squeeze casting of magnesium alloys potentially can be used in lightweight chassis components such as control arms and knuckles. This study documents the microstructural analysis and corrosion behavior of AM50 alloys squeeze cast at different pressures between 40 and 120 MPa and compares them with high-pressure die cast (HPDC) AM50 alloy castings and an AM50 squeeze cast prototype control arm. Although the corrosion rates of the squeeze cast samples are slightly higher than those observed for the HPDC AM50 alloy, the former does produce virtually porosity-free castings that are required for structural applications like control arms and wheels. This outcome is extremely encouraging as it provides an opportunity for additional alloy and process development by squeeze casting that has remained relatively unexplored for magnesium alloys compared with aluminum. Among the microstructural parameters analyzed, it seems that the β-phase interfacial area, indicating a greater degree of β network, leads to a lower corrosion rate. Weight loss was the better method for determining corrosion behavior in these alloys that contain a large fraction of second phase, which can cause perturbations to an overall uniform surface corrosion behavior.

  1. Effects of Variations in Salt-Spray Conditions on the Corrosion Mechanisms of an AE44 Magnesium Alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, Holly J.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Wang, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of how corrosion affects magnesium alloys is of utmost importance as the automotive and aerospace industries have become interested in the use of these lightweight alloys. However, the standardized salt-spray test does not produce adequate corrosion results when compared with field data, due to the lack of multiple exposure environments. This research explored four test combinations through three sets of cycles to determine how the corrosion mechanisms of pitting, intergranular corrosion, and general corrosion were affected by the environment. Of the four test combinations, Humidity-Drying was the least corrosive, while the most corrosive test condition was Salt Spray-Humidity-Drying.more » The differences in corrosivity of the test conditions are due to the various reactions needed to cause corrosion, including the presence of chloride ions to cause pit nucleation, the presence of humidity to cause galvanic corrosion, and the drying phase which trapped chloride ions beneath the corrosion by-products.« less

  2. Effect of flow velocity on erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weijiu; Zhou, Yongtao; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Zhijun; Zheng, Ziqing

    2018-05-01

    The erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy used as propellers in marine environment was evaluated by erosion-corrosion experiments with/without cathodic protection, electrochemical tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. The analysis was focused on the effect of flow velocity. The dynamic polarization curves showed that the corrosion rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased, due to the protective surface film removal at higher velocities. The lowest corrosion current densities of 1.26 × 10‑4 A cm‑2 was obtained at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1. Because of the higher particle kinetic energies at higher flow velocity, the mass loss rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased. The mass loss rate with cathodic protection was lower than that without cathodic protection under the same conditions. Also, the lowest mass loss rate of 0.7 g m‑2 · h‑1 was acquired at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 with cathodic protection. However, the increase rate of corrosion rate and mass loss were decreased with increasing the flow velocity. Through observation the SEM morphologies of the worn surfaces, the main wear mechanism was ploughing with/without cathodic protection. The removal rates of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased in both pure erosion and erosion-corrosion, whereas the erosion and corrosion intensified each other. At the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1, the synergy rate (ΔW) exceeded by 5 times the erosion rate (Wwear). Through establishment and observation the erosion-corrosion mechanism map, the erosion-corrosion was the dominant regime in the study due to the contribution of erosion on the mass loss rate exceeded the corrosion contribution. The QSn6 alloy with cathodic protection is feasible as propellers, there are higher security at lower flow velocity, such as the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 in the paper.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in all volatile treated water at elevated temperatures. Final report. [PWR

    SciT

    Theus, G.J.; Emanuelson, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes a continuing study of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Inconel alloys 600 and 690 in all-volatile treated (AVT) water. Specimens of alloys 600 and 690 are being exposed to AVT water at 288/sup 0/, 332/sup 0/, 343/sup 0/, and 360/sup 0/C. Alloy 600 generally resists SCC in high-purity water under normal service conditions but is susceptible under other specific conditions. In general, mill-annealed alloy 600 is more susceptible than stress-relieved material. Susceptibility to SCC increases rapidly with increasing exposure temperature. Very high stresses (near or above yield) are required to induce cracking in AVT or other high-puritymore » waters. Most of the data presented in this report are for alloy 600; alloy 690 has not yet cracked. However, the program is being continued and will subsequently characterize the high-purity water cracking behavior, if any, of alloy 690.« less

  4. Effect of carbide precipitation on the corrosion behavior of Inconel alloy 690

    SciT

    Sarver, J.M.; Crum, J.R.; Mankins, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    Intergranular carbide precipitation reactions have been shown to affect the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys in environments relative to nuclear steam generators. Carbon solubility curves, time-temperature-sensitization plots and other carbide precipitation data are presented for alloy 690 as an aid in developing heat treatments for improved SCC resistance.

  5. In vitro corrosion properties and cytocompatibility of Fe-Ga alloys as potential biodegradable metallic materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Henan; Zheng, Yang; Liu, Jinghua; Jiang, Chengbao; Li, Yan

    2017-02-01

    The in vitro biodegradable properties and cytocompatibility of Fe-Ga alloys including Fe 81 Ga 19 , (Fe 81 Ga 19 ) 98 B 2 and (Fe 81 Ga 19 ) 99.5 (TaC) 0.5 , and pure Fe were investigated for biomedical applications. The microstructure of the alloys was characterized using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results showed that A2 and D0 3 phases were detected for the three types of Fe-Ga alloys, and additional Fe 2 B and TaC phases were found in the (Fe 81 Ga 19 ) 98 B 2 and (Fe 81 Ga 19 ) 99.5 (TaC) 0.5 alloys, respectively. The corrosion rates of the Fe-Ga alloys were higher than that of pure Fe, as demonstrated by both potentiodynamic polarization measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid. The alloying element Ga lowered the corrosion potential of the Fe matrix and made it more susceptible to corrosion. Severe pitting corrosion developed on the surface of the Fe 81 Ga 19 alloy after the addition of ternary B or TaC due to the multi-phase microstructures. The MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited good adhesion and proliferation behavior on the surfaces of the Fe-Ga alloys after culture for 4h and 24h. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Corrosion Performance of Mg-Ti Alloys Synthesized by Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenqing; Song, Guang-Ling; Haddad, Daad

    Mg is difficult to alloy with Ti through a conventional metallurgical approach due to their insolubility in each other and big difference in melting point. However, Mg, if alloyed with Ti, may become corrosion resistant. This hypothesis is verified in this study.

  7. Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic films of Mo49Cr33B18 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.; Distefano, S.; Fitzgerald, D.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic alloy films of Mo49Cr33B18 with a crystallization temperature of 590 C were deposited onto glass and quartz substrates by magnetron sputter-quench technique. The amorphous nature of the films was confirmed by their diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns. The deposited films are densely packed (zone T) and exhibit low stress and good adhesion to the substrate. Corrosion current of as-deposited coating of MoCrB amorphous metallic alloy is approximately three orders of magnitude less than the corrosion current of 304 stainless steel in 1N H2SO4 solution.

  8. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  9. Influence of Zeolite Coating on the Corrosion Resistance of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, P Chakraborty; Woo, Ren Ping; Grayson, Sam Matthew; Majumder, Amrita; Raman, R K Singh

    2014-08-22

    The protective performance of zeolite coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.1 M sodium chloride solution (NaCl). Electrical equivalent circuit (EEC) was developed based upon hypothetical corrosion mechanisms and simulated to correspond to the experimental data. The morphology and the chemical nature of the coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Post corrosion morphologies of the zeolite coated and the uncoated AZ91D alloy were investigated using SEM. The corrosion resistance of the zeolite coated specimen was at least one order of magnitude higher than the uncoated specimen.

  10. Comparison of corrosion performance and mechanisms of Al-Cu alloys with and without Li addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henon, Christine; Rouault, Sacha

    The corrosion behaviour (intergranular corrosion, exfoliation and SCC) of alloy 2050 (AlCuLi) has been evaluated as a function of tempering and compared with some 2xxx Li free alloys. They show a similar qualitative behaviour: sensitivity to corrosion in underaged conditions, desensitization near peak age and re-sensitization in overaged conditions. The desentization can be rationalized on the basis of microstructural investigations and electrochemical measurements: preferential dissolution in underaged conditions is attributed to a Cu depleted zone near grain boundary. The re-sensitization in an overaged temper needs further investigations.

  11. Effect of thermal oxidation on corrosion and corrosion-wear behaviour of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Güleryüz, Hasan; Cimenoğlu, Hüseyin

    2004-07-01

    In this study, comparative investigation of thermal oxidation treatment for Ti-6Al-4V was carried out to determine the optimum oxidation conditions for further evaluation of corrosion-wear performance. Characterization of modified surface layers was made by means of microscopic examinations, hardness measurements and X-ray diffraction analysis. Optimum oxidation condition was determined according to the results of accelerated corrosion tests made in 5m HCl solution The examined Ti-6Al-4V alloy exhibited excellent resistance to corrosion after oxidation at 600 degrees C for 60 h. This oxidation condition achieved 25 times higher wear resistance than the untreated alloy during reciprocating wear test conducted in a 0.9% NaCl solution.

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of LD10 Aluminum Alloy in UDMH and N2O4 propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youhong; Chang, Xinlong; Liu, Wanlei

    2018-03-01

    The LD10 aluminum alloy double cantilever beam specimens were corroded under the conditions of Unsymmetric Uimethyl Hydrazine (UDMH), Dinitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4), and 3.5% NaCl environment. The crack propagation behavior of the aluminum alloy in different corrosion environment was analyzed. The stress corrosion cracking behavior of aluminum alloy in N2O4 is relatively slight and there are not evident stress corrosion phenomenons founded in UDMH.

  13. Electrochemical Interpretation of a Stress Corrosion Cracking of Thermally Treated Ni base Alloys in a Lead Contaminated Water

    SciT

    Hwang, Seong Sik; Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2007-08-20

    Since the PbSCC(Lead stress corrosion cracking) of alloy 600 tubing materials was reported by Copson and Dean in 1965, the effect of lead on a corrosion film and cracking morphology have been continually debated. An electrochemical interaction of lead with the alloying elements of SG tubings was studied and the corrosion products were analyzed. It was found that lead enhanced the anodic dissolution of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in the electrochemical test. The lead preferentially dissolved the Cr from the corrosion film of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in alkaline water. The lead ion seemed to penetrate into themore » TG crack tip and react with the corrosion film. A selective Cr depletion was observed to weaken the stability of the passive film on the alloys. Whereas passivity of Ni became stable in lead containing solution, Cr and Fe passivity became unstable.« less

  14. Magnetostriction and corrosion studies in single crystals of iron-gallium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Tanjore V.

    Iron-gallium alloys have an excellent combination of large low-field magnetostriction, good mechanical properties, low hysteresis, and relatively low cost. This dissertation focuses on the magneto striction and corrosion behaviors of single crystals of Fe-Ga alloys. In the first part, the variation of magnetostrictive coefficient: (3/2) lambda100, with composition and heat treatment conditions of Fe-Ga alloys, is examined. Single crystals with compositions Fe-15 at.% Ga, Fe-20 at.% Ga, and Fe-27.5 at.% Ga were obtained by (a) vertical Bridgman technique (DG) and (b) vertical Bridgman technique followed by long-term annealing (LTA) and quenching. Rapid quenching from a phase region improves the (3/2) lambda 100 value in these alloys. X-ray diffraction characterization showed for the first time the direct evidence of short-range ordering in these alloys. The second part reports the first study of alpha" ordering heat treatment on the elastic properties and magnetostriction of Fe-27.5 at.% Ga alloy single crystals. The elastic constants were measured using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS), and the elastic properties and magneto-elastic coupling constant were calculated. The (3/2) lambda100 and B1 values obtained for a phase were higher than alpha" phase. The third part examines the first study of corrosion behavior of as-cast FeGa and Fe-Ga-Al alloys in acidic, basic, and simulated seawater environments. Corrosion measurements were performed by Tafel scan and polarization resistance method and in general exhibited good corrosion resistance. The fourth part examines the first study of corrosion behavior of Fe-15 at.% Ga, Fe-20 at.% Ga, and Fe-27.5 at.% Ga DG and LTA alloy single crystals and the dependence of corrosion rates on the crystal orientations. The corrosion resistance was better in basic environments followed by simulated seawater and acidic environments. The fifth part examines the effect of magnetostriction on the corrosion behavior of [100]-oriented

  15. Corrosion Behavior and Durability of Low-Alloy Steel Rebars in Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Cheng, Xuequn; Li, Xiaogang; Yue, Pan; Li, Jun

    2016-11-01

    The corrosion resistance of Cr-modified low-alloy steels and HRB400 carbon steel was estimated using the open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic, and weight loss methods in simulated concrete pore solution. Results show that Cr-modified steels exhibit a higher corrosion resistance with a higher critical chloride level (CTL), lower corrosion current density, and higher impedance than carbon steel. The CTL of the steels significantly reduces with increasing temperature. Weight loss measurement shows that the Cr-modified steels exhibit low corrosion rates and small corrosion pitting. The primary constituents of the corrosion scales are Fe2O3, Fe3O4, β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and α-FeOOH. A large amount of α-FeOOH could be detected in the Cr-modified steel corrosion products. Moreover, the Cr-modified steels demonstrate a higher durability than HRB400 carbon steel.

  16. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Of Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Calle, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate resistances of 19 alloys to corrosion under conditions similar to those of corrosive, chloride-laden seaside environment of Space Transportation System launch site. Alloys investigated: Hastelloy C-4, C-22, C-276, and B-2; Inconel(R) 600, 625, and 825; Inco(R) G-3; Monel 400; Zirconium 702; Stainless Steel 304L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 904L; 20Cb-3; 7Mo+N; ES2205; and Ferralium 255. Results suggest electrochemical impedance spectroscopy used to predict corrosion performances of metal alloys.

  17. The long-term corrosion performance of Alloy 22 in heated brine solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Enos, D. G.; Bryan, C. R.

    2015-02-13

    Long-term corrosion experiments have been performed on Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), in a series of heated brines formulated to represent evaporatively concentrated ground water, to evaluate the long-term corrosion performance of the material. These solutions included 0.5 M NaCl, in addition to two simulated concentrated ground water solutions. Under conditions where Alloy 22 was anticipated to be passive, the corrosion rate was found to be vanishingly small (i.e., below the resolution of the weight-loss technique used to quantify corrosion in this study). However, under low pH conditions where Alloy 22 was anticipated to be active, or more specifically, where themore » chromium oxide passive film was not thermodynamically stable, the corrosion rate was appreciable. Furthermore, under such conditions the corrosion rate was observed to be a strong function of temperature, with an activation energy of 72.9±1.8 kJ/mol. Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy analysis of the oxide layer revealed that, while sulfur was present within the oxide for all test conditions, no accumulation was observed at or near the metal/oxide interface. Furthermore, these observations confirm that inhibition of passive film formation via sulfur accumulation does not occur during the corrosion of Alloy 22.« less

  18. Nanocontainer-Enhanced Self-Healing for Corrosion-Resistant Ni Coating on Mg Alloy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi-Hui; Li, Dan; Skeete, Zakiya; Sharma, Anju; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2017-10-18

    The ability to manipulate the functionalization of Ni coating is of great importance in improving the corrosion resistance of magnesium (Mg) alloy for many industrial applications. In the present work, MCM-41 type mesoporous silica nanocontainers (MSNs) loaded with corrosion inhibitor (NaF) were synthesized and employed as smart reinforcements to enhance the integrity and corrosion inhibition of the Ni coating. The incorporation of the F-loaded MSNs (F@MSNs) to enhance the corrosion resistant capacity of a metallic coating is reported for the first time. The mesoporous structures of the as-prepared MSNs and F@MSNs were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-rays scattering (SAXS), and N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data demonstrated the successful immobilization of fluoride ion on the MSNs and formation of a magnesium fluoride (MgF 2 ) protective film at the corrosion sites of the Mg alloy upon soaking in a F@MSNs-containing NaCl solution. The results from potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for both bare Mg alloy and Ni coatings with and without F@MSNs have revealed a clear decrease in corrosion rate in a corrosive solution for a long-time immersion due to the introduction of F@MSNs. These findings open new opportunities in the exploration of self-healing metallic coatings for highly enhanced anticorrosion protection of Mg alloy.

  19. Effect of ECAP processing on corrosion resistance of AE21 and AE42 magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minárik, P.; Král, R.; Janeček, M.

    2013-09-01

    Corrosion properties of AE21 and AE42 magnesium alloys were investigated in the extruded state and after subsequent 8 passes of Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) via route Bc, by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.1 M NaCl solution. The resulting microstructure was observed by the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Corrosion layer created after 7 days of immersion was observed by (SEM) in order to explain different evolution of the corrosion resistance after ECAP processing in both alloys. It was found that Al-rich Al11RE3 dispersed particles (present in both alloys) strongly influence the corrosion process and enhance the corrosion resistance. Ultra-fine grained structure was found to reduce the corrosion resistance in AE21. On the other hand, the microstructure of AE42 after ECAP and particularly the better distribution of the alloying elements in the matrix enhance the corrosion resistance when compared to the extruded material.

  20. Characterization of Localized Corrosion in an Al-Cu-Li Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chen; Zhang, Xinxin; Zhou, Xiaorong; Sun, Zhihua; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Tang, Zhihui; Lu, Feng; Thompson, George E.

    2016-05-01

    Corrosion behaviors of recently developed 2A97-T6 aluminum-copper-lithium alloy in sodium chloride solution are investigated using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies in conjunction with electron backscatter diffraction. It has been found that corrosion product rings were established on the alloy surface as early as 5 min during immersion in sodium chloride solution. Meanwhile, hydrogen continuously evolved from within the rings. Pitting corrosion is evident with crystallographic dependant corrosion channel facets mainly parallel to {100} planes. Non-uniform distribution of misorientation in the 2A97 aluminum alloy results in a portion of grains of relatively high stored energy. Such grains were preferentially attacked, serving as local anodes, during the development of crystallographic pitting.

  1. In vitro and in vivo corrosion evaluation of nickel-chromium- and copper-aluminum-based alloys.

    PubMed

    Benatti, O F; Miranda, W G; Muench, A

    2000-09-01

    The low resistance to corrosion is the major problem related to the use of copper-aluminum alloys. This in vitro and in vivo study evaluated the corrosion of 2 copper-aluminum alloys (Cu-Al and Cu-Al-Zn) compared with a nickel-chromium alloy. For the in vitro test, specimens were immersed in the following 3 corrosion solutions: artificial saliva, 0.9% sodium chloride, and 1.0% sodium sulfide. For the in vivo test, specimens were embedded in complete dentures, so that one surface was left exposed. The 3 testing sites were (1) close to the oral mucosa (partial self-cleaning site), (2) surface exposed to the oral cavity (self-cleaning site), and (3) specimen bottom surface exposed to the saliva by means of a tunnel-shaped perforation (non-self-cleaning site). Almost no corrosion occurred with the nickel-chromium alloy, for either the in vitro or in vivo test. On the other hand, the 2 copper-aluminum-based alloys exhibited high corrosion in the sulfide solution. These same alloys also underwent high corrosion in non-self-cleaning sites for the in vivo test, although minimal attack was observed in self-cleaning sites. The nickel-chromium alloy presented high resistance to corrosion. Both copper-aluminum alloys showed considerable corrosion in the sulfide solution and clinically in the non-self-cleaning site. However, in self-cleaning sites these 2 alloys did not show substantial corrosion.

  2. Effect of Minor Alloying Elements on Localized Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Copper-Magnesium based Solid Solution Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburada, Tomohiro

    2011-12-01

    The effects and mechanistic roles of a minor alloying element, Ni, on the localized corrosion behavior were explored by studying (Al75Cu 17Mg8)97Ni3 and Al70Cu 18Mg12 amorphous alloys. To explore the minor alloying element limited to the outer surface layers, the corrosion behavior of Al70Cu 18Mg12 amorphous alloy in solutions with and without Ni 2+ was also studied. Both Ni alloying and Ni2+ in solution improved the localized corrosion resistance of the alloys by ennobling the pitting and repassivation potentials. Pit growth by the selective dissolution of Al and Mg was also suppressed by Ni alloying. Remaining Cu and Ni reorganized into a Cu-rich polycrystalline nanoporous structure with continuous ligaments in pits. The minor Ni alloying and Ni2+ in solution suppressed the coarsening of the ligaments in the dealloyed nanoporous structure. The presence of relatively immobile Ni atoms at the surface suppressed the surface diffusion of Cu, which reduced the coarsening of the nanoporous structure, resulting in the formation of 10 to 30 nm wide Cu ligaments. Two mechanistic roles of minor alloying elements in the improvement of the pitting corrosion resistance of the solid solution alloys are elucidated. The first role is the suppression of active dissolution by altering the atomic structure. Ni in solid solution formed stronger bonds with Al, and reduces the probability of weaker Al-Al bonds. The second role is to hinder dissolution by producing a greater negative shift of the true interfacial potential at the dissolution front under the dealloyed layer due to the greater Ohmic resistance through the finer porous structure. These effects contributed to the elevation of pitting potentials by ennobling the applied potential required to produce enough dissolution for the stabilization of pits. Scientifically, this thesis advances the state of understanding of alloy dissolution, particularly the role of minor alloying elements on preferential oxidation at the atomic

  3. Appropriate Mechanochemical Conditions for Corrosion-Fatigue Testing of Magnesium Alloys for Temporary Bioimplant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Singh Raman, R. K.

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys possess great potential as bioimplants. A temporary implant employed as support for the repair of a fractured bone must possess sufficient strength to maintain their mechanical integrity for the required duration of healing. However, Mg alloys are susceptible to sudden cracking or fracture under the simultaneous action of cyclic loading and the corrosive physiological environment, i.e., corrosion fatigue (CF). Investigations of such fracture should be performed under appropriate mechanochemical conditions that appropriately simulate the actual human body conditions. This article reviews the existing knowledge on CF of Mg alloys in simulated body fluid and describes a relatively more accurate testing procedure developed in the authors' laboratory.

  4. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in High Strength Steels and in Titanium and Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    EFFECTS 01: STRESS) 155 Table 2. Mechanical, Fracture, and Stress Corrosion Properties for Plates of Several Aluminum Alloys --Continued 4f’l14...One of the most effective SCC preventives for high strength aluminum alloys is surface working by shot peening, particularl) when used in combination...Aluminaut uses aluminum alloy anodes to supplement the protection of the pressure hull offered by several layers of polyurethane coating 175). 100 A

  5. The Nature of Surface Oxides on Corrosion-Resistant Nickel Alloy Covered by Alkaline Water

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A nickel alloy with high chrome and molybdenum content was found to form a highly resistive and passive oxide layer. The donor density and mobility of ions in the oxide layer has been determined as a function of the electrical potential when alkaline water layers are on the alloy surface in order to account for the relative inertness of the nickel alloy in corrosive environments. PMID:20672134

  6. Structural Characteristics and Corrosion Behavior of Bio-Degradable Zn-Li Alloys in Stent Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shan

    Zinc has begun to be studied as a bio-degradable material in recent years due to its excellent corrosion rate and optimal biocompatibility. Unfortunately, pure Zn's intrinsic ultimate tensile strength (UTS; below 120 MPa) is lower than the benchmark (about 300 MPa) for cardiovascular stent materials, raising concerns about sufficient strength to support the blood vessel. Thus, modifying pure Zn to improve its mechanical properties is an important research topic. In this dissertation project, a new Zn-Li alloy has been developed to retain the outstanding corrosion behavior from Zn while improving the mechanical characteristics and uniform biodegradation once it is implanted into the artery of Sprague-Dawley rats. The completed work includes: Manufactured Zn-Li alloy ingots and sheets via induction vacuum casting, melt spinning, hot rolling deformation, and wire electro discharge machining (wire EDM) technique; processed alloy samples using cross sectioning, mounting, etching and polishing technique; • Characterized alloy ingots, sheets and wires using hardness and tensile test, XRD, BEI imaging, SEM, ESEM, FTIR, ICP-OES and electrochemical test; then selected the optimum composition for in vitro and in vivo experiments; • Mimicked the degradation behavior of the Zn-Li alloy in vitro using simulated body fluid (SBF) and explored the relations between corrosion rate, corrosion products and surface morphology with changing compositions; • Explanted the Zn-Li alloy wire in abdominal aorta of rat over 12 months and studied its degradation mechanism, rate of bioabsorption, cytotoxicity and corrosion product migration from histological analysis.

  7. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  8. Effect of Temper Condition on the Corrosion and Fatigue Performance of AA2219 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Rahul; Venugopal, A.; Rao, G. Sudarshan; Ramesh Narayanan, P.; Pant, Bhanu; Cherian, Roy M.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of temper condition and corrosion on the fatigue behavior of alloy AA2219 has been investigated in different temper conditions (T87 and T851). Corrosion testing was performed by exposing the tensile specimens to 3.5% NaCl solution for different time periods, and the corrosion damage was quantified using a 3D profilometer. The exposure-tested specimens were subjected for fatigue testing at different stress levels, and the reduction in fatigue life was measured along with detailed fracture morphology variations. The results indicated that the alloy in both tempers suffers localized corrosion damage and the measured corrosion depth was 120 and 1200 µm, respectively, for T87 and T851 conditions. The loss in fatigue strength was found to be high for T851 (67%) when compared to that of T87 temper condition (58%) for a pre-corrosion time of 15 days. In both cases, fatigue crack initiation is associated with corrosion pits, which act as stress raisers. However, the crack propagation was predominantly transgranular for T87 and a mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture in the case of T851 temper condition. This was shown to be due to the heterogeneous microstructure due to the thermomechanical working and the delay in quench time imposed on the alloy forging in T851 temper condition. The findings in this paper present useful information for the selection of appropriate heat treatment condition to facilitate control of the corrosion behavior which is of great significance for their fatigue performance.

  9. Effect of Zr Inhibitor on Corrosion of Haynes 230 and NS-163 Alloys in Flinak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuxiang; Reddy, Ramana G.

    The intrinsic corrosion behavior of Haynes 230 and NS-163 alloys after adding corrosion inhibitor Zr to LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) salts was evaluated. Thermodynamic modeling studies were performed to investigate the compatibility of Haynes alloys for solar thermal energy storage applications in the molten salts. Equilibrium conditions were considered for predicting the corrosion products and weight loss of salts at higher temperatures (700 - 1000°C). Weight loss of FLiNaK salt after corrosion with or without inhibitor is less than 5%, indicating no significant change in compositions of FLiNaK even with Zr inhibitor. Furthermore, to compare with experimental data, modeling calculation with known amount of trace impurities (Ni2+, Fe3+ and so on) added to the molten salts, shows similar trend and corrosion product with and without Zr inhibitor.

