Science.gov

Sample records for zirconium nitride zrn

  1. Plasmonic efficiencies of nanoparticles made of metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN) compared with gold

    PubMed Central

    Lalisse, Adrien; Tessier, Gilles; Plain, Jérome; Baffou, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Metal nitrides have been proposed to replace noble metals in plasmonics for some specific applications. In particular, while titanium nitride (TiN) and zirconium nitride (ZrN) possess localized plasmon resonances very similar to gold in magnitude and wavelength, they benefit from a much higher sustainability to temperature. For this reason, they are foreseen as ideal candidates for applications in nanoplasmonics that require high material temperature under operation, such as heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) or thermophotovoltaics. This article presents a detailed investigation of the plasmonic properties of TiN and ZrN nanoparticles in comparison with gold nanoparticles, as a function of the nanoparticle morphology. As a main result, metal nitrides are shown to be poor near-field enhancers compared to gold, no matter the nanoparticle morphology and wavelength. The best efficiencies of metal nitrides as compared to gold in term of near-field enhancement are obtained for small and spherical nanoparticles, and they do not exceed 60%. Nanoparticle enlargements or asymmetries are detrimental. These results mitigate the utility of metal nitrides for high-temperature applications such as HAMR, despite their high temperature sustainability. Nevertheless, at resonance, metal nitrides behave as efficient nanosources of heat and could be relevant for applications in thermoplasmonics, where heat generation is not detrimental but desired. PMID:27934890

  2. Plasmonic efficiencies of nanoparticles made of metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN) compared with gold.

    PubMed

    Lalisse, Adrien; Tessier, Gilles; Plain, Jérome; Baffou, Guillaume

    2016-12-09

    Metal nitrides have been proposed to replace noble metals in plasmonics for some specific applications. In particular, while titanium nitride (TiN) and zirconium nitride (ZrN) possess localized plasmon resonances very similar to gold in magnitude and wavelength, they benefit from a much higher sustainability to temperature. For this reason, they are foreseen as ideal candidates for applications in nanoplasmonics that require high material temperature under operation, such as heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) or thermophotovoltaics. This article presents a detailed investigation of the plasmonic properties of TiN and ZrN nanoparticles in comparison with gold nanoparticles, as a function of the nanoparticle morphology. As a main result, metal nitrides are shown to be poor near-field enhancers compared to gold, no matter the nanoparticle morphology and wavelength. The best efficiencies of metal nitrides as compared to gold in term of near-field enhancement are obtained for small and spherical nanoparticles, and they do not exceed 60%. Nanoparticle enlargements or asymmetries are detrimental. These results mitigate the utility of metal nitrides for high-temperature applications such as HAMR, despite their high temperature sustainability. Nevertheless, at resonance, metal nitrides behave as efficient nanosources of heat and could be relevant for applications in thermoplasmonics, where heat generation is not detrimental but desired.

  3. Development of a Modified Embedded Atom Force Field for Zirconium Nitride Using Multi-Objective Evolutionary Optimization

    SciT

    Narayanan, Badri; Sasikumar, Kiran; Mei, Zhi-Gang

    2016-07-07

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) exhibits exceptional mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties, which make it attractive for a wide range of technological applications, including wear-resistant coatings, protection from corrosion, cutting/shaping tools, and nuclear breeder reactors. Despite its broad usability, an atomic scale understanding of the superior performance of ZrN, and its response to external stimuli, for example, temperature, applied strain, and so on, is not well understood. This is mainly due to the lack of interatomic potential models that accurately describe the interactions between Zr and N atoms. To address this challenge, we develop a modified embedded atom method (MEAM) interatomic potentialmore » for the Zr–N binary system by training against formation enthalpies, lattice parameters, elastic properties, and surface energies of ZrN (and, in some cases, also Zr3N4) obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The best set of MEAM parameters are determined by employing a multiobjective global optimization scheme driven by genetic algorithms. Our newly developed MEAM potential accurately reproduces structure, thermodynamics, energetic ordering of polymorphs, as well as elastic and surface properties of Zr–N compounds, in excellent agreement with DFT calculations and experiments. As a representative application, we employed molecular dynamics simulations based on this MEAM potential to investigate the atomic scale mechanisms underlying fracture of bulk and nanopillar ZrN under applied uniaxial strains, as well as the impact of strain rate on their mechanical behavior. These simulations indicate that bulk ZrN undergoes brittle fracture irrespective of the strain rate, while ZrN nanopillars show quasi-plasticity owing to amorphization at the crack front. The MEAM potential for Zr–N developed in this work is an invaluable tool to investigate atomic-scale mechanisms underlying the response of ZrN to external stimuli (e

  4. Atom economy and green elimination of nitric oxide using ZrN powders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Wang, Jigang; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Zhen; Li, Peishen; Guo, Ming; Wang, Qiang; Li, Chunlei; Wang, Changzheng; Chen, Shaowei

    2018-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) may cause serious environmental problems, such as acid rain, haze weather, global warming and even death. Herein, a new low-cost, highly efficient and green method for the elimination of NO using zirconium nitride (ZrN) is reported for the first time, which does not produce any waste or any by-product. Relevant experimental parameters, such as reaction temperature and gas concentration, were investigated to explore the reaction mechanism. Interestingly, NO can be easily decomposed into nitrogen (N 2 ) by ZrN powders at 600°C with ZrN simultaneously transformed into zirconium dioxide (ZrO 2 ) gradually. The time for the complete conversion of NO into N 2 was approximately 14 h over 0.5 g of ZrN at a NO concentration of 500 ppm. This green elimination process of NO demonstrated good atom economy and practical significance in mitigating environmental problems.

  5. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ZIRCONIUM NITRIDE IN THE HOMOGENEITY REGION (in Ukrainian)

    SciT

    Samsonov, G.V.; Verkhoglyadova, T.S.

    1962-01-01

    The x-ray method was used to determine the homogeneity region of zirconium nitride as 40 to 50 at.% (9.5 to 13.3% by weight) of nitrogen. It is also shown that part of the ionic bond in the zirconium nitride lattice increases with a decrease in the nitrogen content in this region, this increase being higher than in the homogeneity region of titunium nitride due to the smaller degree of unfilling of the electron d-shell of the zirconium atom in comparison with that of the titanium atom. (auth)

  6. On the mechanism of zirconium nitride formation by zirconium, zirconia and yttria burning in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikova, Ekaterina; Pautova, Julia; Gromov, Alexander; Monogarov, Konstantin; Larionov, Kirill; Teipel, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    The combustion of Zr and (Zr+ZrO2) powdery mixtures in air was accompanied by major ZrN stabilization. The synthesis of cheap ZrN with the high yield in air was facile and utile. The influence of Y2O3 additive on the content of ZrN the solid combustion products (SCP) was investigated. The reagents and SCP were analyzed by BET, DTA-TGA, XRD, SEM and EDS. Burning temperature was measured by thermal imager. The yield of ZrN in the SCP has been varied by the time regulation of the combustion process. The burning samples were quenched at a certain time to avoid the re-oxidation of the obtained ZrN by oxygen. The quenching of the burned (Zr+ZrO2) samples with the Y2O3 additive was allowed increasing the ZrN yield in SCP up to 66 wt%. The chemical mechanism of ZrN formation in air was discussed and the probable source of ZrN massive formation is suggested.

  7. High-voltage SPM oxidation of ZrN: materials for multiscale applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, N.; Comer, J. R.; Zhang, G.; Evans, E. A.; Ramsier, R. D.; Dagata, J. A.

    2005-02-01

    Scanning probe microscope (SPM) oxidation was used to form zirconium oxide features on 200 nm thick ZrN films. The features exhibit rapid yet controlled growth kinetics, even in contact mode with 70 V dc applied between the probe tip and substrate. The features grown for times longer than 10 s are higher than 200 nm, and reach more than 1000 nm in height after 300 s. Long-time oxidation experiments and selective etching of the oxides and nitrides lead us to propose that as the oxidation reaches the silicon substrate, delamination occurs with the simultaneous formation of a thin layer of new material at the ZrN/Si interface. High-voltage oxide growth on ZrN is fast and sustainable, and the robust oxide features are promising candidates for multiscale (nanometre-to-micrometre) applications.

  8. Effects of Plasma ZrN Metallurgy and Shot Peening Duplex Treatment on Fretting Wear and Fretting Fatigue Behavior of Ti6Al4V Alloy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingang; Liu, Daoxin; Zhang, Xiaohua; Du, Dongxing; Yu, Shouming

    2016-03-23

    A metallurgical zirconium nitride (ZrN) layer was fabricated using glow metallurgy using nitriding with zirconiuming prior treatment of the Ti6Al4V alloy. The microstructure, composition and microhardness of the corresponding layer were studied. The influence of this treatment on fretting wear (FW) and fretting fatigue (FF) behavior of the Ti6Al4V alloy was studied. The composite layer consisted of an 8-μm-thick ZrN compound layer and a 50-μm-thick nitrogen-rich Zr-Ti solid solution layer. The surface microhardness of the composite layer is 1775 HK 0.1 . A gradient in cross-sectional microhardness distribution exists in the layer. The plasma ZrN metallurgical layer improves the FW resistance of the Ti6Al4V alloy, but reduces the base FF resistance. This occurs because the improvement in surface hardness results in lowering of the toughness and increasing in the notch sensitivity. Compared with shot peening treatment, plasma ZrN metallurgy and shot peening composite treatment improves the FW resistance and enhances the FF resistance of the Ti6Al4V alloy. This is attributed to the introduction of a compressive stress field. The combination of toughness, strength, FW resistance and fatigue resistance enhance the FF resistance for titanium alloy.

  9. Effects of Plasma ZrN Metallurgy and Shot Peening Duplex Treatment on Fretting Wear and Fretting Fatigue Behavior of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jingang; Liu, Daoxin; Zhang, Xiaohua; Du, Dongxing; Yu, Shouming

    2016-01-01

    A metallurgical zirconium nitride (ZrN) layer was fabricated using glow metallurgy using nitriding with zirconiuming prior treatment of the Ti6Al4V alloy. The microstructure, composition and microhardness of the corresponding layer were studied. The influence of this treatment on fretting wear (FW) and fretting fatigue (FF) behavior of the Ti6Al4V alloy was studied. The composite layer consisted of an 8-μm-thick ZrN compound layer and a 50-μm-thick nitrogen-rich Zr–Ti solid solution layer. The surface microhardness of the composite layer is 1775 HK0.1. A gradient in cross-sectional microhardness distribution exists in the layer. The plasma ZrN metallurgical layer improves the FW resistance of the Ti6Al4V alloy, but reduces the base FF resistance. This occurs because the improvement in surface hardness results in lowering of the toughness and increasing in the notch sensitivity. Compared with shot peening treatment, plasma ZrN metallurgy and shot peening composite treatment improves the FW resistance and enhances the FF resistance of the Ti6Al4V alloy. This is attributed to the introduction of a compressive stress field. The combination of toughness, strength, FW resistance and fatigue resistance enhance the FF resistance for titanium alloy. PMID:28773345

  10. SPM oxidation and parallel writing on zirconium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, N.; Comer, J. R.; Zhang, G.; Evans, E. A.; Ramsier, R. D.; Dagata, J. A.

    2005-07-01

    Systematic investigation of the SPM oxidation process of sputter-deposited ZrN thin films is reported. During the intrinsic part of the oxidation, the density of the oxide increases until the total oxide thickness is approximately twice the feature height. Further oxide growth is sustainable as the system undergoes plastic flow followed by delamination from the ZrN-silicon interface keeping the oxide density constant. ZrN exhibits superdiffusive oxidation kinetics in these single tip SPM studies. We extend this work to the fabrication of parallel oxide patterns 70 nm in height covering areas in the square centimeter range. This simple, quick, and well-controlled parallel nanolithographic technique has great potential for biomedical template fabrication.

  11. Effect of zirconium nitride physical vapor deposition coating on preosteoblast cell adhesion and proliferation onto titanium screws.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Manuela; Gatti, Giorgio; Migliario, Mario; Marchese, Leonardo; Rocchetti, Vincenzo; Renò, Filippo

    2014-11-01

    Titanium has long been used to produce dental implants. Problems related to its manufacturing, casting, welding, and ceramic application for dental prostheses still limit its use, which highlights the need for technologic improvements. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the biologic performance of titanium dental implants coated with zirconium nitride in a murine preosteoblast cellular model. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical and morphologic characteristics of titanium implants coated with zirconium nitride by means of physical vapor deposition. Chemical and morphologic characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and the bioactivity of the implants was evaluated by cell-counting experiments. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis found that physical vapor deposition was effective in covering titanium surfaces with zirconium nitride. Murine MC-3T3 preosteoblasts were seeded onto titanium-coated and zirconium nitride-coated screws to evaluate their adhesion and proliferation. These experiments found a significantly higher number of cells adhering and spreading onto zirconium nitride-coated surfaces (P<.05) after 24 hours; after 7 days, both titanium and zirconium nitride surfaces were completely covered with MC-3T3 cells. Analysis of these data indicates that the proposed zirconium nitride coating of titanium implants could make the surface of the titanium more bioactive than uncoated titanium surfaces. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Zirconium nitride precipitation in nominally pure yttria-stabilized zirconia

    SciT

    Gomez-Garcia, D.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    Nominally pure yttria-stabilized zirconia alloys are shown to contain unexpectedly large amounts of dissolved nitrogen. Its presence in the lattice was detected through the observation of large precipitates in alloys with three different concentrations of yttria deformed in compression in argon in the temperature range 1,600--1,800 C. Electron diffraction, EDS and PEELS analyses, and Moire imaging were used to identify the precipitates as ZrN. The possible origin of the nitrogen, its likely effects on properties, and the role of annealing atmosphere are briefly discussed.

  13. Comparing XPS on bare and capped ZrN films grown by plasma enhanced ALD: Effect of ambient oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2018-03-01

    In this article we compare x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements on bare- and capped- zirconium nitride (ZrN) films to investigate the effect of ambient sample oxidation on the detected bound O in the form of oxide ZrO2 and/or oxynitride ZrOxNy. ZrN films in both bare- and Al2O3/AlN capped- XPS samples were grown by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) technique using tetrakis dimethylamino zirconium (TDMAZr) precursor, forming gas (5% H2, rest N2) inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and as received research grade process gases under identical process conditions. Capped samples were prepared by depositing 1 nm thick PEALD AlN on ZrN, followed by additional deposition of 1 nm thick ALD Al2O3, without venting of ALD reactor. On bare ZrN sample at room temperature, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements with increasing ambient exposure times (texp) showed a self-limiting surface oxidation with the oxide thickness (dox) approaching 3.7 ± 0.02 nm for texp > 120 min. In XPS data measured prior to sample sputtering (tsput = 0), ZrO2 and ZrOxNy were detected in bare- samples, whereas only ZrN and Al2O3/AlN from capping layer were detected in capped- samples. For bare-ZrN samples, appearance of ZrO2 and ZrOxNy up to sputter depth (dsput) of 15 nm in depth-profile XPS data is in contradiction with measured dox = 3.7 nm, but explained from sputtering induced atomic inter-diffusion within analyzed sample. Appearance of artifacts in the XPS spectra from moderately sputtered (dsput = 0.2 nm and 0.4 nm) capped-ZrN sample, provides an evidence to ion-bombardment induced modifications within analyzed sample.

  14. First-principles study of fission gas incorporation and migration in zirconium nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Mei, Zhi-Gang; Liang, Linyun; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2017-03-24

    To evaluate the effectiveness of ZrN as a diffusion barrier against fission gases, we investigate in this paper the incorporation and migration of fission gas atoms, with a focus on Xe, in ZrN by first-principles calculations. The formations of point defects in ZrN, including vacancies, interstitials, divacancies, Frenkel pairs, and Schottky defects, are first studied. Among all the defects, the Schottky defect with two vacancies as first nearest neighbor is predicted to be the most favorable incorporation site for fission gas Xe in ZrN. The migration of Xe gas atom in ZrN is investigated through two diffusion mechanisms, i.e., interstitialmore » and vacancy-assisted diffusions. The migration barrier of Xe gas atom through the intrinsic interstitials in ZrN is considerably lower than that through vacancies. Finally, therefore, at low temperatures fission gas Xe atoms diffuse mainly through interstitials in single crystal ZrN, whereas at high temperatures Xe may diffuse in ZrN assisted by vacancies.« less

  15. Reactive bipolar pulsed dual magnetron sputtering of ZrN films: The effect of duty cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, A.; Valerini, D.; Capodieci, L.; Mirenghi, L.; Di Benedetto, F.; Protopapa, M. L.

    2018-01-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings, due to their inherent high hardness, wear and corrosion resistance, as well as the golden color, can be attractive for a wide range of applications, such as mechanical, optical, decorative and biomedical devices. Reactive Bipolar Pulsed Dual Magnetron Sputtering (BPDMS) operating in mid-frequency range is a powerful technique for the deposition of dense coatings, free from morphological defects, at high deposition rate. In fact, the use of mid-frequency voltage reversals allows suppressing arcs and, as a consequence, stabilizing the reactive sputtering process. Despite the success of the dual bipolar process, there are many aspects of this complex process that are not yet well understood, such as the influence of the target voltage waveforms and plasma parameters on the film growth. In order to fill this lack of knowledge, ZrN films were deposited by BPDMS with different voltage waveforms on the Zr targets and the influence of these deposition parameters on the films' stoichiometry as well as on their structural and mechanical properties is investigated in this paper. In particular, it was found that, for duty cycle values below 33%, the hardness of the coating increases up to 31 GPa. The analysis of the chemical composition, performed by XPS, detects an almost constant value of stoichiometry along the depth-profile of each film and the N:Zr ratio increases from 1.06 to 1.20 as the duty cycle decreases. Therefore, when the N:Zr ratio is 1.06 we got a stoichiometric ZrN compound, while for N:Zr equal to 1.20 we obtained a lack of Zr atoms with respect to N atoms. Raman spectroscopy confirms the results of XPS analyzes, since it showed some features related to the structural disorder in the sample grown with the lowest duty cycle.