  10. Chemical passivation as a method of improving the electrochemical corrosion resistance of Co-Cr-based dental alloy.

    PubMed

    Rylska, Dorota; Sokołowski, Grzegorz; Sokołowski, Jerzy; Łukomska-Szymańska, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate corrosion resistance of Wirobond C® alloy after chemical passivation treatment. The alloy surface undergone chemical passivation treatment in four different media. Corrosion studies were carried out by means of electrochemical methods in saline solution. Corrosion effects were determined using SEM. The greatest increase in the alloy polarization resistance was observed for passive layer produced in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. The same layer caused the highest increase in corrosion current. Generally speaking, the alloy passivation in Na2SO4 solution with graphite caused a substantial improvement of the corrosion resistance. The sample after passivation in Na2SO4 solution without graphite, contrary to others, lost its protective properties along with successive anodic polarization cycles. The alloy passivation in Na3PO4 solution with graphite was the only one that caused a decrease in the alloy corrosion properties. The SEM studies of all samples after chemical passivation revealed no pit corrosion - in contrast to the sample without any modification. Every successive polarization cycle in anodic direction of pure Wirobond C® alloy enhances corrosion resistance shifting corrosion potential in the positive direction and decreasing corrosion current value. The chemical passivation in solutions with low pH values decreases susceptibility to electrochemical corrosion of Co-Cr dental alloy. The best protection against corrosion was obtained after chemical passivation of Wirobond C® in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. Passivation with Na2SO4 in solution of high pH does not cause an increase in corrosion resistance of WIROBOND C. Passivation process increases alloy resistance to pit corrosion.

  11. Corrosion resistance evaluation of Pd-free Ag-Au-Pt-Cu dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Takuma, Yasuko; Hisatsune, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of nine experimental Pd-free Ag-Au-Pt-Cu dental alloys in a 0.9% NaCl solution was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). CV measurements revealed that the breakdown potential (E(bd)) and zero current potential (E(zc)) increased with increasing Au/(Au+Ag) atomic ratio. Thus, the Au/(Au+Ag) atomic ratio, but not the Cu content, influenced the corrosion resistance of Ag-Au-Pt-Cu alloys. After the forward scan of CV, both optical and scanning electron microscope images showed that in all the experimental alloys, the matrix phase was corroded but not the second phase. From corrosion resistance viewpoint, the Ag-Au-Pt-Cu alloys seemed to be suitable for clinical application.

  12. Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) Coatings on an A356 Alloy for Improved Corrosion and Wear Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhijing

    Plasma electrolytic oxidizing (PEO) is an advanced technique that has been used to deposit thick and hard ceramic coatings on aluminium (Al) alloys. This work was however to use the PEO process to produce thin ceramic oxide coatings on an A356 Al alloy for improving corrosion and wear resistance of the alloy. Effects of current density and treatment time on surface morphologies and thickness of the PEO coatings were investigated. The improvement of galvanic corrosion properties of the coated A356 alloy vs. steel and carbon fibre were evaluated in E85 fuel or NaCl environments. Tribological properties of the coatings were studied with comparison to the uncoated A356 substrate and other commercially-used engine bore materials. The research results indicated that the PEO coatings could have excellent tribological and corrosion properties for aluminium engine applications.

  13. Resistance of Magnesium Alloys to Corrosion Fatigue for Biodegradable Implant Applications: Current Status and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Raman, R. K. Singh; Harandi, Shervin Eslami

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are attracting increasing interest as the most suitable metallic materials for construction of biodegradable and bio-absorbable temporary implants. However, Mg-alloys can suffer premature and catastrophic fracture under the synergy of cyclic loading and corrosion (i.e., corrosion fatigue (CF)). Though Mg alloys are reported to be susceptible to CF also in the corrosive human body fluid, there are very limited studies on this topic. Furthermore, the in vitro test parameters employed in these investigations have not properly simulated the actual conditions in the human body. This article presents an overview of the findings of available studies on the CF of Mg alloys in pseudo-physiological solutions and the employed testing procedures, as well as identifying the knowledge gap. PMID:29144428

  14. Resistance of Magnesium Alloys to Corrosion Fatigue for Biodegradable Implant Applications: Current Status and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Raman, R K Singh; Harandi, Shervin Eslami

    2017-11-16

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are attracting increasing interest as the most suitable metallic materials for construction of biodegradable and bio-absorbable temporary implants. However, Mg-alloys can suffer premature and catastrophic fracture under the synergy of cyclic loading and corrosion (i.e., corrosion fatigue (CF)). Though Mg alloys are reported to be susceptible to CF also in the corrosive human body fluid, there are very limited studies on this topic. Furthermore, the in vitro test parameters employed in these investigations have not properly simulated the actual conditions in the human body. This article presents an overview of the findings of available studies on the CF of Mg alloys in pseudo-physiological solutions and the employed testing procedures, as well as identifying the knowledge gap.

  15. Oxidation and corrosion resistance of candidate Stirling engine heater-head-tube alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen candidate iron base Stirling engine heater head tube alloys are evaluated in a diesel fuel fired simulator materials test rig to determine their oxidation and corrosion resistance. Sheet specimens are tested at 820 C for 3500 hr in 5 hr heating cycles. Specific weight change data and an attack parameter are used to categorize the alloys into four groups; 10 alloys show excellent for good oxidation and corrosion resistance and six alloys exhibit poor or catastrophic resistance. Metallographic, X-ray, and electron microprobe analyses aid in further characterizing the oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. Alloy compositions, expecially the reactive elements aluminum, titanium, and chromium, play a major role in the excellent oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. The best oxidation resistance is associated with the formation of an iron nickel aluminum outer oxide scale, an intermediate oxide scale rich in chromium and titanium, and an aluminum outer oxide scale adjacent to the metallic substrate, which exhibits a zone of internal oxidation of aluminum and to some extent titanium.

  16. Stress-corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys in aqueous salt environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of two powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Cu-Mg; two mechanically attrited (M/A) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Mg; and two wrought, ingot alloys, X-2020 and AA7475, are compared. Time-dependent fracture in an aqueous sodium chloride environment under alternate immersion condition was found to vary significantly between alloys. The stress corrosion behavior of the two powder metallurgy processed alloys was studied in detail under conditions of crack initiation, static crack growth, and fatigue crack growth. A variety of stress corrosion tests were performed including smooth surface, time-to-failure tests; potentiostatic tests on smooth surfaces exposed to constant applied strain rates; and fracture mechanics-type tests under static and cyclic loads. Both alloys show surface pitting and subsequent intergranular corrosion. Pitting is more severe in the magnesium-bearing alloy and is associated with stringer particles strung along the extrusion direction as a result of P/M processing.

  17. Stress-corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1983-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of two powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Cu-Mg two mechanically attrited (M/A) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Mg; and two wrought, ingot alloys, X-2020 and AA7475, are compared. Time-dependent fracture in an aqueous sodium chloride environment under alternate immersion condition was found to vary significantly between alloys. The stress corrosion behavior of the two powder metallurgy processed alloys was studied in detail under conditions of crack initiation, static crack growth, and fatigue crack growth. A variety of stress corrosion tests were performed including smooth surface, time-to-failure tests; potentiostatic tests on smooth surfaces exposed to constant applied strain rates; and fracture mechanics-type tests under static and cyclic loads. Both alloys show surface pitting and subsequent intergranular corrosion. Pitting is more severe in the magnesium-bearing alloy and is associated with stringer particles strung along the extrusion direction as a result of P/M processing.

  18. In vitro corrosion behavior of cast iron-platinum magnetic alloys.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, I; Hai, K; Tanaka, Y; Hisatsune, K; Atsuta, M

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the corrosion resistance of cast Fe-Pt alloys of varying compositions for use as attachment keepers and to make a comparison with the corrosion resistance of magnetic stainless steel. The corrosion behavior of cast Fe-Pt alloy keepers (Fe-40 at%Pt, Fe-38 at%Pt, Fe-37 at%Pt and Fe-36 at%Pt) was evaluated by means of an immersion test and an anodic polarization test. The solutions used were a 1.0% lactic acid aqueous solution (pH=2.3) (10 ml) and 0.9% NaCl solution (pH=7.3) (10 ml). As a control, the corrosion resistance of a magnetic stainless steel keeper (SUS 447J1: HICOREX) was also measured. Chromium and platinum ions were not detected in either the 1.0% lactic acid or 0.9% NaCl solutions. The only released ions detected were the Fe ions in the 1.0% lactic acid solution. The amounts of Fe ions released from the Fe-40 at%Pt and Fe-38 at%Pt alloys were significantly (p<0.05) lower than from the Fe-37at%Pt, Fe-36 at%Pt and SUS 447J1 alloys. In the anodic polarization test, the potentials at the beginning of passivation for the four Fe-Pt alloys were higher than for the SUS 447J1 alloy in both solutions. The Fe-Pt alloys, especially the alloys with higher Pt percentages (Fe-40 and 38 at%Pt), indicated a high corrosion resistance compared to the magnetic stainless steel keeper. A reduction in the Pt percentage may decrease the corrosion resistance in the oral environment.

  19. Corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, corrosion fatigue strength and cytocompatibility of new Ti alloys without Al and V.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Y; Rao, S; Ito, Y; Tateishi, T

    1998-07-01

    The effects of various metallic ions using various metallic powders on the relative growth ratio of fibroblasts L929 and osteoblasts MC3T3-E1 cells were carried out. Ti, Zr, Sn, Nb and Ta had evidently no effect on the relative growth ratios of cells. Otherwise, Al and V ions exhibit cytotoxicity from a concentration of > or = 0.2 ppm. This Al effect on cells tend to be stronger in medium containing small quantity of V ions (< or = 0.03 ppm). The new Ti-15%Zr-4%Nb-4%Ta-0.2%Pd alloy exhibited a higher corrosion resistance in physiological saline solution. The addition of 0.02%O and 0.05%N to Ti-Zr alloy improved the mechanical properties at room temperature and corrosion fatigue strength. The relative growth ratios for the new Ti alloy plate and the alloy block extraction were unity. Further, the relative growth ratios were almost unity for the new Ti alloy against apatite ceramic pins up to 10(5) wear cycles in Eagle's MEM solution. However, there was a sharp decrease for Ti-6%Al-4%V ELI alloy from 3 x 10(4) wear cycles as V ion was released during wear into the wear test solution since the pH of the Eagle's MEM increases with increasing wear cycles.

  20. Effects of nitrogen gas ratio on the structural and corrosion properties of ZrN thin films grown on biodegradable magnesium alloy by ion-beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiahosseini, Seyed Rahim; Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Majid

    2017-12-01

    Studies on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys, which are widely applied as biomaterials, have increased in recent years. In this work, zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy through ion-beam sputtering at 473 K with 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 nitrogen proportions [F(N2)] in ionized gas. X-ray diffraction, profilometry, hardness tests, scanning electron microscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques were used to analyze the structure, thickness, adhesion, microstructure, and corrosion resistance of coated samples, respectively. Results showed that the (111) crystalline orientation dominated in all coatings. Williamson-Hall technique revealed that the crystallite size of ZrN films decreased from 73 to 20 nm with increasing F(N2), and compressive microstrain increased from 0.004 to 0.030. Film thicknesses were inversely correlated with N2 amount and significantly decreased from 1.7 to 0.8 µm. The maximum d P/d r ratio, a dependent factor of adhesion, was 0.04 kg/cm for the film deposited under the F(N2) value of 0.5. The corrosion potential of coated samples was not significantly different from that of uncoated AZ91. Under the F(N2) value of 0.6, corrosion current density slightly decreased from 14 to 9.7 µA/cm2 and significantly increased to 13.5 µA/cm2. Results indicated that ZrN film deposited under the F(N2) value of 0.5 showed high adhesion and corrosion resistance.

  1. Potentiodynamic polarization study of the in vitro corrosion behavior of 3 high-palladium alloys and a gold-palladium alloy in 5 media.

    PubMed

    Sun, Desheng; Monaghan, Peter; Brantley, William A; Johnston, William M

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion of cast alloy restorations may lead to their failure or adversely affect their biocompatibility. Although some documentation of the corrosion behavior of the high-palladium dental alloys exists, questions remain about their corrosion resistance and mechanisms. This study compared the in vitro corrosion characteristics of 3 high-palladium alloys and 1 gold-palladium alloy in simulated body fluid and oral environments. Two Pd-Cu-Ga alloys and 1 Pd-Ga alloy were selected; an Au-Pd alloy served as the control. The corrosion behavior for the as-cast and simulated porcelain-firing (heat-treated) conditions of each alloy (N = 5) was evaluated in 0.9% NaCl, 0.09% NaCl, and Fusayama solutions. Heat-treated specimens of each alloy (N = 5) were also tested in N(2)-deaerated 0.09% NaCl and Fusayama solutions (pH 4). After immersion in the electrolyte for 24 hours, the open-circuit potential (OCP) was measured, and linear polarization was performed from -20 mV to +20 mV (vs. OCP) at a scanning rate of 0.125 mV/s. Cyclic polarization was performed from -300 mV to +1000 mV and back to -300 mV (vs. OCP) at a scanning rate of 1 mV/s. Data were evaluated with analysis of variance and the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple-range test (alpha=.05). The OCP of each alloy varied with the condition (as-cast or heat-treated) and electrolyte used. Corrosion resistance was similar for the 4 alloys tested. For cyclic polarization, all alloys showed active-passive or spontaneous passive behavior in nearly all electrolytes. During some reverse scans, the 3 high-palladium alloys displayed 3 or 5 anodic peaks. No positive hysteresis was observed for any of the alloy/electrolyte combinations evaluated. The corrosion resistances of the 3 high-palladium alloys in simulated body fluid and oral environments were comparable to that of the gold-palladium alloy. The similar corrosion resistance for the 3 high-palladium alloys was attributed to their high noble metal content and theorized stable

  2. Effect of an Mg-rich matrix on the corrosion behavior of As-cast magnesium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong Do; Kang, Choon Sik; Shin, Kwang Seon

    2000-10-01

    In the present study, the corrosion behavior of as-cast Mg-Al and Mg-Al-Zn alloys was studied as a function of the Al content in the matrix. Corrosion properties such as the corrosion rate, corrosion potential, and repassivation tendency were estimated through immersion and electrochemical tests. The corrosion potential and corrosion rate of a solutionized alloy depend mainly on the Al content of the as-cast alloy. The variation of Al content in the Mg-rich matrix influences the stability of the passive film and the repassivation tendency, i.e., as the Al content of the matrix increases, the repassivation tendency of the surface protective film after its breakage deteriorates. Also, it was proven that the enhancement of corrosion resistance by heat treatment, as in T6, is due to the decrease of solute concentration in the matrix, in addition to the effect of the precipitate, which plays the role of a barrier against corrosion.

  3. Determining cyclic corrosion cracking resistance for titanium alloys with allowance for electrochemical conditions at the fatigue corrosion crack tip

    SciT

    Panasyuk, V.V.; Ratich, L.V.; Petranyuk, I.Ya.

    1994-08-01

    Published data are examined on how various factors affect fatigue crack growth rates. Basic diagrams have been constructed for the cyclic cracking resistance in Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-2Sn alloys in air, distilled water, and 3.5% NaCl for use in working-life calculations. Appropriate heat treatment can produce two microstructures in a titanium alloy, one of which has the largest cyclic cracking resistance, while in the second, the cracks grow at the lowest rate. The cyclic corrosion cracking resistance for a titanium alloy should be determined in relation to the state of stress and strain and to the electrochemical conditions at the corrosionmore » fatigue crack tip, while the variations in fatigue crack growth rate for a given stress intensity factor in a corrosive medium are due to differing electrochemical conditions at the crack tip during the testing on different specimens. Basic diagrams can be derived for titanium alloys by using a physically sound methodology developed previously for steels, which is based on invariant diagrams for cyclic cracking resistance in air and in the corresponding medium, which can be constructed in relation to extremal working and electrochemical conditions at corrosion-fatigue crack tips.« less

  4. Effects of porosity on corrosion resistance of Mg alloy foam produced by powder metallurgy technology

    SciT

    Aghion, E., E-mail: egyon@bgu.ac.il; Perez, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Magnesium alloy foams have the potential to serve as structural material for regular light-weight applications as well as for biodegradable scaffold implants. However, their main disadvantage relates to the high reactivity of magnesium and consequently their natural tendency to corrode in regular service conditions and in physiological environments. The present study aims at evaluating the effect of porosity on the corrosion resistance of MRI 201S magnesium alloy foams in 0.9% NaCl solution and in phosphate buffer saline solution as a simulated physiological electrolyte. The magnesium foams were produced by powder metallurgy technology using space-holding particles to control the porosity content.more » Machined chips were used as raw material for the production of Mg alloy powder by milling process. The microstructure of the foams was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion test and potentiodynamic polarization analysis. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the porosity has a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the tested foams. Foams with 14–19% porosity have a corrosion rate of 4–10 mcd and 7–15 mcd in NaCl and phosphate buffer saline solution, respectively, compared to only 0.10 mcd for the same alloy in as cast conditions. This increased corrosion degradation of the Mg foams by more than one order of magnitude compared to the cast alloy may limit their potential application in regular and physiological environments. - Highlights: • Porosity has a detrimental effect on corrosion resistance of MRI 201S Mg foams. • 14–19% porosity increases the corrosion rate by more than one order of magnitude. • Accelerated corrosion limits the use of foams in regular/physiological environments.« less

  5. Increased corrosion resistance of the AZ80 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification.

    PubMed

    Aghion, E; Jan, L; Meshi, L; Goldman, J

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys are being considered as implantable biometals. Despite their excellent biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, their rapid corrosion is a major impediment precluding their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigate the potential for rapid solidification to increase the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. To this end, the effect of rapid solidification on the environmental and stress corrosion behavior of the AZ80 Mg alloy vs. its conventionally cast counterpart was evaluated in simulated physiological electrolytes. The microstructural characteristics were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion, salt spraying, and potentiodynamic polarization. Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by Slow Strain Rate Testing. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of rapidly solidified ribbons is significantly improved relative to the conventional cast alloy due to the increased Al content dissolved in the α-Mg matrix and the correspondingly reduced presence of the β-phase (Mg17 Al12 ). Unfortunately, extrusion consolidated solidified ribbons exhibited a substantial reduction in the environmental performance and stress corrosion resistance. This was mainly attributed to the detrimental effect of the extrusion process, which enriched the iron impurities and increased the internal stresses by imposing a higher dislocation density. In terms of immersion tests, the average corrosion rate of the rapidly solidified ribbons was <0.4 mm/year compared with ∼2 mm/year for the conventionally cast alloy and 26 mm/year for the rapidly solidified extruded ribbons. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of mixed alloy combinations on fretting corrosion performance of spinal screw and rod implants.

    PubMed

    Mali, Sachin A; Singh, Vaneet; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2017-07-01

    Spinal implants are made from a variety of materials to meet the unique mechanical demands of each application. However, the medical device community has raised concern about mixing dissimilar metals in an implant because of fear of inducing corrosion. There is a lack of systematic studies on the effects of mixing metals on performance of spinal implants, especially in fretting corrosion conditions. Hence, the goal was to determine whether mixing stainless steel (SS316L), titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt chromium (CoCrMo) alloy components in a spinal implant leads to any increased risk of corrosion degradation. Spinal constructs consisting of single assembly screw-connector-rod components were tested using a novel short-term cyclic fretting corrosion test method. A total of 17 alloy component combinations (comprised of SS316L, Ti6Al4V-anodized and CoCrMo alloy for rod, screws and connectors) were tested under three anatomic orientations. Spinal constructs having all SS316L were most susceptible to fretting-initiated crevice corrosion attack and showed higher average fretting currents (∼25 - 30 µA), whereas constructs containing all Ti6Al4V components were less susceptible to fretting corrosion with average fretting currents in the range of 1 - 6 µA. Mixed groups showed evidence of fretting corrosion but they were not as severe as all SS316L group. SEM results showed evidence of severe corrosion attack in constructs having SS316L components. There also did not appear to be any galvanic effects of combining alloys together. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1169-1177, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Dealloying, Microstructure and the Corrosion/Protection of Cast Magnesium Alloys

    SciT

    Sieradzki, Karl; Aiello, Ashlee; McCue, Ian

    The purpose of this project was to develop a greater understanding of micro-galvanic corrosion effects in cast magnesium alloys using both experimental and computational methods. Experimental accomplishments have been made in the following areas of interest: characterization, aqueous free-corrosion, atmospheric corrosion, ionic liquid dissolution, rate kinetics of oxide dissolution, and coating investigation. Commercial alloys (AZ91D, AM60, and AZ31B), binary-phase alloys (αMg-2at.%Al, αMg-5at.%Al, and Mg-8at.%Al), and component phases (Mg, Al, β-Mg, β-1%Zn, MnAl3) were obtained and characterized using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Full immersion in aqueous chloride was used to characterize the corrosionmore » behavior of alloys. Rotating disc electrodes (RDEs) were used to observe accelerated long-term corrosion behavior. Al surface redistribution for freely corroded samples was analyzed using SEM, EDS, and lithium underpotential deposition (Li UPD). Atmospheric corrosion was observed using contact angle evolution, overnight pH monitoring, and surface pH evolution studies. Ionic liquid corrosion characterization was performed using linear sweep voltammetry and potentiostatic dissolution in 150° choline chloride-urea (cc-urea). Two surface coatings were investigated: (1) Li-carbonate and (2) cc-urea. Li-carbonate coatings were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SEM, and aqueous free corrosion potential monitoring. Hydrophobic cc-urea coatings were characterized using contact angle measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Oxide dissolution rate kinetics were studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Computational accomplishments have been made through the development of Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations which model time- and composition-dependent effects on the microstructure due to spatial redistribution of alloying

  8. Effect of the environment on wear ranking and corrosion of biomedical CoCrMo alloys.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, A Igual; Mischler, S

    2011-03-01

    The corrosion behaviour and the wear ranking of biomedical high carbon (HC) and low carbon (LC) CoCrMo alloys sliding against an alumina ball in four different simulated body fluids [NaCl and phosphate buffered solutions (PBS) with and without albumin] has been analyzed by tribocorrosion and electrochemical techniques. The effects of alloy and of albumin on corrosion depend on the base electrolyte: differences between LC and HC alloy were only observed in NaCl solutions but not in PBS. Albumin increased significantly corrosion of both alloys in PBS solutions while its effect in NaCl was smaller. The wear ranking of the HC and LC alloys also depends on the environment. In the present study, HC CoCrMo alloy had lower wear resistance in NaCl and PBS + albumin than the LC alloy, while no differences between both alloys were found in the other solutions. This was attributed to surface chemical effects affecting third body behaviour.

  9. Microhardness and In Vitro Corrosion of Heat-Treated Mg–Y–Ag Biodegradable Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Vlček, Marián; Lukáč, František; Kudrnová, Hana; Smola, Bohumil; Stulíková, Ivana; Luczak, Monika; Szakács, Gábor; Hort, Norbert; Willumeit-Römer, Regine

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising candidates for biodegradable medical implants which reduce the necessity of second surgery to remove the implants. Yttrium in solid solution is an attractive alloying element because it improves mechanical properties and exhibits suitable corrosion properties. Silver was shown to have an antibacterial effect and can also enhance the mechanical properties of magnesium alloys. Measurements of microhardness and electrical resistivity were used to study the response of Mg–4Y and Mg–4Y–1Ag alloys to isochronal or isothermal heat treatments. Hardening response and electrical resistivity annealing curves in these alloys were compared in order to investigate the effect of silver addition. Procedures for solid solution annealing and artificial aging of the Mg–4Y–1Ag alloy were developed. The corrosion rate of the as-cast and heat-treated Mg–4Y–1Ag alloy was measured by the mass loss method. It was found out that solid solution heat treatment, as well artificial aging to peak hardness, lead to substantial improvement in the corrosion properties of the Mg–4Y–1Ag alloy. PMID:28772414

  10. Improving the corrosion properties of magnesium AZ31 alloy GTA weld metal using microarc oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siva Prasad, M.; Ashfaq, M.; Kishore Babu, N.; Sreekanth, A.; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, the morphology, phase composition, and corrosion properties of microarc oxidized (MAO) gas tungsten arc (GTA) weldments of AZ31 alloy were investigated. Autogenous gas tungsten arc welds were made as full penetration bead-on-plate welding under the alternating-current mode. A uniform oxide layer was developed on the surface of the specimens with MAO treatment in silicate-based alkaline electrolytes for different oxidation times. The corrosion behavior of the samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The oxide film improved the corrosion resistance substantially compared to the uncoated specimens. The sample coated for 10 min exhibited better corrosion properties. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was concluded to strongly depend on the morphology, whereas the phase composition and thickness were concluded to only slightly affect the corrosion resistance.

  11. Dependence of Crystallographic Orientation on Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Ni-Fe-Cr Alloy 028

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, LiNa; Szpunar, Jerzy A.; Dong, JianXin; Ojo, Olanrewaju A.; Wang, Xu

    2018-06-01

    The influence of crystallographic orientation on the pitting corrosion behavior of Ni-Fe-Cr alloy 028 was studied using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), potentiodynamic polarization technique, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that there is anisotropy of pitting corrosion that strongly depends on crystallographic orientation of the surface plane. The distribution of pit density in a standard stereographic triangle indicates that the crystallographic planes close to {100} are more prone to pitting corrosion compared to planes {110} and {111}. The surface energy calculation of (001) and (111) shows that the plane with a high atomic packing density has a low surface energy with concomitant strong resistance to pitting corrosion. A correlation function between crystallographic orientation and pitting corrosion susceptibility suggests a method that not only predicts the pitting resistance of known textured materials, but also could help to improve corrosion resistance by controlling material texture.

  12. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  13. Effect of temperature on crack growth rates of stress corrosion cracks in metal alloys exposed to water

    SciT

    Vogt, H.; Speidel, M.O.

    1996-12-01

    The effect of temperature on stress corrosion crack growth rates was studied using four commercial alloys: an Al-Mg-Zn alloy (7000-Series), an Al-Cu alloy (2000-Series), a Mg-rare earth alloy and a Zr 2.5% Nb alloy. Stress Corrosion crack growth rate data were obtained using fracture mechanic specimens which were tested in high purity water in the temperature range of {minus}10 C to 320 C, depending on the alloy. Attention was directed towards region 2 behavior, where the crack propagation rate is independent of stress intensity but sensitive to test temperature. The experimental activation energies of the different alloys were compared withmore » literature on rate-controlling steps in order to identify the possible stress corrosion cracking mechanisms. The results were also compared with the activation energies obtained from general corrosion and hydrogen diffusion experiments.« less

  14. Influence of chemical composition of zirconium alloy E110 on embrittlement under LOCA conditions - Part 1: Oxidation kinetics and macrocharacteristics of structure and fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, S. A.; Rozhnov, A. B.; Belov, V. A.; Li, E. V.; Glazkina, V. S.

    2011-11-01

    Exploratory investigations of the influence of alloying and impurity content in the E110 alloy cladding tubes on the behavior under conditions of Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) has been performed. Three alloys of E110 type have been tested: E110 alloy of nominal composition Zr-1%Nb (E110), E110 alloy of modified composition Zr-1%Nb-0.12%Fe-0.13%O (E110M), E110 alloy of nominal composition Zr-1%Nb with reduced impurity content (E110G). Alloys E110 and E110M were manufactured on the electrolytic basis and alloy E110G was manufactured on the basis of zirconium sponge. The high temperature oxidation tests in steam ( T = 1100 °C, 18% of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR)) have been conducted, kinetics of oxidation was investigated. Quantitative research of structure and fracture macrocharacteristics was performed by means of optical and electron microscopy. The results received were compared with the residual ductility of specimens. The results of the investigation showed the existence of "breakaway oxidation" kinetics and white spalling oxide in E110 and E110M alloys while the specimen oxidation kinetics in E110G alloy was characterized by a parabolic law and specimens had a dense black oxide. Oxygen and iron alloying in the E110 alloy positively changed the macrocharacteristics of structure and fracture. However, in general, it did not improve the resistance to embrittlement in LOCA conditions apparently because of a strong impurity influence caused by electrolytic process of zirconium production.

  15. Improve sensitization and corrosion resistance of an Al-Mg alloy by optimization of grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianfeng; Heckman, Nathan M.; Velasco, Leonardo; Hodge, Andrea M.

    2016-05-01

    The sensitization and subsequent intergranular corrosion of Al-5.3 wt.% Mg alloy has been shown to be an important factor in stress corrosion cracking of Al-Mg alloys. Understanding sensitization requires the review of grain boundary character on the precipitation process which can assist in developing and designing alloys with improved corrosion resistance. This study shows that the degree of precipitation in Al-Mg alloy is dependent on grain boundary misorientation angle, adjacent grain boundary planes and grain boundary types. The results show that the misorientation angle is the most important factor influencing precipitation in grain boundaries of the Al-Mg alloy. Low angle grain boundaries (≤15°) have better immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. High angle grain boundaries (>15°) are vulnerable to grain boundary acid attack. Grain boundaries with adjacent plane orientations near to {100} have potential for immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. This work shows that low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) coincident site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries have thinner β precipitates. Modified nitric acid mass loss test and polarization test demonstrated that the global corrosion resistance of sputtered Al-Mg alloy is enhanced. This may be attributed to the increased fractions of low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) CSL grain boundaries after sputtering.

  16. Corrosion of Mg alloy AZ91D in the presence of living cells.

    PubMed

    Seuss, F; Seuss, S; Turhan, M C; Fabry, B; Virtanen, S

    2011-11-01

    Mg and Mg alloys are of interest for biodegradable implants as they readily corrode in biological fluids, and dissolved Mg ions are nontoxic. Even though it is well known that Mg dissolution leads to pH increase in the surroundings, the effect of the corrosion-induced alkalization on the biological environment has not been studied in detail. We therefore explored the interactions between corrosion-induced pH increase and cell growth on Mg alloy AZ91D surface. Cell adhesion and spreading on the alloy surface is unimpeded initially. However, with time a large fraction of cells de-adhere. We attribute this to the observed increase of the pH in the cell culture medium in the process of alloy dissolution. Cytotoxicity tests with HeLa cells grown on glass surfaces confirm that cell death increases with increasing alkalinity of the cell culture medium. We also show that a the cells that adhere on the Mg alloy surface act as a corrosion-blocking surface layer. In consequence, a slower pH increase in the medium takes place when the alloy surface is covered with cells. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements (EIS) verify that a cell layer slows down the corrosion process. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Prediction of Failure Due to Thermal Aging, Corrosion and Environmental Fracture in Amorphous and Titanium Alloys

    SciT

    Farmer, J C

    2003-04-15

    DARPA is exploring a number of advanced materials for military applications, including amorphous metals and titanium-based alloys. Equipment made from these materials can undergo degradation due to thermal aging, uniform corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, denting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, hydrogen induced cracking and microbial influenced corrosion. Amorphous alloys have exceptional resistance to corrosion, due in part to the absence of grain boundaries, but can undergo crystallization and other phase instabilities during heating and welding. Titanium alloys are extremely corrosion resistant due to the formation of a tenacious passive film of titanium oxide, but is prone to hydrogen absorption inmore » crevices, and hydrogen induced cracking after hydrogen absorption. Accurate predictions of equipment reliability, necessary for strategic planning, requires integrated models that account for all relevant modes of attack, and that can make probabilistic predictions. Once developed, model parameters must be determined experimentally, and the validity of models must be established through careful laboratory and field tests. Such validation testing requires state-of-the-art surface analytical techniques, as well as electrochemical and fracture mechanics tests. The interaction between those processes that perturb the local environment on a surface and those that alter metallurgical condition must be integrated in predictive models. The material and environment come together to drive various modes of corrosive attack (Figure 1). Models must be supported through comprehensive materials testing capabilities. Such capabilities are available at LLNL and include: the Long Term Corrosion Test Facility (LTCTF) where large numbers of standard samples can be exposed to realistic test media at several temperature levels; a reverse DC machine that can be used to monitor the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in situ; and banks of potentiostats

  18. Relative stress corrosion susceptibilities of alloys 690 and 600 in simulated boiling water reactor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, R. A.; McMinn, A.

    1986-05-01

    The relative susceptibilities of alloys 600 and 690 to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in pure water and a simulated resin intrusion environment at 288 °C were evaluated. A combination of creviced and noncreviced slow-strain-rate, and precracked fracture mechanics tests were employed in the evaluation. Susceptibility was determined as a function of dissolved oxygen content, degree of sensitization, and crevice condition. The results indicated that alloy 600 was susceptible to various degrees of IGSCC in oxygen containing pure water when creviced, and immune to IGSCC when uncreviced. Alloy 690 was immune to IGSCC under all pure water conditions examined. Alloy 600 and alloy 690 were both susceptible to cracking in the simulated resin intrusion environment. Alloy 690, however, exhibited the greatest resistance to SCC of the two alloys.

  19. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 2: Zirconium-copper at 482, 538 and 593 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Zirconium-copper (1/2 hard) was tested in argon over the temperature range from 482 to 593 C in an evaluation of short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue behavior. The effect of strain rate on the tensile properties was evaluated at 538 C and in general it was found that the yield and ultimate strengths increased as the strain rate was increased from 0.0004 to 0.01/sec. Ductility was essentially insensitive to strain rate in the case of the zirconium-copper alloy. Strain-rate and hold-time effects on the low cycle fatigue behavior of zirconium-copper were evaluated in argon at 538 C. These effects were as expected in that decreased fatigue life was noted as the strain rate decreased and when hold times were introduced into the tension portion of the strain-cycle. Hold times in compression were much less detrimental than hold times in tension.

  20. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-03-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  1. Corrosion analysis of NiCu and PdCo thermal seed alloys used as interstitial hyperthermia implants.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J A; Parida, G R; Tucker, R D; Park, J B

    1997-12-01

    Ferromagnetic materials with low Curie temperatures are being investigated for use as interstitial implants for fractionated hyperthermia treatment of prostatic disease. Previous investigations of the system have utilized alloys, such as NiCu, with inadequate corrosion resistance, requiring the use of catheters for removal of the implants following treatment or inert surface coatings which may interfere with thermal characteristics of the implants. We are evaluating a palladium-cobalt (PdCo) binary alloy which is very similar to high palladium alloys used in dentistry. Electrochemical corrosion tests and immersion tests at 37 degrees C for both NiCu and PdCo alloy samples in mammalian Ringer's solution were performed. Long-term corrosion rates are 5.8 x 10(-5) microm per year (NiCu) and 7.7 x 10(-8) microm per year (PdCo) from average immersion test results, indicating higher corrosion resistance of PdCo (P < 0.02); immersion corrosion rates were much lower than initial corrosion rates found electrochemically. Both alloys had significantly lower corrosion rates than standard surgical implant rates of 0.04 microm per year (P < 0.001 for both alloys). Scanning electron microscopy illustrates changes in the NiCu alloy surface due to pitting corrosion; no difference is observed for PdCo. The data indicate that the PdCo alloy may be suitable as a long-term implant for use in fractionated hyperthermia.

  2. Method to predict relative hydriding within a group of zirconium alloys under nuclear irradiation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., A. Burtron; Levy, Ira S.; Trimble, Dennis J.; Lanning, Donald D.; Gerber, Franna S.

    1990-01-01

    An out-of-reactor method for screening to predict relative in-reactor hydriding behavior of zirconium-bsed materials is disclosed. Samples of zirconium-based materials having different composition and/or fabrication are autoclaved in a relatively concentrated (0.3 to 1.0M) aqueous lithium hydroxide solution at constant temperatures within the water reactor coolant temperature range (280.degree. to 316.degree. C.). Samples tested by this out-of-reactor procedure, when compared on the basis of the ratio of hydrogen weight gain to oxide weight gain, accurately predict the relative rate of hyriding for the same materials when subject to in-reactor (irradiated) corrision.

  3. Corrosion Fatigue Characteristics of 12Cr Alloy Steel in Na2SO4 Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, D. H.; Cho, S. Y.

    In order to estimate reliability of 12Cr alloy steel using as the turbine blade material of the steam power plant, its corrosion fatigue characteristics in Na2SO4 solution considering its percentage and temperature that were determined from the polarization test results were investigated, and compared with the results in air. The corrosion characteristic of 12Cr alloy steel was remarkably susceptible in 12.7wt.% (IM) Na2SO4 solution, and its susceptibility increased with the solution temperature increase. The corrosion fatigue characteristics in 12.7wt.% Na2SO4 solution were similar to that of in air at 25°C. The crack growth rate was however increased with the temperature of solution increase. The reasons showing such results are due to the difference of the crack growth mechanism according to the electro-chemical activity of the corrosion factors.

  4. Experimental Study of Laser - enhanced 5A03 Aluminum Alloy and Its Stress Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guicheng; Chen, Jing; Pang, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Based on the study of improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy for ship, this paper mainly studied the tensile test, surface morphology and residual stress under laser shock, high temperature and stress corrosion. It is found that the residual compressive stress and the grain refinement on the surface of the material during the heat strengthening process increase the breaking strength of the sample in the stress corrosion environment. Appropriate high temperature maintenance helps to enhance the effect of deformation strengthening. In the 300°C environment insulation, due to recrystallization of the material, the performance decreased significantly. This study provides an experimental basis for effectively improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy.

  5. Characterization of the corrosion resistance of several alloys to dilute biologically active solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria/fungi detected in hygiene waters increased the corrosion rate in aluminum alloy. Biologically active media enhanced the formation of pits on metal coupons. Direct observation of gas evolved at the corrosion sample, coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the corrosion products indicates that the corrosion rate is increased because the presence of bacteria favor the reduction of hydrogen as the cathodic reaction through the reaction of oxygen and water. SEM verifies the presence of microbes in a biofilm on the surface of corroding samples. The bacterial consortia are associated with anodic sites on the metal surface, aggressive pitting occurs adjacent to biofilms. Many pits are associated with triple points and inclusions in the aluminum alloy microstructure. Similar bacterial colonization was found on the stainless steel samples. Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carbonyl groups in pitted areas of samples exposed to biologically active waters.

  6. In vitro corrosion behaviour of Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys in Ringer's physiological solution.

    PubMed

    Rosalbino, F; Macciò, D; Scavino, G; Saccone, A

    2012-04-01

    The nearly equiatomic Ni-Ti alloy (Nitinol) has been widely employed in the medical and dental fields owing to its shape memory or superelastic properties. The main concern about the use of this alloy derives form the fact that it contains a large amount of nickel (55% by mass), which is suspected responsible for allergic, toxic and carcinogenic reactions. In this work, the in vitro corrosion behavior of two Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys, Ti-16Nb-5Sn and Ti-18Nb-4Sn (mass%) has been investigated and compared with that of Nitinol. The in vitro corrosion resistance was assessed in naturally aerated Ringer's physiological solution at 37°C by corrosion potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements as a function of exposure time, and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Corrosion potential values indicated that both Ni-Ti and Ti-Nb-Sn alloys undergo spontaneous passivation due to spontaneously formed oxide film passivating the metallic surface, in the aggressive environment. It also indicated that the tendency for the formation of a spontaneous oxide is greater for the Ti-18Nb-5Sn alloy. Significantly low anodic current density values were obtained from the polarization curves, indicating a typical passive behaviour for all investigated alloys, but Nitinol exhibited breakdown of passivity at potentials above approximately 450 mV(SCE), suggesting lower corrosion protection characteristics of its oxide film compared to the Ti-Nb-Sn alloys. EIS studies showed high impedance values for all samples, increasing with exposure time, indicating an improvement in corrosion resistance of the spontaneous oxide film. The obtained EIS spectra were analyzed using an equivalent electrical circuit representing a duplex structure oxide film, composed by an outer and porous layer (low resistance), and an inner barrier layer (high resistance) mainly responsible for the alloys corrosion resistance. The resistance of passive film present on the metals' surface

  7. Microstructure, Phase Occurrence, and Corrosion Behavior of As-Solidified and As-Annealed Al-Pd Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ďuriška, Libor; Palcut, Marián; Špoták, Martin; Černičková, Ivona; Gondek, Ján; Priputen, Pavol; Čička, Roman; Janičkovič, Dušan; Janovec, Jozef

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, we studied the microstructure, phase constitution, and corrosion performance of Al88Pd12, Al77Pd23, Al72Pd28, and Al67Pd33 alloys (metal concentrations are given in at.%). The alloys were prepared by repeated arc melting of Al and Pd granules in argon atmosphere. The as-solidified samples were further annealed at 700 °C for 500 h. The microstructure and phase constitution of the as-solidified and as-annealed alloys were studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The alloys were found to consist of (Al), ɛ n ( Al3Pd), and δ (Al3Pd2) in various fractions. The corrosion testing of the alloys was performed in aqueous NaCl (0.6 M) using a standard 3-electrode cell monitored by potentiostat. The corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials were determined by Tafel extrapolation. The corrosion potentials of the alloys were found between - 763 and - 841 mV versus Ag/AgCl. An active alloy dissolution has been observed, and it has been found that (Al) was excavated, whereas Al in ɛ n was de-alloyed. The effects of bulk chemical composition, phase occurrence and microstructure on the corrosion behavior are evaluated. The local nobilities of ɛ n and δ are discussed. Finally, the conclusions about the alloy's corrosion resistance in saline solutions are provided.

  8. Friction stir welded AM50 and AZ31 Mg alloys: Microstructural evolution and improved corrosion resistance

    SciT

    Templeman, Yael

    One of the major drawbacks of Mg alloys is poor weldability, caused by porosity formation during conventional fusion welding processes. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is promising technique in this context since it is a solid state technique. Contradicting results were published in the literature regarding the FSWed Mg alloys joint's properties. Current research was performed in order to investigate the microstructure and corrosion properties of FSWed Mg alloys, studying representatives of two commercial families: wrought AZ31-H24 and die cast AM50. It was found that in both alloys recrystallization occurred during the FSW. In AM50 the mechanism of the recrystallization wasmore » continuous, manifested by dislocation rearrangement into sub grain boundaries. In AZ31 discontinuous recrystallization had occurred through grain boundaries migration - twins rotated with respect to the matrix, turning into low angle grain boundaries. Corrosion resistance has improved during the FSW in both alloys to different extents. In the AM50 alloy, the nugget exhibited significantly higher surface potential than the base metal mainly due to the higher Al concentration in the matrix of the nugget, resulting from the dissolution of Al-enrichment and β-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase. In the AZ31 alloy, no change in Al concentration had occurred, and the surface potential measured in the nugget was only slightly higher than in the base metal. These results underline the appropriateness of the FSW for Mg alloys since during the conventional welding deterioration of the corrosion resistance occurs. - Highlights: • Following FSW, AZ31-H24 experienced discontinuous recrystallization. • In AZ31 grain boundaries migration occurred, thus twins rotated. • In die cast AM50 continuous recrystallization occurred during the FSW. • In AM50 - dislocations rearranged into sub grain boundaries. • Corrosion resistance has improved during the FSW in both alloys to different extent.« less

  9. Fabrication of biodegradable Zn-Al-Mg alloy: Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, cytotoxicity and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H R; Hamzah, E; Low, H T; Kasiri-Asgarani, M; Farahany, S; Akbari, E; Cho, M H

    2017-04-01

    In this work, binary Zn-0.5Al and ternary Zn-0.5Al-xMg alloys with various Mg contents were investigated as biodegradable materials for implant applications. Compared with Zn-0.5Al (single phase), Zn-0.5Al-xMg alloys consisted of the α-Zn and Mg 2 (Zn, Al) 11 with a fine lamellar structure. The results also revealed that ternary Zn-Al-Mg alloys presented higher micro-hardness value, tensile strength and corrosion resistance compared to the binary Zn-Al alloy. In addition, the tensile strength and corrosion resistance increased with increasing the Mg content in ternary alloys. The immersion tests also indicated that the corrosion rates in the following order Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mgalloy presents higher viability of MC3T3-E1 cell compared to the Zn-0.5Al alloy, which suggested good biocompatibility. The antibacterial activity result of both Zn-0.5Al and Zn-0.5Al-Mg alloys against Escherichia coli presented some antibacterial activity, while the Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mg significantly prohibited the growth of Escherichia coli. Thus, Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mg alloy with appropriate mechanical properties, low corrosion rate, good biocompatibility and antibacterial activities was believed to be a good candidate as a biodegradable implant material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  11. Corrosion Screening of EV31A Magnesium and Other Magnesium Alloys using Laboratory-Based Accelerated Corrosion and Electro-Chemical Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    corrosion studies (16). A schematic of the SWAP process and example of the powder produced is included in figure 4. This alloy contains amounts of Al ...advanced powder -based alloy and ZAXE1711 (both from Japan) were produced using a Spinning Water Atomization Process (SWAP) to yield powder particles with...and ZAXE1711 Mg alloy powders and (b) morphology of coarse Mg alloy powder prepared by SWAP

  12. The thermodynamics of latent fingerprint corrosion of metal elements and alloys.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2008-11-01

    Redox reactions taking place between the surface of a metal and fingerprint residue have been expressed thermodynamically in terms of both the Nernst equation for reduction potential and the complexation constant for the formation of complex metal halide ions in aqueous solution. These expressions are used to explain experimental results for the corrosion of 10 different metal elements by fingerprint residue in air at room temperature. Corrosion of noble metals, such as silver and gold, supports the proposition that the degree of metal corrosion is enhanced by the presence of chloride ions in eccrine sweat. Extending the experiments to include 10 metal alloys enabled the construction of a fingerprint corrosion series for 20 different metals. Fingerprint corrosion on metals alloyed with > approximately 40% copper was found to display third level fingerprint detail. A comparison of both conventional ink on paper and digital (Livescan) fingerprinting techniques with fingerprints deposited on 9 Karat gold alloy has shown that gold alloy depositions are least susceptible to third level detail obliteration by poor fingerprint capturing techniques.

  13. Corrosion behavior of metals and alloys in marine-industrial environment

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Mariappan; Selvaraj, Subbiah; Manickam, Tharmakkannu; Venkatachari, Gopalachari

    2008-01-01

    This work deals with atmospheric corrosion to assess the degrading effects of air pollutants on ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, which are mostly used as engineering materials. An exposure study was conducted in the Tuticorin port area located on the east coast of South India, in the Gulf of Mannar with Sri Lanka to the southeast. Common engineering materials, namely mild steel, galvanized iron, Zn, Al, Cu and Cu–Zn alloys (Cu–27Zn, Cu–30Zn and Cu–37Zn), were used in the investigation. The site was chosen where the metals are exposed to marine and industrial atmospheres. Seasonal 1 to 12 month corrosion losses of these metals and alloys were determined by a weight loss method. The weight losses showed strong corrosion of mild steel, galvanized iron, Cu and Zn and minor effect on Al and Cu–Zn alloys. Linear regression analysis was conducted to study the mechanism of corrosion. The composition of corrosion products formed on the metal surfaces was identified by x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PMID:27878030

  14. Characteristics of lead induced stress corrosion cracking of alloy 690 in high temperature

    SciT

    Chung, K.K.; Lim, J.K.; Watanabe, Yutaka

    1996-10-01

    Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted on alloy 690 in various lead chloride solutions and metal lead added to 100 ppm chloride solution at 288 C. The corrosion potential (rest potential) for the alloy was measured with SSRT tests. The cracking was observed by metallographic examination and electron probe micro analyzer. Also, the corrosion behavior of the alloy was evaluated by anodic polarized measurement at 30 C. Resulting from the tests, cracking was characterized by cracking behavior, crack length and crack growth rate, and lead effects on cracking. The cracking was mainly intergranular in mode, approximately from 60 ummore » to 450 um in crack length, and approximately 10{sup {minus}6} to 10{sup {minus}7} mmS-1 in crack velocity. The cracking was evaluated through the variation the corrosion potential in potential-time and lead behavior during SSRTs. The lead effect in corrosion was evaluated through active to passive transition behavior in anodic polarized curves. The corrosion reactions in the cracking region were confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. Alloy 690 is used for steam generation tubes in pressurized water reactors.« less

  15. Pitting Corrosion of alloy 690 in thiosulfate-containing chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Ta; Wu, Tsung-Feng

    2000-01-01

    The effects of thiosulfate ion and solution pH on pitting corrosion of Alloy 690 in chloride solution were explored. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements were conducted to evaluate pitting corrosion susceptibility of Alloy 690 in these environments. The results showed that pitting corrosion occurred in the mill-annealed (1050°C/5min) Alloy 690 in 1 wt% NaCl solution but not in 0.1 M Na 2S 2O 3 solution. The value of pitting nucleation potential ( Enp) determined in 1 wt% NaCl solution (without Na 2S 2O 3 ) increased with increasing solution pH value in the range of 2-10. The addition of Na 2S 2O 3 to 1 wt% NaCl solution greatly affected the pitting corrosion behavior, which was dependent on concentration. The preformed nickel sulfide surface film due to the presence of Na 2S 2O 3 caused Alloy 690 to become more susceptible to pitting corrosion in 1 wt% NaCl solution.

  16. Alloy Corrosion Considerations in Low-Cost, Clean Biomass Cookstoves for the Developing World

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Michael P.; Banta, Kelly; Mizia, John; ...

    2017-04-01

    In nearly 40% of the world cooks on open fires or inefficient biomass-fueled cookstoves. The resulting smoke is a health hazard, contributing to an estimated 4 million premature deaths per year, as well as a major source of black carbon emissions. One solution is the introduction of improved, clean-burning biomass cookstoves. One of the most challenging components is the combustor, which must operate at high temperatures (often ≥ 600 °C) in the presence of highly corrosive species released from biomass fuel combustion, yet be sufficiently low cost to permit widespread adoption. In our present work we report the development ofmore » accelerated corrosion test screening protocols employing highly corrosive salt and water vapor species, specifically designed to evaluate alloys for clean biomass cookstove combustors, and corrosion findings for a range of commercial and developmental alloys. Lastly, a new Fe-Cr-Si base alloy that offers promise for improved corrosion resistance at lower cost than state-of the art FeCrAl and stainless steel alloys is also reported.« less

  17. The Enhancement of Mg Corrosion Resistance by Alloying Mn and Laser-Melting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Youwen; Wu, Ping; Wang, Qiyuan; Wu, Hong; Liu, Yong; Deng, Youwen; Zhou, Yuanzhuo; Shuai, Cijun

    2016-01-01

    Mg has been considered a promising biomaterial for bone implants. However, the poor corrosion resistance has become its main undesirable property. In this study, both alloying Mn and laser-melting were applied to enhance the Mg corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, and microstructure of rapid laser-melted Mg-xMn (x = 0–3 wt %) alloys were investigated. The alloys were composed of dendrite grains, and the grains size decreased with increasing Mn. Moreover, Mn could dissolve and induce the crystal lattice distortion of the Mg matrix during the solidification process. Mn ranging from 0–2 wt % dissolved completely due to rapid laser solidification. As Mn contents further increased up to 3 wt %, a small amount of Mn was left undissolved. The compressive strength of Mg-Mn alloys increased first (up to 2 wt %) and then decreased with increasing Mn, while the hardness increased continuously. The refinement of grains and the increase in corrosion potential both made contributions to the enhancement of Mg corrosion resistance. PMID:28773342

  18. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of laser processed NiTi alloy.

    PubMed

    Marattukalam, Jithin J; Singh, Amit Kumar; Datta, Susmit; Das, Mitun; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bontha, Srikanth; Kalpathy, Sreeram K

    2015-12-01

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), a commercially available additive manufacturing technology, has been used to fabricate dense equiatomic NiTi alloy components. The primary aim of this work is to study the effect of laser power and scan speed on microstructure, phase constituents, hardness and corrosion behavior of laser processed NiTi alloy. The results showed retention of large amount of high-temperature austenite phase at room temperature due to high cooling rates associated with laser processing. The high amount of austenite in these samples increased the hardness. The grain size and corrosion resistance were found to increase with laser power. The surface energy of NiTi alloy, calculated using contact angles, decreased from 61 mN/m to 56 mN/m with increase in laser energy density from 20 J/mm(2) to 80 J/mm(2). The decrease in surface energy shifted the corrosion potentials to nobler direction and decreased the corrosion current. Under present experimental conditions the laser power found to have strong influence on microstructure, phase constituents and corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Alloy Corrosion Considerations in Low-Cost, Clean Biomass Cookstoves for the Developing World

    SciT

    Brady, Michael P.; Banta, Kelly; Mizia, John

    In nearly 40% of the world cooks on open fires or inefficient biomass-fueled cookstoves. The resulting smoke is a health hazard, contributing to an estimated 4 million premature deaths per year, as well as a major source of black carbon emissions. One solution is the introduction of improved, clean-burning biomass cookstoves. One of the most challenging components is the combustor, which must operate at high temperatures (often ≥ 600 °C) in the presence of highly corrosive species released from biomass fuel combustion, yet be sufficiently low cost to permit widespread adoption. In our present work we report the development ofmore » accelerated corrosion test screening protocols employing highly corrosive salt and water vapor species, specifically designed to evaluate alloys for clean biomass cookstove combustors, and corrosion findings for a range of commercial and developmental alloys. Lastly, a new Fe-Cr-Si base alloy that offers promise for improved corrosion resistance at lower cost than state-of the art FeCrAl and stainless steel alloys is also reported.« less

  20. Effect of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of modified aluminum-magnesium alloys in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Z.; Aleem, A.

    1993-10-01

    Study of modified Al-2.5Mg alloys containing chromium, silica, iron, and manganese in various tempers (O, H-18, T-4, T-6, T-18, and H-34) has shown that their corrosion resistance is significantly altered by thermomechanical treatment and the beneficial effect of chromium on microstructural changes. Modified binary Al-2.5Mg alloys in the T-6 and T-4 tempers exhibit a higher resistance to corrosion in Arabian Gulf water than H-34 tempers due to the beneficial effect of chromium on microstructural changes.

  1. Effect of Hydroxyapatite on the Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of Mg-Zn-Y Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun; Lu, Chih-Te; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Mg-Zn-Y alloys with a long period stacking ordered (LPSO) phase are potential candidates for biodegradable implants; however, an unfavorable degradation rate has limited their applications. Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been shown to enhance the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. In this study, Mg97Zn1Y2-0.5 wt% HA composite was synthesized and solution treated at 500 °C for 10 h. The corrosion behavior of the composite was studied by electrochemical and immersion tests, while the mechanical properties were investigated by a tensile test. Addition of HA particles improves the corrosion resistance of Mg97Zn1Y2 alloy without sacrificing tensile strength. The improved corrosion resistance is due to the formation of a compact Ca-P surface layer and a decrease of the volume fraction of the LPSO phase, both resulting from the addition of HA. After solution-treatment, the corrosion resistance of the composite decreases. This is due to the formation of a more extended LPSO phase, which weakens its role as a corrosion barrier in protecting the Mg matrix. PMID:28773216

  2. Corrosion behavior of ultrafine-grained AA2024 aluminum alloy produced by cryorolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxman Mani Kanta, P.; Srivastava, V. C.; Venkateswarlu, K.; Paswan, Sharma; Mahato, B.; Das, Goutam; Sivaprasad, K.; Krishna, K. Gopala

    2017-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to produce ultrafine-grained (UFG) AA2024 aluminum alloy by cryorolling followed by aging and to evaluate its corrosion behavior. Solutionized samples were cryorolled to 85% reduction in thickness. Subsequent aging resulted in a UFG structure with finer precipitates of Al2CuMg in the cryorolled alloy. The (1) solutionized and (2) solutionized and cryorolled samples were uniformly aged at 160°C/24 h and were designated as CGPA and CRPA, respectively; these samples were subsequently subjected to corrosion studies. Potentiodynamic polarization studies in 3.5wt% NaCl solution indicated an increase in corrosion potential and a decrease in corrosion current density for CRPA compared to CGPA. In the case of CRPA, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic studies indicated the presence of two complex passive oxide layers with a higher charge transfer resistance and lower mass loss during intergranular corrosion tests. The improved corrosion resistance of CRPA was mainly attributed to its UFG structure, uniform distribution of fine precipitates, and absence of coarse grain-boundary precipitation and associated precipitate-free zones as compared with the CGPA alloy.