  16. Electrical and structural properties of group-4 transition-metal nitride (TiN, ZrN, and HfN) contacts on Ge

    SciT

    Yamamoto, Keisuke; Nakashima, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakasima@astec.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Noguchi, Ryutaro

    2015-09-21

    Electrical and structural properties were investigated for group-4 transition-metal nitride contacts on Ge (TiN/Ge, ZrN/Ge, and HfN/Ge), which were prepared by direct sputter depositions using nitride targets. These contacts could alleviate the intrinsic Fermi-level pinning (FLP) position toward the conduction band edge. It was revealed that this phenomenon is induced by an amorphous interlayer (a-IL) containing nitrogen atoms at the nitride/Ge interfaces. The strength of FLP alleviation positively depended on the thickness of a-IL. TiN/Ge and ZrN/Ge contacts with ∼2 nm-thick a-ILs showed strong FLP alleviations with hole barrier heights (Φ{sub BP}) in the range of 0.52–56 eV, and a HfN/Ge contactmore » with an ∼1 nm-thick a-IL showed a weaker one with a Φ{sub BP} of 0.39 eV. However, TaN/Ge contact without a-IL did not show such FLP alleviation. Based on the results of depth distributions for respective elements, we discussed the formation kinetics of a-ILs at TiN/Ge and ZrN/Ge interfaces. Finally, we proposed an interfacial dipole model to explain the FLP alleviation.« less

  17. Corrosion resistance of zirconium oxynitride coatings deposited via DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering and spray pyrolysis-nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, G. I.; Bethencourt, M.; Olaya, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    ZrOxNy/ZrO2 thin films were deposited on stainless steel using two different methods: ultrasonic spray pyrolysis-nitriding (SPY-N) and the DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (UBMS). Using the first method, ZrO2 was initially deposited and subsequently nitrided in an anhydrous ammonia atmosphere at 1023 K at atmospheric pressure. For UBMS, the film was deposited in an atmosphere of air/argon with a Φair/ΦAr flow ratio of 3.0. Structural analysis was carried out through X-ray diffraction (XRD), and morphological analysis was done through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Chemical analysis was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). ZrOxNy rhombohedral polycrystalline film was produced with spray pyrolysis-nitriding, whereas using the UBMS technique, the oxynitride films grew with cubic Zr2ON2 crystalline structures preferentially oriented along the (2 2 2) plane. Upon chemical analysis of the surface, the coatings exhibited spectral lines of Zr3d, O1s, and N1s, characteristic of zirconium oxynitride/zirconia. SEM analysis showed the homogeneity of the films, and AFM showed morphological differences according to the deposition technique of the coatings. Zirconium oxynitride films enhanced the stainless steel's resistance to corrosion using both techniques. The protective efficacy was evaluated using electrochemical techniques based on linear polarization (LP). The results indicated that the layers provide good resistance to corrosion when exposed to chloride-containing media.

  18. Estimation of sensing characteristics for refractory nitrides based gain assisted core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishodia, Manmohan Singh; Pathania, Pankaj

    2018-04-01

    Refractory transition metal nitrides such as zirconium nitride (ZrN), hafnium nitride (HfN) and titanium nitride (TiN) have emerged as viable alternatives to coinage metals based plasmonic materials, e.g., gold (Au) and silver (Ag). The present work assesses the suitability of gain assisted ZrN-, HfN- and TiN-based conventional core-shell nanoparticles (CCSNPs) and multilayered core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNPs) for refractive index sensing. We report that the optical gain incorporation in the dielectric layer leads to multifold enhancement of the scattering efficiency (Qsca), substantial reduction of the spectral full width at half maximum, and a higher figure of merit (FOM). In comparison with CCSNPs, the MCSNP system exhibits superior sensing characteristics such as higher FOM, ˜ 45% reduction in the critical optical gain, response shift towards the biological window, and higher degree of tunability. Inherent biocompatibility, growth compatibility, chemical stability and flexible spectral tuning of refractory nitrides augmented by superior sensing properties in the present work may pave the way for refractory nitrides based low cost sensing.

  19. Zirconium

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium is the 20th most abundant element in the Earth’s crust. It occurs in a variety of rock types and geologic environments but most often in igneous rocks in the form of zircon (ZrSiO4). Zircon is recovered as a coproduct of the mining and processing of heavy mineral sands for the titanium minerals ilmenite and rutile. The sands are formed by the weathering and erosion of rock containing zircon and titanium heavy minerals and their subsequent concentration in sedimentary systems, particularly in coastal environments. A small quantity of zirconium, less than 10 kt/a (11,000 stpy), compared with total world production of 1.4 Mt (1.5 million st) in 2012, was derived from the mineral baddeleyite (ZrO2), produced from a single source in Kovdor, Russia.

  20. Effects of nitrogen gas ratio on the structural and corrosion properties of ZrN thin films grown on biodegradable magnesium alloy by ion-beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiahosseini, Seyed Rahim; Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Majid

    2017-12-01

    Studies on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys, which are widely applied as biomaterials, have increased in recent years. In this work, zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy through ion-beam sputtering at 473 K with 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 nitrogen proportions [F(N2)] in ionized gas. X-ray diffraction, profilometry, hardness tests, scanning electron microscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques were used to analyze the structure, thickness, adhesion, microstructure, and corrosion resistance of coated samples, respectively. Results showed that the (111) crystalline orientation dominated in all coatings. Williamson-Hall technique revealed that the crystallite size of ZrN films decreased from 73 to 20 nm with increasing F(N2), and compressive microstrain increased from 0.004 to 0.030. Film thicknesses were inversely correlated with N2 amount and significantly decreased from 1.7 to 0.8 µm. The maximum d P/d r ratio, a dependent factor of adhesion, was 0.04 kg/cm for the film deposited under the F(N2) value of 0.5. The corrosion potential of coated samples was not significantly different from that of uncoated AZ91. Under the F(N2) value of 0.6, corrosion current density slightly decreased from 14 to 9.7 µA/cm2 and significantly increased to 13.5 µA/cm2. Results indicated that ZrN film deposited under the F(N2) value of 0.5 showed high adhesion and corrosion resistance.

  1. ZrN coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc techniques

    SciT

    Purandare, Yashodhan, E-mail: Y.Purandare@shu.ac.uk; Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on 1 μm finish high speed steel and 316L stainless steel test coupons. Cathodic Arc (CA) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) + Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (UBM) techniques were utilized to deposit coatings. CA plasmas are known to be rich in metal and gas ions of the depositing species as well as macroparticles (droplets) emitted from the arc sports. Combining HIPIMS technique with UBM in the same deposition process facilitated increased ion bombardment on the depositing species during coating growth maintaining high deposition rate. Prior to coating deposition, substrates were pretreated with Zr{sup +}more » rich plasma, for both arc deposited and HIPIMS deposited coatings, which led to a very high scratch adhesion value (L{sub C2}) of 100 N. Characterization results revealed the overall thickness of the coatings in the range of 2.5 μm with hardness in the range of 30–40 GPa depending on the deposition technique. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and tribological experiments such as dry sliding wear tests and corrosion studies have been utilized to study the effects of ion bombardment on the structure and properties of these coatings. In all the cases, HIPIMS assisted UBM deposited coating fared equal or better than the arc deposited coatings, the reasons being discussed in this paper. Thus H+U coatings provide a good alternative to arc deposited where smooth, dense coatings are required and macrodroplets cannot be tolerated.« less

  2. First-principles study of adsorption and diffusion of oxygen on surfaces of TiN, ZrN and HfN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fangyu; Wang, Jianchuan; Du, Yong; Wang, Jiong; Shang, Shun-Li; Li, Songlin; Chen, Li

    2018-09-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we systematically study the adsorption and diffusion behaviors of single oxygen (O) atom on the (0 0 1) surfaces of TiN, ZrN and HfN nitride coatings. The top of N site (top(N)) is the most energetic favorable site for O atom and followed by the hollow site for all the three nitrides. O atom tends to diffuse on the (0 0 1) surfaces of the nitrides from the top of transition metal top(TM) sites to a neighboring top(TM) sites by avoiding N sites. The adsorption of O on ZrN and HfN is more stable than that on TiN. Our findings could explain the experimental phenomenon that the oxide thickness of TiN is smaller than that of ZrN under the same oxidation conditions.

  3. Synthesis of Nacre-Like Structures using Novel Fabrication Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-18

    vapor deposition methods in order to prepare zirconium nitride (ZrN) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) multilayer Figure 1. (a) Tortuous crack growth...deposition methods in order to prepare zirconium nitride (ZrN) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) multilayer E la st ic m od ul us (G P a) Number

  4. Growth and characterization of zirconium oxynitride films prepared by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraj, S.; Kappertz, O.; Jayavel, R.; Wuttig, M.

    2002-09-01

    Thin films of zirconium oxynitrides have been deposited onto Si(100) substrates at room temperature by reactive dc magnetron sputtering of a metallic Zr target in an argon-oxygen-nitrogen atmosphere. To prepare oxynitride films the sum of the O2 and N2 flow was kept at 3.5 sccm, while the relative nitrogen content of this mixture was changed stepwise from 0% to 100%. The film structure was determined by x-ray diffraction, while x-ray reflectometry was employed to determine the thickness, density, and surface roughness of the films. The optical properties have been studied by spectroscopic reflectance measurements. X-ray diffraction (XRD) determines that the as-deposited films are crystalline and do not change their monoclinic ZrO2 crystal structure even for nitrogen flows up to 80%. For pure argon-nitrogen sputtering, on the contrary, cubic zirconium nitride (ZrN) has been formed. Nevertheless, even though the crystal structure does not change with increasing nitrogen flow up to 80%, there is clear evidence from nitrogen incorporation from Rutherford backscattering experiments, optical spectroscopy, XRD, and x-ray reflectometry. The latter technique determines that the film density increases from 5.2 to 5.8 g/cm3 with increasing nitrogen flow from 0% to 80%. Simultaneously, the rate of sputtering increases from 0.17 to 0.6 m/s, while the film roughness decreases upon increasing N2 flow. Optical spectroscopy measurements of the film reflectance confirm that fully transparent films can be prepared up to a nitrogen flow of 80%. For these films, the band gap decreases from 4.52 to 3.59 eV with increasing N2 flow, while the refractive index at 650 nm simultaneously increases from 2.11 to 2.26. For 100% N2 flow, i.e., without any oxygen, films with a metallic reflectance are obtained.

  5. Plasmonic spectral tunability of conductive ternary nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassavetis, S.; Bellas, D. V.; Abadias, G.; Lidorikis, E.; Patsalas, P.

    2016-06-01

    Conductive binary transition metal nitrides, such as TiN and ZrN, have emerged as a category of promising alternative plasmonic materials. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides such as TixTa1-xN, TixZr1-xN, TixAl1-xN, and ZrxTa1-xN share the important plasmonic features with their binary counterparts, while having the additional asset of the exceptional spectral tunability in the entire visible (400-700 nm) and UVA (315-400 nm) spectral ranges depending on their net valence electrons. In particular, we demonstrate that such ternary nitrides can exhibit maximum field enhancement factors comparable with gold in the aforementioned broadband range. We also critically evaluate the structural features that affect the quality factor of the plasmon resonance and we provide rules of thumb for the selection and growth of materials for nitride plasmonics.

  6. Development of Nitride Coating Using Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sumit

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power and can withstand high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. The design of the research reactor fuels is done for efficient heat emission, and consists of assemblies of thin-plates cladding made from aluminum alloy. The low-enriched fuels (LEU) were developed for replacing high-enriched fuels (HEU) for these reactors necessitates a significantly increased uranium density in the fuel to counterbalance the decrease in enrichment. One of the most promising new fuel candidate is U-Mo alloy, in a U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel form, due to its high uranium loading as well as excellent irradiation resistance performance, is being developed extensively to convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel for high-performance research reactors. However, the formation of an interaction layer (IL) between U-Mo particles and the Al matrix, and the associated pore formation, under high heat flux and high burnup conditions, degrade the irradiation performance of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. From the recent tests results accumulated from the surface engineering of low enriched uranium fuel (SELENIUM) and MIR reactor displayed that a surface barrier coating like physical vapor deposited (PVD) zirconium nitride (ZrN) can significantly reduce the interaction layer. The barrier coating performed well at low burn up but above a fluence rate of 5x 1021 ions/cm2 the swelling reappeared due to formation interaction layer. With this result in mind the objective of this research was to develop an ultrathin ZrN coating over particulate uranium-molybdenum nuclear fuel using a modified savannah 200 atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. This is done in support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) effort to slow down the interaction at fluence rate and reach higher burn up for high power research reactor. The low-pressure Savannah 200 ALD system is modified to be designed as a batch powder coating system using the

  7. METHOD OF COATING GRAPHITE WITH STABLE METAL CARBIDES AND NITRIDES

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1959-10-27

    A method is presented for forming protective stable nitride and carbide compounds on the surface of graphite. This is accomplished by contacting the graphite surface with a fused heavy liquid metal such as bismuth or leadbismuth containing zirconium, titanium, and hafnium dissolved or finely dispersed therein to form a carbide and nitride of at least one of the dissolved metals on the graphite surface.

  8. [Effects of magnetron sputtered ZrN on the bonding strength of titanium porcelain].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shu; Zhang, Wen-yan; Guang, Han-bing; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Fei-min

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the effect of magnetron sputtered ZrN on the bonding strength between a low-fusing porcelain (Ti/Vita titankeramik system) and commercially pure cast titanium. Sixteen specimens were randomly assigned to test group and control group (n=8). The control group received no surface treated. Magnetron sputtered ZrN film was deposited on the surface of specimens in the test group. Then the sixteen titanium-porcelain specimens were prepared in a rectangular shape and went through three-point bending test on a universal test machine. The bond strength of Ti/porcelain was recorded. The phase composition of the specimens was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The interface at titanium and porcelain and the titanium surface after debonding were observed with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analyzed using energy depressive spectrum (EDS). New phase of ZrN was found with XRD in the test group. Statistical analysis showed higher bond strength following ZrN surface treatment in the test group [(45.991+/-0.648) MPa] than that in the control group [(29.483+/-1.007) MPa] (P=0.000). Bonded ceramic could be observed in test group, the amount of bonded ceramic was more than that in the control group. No obvious bonded ceramic in control group was found. Magnetron sputtered ZrN can improve bond strength of Ti/Vita titankeramik system significantly.

  9. Plasmonic spectral tunability of conductive ternary nitrides

    SciT

    Kassavetis, S.; Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@physics.auth.gr; Bellas, D. V.

    2016-06-27

    Conductive binary transition metal nitrides, such as TiN and ZrN, have emerged as a category of promising alternative plasmonic materials. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides such as Ti{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N, and Zr{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N share the important plasmonic features with their binary counterparts, while having the additional asset of the exceptional spectral tunability in the entire visible (400–700 nm) and UVA (315–400 nm) spectral ranges depending on their net valence electrons. In particular, we demonstrate that such ternary nitrides can exhibit maximum field enhancement factors comparable with gold in the aforementionedmore » broadband range. We also critically evaluate the structural features that affect the quality factor of the plasmon resonance and we provide rules of thumb for the selection and growth of materials for nitride plasmonics.« less

  10. First-principles study of transition-metal nitrides as diffusion barriers against Al

    SciT

    Mei, Zhi-Gang; Yacout, Abdellatif M.; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2016-04-01

    Using density-functional theory based first-principles calculations we provided a comparative study of the diffusion barrier properties of TiN, ZrN, and HfN against Al for U-Mo dispersion fuel applications. We firstly examined the thermodynamic stability of these transition-metal nitrides with Al. The calculated heats of reaction show that both TiN and ZrN are thermodynamically unstable diffusion barrier materials, which might be decomposed by Al at relatively high temperatures. As a comparison, HfN is a stable diffusion barrier material for Al. To evaluate the kinetic stability of these nitride systems against Al diffusion, we investigated the diffusion mechanisms of Al in TiN,more » ZrN and HfN using atomic scale simulations. The effect of non-stoichiometry on the defect formation and Al migration was systematically studied. (C) 2015 ELSEVIER B.V. All rights reserved« less

  11. Low temperature route to uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Yeamans, Charles; Hartmann, Thomas; Silva, G. W. Chinthaka; Cerefice, Gary; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2009-09-01

    A method of preparing an actinide nitride fuel for nuclear reactors is provided. The method comprises the steps of a) providing at least one actinide oxide and optionally zirconium oxide; b) mixing the oxide with a source of hydrogen fluoride for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the oxide to a fluoride salt; c) heating the fluoride salt to remove water; d) heating the fluoride salt in a nitrogen atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the fluorides to nitrides; and e) heating the nitrides under vacuum and/or inert atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to convert the nitrides to mononitrides.

  12. Effect of annealing temperature on the structural, morphological, and mechanical properties of polycrystalline zirconium oxynitride composite films deposited by plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ijaz A.; Kashif, Muhammad; Farid, Amjad; Rawat, Rajdeep S.; Ahmad, Riaz

    2017-12-01

    In this article, we reveal the post deposition annealing effect on the structural, morphological, and mechanical properties of polycrystalline zirconium oxynitride (P-ZrON) composite films deposited for 40 focus shots using a plasma focus device. The development of Zr(101), ZrN(111), ZrN(200), Zr3N4(320), ZrN0.28(002), and m-ZrO2(200) diffraction peaks confirms the deposition of P-ZrON composite films. The peak intensity, crystallite size, dislocation density, compressive stress, and texture coefficient of the Zr3N4(320) plane and the microstructural features such as the shape, size and distribution of nanoparticles as well as the film compactness are influenced by the annealing temperature. Elemental analysis confirms the presence of Zr, N, and O in the deposited films. The microhardness of the P-ZrON composite film annealed at 500 °C is found to be 11.87 GPa which is 7.8 times that of virgin zirconium.

  13. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    SciT

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst supportmore » in a fuel cell.« less

  14. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  15. Intrinsic stress in ZrN thin films: Evaluation of grain boundary contribution from in situ wafer curvature and ex situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    SciT

    Koutsokeras, L. E.; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110; Abadias, G.

    2012-05-01

    Low-mobility materials, like transition metal nitrides, usually undergo large residual stress when sputter-deposited as thin films. While the origin of stress development has been an active area of research for high-mobility materials, atomistic processes are less understood for low-mobility systems. In the present work, the contribution of grain boundary to intrinsic stress in reactively magnetron-sputtered ZrN films is evaluated by combining in situ wafer curvature measurements, providing information on the overall biaxial stress, and ex situ x-ray diffraction, giving information on elastic strain (and related stress) inside crystallites. The thermal stress contribution was also determined from the in situ stressmore » evolution during cooling down, after deposition was stopped. The stress data are correlated with variations in film microstructure and growth energetics, in the 0.13-0.42 Pa working pressure range investigated, and discussed based on existing stress models. At low pressure (high energetic bombardment conditions), a large compressive stress is observed due to atomic peening, which induces defects inside crystallites but also promotes incorporation of excess atoms in the grain boundary. Above 0.3-0.4 Pa, the adatom surface mobility is reduced, leading to the build-up of tensile stress resulting from attractive forces between under-dense neighbouring column boundary and possible void formation, while crystallites can still remain under compressive stress.« less

  16. Refining As-cast β-Ti Grains Through ZrN Inoculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Dong; Zhang, Duyao; Easton, Mark A.; St John, David H.; Gibson, Mark A.

    2018-03-01

    The columnar-to-equiaxed transition and remarkable refinement of β-Ti grains occur in an as-cast Ti-13Mo alloy when a new grain refiner, ZrN, was inoculated at a nitrogen level as low as 0.4 wt pct. The grain refining effect is attributed to in situ-formed TiN particles that provide active nucleation sites and solute Zr that promotes constitutional supercooling. Reproducible orientation relationships were identified between TiN nucleants and β-Ti matrix, and well explained by the edge-to-edge matching model.

  17. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.

    1956-08-21

    A dilute aqueous solution of zirconyl chloride which is 1N to 2N in HCl is passed through a column of a cation exchange resin in acid form thereby absorbing both zirconium and associated hafnium impurity in the mesin. The cation exchange material with the absorbate is then eluted with aqueous sulfuric acid of a O.8N to 1.2N strength. The first portion of the eluate contains the zirconium substantially free of hafnium.