  3. Effect of macrophages on in vitro corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Hiromoto, Sachiko; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Niu, Jialin; Huang, Hua; Jia, Gaozhi; Li, Haiyan; Ding, Wenjiang; Yuan, Guangyin

    2016-10-01

    The influence of cells on the corrosion behavior of biomedical magnesium alloy is an important but less studied topic, which is helpful for understanding the inconsistent corrosion rates between in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this work, macrophages were directly cultured on Mg-2.1Nd-0.2Zn-0.5Zr (wt %, abbreviated as JDBM) alloy surface for 72 or 168 hours. Macrophages retained good viability and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was greatly promoted on the alloy. Weight loss, Mg(2+) concentration, and cross-section observation results demonstrated that macrophages accelerated the in vitro corrosion of JDBM. The coverage of cell body did not affect the local thickness of corrosion product layer. The corrosion product layer had a porous inner Mg(OH)2 layer and a dense outer layer mainly composed of O, P, Mg, and Ca. The uniform acceleration of JDBM corrosion was attributed to the omnidirection diffusion of ROS from macrophages. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2476-2487, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Preparation of Aluminum-Zirconium Master Alloy by Aluminothermic Reduction in Cryolite Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fengguo; Ding, Chenliang; Tao, Wenju; Hu, Xianwei; Gao, Bingliang; Shi, Zhongning; Wang, Zhaowen

    2017-12-01

    Al-Zr master alloy was prepared by aluminothermic reduction in cryolite melt without alumina impurity. The Al-Zr master alloy was characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The composition of the master alloy was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results indicated that Al-Zr master alloy with high purity could be obtained when byproduct Al2O3 was dissolved in the cryolite melt. The Al-Zr alloy was embedded in the Al matrix in the form of Al3Zr phase with long rod or tetragonal morphology due to temperature variation. Finally, we obtained Al-Zr alloy with 7 wt.% Zr by aluminothermic reduction for 90 min in cryolite melt at 980°C.

  5. Improving the Corrosion Resistance of Biodegradable Magnesium Alloys by Diffusion Coating Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Galit Katarivas; Aghion, Eli

    Magnesium alloys suffer from accelerated corrosion in physiological environment and hence their use as a structural material for biodegradable implants is limited. The present study focuses on a diffusion coating treatment that amplifies the beneficial effect of Neodymium on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. The diffusion coating layer was obtained by applying 1 µm Nd coating on EW10X04 magnesium alloy using Electron-gun evaporator and PVD process. The coated alloy was heat treated at 350°C for 3 hours in a protective atmosphere of N2+0.2%SF6. The micro structure characteristics were evaluated by SEM, XRD, and XPS; the corrosion resistance was examined by potentiodynamic polarization and EIS analysis. The corrosion resistance of the diffusion coated alloy was significantly improved compared to the uncoated material. This was related to: (i) formation of Nd2O3 in the outer scale, (ii) integration of Nd in the MgO oxide layer, and (iii) formation of secondary phase Mg41Nd5 along the grain boundaries of α-Mg.

  6. Formation and Corrosion Resistance of Mg-Al Hydrotalcite Film on Mg-Gd-Zn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Z. X.; Dong, Q. S.; Kong, S. X.; Zhang, X. B.; Xue, Y. J.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-06-01

    An environment-friendly technique for depositing a Mg-Al hydrotalcite (HT) (Mg6Al2(OH)16-CO3ṡ4H2O) conversion film was developed to protect the Mg-Gd-Zn alloy from corrosion. The morphology and chemical compositions of the film were analyzed by scanning electronic microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy (RS), respectively. The electrochemical test and hydrogen evolution test were employed to evaluate the biocorrosion behavior of Mg-Gd-Zn alloy coated with the Mg-Al HT film in the simulated body fluid (SBF). It was found that the formation of Mg-Al HT film was a transition from amorphous precursor to a crystalline HT structure. The HT film can effectively improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy. It indicates that the process provides a promising approach to modify Mg-Gd-Zn alloy.

  7. Study of metal corrosion using ac impedance techniques in the STS launch environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.

    1989-01-01

    AC impedance measurements were performed to investigate the corrosion resistance of 19 alloys under conditions similar to the STS launch environment. The alloys were: Zirconium 702, Hastelloy C-22, Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, Hastelloy C-4, Inconel 600, 7Mo + N, Ferralium 255, Inco Alloy G-3, 20Cb-3, SS 904L, Inconel 825, SS 304LN, SS 316L, SS 317L, ES 2205, SS 304L, Hastelloy B-2, and Monel 400. AC impedance data were gathered for each alloy after one hour immersion time in each of the following three electrolyte solutions: 3.55 percent NaCl, 3.55 percent NaCl-0.1N HCl, and 3.55 percent NaCl-1.0N HCl. The data were analyzed qualitatively using the Nyquist plot and quantitatively using the Bode plot. Polarization resistance, Rp, values were obtained using the Bode plot. Zirconium 702 was the most corrosion resistant alloy in the three electrolytes. The ordering of the other alloys according the their resistance to corrosion varied as the concentration of hydrochloric acid in the electrolyte increased. The corrosion resistance of Zirconium 702 and Ferralium 255 increased as the concentration of hydrochloric acid in the electrolyte increased. The corrosion resistance of the other 17 alloys decreased as the concentration of the hyrdochloric acid in the electrolyte increased.

  8. Steam based conversion coating on AA6060 alloy: Effect of sodium silicate chemistry and corrosion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Tabrizian, Naja; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloy AA6060 using an industrially applicable pilot steam jet system with and without silicate chemistry has been investigated. Treatment using steam alone and steam with silicate, resulted in an oxide layer formation with thickness ∼425 nm and ∼160 nm, respectively. Moreover, the use of sodium silicate resulted in the formation of distinct microstructure and incorporation of silicate into the oxide film. These oxide films reduced the anodic activity 4 times, while the corrosion protection by silicate containing oxide was the function of its concentration. Further, in acid salt spray and filiform corrosion tests, oxide layer containing silicate exhibited two times higher corrosion resistance.

  9. A systematic multiscale modeling and experimental approach to protect grain boundaries in magnesium alloys from corrosion

    SciT

    Horstemeyer, Mark R.; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2015-09-30

    A multiscale modeling Internal State Variable (ISV) constitutive model was developed that captures the fundamental structure-property relationships. The macroscale ISV model used lower length scale simulations (Butler-Volmer and Electronics Structures results) in order to inform the ISVs at the macroscale. The chemomechanical ISV model was calibrated and validated from experiments with magnesium (Mg) alloys that were investigated under corrosive environments coupled with experimental electrochemical studies. Because the ISV chemomechanical model is physically based, it can be used for other material systems to predict corrosion behavior. As such, others can use the chemomechanical model for analyzing corrosion effects on their designs.

  10. Synthesis of hybrid sol-gel coatings for corrosion protection of we54-ae magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Barrios, C. A.; Duarte, N. Z.; Hernández, L. M.; Peña, D. Y.; Coy, A. E.; Viejo, F.

    2013-11-01

    The present work shows some preliminary results related to the synthesis, characterization and corrosion evaluation of different hybrid sol-gel coatings applied on the WE54-AE magnesium alloy attending to the two experimental variables, i.e. the precursors ratio and the aging time, which may affect the quality and the electrochemical properties of the coatings resultant. The experimental results confirmed that, under some specific experimental conditions, it was possible to obtain homogeneous and uniform, porous coatings with good corrosion resistance that also permit to accommodate corrosion inhibitors.

  11. Method of increasing the phase stability and the compressive yield strength of uranium-1 to 3 wt. % zirconium alloy

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    A uranium-1 to 3 wt. % zirconium alloy characterized by high strength, high ductility and stable microstructure is fabricated by an improved thermal mechanical process. A homogenous ingot of the alloy which has been reduced in thickness of at least 50% in the two-step forging operation, rolled into a plate with a 75% reduction and then heated in vacuum at a temperature of about 750.degree. to 850.degree. C. and then quenched in water is subjected to further thermal-mechanical operation steps to increase the compressive yield strength approximately 30%, stabilize the microstructure, and decrease the variations in mechanical properties throughout the plate is provided. These thermal-mechanical steps are achieved by cold rolling the quenched plate to reduce the thickness thereof about 8 to 12%, aging the cold rolled plate at a first temperature of about 325.degree. to 375.degree. C. for five to six hours and then aging the plate at a higher temperature ranging from 480.degree. to 500.degree. C. for five to six hours prior to cooling the billet to ambient conditions and sizing the billet or plate into articles provides the desired increase in mechanical properties and phase stability throughout the plate.

  12. Corrosion Thermodynamics of Magnesium and Alloys from First Principles as a Function of Solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, Krista; Williams, Kristen; Andzelm, Jan

    Thermodynamics of corrosion processes occurring on magnesium surfaces, such as hydrogen evolution and water dissociation, have been examined with density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate the effect of impurities and dilute alloying additions. The modeling of corrosion thermodynamics requires examination of species in a variety of chemical and electronic states in order to accurately represent the complex electrochemical corrosion process. In this study, DFT calculations for magnesium corrosion thermodynamics were performed with two DFT codes (VASP and DMol3), with multiple exchange-correlation functionals for chemical accuracy, as well as with various levels of implicit and explicit solvation for surfaces and solvated ions. The accuracy of the first principles calculations has been validated against Pourbaix diagrams constructed from solid, gas and solvated charged ion calculations. For aqueous corrosion, it is shown that a well parameterized implicit solvent is capable of accurately representing all but the first coordinating layer of explicit water for charged ions.

  13. Fretting corrosion of CoCr alloy: Effect of load and displacement on the degradation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Michael; Neville, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Fretting corrosion of medical devices is of growing concern, yet, the interactions between tribological and electrochemical parameters are not fully understood. Fretting corrosion of CoCr alloy was simulated, and the components of damage were monitored as a function of displacement and contact pressure. Free corrosion potential (E corr ), intermittent linear polarisation resistance and cathodic potentiostatic methods were used to characterise the system. Interferometry was used to estimate material loss post rubbing. The fretting regime influenced the total material lost and the dominant degradation mechanism. At high contact pressures and low displacements, pure corrosion was dominant with wear and its synergies becoming more important as the contact pressure and displacement decreased and increased, respectively. In some cases, an antagonistic effect from the corrosion-enhanced wear contributor was observed suggesting that film formation and removal may be present. The relationship between slip mechanism and the contributors to tribocorrosion degradation is presented.

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Additive Manufactured Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingjing; Yang, Huihui; Yu, Hanchen; Wang, Zemin; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    The microstructures, potentiodynamic curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are characterized for Ti-6Al-4V samples produced by selective laser melting (SLM), SLM followed by heat treatment (HT), wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM), and traditional rolling to investigate their corrosion behaviors. Results show that the processing technology acts a significant role in controlling the microstructures, which in turn directly determine their corrosion resistance. The order of corrosion resistance of these samples is SLM < WAAM < rolling < SLM+HT. Among these microstructural factors for influencing corrosion resistance, type of constituent phase is the main one, followed by grain size, and the last is morphology. Finally, the application potentials of additive manufactured Ti-6Al-4V alloy are verified in the aspect of corrosion resistance.

  15. Mitigation of corrosion attack on carbon steel coated cermet alloy in different anion contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Muhamad Azrin Mohd; Ismail, Azzura

    2017-12-01

    This research study evaluated the corrosion mechanism attack on carbon steel coated with cermet alloys (WC-9% Ni) in seawater at different sulphate-to-chloride ratios. The four different sulphate-to-chloride ratios were synthesised with the same seawater salinity of 3.5 % and same pH of real seawater. The corrosion tests involved immersion and electrochemical tests. The immersion test is used to determine the cermet coating ability to withstand the corrosion attack based on different ratios of anions present in the seawater at different periods of immersion. The corrosion attack was characterized by optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The aggressive anions present in the seawater influenced the corrosion attack on the cermet coating. For immersion test, results revealed that increasing sulphate more than chloride, increased the weight loss of cermets. The electrochemistry analysis showed that the passive layer forms on cermet coating prevented the material from further corrosion attack. However, due to its porosity, the passive layer collapsed and exposed the material for other corrosion reaction. For electrochemical test, the result shows that the solution with sulphate-to-chloride ratio of 0.14 (real seawater) has the highest corrosion current and Open Circuit Potential (OCP) compared to other solutions (different sulphate-to-chloride ratio). In conclusion, sulfate and chloride show their competition to attack the cermet coating on carbon steel and the higher the amount of chloride present in seawater, the higher the corrosion rate and pits formed on the cermet coating.

  16. Corrosion Analysis of TiCN Coated Al-7075 Alloy for Marine Applications: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinath, M. K.; Ganesha Prasad, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    Corrosion is one of the most important marine difficulties that cause long term problems, occurring in ships and submarines surrounded by a corrosive environment when coupled with chemical, temperature and stress related conditions. Corrosion of marine parts could lead to severe disasters. Coatings and heat treatment in a very effective way could be used to protect the aluminium parts against corrosion. The present case study focuses on the corrosion and microstructural properties of TiCN coatings fabricated on Al-7075 aluminium alloy substrate by using Physical Vapour Deposition technique. Corrosion properties of specimen's heat treated at 500 °C at durations of 1, 4, 8 and 12 h were tested through salt spray test. According to D-1193, ASTM standard, corrosion resistance of coated and heat treated Al-7075 samples were investigated in solution kept at 95 °F with a pH of 6.5-7.2, with 5 sections of NaCl to 95 sections of type IV water. The specimen's heat treated for 1 h showed positive corrosion resistance, while the specimens treated for longer durations had the opposite effect. The microstructures of the salt spray tested coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope. X-ray diffraction tests were conducted on specimens to determine the atomic and molecular structure of the surface crystals and the unit cell dimensions. The corrosion mechanisms of the coated specimens under the heat treated conditions have been explored.

  17. [Using Raman spectrum analysis to research corrosive productions occurring in alloy of ancient bronze wares].

    PubMed

    Jia, La-jiang; Jin, Pu-jun

    2015-01-01

    The present paper analyzes the interior rust that occurred in bronze alloy sample from 24 pieces of Early Qin bronze wares. Firstly, samples were processed by grinding, polishing and ultrasonic cleaning-to make a mirror surface. Then, a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer was employed to carry out spectroscopic study on the inclusions in samples. The conclusion indicated that corrosive phases are PbCO3 , PbO and Cu2O, which are common rusting production on bronze alloy. The light-colored circular or massive irregular areas in metallographic structure of samples are proved as Cu2O, showing that bronze wares are not only easy to be covered with red Cu2O rusting layer, but also their alloy is easy to be eroded by atomic oxygen. In other words, the rust Cu2O takes place in both the interior and exterior parts of the bronze alloy. In addition, Raman spectrum analysis shows that the dark grey materials are lead corrosive products--PbCO3 and PbO, showing the corroding process of lead element as Pb -->PbO-->PbCO3. In the texture of cast state of bronze alloy, lead is usually distributed as independent particles between the different alloy phases. The lead particles in bronze alloy would have oxidation reaction and generate PbO when buried in the soil, and then have chemical reaction with CO3(2-) dissolved in the underground water to generate PbCO3, which is a rather stable lead corrosive production. A conclusion can be drawn that the external corrosive factors (water, dissolved oxygen and carbonate, etc) can enter the bronze ware interior through the passageway between different phases and make the alloy to corrode gradually.

  18. A Positron Annihilation Study of Corrosion of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloy by NaOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. C.; Zhai, T.; Coleman, P. G.

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion of fully-annealed pure aluminum and a continuous-cast AA2037 aluminum alloy (solutionized and water quenched) in a 1M NaOH solution for various periods of time were analyzed with positron beam-based Doppler broadening spectroscopy. By varying the energy of the incident positron beam, corrosion-induced defects at different depths from the surface were detected. It was found that the Doppler-broadened annihilation line-width parameter was significantly increased near the surface of pure aluminum after corrosion, probably due to the interaction between positrons and nanometer-sized voids formed near the aluminum surface during corrosion. Examination by atomic force microscopy indicated that many pits were formed on the aluminum surface after corrosion. In contrast, a significant decrease in the line-width parameter was observed in AA2037 alloy after corrosion and interpreted as being caused by copper enrichment at the metal-oxide interface during corrosion; such enrichment at large cavity sites was confirmed by energy dispersion spectrometry.

  19. Influence of the pulsed plasma treatment on the corrosion resistance of the low-alloy steel plated by Ni-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumaev, P.; Yakushin, V.; Kalin, B.; Polsky, V.; Yurlova, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents investigation results of the influence of high temperature pulsed plasma flows (HTPPF) treatment on the corrosion resistance of low-alloy steel 0.2C-Cr-Mn- Ni-Mo cladded by the rapidly quenched nickel-based alloy. A technique that allows obtaining a defect-free clad layer with a good adhesion to the substrate was developed. It is shown that the preliminary treatment of steel samples by nitrogen plasma flows significantly increases their corrosion resistance in the conditions of intergranular corrosion test in a water solution of sulfuric acid. A change of the corrosion mechanism of the clad layer from intergranular to uniform corrosion was observed as a result of sub-microcrystalline structure formation and homogeneous distribution of alloying elements in the plasma treated surface layer thus leading to the significant increase of the corrosion resistance.

  20. The stress-corrosion cracking behavior of high-strength aluminum powder metallurgy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickens, J. R.; Christodoulou, L.

    1987-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of rapidly solidified (RS) aluminum powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys 7090 and 7091, mechanically alloyed aluminum P/M alloy IN* 9052, and ingot metallurgy (I/M) alloys of similar compositions was compared using bolt-loaded double cantilever beam specimens. In addition, the effects of aging, grain size, grain boundary segregation, pre-exposure embrittlement, and loading mode on the SCC of 7091 were independently assessed. Finally, the data generated were used to elucidate the mechanisms of SCC in the three P/M alloys. The IN 9052 had the lowest SCC susceptibility of all alloys tested in the peak-strength condition, although no SCC was observed in the two RS alloys in the overaged condition. The susceptibility of the RS alloys was greater in the underaged than the peak-aged temper. We detected no significant differences in susceptibility of 7091 with grain sizes varying from 2 to 300 μm. Most of the crack advance during SCC of 7091 was by hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Furthermore, both RS alloys were found to be susceptible to preexposure embrittlement—also indicative of HE. The P/M alloys were less susceptible to SCC than the I/M alloys in all but one test.

  1. Improvement of Corrosion Resistance of Binary Mg-Ca Alloys Using Duplex Aluminum-Chromium Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daroonparvar, Mohammadreza; Yajid, Muhamad Azizi Mat; Yusof, Noordin Mohd; Bakhsheshi-Rad, Hamid Reza; Adabi, Mohsen; Hamzah, Esah; Kamali, Hussein Ali

    2015-07-01

    Al-AlCr was coated on Mg-Ca and Mg-Zn-Ce-La alloys using physical vapor deposition method. The surface morphology of the specimens was characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM results indicated that the average surface roughness of Al-AlCr coating on the Mg-Ca alloy is much lower than that of Al-AlCr coating on the Mg-Zn-Ce-La alloy. However, Al-AlCr coating on the Mg-Ca alloy presented a more compact structure with fewer pores, pinholes, and cracks than Al-AlCr coating on the Mg-Zn-Ce-La alloy. Electrochemical studies revealed that the novel coating (Al-AlCr) can remarkably reduce the corrosion rate of the Mg-Ca alloy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. It was seen that the anodic current density of the Al-AlCr-coated Mg-Ca alloy was very small when compared to the Al-AlCr-coated Mg-Zn-Ce-La and uncoated alloys. Impedance modulus ( Z) of the Al-AlCr-coated samples was higher than that of the bare Mg alloys. Z of Al-AlCr-coated Mg-Ca alloy was higher than that of the Al-AlCr-coated Mg-Zn-Ce-La alloy at low frequency.

  2. Mechanical and corrosion resistance of a new nanostructured Ti-Zr-Ta-Nb alloy.

    PubMed

    Raducanu, D; Vasilescu, E; Cojocaru, V D; Cinca, I; Drob, P; Vasilescu, C; Drob, S I

    2011-10-01

    In this work, a multi-elementary Ti-10Zr-5Nb-5Ta alloy, with non-toxic alloying elements, was used to develop an accumulative roll bonding, ARB-type procedure in order to improve its structural and mechanical properties. The alloy was obtained by cold crucible semi-levitation melting technique and then was ARB deformed following a special route. After three ARB cycles, the total deformation degree per layer is about 86%; the calculated medium layer thickness is about 13 μm. The ARB processed alloy has a low Young's modulus of 46 GPa, a value very close to the value of the natural cortical bone (about 20 GPa). Data concerning ultimate tensile strength obtained for ARB processed alloy is rather high, suitable to be used as a material for bone substitute. Hardness of the ARB processed alloy is higher than that of the as-cast alloy, ensuring a better behaviour as a implant material. The tensile curve for the as-cast alloy shows an elastoplastic behaviour with a quite linear elastic behaviour and the tensile curve for the ARB processed alloy is quite similar with a strain-hardening elastoplastic body. Corrosion behaviour of the studied alloy revealed the improvement of the main electrochemical parameters, as a result of the positive influence of ARB processing. Lower corrosion and ion release rates for the ARB processed alloy than for the as-cast alloy, due to the favourable effect of ARB thermo-mechanical processing were obtained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Corrosion Mechanisms in Brazed Al-Base Alloy Sandwich Structures as a Function of Braze Alloy and Process Variables

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    aeration solution for 8 hours. A concentrated Nitric acid (HNO3) dip for 15 seconds removed corrosion products prior to post-exposure SEM imaging [25...32 to -37°C under a liquid nitrogen chill at 11.2 V for one minute [10]. The electropolishing solution was a mixture of 1/3 concentrated Nitric acid ...DATES COVERED (From - To) 03/27/06-12/31/12 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Corrosion Mechanisms in Brazed Al-Base Alloy Sandwich Structures as a Function

  4. Corrosion behaviour of Ti-15Mo alloy for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Narayanan, T S N Sankara

    2008-07-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Ti-15Mo alloy in 0.15M NaCl solution containing varying concentrations of fluoride ions (190, 570, 1140 and 9500 ppm) is evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and chronoamperometric/current-time transient (CTT) studies to ascertain its suitability for dental implant applications. The study reveals that there is a strong dependence of the corrosion resistance of Ti-15Mo alloy on the concentration of fluoride ions in the electrolyte medium. Increase in fluoride ion concentration from 0 to 9500 ppm shifts the corrosion potential (E(corr)) from -275 to -457 mV vs. SCE, increases the corrosion current density (i(corr)) from 0.31 to 2.30 microA/cm(2), the passive current density (i(pass)) from 0.07 to 7.32 mA/cm(2) and the double-layer capacitance (C(dl)) from 9.63 x 10(-5) to 1.79 x 10(-4)F and reduces the charge transfer resistance (R(ct)) from 6.58 x 10(4) to 6.64 x 10(3)Omega cm(2). In spite of the active dissolution, the Ti-15Mo alloy exhibit passivity at anodic potentials at all concentrations of the fluoride ions studied. In dental implants since the exposure of the alloy will be limited only to its 'neck', the amount of Mo ions released from Ti-15Mo alloy is not likely to have an adverse and hence, in terms of biocompatibility this alloy seems to be acceptable for dental implant applications. The results of the study suggest that Ti-15Mo alloy can be a suitable alternative for dental implant applications.

  5. Hot Corrosion of Single-Crystal NiAl-X Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Several single-crystal NiAl-X alloys (X=Hf, Ti, Cr, Ga) underwent hot corrosion testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at 900 deg. C for 300 1-hr cycles. The surface morphology after testing consisted of either mounds or an inward, uniform-type of attack which preserved surface features. It was observed that the surface morphology was affected by the surface preparation treatments. Microstructurally, the hot corrosion attack initiated as pits but evolved to a rampant attack consisting of the rapid inward growth of Al2O3. Electropolishing and chemical milling produced many pits and grooves on the surface. However, the presence of pits and grooves did not appear to strongly influence the hot corrosion response. Attack on many samples was strongly localized which was attributed to compositional inhomogeneity within the samples. It was found that increasing the Ti content from 1% to 5 % degraded the hot corrosion response of these alloys. In contrast, the addition of 1-2% Cr reduced the susceptibility of these alloys to hot corrosion attack and negated the deleterious effect of the 4-5% Ti addition.

  6. Effect of surface nanostructuring on corrosion behavior of Ti–6Al–4V alloy

    SciT

    Kumar, Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeevphy85@gmail.com; Ch

    Surface nanostructure was induced in Ti–6Al–4V alloy by ultrasonic shot peening (USSP) for different durations, from 15 s to 30 min, and the modified surface was characterized by optical, scanning, atomic force and transmission electron microscopy. Nano size grains were observed to form on surface of the USSPed samples and surface roughness was increased with duration of USSP. Polarization study was carried out in Ringer's solution to examine the effect of surface nanostructuring on corrosion resistance of this alloy. Electrochemical corrosion was carried out for all the USSPed specimens as well as the non-USSPed sample in Ringer's solution. Surface morphologymore » of the corroded samples was examined by SEM. In general, corrosion resistance was improved by USSP up to the duration of 15 min and there was maximum improvement in the specimen USSPed for 1 min. However, corrosion resistance was drastically reduced due to USSP for long duration of 30 min. - Highlights: •Nanostructure was induced by USSP on alloy Ti–6Al–4V of about 28 nm. •Grain refinement was confirmed by XRD and TEM. •USSP is an effective technique for the improvement in corrosion resistance. •Nanostructured surface promotes formation of protective surface layer of TiO{sub 2}.« less

  7. Corrosion inhibition of steam generator tubesheet by Alloy 690 cladding in secondary side environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Do Haeng; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Han, Jung Ho; Shim, Hee Sang

    2013-11-01

    Denting is a phenomenon that a steam generator tube is distorted by a volume expansion of corrosion products of the tube support and tubesheet materials adjacent to the tube. Although denting has been mitigated by a modification of the design and material of the tube support structures, it has been an inevitable concern in the crevice region of the top of tubesheet. This paper provides a new technology to prevent denting by cladding the secondary surface of the tubesheet with a corrosion resistant material. In this study, Alloy 690 material was cladded onto the surface of an SA508 tubesheet to a thickness of about 9 mm. The corrosion rates of the original SA508 tubesheet and the Alloy 690 clad material were measured in acidic and alkaline simulated environments. Using Alloy 690 cladding, the corrosion rate of the tubesheet within a magnetite sludge pile decreased by a factor of 680 in 0.1 M NiCl2 solution at 300 °C, and by a factor of 58 in 2 M NaOH solution at 315 °C. This means that denting can drastically be prevented by cladding the secondary tubesheet surface with corrosion resistant materials.

  8. Study on the corrosion resistance and anti-infection of modified magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ningning; Tan, Cui; Li, Qing; Xi, Zhongxian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a low-cost and multifunctional hydroxyapatite (HA)/pefloxacin (PFLX) drug eluting layer is coated on magnesium (Mg) alloy through a simple hydrothermal and dip process. The drug PFLX could provide effective prevention for bone infection and inflammation due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial property. And HA would promote the growth of new bone and further improve the biocompatibility of implants. Besides, both PFLX and HA exhibits excellent corrosion protection for Mg alloy substrate. This coating is of great value for improving the application of Mg alloy as biomaterials.

  9. The effect of cathodic polarization on the corrosion fatigue behavior of a precipitation hardened aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. F.; Duquette, D. J.

    1986-02-01

    Fatigue experiments were conducted on polycrystalline and monocrystalline samples of a high purity Al, 5.5 wt pct Zn, 2.5 wt pct Mg, 1.5 wt pct Cu alloy in the peak-hardened heat treatment condition. These experiments were conducted in dry laboratory air and in 0.5 N NaCl solutions at the corrosion potential and at applied potentials cathodic to the corrosion potential. It has been shown that saline solutions severely reduce the fatigue resistance of the alloy, resulting in considerable amounts of intergranular crack initiation and propagation under freely corroding conditions for polycrystalline samples. Applied cathodic potentials resulted in still larger decreases in fatigue resistance and, for poly crystals, increases in the degree of transgranular crack initiation and propagation. Increasing amounts of intergranular cracking were observed when applied cyclic stresses were reduced (longer test times). The characteristics of cracking, combined with results obtained on tensile tests of deformed and hydrogen charged samples, suggest that environmental cracking of these alloys is associated with a form of hydrogen embrittlement of the process zones of growing cracks. Further, it is suggested that stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue of these alloys occurs by essentially the same mechanism, but that the often observed transgranular cracking under cyclic loading conditions occurs due to enhanced hydrogen transport and/or concentrations associated with mobile dislocations at growing crack tips.

  10. Fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with improved corrosion inhibition on 6061 aluminum alloy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuewu; Zhang, Qiaoxin; Guo, Zheng; Shi, Tian; Yu, Jingui; Tang, Mingkai; Huang, Xingjiu

    2015-07-01

    This work has developed a simple and low-cost method to render 6061 aluminum alloy surface superhydrophobicity and excellent corrosion inhibition. The superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface has been fabricated by hydrochloric acid etching, potassium permanganate passivation and fluoroalkyl-silane modification. Meanwhile, the effect of the etching and passivation time on the wettability and corrosion inhibition of the fabricated surface has also been investigated. Results show that with the etching time of 6 min and passivation time of 180 min the fabricated micro/nano-scale terrace-like hierarchical structures accompanying with the nanoscale coral-like network bulge structures after being modified can result in superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle (CA) of 155.7°. Moreover, an extremely weak adhesive force to droplets as well as an outstanding self-cleaning behavior of the superhydrophobic surface has also been proved. Finally, corrosion inhibition in seawater of the as-prepared aluminum alloy surface is characterized by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Evidently, the fabricated superhydrophobic surface attained an improved corrosion inhibition efficiency of 83.37% compared with the traditional two-step processing consisting of etching and modification, which will extend the further applications of aluminum alloy especially in marine engineering fields.

  11. Duct and cladding alloy

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  12. Development of Zirconium-based Conversion Coatings for the Pretreatment of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy Prior to Electrocoating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reck, James; Wang, Yar-Ming; Kuo, Hong-Hsiang Harry

    This work examines the use of hexafluorozirconic acid based solutions at concentrations from 0.025 M to 0.100 M and pH values of 2.0 to 4.0 for the creation of a zirconia-based conversion coating less than 1 micron thick to protect magnesium alloy AZ91D. Similar coatings have been found to give excellent protection for steel and aluminum alloys, but little research has been conducted on its application to magnesium. Work was performed to gain an understanding of the film formation mechanisms and related kinetics using x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and open circuit potential monitoring techniques. A design of experiments approach was taken to determine the effects of acid concentration, pH, and soak time on the corrosion properties both as-deposited and with an application of electrocoat. It was found that the application of the zirconia-based coating significantly increased corrosion resistance, and allowed for an acceptable e-coat application with excellent adherence.

  13. Review and study of physics driven pitting corrosion modeling in 2024-T3 aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Jata, Kumar V.

    2015-04-01

    Material degradation due to corrosion and corrosion fatigue has been recognized to significantly affect the airworthiness of civilian and military aircraft, especially for the current fleet of airplanes that have served beyond their initial design life. The ability to predict the corrosion damage development in aircraft components and structures, therefore, is of great importance in managing timely maintenance for the aging aircraft vehicles and in assisting the design of new ones. The assessment of aircraft corrosion and its influence on fatigue life relies on appropriate quantitative models that can evaluate the initiation of the corrosion as well as the accumulation during the period of operation. Beyond the aircraft regime, corrosion has also affected the maintenance, safety and reliability of other systems such as nuclear power systems, steam and gas turbines, marine structures and so on. In the work presented in this paper, we reviewed and studied several physics based pitting corrosion models that have been reported in the literature. The classic work of particle induced pitting corrosion by Wei and Harlow is reviewed in detail. Two types of modeling, a power law based simplified model and a microstructure based model, are compared for 2024-T3 alloy. Data from literatures are used as model inputs. The paper ends with conclusions and recommendations for future work.

  14. Corrosion behavior of as-received and previously cast type III gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Ayad, Ghada M

    2010-04-01

    The rationale for using gold alloys is based largely upon their alleged ability to resist corrosion, but little information is available to determine the corrosion behavior of recast alloys. This study characterized the elemental composition of as-received and recast type III gold alloy and examined the in vitro corrosion behavior in two media using a potentiodynamic polarization technique. Seventy-eight disk-shaped specimens were prepared from a type III gold alloy under three casting protocols according to the proportion of as-received and recast gold alloy (n = 26). (1) Group as received (100% as-received metal), (2) group 50% to 50% (50% wt. new metal, 50% wt. once recast metal), and (3) group recast (100% once recast metal). The surface structures of 20 specimens from each group were examined under scanning electron microscopy, and their elemental compositions were determined using X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Further, the potentiodynamic cyclic polarization between -1000 and +1000 mV (SCE) were performed for six specimens from each casting protocol in 0.09% NaCl solution (n = 3) and Fusayama artificial saliva (n = 3) at 37 degrees C. Zero-current potential and corrosion current density were determined. The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple-range test t (alpha= 0.05). Elemental composition was significantly different among the casting groups (p < 0.001). The mean weight percentage values were 72.4 to 75.7% Au, 4.5 to 7.0% Pd, 10.7 to 11.1% Ag, 7.8 to 8.4% Cu, and 1.0 to 1.4% Zn. The mean values for Zero-current potential and corrosion current density for all casting protocols were not significant (p > 0.05); however, the difference between the electrolytes was significant (p < 0.001). Fusayama artificial saliva seemed to offer the most corrosive environment. Type III gold alloy in any casting protocol retained passivity under electrochemical conditions similar to the oral environment. Moreover, high

  15. AN ATTEMPT TO LOCATE INTERMETALLIC PARTICLES IN ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS USING A BITTER FIGURE TECHNIQUE

    SciT

    Cox, B.; Harder, B.R.

    1961-10-01

    The compound ZrFe/sub 2/ is known to be ferromagnetic, and an attempt to locate particles of magnetic material in zircaloy-2 and dilute Zr- Fe alloys by a Bitter figure technlque is described. An Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ sol in water-soluble plastic was used to prepare Bitter figures of the alloy surfaces in the form of replicas, which were then examined in an electron microscope. No magnetic particles were located in either zircaloy-2 or a Zr-O.3% Fe alloy. Subsequent work on specimens of ZrFe/sub 2/ showed that the failure to detect it in the dilute alloys arose because the size of themore » intermetallic particles in the latter was smaller than the size of the magnetic domains. (auth)« less

  16. Improvement of corrosion resistance of low-alloy steels by resurfacing using multifunction cavitation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijiri, Masataka; Yoshimura, Toshihiko

    2018-02-01

    Low-alloy steels are based on carbon steel in combination with several percent or less (in many cases, 1 mass%) alloying elements, and they offer improved resistance to corrosion at a cost slightly higher than that of carbon steel. However, these materials do not exhibit the same corrosion resistance as stainless steel. The authors have previously developed a novel multifunction cavitation (MFC) technique, which combines ultrasonic cavitation with water jet cavitation. In this study, MFC was used to modify the surface of Cr-Mo steel (SCM435) and Ni-Cr-Mo steel (SNCM630). MFC was found to improve the residual stress value of the material as the result of surface modification while also imparting high strength and superior corrosion resistance.

  17. Corrosion of pure aluminium and aluminium alloy: a comparative study using a slow positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. C.; Li, P. H.; Xue, X. D.; Wang, S. J.; Kallis, A.; Coleman, P. G.; Zhai, T.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion-related defects in pure Al and AA 2037 Al alloy have been investigated by positron beam-based Doppler broadening energy spectroscopy. Defect profiles have been analyzed by measuring the S parameter as a function of incident positron energy up to 30 keV. When pure Al samples are immersed in 1M NaOH for various times, a significant increase in the S parameter near the surface is observed. This implies that the corrosion process involves the creation of defects and nanometer voids. In contrast, a significant decrease in the S parameter is observed after the corrosion of water-quenched Al alloy by the same method, which is interpreted as being a result of Cu enrichment near the metal-oxide interface layer.

  18. Oxidation and corrosion behavior of modified-composition, low-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of substituting less strategic elements than Cr on the oxidation and corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated. Cyclic oxidation resistance was evaluated at 870 C. Corrosion resistance was determined by exposure of specimens to a boiling copper-rich solution of copper sulfate and sulfuric acid. Alloy substitutes for Cr included Al, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, V, Y, and misch metal. A level of about 12% Cr was the minimum amount of Cr required for adequate oxidation and corrosion resistance in the modified composition 304 stainless steels. This represents a Cr saving of at least 33%. Two alloys containing 12% Cr and 2% Al plus 2% Mo and 12% Cr plus 2.65% Si were identified as most promising for more detailed evaluation.

  19. Chitosan coatings crosslinked with genipin for corrosion protection of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets.

    PubMed

    de Y Pozzo, Ludmila; da Conceição, Thiago F; Spinelli, Almir; Scharnagl, Nico; Pires, Alfredo T N

    2018-02-01

    In this study, coatings of chitosan crosslinked with genipin were prepared on sheets of AZ31 magnesium alloy and their corrosion protection properties were characterized by means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The coatings were also characterized by means of FTIR and XPS. It was observed that the crosslinking process decreases the corrosion current and shifts the corrosion potential of the alloy to less negative values. The EIS analysis demonstrated that the crosslinking process increases the maximum impedance after short and long exposure times. The superior performance of the crosslinked coatings is related to a lower degree of swelling, as observed in the swelling tests carried out on free-standing films. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mg and Mg alloys: how comparable are in vitro and in vivo corrosion rates? A review.

    PubMed

    Martinez Sanchez, Adela Helvia; Luthringer, Bérengère J C; Feyerabend, Frank; Willumeit, Regine

    2015-02-01

    Due to their biodegradability, magnesium and magnesium-based alloys could represent the third generation of biomaterials. However, their mechanical properties and time of degradation have to match the needs of applications. Several approaches, such as choice of alloying elements or tailored microstructure, are employed to tailor corrosion behaviour. Due to the high electrochemical activity of Mg, numerous environmental factors (e.g. temperature and surrounding ion composition) influence its corrosion behaviour, making it unpredictable. Nevertheless, the need of reliable in vitro model(s) to predict in vivo implant degradation is increasing. In an attempt to find a correlation between in vitro and vivo corrosion rates, this review presents a systematic literature survey, as well as an attempt to correlate the different results. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cyclic Corrosion and Chlorination of an FeCrAl Alloy in the Presence of KCl

    DOE PAGES

    Israelsson, Niklas; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hellström, K.; ...

    2015-05-30

    The KCl-induced corrosion of the FeCrAl alloy Kanthal® APMT in an O 2 + N 2 + H 2O environment was studied at 600 °C. The samples were pre-oxidized prior to exposure in order to investigate the protective nature of alumina scales in the present environment. The microstructure and composition of the corroded surface was investigated in detail. Corrosion started at flaws in the pre-formed α-alumina scales, i.e. α-alumina was protective in itself. Consequently, KCl-induced corrosion started locally and, subsequently, spread laterally. An electrochemical mechanism is proposed here by which a transition metal chloride forms in the alloy and Kmore » 2CrO 4 forms at the scale/gas interface. Scale de-cohesion is attributed to the formation of a sub-scale transition metal chloride.« less

  2. Influence of Zeolite Coating on the Corrosion Resistance of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, P. Chakraborty; Woo, Ren Ping; Grayson, Sam Matthew; Majumder, Amrita; Raman, R. K. Singh

    2014-01-01

    The protective performance of zeolite coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.1 M sodium chloride solution (NaCl). Electrical equivalent circuit (EEC) was developed based upon hypothetical corrosion mechanisms and simulated to correspond to the experimental data. The morphology and the chemical nature of the coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Post corrosion morphologies of the zeolite coated and the uncoated AZ91D alloy were investigated using SEM. The corrosion resistance of the zeolite coated specimen was at least one order of magnitude higher than the uncoated specimen. PMID:28788178

  3. Characterization and corrosion study of NiTi laser surface alloyed with Nb or Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, K. W.; Man, H. C.; Yue, T. M.

    2011-02-01

    The interest in NiTi alloys for medical applications has been steadily growing in recent years because of its biocompatibility, superelasticity and shape memory characteristics. However, the high Ni content in NiTi alloys is still a concern for its long-term applications in the human body. The release of Ni ion into the human body might cause serious problems, as Ni is capable of eliciting toxic and allergic responses. In view of this, surface modification to reduce the surface content of Ni and to improve the corrosion resistance, both of which would reduce Ni release, is an important step in the development of NiTi implants. In the present study, NiTi was surface alloyed with Nb or Co by laser processing. The fine dendritic structure characteristic of laser processing has been described in terms of rapid solidification. The amount of surface elemental Ni was reduced to 10% and 35% for the Nb-alloyed and Co-alloyed layer, respectively. The corrosion resistance in Hanks' solution (a simulated body fluid) was increased as evidenced by a reduced passive current density and a higher pitting potential for both the Nb- and Co-alloyed specimens. The composition and hardness profiles along the depth of the modified layer were correlated with the distribution of the dendrites. The microhardness of the alloyed layers was around 700-800 Hv, which was about four times that of the untreated NiTi specimens.

  4. Hot Corrosion Degradation of Metals and Alloys - A Unified Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    microscope, electron beam microprobe and X-ray diffraction. REULTS AND DMCtESION Hot Corrosion Degradation Sectuence In attempting to develop a unified...Figure 40a. Such ghost images, which can be called corrosion front ghosts , appear as sequential dark and light zones in electron backscatter images... Electronic and Solid State Sciences AUG Ill 1979I Bolling AFB, D.C. 20332 ID PRATT &WHITNEY ARCRAFT GROUP P.O . Box 2861 /Government Products Division wi

  5. IN VIVO SEVERE CORROSION AND HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF RETRIEVED MODULAR BODY TITANIUM ALLOY HIP-IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Danieli C.; Urban, Robert M.; Jacobs, Joshua J.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  6. Effects of gaseous nitriding AISI4140 alloy steel on corrosion and hardness properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamil Moli, L.; Wahab, N.; Gopinathan, M.; Karmegam, K.; Maniyarasi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Corrosion is one of the major problems in the industry especially on machinery since it weakens the structure of the machinery part and causes the mechanical failure. This will stop the production and increase the maintenance cost. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of gas nitriding on a screw press machine shaft made from AISI 4140 steel was investigated. Pitting corrosion was identified as a major cause of the shaft failure and this study was conducted to improve the corrosion resistance on the AISI 4140 alloy steel shaft by gas nitriding as a surface hardening treatment. Gas nitriding was performed with composition of 15% ammonia and 85% nitrogen at temperatures of 525 °C, 550 °C and 575 °C and with the soaking time of 30, 45 and 60 minutes, respectively. The samples were prepared as rectangular sized of 30mm x 12mm x 3mm for immersion testing. The results showed that corrosion rate of untreated samples was 77% higher compared to the nitrided samples. It was also found that hardness of the nitrided samples was higher than untreated sample. All in all, it can be concluded that gaseous nitriding can significantly improve the surface hardness and the corrosion resistance of the shaft made of AISI 4140 alloy steel, hence reduces the pitting that is the root cause of failure.

  7. Hot corrosion behavior of platinum-modified nickel- and cobalt-based alloys and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deodeshmukh, Vinay Prakash

    High temperature degradation by hot corrosion (650-1000°C) and/or oxidation (>1000°C) can severely reduce the longevity of advanced gas turbine engine components. The protection of high-temperature components against hot corrosion or oxidation is typically conferred by the application of either a diffusion or overlay metallic coating that is able to form a continuous, adherent, and slow-growing oxide scale. There are currently no coatings that provide adequate protection to both hot corrosion and oxidation. Indeed, there is a particular need for such protective coatings because many advanced aero, marine, and industrial gas-turbines operate in both hot corrosion and oxidation regimes in their duty cycle. Recent work at Iowa State University (ISU) has showed that a wide range Pt+Hf-modified gamma'-Ni3Al + gamma-Ni alloy compositions form a very adherent and slow-growing Al 2O3 scale. In fact, the results reported suggest that Pt+Hf-modified gamma' + gamma coatings offer a viable superior alternative to beta-NiAl(Pt)-based coatings. The main thrust of this study was to assess and establish optimum target gamma' + gamma coating compositions for extending the service life of high-temperature gas turbine components exposed to hot corrosion and oxidation conditions. Both high temperature hot-corrosion (HTHC-900°C) and low temperature hot-corrosion (LTHC-705°C) behaviors of the Pt+Hf-modified gamma' + gamma alloys were assessed. The salt used to bring about hot corrosion was Na 2SO4. Quite interestingly, it was found that the HTHC resistance of gamma' + gamma alloys improved with up to about 10 at.% Pt addition, but then decreased significantly with increasing Pt content up to 30 at.% (the maximum level studied); however, under LTHC conditions the resistance of gamma' + gamma alloys improved with increasing Pt content up to 30 at.%. To further improve hot corrosion resistance of Pt+Hf-modified gamma' + gamma alloys, the effects of systematic additions of Cr, Si, and

  8. Electrodeposition and Characterization of Mn-Cu-Zn Alloys for Corrosion Protection Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurtsumia, Gigla; Gogoli, David; Koiava, Nana; Kakhniashvili, Izolda; Jokhadze, Nunu; Lezhava, Tinatin; Nioradze, Nikoloz; Tatishvili, Dimitri

    2017-12-01

    Mn-Cu-Zn alloys were electrodeposited from sulphate bath, containing citrate or EDTA and their mixtures as complexing ligands. The influence of bath composition and deposition parameters on alloys composition, cathodic current efficiency and structural and electrochemical properties were studied. At a higher current density (≥ 37.5 A dm-2) a uniform surface deposit of Mn-Cu-Zn was obtained. Optimal pH of electrolyte (0.3 mol/dm3Mn2+ + 0.6 mol/dm3 (NH4)2SO4 +0.1 mol/dm3Zn2++0.005 mol/dm3 Cu2++ 0.05mol/dm3Na3Cit + 0.15mol/dm3 EDTA; t=300C; τ=20 min) for silvery, nonporous coating of Mn-Cu-Zn alloy was within 6.5-7.5; coating composition: 71-83% Mn, 6-7.8% Cu, 11.5-20% Zn, current efficiency up to 40%. XRD patterns revealed BCT (body centred tetragonal) γ-Mn solid phase solution (lattice constants a=2.68 Å c=3.59 Å). Corrosion measurements of deposited alloys were performed in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. The corrosion current density (icorr) of the electrodeposited alloys on carbon steel was 10 times lower than corrosion rate of pure zinc and manganese coatings. Triple alloy coatings corrosion potential (Ecorr = -1140 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) preserved negative potential value longer (more than three months) compared to carbon steel substrate (Ecorr = -670 mV vs. Ag/AgCl). Tafel polarization curves taken on Mn-Cu-Zn alloy coating in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution did not show a typical passivation behaviour which can be explained by formation oflow solubility of adherent corrosion products on the alloy surface. Corrosion test of Mn-Cu-Zn electrocoating in chlorine environment shows that it is the best cathodic protective coating for a steel product.

  9. Biomimetic coating of magnesium alloy for enhanced corrosion resistance and calcium phosphate deposition.

    PubMed

    Cui, W; Beniash, E; Gawalt, E; Xu, Z; Sfeir, C

    2013-11-01

    Degradable metals have been suggested as biomaterials with revolutionary potential for bone-related therapies. Of these candidate metals, magnesium alloys appear to be particularly attractive candidates because of their non-toxicity and outstanding mechanical properties. Despite their having been widely studied as orthopedic implants for bone replacement/regeneration, their undesirably rapid corrosion rate under physiological conditions has limited their actual clinical application. This study reports the use of a novel biomimetic peptide coating for Mg alloys to improve the alloy corrosion resistance. A 3DSS biomimetic peptide is designed based on the highly acidic, bioactive bone and dentin extracellular matrix protein, phosphophoryn. Surface characterization techniques (scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and diffuse-reflectance infrared spectroscopy) confirmed the feasibility of coating the biomimetic 3DSS peptide onto Mg alloy AZ31B. The 3DSS peptide was also used as a template for calcium phosphate deposition on the surface of the alloy. The 3DSS biomimetic peptide coating presented a protective role of AZ31B in both hydrogen evolution and electrochemical corrosion tests. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Corrosion and Potentiostatic Polarization of an Al-Cu-Li Alloy under Tensile Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-feng; Zheng, Zi-qiao

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of an Al-3.8Cu-1.5Li-0.5Zn-0.5Mg-0.3Mn alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution was studied through using slow strain rate tension(SSRT). The potentiodynamic polarization and anodic potentiostastic polarization of the stressed and stress free alloy with T6 temper were investigated. The tensile stress decreased the break down potential. The alloy was sensitive to intergranular SCC (IGSCC), due to the continuous distribution of anodic phase of T2(Al6CuLi3) along the grain boundary. During the potentiostastic polarization, the current-time curve of the stressed alloy displayed a repeated transient feature that the current increased suddenly followed by a slower recovery, and corrosion crack appeared along the grain boundary. While the stress free alloy did not show this current feature and corrosion crack along the grain boundary. The repeated current transient was associated with the crack tip propagation and crack wall passivation. This feature may be used to analyze the SCC process.

  11. Microstructure and corrosion study of porous Mg-Zn-Ca alloy in simulated body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annur, Dhyah; Erryani, Aprilia; Lestari, Franciska P.; Nyoman Putrayasa, I.; Gede, P. A.; Kartika, Ika

    2017-03-01

    Magnesium alloys had been considered as promising biomedical devices due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this present work, microstructure and corrosion properties of Mg-Zn-Ca-CaCO3 porous magnesium alloy were examined. Porous metals were fabricated through powder metallurgy process with CaCO3 addition as a foaming agent. CaCO3 content was varied (1, 5, and 10%wt) followed by sintering process in 650 °C in Argon atmosphere for 10 and 15 h. The microstructure of the resulted alloys was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometry data (EDS). Further, to examine corrosion properties, electrochemical test were conducted using G750 Gamry Instrument in accordance with ASTM standard G5-94 in simulated body fluid (Hank’s solution). As it was predicted, increasing content of foaming agent was in line with the increasing of pore formation. The electrochemical testing indicated corrosion rate would increase along with the increasing of foaming agent. The porous Mg-Zn-Ca alloy which has more porosity and connecting area will corrode much faster because it can transport the solution containing chloride ion which accelerated the chemical reaction. Highest corrosion resistance was given by Mg-Zn-Ca-1CaCO3-10 h sintering with potential corrosion of  -1.59 VSCE and corrosion rate of 1.01 mmpy. From the microstructure after electrochemical testing, it was revealed that volcano shaped structure and crack would occur after exposure to Hank’s solution

  12. Bioactive glass-ceramic coating for enhancing the in vitro corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xinyu; Cai, Shu; Dou, Ying; Xu, Guohua; Huang, Kai; Ren, Mengguo; Wang, Xuexin

    2012-10-01

    In this work, a bioactive 45S5 glass-ceramic coating was synthesized on magnesium (Mg) alloy substrate by using a sol-gel dip-coating method, to improve the initial corrosion resistance of AZ31 Mg alloy. The surface morphology and phase composition of the glass-ceramic coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The coating composed of amorphous phase and crystalline phase Na2Ca2Si3O9, with the thickness of ∼1.0 μm, exhibited a uniform and crack-free surface morphology. The corrosion behavior of the uncoated and coated Mg alloy substrates was investigated by the electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization tests recorded an increase of potential (Ecorr) form -1.60 V to -1.48 V, and a reduction of corrosion current density (icorr) from 4.48 μA cm-2 to 0.16 μA cm-2, due to the protection provided by the glass-ceramic coating. Immersion tests also showed the markedly improved corrosion resistance of the coated sample over the immersion period of 7 days. Moreover, after 14 days of immersion in SBF, the corrosion resistance of the coated sample declined due to the cracking of the glass-ceramic coating, which was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. The results suggested that the 45S5 glass-ceramic coated Mg alloy could provide a suitable corrosion behavior for use as degradable implants.

  13. The corrosion of Alloy 690 in high-temperature aqueous media - thermodynamic considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemire, R. J.; McRae, G. A.

    2001-04-01

    Alloy 690 (N06690) is a technologically important material that contains a minimum of 58 wt% nickel, 27.0-31.0 wt% chromium and 7.0-11.0 wt% iron. A thermodynamic analysis of the expected behaviour of Alloy 690 in high-temperature (573 K) aqueous media has been carried out. The stabilization or destabilization of chromium, iron and nickel in the alloy has been taken into account using a variation of regular solution theory. Formation of polymetallic corrosion products, such as spinels, has also been considered. Reaction path calculations were performed for Alloy 690 at 573 K. The results are similar to those found from comparable calculations for the more widely used Alloy 600. Comparisons are made with available experimental observations.

  14. High-temperature corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys exhibiting improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Liu, C.T.

    1996-08-13

    This invention relates to improved corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide intermetallic alloys. The alloys of this invention comprise, in atomic percent, from about 30% to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.1% to about 0.5% carbon, no more than about 0.04% boron such that the atomic weight ratio of boron to carbon in the alloy is in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.08:1, from about 0.01 to about 3.5% of one or more transition metals selected from Group IVB, VB, and VIB elements and the balance iron wherein the alloy exhibits improved resistance to hot cracking during welding. 13 figs.

  15. High-temperature corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys exhibiting improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Goodwin, Gene M.; Liu, Chain T.

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates to improved corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide intermetallic alloys. The alloys of this invention comprise, in atomic percent, from about 30% to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.1% to about 0.5% carbon, no more than about 0.04% boron such that the atomic weight ratio of boron to carbon in the alloy is in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.08:1, from about 0.01 to about 3.5% of one or more transition metals selected from Group IVB, VB, and VIB elements and the balance iron wherein the alloy exhibits improved resistance to hot cracking during welding.