  18. Hot carrier dynamics in plasmonic transition metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Adela; Florio, Fred; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2018-06-01

    Extraction of non-equilibrium hot carriers generated by plasmon decay in metallic nano-structures is an increasingly exciting prospect for utilizing plasmonic losses, but the search for optimum plasmonic materials with long-lived carriers is ongoing. Transition metal nitrides are an exciting class of new plasmonic materials with superior thermal and mechanical properties compared to conventional noble metals, but their suitability for plasmonic hot carrier applications remains unknown. Here, we present fully first principles calculations of the plasmonic response, hot carrier generation and subsequent thermalization of all group IV, V and VI transition metal nitrides, fully accounting for direct and phonon-assisted transitions as well as electron–electron and electron–phonon scattering. We find the largest frequency ranges for plasmonic response in ZrN, HfN and WN, between those of gold and silver, while we predict strongest absorption in the visible spectrum for the VN, NbN and TaN. Hot carrier generation is dominated by direct transitions for most of the relevant energy range in all these nitrides, while phonon-assisted processes dominate only below 1 eV plasmon energies primarily for the group IV nitrides. Finally, we predict the maximum hot carrier lifetimes to be around 10 fs for group IV and VI nitrides, a factor of 3–4 smaller than noble metals, due to strong electron–phonon scattering. However, we find longer carrier lifetimes for group V nitrides, comparable to silver for NbN and TaN, while exceeding 100 fs (twice that of silver) for VN, making them promising candidates for efficient hot carrier extraction.

  19. Optical Properties of Ar Ions Irradiated Nanocrystalline ZrC and ZrN Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C.; Miller, K. H.; Makino, H.; Craciun, D.; Simeone, D.; Craciun, V.

    2017-01-01

    Thin nanocrystalline ZrC and ZrN films (less than 400 nanometers), grown on (100) Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 degrees Centigrade by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique, were irradiated by 800 kiloelectronvolts Ar ion irradiation with fluences from 1 times 10(sup 14) atoms per square centimeter up to 2 times 10(sup 15) atoms per square centimeter. Optical reflectance data, acquired from as-deposited and irradiated films, in the range of 500-50000 per centimeter (0.06–6 electronvolts), was used to assess the effect of irradiation on the optical and electronic properties. Both in ZrC and ZrN films we observed that irradiation affects the optical properties of the films mostly at low frequencies, which is dominated by the free carriers response. In both materials, we found a significant reduction in the free carriers scattering rate, i.e. possible increase in mobility, at higher irradiation flux. This is consistent with our previous findings that irradiation affects the crystallite size and the micro-strain, but it does not induce major structural changes.

  20. Post Irradiation TEM Investigation of ZrN Coated U(Mo) Particles Prepared with FIB

    SciT

    Van Renterghem, W.; Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.

    2015-10-01

    In the framework of the Selenium project, two dispersion fuel plates were fabricated with Si and ZrN coated fuel particles and irradiated in the Br2 reactor of SCK•CEN to high burn-up. The first analysis of the irradiated plate proved the reduced swelling of the fuel plate and interaction layer growth up to 70% burn-up. The question was raised how the structure of the interaction layer had been affected by the irradiation and how the structure of the fuel particles had evolved. Hereto, samples from the ZrN coated UMo particles were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using focused ion beammore » milling (FIB) at INL. The FIB technique allowed to precisely select the area of the interaction layer and/or fuel to produce a sample that is TEM transparent over an area of 20 by 20 µm. In this contribution, the first TEM results will be presented from the 66% burn-up sample.« less

  1. ZIRCONIUM-CLADDING OF THORIUM

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.

    1961-11-21

    A method of cladding thorium with zirconium is described. The quality of the bond achieved between thorium and zirconium by hot-rolling is improved by inserting and melting a thorium-zirconium alloy foil between the two materials prior to rolling. (AEC)

  2. Synthesis of zirconium oxynitride in air under DC electric fields

    SciT

    Morisaki, Nobuhiro; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Sasaki, Katsuhiro

    We synthesized zirconium oxynitride from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) in air by applying DC electric fields that produced a controlled electric current in the specimen. When YSZ was heated under an applied DC electric field, the electric current of the specimen steeply increased at a critical temperature, called a flash event, during flash sintering. By keeping the electric current of the specimen constant during the flash event and then holding the specimen at the critical temperature, YSZ was transformed into zirconium oxynitride under the optimal conditions of 50 V/cm, 500 mA, and 1000 °C. We confirmed that zirconium oxynitride formed using high-resolution transmission electronmore » microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive spectrometry. To convert oxides to nitrides, reducing conditions are necessary to form excess oxygen vacancies. Our technique produced the strong reducing conditions necessary to form nitrides from the oxides by delivering a controlled electric current to the specimen.« less

  3. Drude analysis of transition metal nitride films for solar control and low-E multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veszelei, Monica; Ribbing, Carl-Gustaf; Roos, Arne

    1994-09-01

    The Drude-like behavior of the group IVB metal nitrides: TiN, ZrN and HfN furnishes the physical basis for the use of these hard, inert materials as replacement for noble metals in optically selective multilayers. A low value of the refractive index, n, in the visible region and rapidly increasing extinction coefficient, k, when the wavelength increases into the infrared, is characteristic for these nitrides, although to a lesser extent than for the noble metals. A screened Drude model can be fitted to the experimental dielectric function over the near infrared and at least part of the visible spectrum to determine the parameters: plasma resonance energy hvp and relaxation time (tau) . Systematic studies of TiN and ZrN films show that n increases with decreasing film thickness below 60 nm when the film transmits. This increase can be modelled with a increasing Drude parameter (tau) and has previously been explained as an extrinsic effect from defects etc. It is argued that most of this change can be understood as an effect of diffuse scattering against the back surface of the film and is therefore not cured by improvements in deposition technology.

  4. Zirconium and hafnium

    Jones, James V.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Bedinger, George M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Zirconium and hafnium are corrosion-resistant metals that are widely used in the chemical and nuclear industries. Most zirconium is consumed in the form of the main ore mineral zircon (ZrSiO4, or as zirconium oxide or other zirconium chemicals. Zirconium and hafnium are both refractory lithophile elements that have nearly identical charge, ionic radii, and ionic potentials. As a result, their geochemical behavior is generally similar. Both elements are classified as incompatible because they have physical and crystallochemical properties that exclude them from the crystal lattices of most rock-forming minerals. Zircon and another, less common, ore mineral, baddeleyite (ZrO2), form primarily as accessory minerals in igneous rocks. The presence and abundance of these ore minerals in igneous rocks are largely controlled by the element concentrations in the magma source and by the processes of melt generation and evolution. The world’s largest primary deposits of zirconium and hafnium are associated with alkaline igneous rocks, and, in one locality on the Kola Peninsula of Murmanskaya Oblast, Russia, baddeleyite is recovered as a byproduct of apatite and magnetite mining. Otherwise, there are few primary igneous deposits of zirconium- and hafnium-bearing minerals with economic value at present. The main ore deposits worldwide are heavy-mineral sands produced by the weathering and erosion of preexisting rocks and the concentration of zircon and other economically important heavy minerals, such as ilmenite and rutile (for titanium), chromite (for chromium), and monazite (for rare-earth elements) in sedimentary systems, particularly in coastal environments. In coastal deposits, heavy-mineral enrichment occurs where sediment is repeatedly reworked by wind, waves, currents, and tidal processes. The resulting heavy-mineral-sand deposits, called placers or paleoplacers, preferentially form at relatively low latitudes on passive continental margins and supply 100 percent of

  5. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  6. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  7. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    PubMed

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, R. E.; Sherman, A. H.

    1981-08-18

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer. 1 fig.

  9. Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.; Sherman, Anna H.

    1981-01-01

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer.

  10. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.; Hutcheon, J.M.

    1956-08-21

    Substantially complete separation of zirconium from hafnium may be obtained by elution of ion exchange material, on which compounds of the elements are adsorbed, with an approximately normal solution of sulfuric acid. Preferably the acid concentration is between 0.8 N amd 1.2 N, amd should not exceed 1.5 N;. Increasing the concentration of sulfate ion in the eluting solution by addition of a soluble sulfate, such as sodium sulfate, has been found to be advantageous. The preferred ion exchange materials are sulfonated polystyrene resins such as Dowex 50,'' and are preferably arranged in a column through which the solutions are passed.

  11. ZIRCONIUM PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Russell, E.R.; Adamson, A.S.; Schubert, J.; Boyd, G.E.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for separating plutonium values from fission product values in aqueous acidic solution. This is accomplished by flowing the solutlon containing such values through a bed of zirconium orthophosphate. Any fission products adsorbed can subsequently be eluted by washing the column with a solution of 2N HNO/sub 3/ and O.lN H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Plutonium values may subsequently be desorbed by contacting the column with a solution of 7N HNO/sub 3/ .

  12. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    SciT

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. For example, one aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising: (a) providing boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon; (b) heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the aerogel; (c) mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide; and (d) converting at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride. Another aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising heating boron oxidemore » and an aerogel comprising carbon under flow of a nitrogen-containing gas, wherein boron oxide vapor and the nitrogen-containing gas convert at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride.« less

  13. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    SciT

    Sharma, Mayank, E-mail: mayank30134@gmail.com; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S.

    2016-05-06

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  14. Lattice dynamics and electron/phonon interactions in epitaxial transition-metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Antonio Rodolph Bighetti

    Transition metal (TM) nitrides, due to their unique combination of remarkable physical properties and simple NaCl structure, are presently utilized in a broad range of applications and as model systems in the investigation of complex phenomena. Group-IVB nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN have transport properties which include superconductivity and high electrical conductivity; consequentially, they have become technologically important as electrodes and contacts in the semiconducting and superconducting industries. The Group-VB nitride VN, which exhibits enhanced ductility, is a fundamental component in superhard and tough nanostructured hard coatings. In this thesis, I investigate the lattice dynamics responsible for controlling superconductivity and electrical conductivities in Group-IVB nitrides and elasticity and structural stability of the NaCl-structure Group-VB nitride VN. Our group has already synthesized high-quality epitaxial TiN, HfN, and CeN layers on MgO(001) substrates. By irradiating the growth surface with high ion fluxes at energies below the bulk lattice-atom displacement threshold, dense epitaxial single crystal TM nitride films with extremely smooth surfaces have been grown using ultra-high vacuum magnetically-unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Using this approach, I completed the Group-IVB nitride series by growing epitaxial ZrN/MgO(001) films and then grew Group-VB nitride VN films epitaxially on MgO(001), MgO(011), and MgO(111). The combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) reciprocal lattice maps (RLMs), high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR-XTEM), and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) show that single-crystal stoichiometric ZrN films grown at 450 °C are epitaxially oriented cube-on-cube with respect to their MgO(001) substrates, (001) ZrN||(001)MgO and [100]ZrN||[100]MgO. The layers are essentially fully relaxed with a lattice parameter of 0.4575 nm. X-ray reflectivity results reveal that

  15. SEPARATION OF HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Overholser, L.B.; Barton, C.J. Sr.; Ramsey, J.W.

    1960-05-31

    The separation of hafnium impurities from zirconium can be accomplished by means of organic solvent extraction. The hafnium-containing zirconium feed material is dissolved in an aqueous chloride solution and the resulting solution is contacted with an organic hexone phase, with at least one of the phases containing thiocyanate. The hafnium is extracted into the organic phase while zirconium remains in the aqueous phase. Further recovery of zirconium is effected by stripping the onganic phase with a hydrochloric acid solution and commingling the resulting strip solution with the aqueous feed solution. Hexone is recovered and recycled by means of scrubbing the onganic phase with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the hafnium, and thiocyanate is recovered and recycled by means of neutralizing the effluent streams to obtain ammonium thiocyanate.

  16. Influence of atomic layer deposition valve temperature on ZrN plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition growth

    SciT

    Muneshwar, Triratna, E-mail: muneshwa@ualberta.ca; Cadien, Ken

    2015-11-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) relies on a sequence of self-limiting surface reactions for thin film growth. The effect of non-ALD side reactions, from insufficient purging between pulses and from precursor self-decomposition, on film growth is well known. In this article, precursor condensation within an ALD valve is described, and the effect of the continuous precursor source from condensate evaporation on ALD growth is discussed. The influence of the ALD valve temperature on growth and electrical resistivity of ZrN plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) films is reported. Increasing ALD valve temperature from 75 to 95 °C, with other process parameters being identical, decreasedmore » both the growth per cycle and electrical resistivity (ρ) of ZrN PEALD films from 0.10 to 0.07 nm/cycle and from 560 to 350 μΩ cm, respectively. Our results show that the non-ALD growth resulting from condensate accumulation is eliminated at valve temperatures close to the pressure corrected boiling point of precursor.« less

  17. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of neutron irradiated Si and ZrN coated UMo particles prepared using FIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Renterghem, W.; Miller, B. D.; Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Gan, J.; Madden, J. W.; Keiser, D. D.

    2018-01-01

    Two fuel plates, containing Si and ZrN coated U-Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al matrix, were irradiated in the BR2 reactor of SCK•CEN to a burn-up of ∼70% 235U. Five samples were prepared by INL using focused ion beam milling and transported to SCK•CEN for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation. Two samples were taken from the Si coated U-Mo fuel particles at a burn-up of ∼42% and ∼66% 235U and three samples from the ZrN coated U-Mo at a burn-up of ∼42%, ∼52% and ∼66% 235U. The evolution of the coating, fuel structure, fission products and the formation of interaction layers are discussed. Both coatings appear to be an effective barrier against fuel matrix interaction and only on the samples having received the highest burn-up and power, the formation of an interaction between Al and U(Mo) can be observed on those locations where breaches in the coatings were formed during plate fabrication.

  18. Methods of forming boron nitride

    SciT

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boronmore » nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.« less

  19. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, James M.; Lepetre, Yves J.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

  20. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  1. Microstructural characterization of a thin film ZrN diffusion barrier in an As-fabricated U-7Mo/Al matrix dispersion fuel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Perez, Emmanuel; Wiencek, Tom; Leenaers, Ann; Van den Berghe, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The United States High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development program is developing low enriched uranium fuels for application in research and test reactors. One concept utilizes U-7 wt.% Mo (U-7Mo) fuel particles dispersed in Al matrix, where the fuel particles are coated with a 1 μm-thick ZrN coating. The ZrN serves as a diffusion barrier to eliminate a deleterious reaction that can occur between U-7Mo and Al when a dispersion fuel is irradiated under aggressive reactor conditions. To investigate the final microstructure of a physically-vapor-deposited ZrN coating in a dispersion fuel plate after it was fabricated using a rolling process, characterization samples were taken from a fuel plate that was fabricated at 500 °C using ZrN-coated U-7Mo particles, Al matrix and AA6061 cladding. Scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy analysis were performed. Data from these analyses will be used to support future microstructural examinations of irradiated fuel plates, in terms of understanding the effects of irradiation on the ZrN microstructure, and to determine the role of diffusion barrier microstructure in eliminating fuel/matrix interactions during irradiation. The as-fabricated coating was determined to be cubic-ZrN (cF8) phase. It exhibited a columnar microstructure comprised of nanometer-sized grains and a region of relatively high porosity, mainly near the Al matrix. Small impurity-containing phases were observed at the U-7Mo/ZrN interface, and no interaction zone was observed at the ZrN/Al interface. The bonding between the U-7Mo and ZrN appeared to be mechanical in nature. A relatively high level of oxygen was observed in the ZrN coating, extending from the Al matrix in the ZrN coating in decreasing concentration. The above microstructural characteristics are discussed in terms of what may be most optimal for a diffusion barrier in a dispersion fuel plate application.

  2. Fine-grained zirconium-base material

    DOEpatents

    Van Houten, G.R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for making zirconium with inhibited grain growth characteristics, by the process of vacuum melting the zirconium, adding 0.3 to 0.5% carbon, stirring, homogenizing, and cooling. (Official Gazette)

  3. Method for preparing actinide nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, G.H.; Cleveland, J.M.; Heiple, C.R.

    1975-12-01

    Actinide nitrides, and particularly plutonium and uranium nitrides, are prepared by reacting an ammonia solution of an actinide compound with an ammonia solution of a reactant or reductant metal, to form finely divided actinide nitride precipitate which may then be appropriately separated from the solution. The actinide nitride precipitate is particularly suitable for forming nuclear fuels.

  4. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  5. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  6. Zirconium tetrachloride revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Borjas Nevarez, Rosendo; Balasekaran, Samundeeswari Mariappan; Kim, Eunja; ...

    2018-02-19

    We present that zirconium tetrachloride, ZrCl 4, is a strategic material with wide-ranging applications. Until now, only one crystallographic study on ZrCl 4has been reported [Krebs (1970).Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem.378, 263–272] and that was more than 40 years ago. The compound used for the previous determination was prepared from ZrO 2 and Cl 2–CCl 4, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) studies on ZrCl 4 obtained from Zr metal have not yet been reported. In this context, we prepared ZrCl 4 from the reaction of Zr metal and Cl 2 gas in a sealed tube and investigated its structure at 100,more » 150, 200, 250, and 300 K. At 300 K, the SCXRD analysis indicates that ZrCl 4 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pca2 1 [a= 6.262 (9),b= 7.402 (11),c= 12.039 (17) Å, andV= 558.0 (14) Å 3] and consists of infinite zigzag chains of edge-sharing ZrCl 6 octahedra. This chain motif is similar to that observed previously in ZrCl 4, but the structural parameters and space group differ. Finally, in the temperature range 100–300 K, no phase transformation was identified, while elongation of intra-chain Zr...Zr [3.950 (1) Å at 100 K and 3.968 (5) Å at 300 K] and inter-chain Cl...Cl [3.630 (3) Å at 100 K and 3.687 (9) Å at 300 K] distances occurred.« less

  7. Diamond-like carbon coatings with zirconium-containing interlayers for orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Dipankar; Lackner, Juergen; Fleming, Robert A; Goss, Josh; Chen, Jingyi; Zou, Min

    2017-04-01

    Six types of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings with zirconium (Zr)-containing interlayers on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) were investigated for improving the biotribological performance of orthopedic implants. The coatings consist of three layers: above the substrate a layer stack of 32 alternating Zr and ZrN sublayers (Zr:ZrN), followed by a layer comprised of Zr and DLC (Zr:DLC), and finally a N-doped DLC layer. The Zr:ZrN layer is designed for increasing load carrying capacity and corrosion resistance; the Zr:DLC layer is for gradual transition of stress, thus enhancing layer adhesion; and the N-doped DLC layer is for decreasing friction, squeaking noises and wear. Biotribological experiments were performed in simulated body fluid employing a ball-on-disc contact with a Si 3 N 4 ball and a rotational oscillating motion to mimic hip motion in terms of gait angle, dynamic contact pressures, speed and body temperature. The results showed that the Zr:DLC layer has a substantial influence on eliminating delamination of the DLC from the substrates. The DLC/Si 3 N 4 pairs significantly reduced friction coefficient, squeaking noise and wear of both the Si 3 N 4 balls and the discs compared to those of the Ti-6Al-4V/Si 3 N 4 pair after testing for a duration that is equivalent to one year of hip motion in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR ZIRCONIUM AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, H.W.; Thomas, J.R.

    1959-06-30

    The separation of zirconium from columbium, rare earths, yttrium and the alkaline earth metals, such mixtures of elements occurring in zirconium ores or neutron irradiated uranium is described. According to the invention a suitable separation of zirconium from a one normal acidic aqueous solution containing salts, nitrates for example, of tetravalent zirconium, pentavalent columbium, yttrium, rare earths in the trivalent state and alkaline earths can be obtained by contacting the aqueous solution with a fluorinated beta diketonc alone or in an organic solvent solution, such as benzene, to form a zirconium chelate compound. When the organic solvent is present the zirconium chelate compound is directly extracted; otherwise it is separated by filtration. The zirconium may be recovered from contacting the organic solvent solution containing the chelated compound by back extraction with either an aqueous hydrofluoric acid or an oxalic acid solution.

  9. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  10. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  11. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  12. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W [Newport News, VA; Jordan, Kevin [Newport News, VA; Park, Cheol [Yorktown, VA

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  13. PROCESS OF PREPARING ZIRCONIUM OXYCHLORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Andrews, M.L.

    1960-06-28

    A process is given for preparing zirconyl chloride by mixing solid zirconyl chloride octahydrate and solid zirconium tetrachloride at room temperature whereby both chlorides are converted to zirconyl chloride trinydrate and hydrogen chloride is formed and volatilized by the reaction heat.

  14. Boron nitride housing cools transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Boron nitride ceramic heat sink cools transistors in r-f transmitter and receiver circuits. Heat dissipated by the transistor is conducted by the boron nitride housing to the metal chassis on which it is mounted.

  15. Unintentional carbide formation evidenced during high-vacuum magnetron sputtering of transition metal nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Hultman, L.; Schneider, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    Carbide signatures are ubiquitous in the surface analyses of industrially sputter-deposited transition metal nitride thin films grown with carbon-less source materials in typical high-vacuum systems. We use high-energy-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy to reveal details of carbon temporal chemical state evolution, from carbide formed during film growth to adventitious carbon adsorbed upon contact with air. Using in-situ grown Al capping layers that protect the as-deposited transition metal nitride surfaces from oxidation, it is shown that the carbide forms during film growth rather than as a result of post deposition atmosphere exposure. The XPS signature of carbides is masked by the presence of adventitious carbon contamination, appearing as soon as samples are exposed to atmosphere, and eventually disappears after one week-long storage in lab atmosphere. The concentration of carbon assigned to carbide species varies from 0.28 at% for ZrN sample, to 0.25 and 0.11 at% for TiN and HfN, respectively. These findings are relevant for numerous applications, as unintentionally formed impurity phases may dramatically alter catalytic activity, charge transport and mechanical properties by offsetting the onset of thermally-induced phase transitions. Therefore, the chemical state of C impurities in PVD-grown films should be carefully investigated.

  16. Resistance to Corrosion of Zirconia Coatings Deposited by Spray Pyrolysis in Nitrided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, G. I.; Olaya, J. J.; Bethencourt, M.; Cifredo, G.; Blanco, G.

    2013-10-01

    Coatings of zirconium oxide were deposited onto three types of stainless steel, AISI 316L, 2205, and tool steel AISI D2, using the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method. The effect of the flux ratio on the process and its influence on the structure and morphology of the coatings were investigated. The coatings obtained, 600 nm thick, were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The resistance to corrosion of the coatings deposited over steel (not nitrided) and stainless steel nitrided (for 2 h at 823 K) in an ammonia atmosphere was evaluated. The zirconia coating enhances the stainless steel's resistance to corrosion, with the greatest increase in corrosion resistance being observed for tool steel. When the deposition is performed on previously nitrided stainless steel, the morphology of the surface improves and the coating is more homogeneous, which leads to an improved corrosion resistance.

  17. Zirconium Phosphate Supported MOF Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham

    2016-06-06

    We report a rare example of the preparation of HKUST-1 metal-organic framework nanoplatelets through a step-by-step seeding procedure. Sodium ion exchanged zirconium phosphate, NaZrP, nanoplatelets were judiciously selected as support for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of Cu(II) and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) linkers. The first layer of Cu(II) is attached to the surface of zirconium phosphate through covalent interaction. The successive LBL growth of HKUST-1 film is then realized by soaking the NaZrP nanoplatelets in ethanolic solutions of cupric acetate and H3BTC, respectively. The amount of assembled HKUST-1 can be readily controlled by varying the number of growth cycles, which was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and gas adsorption analyses. The successful construction of HKUST-1 on NaZrP was also supported by its catalytic performance for the oxidation of cyclohexene.

  18. Cubic nitride templates

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-04-30

    A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

  19. Method for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide gels and spherules

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L.

    2003-08-05

    Methods for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent having a desired crystallinity, zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials, zirconium oxide fiber materials, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite and spherules of barium zirconate. The hydrous zirconium oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process are useful as inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters and ceramics.

  20. Sintering silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  1. DISSOLUTION OF ZIRCONIUM-CONTAINING FUEL ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Horn, F.L.

    1961-12-12

    Uranium is recovered from spent uranium fuel elements containing or clad with zirconium. These fuel elements are placed in an anhydrous solution of hydrogen fluoride and nitrogen dioxide. Within this system uranium forms a soluble complex and zirconium forms an insoluble complex. The uranium can then be separated, treated, and removed from solution as uranium hexafluoride. (AEC)

  2. Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Richard W.

    1980-01-01

    Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

  3. Phase transformation and microstructural evolution of nanostructured oxides and nitrides under ion irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fengyuan

    Material design at the nanometer scale is an effective strategy for developing advanced materails with enhanced radiation tolerance for advanced nuclear energy systems as high densities of surfaces and interfaces of the nanostructured materials may behave as effective sinks for defect recovery. However, nanostructured materials may not be intrinsically radiation tolerant, and the interplay among the factors of crystal size, temperature, chemical composition, surface energy and radiation conditions may eventually determine material radiation behaviors. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the radiation effects of nanostructured materials and the underlying physics for the design of advanced nanostructured nuclear materials. The main objective of this doctoral thesis is to study the behavior of nanostructured oxides and nitrides used as fuel matrix and waste forms under extreme radiation conditions with the focus of phase transformation, microstructural evolution and damage mechanisms. Radiation experiments were performed using energetic ion beam techniques to simulate radiation damage resulting from energetic neutrons, alpha-decay events and fission fragments, and various experimental approaches were employed to characterize materials’ microstructural evolution and phase stability upon intense radiation environments including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Thermal annealing experiments indicated that nanostructured ZrO2 phase stability is strongly affected by the grain size. Radiation results on nanostructured ZrO2 indicated that thermodynamically unstable or metastable high temperature phases can be induced by energetic beam irradiation at room temperature. Various phase transformation among different polymorphs of monoclinic, tetragonal and amorphous states can be induced, and different mechanisms are responsible for structural transformations including oxygen vacancies accumulation upon displacive

  4. Separation of Zirconium and Hafnium: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Xiao, Y.; van Sandwijk, A.; Xu, Q.; Yang, Y.

    Zirconium is an ideal material for nuclear reactors due to its low absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, whereas the typically contained hafnium with strong neutron-absorption is very harmful for zirconium. This paper provides an overview of the processes for separating hafnium from zirconium. The separation processes are roughly classified into hydro- and pyrometallurgical routes. The current dominant zirconium production route involves pyrometallurgical ore cracking, multi-step hydrometallurgical liquid-liquid extraction for hafnium removal and the reduction of zirconium tetrachloride to the pure metal by the Kroll process. The lengthy hydrometallurgical Zr-Hf separation operations leads to high production cost, intensive labour and heavy environmental burden. Using a compact pyrometallurgical separation method can simplify the whole production flowsheet with a higher process efficiency. The known separation methods are discussed based on the following reaction features: redox characteristics, volatility, electrochemical properties and molten salt extraction. The commercially operating extractive distillation process is a significant advance in Zr-Hf separation technology but it suffers from high process maintenance cost. The recently developed new process based on molten salt-metal equilibrium for Zr-Hf separation shows a great potential for industrial application, which is compact for nuclear grade zirconium production starting from crude ore. In the present paper, the available separation technologies are compared. The advantages and disadvantages as well as future directions of research and development for nuclear grade zirconium production are discussed.

  5. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  6. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION WITH RESPECT TO ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Vogler, S.; Beederman, M.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranium values from a nitric acid aqueous solution containing uranyl values, zirconium values and tetravalent plutonium values. The process comprises contacting said solution with a substantially water-immiscible liquid organic solvent containing alkyl phosphate, separating an organic extract phase containing the uranium, zirconium, and tetravalent plutonium values from an aqueous raffinate, contacting said organic extract phase with an aqueous solution 2M to 7M in nitric acid and also containing an oxalate ion-containing substance, and separating a uranium- containing organic raffinate from aqueous zirconium- and plutonium-containing extract phase.

  7. Production of nuclear grade zirconium: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Xiao, Y.; van Sandwijk, A.; Xu, Q.; Yang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Zirconium is an ideal material for nuclear reactors due to its low absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, whereas the typically contained hafnium with strong neutron-absorption is very harmful for zirconium as a fuel cladding material. This paper provides an overview of the processes for nuclear grade zirconium production with emphasis on the methods of Zr-Hf separation. The separation processes are roughly classified into hydro- and pyrometallurgical routes. The known pyrometallurgical Zr-Hf separation methods are discussed based on the following reaction features: redox characteristics, volatility, electrochemical properties and molten salt-metal equilibrium. In the present paper, the available Zr-Hf separation technologies are compared. The advantages and disadvantages as well as future directions of research and development for nuclear grade zirconium production are discussed.

  8. Oxidized zirconium on ceramic; Catastrophic coupling.

    PubMed

    Ozden, V E; Saglam, N; Dikmen, G; Tozun, I R

    2017-02-01

    Oxidized zirconium (Oxinium™; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA) articulated with polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty (THA) appeared to have the potential to reduce wear dramatically. The thermally oxidized metal zirconium surface is transformed into ceramic-like hard surface that is resistant to abrasion. The exposure of soft zirconium metal under hard coverage surface after the damage of oxidized zirconium femoral head has been described. It occurred following joint dislocation or in situ succeeding disengagement of polyethylene liner. We reported three cases of misuse of Oxinium™ (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA) heads. These three cases resulted in catastrophic in situ wear and inevitable failure although there was no advice, indication or recommendation for this use from the manufacturer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  10. METHOD OF IMPROVING CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Shannon, D.W.

    1961-03-28

    An improved intermediate rinse for zirconium counteracts an anomalous deposit that often results in crevices and outof-the-way places when ordinary water is used to rinse away a strong fluoride etching solution designed to promote passivation of the metal. The intermediate rinse, which is used after the etching solution and before the water, is characterized by a complexing agent for fluoride ions such as aluminum or zirconium nitrates or chlorides.

  11. DISSOLUTION OF ZIRCONIUM AND ALLOYS THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, J.L.

    1961-07-11

    The dissolution of zirconium cladding in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate is described. The method finds particular utility in processing spent fuel elements for nuclear reactors. The zirconium cladding is first dissolved in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate; insoluble uranium and plutonium fiuorides formed by attack of the solvent on the fuel materiai of the fuel element are then separated from the solution, and the fuel materiai is dissolved in another solution.

  12. The 95Zr(n, γ)96Zr Cross Section from the Surrogate Ratio Method and Its Effect on s-process Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, S. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Wang, Y. B.; Nishio, K.; Lugaro, M.; Karakas, A. I.; Makii, H.; Mohr, P.; Su, J.; Li, Y. J.; Nishinaka, I.; Hirose, K.; Han, Y. L.; Orlandi, R.; Shen, Y. P.; Guo, B.; Zeng, S.; Lian, G.; Chen, Y. S.; Liu, W. P.

    2017-10-01

    The 95Zr(n, γ)96Zr reaction cross section is crucial in the modeling of s-process nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars because it controls the operation of the branching point at the unstable 95Zr and the subsequent production of 96Zr. We have carried out the measurement of the 94Zr(18O, 16O) and 90Zr(18O, 16O) reactions and obtained the γ-decay probability ratio of 96Zr* and 92Zr* to determine the 95Zr(n, γ)96Zr reaction cross sections with the surrogate ratio method. Our deduced Maxwellian-averaged cross section of 66 ± 16 mb at 30 keV is close to the value recommended by Bao et al., but 30% and more than a factor of two larger than the values proposed by Toukan & Käppeler and Lugaro et al., respectively, and routinely used in s-process models. We tested the new rate in stellar models with masses between 2 and 6 M ⊙ and metallicities of 0.014 and 0.03. The largest changes—up to 80% variations in 96Zr—are seen in models of mass 3–4 M ⊙, where the 22Ne neutron source is mildly activated. The new rate can still provide a match to data from meteoritic stardust silicon carbide grains, provided that the maximum mass of the parent stars is below 4 M ⊙, for a metallicity of 0.03.

  13. THE ANALYSIS OF URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    SciT

    Milner, G.W.C.; Skewies, A.F.

    1953-03-01

    A satisfactory procedure is described for the analysis of uranium-zirconium alloys containing up to 25% zirconium. It is based on the separation of the zirconium from the uranium by dissolving the cupferron complex of the former element into chloroform. After the evaporation of the solvent from the combined organic extracts, the residue is ignited to zirconium oxide. The latter is then re-dissolved and zirconium is separated from other elements co-extracted in the solvent extraction procedure by precipitation with mandelic acid. The zirconium mandelate is finally ignited to oxide at 960 deg C. The uranium is separated from the aqueous solutionmore » remaining from the cupferron extraction by precipitating with tannin at a pH of 8; the precipitate being removed by filtration and then ignited a t 800 deg C. The residue is dissolved in nitric acid and the uranium is finally determined by precipitating as ammonium diuranate and then igniting to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. (auth)« less

  14. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; ...

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  15. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  16. IMPROVEMENT OF THE EXTRACTION SEPARATION OF URANIUM AND ZIRCONIUM USING ZIRCONIUM-MASKING REAGENTS (in German)

    SciT

    Kyrs, M.; Caletka, R.; Selucky, P.

    1963-12-01

    The masking capacities of a series of reagents were studied in the zirconium extraction with tributyl phosphate solution in the presence of nitric acid. It was established that with many reagents an improvement of the separation of uranium from zirconium could be obtained. The efficiency of the reagents increases in the series tannin, oxalic acid, tiron, pyrogallol, and Arsenazo I. (tr-auth)

  17. Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN) Nanorods Superlattice (SL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-29

    Final Report (Technical) 3. DATES COVERED 29-03-2005 to 29-05-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Indium Gallium Nitride/ Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN...Institution: Quantum functional Semiconductor Research Center (QSRC), Dongguk University - Title of project: Indium Gallium Nitride/ Gallium Nitride...Accepted with minor revision Indium Gallium Nitride / Gallium Nitride (InGaN/ GaN) Nanorods Superlattice (SL) Abstract The growth condition, electrical

  18. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Schöllchen, Maximilian; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants. Methods: Zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line–distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. Results: While titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium–zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. Conclusions: MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting. PMID:27910719

  19. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Schöllchen, Maximilian; Gauer, Tobias; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants. Zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line-distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. While titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium-zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting.

  20. Zirconium: biomedical and nephrological applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, David B N; Roberts, Martin; Bluchel, Christian G; Odell, Ross A

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid increase in the use of zirconium (Zr)-containing compounds in artificial internal organs. Examples include dental implants and other restorative practices, total knee and hip replacement, and middle-ear ossicular chain reconstruction. In nephrological practice, Zr-containing sorbents have been used in hemofiltration, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and in the design and construction of wearable artificial kidneys. Zr compounds continue to be widely and extensively used in deodorant and antiperspirant preparations. In the public health arena, Zr compounds have been studied or used in controlling phosphorus pollution and in the reclamation of poison and bacteria-contaminated water. Experimental and clinical studies support the general consensus that Zr compounds are biocompatible and exhibit low toxicity. Reports on possible Zr-associated adverse reactions are rare and, in general, have not rigorously established a cause-and-effect relationship. Although publications on the use of Zr compounds have continued to increase in recent years, reports on Zr toxicity have virtually disappeared from the medical literature. Nevertheless, familiarity with, and continued vigilant monitoring of, the use of these compounds are warranted. This article provides an updated review on the biomedical use of Zr compounds.

  1. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Hansen, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Novel crystalline .alpha. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and .beta. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate.

  2. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs P...

  3. Processing fissile material mixtures containing zirconium and/or carbon

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Michael Ernest; Maloney, Martin David

    2013-07-02

    A method of processing spent TRIZO-coated nuclear fuel may include adding fluoride to complex zirconium present in a dissolved TRIZO-coated fuel. Complexing the zirconium with fluoride may reduce or eliminate the potential for zirconium to interfere with the extraction of uranium and/or transuranics from fission materials in the spent nuclear fuel.

  4. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  5. Method for producing refractory nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1989-01-24

    A process for making fine, uniform metal nitride powders that can be hot pressed or sintered. A metal salt is placed in a solvent with Melamine and warmed until a metal-Melamine compound forms. The solution is cooled and the metal-Melamine precipitate is calcined at a temperature below 700.degree. C. to form the metal nitrides and to avoid formation of the metal oxide.

  6. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  7. Nitride stabilized core/shell nanoparticles

    SciT

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian Abraham; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    Nitride stabilized metal nanoparticles and methods for their manufacture are disclosed. In one embodiment the metal nanoparticles have a continuous and nonporous noble metal shell with a nitride-stabilized non-noble metal core. The nitride-stabilized core provides a stabilizing effect under high oxidizing conditions suppressing the noble metal dissolution during potential cycling. The nitride stabilized nanoparticles may be fabricated by a process in which a core is coated with a shell layer that encapsulates the entire core. Introduction of nitrogen into the core by annealing produces metal nitride(s) that are less susceptible to dissolution during potential cycling under high oxidizing conditions.

  8. Zirconium diselenite microstructures, formation and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Chandan C.; Salker, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a series of microstructures of zirconium diselenite (Zr(SeO3)2) has been prepared via a simple precipitation method at room temperature without adding any organic surfactants. Phase purity of the sample has been checked by X-ray Diffraction. From the SEM, FESEM, and TEM images spheroid nanoparticles to the starfish-like structure of zirconium diselenite are detected. The morphological evolution processes were investigated carefully following time-dependent experiments and a growth mechanism has been proposed. Two different crystal growth processes, the oriented attachment process accompanying the Ostwald ripening process were held responsible for the formation of a structure resembling starfish having four arms.

  9. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK•CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% 235U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL-matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)-matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  10. Aluminum nitride insulating films for MOSFET devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of aluminum nitrides as electrical insulator for electric capacitors is discussed. Electrical properties of aluminum nitrides are analyzed and specific use with field effect transistors is defined. Operational limits of field effect transistors are developed.

  11. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  12. METHOD AND ALLOY FOR BONDING TO ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, F.D.; Misch, R.D.

    1960-04-19

    A brazing alloy can be used for bonding zirconium and its alloys to other metals, ceramics, and cermets, and consists of 6 to 9 wt.% Ni, 6 to 9 wn~.% Cr, Mo, or W, 0 to 7.5 wt.% Fe, and the balance Zr.

  13. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  14. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  15. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites.