  16. The role of hydrogen in hot-salt stress corrosion cracking of titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondrejcin, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    Additional support is presented for the previously proposed role of hydrogen as an embrittling agent in hot-salt stress corrosion cracking of titanium-aluminum alloys. The main source of hydrogen formed during the reactions of titanium alloys with hot salt was identified as water associated with the salt. Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of an intermediate (hydrogen halide) with the alloy rather than from metal-water reactions. The fracture mode of precracked tensile specimens was ductile when the specimens were tested in air, and brittle when tests were made in high-pressure hydrogen. Stressed titanium-aluminum alloys also were cracked by bombardment with hydrogen ions produced in a proton accelerator. The approximate concentrations of the hydrogen ions in the alloys were calculated.

  17. Corrosion Behavior of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy in Three Different Physiological Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Juncen; Li, Qing; Zhang, Haixiao; Chen, Funan

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been considered as promising biomedical materials and were studied in different physiological environments. In this work, corrosion behavior of AZ91D magnesium alloy in artificial saliva, simulated body fluid (SBF), and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated using electrochemical techniques and a short-term immersion test. In contrast with other physiological environments, the amount of aggressive ions in artificial saliva is small. In addition, a protective film is formed on the surface of samples in artificial saliva. Experimental results suggest that corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy in artificial saliva is better than that in c-SBF and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution.

  18. Mechanical properties and oxidation and corrosion resistance of reduced-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify effective substitutes for part of the Cr in 304 stainless steel as a method of conserving the strategic element Cr. Although special emphasis was placed on tensile properties, oxidation and corrosion resistance were also examined. Results indicate that over the temperature range of -196 C to 540 C the yield stress of experimental austenitic alloys with only 12 percent Cr compare favorably with the 18 percent Cr in 304 stainless steel. Oxidation resistance and in most cases corrosion resistance for the experimental alloys were comparable to the commercial alloy. Effective substitutes for Cr included Al, Mo, Si, Ti, and V, while Ni and Mn contents were increased to maintain an austenitic structure.

  19. Effects of environmental variables on the crack initiation stages of corrosion fatigue of high strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteat, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Fatigue initiation in six aluminum alloys used in the aircraft industry was investigated. Cyclic loading superimposed on a constant stress was alternated with atmospheric corrosion. Tests made at different stress levels revealed that a residual stress as low as 39% of the yield strength caused stress corrosion cracking in some of the alloys. An atmospheric corrosion rate meter developed to measure the corrosivity of the atmosphere is described. An easily duplicated hole in the square test specimen with a self-induced residual stress was developed.

  20. Machining-induced surface transformations of magnesium alloys to enhance corrosion resistance in human-like environment

    SciT

    Bruschi, Stefania; Bertolini, Rachele; Ghiotti, Andrea

    We report that magnesium alloys are becoming increasingly attractive for producing temporary prosthetic devices thanks to their bioresorbable characteristics in human body. However, their poor corrosion resistance to body fluids seriously limits their applicability. In this work, machining-induced surface transformations are explored as means to enhance corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy. Surface characteristics including topography, residual stresses, wettability, microstructures and depth of transformed layer, were analysed and correlated to in-vitro corrosion resistance. Results showed that cryogenic machining at low feed provided the most promising corrosion reduction. Finally, thorough physical characterizations gave fundamental insights into possible drivers for this enhancedmore » resistance.« less

  1. Machining-induced surface transformations of magnesium alloys to enhance corrosion resistance in human-like environment

    DOE PAGES

    Bruschi, Stefania; Bertolini, Rachele; Ghiotti, Andrea; ...

    2018-04-22

    We report that magnesium alloys are becoming increasingly attractive for producing temporary prosthetic devices thanks to their bioresorbable characteristics in human body. However, their poor corrosion resistance to body fluids seriously limits their applicability. In this work, machining-induced surface transformations are explored as means to enhance corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy. Surface characteristics including topography, residual stresses, wettability, microstructures and depth of transformed layer, were analysed and correlated to in-vitro corrosion resistance. Results showed that cryogenic machining at low feed provided the most promising corrosion reduction. Finally, thorough physical characterizations gave fundamental insights into possible drivers for this enhancedmore » resistance.« less

  2. Relationship between microstructure, cytotoxicity and corrosion properties of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Colić, Miodrag; Rudolf, Rebeka; Stamenković, Dragoslav; Anzel, Ivan; Vucević, Dragana; Jenko, Monika; Lazić, Vojkan; Lojen, Gorazd

    2010-01-01

    Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been investigated as materials for medical devices, but their biomedical application is still limited. The aim of this work was to compare the microstructure, corrosion and cytotoxicity in vitro of a Cu-Al-Ni SMA. Rapidly solidified (RS) thin ribbons, manufactured via melt spinning, were used for the tests. The control alloy was a permanent mould casting of the same composition, but without shape memory effect. The results show that RS ribbons are significantly more resistant to corrosion compared with the control alloy, as judged by the lesser release of Cu and Ni into the conditioning medium. These results correlate with the finding that RS ribbons were not cytotoxic to L929 mouse fibroblasts and rat thymocytes. In addition, the RS ribbon conditioning medium inhibited cellular proliferation and IL-2 production by activated rat splenocytes to a much lesser extent. The inhibitory effects were almost completely abolished by conditioning the RS ribbons in culture medium for 4 weeks. Microstructural analysis showed that RS ribbons are martensitic, with boron particles as a minor phase. In contrast, the control Cu-Al-Ni alloy had a complex multiphase microstructure. Examination of the alloy surfaces after conditioning by energy dispersive X-ray and Auger electron spectroscopy showed the formation of Cu and Al oxide layers and confirmed that the metals in RS ribbons are less susceptible to oxidation and corrosion compared with the control alloy. In conclusion, these results suggest that rapid solidification significantly improves the corrosion stability and biocompatibility in vitro of Cu-Al-Ni SMA ribbons.

  3. Corrosion of Nickel-Based Alloys in Ultra-High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2017-03-01

    MgCl2-KCl binary system has been proposed to be used as high temperature reactor coolant. Due to its relatively low melting point, good heat capacity and excellent thermal stability, this system can also be used in high operation temperature concentrating solar power generation system as heat transfer fluid (HTF). The corrosion behaviors of nickel based alloys in MgCl2-KCl molten salt system at 1,000 °C were determined based on long-term isothermal dipping test. After 500 h exposure tests under strictly maintained high purity argon gas atmosphere, the weight loss and corrosion rate analysis were conducted. Among all the tested samples, Ni-201 demonstrated the lowest corrosion rate due to the excellent resistance of Ni to high temperature element dissolution. Detailed surface topography and corrosion mechanisms were also determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS).

  4. Corrosion product layers on magnesium alloys AZ31 and AZ61: Surface chemistry and protective ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feliu, S.; Llorente, I.

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the chemical composition of the corrosion product layers formed on magnesium alloys AZ31 and AZ61 following immersion in 0.6 M NaCl, with a view to better understanding their protective action. Relative differences in the chemical nature of the layers were quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDX) and low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD). Corrosion behavior was investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and hydrogen evolution measurement. An inhibitive effect from the corrosion product layers was observed from EIS, principally in the case of AZ31, as confirmed by hydrogen evolution tests. A link was found between carbonate enrichment observed by XPS in the surface of the corrosion product layer, concomitant with the increase in the protective properties observed by EIS.

  5. Burner Rig Hot Corrosion of a Single Crystal Ni-48Al-Ti-Hf-Ga Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Darolia, Ram; Cuy, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of a single crystal Ni-48Al-1Ti-0.5Hf-0.2Ga alloy was examined in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at 900 C for 300 hours. The combustion chamber was doped with 2 ppmw synthetic sea salt. The hot corrosion attack produced a random mound morphology on the surface. Microstructurally, the hot corrosion attack appeared to initiate with oxide-filled pits which were often broad and shallow. At an intermediate stage, the pits increased in size to incorporate unoxidized Ni islands in the corrosion product. The rampant attack stage, which was observed only at sharp sample corners, was characterized by rapid inward growth of alumina in finger-like protrusions incorporating significant amounts of Al-depleted Ni islands. Aluminum consumption in the oxide fingers resulted in the growth of a gamma' layer ahead of the advancing oxide fingers.

  6. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Xingmao; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Liu, Nanguo; ...

    2011-01-01

    Ceriumore » m (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0 × 10 − 14  m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5 × 10 − 13  m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.« less

  7. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  8. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Min; Liu, Li; Fan, Lei; Yu, Zhongfen; Li, Ying; Oguzie, Emeka E.; Wang, Fuhui

    2018-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C) has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−), and the formation of protective AlO(OH), which further affects the corrosion speed. PMID:29401690

  9. A novel high-strength and highly corrosive biodegradable Fe-Pd alloy: Structural, mechanical and in vitro corrosion and cytotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Msallamová, Šárka; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2017-10-01

    Recently, iron-based materials have been considered as candidates for the fabrication of biodegradable load-bearing implants. Alloying with palladium has been found to be a suitable approach to enhance the insufficient corrosion rate of iron-based alloys. In this work, we have extensively compared the microstructure, the mechanical and corrosion properties, and the cytotoxicity of an FePd2 (wt%) alloy prepared by three different routes - casting, mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering (SPS), and mechanical alloying and the space holder technique (SHT). The properties of the FePd2 (wt%) were compared with pure Fe prepared in the same processes. The preparation route significantly influenced the material properties. Materials prepared by SPS possessed the highest values of mechanical properties (CYS~750-850MPa) and higher corrosion rates than the casted materials. Materials prepared by SHT contained approximately 60% porosity; therefore, their mechanical properties reached the lowest values, and they had the highest corrosion rates, approximately 0.7-1.2mm/a. Highly porous FePd2 was tested in vitro according to the ISO 10993-5 standard using L929 cells, and two-fold diluted extracts showed acceptable cytocompatibility. In general, alloying with Pd enhanced both mechanical properties and corrosion rates and did not decrease the cytocompatibility of the studied materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation on wear resistance and corrosion resistance of electron beam cladding co-alloy coating on Inconel617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailang; Zhang, Guopei; Huang, Yiping; Qi, Zhengwei; Wang, Bo; Yu, Zhibiao; Wang, Dezhi

    2018-04-01

    To improve surface properties of Inconel 617 alloy (referred to as 617 alloy), co-alloy coating metallurgically bonded to substrate was prepared on the surface of 617 alloy by electron beam cladding. The microstructure, phase composition, microhardness, tribological properties and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated. The XRD results of the coatings reinforced by co-alloy (Co800) revealed the presence of γ-Co, CoCx and Cr23C6 phase as matrix and new metastable phases of Cr2Ni3 and Co3Mo2Si. These hypoeutectic structures contain primary dendrites and interdendritic eutectics. The metallurgical bonding forms well between the cladding layer and the matrix of 617 alloy. In most studied conditions, the co-alloy coating displays a better hardness, tribological performance, i.e., lower coefficient of frictions and wear rates, corrosion resistance in 1 mol L‑1 HCl solution, than the 617 alloy.

  11. Electrochemical corrosion and surface analyses of a ni-cr alloy in bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Evşen; Aydın, A Kevser; Bilgiç, Semra

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the corrosion behavior of a Ni-Cr dental casting alloy subjected to 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP) and 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching solutions and to determine the composition of the surface oxide layer formed on the alloy specimens. Ten cylindrical specimens (4 mm in diameter × 25 mm in height) were cast from a Ni-Cr alloy (Wiron 99) and divided into two groups (n = 5). A potentiodynamic polarization test was used to compare the corrosion rates of specimens in HP and CP (pH = 6.5). Before cyclic polarization tests, all alloy specimens were allowed to reach a steady open circuit potential (Ecorr ) for a period of 1 hour. Then tests were initiated at 100 mV versus standard calomel electrode (SCE) below Ecorr and scanned at a rate of 1 mV/s in the anodic direction until reaching 1000 mV over the Ecorr value. The scan then was reversed back to the Ecorr of the specimens. The open circuit potentials (Ecorr ) and the current densities (Icorr ) were determined using the anodic Tafel regions extrapolating from the curves. Differences in Ecorr and Icorr were determined using one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). In addition, corrosion rates were calculated from these curves. Before and after polarization tests, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination accompanied by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to analyze the surface morphology. The surface characterization of the passive film formed on alloy specimens was also performed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this study, bleaching agents had an effect on the anodic process for two groups. Although no statistical difference was identified between the groups for both corrosion parameters, results indicated that the effect of CP on the corrosion behavior was less than that of HP. These results agreed with the SEM observations. XPS data showed that oxide layers formed on all groups contained mainly Cr2 O3 , NiO, and MoO3 , and the amounts of oxides

  12. Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying

    DOEpatents

    Merz, Martin D.; Knoll, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

  13. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  14. Corrosion resistant properties of polyaniline acrylic coating on magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Azim, S. Syed; Venkatachari, G.

    2006-12-01

    The performance of the paint coating based on acrylic-polyaniline on magnesium alloy ZM 21 has been studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.5% NaCl solution. The polyaniline was prepared by chemical oxidative method of aniline with ammonium persulphate in phosphoric acid medium. The phosphate-doped polyaniline was characterized by FTIR and XRD methods. Acrylic paint containing the phosphate-doped polyaniline was prepared and coated on magnesium ZM 21 alloy. The coating was able to protect the magnesium alloy and no base metal dissolution was noted even after 75 days exposure to sodium chloride solution.

  15. Effects of strain variations on aging response and corrosion properties of third generation Al-Li alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Ellen E.

    Due to their high specific strength (strength/density) and specific stiffness (elastic modulus/density), Al-Li alloys are attractive alloys for structural aircraft applications. To produce contoured aircraft components from Al-Li wrought products, stretch forming prior to aging is a common manufacturing technique. The effects of different amounts of tensile straining (0-9%) on the mechanical, microstructural, and corrosion properties of two third generation Al-Li alloys (2099 and 2196) were investigated. In addition to typical characterization techniques, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), 2D micro-digital image correlation (DIC), and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) were used to examine site-specific effects of orientation, micro-strain evolution during straining, and surface potential on corrosion, respectively. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) was also performed to study galvanic corrosion in artificial seawater (3.5% NaCl) as it occurred in-situ. There was evidence of intergranular corrosion for 0% strain conditions, but the dominant form of corrosion was localized pitting for all specimens except Alloy 2196 strained 0%. Pitting initiated at grain boundaries and triple points. In many cases, pitting extended into particular grains and was elongated in the extrusion direction. Regions of high micro-strain preferentially corroded, and large, recrystallized grains in mostly unrecrystallized microstructures were detrimental to corrosion properties. Recommendations for improved thermomechanical processing and/or alloying to promote corrosion resistance of 2XXX series Al-Li alloys were investigated.

  16. Corrosion behavior of experimental and commercial nickel-base alloys in HCl and HCl containing Fe3+

    SciT

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.

    The effects of ferric ions on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of a series of Ni-based alloys in 20% HCl at 30ºC were investigated. The alloys studied were those prepared by the Albany Research Center (ARC), alloys J5, J12, J13, and those sold commercially, alloys 22, 242, 276, and 2000. Tests included mass loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and linear polarization.

  17. THE CREEP BEHAVIOUR OF THE MAGNESIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOY ZA AT 400 AND 450 C IN CARBON DIOXIDE CONTAINING /approximately equals/200 PPM MOISTURE

    SciT

    Kent, R.P.; Wells, T.C.

    1963-03-01

    The creep behavior of the magnesium-zirconium alloy ZA was studied in tests of up to 5600 hr duration at 400 deg C and up to 12 600 hr duration at 450 deg C, in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide containing approximately 200 ppm water. The accompanying microstructural changes were observed by optical and electron microscopy. The alloy is stronger at 450 deg C than at 400 deg C and additional strengthening obtains from prestraining at 250 deg C prior to creep-testing. In stress rupture tests at 200 deg C subsequent to creep-testing, the time to rupture and the rupture ductilitymore » are lower in specimens previously tested at 450 deg C than in those tested at 400 deg C. The increase in creep strength at 450 deg C, and subsequent loss of ductility, are attributed principally to the precipitation of a zirconium-rich phase, tentatively identified as epsilon - zirconium hydride, which forms both intragranularly (as ribbons and thin hexagonal plates) and as intergranular particles. (auth)« less

  18. Biodegradable Orthopedic Magnesium-Calcium (MgCa) Alloys, Processing, and Corrosion Performance.

    PubMed

    Salahshoor, Meisam; Guo, Yuebin

    2012-01-09

    Magnesium-Calcium (Mg-Ca) alloy has received considerable attention as an emerging biodegradable implant material in orthopedic fixation applications. The biodegradable Mg-Ca alloys avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. They also provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers. However, the key issue facing a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant is the fast corrosion in the human body environment. The ability to adjust degradation rate of Mg-Ca alloys is critical for the successful development of biodegradable orthopedic implants. This paper focuses on the functions and requirements of bone implants and critical issues of current implant biomaterials. Microstructures and mechanical properties of Mg-Ca alloys, and the unique properties of novel magnesium-calcium implant materials have been reviewed. Various manufacturing techniques to process Mg-Ca based alloys have been analyzed regarding their impacts on implant performance. Corrosion performance of Mg-Ca alloys processed by different manufacturing techniques was compared. In addition, the societal and economical impacts of developing biodegradable orthopedic implants have been emphasized.

  19. Facile formation of biomimetic color-tuned superhydrophobic magnesium alloy with corrosion resistance.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2011-03-15

    The design of color-tuned magnesium alloy with anticorrosive properties and damping capacity was created by means of a simple and inexpensive method. The vertically self-aligned nano- and microsheets were formed on magnesium alloy AZ31 by a chemical-free immersion process in ultrapure water at a temperature of 120 °C, resulting in the color expression. The color changed from silver with metallic luster to some specific colors such as orange, green, and orchid, depending on the immersion time. The color-tuned magnesium alloy showed anticorrosive performance and damping capacity. In addition, the colored surface with minute surface textures was modified with n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS), leading to the formation of color-tuned superhydrophobic surfaces. The corrosion resistance of the color-tuned superhydrophobic magnesium alloy was also investigated using electrochemical potentiodynamic measurements. Moreover, the color-tuned superhydrophobic magnesium alloy showed high hydrophobicity not just for pure water but also for corrosive liquids, such as acidic, basic, and some aqueous salt solutions. In addition, the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D 3359-02 cross cut tape test was performed to investigate the adhesion of the color-tuned superhydrophobic film to the magnesium alloy surface.

  20. Biodegradable Orthopedic Magnesium-Calcium (MgCa) Alloys, Processing, and Corrosion Performance

    PubMed Central

    Salahshoor, Meisam; Guo, Yuebin

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium-Calcium (Mg-Ca) alloy has received considerable attention as an emerging biodegradable implant material in orthopedic fixation applications. The biodegradable Mg-Ca alloys avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. They also provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers. However, the key issue facing a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant is the fast corrosion in the human body environment. The ability to adjust degradation rate of Mg-Ca alloys is critical for the successful development of biodegradable orthopedic implants. This paper focuses on the functions and requirements of bone implants and critical issues of current implant biomaterials. Microstructures and mechanical properties of Mg-Ca alloys, and the unique properties of novel magnesium-calcium implant materials have been reviewed. Various manufacturing techniques to process Mg-Ca based alloys have been analyzed regarding their impacts on implant performance. Corrosion performance of Mg-Ca alloys processed by different manufacturing techniques was compared. In addition, the societal and economical impacts of developing biodegradable orthopedic implants have been emphasized. PMID:28817036

  1. In vivo corrosion of four magnesium alloys and the associated bone response.

    PubMed

    Witte, F; Kaese, V; Haferkamp, H; Switzer, E; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Wirth, C J; Windhagen, H

    2005-06-01

    Degrading metal alloys are a new class of implant materials suitable for bone surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the degradation mechanism at the bone-implant interface of different degrading magnesium alloys in bone and to determine their effect on the surrounding bone. Sample rods of four different magnesium alloys and a degradable polymer as a control were implanted intramedullary into the femora of guinea pigs. After 6 and 18 weeks, uncalcified sections were generated for histomorphologic analysis. The bone-implant interface was characterized in uncalcified sections by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), element mapping and X-ray diffraction. Results showed that metallic implants made of magnesium alloys degrade in vivo depending on the composition of the alloying elements. While the corrosion layer of all magnesium alloys accumulated with biological calcium phosphates, the corrosion layer was in direct contact with the surrounding bone. The results further showed high mineral apposition rates and an increased bone mass around the magnesium rods, while no bone was induced in the surrounding soft tissue. From the results of this study, there is a strong rationale that in this research model, high magnesium ion concentration could lead to bone cell activation.

  2. CeLa enhanced corrosion resistance of Al-Cu-Mn-Mg-Fe alloy for lithium battery shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiandi; Ding, Dongyan; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Zhou; Gao, Yongjin; Chen, Guozhen; Chen, Weigao; You, Xiaohua; Chen, Renzong; Huang, Yuanwei; Tang, Jinsong

    2017-11-01

    Effects of CeLa addition on the localized corrosion and electrochemical corrosion behavior of Al-Cu-Mn-Mg-Fe lithium battery shell alloy were investigated by immersion testing and electrochemical testing in 0.6 M NaCl solution at different temperatures. Experimental results indicated that CeLa addition resulted in the formation of AlCuCe/La (Al8Cu4Ce and Al6Cu6La) local cathodes and corrosion activity of the main intermetallic particles decreased in the order of Al2CuMg, AlCuCe/La, Al6(Mn, Fe). Corrosion potential shifted positively due to CeLa alloying. Corrosion current density of the CeLa-containing alloy was lower than that of the CeLa-free alloy at room temperature. At room temperature, there was no obvious surface passivation for both alloys. At 80 °C CeLa addition resulted in a wide passive region at the anode polarization region. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis also indicated that corrosion resistance of the CeLa-containing alloy was much higher than that of the CeLa-free alloy.

  3. Microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and antibacterial properties of Ti-Ag sintered alloys.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mian; Zhang, Erlin; Zhang, Lan

    2016-05-01

    In this research, Ag element was selected as an antibacterial agent to develop an antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy by a powder metallurgy. The microstructure, phase constitution, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial properties of the Ti-Ag sintered alloys have been systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), compressive test, electrochemical measurements and antibacterial test. The effects of the Ag powder size and the Ag content on the antibacterial property and mechanical property as well as the anticorrosion property have been investigated. The microstructure results have shown that Ti-Ag phase, residual pure Ag and Ti were the mainly phases in Ti-Ag(S75) sintered alloy while Ti2Ag was synthesized in Ti-Ag(S10) sintered alloy. The mechanical test indicated that Ti-Ag sintered alloy showed a much higher hardness and the compressive yield strength than cp-Ti but the mechanical properties were slightly reduced with the increase of Ag content. Electrochemical results showed that Ag powder size had a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of Ti-Ag sintered alloy. Ag content increased the corrosion resistance in a dose dependent way under a homogeneous microstructure. Antibacterial tests have demonstrated that antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy was successfully prepared. It was also shown that the Ag powder particle size and the Ag content influenced the antibacterial activity seriously. The reduction in the Ag powder size was benefit to the improvement in the antibacterial property and the Ag content has to be at least 3wt.% in order to obtain a strong and stable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The bacterial mechanism was thought to be related to the Ti2Ag and its distribution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Corrosion behavior of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloyed with Cu.