  16. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; zirconium

    Towner, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Zircon, a zirconium silicate, is currently the most important commercial zirconium-bearing mineral. Baddeleyite, a natural form of zirconia, is less important but has some specific end uses. Both zircon and baddeleyite occur in hard-rock and placer deposits, but at present all zircon production is from placer deposits. Most baddeleyite production is from hard-rock deposits, principally as a byproduct of copper and phosphate-rock mining. World zirconium resources in identified, economically exploitable deposits are about 46 times current production rates. Of these resources, some 71 percent are in South Africa, Australia, and the United States. The principal end uses of zirconium minerals are in ceramic applications and as refractories, abrasives, and mold linings in foundries. A minor amount, mainly of zircon, is used for the production of hafnium-free zirconium metal, which is used principally for sheathing fuel elements in nuclear reactors and in the chemical-processing industry, aerospace engineering, and electronics. Australia and South Africa are the largest zircon producers and account for more than 70 percent of world output; the United States and the Soviet Union account for another 20 percent. South Africa accounts for almost all the world's production of baddeleyite, which is about 2 percent of world production of contained zirconia. Australia and South Africa are the largest exporters of zircon. Unless major new deposits are developed in countries that have not traditionally produced zircon, the pattern of world production is unlikely to change by 2020. The proportions, however, of production that come from existing producing countries may change somewhat.

  18. Tubes of rhombohedral boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, L.; Bando, Y.; Sato, T.

    2000-08-01

    The structure of boron nitride bamboo-like tubular whiskers grown from boron nitride powder is investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Despite the relatively small size of the tubes (20-200 nm in diameter), they all exhibit rhombohedral-like ordering in their layer stacking. The tubular sheets also tend to have their [10 bar 1 0] direction parallel to the fibre axis. Particles of iron alloys are commonly found encapsulated inside or at the end of the filaments. It is suggested that iron plays an active role in the growth of the fibres.

  19. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons from Exfoliation of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Two types of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were exfoliated into boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNR), which were identified using transmission electron microscopy: (1) commercial BNNTs with thin tube walls and small diameters. Tube unzipping was indicated by a large decrease of the sample's surface area and volume for pores less than 2 nm in diameter. (2) BNNTs with large diameters and thick walls synthesized at NASA Glenn Research Center. Here, tube unraveling was indicated by a large increase in external surface area and pore volume. For both, the exfoliation process was similar to the previous reported method to exfoliate commercial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN): Mixtures of BNNT, FeCl3, and NaF (or KF) were sequentially treated in 250 to 350 C nitrogen for intercalation, 500 to 750 C air for exfoliation, and finally HCl for purification. Property changes of the nanosized boron nitride throughout this process were also similar to the previously observed changes of commercial hBN during the exfoliation process: Both crystal structure (x-ray diffraction data) and chemical properties (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy data) of the original reactant changed after intercalation and exfoliation, but most (not all) of these changes revert back to those of the reactant once the final, purified products are obtained.

  20. METHOD OF MAKING DELTA ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE MONOLITHIC MODERATOR PIECES

    DOEpatents

    Vetrano, J.B.

    1962-01-23

    A method is given for preparing large, sound bodies of delta zirconium hydride. The method includes the steps of heating a zirconium body to a temperature of not less than l000 deg C, providing a hydrogen atmosphere for the zirconium body at a pressure not greater than one atmosphere, reducing the temperature slowly to 800 deg C at such a rate that cracks do not form while maintaining the hydrogen pressure substantially constant, and cooling in an atmosphere of hydrogen. (AEC)

  1. Intercalation chemistry of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Jan; Zima, Vítězslav; Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík; Trchová, Miroslava

    2013-12-01

    Zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate is a layered material which can be employed as a host for the intercalation reactions with basic molecules. A wide range of organic compounds were chosen to represent intercalation ability of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate. These were a series of alkylamines from methylamine to dodecylamine, 1,4-phenylenediamine, p-toluidine, 1,8-diaminonaphthalene, 1-aminopyrene, imidazole, pyridine, 4,4‧-bipyridine, poly(ethylene imine), and a series of amino acids from glycine to 6-aminocaproic acid. The prepared compounds were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis and IR spectroscopy and probable arrangement of the guest molecules in the interlayer space of the host is proposed based on the interlayer distance of the prepared intercalates and amount of the intercalated guest molecules.

  2. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-01

    Transition-metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock-salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10-20 GPa. Here, we report high-pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN through an ion-exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 - 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ-MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ-MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo-N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.

  3. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  4. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  5. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; ...

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form withmore » crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.« less

  6. Manufacturing process to reduce large grain growth in zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Rosecrans, P.M.

    1984-08-01

    It is an object of the present invention to provide a procedure for desensitizing zirconium-based alloys to large grain growth (LGG) during thermal treatment above the recrystallization temperature of the alloy. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a method for treating zirconium-based alloys which have been cold-worked in the range of 2 to 8% strain to reduce large grain growth. It is another object of the present invention to provide a method for fabricating a zirconium alloy clad nuclear fuel element wherein the zirconium clad is resistant to large grain growth.

  7. Evaluation of a Zirconium Recycle Scrubber System

    SciT

    Spencer, Barry B.; Bruffey, Stephanie H.

    2017-04-01

    A hot-cell demonstration of the zirconium recycle process is planned as part of the Materials Recovery and Waste Forms Development (MRWFD) campaign. The process treats Zircaloy® cladding recovered from used nuclear fuel with chlorine gas to recover the zirconium as volatile ZrCl4. This releases radioactive tritium trapped in the alloy, converting it to volatile tritium chloride (TCl). To meet regulatory requirements governing radioactive emissions from nuclear fuel treatment operations, the capture and retention of a portion of this TCl may be required prior to discharge of the off-gas stream to the environment. In addition to demonstrating tritium removal from amore » synthetic zirconium recycle off-gas stream, the recovery and quantification of tritium may refine estimates of the amount of tritium present in the Zircaloy cladding of used nuclear fuel. To support these objectives, a bubbler-type scrubber was fabricated to remove the TCl from the zirconium recycle off-gas stream. The scrubber was fabricated from glass and polymer components that are resistant to chlorine and hydrochloric acid solutions. Because of concerns that the scrubber efficiency is not quantitative, tests were performed using DCl as a stand-in to experimentally measure the scrubbing efficiency of this unit. Scrubbing efficiency was ~108% ± 3% with water as the scrubber solution. Variations were noted when 1 M NaOH scrub solution was used, values ranged from 64% to 130%. The reason for the variations is not known. It is recommended that the equipment be operated with water as the scrubbing solution. Scrubbing efficiency is estimated at 100%.« less

  8. ELECTROLYTIC CLADDING OF ZIRCONIUM ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Wick, J.J.

    1959-09-22

    A method is presented for coating uranium with zircoalum by rendering the uranium surface smooth and oxidefree, immersing it in a molten electrolytic bath in NaCI, K/sub 2/ZrF/sub 6/, KF, and ZrO/sub 2/, and before the article reaches temperature equilibrium with the bath, applying an electrolyzing current of 60 amperes per square dectmeter at approximately 3 volts to form a layer of zirconium metal on the uranium.

  9. Fluorometric determination of zirconium in minerals

    Alford, W.C.; Shapiro, L.; White, C.E.

    1951-01-01

    The increasing use of zirconium in alloys and in the ceramics industry has created renewed interest in methods for its determination. It is a common constituent of many minerals, but is usually present in very small amounts. Published methods tend to be tedious, time-consuming, and uncertain as to accuracy. A new fluorometric procedure, which overcomes these objections to a large extent, is based on the blue fluorescence given by zirconium and flavonol in sulfuric acid solution. Hafnium is the only element that interferes. The sample is fused with borax glass and sodium carbonate and extracted with water. The residue is dissolved in sulfuric acid, made alkaline with sodium hydroxide to separate aluminum, and filtered. The precipitate is dissolved in sulfuric acid and electrolysed in a Melaven cell to remove iron. Flavonol is then added and the fluorescence intensity is measured with a photo-fluorometer. Analysis of seven standard mineral samples shows excellent results. The method is especially useful for minerals containing less than 0.25% zirconium oxide.

  10. From Zirconium Nanograins to Zirconia Nanoneedles

    PubMed Central

    Zalnezhad, E.; Hamouda, A. M. S.; Jaworski, J.; Do Kim, Young

    2016-01-01

    Combinations of three simple techniques were utilized to gradually form zirconia nanoneedles from zirconium nanograins. First, a physical vapor deposition magnetron sputtering technique was used to deposit pure zirconium nanograins on top of a substrate. Second, an anodic oxidation was applied to fabricate zirconia nanotubular arrays. Finally, heat treatment was used at different annealing temperatures in order to change the structure and morphology from nanotubes to nanowires and subsequently to nanoneedles in the presence of argon gas. The size of the pure zirconium nanograins was estimated to be approximately 200–300 nm. ZrO2 nanotubular arrays with diameters of 70–120 nm were obtained. Both tetragonal and monoclinic ZrO2 were observed after annealing at 450 °C and 650 °C. Only a few tetragonal peaks appeared at 850 °C, while monoclinic ZrO2 was obtained at 900 °C and 950 °C. In assessing the biocompatibility of the ZrO2 surface, the human cell line MDA-MB-231 was found to attach and proliferate well on surfaces annealed at 850 °C and 450 °C; however, the amorphous ZrO2 surface, which was not heat treated, did not permit extensive cell growth, presumably due to remaining fluoride. PMID:27623486

  11. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

  12. Finishing Techniques for Silicon Nitride Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    finishing procedures. Rolling contact fatigue lives of silicon nitride with selected smoother finishes tested at 800 ksi Hertz stress were an order...grinding. Rolling contact fatigue lives of silicon nitride with selected smoother finishes tested at 800 ksi Hertz stress were an order of magnitude...lives of silicon nitride with selected smoother finishes tested at 800 ksi Hertz stress were an order of magnitude longer than those

  13. Development of Self-Healing Zirconium-Silicide Coatings for Improved Performance Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Cladding

    SciT

    Sridharan, Kumar; Mariani, Robert; Bai, Xianming

    Zirconium-alloy fuel claddings have been used successfully in Light Water Reactors (LWR) for over four decades. However, under high temperature accident conditions, zirconium-alloys fuel claddings exhibit profuse exothermic oxidation accompanied by release of hydrogen gas due to the reaction with water/steam. Additionally, the ZrO 2 layer can undergo monoclinic to tetragonal to cubic phase transformations at high temperatures which can induce stresses and cracking. These events were unfortunately borne out in the Fukushima-Daiichi accident in in Japan in 2011. In reaction to such accident, protective oxidation-resistant coatings for zirconium-alloy fuel claddings has been extensively investigated to enhance safety margins inmore » accidents as well as fuel performance under normal operation conditions. Such surface modification could also beneficially affect fuel rod heat transfer characteristics. Zirconium-silicide, a candidate coating material, is particularly attractive because zirconium-silicide coating is expected to bond strongly to zirconium-alloy substrate. Intermetallic compound phases of zirconium-silicide have high melting points and oxidation of zirconium silicide produces highly corrosion resistant glassy zircon (ZrSiO 4) and silica (SiO 2) which possessing self-healing qualities. Given the long-term goal of developing such coatings for use with nuclear reactor fuel cladding, this work describes results of oxidation and corrosion behavior of bulk zirconium-silicide and fabrication of zirconium-silicide coatings on zirconium-alloy test flats, tube configurations, and SiC test flats. In addition, boiling heat transfer of these modified surfaces (including ZrSi 2 coating) during clad quenching experiments is discussed in detail.« less

  14. NEUTRON REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT UTILIZING ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.; Szumachowski, E.R.

    1957-11-12

    This patent relates to clad fuel elements for use in neutronic reactors and is drawn to such a fuel element which consists of a core of fissionable material, comprised of an alloy of zirconium and U/sup 235/ enriched uranium, encased in a jacket of a binary zirconium-tin alloy in which the tin content ranges between 1 and 15% by weight.

  15. [The clinical application of zirconium-dioxide-ceramics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Somfai, Dóra; Zsigmond, Ágnes; Károlyházy, Katalin; Kispély, Barbara; Hermann, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Due to its outstanding physical, mechanical and esthetic properties, zirconium-dioxide is one of the most popular non-metal denture, capable of surpassing PFM in most cases. The recent advances of CAD/CAM technology makes it a good alternitve. Here we show the usefulness of zirconium-dioxide in everyday dental practice through three case reports.

  16. 40 CFR 721.10602 - Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... as specified in § 721.90 (a)(4), (b)(4), and (c)(4) (Where N=8, and 8 is an aggregate of releases for the following substances: Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide (PMN P-11-270; CAS No. 61461-40-3... strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0); Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10602 - Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... as specified in § 721.90 (a)(4), (b)(4), and (c)(4) (Where N=8, and 8 is an aggregate of releases for the following substances: Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide (PMN P-11-270; CAS No. 61461-40-3... strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0); Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10598 - Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lead strontium titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10598 Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lead strontium...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10598 - Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lead strontium titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10598 Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lead strontium...

  20. PROCESS FOR DISSOLVING BINARY URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM OR ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.; Barghusen, J.J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1962-08-14

    A process of dissolving uranium-- zirconium and zircaloy alloys, e.g. jackets of fuel elements, with an anhydrous hydrogen fluoride containing from 10 to 32% by weight of hydrogen chloride at between 400 and 450 deg C., preferably while in contact with a fluidized inert powder, such as calcium fluoride is described. (AEC)

  1. Experimental observation of boron nitride chains.

    PubMed

    Cretu, Ovidiu; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Lehtinen, Ossi; Algara-Siller, Gerardo; Kaiser, Ute; Suenaga, Kazu; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V

    2014-12-23

    We report the formation and characterization of boron nitride atomic chains. The chains were made from hexagonal boron nitride sheets using the electron beam inside a transmission electron microscope. We find that the stability and lifetime of the chains are significantly improved when they are supported by another boron nitride layer. With the help of first-principles calculations, we prove the heteroatomic structure of the chains and determine their mechanical and electronic properties. Our study completes the analogy between various boron nitride and carbon polymorphs, in accordance with earlier theoretical predictions.

  2. Manufacture of sintered silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwai, T.

    1985-01-01

    Sintered silicon nitrides are manufactured by sintering Si3N powder containing 2 to 15% in wt of a powder mixture composed of nitride powder of lanthanide or Y 100 parts and AIN powder less than 100 parts at 1500 to 1900 deg. temperature under a pressure of less than 200 Kg/sq. cm. The sintered Si3N has high mechanical strength in high temperature. Thus, Si3N4 93.0, Y 5.0 and AlN 2.0% in weight were wet mixed in acetone in N atom, molded and sintered at 1750 deg. and 1000 Kg/sq. cm. to give a sintered body having high hardness.

  3. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  4. Silicon nitride equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  5. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  6. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  7. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  8. METHOD FOR DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM-URANIUM COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Gens, T.A.

    1961-07-18

    A method is descrioed for treating a zirconium-- uranium composition to form a stable solution from which uranium and other values may be extracted by contacting the composition with at least a 4 molar aqueous solution of ammonium fluoride at a temperature of about 100 deg C, adding a peroxide, in incremental amounts, to the heated solution throughout the period of dissolution until all of the uranium is converted to soluble uranyl salt, adding nitric acid to the resultant solution to form a solvent extraction feed solution to convert the uranyl salt to a solvent extractable state, and thereafter recovering the uranium and other desired values from the feed solution by solvent extraction.

  9. Acidic ammonothermal growth of gallium nitride in a liner-free molybdenum alloy autoclave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkowski, Thomas F.; Pimputkar, Siddha; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji

    2016-12-01

    This paper discusses promising materials for use as internal, non-load bearing components as well as molybdenum-based alloys for autoclave structural components for an ammonothermal autoclave. An autoclave was constructed from the commercial titanium-zirconium-molybdenum (TZM) alloy and was found to be chemically inert and mechanically stable under acidic ammonothermal conditions. Preliminary seeded growth of GaN was demonstrated with negligible incorporation of transition metals (including molybdenum) into the grown material (<1017 cm-3). Molybdenum and TZM were exposed to a basic ammonothermal environment, leading to slight degradation through formation of molybdenum nitride powders on their surface at elevated temperatures (T>560 °C). The possibility of a 'universal', inexpensive, liner-free ammonothermal autoclave capable of exposure to basic and acidic chemistry is demonstrated.

  10. Optical properties of zirconium oxynitride films: The effect of composition, electronic and crystalline structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, P.; Borges, J.; Rodrigues, M. S.; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Espinós, J. P.; González-Elipe, A. R.; Cunha, L.; Marques, L.; Vasilevskiy, M. I.; Vaz, F.

    2015-12-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of zirconium oxynitride (ZrOxNy) films with varied optical responses prompted by the variations in their compositional and structural properties. The films were prepared by dc reactive magnetron sputtering of Zr, using Ar and a reactive gas mixture of N2 + O2 (17:3). The colour of the films changed from metallic-like, very bright yellow-pale and golden yellow, for low gas flows to red-brownish for intermediate gas flows. Associated to this colour change there was a significant decrease of brightness. With further increase of the reactive gas flow, the colour of the samples changed from red-brownish to dark blue or even to interference colourations. The variations in composition disclosed the existence of four different zones, which were found to be closely related with the variations in the crystalline structure. XRD analysis revealed the change from a B1 NaCl face-centred cubic zirconium nitride-type phase for films prepared with low reactive gas flows, towards a poorly crystallized over-stoichiometric nitride phase, which may be similar to that of Zr3N4 with some probable oxygen inclusions within nitrogen positions, for films prepared with intermediate reactive gas flows. For high reactive gas flows, the films developed an oxynitride-type phase, similar to that of γ-Zr2ON2 with some oxygen atoms occupying some of the nitrogen positions, evolving to a ZrO2 monoclinic type structure within the zone where films were prepared with relatively high reactive gas flows. The analysis carried out by reflected electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) revealed a continuous depopulation of the d-band and an opening of an energy gap between the valence band (2p) and the Fermi level close to 5 eV. The ZrN-based coatings (zone I and II) presented intrinsic colourations, with a decrease in brightness and a colour change from bright yellow to golden yellow, red brownish and dark blue. Associated to these changes, there was also a shift

  11. Nitride alloy layer formation of duplex stainless steel using nitriding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleque, M. A.; Lailatul, P. H.; Fathaen, A. A.; Norinsan, K.; Haider, J.

    2018-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) shows a good corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties. However, DSS performance decrease as it works under aggressive environment and at high temperature. At the mentioned environment, the DSS become susceptible to wear failure. Surface modification is the favourable technique to widen the application of duplex stainless steel and improve the wear resistance and its hardness properties. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to nitride alloy layer on the surface of duplex stainless steel by the nitriding process temperature of 400°C and 450°C at different time and ammonia composition using a horizontal tube furnace. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyzer are used to analyse the morphology, composition and the nitrided alloy layer for treated DSS. The micro hardnesss Vickers tester was used to measure hardness on cross-sectional area of nitrided DSS. After nitriding, it was observed that the hardness performance increased until 1100 Hv0.5kgf compared to substrate material of 250 Hv0.5kgf. The thickness layer of nitride alloy also increased from 5μm until 100μm due to diffusion of nitrogen on the surface of DSS. The x-ray diffraction results showed that the nitride layer consists of iron nitride, expanded austenite and chromium nitride. It can be concluded that nitride alloy layer can be produced via nitriding process using tube furnace with significant improvement of microstructural and hardness properties.

  12. Feasibility study of silicon nitride regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.; Rao, V. D. N.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride as a regenerator matrix material for applications requiring inlet temperatures above 1000 C is examined. The present generation oxide ceramics are used as a reference to examine silicon nitride from a material characteristics, manufacturing, thermal stress and aerothermodynamic viewpoint.

  13. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  14. Silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride deposition was studied as a method of passivation for silicon solar cell surfaces. The following three objectives were the thrust of the research: (1) the use of pecvd silicon nitride for passivation of silicon surfaces; (2) measurement techniques for surface recombination velocity; and (3) the importance of surface passivation to high efficiency solar cells.

  15. Crystallographic study of Si and ZrN coated U-Mo atomised particles and of their interaction with al under thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweifel, T.; Palancher, H.; Leenaers, A.; Bonnin, A.; Honkimaki, V.; Tucoulou, R.; Van Den Berghe, S.; Jungwirth, R.; Charollais, F.; Petry, W.

    2013-11-01

    A new type of high density fuel is needed for the conversion of research and test reactors from high to lower enriched uranium. The most promising one is a dispersion of atomized uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) particles in an Al matrix. However, during in-pile irradiation the growth of an interaction layer between the U-Mo and the Al matrix strongly limits the fuel's performance. To improve the in-pile behaviour, the U-Mo particles can be coated with protective layers. The SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) fuel development project consists of the production, irradiation and post-irradiation examination of 2 flat, full-size dispersion fuel plates containing respectively Si and ZrN coated U-Mo atomized powder dispersed in a pure Al matrix. In this paper X-ray diffraction analyses of the Si and ZrN layers after deposition, fuel plate manufacturing and thermal annealing are reported. It was found for the U-Mo particles coated with ZrN (thickness 1 μm), that the layer is crystalline, and exhibits lower density than the theoretical one. Fuel plate manufacturing does not strongly influence these crystallographic features. For the U-Mo particles coated with Si (thickness 0.6 μm), the measurements of the as received material suggest an amorphous state of the deposited layer. Fuel plate manufacturing strongly modifies its composition: Si reacts with the U-Mo particles and the Al matrix to grow U(Al, Si)3 and U3Si5 phases. Finally both coatings have shown excellent performances under thermal treatment by limiting drastically the U-Mo/Al interdiffusion. U(Al,Si)3 with two lattice parameters (4.16 Å and 4.21 Å), A distorted U3Si5 phase. Note that these phases were not present in the U-Mo(Si) powders. These phases are usually found in the Silicon rich diffusion layer (SiRDL) obtained in dispersed fuels (as-manufactured U-Mo/Al(Si) fuel plates [12,3] or annealed UMo(Si)/Al fuel rods [40]) as well as in diffusion couples (U-Mo/Al(Si7) [37-39] or U

  16. Method to synthesize bulk iron nitride

    SciT

    Monson, Todd; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Zheng, Baolong

    Bulk iron nitride can be synthesized from iron nitride powder by spark plasma sintering. The iron nitride can be spark plasma sintered at a temperature of less than 600°C. and a pressure of less than 600 MPa, with 400 MPa or less most often being sufficient. High pressure SPS can consolidate dense iron nitrides at a lower temperature to avoid decomposition. The higher pressure and lower temperature of spark discharge sintering avoids decomposition and limits grain growth, enabling enhanced magnetic properties. The method can further comprise synthesis of nanocrystalline iron nitride powders using two-step reactive milling prior to high-pressure sparkmore » discharge sintering.« less

  17. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  18. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  19. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  20. METHOD OF PREPARING SINTERED ZIRCONIUM METAL FROM ITS HYDRIDES

    DOEpatents

    Angier, R.P.

    1958-02-11

    The invention relates to the preparation of metal shapes from zirconium hydride by powder metallurgical techniques. The zirconium hydride powder which is to be used for this purpose can be prepared by rendering massive pieces of crystal bar zirconium friable by heat treatment in purified hydrogen. This any then be ground into powder and powder can be handled in the air without danger of it igniting. It may then be compacted in the normal manner by being piaced in a die. The compact is sintered under vacuum conditions preferably at a temperature ranging from 1200 to 1300 deg C and for periods of one to three hours.

  1. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM AND NIOBIUM BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Voiland, E.E.

    1958-05-01

    A process for separation of the uranium from zirconium and/or niobium values contained in 3 to 7M aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. This is accomplished by adding phosphoric acid anions to the nitric acid solution containing the uranium, zirconium, and/or niobium in an amount sufficient to make the solution 0.05 to 0.2M in phosphate ion and contacting the solution with an organic water-immiscible solvent such as MEK, whereby the uranyl values are taken up by the extract phase while the zirconium and niobium preferentially remain in the aqueous raffinate.

  2. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM-URANIUM NUCLEAR FUELS

    DOEpatents

    Gens, T.A.

    1962-07-10

    An improvement was made in a process of recovering uranium from a uranium-zirconium composition which was hydrochlorinated with gsseous hydrogen chloride at a temperature of from 350 to 800 deg C resulting in volatilization of the zirconium, as zirconium tetrachloride, and the formation of a uranium containing nitric acid insoluble residue. The improvement consists of reacting the nitric acid insoluble hydrochlorination residue with gaseous carbon tetrachloride at a temperature in the range 550 to 600 deg C, and thereafter recovering the resulting uranium chloride vapors. (AEC)

  3. Synthesis of boron nitride powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreissig, Dirk Horst

    2002-09-01

    In the materials science community there is much interest in the development of new, efficient approaches for preparing ceramic powders having properties or performance characteristics not found with powders produced by traditional metallurgical synthesis methods. In this regard, aerosol-based syntheses are finding general acceptance for the preparation of non-metal and metal oxide powders. In contrast, much less effort has been given to aerosol-type syntheses for non-oxide powders despite potentially useful benefits. This dissertation describes the application of two chemical systems in aerosol assisted vapor phase synthesis (AAVS) for the preparation of spherical morphology boron oxynitride, BNxOy, powders that are subsequently converted to spherical morphology boron nitride in a second nitridation step. Chapter 1 describes the AAVS synthesis of BNxOy powders using a reaction of an aqueous boric acid containing aerosol with ammonia at 1000°C. The effect of reactor tube material, total gas flow rate, ammonia concentration, boric acid concentration, and urea addition to the boric acid aerosol on the percent oxygen composition is described. The resulting BNxOy powders contain significant amounts of oxygen that require replacement in a second stage nitridation reaction at elevated temperature under ammonia. The influences of the reaction temperature profile, crucible geometry and transformation additive on final oxygen composition and powder crystallinity are described. Chapter 2 outlines the formation of BNxOy powders from an AAVS reaction between the boron precursor (MeO)3B and ammonia. The formation of the powders is studied as a function of total gas flow rate and ammonia concentration. In all cases the resulting powders contain lower levels of oxygen compared to powders produced from aqueous boric acid aerosols. The conversion of the BNxOy powders in the second stage nitridation reaction with ammonia is examined as a function of crucible geometry, temperature

  4. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  5. PRECIPITATION OF ZIRCONIUM AND FLUORIDE IONS FROM SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Newby, B.J.

    1963-06-11

    A process is given for removing zirconium and fluorine ions from aqueous solutions also containing uranium(VI). The precipitation is carried out with sodium formate, and the uranium remains in solution. (AEC)

  6. Process for massively hydriding zirconium--uranium fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Katz, N.H.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of hydriding uranium-zirconium alloy by heating the alloy in a vacuum, introducing hydrogen and maintaining an elevated temperature until occurrence of the beta--delta phase transformation and isobarically cooling the composition. (Official Gazette)

  7. Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asquith, J. G.; Mason, D. G.; Stamp, S.

    1972-01-01

    The Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor being designed and fabricated at Atomics International is intended for a wide range of potential applications. Throughout the program a series of reactor designs have been evaluated to establish the unique requirements imposed by coupling with various power conversion systems and for specific applications. Current design and development emphasis is upon a 100 kilowatt thermal reactor for application in a 5 kwe thermoelectric space power generating system, which is scheduled to be fabricated and ground tested in the mid 70s. The reactor design considerations reviewed in this paper will be discussed in the context of this 100 kwt reactor and a 300 kwt reactor previously designed for larger power demand applications.

  8. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  9. Uranium nitride behavior at thermionic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using uranium nitride for in-core thermionic applications was evaluated in electrically heated thermal gradient tests and in flat plate thermionic converters. These tests indicated that grain boundary penetration of uranium nitride into both tungsten and rhenium will occur under thermal gradient conditions. In the case of the tungsten thermionic converter, this led to grain boundary rupture of the emitter and almost total loss of electrical output from the converter. It appears that uranium nitride is unsuitable for thermionic applications at the 2000 K temperatures used in these tests.

  10. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  11. Application of hard coatings to substrates at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sproul, William D.

    1993-01-01

    BIRL, the industrial research laboratory of Northwestern University, has conducted unique and innovative research, under sponsorship from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), in the application of hard, wear resistant coatings to bearing steels using the high-rate reactive sputtering (HRRS) process that was pioneered by Dr. William Sproul, the principal investigator on this program. Prior to this program, Dr. Sproul had demonstrated that it is possible to apply hard coatings such as titanium nitride (TiN) to alloy steels at low temperatures via the HRRS process without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel. The NASA MSFC program at BIRL had the specific objectives to: apply TiN to 440C stainless steel without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel; prepare rolling contact fatigue (RCF) test samples coated with binary hard coatings of TiN, zirconium nitride (ZrN), hafnium nitride (HfN), chromium nitride (CrN), and molybdenum nitride (MoN), and metal coatings of copper (Cu) and gold (Au); and develop new alloyed hard coatings of titanium aluminum nitride (Ti(0.5)Al(0.5)N), titanium zirconium nitride (Ti(0.5)Zr(0.5)N), and titanium aluminum vanadium nitride.

  12. CHARACTERISTICS OF ANODIC AND CORROSION FILMS ON ZIRCONIUM

    SciT

    Misch, R.D.

    1960-05-01

    Zirconium anodizes similarly to tungsten in respect to the change of interference colors with applied voltage. However, the oxide layer on tungsten cannot reach as great a thickness. Hafnium does not anodize in the same way as zirconium but is similar to tantalum. By measuring the interference color and capacitative thicknesses on zirconium (Grades I and III) and a 2.5 wt.% tin ailoy, the film was found to grow less rapidly in terms of capacitance than in terms of iaterference colors. This was interpreted to mean that cracks develop in the oxide as it thickens. The effect was most pronouncedmore » on Grade III zirconium and least pronounced on the tin alloy. The reduction in capacitative thickness was especially noticeable when white oxide appeared. Comparative measurements on Grade I zirconium and 2.5 wt.% tin alloy indicated that the thickness of the oxide film on the tin alloy (after 16 hours in water) increased more rapidly with temperature than the film on zirconium. Tin is believed to act in ways to counteract the tendency of the oxide to form cracks, and to produce vacancies which promote ionic diffusion. (auth)« less

  13. Nanoindentation study of bulk zirconium hydrides at elevated temperatures

    SciT

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim; Balooch, Mehdi; Hu, Xunxiang

    Here, the mechanical properties of zirconium hydrides was studied using nano-indentation technique at a temperature range of 25 – 400 °C. Temperature dependency of reduced elastic modulus and hardness of δ- and ε-zirconium hydrides were obtained by conducting nanoindentation experiments on the bulk hydride samples with independently heating capability of indenter and heating stage. The reduced elastic modulus of δ-zirconium hydride (H/Zr ratio =1.61) decreased from ~113 GPa to ~109 GPa while temperature increased from room temperature to 400°C. For ε-zirconium hydrides (H/Zr ratio=1.79), the reduced elastic modulus decreased from 61 GPa to 54 GPa as temperature increased from roommore » temperature to 300 °C. Whereas, hardness of δ-zirconium hydride significantly decreased from 4.1 GPa to 2.41 GPa when temperature increased from room temperature to 400 °C. Similarly, hardness of ε-zirconium hydride decreased from 3.06 GPa to 2.19 GPa with temperature increase from room temperature to 300°C.« less

  14. Nanoindentation study of bulk zirconium hydrides at elevated temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim; Balooch, Mehdi; Hu, Xunxiang; ...

    2017-08-02

    Here, the mechanical properties of zirconium hydrides was studied using nano-indentation technique at a temperature range of 25 – 400 °C. Temperature dependency of reduced elastic modulus and hardness of δ- and ε-zirconium hydrides were obtained by conducting nanoindentation experiments on the bulk hydride samples with independently heating capability of indenter and heating stage. The reduced elastic modulus of δ-zirconium hydride (H/Zr ratio =1.61) decreased from ~113 GPa to ~109 GPa while temperature increased from room temperature to 400°C. For ε-zirconium hydrides (H/Zr ratio=1.79), the reduced elastic modulus decreased from 61 GPa to 54 GPa as temperature increased from roommore » temperature to 300 °C. Whereas, hardness of δ-zirconium hydride significantly decreased from 4.1 GPa to 2.41 GPa when temperature increased from room temperature to 400 °C. Similarly, hardness of ε-zirconium hydride decreased from 3.06 GPa to 2.19 GPa with temperature increase from room temperature to 300°C.« less

  15. Quercetin as colorimetric reagent for determination of zirconium

    Grimaldi, F.S.; White, C.E.

    1953-01-01

    Methods described in the literature for the determination of zirconium are generally designed for relatively large amounts of this element. A good procedure using colorimetric reagent for the determination of trace amounts is desirable. Quercetin has been found to yield a sensitive color reaction with zirconium suitable for the determination of from 0.1 to 50?? of zirconium dioxide. The procedure developed involves the separation of zirconium from interfering elements by precipitation with p-dimethylaminoazophenylarsonic acid prior to its estimation with quercetin. The quercetin reaction is carried out in 0.5N hydrochloric acid solution. Under the operating conditions it is indicated that quercetin forms a 2 to 1 complex with zirconium; however, a 2 to 1 and a 1 to 1 complex can coexist under special conditions. Approximate values for the equilibrium constants of the complexes are K1 = 0.33 ?? 10-5 and K2 = 1.3 ?? 10-9. Seven Bureau of Standards samples of glass sands and refractories were analyzed with excellent results. The method described should find considerable application in the analysis of minerals and other materials for macro as well as micro amounts of zirconium.

  16. Zirconium behaviour during electrorefining of actinide-zirconium alloy in molten LiCl-KCl on aluminium cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Souček, P.; Malmbeck, R.; Krachler, M.; Rodrigues, A.; Claux, B.; Glatz, J.-P.; Fanghänel, Th.

    2016-04-01

    A pyrochemical electrorefining process for the recovery of actinides from metallic nuclear fuel based on actinide-zirconium alloys (An-Zr) in a molten salt is being investigated. In this process actinides are group-selectively recovered on solid aluminium cathodes as An-Al alloys using a LiCl-KCl eutectic melt at a temperature of 450 °C. In the present study the electrochemical behaviour of zirconium during electrorefining was investigated. The maximum amount of actinides that can be oxidised without anodic co-dissolution of zirconium was determined at a selected constant cathodic current density. The experiment consisted of three steps to assess the different stages of the electrorefining process, each of which employing a fresh aluminium cathode. The results indicate that almost a complete dissolution of the actinides without co-dissolution of zirconium is possible under the applied experimental conditions.

  17. Layer Protecting the Surface of Zirconium Used in Nuclear Reactors.

    PubMed

    Ashcheulov, Petr; Skoda, Radek; Skarohlíd, Jan; Taylor, Andrew; Fendrych, Frantisek; Kratochvílová, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Zirconium alloys have very useful properties for nuclear facilities applications having low absorption cross-section of thermal electrons, high ductility, hardness and corrosion resistance. However, there is also a significant disadvantage: it reacts with water steam and during this (oxidative) reaction it releases hydrogen gas, which partly diffuses into the alloy forming zirconium hydrides. A new strategy for surface protection of zirconium alloys against undesirable oxidation in nuclear reactors by polycrystalline diamond film has been patented- Czech patent 305059: Layer protecting the surface of zirconium alloys used in nuclear reactors and PCT patent: Layer for protecting surface of zirconium alloys (Patent Number: WO2015039636-A1). The zirconium alloy surface was covered by polycrystalline diamond layer grown in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition apparatus with linear antenna delivery system. Substantial progress in the description and understanding of the polycrystalline diamond/ zirconium alloys interface and material properties under standard and nuclear reactors conditions (irradiation, hot steam oxidation experiments and heating-quenching cycles) was made. In addition, process technology for the deposition of protective polycrystalline diamond films onto the surface of zirconium alloys was optimized. Zircaloy2 nuclear fuel pins were covered by 300 nm thick protective polycrystalline diamond layer (PCD) using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition apparatus with linear antenna delivery system. The polycrystalline diamond layer protects the zirconium alloy surface against undesirable oxidation and consolidates its chemical stability while preserving its functionality. PCD covered Zircaloy2 and standard Zircaloy2 pins were for 30 min. oxidized in 1100°C hot steam. Under these conditions α phase of zirconium changes to β phase (more opened for oxygen/hydrogen diffusion). PCD anticorrosion protection of Zircaloy nuclear fuel assemblies can

  18. Molecular titanium nitrides: nucleophiles unleashed

    DOE PAGES

    Grant, Lauren N.; Pinter, Balazs; Kurogi, Takashi; ...

    2017-01-30

    In this contribution we present reactivity studies of a rare example of a titanium salt, in the form of [μ 2-K(OEt 2)] 2[(PN) 2Timore » $$\\equiv$$N] 2 (1) (PN - = N-(2-(diisopropylphosphino)-4-methylphenyl)-2,4,6-trimethylanilide) to produce a series of imide moieties including rare examples such as methylimido, borylimido, phosphonylimido, and a parent imido. For the latter, using various weak acids allowed us to narrow the pK a range of the NH group in (PN) 2Ti$$\\equiv$$NH to be between 26–36. Complex 1 could be produced by a reductively promoted elimination of N 2 from the azide precursor (PN) 2TiN 3, whereas reductive splitting of N 2 could not be achieved using the complex (PN) 2Ti$$\\equiv$$N$$\\equiv$$N$$\\equiv$$Ti(PN) 2 (2) and a strong reductant. Complete N-atom transfer reactions could also be observed when 1 was treated with ClC(O) tBu and OCCPh 2 to form NC tBu and KNCCPh 2, respectively, along with the terminal oxo complex (PN) 2Ti$$\\equiv$$O, which was also characterized. A combination of solid state 15N NMR (MAS) and theoretical studies allowed us to understand the shielding effect of the counter cation in dimer 1, the monomer [K(18-crown-6)][(PN) 2Ti$$\\equiv$$N], and the discrete salt [K(2,2,2-Kryptofix)][(PN) 2Ti$$\\equiv$$N] as well as the origin of the highly downfield 15N NMR resonance when shifting from dimer to monomer to a terminal nitride (discrete salt). The upfield shift of 15N nitride resonance in the 15N NMR spectrum was found to be linked to the K + induced electronic structural change of the titanium-nitride functionality by using a combination of MO analysis and quantum chemical analysis of the corresponding shielding tensors.« less

  19. III-Nitride Nanowire Lasers

    SciT

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key gure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical con nement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices.more » Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve singlemode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode op eration. The rst method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-o condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter e ciency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, speci cally a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip that

  20. Reactive magnetron cosputtering of hard and conductive ternary nitride thin films: Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N

    SciT

    Abadias, G.; Koutsokeras, L. E.; Dub, S. N.