    PubMed

    Koike, Marie; Cai, Zhuo; Oda, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okabe, Toru

    2005-05-01

    It has recently been found that alloying with copper improved the inherently poor grindability and wear resistance of titanium. This study characterized the corrosion behavior of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloyed with copper. Alloys (0.9 or 3.5 mass % Cu) were cast with the use of a magnesia-based investment in a centrifugal casting machine. Three specimen surfaces were tested: ground, sandblasted, and as cast. Commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V served as controls. Open-circuit potential measurement, linear polarization, and potentiodynamic cathodic polarization were performed in aerated (air + 10% CO(2)) modified Tani-Zucchi synthetic saliva at 37 degrees C. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization was conducted in the same medium deaerated by N(2) + 10% CO(2). Polarization resistance (R(p)), Tafel slopes, and corrosion current density (I(corr)) were determined. A passive region occurred for the alloy specimens with ground and sandblasted surfaces, as for CP Ti. However, no passivation was observed on the as-cast alloys or on CP Ti. There were significant differences among all metals tested for R(p) and I(corr) and significantly higher R(p) and lower I(corr) values for CP Ti compared to Ti-6Al-4V or the alloys with Cu. Alloying up to 3.5 mass % Cu to Ti-6Al-4V did not change the corrosion behavior. Specimens with ground or sandblasted surfaces were superior to specimens with as-cast surfaces. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Electrochemical studies on zirconium and its biocompatible alloys Ti-50Zr at.% and Zr-2.5Nb wt.% in simulated physiologic media.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Nilson T C; Biaggio, Sonia R; Rocha-Filho, Romeu C; Bocchi, Nerilso

    2005-09-01

    Different electrochemical studies were carried out for Zr and its biocompatible alloys Ti-50Zr at.% and Zr-2.5Nb wt.% in solutions simulating physiologic media, Ringer and PBS (phosphate buffered saline) solutions. The results from rest-potential measurements showed that the three materials are spontaneously passivated in both solutions and that the Ti-50Zr alloy has the greatest tendency for spontaneous oxide formation. Some corrosion parameters (such as the pitting and repassivation potentials) were obtained via cyclic voltammetry in both solutions, revealing that the Ti-50Zr has the best corrosion protection while Zr has the worst. On the other hand, the pre-anodization (up to 8 V vs. SCE) of the alloys in a 0.15 mol/L Na2SO4 solution led to a significant improvement in their protection against pitting corrosion when exposed to the Ringer solution. Elemental analyses by EDX showed that during pitting corrosion, there is no preferential corrosion of any of the alloying elements (Zr, Ti, Nb). Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [A surface reacted layer study of titanium-zirconium alloy after dental casting].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Guo, T; Li, Z; Li, C

    2000-10-01

    To investigate the influence of the mold temperature on the surface reacted layer of Ti-Zr alloy castings. Ti-Zr alloy was casted into a mold which was made of a zircon (ZrO2.SiO2) for inner coating and a phosphate-bonded material for outer investing with a casting machine (China) designed as vacuum, pressure and centrifuge. At three mold temperatures (room temperature, 300 degrees C, 600 degrees C) the Ti-Zr alloy was casted separately. The surface roughness of the castings was calculated by instrument of smooth finish (China). From the surface to the inner part the Knoop hardness and thickness in reacted layer of Ti-Zr alloy casting was measured. The structure of the surface reacted layer was analysed by SEM. Elemental analyses of the interfacial zone of the casting was made by element line scanning observation. The surface roughness of the castings was increased significantly with the mold temperature increasing. At a higher mold temperature the Knoop hardness of the reactive layer was increased. At the three mold temperature the outmost surface was very hard, and microhardness data decreased rapidly where they reached constant values. The thickness was about 85 microns for castings at room temperature and 300 degrees C, 105 microns for castings at 600 degrees C. From the SEM micrograph of the Ti-Zr alloy casting, the surface reacted layer could be divided into three different layers. The first layer was called non-structure layer, which thickness was about 10 microns for room temperature group, 20 microns for 300 degrees C and 25 microns for 600 degrees C. The second layer was characterized by coarse-grained acicular crystal, which thickness was about 50 microns for three mold temperatures. The third layer was Ti-Zr alloy. The element line scanning showed non-structure layer with higher level of element of O, Al, Si and Zr, The higher the mold temperature during casting, the deeper the Si permeating and in the second layer the element Si could also be found

  7. Initiation criteria for crevice corrosion of titanium alloys used for HLW disposal overpack

    SciT

    Akashi, Masatsune; Nakayama, Guen; Fukuda, Takanori

    1998-12-31

    The overpack that geologically stores the canisters containing vitrified high-level radioactive waste (HLW) for super-long term disposal is demanded of being able to hold the canisters securely for at least 1,000 years. For such a service, the greatest as well as essentially the sole factor that can mar the overpack`s working is corrosion by the groundwater. This paper discusses the notion and the methodology to prove for overpacks made of titanium (Ti) alloys that they are capable of stably maintaining the state of passivity indefinitely long time so as to be immune to the initiation of localized corrosion. it ismore » shown that (1) the critical potential for corrosion-crevice initiation, V{sub C,CREV}, can be substituted rationally by the corrosion-crevice repassivation potential, E{sub R,CREV}, which can be determined by the cyclic polarization test, and (2) the limits of safety usage of Ti alloys can be determined quantitatively by comparing E{sub R,CREV} and E{sub SP}, the steady-state corrosion potential.« less

  8. Corrosion Studies in Support of Medium Power Lead Alloy Cooled Reactor

    SciT

    Eric Loewen; Ronald Ballinger; Jeongyoun Lim

    2004-09-01

    The performance of structural materials in lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) systems is evaluated. The materials evaluated included refractory metals (W, Mo, and Ta), several U.S. steels [austenitic steel (316L), carbon steels (F-22, Fe-Si), ferritic/martensitic steels (HT-9 and 410)], and several experimental Fe-Si-Cr alloys that were expected to demonstrate corrosion resistance. The materials were exposed in either an LBE rotating electrode or a dynamic corrosion cell for periods from 100 to 1000 h at temperatures of 400, 500, 600, and 700°C, depending on material and exposure location. Weight change and optical scanning electron microscopy or X-ray analysis of the specimenmore » were used to characterize oxide film thickness, corrosion depth, microstructure, and composition changes. The results of corrosion tests validate the excellent resistance of refractory metals (W, Ta, and Mo) to LBE corrosion. The tests conducted with stainless steels (410, 316L, and HT-9) produced mass transfer of elements (e.g., Ni and Cr) into the LBE, resulting in degradation of the material. With Fe-Si alloys a Si-rich layer (as SiO2) is formed on the surface during exposure to LBE from the selective dissolution of Fe.« less

  9. Corrosion Studies in Support of Medium-Power Lead-Alloy-Cooled Reactor

    SciT

    Loewen, Eric P.; Ballinger, Ronald G.; Lim, Jeongyoun

    2004-09-15

    The performance of structural materials in lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) systems is evaluated. The materials evaluated included refractory metals (W, Mo, and Ta), several U.S. steels [austenitic steel (316L), carbon steels (F-22, Fe-Si), ferritic/martensitic steels (HT-9 and 410)], and several experimental Fe-Si-Cr alloys that were expected to demonstrate corrosion resistance. The materials were exposed in either an LBE rotating electrode or a dynamic corrosion cell for periods from 100 to 1000 h at temperatures of 400, 500, 600, and 700 deg. C, depending on material and exposure location. Weight change and optical scanning electron microscopy or X-ray analysis ofmore » the specimen were used to characterize oxide film thickness, corrosion depth, microstructure, and composition changes. The results of corrosion tests validate the excellent resistance of refractory metals (W, Ta, and Mo) to LBE corrosion. The tests conducted with stainless steels (410, 316L, and HT-9) produced mass transfer of elements (e.g., Ni and Cr) into the LBE, resulting in degradation of the material. With Fe-Si alloys a Si-rich layer (as SiO{sub 2}) is formed on the surface during exposure to LBE from the selective dissolution of Fe.« less

  10. ZM-21 magnesium alloy corrosion properties and cryogenic to elevated temperature mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montana, J. W.; Nelson, E. E.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of bare ZM-21 magnesium alloy flat tensile specimens were determined for test temperatures of +400 F, +300 F, +200 F, +80 F, 0 F, -100 F, -200 F, and -320 F. The ultimate tensile and yield strengths of the material increased with decreasing temperature with a corresponding reduction in elongation values. Stress corrosion tests performed under: (1) MSFC atmospheric conditions; (2) 95% relative humidity; and (3) submerged in 100 ppm chloride solution for 8 weeks indicated that the alloy is not susceptible to stress corrosion. The corrosion tests indicated that the material is susceptible to attack by crevice corrosion in high humidity and chemical type attack by chloride solution. Atmospheric conditions at MSFC did not produce any adverse effects on the material, probably due to the rapid formation of a protective oxide coating. In both the mechanical properties and the stress corrosion evaluations the test specimens which were cut transverse to the rolling direction had superior properties when compared to the longitudinal properties.

  11. Assessment of in vitro temporal corrosion and cytotoxicity of AZ91D alloy.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, Costantino; Bagalà, Paolo; Venturini, Marco; Grandi, Claudio; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Bianco, Alessandra; Montesperelli, Giampiero

    2012-10-01

    Magnesium alloys represent a valuable option for the production of bioresorbable implantable medical devices aimed to improve the therapeutic approach and minimize the potential risks related to biostable materials. In this regard, the degradation process needs to be carefully evaluated in order to assess the effectiveness of the regenerative support and the eventual toxic effects induced by the released corrosion products. Aluminium is one of the most common alloying element that raised several safety concerns, contributing to shift the investigation toward Al-free alloys. To delve into this issue, a long-term investigation (up to 28 days) was performed using AZ91D alloy, due to its relevant Al content. Immersion tests in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution was performed following the ASTM standards and the corrosion behaviour was evaluated at fixed time points by means of electrochemical techniques. Cytotoxic effects were assessed by culturing human neuroblastoma cells with conditioned medium derived from immersion tests at different dilution degree. An increase in the resistance corrosion with the time was observed. In all the investigated cases the presence of Al in the conditioned media did not induce significant toxic effects directly correlated to its content. A decrease of cell viability was only observed in the case of 50 % dilution of PBS conditioned for the longest immersion period (i.e., 28 days).

  12. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y.-J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. The maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ∼2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ∼300-500 μm thick cladding.

  13. Mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg-Gd-Ca-Zr alloys for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ling-Ling; Huang, Yuanding; Yang, Lei; Feyerabend, Frank; Mendis, Chamini; Willumeit, Regine; Ulrich Kainer, Karl; Hort, Norbert

    2015-07-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising candidates for biomedical applications. In this work, influences of composition and heat treatment on the microstructure, the mechanical properties and the corrosion behavior of Mg-Gd-Ca-Zr alloys as potential biomedical implant candidates were investigated. Mg5Gd phase was observed at the grain boundaries of Mg-10Gd-xCa-0.5Zr (x=0, 0.3, 1.2wt%) alloys. Increase in the Ca content led to the formation of additional Mg2Ca phase. The Ca additions increased both the compressive and the tensile yield strengths, but reduced the ductility and the corrosion resistance in cell culture medium. After solution heat treatment, the Mg5Gd particles dissolved in the Mg matrix. The compressive strength decreased, while the corrosion resistance improved in the solution treated alloys. After ageing at 200°C, metastable β' phase formed on prismatic planes and a new type of basal precipitates have been observed, which improved the compressive and tensile ultimate strength, but decreased the ductility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    DOE PAGES

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; ...

    2016-06-29

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation ofmore » very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.« less

  15. Atomic layer deposited ZrO2 nanofilm on Mg-Sr alloy for enhanced corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiuyue; Yuan, Wei; Liu, Xiangmei; Zheng, Yufeng; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin; Pan, Haobo; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-08-01

    The biodegradability and good mechanical property of magnesium alloys make them potential biomedical materials. However, their rapid corrosion rate in the human body's environment impairs these advantages and limits their clinical use. In this work, a compact zirconia (ZrO 2 ) nanofilm was fabricated on the surface of a magnesium-strontium (Mg-Sr) alloy by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method, which can regulate the thickness of the film precisely and thus also control the corrosion rate. Corrosion tests reveal that the ZrO 2 film can effectively reduce the corrosion rate of Mg-Sr alloys that is closely related to the thickness of the film. The cell culture test shows that this kind of ZrO 2 film can also enhance the activity and adhesion of osteoblasts on the surfaces of Mg-Sr alloys. The significance of the current work is to develop a zirconia nanofilm on biomedical MgSr alloy with controllable thickness precisely through atomic layer deposition technique. By adjusting the thickness of nanofilm, the corrosion rate of Mg-Sr alloy can be modulated, thereafter, the degradation rate of Mg-based alloys can be controlled precisely according to actual clinical requirement. In addition, this zirconia nanofilm modified Mg-Sr alloys show excellent biocompatibility than the bare samples. Hence, this work provides a new surface strategy to control the degradation rate while improving the biocompatibility of substrates. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In-vitro characterization of stress corrosion cracking of aluminium-free magnesium alloys for temporary bio-implant applications.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Singh Raman, R K; Hofstetter, Joelle; Uggowitzer, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The complex interaction between physiological stresses and corrosive human body fluid may cause premature failure of metallic biomaterials due to the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking. In this study, the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of biodegradable and aluminium-free magnesium alloys ZX50, WZ21 and WE43 was investigated by slow strain rate tensile testing in a simulated human body fluid. Slow strain rate tensile testing results indicated that each alloy was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, and this was confirmed by fractographic features of transgranular and/or intergranular cracking. However, the variation in alloy susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking is explained on the basis of their electrochemical and microstructural characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Intergranular corrosion in AA5XXX aluminum alloys with discontinuous precipitation at the grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumiller, Elissa

    The US Navy currently uses AA5xxx aluminum alloys for structures exposed to a marine environment. These alloys demonstrate excellent corrosion resistance over other aluminum alloys (e.g., AA2xxx or AA7xxx) in this environment, filling a niche in the marine structures market when requiring a light-weight alternative to steel. However, these alloys are susceptible to localized corrosion; more specifically, intergranular corrosion (IGC) is of concern. IGC of AA5xxx alloys due to the precipitation of beta phase on the grain boundaries is a well-established phenomenon referred to as sensitization. At high degrees of sensitization, the IGC path is a continuous anodic path of beta phase particles. At lower degrees of sensitization, the beta phase coverage at the grain boundaries is not continuous. The traditional ranges of susceptibility to IGC as defined by ASTM B928 are in question due to recent studies. These studies showed that even at mid range degrees of sensitization where the beta phase is no longer continuous, IGC may still occur. Previous thoughts on IGC of these alloy systems were founded on the idea that once the grain boundary precipitate became discontinuous the susceptibility to IGC was greatly reduced. Additionally, IGC susceptibility has been defined metallurgically by compositional gradients at the grain boundaries. However, AA5xxx alloys show no compositional gradients at the grain boundaries, yet are still susceptible to IGC. The goal of this work is to establish criteria necessary for IGC to occur given no continuous beta phase path and no compositional gradient at the grain boundaries. IGC performance of the bulk alloy system AA5083 has been studied along with the primary phases present in the IGC system: alpha and beta phases using electrochemistry and modeling as the primary tools. Numerical modeling supports that at steady-state the fissure tip is likely saturated with Mg in excess of the 4% dissolved in the matrix. By combining these results

  18. Corrosion behavior of alloy 800H (Fe-21Cr-32Ni) in supercritical water

    SciT

    Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.; Yang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The effect of testing conditions (temperature, time, and oxygen content) and material's microstructure (the as-received and the grain boundary engineered conditions) on the corrosion behavior of alloy 800H in high-temperature pressurized water was studied using a variety of characterization techniques. Oxidation was observed as the primary corrosion behavior on the samples. Oxide exfoliation was significantly mitigated on the grain boundary engineered samples compared to the as-received ones. The oxide formation, including some 'mushroom-shaped oxidation', is predicted via a combination of thermodynamics and kinetics influenced by the preferential diffusion of specific species using short-cut diffusion paths.

  19. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour in biological environments of the new forged low-Ni Co-Cr-Mo alloys.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Sachiko; Onodera, Emi; Chiba, Akihiko; Asami, Katsuhiko; Hanawa, Takao

    2005-08-01

    Corrosion behaviour and microstructure of developed low-Ni Co-29Cr-(6, 8)Mo (mass%) alloys and a conventional Co-29Cr-6Mo-1Ni alloy (ASTM F75-92) were investigated in saline solution (saline), Hanks' solution (Hanks), and cell culture medium (E-MEM + FBS). The forging ratios of the Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy were 50% and 88% and that of the Co-29Cr-8Mo alloy was 88%. Ni content in the air-formed surface oxide film of the low-Ni alloys was under the detection limit of XPS. The passive current densities of the low-Ni alloys were of the same order of magnitude as that of the ASTM alloy in all the solutions. The passive current densities of all the alloys did not significantly change with the inorganic ions and the biomolecules. The anodic current densities in the secondary passive region of the low-Ni alloys were lower than that of the ASTM alloy in the E-MEM + FBS. Consequently, the low-Ni alloys are expected to show as high corrosion resistance as the ASTM alloy. On the other hand, the passive current density of the Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy with a forging ratio of 50% was slightly lower than that with a forging ratio of 88% in the saline. The refining of grains by further forging causes the increase in the passive current density of the low-Ni alloy.

  20. Influence of hydroxyapatite on the corrosion resistance of the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Laís T; Biaggio, Sonia R; Rocha-Filho, Romeu C; Bocchi, Nerilso

    2009-05-01

    Electrochemical analyses on the biocompatible alloy Ti-13Nb-13Zr wt% in an electrolyte simulating physiological medium (PBS solution) are reported. Hydroxyapatite (HA) films were obtained on the alloy by electrodeposition at constant cathodic current. Samples of the alloy covered with an anodic-oxide film or an anodic-oxide/HA film were analyzed by open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements during 180 days in the PBS electrolyte. Analyses of the open-circuit potential (E (oc)) values indicated that the oxide/HA film presents better protection characteristics than the oxide only. This behavior was corroborated by the higher film resistances obtained from impedance data, indicating that, besides improving the alloy osteointegration, the hydroxyapatite film may also increase the corrosion protection of the biomaterial.

  1. Corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of biodegradable surgical magnesium alloy coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yunchang; Jiang, Jiang; Huo, Kaifu; Tang, Guoyi; Tian, Xiubo; Chu, Paul K

    2009-06-01

    The fast degradation rates in the physiological environment constitute the main limitation for the applications of surgical magnesium alloys as biodegradable hard-tissue implants. In this work, a stable and dense hydrogenated amorphous silicon coating (a-Si:H) with desirable bioactivity is deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy using magnetron sputtering deposition. Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveal that the coating is mainly composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The hardness of the coated alloy is enhanced significantly and the coating is quite hydrophilic as well. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy is enhanced dramatically. In addition, the deterioration process of the coating in simulated body fluids is systematically investigated by open circuit potential evolution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The cytocompatibility of the coated Mg is evaluated for the first time using hFOB1.19 cells and favorable biocompatibility is observed. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effect of Alloying Elements on Tensile Properties, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of Reinforcing Bar Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, B. K.; Srikanth, S.; Sahoo, G.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of copper, phosphorus, and chromium present in a semikilled reinforcing bar steel produced by in-line quenching [thermomechanical treatment (TMT)] process on the tensile properties, microstructure, and corrosion resistance of steel in simulated chloride environment has been investigated. The results have been compared with that of a semikilled C-Mn reinforcing bar steel without these alloying elements produced by the same process route. Though the amount of phosphorus (0.11 wt.%) was higher than that specified by ASTM A 706 standard, the Cu-P-Cr steel exhibited a composite microstructure, and good balance of yield stress, tensile stress, elongation, and ultimate tensile to yield stress ratio. Two conventional test methods, namely, the salt fog, and potentiodynamic polarization tests, were used for the corrosion test. The rust formed on Cu-P-Cr steel was adherent, and was of multiple colors, while the corrosion products formed on the C-Mn steel were weakly adherent and relatively darker blue. Also, the free corrosion potential of the Cu-P-Cr steel was nobler, and the corrosion current was markedly lower than that of a C-Mn rebar. The Cu-P-Cr steel did not develop any pits/deep grooves on its surface even after the prolonged exposure to salt fog. The improved corrosion resistance of the Cu-P-Cr steel has been attributed to the presence of copper, phosphorus, and small amount of chromium in the dense, adherent rust layer on the surface of reinforcing steel bar. A schematic mechanism of charge transfer has been proposed to explain the improved corrosion resistance of the Cu-P-Cr alloyed TMT rebar.

  3. Effects of crack tip plastic zone on corrosion fatigue cracking of alloy 690(TT) in pressurized water reactor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, J.; Qiu, S. Y.; Chen, Y.; Fu, Z. H.; Lin, Z. X.; Xu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Alloy 690(TT) is widely used for steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactor (PWR), where it is susceptible to corrosion fatigue. In this study, the corrosion fatigue behavior of Alloy 690(TT) in simulated PWR environments was investigated. The microstructure of the plastic zone near the crack tip was investigated and labyrinth structures were observed. The relationship between the crack tip plastic zone and fatigue crack growth rates and the environment factor Fen was illuminated.

  4. [The effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental casting alloys after electrochemical corrosion].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Guang-yan; Zhang, Li-xia; Wang, Jue; Shen, Qing-ping; Su, Jian-sheng

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental alloys after electrochemical corrosion. The surface morphology and surface structure of nickel-chromium dental alloys were examined by stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy before and after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. The surface element component and chemical states of nickel-chromium dental alloys were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrograph after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. More serious corrosion happened on the surface of nickel-chromium alloy in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva than in 0 g/L EGCG. The diameters of corrosion pits were smaller, and the dendrite structure of the alloy surface was not affected in 0 g/L EGCG. While the diameters of corrosion pits were larger, the dendritic interval of the alloy surface began to merge, and the dendrite structure was fuzzy in 1.0 g/L EGCG. In addition, the O, Ni, Cr, Be, C and Mo elements were detected on the surface of nickel-chromium alloys after sputtered for 120 s in 0 g/L EGCG and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva after electrochemical corrosion, and the surface oxides were mainly NiO and Cr(2)O(3). Compared with 0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva, the content of O, NiO and Cr(2)O(3) were lower in 1.0 g/L EGCG. The results of surface morphology and the corrosion products both show that the corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium alloys become worse and the oxide content of corrosion products on the surface reduce in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva.

  5. Corrosion mechanism and model of pulsed DC microarc oxidation treated AZ31 alloy in simulated body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yanhong; Chen, Cheng-fu; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Ning, Chengyun; Zhang, Yongjun; Guo, Yuanjun

    2012-06-01

    This paper addresses the effect of pulse frequency on the corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation (MAO) coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF). The MAO coatings were deposited by a pulsed DC mode at four different pulse frequencies of 300 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz and 3000 Hz with a constant pulse ratio. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were used for corrosion rate and electrochemical impedance evaluation. The corroded surfaces were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and optical microscopy. All the results exhibited that the corrosion resistance of MAO coating produced at 3000 Hz is superior among the four frequencies used. The XRD spectra showed that the corrosion products contain hydroxyapatite, brucite and quintinite. A model for corrosion mechanism and corrosion process of the MAO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy in the SBF is proposed.

  6. Effect of Mucin and Bicarbonate Ion on Corrosion Behavior of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy for Airway Stents.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongseok; Owuor, Daniel; Waterman, Jenora T; White, Leon; Collins, Boyce; Sankar, Jagannathan; Gilbert, Thomas W; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-08-15

    The biodegradable ability of magnesium alloys is an attractive feature for tracheal stents since they can be absorbed by the body through gradual degradation after healing of the airway structure, which can reduce the risk of inflammation caused by long-term implantation and prevent the repetitive surgery for removal of existing stent. In this study, the effects of bicarbonate ion (HCO₃ - ) and mucin in Gamble's solution on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated, using immersion and electrochemical tests to systematically identify the biodegradation kinetics of magnesium alloy under in vitro environment, mimicking the epithelial mucus surfaces in a trachea for development of biodegradable airway stents. Analysis of corrosion products after immersion test was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to identify the effects of bicarbonate ions and mucin on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloys with the temporal change of corrosion resistance. The results show that the increase of the bicarbonate ions in Gamble's solution accelerates the dissolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy, while the addition of mucin retards the corrosion. The experimental data in this work is intended to be used as foundational knowledge to predict the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy in the airway environment while providing degradation information for future in vivo studies.

  7. Wear and Corrosion Properties of 316L-SiC Composite Coating Deposited by Cold Spray on Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Ma, Bing; Liu, Guang; Song, Hui; Wu, Jinming; Cui, Lang; Zheng, Ziyun

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve the wear and corrosion resistance of commonly used magnesium alloys, 316L stainless steel coating and 316L-SiC composite coating have been deposited directly on commercial AZ80 magnesium alloy using cold spraying technology (CS). The microstructure, hardness and bonding strength of as-sprayed coatings were studied. Their tribological properties sliding against Si3N4 and GCr15 steel under unlubricated conditions were evaluated by a ball-on-disk tribometer. Corrosion behaviors of coated samples were also evaluated and compared to that of uncoated magnesium alloy substrate in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution by electrochemical measurements. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the corresponding wear tracks and corroded surfaces to determine wear and corrosion mechanisms. The results showed that the as-sprayed coatings possessed higher microhardness and more excellent wear resistance than magnesium alloy substrate. Meanwhile, 316L and 316L-SiC coating also reduced the corrosion current density of magnesium alloy and the galvanic corrosion of the substrates was not observed after 200-h neutral salt spray exposure, which demonstrated that corrosion resistance of a magnesium alloy substrate could be greatly improved by cold-sprayed stainless steel-based coatings.

  8. Effect of Mucin and Bicarbonate Ion on Corrosion Behavior of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy for Airway Stents

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yongseok; Owuor, Daniel; Waterman, Jenora T.; White, Leon; Collins, Boyce; Sankar, Jagannathan; Gilbert, Thomas W.; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-01-01

    The biodegradable ability of magnesium alloys is an attractive feature for tracheal stents since they can be absorbed by the body through gradual degradation after healing of the airway structure, which can reduce the risk of inflammation caused by long-term implantation and prevent the repetitive surgery for removal of existing stent. In this study, the effects of bicarbonate ion (HCO3−) and mucin in Gamble’s solution on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated, using immersion and electrochemical tests to systematically identify the biodegradation kinetics of magnesium alloy under in vitro environment, mimicking the epithelial mucus surfaces in a trachea for development of biodegradable airway stents. Analysis of corrosion products after immersion test was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to identify the effects of bicarbonate ions and mucin on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloys with the temporal change of corrosion resistance. The results show that the increase of the bicarbonate ions in Gamble’s solution accelerates the dissolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy, while the addition of mucin retards the corrosion. The experimental data in this work is intended to be used as foundational knowledge to predict the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy in the airway environment while providing degradation information for future in vivo studies. PMID:28788166

  9. Influence of noble metals alloying additions on the corrosion behaviour of titanium in a fluoride-containing environment.

    PubMed

    Rosalbino, F; Delsante, S; Borzone, G; Scavino, G

    2012-05-01

    Titanium alloys exhibit excellent corrosion resistance in most aqueous media due to the formation of a stable oxide film, and some of these alloys (particularly Ti-6Al-7Nb) have been chosen for surgical and odontological implants for their resistance and biocompatibility. Treatment with fluorides (F(-)) is known to be the main method for preventing plaque formation and dental caries. Toothpastes, mouthwashes, and prophylactic gels can contain from 200 to 20,000 ppm F(-) and can affect the corrosion behaviour of titanium alloy devices present in the oral cavity. In this work, the electrochemical corrosion behaviour of Ti-1M alloys (M = Ag, Au, Pd, Pt) was assessed in artificial saliva of pH = 3.0 containing 910 ppm F(-) (0.05 M NaF) through open circuit potential, E(OC), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The corrosion behaviour of the Ti-6Al-7Nb commercial alloy was also evaluated for comparison. E (OC) measurements show an active behaviour for all the titanium alloys in fluoridated acidified saliva due to the presence of significant concentrations of HF and HF(2) (-) species that dissolve the spontaneous air-formed oxide film giving rise to surface activation. However, an increase in stability of the passive oxide layer and consequently a decrease in surface activation is observed for the Ti-1M alloys. This behaviour is confirmed by EIS measurements. In fact, the Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy exhibits lower impedance values as compared with Ti-1M alloys, the highest values being measured for the Ti-1Au alloy. The experimental results show that the corrosion resistance of the studied Ti-1M alloys is similar to or better than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy currently used as biomaterial, suggesting their potential for dental applications.

  10. [Effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes].

    PubMed

    Qiuxia, Yang; Ying, Yang; Han, Xu; Di, Wu; Ke, Guo

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes in a simulated oral environment. A total of 15 specimens were employed with selective laser melting (SLM) and another 15 for traditional casting (Cast) in cobalt-chromium alloy powders and blocks with the same material composition. The corrosion behavior of the specimens was studied by potentiodynamic polarization test under different oral environments with varying solubilities of fluorine (0, 0.05%, and 0.20% for each) in acid artificial saliva (pH = 5.0). The specimens were soaked in fluorine for 24 h, and the surface microstructure was observed under a field emission scanning electron microscope after immersing the specimens in the test solution at constant temperature. The corrosion potential (Ecorr) value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast decreased with increasing fluoride concentration in acidic artificial saliva. The Ecorr, Icorr, and Rp values of the cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes changed significantly when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P < 0.05). The Ecorr, Icorr, and Rp values of the cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes exhibited a statistically significant difference. The Icorr value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was higher than that in the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P < 0.05). The Ecorr, tRp alues of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast were lower htan those of the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P< 0 .05). Fluoride ions adversely affected the corrosion resistance of the cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes. The corrosion resistance of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was worse than that of the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20%.

  11. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE IMPACT OF ALLOY COMPOSITION AND PH ON THE CORROSION OF BRASS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better understanding of brass corrosion may provide information and guidance on the use of the safest materials for the production of plumbing fixtures, and optimization of corrosion control treatments. The effect of alloy composition and pH on the metal leached from six differ...