    2010-07-15

    Ternary transition metal nitride thin films, with thickness up to 300 nm, were deposited by dc reactive magnetron cosputtering in Ar-N{sub 2} plasma discharges at 300 deg. C on Si substrates. Two systems were comparatively studied, Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N, as representative of isostructural and nonisostructural prototypes, with the aim of characterizing their structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. While phase-separated TiN-ZrN and TiN-TaN are the bulk equilibrium states, Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N and Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N solid solutions with the Na-Cl (B1-type) structure could be stabilized in a large compositional range (up to x=1 and y=0.75, respectively). Substituting Ti atoms by eithermore » Zr or Ta atoms led to significant changes in film texture, microstructure, grain size, and surface morphology, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, and scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. The ternary Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films exhibited superior mechanical properties to Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N films as well as binary compounds, with hardness as high as 42 GPa for y=0.69. All films were metallic, the lowest electrical resistivity {rho}{approx}65 {mu}{Omega} cm being obtained for pure ZrN, while for Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films a minimum was observed at y{approx}0.3. The evolution of the different film properties is discussed based on microstructrural investigations.« less

  1. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.; Young, Albert C.

    1994-01-01

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  2. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

    1994-03-15

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  3. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol. %.

  4. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  5. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  6. Electrochemical Solution Growth of Magnetic Nitrides

    SciT

    Monson, Todd C.; Pearce, Charles

    Magnetic nitrides, if manufactured in bulk form, would provide designers of transformers and inductors with a new class of better performing and affordable soft magnetic materials. According to experimental results from thin films and/or theoretical calculations, magnetic nitrides would have magnetic moments well in excess of current state of the art soft magnets. Furthermore, magnetic nitrides would have higher resistivities than current transformer core materials and therefore not require the use of laminates of inactive material to limit eddy current losses. However, almost all of the magnetic nitrides have been elusive except in difficult to reproduce thin films or asmore » inclusions in another material. Now, through its ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen, the electrochemical solution growth (ESG) technique can bring highly sought after (and previously inaccessible) new magnetic nitrides into existence in bulk form. This method utilizes a molten salt as a solvent to solubilize metal cations and nitrogen ions produced electrochemically and form nitrogen compounds. Unlike other growth methods, the scalable ESG process can sustain high growth rates (~mm/hr) even under reasonable operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and 500 °C). Ultimately, this translates into a high throughput, low cost, manufacturing process. The ESG process has already been used successfully to grow high quality GaN. Below, the experimental results of an exploratory express LDRD project to access the viability of the ESG technique to grow magnetic nitrides will be presented.« less

  7. Tensile strength of aluminium nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Deng Gang; Ong, Chung Wo; Aravind, Manju; Tsang, Mei Po; Loong Choy, Chung; Lu, Deren; Ma, Dejun

    2004-11-01

    Two-layered aluminium nitride (AlN)/silicon nitride microbridges were fabricated for microbridge tests to evaluate the elastic modulus, residual stress and tensile strength of the AlN films. The silicon nitride layer was added to increase the robustness of the structure. In a microbridge test, load was applied to the centre of a microbridge and was gradually increased by a nano-indenter equipped with a wedge tip until the sample was broken, while displacement was recorded coherently. Measurements were performed on single-layered silicon nitride microbridges and two-layered AlN/silicon nitride microbridges respectively. The data were fitted to a theory to derive the elastic modulus, residual stress and tensile strength of the silicon nitride films and AlN films. For the AlN films, the three parameters were determined to be 200, 0.06 and 0.3 GPa, respectively. The values of elastic modulus obtained were consistent with those measured by conventional nano-indentation method. The tensile strength value can be used as a reference to reflect the maximum tolerable tensile stress of AlN films when they are used in micro-electromechanical devices.

  8. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    SciT

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane

    2013-10-11

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known aboutmore » basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  9. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ZIRCONIUM VALUES FROM HAFNIUM VALUES BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION WITH AN ALKYL PHOSPHATE

    DOEpatents

    Peppard, D.F.

    1960-02-01

    A process of separating hafnium nitrate from zirconium nitrate contained in a nitric acid solution by selectively. extracting the zirconium nitrate with a water-immiscible alkyl phosphate is reported.

  10. Zirconium oxide surface passivation of crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yimao; Bullock, James; Hettick, Mark; Xu, Zhaoran; Yan, Di; Peng, Jun; Javey, Ali; Cuevas, Andres

    2018-05-01

    This letter reports effective passivation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces by thermal atomic layer deposited zirconium oxide (ZrOx). The optimum layer thickness and activation annealing conditions are determined to be 20 nm and 300 °C for 20 min. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging shows an approximately 1.6 nm thick SiOx interfacial layer underneath an 18 nm ZrOx layer, consistent with ellipsometry measurements (˜20 nm). Capacitance-voltage measurements show that the annealed ZrOx film features a low interface defect density of 1.0 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1 and a low negative film charge density of -6 × 1010 cm-2. Effective lifetimes of 673 μs and 1.1 ms are achieved on p-type and n-type 1 Ω cm undiffused c-Si wafers, respectively, corresponding to an implied open circuit voltage above 720 mV in both cases. The results demonstrate that surface passivation quality provided by ALD ZrOx is consistent with the requirements of high efficiency silicon solar cells.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of zirconium silicate films using zirconium tetrachloride and tetra-n-butyl orthosilicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Kyu; Kang, Sang-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo; Lee, Nae-In; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kang, Ho-Kyu

    2002-11-01

    Atomic layer chemical vapor deposition of zirconium silicate films with a precursor combination of ZrCl4 and tetra-n-butyl orthosilicate (TBOS) was studied for high dielectric gate insulators. The effect of deposition conditions, such as deposition temperature, pulse time for purge and precursor injection on the deposition rate per cycle, and composition of the film were studied. At 400 °C, the growth rate saturated to 1.35 Å/cycle above 500 sccm of the argon purge flow rate. The growth rate, composition ratio ((Zr/Zr+Si)), and impurity contents (carbon and chlorine) saturated with the increase of the injection time of ZrCl4 and TBOS and decreased with the increased deposition temperature from 300 to 500 °C. The growth rate, composition ratio, carbon, and chlorine contents of the Zr silicate thin films deposited at 500 °C were 1.05 Å/cycle, 0.23, 1.1 at. %, and 2.1 at. %, respectively. It appeared that by using only zirconium chloride and silicon alkoxide sources, the content of carbon and chlorine impurities could not be lowered below 1%. It was also found that the incorporation rate of metal from halide source was lower than alkoxide source.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of zirconium silicate films using zirconium tetra-tert-butoxide and silicon tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Kyu; Kang, Sang-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2003-09-01

    A new precursor combination (SiCl4 and Zr(OtC4H9)4) was used to deposit Zr silicate with Zr(OtC4H9)4 as a zirconium source and oxygen source at the same time. SiCl4 and Zr(OtC4H9)4 have higher vapor pressures than their counterpart, ZrCl4 and tetra-n-butyl orthosilicate (TBOS), and it was expected that the cycle time would be shorter. The deposition temperature of the new combination was about 150 °C lower than that of ZrCl4 and TBOS. The film was zirconium rich while it was silicon rich with ZrCl4 and TBOS. Growth rate (nm/cycle), composition ratio [Zr/(Zr+Si)], and chlorine impurity were decreased with increasing deposition temperature from 125 to 225 °C. The composition ratio of the film deposited at 225 °C was 0.53 and the chlorine content was about 0.4 at. %. No carbon was detected by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  13. Mechanical properties of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides predicted from density functional perturbation theory

    DOE PAGES

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Tikare, Veena; ...

    2015-10-13

    Here, the elastic properties and mechanical stability of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides have been investigated within the framework of density functional perturbation theory. Results show that the lowest-energy cubic Pn-3m with combining macron]m polymorph of δ-ZrH 1.5 does not satisfy all the Born requirements for mechanical stability, unlike its nearly degenerate tetragonal P4 2/ mcm polymorph. Elastic moduli predicted with the Voigt–Reuss–Hill approximations suggest that mechanical stability of α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates is limited by the shear modulus. According to both Pugh's and Poisson's ratios, α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates can be considered ductile. The Debyemore » temperatures predicted for γ-ZrH, δ-ZrH 1.5 and ε-ZrH 2 are θ D = 299.7, 415.6 and 356.9 K, respectively, while θ D = 273.6, 284.2, 264.1 and 257.1 K for the α-Zr, Zry-4, ZIRLO and M5 matrices, i.e. suggesting that Zry-4 possesses the highest micro-hardness among Zr matrices.« less

  14. Inhibition of Ice Growth and Recrystallization by Zirconium Acetate and Zirconium Acetate Hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahy, Ortal; Bar-Dolev, Maya; Guy, Shlomit; Braslavsky, Ido

    2013-01-01

    The control over ice crystal growth, melting, and shaping is important in a variety of fields, including cell and food preservation and ice templating for the production of composite materials. Control over ice growth remains a challenge in industry, and the demand for new cryoprotectants is high. Naturally occurring cryoprotectants, such as antifreeze proteins (AFPs), present one solution for modulating ice crystal growth; however, the production of AFPs is expensive and inefficient. These obstacles can be overcome by identifying synthetic substitutes with similar AFP properties. Zirconium acetate (ZRA) was recently found to induce the formation of hexagonal cavities in materials prepared by ice templating. Here, we continue this line of study and examine the effects of ZRA and a related compound, zirconium acetate hydroxide (ZRAH), on ice growth, shaping, and recrystallization. We found that the growth rate of ice crystals was significantly reduced in the presence of ZRA and ZRAH, and that solutions containing these compounds display a small degree of thermal hysteresis, depending on the solution pH. The compounds were found to inhibit recrystallization in a manner similar to that observed in the presence of AFPs. The favorable properties of ZRA and ZRAH suggest tremendous potential utility in industrial applications. PMID:23555701

  15. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under this...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under this...

  17. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  18. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  19. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  20. Process for electroless deposition of metals on zirconium materials

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A process for the electroless deposition of a metal layer on an article comprised of zirconium or a zirconium alloy is disclosed. The article is activated in an aged aqueous solution comprising from about 10 to about 20 grams per liter ammonium bifluoride and from about 0.75 to about 2 grams per liter of sulfuric acid. The solution is aged by immersion of pickled zirconium in the solution for at least about 10 minutes. The loosely adhering film formed on the article in the activating step is removed and the article is contacted with an electroless plating solution containing the metal to be deposited on the article upon sufficient contact with the article.

  1. Process for electrolytic deposition of metals on zirconium materials

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.

    1979-01-30

    A process for the electrolytic deposition of a metal layer on an article comprised of zirconium or a zirconium alloy is disclosed. The article is activated in an aged aqueous solution comprising from about 10 to about 20 grams per liter ammonium bifluoride and from about 0.75 to about 2 grams per liter of sulfuric acid. The solution is aged by immersion of pickled zirconium in the solution for at least about 10 minutes. The loosely adhering film formed on the article in the activating step is removed and the article is contacted with an electrolytic plating solution containing the metal to be deposited on the article in the presence of an electrode receiving current.

  2. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  3. Extractive separation of uranium and zirconium sulfates by amines

    SciT

    Schroetterova, D.; Nekovar, P.; Mrnka, M.

    1992-04-01

    This paper describes an amine extraction process for zirconium and uranium separation. The behaviour of an extraction system containing uranium (VI) sulfate, zirconium (IV) sulfate, 0.2 and 0.5 M sulfuric acid (as the original aqueous phase), tertiary amine tri-n-lauryl- amine or primary amine Primene JMT in benzene (as the original organic phase) is discussed on the basis of equilibrium data. The measured dependences show that the degree of extraction of zirconium at the sulfuric acid concentration of 0.5 M and above is only slightly affected by a presence of uranium in solution. From this surprising behaviour it follows that zirconiummore » may be employed for the displacement of uranium from the organic phase. This effect is more pronounced with the primary amine Primene JMT than with TLA. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less

  4. 77 FR 51825 - Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Nitrided Vanadium From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... order on ferrovanadium and nitrided vanadium from Russia would not be likely to lead to continuation or... in USITC Publication 4345 (August 2012), entitled Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium from Russia...

  5. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    DOEpatents

    Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  6. Thermochemistry of amorphous and crystalline zirconium and hafnium silicates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, S.; Brown, C. E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Boatner, L. A.; Demkov, A. A.; Wang, C.; Nguyen, B.-Y.

    2003-03-01

    Calorimetric investigation of amorphous and crystalline zirconium and hafnium silicates was performed as part of a research program on thermochemistry of alternative gate dielectrics. Amorphous hafnium and zirconium silicates with varying SiO2 content were synthesized by a sol-gel process. Crystalline zirconium and hafnium silicates (zircon and hafnon) were synthesized by solid state reaction at 1450 °C from amorphous gels and grown as single crystals from flux. High temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry in lead borate (2PbO.B2O3) solvent at 800 oC was used to measure drop solution enthalpies for amorphous and crystalline zirconium and hafnium silicates and corresponding oxides. Applying appropriate thermochemical cycles, formation enthalpy of crystalline ZrSiO4 (zircon) from binary oxides (baddeleite and quartz) at 298 K was calculated as -23 +/-2 kJ/mol and enthalpy difference between amorphous and crystalline zirconium silicate (vitrification enthalpy) was found to be 61 +/-3 kJ/mol. Crystallization onset temperatures of amorphous zirconium and hafnium silicates, as measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), increased with silica content. The resulting crystalline phases, as characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), were tetragonal HfO2 and ZrO2. Critical crystallite size for tetragonal to monoclinic transformation of HfO2 in the gel was estimated as 6 +/-2 nm from XRD data Crystallization enthalpies per mole of hafnia and zirconia in gels decrease slightly together with crystallite size with increasing silica content, for example from -22 to -15 +/-1 kJ per mol of HfO2 crystallized at 740 and 1006 °C from silicates with 10 and 70 mol Applications of thermal analyses and solution calorimetry techniques together with first-principles density functional calculations to estimate interface and surface energies are discussed.

  7. Boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Huang, Yang; Terao, Takeshi; Mitome, Masanori; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2010-06-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered material with a graphite-like structure in which planar networks of BN hexagons are regularly stacked. As the structural analogue of a carbon nanotube (CNT), a BN nanotube (BNNT) was first predicted in 1994; since then, it has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanotubes. Compared with metallic or semiconducting CNTs, a BNNT is an electrical insulator with a band gap of ca. 5 eV, basically independent of tube geometry. In addition, BNNTs possess a high chemical stability, excellent mechanical properties, and high thermal conductivity. The same advantages are likely applicable to a graphene analogue-a monatomic layer of a hexagonal BN. Such unique properties make BN nanotubes and nanosheets a promising nanomaterial in a variety of potential fields such as optoelectronic nanodevices, functional composites, hydrogen accumulators, electrically insulating substrates perfectly matching the CNT, and graphene lattices. This review gives an introduction to the rich BN nanotube/nanosheet field, including the latest achievements in the synthesis, structural analyses, and property evaluations, and presents the purpose and significance of this direction in the light of the general nanotube/nanosheet developments.

  8. Nonlinear conductivity in silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncer, Enis

    2017-08-01

    To better comprehend electrical silicon-package interaction in high voltage applications requires full characterization of the electrical properties of dielectric materials employed in wafer and package level design. Not only the packaging but wafer level dielectrics, i.e. passivation layers, would experience high electric fields generated by the voltage applied pads. In addition the interface between the passivation layer and a mold compound might develop space charge because of the mismatch in electrical properties of the materials. In this contribution electrical properties of a thin silicon nitride (Si3N4) dielectric is reported as a function of temperature and electric field. The measured values later analyzed using different temperature dependent exponential expressions and found that the Mott variable range hopping conduction model was successful to express the data. A full temperature/electric field dependency of conductivity is generated. It was found that the conduction in Si3N4 could be expressed like a field ionization or Fowler-Nordheim mechanism.

  9. Control of Defects in Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al)GaN) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Nord, J.; Albe, K.; Erhart, P.; Nordlund, K. Modelling of Compound Semiconductors: Analytical Bond-order Potential for Gallium , Nitrogen and Gallium ...Control of Defects in Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al)GaN) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates by Iskander G. Batyrev, Chi-Chin Wu...Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al)GaN) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates Iskander G. Batyrev and N. Scott Weingarten Weapons and

  10. In-situ stabilization of radioactive zirconium swarf

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Clay C.

    1999-01-01

    The method for treating ignitable cutting swarf in accordance with the present invention involves collecting cutting swarf in a casting mold underwater and injecting a binder mixture comprising vinyl ester styrene into the vessel to fill void volume; and form a mixture comprising swarf and vinyl ester styrene; and curing the mixture. The method is especially useful for stabilizing the ignitable characteristics of radioactive zirconium cutting swarf, and can be used to solidify zirconium swarf, or other ignitable finely divided material, underwater. The process could also be performed out of water with other particulate wastes.

  11. In-situ stabilization of radioactive zirconium swarf

    DOEpatents

    Hess, C.C.

    1999-08-31

    The method for treating ignitable cutting swarf in accordance with the present invention involves collecting cutting swarf in a casting mold underwater and injecting a binder mixture comprising vinyl ester styrene into the vessel to fill void volume; and form a mixture comprising swarf and vinyl ester styrene; and curing the mixture. The method is especially useful for stabilizing the ignitable characteristics of radioactive zirconium cutting swarf, and can be used to solidify zirconium swarf, or other ignitable finely divided material, underwater. The process could also be performed out of water with other particulate wastes. 6 figs.

  12. Synthesis and nonstoichiometry of the zirconium trihalides

    SciT

    Daake, R.L.; Corbett, J.D.

    1978-05-01

    The synthesis of ZrX/sub 3/ (X = Cl, Br, I) by reaction of the corresponding tetrahalides with ZrCl, ZrBr, or ZrI/sub 1.8/ in sealed tantalum tubing gives high-purity, single-phase products, thereby avoiding problems of the relatively low reactivity of and contamination by zirconium powder reductant used previously. Phase limits for the three trihalides established by isopiestic equilibration with the adjoining phases are 2.94 (2) less than or equal to Cl:Zr less than or equal to 3.03 (2) (440/sup 0/C), 2.87 (2) less than or equal to Br:Zr less than or equal to 3.23 (2) (435/sup 0/C), and 2.83 (5) (775/supmore » 0/C) less than or equal to I:Zr less than or equal to 3.43 (5) (475/sup 0/C). The hexagonal lattice constants for the bromide phase (Guinier techniques) decrease linearly with increasing bromide content across the entire range without the development of any additional lines. The variation of the c dimension for ZrI/sub 3/ (and HfI/sub 3/) on oxidation is in the opposite direction, and in this case extra lines from a presumed superlattice structure developed toward the upper limit. The structural implications of these results are considered. The reported structure for ..cap alpha..-ZrCl/sub 3/, an unusual BiI/sub 3/-type variant, was based on a misassigned ZrCl powder pattern and therefore appears to be in error. 25 references.« less

  13. Indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride quantum wells grown on polar and nonpolar gallium nitride substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Kun-Yu

    Nonpolar (m-plane or a-plane) gallium nitride (GaN) is predicted to be a potential substrate material to improve luminous efficiencies of nitride-based quantum wells (QWs). Numerical calculations indicated that the spontaneous emission rate in a single In0.15Ga0.85N/GaN QW could be improved by ˜2.2 times if the polarization-induced internal field was avoided by epitaxial deposition on nonpolar substrates. A challenge for nonpolar GaN is the limited size (less than 10x10 mm2) of substrates, which was addressed by expansion during the regrowth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE). Subsurface damage in GaN substrates were reduced by annealing with NH3 and N2 at 950°C for 60 minutes. It was additionally found that the variation of m-plane QWs' emission properties was significantly increased when the substrate miscut toward a-axis was increased from 0° to 0.1°. InGaN/GaN QWs were grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane and m-plane GaN substrates. The QWs were studied by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with different incident electron beam probe currents (0.1 nA ˜ 1000 nA). Lower emission intensities and longer peak wavelengths from c-plane QWs were attributed to the Quantum-confined Stark Effect (QCSE). The emission intensity ratios of m-plane QWs to c-plane QWs decreased from 3.04 at 1 nA to 1.53 at 1000 nA. This was identified as the stronger screening effects of QCSE at higher current densities in c-plane QWs. To further investigate these effects in a fabricated structure, biased photoluminescence measurements were performed on m-plane InGaN/GaN QWs. The purpose was to detect the possible internal fields induced by the dot-like structure in the InGaN layer through the response of these internal fields under externally applied fields. No energy shifts of the QWs were observed, which was attributed to strong surface leakage currents.