  12. Influence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria on the Corrosion Residual Strength of an AZ91D Magnesium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xianyong; Liu, Yaohui; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jiaan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the corrosion residual strength of the AZ91D magnesium alloy in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria is studied. In the experiments, the chemical composition of corrosion film was analyzed by a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, a series of instruments, such as scanning electronic microscope, pH-meter and an AG-10TA materials test machine, were applied to test and record the morphology of the corrosion product, fracture texture and mechanical properties of the AZ91D magnesium alloy. The experiments show that the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in the corrosion process of the AZ91D magnesium alloy. Pitting corrosion was enhanced by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Corrosion pits are important defects that could lead to a significant stress concentration in the tensile process. As a result, sulfate-reducing bacteria influence the corrosion residual strength of the AZ91D magnesium alloy by accelerating pitting corrosion. PMID:28788236

  13. Lead induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 690 in high temperature water

    SciT

    Chung, K.K.; Lim, J.K.; Moriya, Shinichi

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of cracked steam generator tubes at nuclear power plants concluded that lead significantly contributed to cracking the Alloy 600 materials. In order to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 690, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and anodic polarization measurements were performed. The SSRTs were conducted in a lead-chloride solution (PbCl{sub 2}) and in a chloride but lead free solution (NaCl) at pH of 3 and 4.5 at 288 C. The anodic polarization measurements were carried out at 30 C using the same solutions as in SSRT. The SSRT results showed that Alloy 690 was susceptiblemore » to SCC in both solutions. In the lead chloride solution, cracking had slight dependence on lead concentration and pH. Cracking tend to increase with a higher lead concentration and a lower pH and was mainly intergranular and was to be a few tens to hundreds micrometers in length. In the chloride only solution, cracking was similar to the lead induced SCC. The results of anodic polarization measurement and electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) helped to understand lead induced SCC. Lead was a stronger active corrosive element but had a minor affect on cracking susceptibility of the alloy. While, chloride was quite different from lead effect to SCC. A possible mechanism of lead induced SCC of Alloy 690 was also discussed based on the test results.« less

  14. Hot corrosion testing of Ni-based alloys and coatings in a modified Dean rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, Jason Reid

    Gas turbine blades are designed to withstand a variety of harsh operating conditions. Although material and coating improvements are constantly administered to increase the mean time before turbine refurbishment or replacement, hot corrosion is still considered as the major life-limiting factor in many industrial and marine gas turbines. A modified Dean rig was designed and manufactured at Tennessee Technological University to simulate the accelerated hot corrosion conditions and to conduct screening tests on the new coatings on Ni-based superalloys. Uncoated Ni-based superalloys, Rene 142 and Rene 80, were tested in the modified Dean rig to establish a testing procedure for Type I hot corrosion. The influence of surface treatments on the hot corrosion resistance was then investigated. It was found that grit-blasted specimens showed inferior hot corrosion resistance than that of the polished counterpart. The Dean rig was also used to test model MCrAlY alloys, pack cementation NiAl coatings, and electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings. Furthermore, the hot corrosion attack on the coated-specimens were also assessed using a statistical analysis approach.

  15. Titanium alloy 5111 brings intermediate strength, excellent toughness, and corrosion resistance to naval operating environments

    SciT

    Been, J.

    1999-07-01

    Ti-5Al-1Sn-1Zr-1V-O.8M0 is a near alpha titanium alloy of intermediate strength, designed for high toughness, good weldability, stress-corrosion cracking resistance, and room temperature creep resistance. Ideally suited for marine environments, Ti 5111 offers the means to aid the navy in fulfilling their goals of reducing maintenance and life cycle costs, reducing topside and overall weight, improve survivability and increase reliability. The alloy was recently included in the ASTM bar and plate specifications as ASTM Grade 32.

  16. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    DOE PAGES

    Zhai, Ziqing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; ...

    2017-04-27

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation of three mill-annealed alloy 600 heats in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water has been investigated using constant load tests equipped with in-situ direct current potential drop (DCPD) measurement capabilities. SCC initiation times were greatly reduced by a small amount of cold work. Shallow intergranular attack and/or cracks were found on most high-energy grain boundaries intersecting the surface with only a small fraction evolving into larger cracks and intergranular SCC growth. Crack depth profiles were measured and related to DCPD-detected initiation response. Lastly, we discuss processes controlling the SCC initiation in mill-annealed alloy 600.

  17. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    SciT

    Zhai, Ziqing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation of three mill-annealed alloy 600 heats in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water has been investigated using constant load tests equipped with in-situ direct current potential drop (DCPD) measurement capabilities. SCC initiation times were greatly reduced by a small amount of cold work. Shallow intergranular attack and/or cracks were found on most high-energy grain boundaries intersecting the surface with only a small fraction evolving into larger cracks and intergranular SCC growth. Crack depth profiles were measured and related to DCPD-detected initiation response. Lastly, we discuss processes controlling the SCC initiation in mill-annealed alloy 600.

  18. Impact of Alloying on Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion. A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    H.A. Videla, Acta MIC. Chromium and molybdenum sion 47,9 (1991): p. 674. Cientifica Venezolana 35 (1984): p. 244. additions as high as 20 and 6%, re...conductivity, described a model that predicts sul- logical settlement. Biofilms produce ease of soldering and brazing , and fide-induced corrosion in the pres...highly aerated, the area immediately under the de- (Cu3,S16) formation hasbeen reported high -velocity seawater applications. posit becomes a

  19. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking and Corrosion of Some Highly Corrosion Resistant Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Stainless Steel", June 1985, and "On the Roles of Corrosion Products in Local Cell Processes", January 1986. Research on the latter has occurred in the...concern. In closed systems. howevter, such as nuclear reactor cooling pipes. acid container systems, fuel cells, and so on. the production of ti, gas and...mernhra lie is also imiportant. fihe stirf.ice should he flat. m-e1I-polished and free of filims. (Whde or other corrosion product film-. :Are easil% formed

  20. Hot-salt stress-corrosion of titanium alloys as related to turbine operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    In an effort to simulate typical compressor operating conditions of current turbine engines, special test facilities were designed. Air velocity, air pressure, air dewpoint, salt deposition temperature, salt concentration, and specimen surface condition were systematically controlled and their influence on hot-salt stress-corrosion evaluated. The influence of both continuous and cyclic stress-temperature exposures was determined. The relative susceptibility of a variety of titanium alloys in commonly used heat-treated conditions was determined. The effects of both environmental and material variables were used to interpret the behavior of titanium alloys under hot-salt stress-corrosion conditions found in jet engines and to appraise their future potential under such conditions.

  1. PEO of pre-anodized Al-Si alloys: Corrosion properties and influence of sealings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohedano, M.; Matykina, E.; Arrabal, R.; Mingo, B.; Pardo, A.

    2015-08-01

    Voltage-controlled PEO coatings were developed on A356 aluminum alloys (gravity-cast and rheocast) with a pre-anodized layer. The influence of the alloy manufacturing process and the effect of Si-rich phase on the structure and composition of the oxide layers were evaluated using SEM, EDS and XRD. The pre-anodized oxide layer preserves the microstructure of the substrate due to the presence of secondary phases that have a different behavior relative to the matrix during anodizing. PEO coatings consisted of a mixture of α-Al2O3, γ-Al2O3 and mullite. The corrosion behavior and the effectiveness of different sealing techniques based on salts of nickel, cobalt, cerium and phosphonic acid were also studied. Post-treatments improved the hydrophobic properties of the coatings and showed a beneficial effect, significantly increasing the coating impedance and thereby reducing the susceptibility to corrosion.

  2. Sample environment for in situ synchrotron corrosion studies of materials in extreme environments

    SciT

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed S.; Gill, Simerjeet K.; Motta, Arthur T.

    A new in situ sample environment has been designed and developed to study the interfacial interactions of nuclear cladding alloys with high temperature steam. The sample environment is particularly optimized for synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies for in situ structural analysis. The sample environment is highly corrosion resistant and can be readily adapted for steam environments. The in situ sample environment design complies with G2 ASTM standards for studying corrosion in zirconium and its alloys and offers remote temperature and pressure monitoring during the in situ data collection. The use of the in situ sample environment is exemplified by monitoringmore » the oxidation of metallic zirconium during exposure to steam at 350°C. Finally, the in situ sample environment provides a powerful tool for fundamental understanding of corrosion mechanisms by elucidating the substoichiometric oxide phases formed during early stages of corrosion, which can provide a better understanding the oxidation process.« less

  3. Sample environment for in situ synchrotron corrosion studies of materials in extreme environments

    DOE PAGES

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed S.; Gill, Simerjeet K.; Motta, Arthur T.; ...

    2016-10-25

    A new in situ sample environment has been designed and developed to study the interfacial interactions of nuclear cladding alloys with high temperature steam. The sample environment is particularly optimized for synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies for in situ structural analysis. The sample environment is highly corrosion resistant and can be readily adapted for steam environments. The in situ sample environment design complies with G2 ASTM standards for studying corrosion in zirconium and its alloys and offers remote temperature and pressure monitoring during the in situ data collection. The use of the in situ sample environment is exemplified by monitoringmore » the oxidation of metallic zirconium during exposure to steam at 350°C. Finally, the in situ sample environment provides a powerful tool for fundamental understanding of corrosion mechanisms by elucidating the substoichiometric oxide phases formed during early stages of corrosion, which can provide a better understanding the oxidation process.« less

  4. An electrochemical model for hot-salt stress-corrosion of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkle, M.

    1972-01-01

    An electrochemical model of hot-salt stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys is proposed based on an oxygen-concentration cell. Hydrogen embrittlement is proposed as the direct cause of cracking, the hydrogen being generated as the results of the hydrolysis of complex halides formed at the shielded anode of the electrochemical cell. The model found to be consistent with the diverse observations made both in this study and by many investigators in this field.

  5. Controlling corrosion rate of Magnesium alloy using powder mixed electrical discharge machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, M. A.; Rani, A. M. A.; Saad, N. M.; Littlefair, G.; Aliyu, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Biomedical implant can be divided into permanent and temporary employment. The duration of a temporary implant applied to children and adult is different due to different bone healing rate among the children and adult. Magnesium and its alloys are compatible for the biodegradable implanting application. Nevertheless, it is difficult to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy to suit the application on both the children and adult. Powder mixed electrical discharge machining (PM-EDM) method, a modified EDM process, has high capability to improve the EDM process efficiency and machined surface quality. The objective of this paper is to establish a formula to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy using the PM-EDM method. The different corrosion rate of machined surface is hypothesized to be obtained by having different combinations of PM-EDM operation inputs. PM-EDM experiments are conducted using an opened-loop PM-EDM system and the in-vitro corrosion tests are carried out on the machined surface of each specimen. There are four operation inputs investigated in this study which are zinc powder concentration, peak current, pulse on-time and pulse off-time. The results indicate that zinc powder concentration is significantly affecting the response with 2 g/l of zinc powder concentration obtaining the lowest corrosion rate. The high localized temperature at the cutting zone in spark erosion process causes some of the zinc particles get deposited on the machined surface, hence improving the surface characteristics. The suspended zinc particles in the dielectric fluid have also improve the sparking efficiency and the uniformity of sparks distribution. From the statistical analysis, a formula was developed to control the corrosion rate of magnesium alloy within the range from 0.000183 mm/year to 0.001528 mm/year.

  6. Surface and corrosion characteristics of carbon plasma implanted and deposited nickel-titanium alloy

    SciT

    Poon, R.W.Y.; Liu, X.Y.; Chung, C.Y.

    2005-05-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are potentially useful in orthopedic implants on account of their super-elastic and shape memory properties. However, the materials are prone to surface corrosion and the most common problem is out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the substrate into body tissues and fluids. In order to improve the corrosion resistance and related surface properties, we used the technique of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition to deposit an amorphous hydrogenated carbon coating onto NiTi and implant carbon into NiTi. Both the deposited amorphous carbon film and carbon plasma implanted samples exhibit much improved corrosion resistances andmore » surface mechanical properties and possible mechanisms are suggested.« less

  7. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys in Artificial Saliva and Mouthwash Solution

    PubMed Central

    Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Casales-Diaz, M.; Salinas-Bravo, V. M.; Martinez-Gomez, L.

    2015-01-01

    Several austenitic stainless steels suitable for high temperature applications because of their high corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties were investigated as biomaterials for dental use. The steels were evaluated by electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization curves, cyclic polarization curves, measurements of open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance. The performance of steels was evaluated in two types of environments: artificial saliva and mouthwash solution at 37°C for 48 hours. In order to compare the behavior of steels, titanium a material commonly used in dental applications was also tested in the same conditions. Results show that tested steels have characteristics that may make them attractive as biomaterials for dental applications. Contents of Cr, Ni, and other minor alloying elements (Mo, Ti, and Nb) determine the performance of stainless steels. In artificial saliva steels show a corrosion rate of the same order of magnitude as titanium and in mouthwash have greater corrosion resistance than titanium. PMID:26064083

  8. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  9. Tensile strength and corrosion resistance of brazed and laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy joints.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Rok; Legat, Andraz; Funduk, Nenad

    2006-10-01

    The longevity of prosthodontic restorations is often limited due to the mechanical or corrosive failure occurring at the sites where segments of a metal framework are joined together. The purpose of this study was to determine which joining method offers the best properties to cobalt-chromium alloy frameworks. Brazed and 2 types of laser-welded joints were compared for their mechanical and corrosion characteristics. Sixty-eight cylindrical cobalt-chromium dental alloy specimens, 35 mm long and 2 mm in diameter, were cast. Sixteen specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in an artificial saliva solution and divided into 4 groups (n=4). In the intact group, the specimens were left as cast. The specimens of the remaining 3 groups were sectioned at the center, perpendicular to the long-axis, and were subsequently rejoined by brazing (brazing group) or laser welding using an X- or I-shaped joint design (X laser and I laser groups, respectively). Another 16 specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in a more acidic artificial saliva solution. These specimens were also divided into 4 groups (n=4) as described above. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization were used to assess corrosion potentials, breakdown potentials, corrosion current densities, total impedances at lowest frequency, and polarization charge-transfer resistances. The remaining 36 specimens were used for tensile testing. They were divided into 3 groups in which specimen pairs (n=6) were joined by brazing or laser welding to form 70-mm-long cylindrical rods. The tensile strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine. Differences between groups were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance (alpha=.05). The fracture surfaces and corrosion defects were examined with a scanning electron microscope. The average tensile strength of brazed joints was 792 MPa and was significantly greater (P<.05) than the tensile strength of both types of

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ni-Fe-Cr Alloys Relevant to Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Suraj

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys and weld metals was investigated in simulated environments representative of high temperature water used in the primary and secondary circuits of nuclear power plants. The mechanism of primary water SCC (PWSCC) was studied in Alloys 600, 690, 800 and Alloy 82 dissimilar metal welds using the internal oxidation model as a guide. Initial experiments were carried out in a 480°C hydrogenated steam environment considered to simulate high temperature reducing primary water. Ni alloys underwent classical internal oxidation intragranularly resulting in the expulsion of the solvent metal, Ni, to the surface. Selective intergranular oxidation of Cr in Alloy 600 resulted in embrittlement, while other alloys were resistant owing to their increased Cr contents. Atom probe tomography was used to determine the short-circuit diffusion path used for Ni expulsion at a sub-nanometer scale, which was concluded to be oxide-metal interfaces. Further exposures of Alloys 600 and 800 were done in 315°C simulated primary water and intergranular oxidation tendency was comparable to 480°C hydrogenated steam. Secondary side work involved SCC experiments and electrochemical measurements, which were done at 315°C in acid sulfate solutions. Alloy 800 C-rings were found to undergo acid sulfate SCC (AcSCC) to a depth of up to 300 microm in 0.55 M sulfate solution at pH 4.3. A focused-ion beam was used to extract a crack tip from a C-ring and high resolution analytical electron microscopy revealed a duplex oxide structure and the presence of sulfur. Electrochemical measurements were taken on Ni alloys to complement crack tip analysis; sulfate was concluded to be the aggressive anion in mixed sulfate and chloride systems. Results from electrochemical measurements and crack tip analysis suggested a slip dissolution-type mechanism to explain AcSCC in Ni alloys.

  11. Superelasticity, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the Ti-19Zr-10Nb-1Fe alloy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Pengfei; Li, Yan; Li, Kangming; Zhang, Deyuan; Zhou, Chungen

    2015-05-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties, superelasticity and biocompatibility of a Ti-19Zr-10Nb-1Fe alloy are investigated. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations show that the as-cast Ti-19Zr-10Nb-1Fe alloy is composed of α' and β phases, but only the β phase exists in the as-rolled and as-quenched alloys. The tensile stress-strain tests indicate that the as-quenched alloy exhibits a good combination of mechanical properties with a large elongation of 25%, a low Young's modulus of 59 GPa and a high ultimate tensile stress of 723 MPa. Superelastic recovery behavior is found in the as-quenched alloy during tensile tests, and the corresponding maximum of superelastic strain is 4.7% at the pre-strain of 6%. A superelastic recovery of 4% with high stability is achieved after 10 cyclic loading-unloading training processes. Potentiodynamic polarization and ion release measurements indicate that the as-quenched alloy shows a lower corrosion rate in Hank's solution and a much less ion release rate in 0.9% NaCl solution than those of the NiTi alloys. Cell culture results indicate that the osteoblasts' adhesion and proliferation are similar on both the Ti-19Zr-10Nb-1Fe and NiTi alloys. A better hemocompatibility is confirmed for the as-quenched Ti-19Zr-10Nb-1Fe alloy, attributed to more stable platelet adhesion and small activation degree, and a much lower hemolysis rate compared with the NiTi alloy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Corrosion behaviours of the dental magnetic keeper complexes made by different alloys and methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Ke; Song, Ning; Liu, Fei; Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Min; Wang, Hang; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2016-09-29

    The keeper and cast dowel-coping, as a primary component for a magnetic attachment, is easily subjected to corrosion in a wet environment, such as the oral cavity, which contains electrolyte-rich saliva, complex microflora and chewing behaviour and so on. The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the corrosion resistance of a dowel and coping-keeper complex fabricated by finish keeper and three alloys (cobalt-chromium, CoCr; silver-palladium-gold, PdAu; gold-platinum, AuPt) using a laser-welding process and a casting technique. The surface morphology characteristics and microstructures of the samples were examined by means of metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) with SEM provided elements analysis information for the test samples after 10% oxalic acid solution etching test. Tafel polarization curve recordings demonstrated parameter values indicating corrosion of the samples when subjected to electrochemical testing. This study has suggested that massive oxides are attached to the surface of the CoCr-keeper complex but not to the AuPt-keeper complex. Only the keeper area of cast CoCr-keeper complex displayed obvious intergranular corrosion and changes in the Fe and Co elements. Both cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes had the highest free corrosion potential, followed by the PdAu-keeper complex. We concluded that although the corrosion resistance of the CoCr-keeper complex was worst, the keeper surface passive film was actually preserved to its maximum extent. The laser-welded CoCr- and PdAu-keeper complexes possessed superior corrosion resistance as compared with their cast specimens, but no significant difference was found between the cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes. The Fe-poor and Cr-rich band, appearing on the edge of the keeper when casting, has been proven to be a corrosion-prone area.

  13. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  14. Oxidised zirconium versus cobalt alloy bearing surfaces in total knee arthroplasty: 3D laser scanning of retrieved polyethylene inserts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, F L; Koch, C N; Elpers, M E; Wright, T M; Haas, S B; Heyse, T J

    2017-06-01

    We sought to establish whether an oxidised zirconium (OxZr) femoral component causes less loss of polyethylene volume than a cobalt alloy (CoCr) femoral component in total knee arthroplasty. A total of 20 retrieved tibial inserts that had articulated with OxZr components were matched with 20 inserts from CoCr articulations for patient age, body mass index, length of implantation, and revision diagnosis. Changes in dimensions of the articular surfaces were compared with those of pristine inserts using laser scanning. The differences in volume between the retrieved and pristine surfaces of the two groups were calculated and compared. The loss of polyethylene volume was 122 mm 3 (standard deviation (sd) 87) in the OxZr group and 170 mm 3 (sd 96) in the CoCr group (p = 0.033). The volume loss in the OxZr group was also lower in the medial (72 mm 3 (sd 67) versus 92 mm 3 (sd 60); p = 0.096) and lateral (49 mm 3 (sd 36) versus 79 mm 3 (sd 61); p = 0.096) compartments separately, but these differences were not significant. Our results corroborate earlier findings from in vitro testing and visual retrieval analysis which suggest that polyethylene volume loss is lower with OxZr femoral components. Since both OxZr and CoCr are hard surfaces that would be expected to create comparable amounts of polyethylene creep, the differences in volume loss may reflect differences in the in vivo wear of these inserts. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:793-8. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. Microstructure Analysis of Ti-xPt Alloys and the Effect of Pt Content on the Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of Ti Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ho-Jun; Han, Mi-Kyung; Jeong, Hyeon-Gyeong; Lee, Yong-Tai; Park, Yeong-Joon

    2014-01-01

    The microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of binary Ti-xPt alloys containing 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% Pt were investigated in order to develop new Ti-based dental materials possessing superior properties than those of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti). All of the Ti-xPt (x = 5, 10, 15, 20) alloys showed hexagonal α-Ti structure with cubic Ti3Pt intermetallic phase. The mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Ti-xPt alloys were sensitive to the Pt content. The addition of Pt contributed to hardening of cp-Ti and to improving its oxidation resistance. Electrochemical results showed that the Ti-xPt alloys exhibited superior corrosion resistance than that of cp-Ti. PMID:28788660

  16. Corrosive and cytotoxic properties of compact specimens and microparticles of Ni-Cr dental alloy.

    PubMed

    Ristic, Ljubisa; Vucevic, Dragana; Radovic, Ljubica; Djordjevic, Snezana; Nikacevic, Milutin; Colic, Miodrag

    2014-04-01

    Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) dental alloys have been widely used in prosthodontic practice, but there is a permanent concern about their biocompatibility due to the release of metal ions. This is especially important when Ni-Cr metal microparticles are incorporated into gingival tissue during prosthodontic procedures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine and compare the corrosion and cytotoxic properties of compact specimens and microparticles of Ni-Cr dental alloy. Ni-Cr alloy, Remanium CSe bars (4 mm diameter), were made by the standard casting method and then cut into 0.5-mm-thick disks. Metal particles were obtained by scraping the bars using a diamond instrument for crown preparation. The microstructure was observed by an optical microscope. Quantitative determination and morphological and dimensional characterization of metal particles were carried out by a scanning electron microscope and Leica Application Suite software for image analysis. Corrosion was studied by conditioning the alloy specimens in the RPMI 1640 medium, containing 10% fetal calf serum in an incubator with 5% CO2 for 72 hours at 37°C. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry was used to assess metal ion release. The cytotoxity of conditioning medium (CM) was investigated on L929 cells using an MTT test. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. After casting, the microstructure of the Remanium CSe compact specimen composed of Ni, Cr, Mo, Si, Fe, Al, and Co had a typical dendritic structure. Alloy microparticles had an irregular shape with a wide size range: from less than 1 μm to more than 100 μm. The release of metal ions, especially Ni and Mo from microparticles, was significantly higher, compared to the compact alloy specimen. The CM prepared from compact alloy was not cytotoxic at any tested dilutions, whereas CM from alloy microparticles showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity (90% CM and 45% CM versus control; p < 0.005). Ni-Cr microparticles showed less

  17. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of dental/implant alloys in saline medium.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohit; Kumar, A V Ramesh; Singh, Nirbhay

    2008-07-01

    Dental alloys implanted in mouth are exposed to various aggressive conditions. Keeping this in view, corrosion behaviour of various dental alloys viz. Ni-Cr, Co-Cr, Cu-Ni-Al and commercially pure Ti (c.p. Ti) were studied in 3% NaCl medium by using Tafel polarization, cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. EIS studies were carried out for different duration viz. 1 h, 1 day and 7 days to evaluate the stability of passive film and change in corrosion characteristics with time. It has been found that for Ni-Cr, Co-Cr (DRDO developed) and c.p. Ti the passive film characteristic changed with time whereas for Co-Cr (commercial) and Cu-Ni-Al alloys, the passive film characteristics remained same. From DC electrochemical studies various parameters viz. i(corr), E(corr), i(pass), E(pass) were evaluated. The corrosion rates were observed to be in the order Cu-Ni-Al > Co-Cr (commercial) > Ni-Cr > c.p. Ti > Co-Cr (DRDO).

  18. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior and Corrosion Resistance of a Dual-Phase Mg-Li Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Xie, Wen; Wei, Guobing; Yang, Yan; Liu, Junwei; Xu, Tiancai; Xie, Weidong; Peng, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    The hot deformation and dynamic recrystallization behavior of the dual-phase Mg-9Li-3Al-2Sr-2Y alloy had been investigated using a compression test. The typical dual-phase structure was observed, and average of grain size of as-homogenized alloy is about 110 µm. It mainly contains β-Li, α-Mg, Al4Sr and Al2Y phases. The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) kinetic was established based on an Avrami type equation. The onset of the DRX process occurred before the peak of the stress–strain flow curves. It shows that the DRX volume fraction increases with increasing deformation temperature or decreasing strain rate. The microstructure evolution during the hot compression at various temperatures and strain rates had been investigated. The DRX grain size became larger with the increasing testing temperature or decreasing strain rate because the higher temperature or lower strain rate can improve the migration of DRX grain boundaries. The fully recrystallized microstructure can be achieved in a small strain due to the dispersed island-shape α-Mg phases, continuous the Al4Sr phases and spheroidal Al2Y particles, which can accelerate the nucleation. The continuous Al4Sr phases along the grain boundaries are very helpful for enhancing the corrosion resistance of the duplex structured Mg-Li alloy, which can prevent the pitting corrosion and filiform corrosion. PMID:29522473

  19. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior and Corrosion Resistance of a Dual-Phase Mg-Li Alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Xie, Wen; Wei, Guobing; Yang, Yan; Liu, Junwei; Xu, Tiancai; Xie, Weidong; Peng, Xiaodong

    2018-03-09

    The hot deformation and dynamic recrystallization behavior of the dual-phase Mg-9Li-3Al-2Sr-2Y alloy had been investigated using a compression test. The typical dual-phase structure was observed, and average of grain size of as-homogenized alloy is about 110 µm. It mainly contains β-Li, α-Mg, Al₄Sr and Al₂Y phases. The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) kinetic was established based on an Avrami type equation. The onset of the DRX process occurred before the peak of the stress-strain flow curves. It shows that the DRX volume fraction increases with increasing deformation temperature or decreasing strain rate. The microstructure evolution during the hot compression at various temperatures and strain rates had been investigated. The DRX grain size became larger with the increasing testing temperature or decreasing strain rate because the higher temperature or lower strain rate can improve the migration of DRX grain boundaries. The fully recrystallized microstructure can be achieved in a small strain due to the dispersed island-shape α-Mg phases, continuous the Al₄Sr phases and spheroidal Al₂Y particles, which can accelerate the nucleation. The continuous Al₄Sr phases along the grain boundaries are very helpful for enhancing the corrosion resistance of the duplex structured Mg-Li alloy, which can prevent the pitting corrosion and filiform corrosion.

  20. Hybrid organic-inorganic coatings including nanocontainers for corrosion protection of magnesium alloy ZK30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsonakis, I. A.; Koumoulos, E. P.; Charitidis, C. A.; Kordas, G.

    2013-08-01

    This study is focused on the fabrication, characterization, and application of corrosion protective coatings to magnesium alloy ZK30. Hybrid organic-inorganic coatings were synthesized using organic-modified silicates together with resins based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. Cerium molybdate nanocontainers (ncs) with diameter 100 ± 20 nm were loaded with corrosion inhibitor 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and incorporated into the coatings in order to improve their anticorrosion properties. The coatings were investigated for their anticorrosion and nanomechanical properties. The morphology of the coatings was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The composition was estimated by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The mechanical integrity of the coatings was studied through nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques. Scanning probe microscope imaging of the coatings revealed that the addition of ncs creates surface incongruity; however, the hardness to modulus ratio revealed significant strengthening of the coating with increase of ncs. Studies on their corrosion behavior in 0.5 M sodium chloride solutions at room temperature were made using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Artificial defects were formatted on the surface of the films in order for possible self-healing effects to be evaluated. The results showed that the coated magnesium alloys exhibited only capacitive response after exposure to corrosive environment for 16 months. This behavior denotes that the coatings have enhanced barrier properties and act as an insulator. Finally, the scratched coatings revealed a partial recovery due to the increase of charge-transfer resistance as the immersion time elapsed.