  14. Hydrogen pickup mechanism of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couet, Adrien

    Although the optimization of zirconium based alloys has led to significant improvements in hydrogen pickup and corrosion resistance, the mechanisms by which such alloy improvements occur are still not well understood. In an effort to understand such mechanisms, a systematic study of the alloy effect on hydrogen pickup is conducted, using advanced characterization techniques to rationalize precise measurements of hydrogen pickup. The hydrogen pick-up fraction is accurately measured for a specially designed set of commercial and model alloys to investigate the effects of alloying elements, microstructure and corrosion kinetics on hydrogen uptake. Two different techniques to measure hydrogen concentrations were used: a destructive technique, Vacuum Hot Extraction, and a non-destructive one, Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis. The results indicate that hydrogen pickup varies not only from alloy to alloy but also during the corrosion process for a given alloy. For instance Zircaloy type alloys show high hydrogen pickup fraction and sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics whereas ZrNb alloys show lower hydrogen pickup fraction and close to parabolic oxidation kinetics. Hypothesis is made that hydrogen pickup result from the need to balance charge during the corrosion reaction, such that the pickup of hydrogen is directly related to (and indivisible of) the corrosion mechanism and decreases when the rate of electron transport or oxide electronic conductivity sigmao xe through the protective oxide increases. According to this hypothesis, alloying elements (either in solid solution or in precipitates) embedded in the oxide as well as space charge variations in the oxide would impact the hydrogen pick-up fraction by modifying sigmaox e, which drives oxidation and hydriding kinetics. Dedicated experiments and modelling were performed to assess and validate these hypotheses. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) experiments were performed on Zircaloy-4 tubes

  15. Zirconium determination by cooling curve analysis during the pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, B. R.; Price, J. C.; Bateman, K. J.; Marsden, K. C.

    2015-02-01

    An alternative method to sampling and chemical analyses has been developed to monitor the concentration of zirconium in real-time during the casting of uranium products from the pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel. The method utilizes the solidification characteristics of the uranium products to determine zirconium levels based on standard cooling curve analyses and established binary phase diagram data. Numerous uranium products have been analyzed for their zirconium content and compared against measured zirconium data. From this data, the following equation was derived for the zirconium content of uranium products:

  16. PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films mechanical characterization using membrane point load deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagolini, Alvise; Picciotto, Antonino; Crivellari, Michele; Conci, Paolo; Bellutti, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    An analysis of the mechanical properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) silicon nitrides is presented, using micro fabricated silicon nitride membranes under point load deflection. The membranes are made of PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films. The mechanical performance of the bended membranes is examined both with analytical models and finite element simulation in order to extract the elastic modulus and residual stress values. The elastic modulus of low stress silicon nitride is calculated using stress free analytical models, while for silicon-rich silicon nitride and annealed low stress silicon nitride it is estimated with a pre-stressed model of point-load deflection. The effect of annealing both in nitrogen and hydrogen atmosphere is evaluated in terms of residual stress, refractive index and thickness variation. It is demonstrated that a hydrogen rich annealing atmosphere induces very little change in low stress silicon nitride. Nitrogen annealing effects are measured and shown to be much higher in silicon-rich nitride than in low stress silicon nitride. An estimate of PECVD silicon-rich nitride elastic modulus is obtained in the range between 240-320 GPa for deposited samples and 390 GPa for samples annealed in nitrogen atmosphere. PECVD low stress silicon nitride elastic modulus is estimated to be 88 GPa as deposited and 320 GPa after nitrogen annealing.

  17. Nitridation of silicon by nitrogen neutral beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso

    2016-02-01

    Silicon nitridation was investigated at room temperature using a nitrogen neutral beam (NB) extracted at acceleration voltages of less than 100 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formation of a Si3N4 layer on a Si (1 0 0) substrate when the acceleration voltage was higher than 20 V. The XPS depth profile indicated that nitrogen diffused to a depth of 36 nm for acceleration voltages of 60 V and higher. The thickness of the silicon nitrided layer increased with the acceleration voltages from 20 V to 60 V. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated a Si3N4 layer thickness of 3.1 nm was obtained at an acceleration voltage of 100 V. Moreover, it was proved that the nitrided silicon layer formed by the nitrogen NB at room temperature was effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process.

  18. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  19. Influence of the chemical and electronic structure on the electrical behavior of zirconium oxynitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, P.; Chappé, J. M.; Cunha, L.; Lanceros-Méndez, S.; Alpuim, P.; Vaz, F.; Alves, E.; Rousselot, C.; Espinós, J. P.; González-Elipe, A. R.

    2008-05-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of decorative zirconium oxynitride, ZrOxNy, films prepared by dc reactive magnetron sputtering, using a 17:3 nitrogen-to-oxygen-ratio gas mixture. The color of the films changed from metallic-like, very bright yellow pale, and golden yellow, for low gas mixture flows [from 0 to about 9SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP)] to red brownish for intermediate gas flows (values up to 12SCCM). Associated to this color change there is a significant decrease of brightness. With further increase of the reactive gas flow, the color of the samples changed from red brownish to dark blue (samples prepared with 13 and 14SCCM). The films deposited with gas flows above 14SCCM showed only apparent colorations due to interference effects. This change in optical behavior from opaque to transparent (characteristic of a transition from metallic to insulating-type materials), promoted by the change in gas flow values, revealed that significant changes were occurring in the film structure and electronic properties, thus opening new potential applications for the films, beyond those of purely decorative ones. Taking this into account, the electrical behavior of the films was investigated as a function of the reactive gas flow and correlated with the observed chemical, electronic, and structural features. The variations in composition disclosed the existence of four different zones, which were correlated to different crystalline structures. For the so-called zone I, x-ray diffraction revealed the development of films with a B1 NaCl face-centered cubic zirconium nitride-type phase, with some texture changes. Increasing the reactive gas flow, the structure of the films is that of a poorly crystallized overstoichiometric nitride phase, which may be similar to that of Zr3N4, but with some probable oxygen inclusions within nitrogen positions. This region was characterized as zone II. Zone III was indexed as an oxynitride-type phase

  20. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  1. Laser Beam Welding of Nitride Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongping; Yin, Guobin; Shulkin, Boris

    Laser beam welding is a joining technique that has many advantages over conventional GMAW welding, such as low heat input, short cycle time as well as good cosmetic welds. Laser beam welding has been widely used for welding powertrain components in automotive industry. When welding nitride steel components, however, laser beam welding faces a great challenge. The difficulty lies in the fact that the nitride layer in the joint releases the nitrogen into the weld pool, resulting in a porous weld. This research presents an industrial ready solution to prevent the nitrogen from forming gas bubbles in the weld.

  2. Silicon-nitride and metal composite

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Huffsmith, Sarah A.

    1981-01-01

    A composite and a method for bonding the composite. The composite includes a ceramic portion of silicon nitride, a refractory metal portion and a layer of MoSi.sub.2 indirectly bonding the composite together. The method includes contacting the layer of MoSi.sub.2 with a surface of the silicon nitride and with a surface of the metal; heating the layer to a temperature below 1400.degree. C.; and, simultaneously with the heating, compressing the layer such that the contacting is with a pressure of at least 30 MPa. This composite overcomes useful life problems in the fabrication of parts for a helical expander for use in power generation.

  3. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  4. Silicon-nitride and metal composite

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Huffsmith, S.A.

    A composite and a method for bonding the composite are described. The composite includes a ceramic portion of silicon nitride, a refractory metal portion and a layer of MoSi/sub 2/ indirectly bonding the composite together. The method includes contacting the layer of MoSi/sub 2/ with a surface of the silicon nitride and with a surface of the metal; heating the layer to a temperature below 1400/sup 0/C; and, simultaneously, compressing the layer such that the contacting is with a pressure of at least 30 MPa. This composite overcomes useful life problems in the fabrication of parts for a helical expander for use in power generation.

  5. Polymeric carbon nitride for solar hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2017-07-04

    If solar hydrogen production from water is to be a realistic candidate for industrial hydrogen production, the development of photocatalysts, which avoid the use of expensive and/or toxic elements is highly desirable from a scalability, cost and environmental perspective. Metal-free polymeric carbon nitride is an attractive material that can absorb visible light and produce hydrogen from water. This article reviews recent developments in polymeric carbon nitride as used in photocatalysis and then develops the discussion focusing on the three primary processes of a photocatalytic reaction: light-harvesting, carrier generation/separation/transportation and surface reactions.

  6. Four Terminal Gallium Nitride MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veety, Matthew Thomas

    All reported gallium nitride (GaN) transistors to date have been three-terminal devices with source, drain, and gate electrodes. In the case of GaN MOSFETs, this leaves the bulk of the device at a floating potential which can impact device threshold voltage. In more traditional silicon-based MOSFET fabrication a bulk contact can be made on the back side of the silicon wafer. For GaN grown on sapphire substrates, however, this is not possible and an alternate, front-side bulk contact must be investigated. GaN is a III-V, wide band gap semiconductor that as promising material parameters for use in high frequency and high power applications. Possible applications are in the 1 to 10 GHz frequency band and power inverters for next generation grid solid state transformers and inverters. GaN has seen significant academic and commercial research for use in Heterojunction Field Effect Transistors (HFETs). These devices however are depletion-mode, meaning the device is considered "on" at zero gate bias. A MOSFET structure allows for enhancement mode operation, which is normally off. This mode is preferrable in high power applications as the device has lower off-state power consumption and is easier to implement in circuits. Proper surface passivation of seminconductor surface interface states is an important processing step for any device. Preliminary research on surface treatments using GaN wet etches and depletion-mode GaN devices utilizing this process are discussed. Devices pretreated with potassium pursulfate prior to gate dielectric deposition show significant device improvements. This process can be applied to any current GaN FET. Enhancement-mode GaN MOSFETs were fabricated on magnesium doped p-type Wurtzite gallium nitride grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane sapphire substrates. Devices utilized ion implant source and drain which was activated under NH3 overpressure in MOCVD. Also, devices were fabricated with a SiO2 gate dielectric

  7. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    PubMed

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-09-22

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  8. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    PubMed Central

    Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics. PMID:25248070

  9. Precipitation Modeling in Nitriding in Fe-M Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomio, Yusaku; Miyamoto, Goro; Furuhara, Tadashi

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation of fine alloy nitrides near the specimen surface results in significant surface hardening in nitriding of alloyed steels. In this study, a simulation model of alloy nitride precipitation during nitriding is developed for Fe-M binary system based upon the Kampmann-Wagner numerical model in order to predict variations in the distribution of precipitates with depth. The model can predict the number density, average radius, and volume fraction of alloy nitrides as a function of depth from the surface and nitriding time. By a comparison with the experimental observation in a nitrided Fe-Cr alloy, it was found that the model can predict successfully the observed particle distribution from the surface into depth when appropriate solubility of CrN, interfacial energy between CrN and α, and nitrogen flux at the surface are selected.

  10. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  11. Feasibility study of silicon nitride protection of plastic encapsulated semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, J. W.; Hall, T. C.; Erickson, J. J.; Gebhart, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    The application of low temperature silicon nitride protective layers on wire bonded integrated circuits mounted on lead frame assemblies is reported. An evaluation of the mechanical and electrical compatibility of both plasma nitride and photochemical silicon nitride (photonitride) passivations (parallel evaluations) of integrated circuits which were then encapsulated in plastic is described. Photonitride passivation is compatible with all wire bonded lead frame assemblies, with or without initial chip passivation. Plasma nitride passivation of lead frame assemblies is possible only if the chip is passivated before lead frame assembly. The survival rate after the environmental test sequence of devices with a coating of plasma nitride on the chip and a coating of either plasma nitride or photonitride over the assembled device is significantly greater than that of devices assembled with no nitride protective coating over either chip or lead frame.

  12. Thermal conversion of an iron nitride-silicon nitride precursor into a ferromagnetic nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya, L.; Thompson, J. R.; Song, K. J.; Warmack, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Iron nitride films, FeN, in a pure form and in the form of a nanocomposite in silicon nitride were prepared by reactive sputtering using iron or iron disilicide, respectively, as targets in a nitrogen plasma. Iron nitride decomposes into the elements by heating in vacuum to 800 °C. Intermediate phases such as Fe2N or Fe4N form at lower temperatures. The nanocomposites contain the iron phases as particles with an average size of ˜5 nm dispersed in the amorphous silicon nitride matrix. The magnetic properties of the nanocomposites were established. The precursor FeN-Si3N4 film is paramagnetic, while the Fe-Si3N4, obtained by heating in vacuum, is ferromagnetic and shows typical superparamagnetic behavior. These films are of interest as recording media with superior chemical and mechanical stability and may be encoded by localized heating.

  13. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  14. Surface characterization of anodized zirconium for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, A. Gomez; Schreiner, W.; Duffó, G.; Ceré, S.

    2011-05-01

    Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of zirconium make this material suitable for biomedical implants. Its good in vivo performance is mainly due to the presence of a protective oxide layer that minimizes corrosion rate, diminishes the amount of metallic ions released to the biological media and facilitates the osseointegration process. Since the implant surface is the region in contact with living tissues, the characteristics of the surface film are of great interest. Surface modification is a route to enhance both biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of permanent implant materials. Anodizing is presented as an interesting process to modify metal surfaces with good reproducibility and independence of the geometry. In this work the surface of zirconium before and after anodizing in 1 mol/L phosphoric acid solution at a fixed potential between 3 and 30 V, was characterized by means of several surface techniques. It was found that during anodization the surface oxide grows with an inhomogeneous coverage on zirconium surface, modifying the topography. The incorporation of P from the electrolyte to the surface oxide during the anodizing process changes the surface chemistry. After 30 days of immersion in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) solution, Ca-P rich compounds were present on anodized zirconium.

  15. Direct synthesis of zirconium powder by magnesium reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Won; Yun, Jung-Yeul; Yoon, Sung-Won; Wang, Jei-Pil

    2013-05-01

    The direct synthesis of zirconium powder has been conducted through an analysis of the chemical reaction between evaporated ZrCl4 and molten magnesium over a range of reduction temperatures, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and stirring time. The observed results indicated that the purity of zirconium powder increased with increased stirring time, and Mg and MgCl2 were removed by 10 wt% of hydrochloric acid solution. The pure zirconium powder was obtained by stirring again for 5 h using 5 wt% of hydrochloric acid solution. It was noted that the mean particle size increased when the reaction temperature was increased, and the size of the powder at 1,123 K and 1,173 K was found to be 10 μm and 15 μm, respectively. In addition, the purity of the powder was also improved with temperature, and its purity finally reached up to 99.5% at 1,250 K. Overall, pure zirconium powder was obtained after a stirring stage for 5 hours using 5 wt% of hydrochloric acid solution.

  16. Method for calcining nuclear waste solutions containing zirconium and halides

    DOEpatents

    Newby, Billie J.

    1979-01-01

    A reduction in the quantity of gelatinous solids which are formed in aqueous zirconium-fluoride nuclear reprocessing waste solutions by calcium nitrate added to suppress halide volatility during calcination of the solution while further suppressing chloride volatility is achieved by increasing the aluminum to fluoride mole ratio in the waste solution prior to adding the calcium nitrate.

  17. Mineral resource of the month: zirconium and hafnium

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Zirconium and hafnium are corrosion-resistant metals that are grouped in the same family as titanium on the periodic table. The two elements commonly occur in oxide and silicate minerals and have significant economic importance in everything from ink, ceramics and golf shoes to nuclear fuel rods.

  18. Nanophase Nickel-Zirconium Alloys for Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, jay; Valdez, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Nanophase nickel-zirconium alloys have been investigated for use as electrically conductive coatings and catalyst supports in fuel cells. Heretofore, noble metals have been used because they resist corrosion in the harsh, acidic fuel cell interior environments. However, the high cost of noble metals has prompted a search for less-costly substitutes. Nickel-zirconium alloys belong to a class of base metal alloys formed from transition elements of widely different d-electron configurations. These alloys generally exhibit unique physical, chemical, and metallurgical properties that can include corrosion resistance. Inasmuch as corrosion is accelerated by free-energy differences between bulk material and grain boundaries, it was conjectured that amorphous (glassy) and nanophase forms of these alloys could offer the desired corrosion resistance. For experiments to test the conjecture, thin alloy films containing various proportions of nickel and zirconium were deposited by magnetron and radiofrequency co-sputtering of nickel and zirconium. The results of x-ray diffraction studies of the deposited films suggested that the films had a nanophase and nearly amorphous character.

  19. Manufacturing process to reduce large grain growth in zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Rosecrans, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    A method of treating cold-worked zirconium alloys to reduce large grain gth during thermal treatment at temperatures above the recrystallization temperature of the alloy comprising heating the cold-worked alloy between about 1300.degree.-1350.degree. F. for 1 to 3 hours prior to treatment above its recrystallization temperature.

  20. Surface modification of 17-4PH stainless steel by DC plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, F.; Leng, Y. X.; Huang, N.; Bai, B.; Zhang, P. Ch.

    2007-04-01

    17-4PH stainless steel was modified by direct current (DC) plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment in this study. The microstructure, wear resistance and corrosion resistance were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), pin-on-disk tribological test and polarization experiment. The results revealed that the DC plasma nitriding pretreatment was in favor of improving properties of titanium nitride film. The corrosion resistance and wear resistance of duplex treatment specimen was more superior to that of only coated titanium nitride film.

  1. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Zirconium Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Mehmeti, Blerim; Azizi, Bleron; Kelmendi, Jeta; Iljazi-Shahiqi, Donika; Alar, Željko

    2017-01-01

    Background An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of all-ceramic restorations, such as zirconium. However, one of the challenges the orthodontist must be willing to face is how to increase bond strength between the brackets and various ceramic restorations.Bond strength can beaffected bybracket type, by the material that bracketsaremade of, and their base surface design or retention mode. ​ Aim: of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to all-zirconium ceramic surfaces used for prosthetic restorations, and also to evaluate the fracture mode of these two types of orthodontic brackets. Material and methods Twenty samples/semi-crowns of all-zirconium ceramic, on which orthodontic brackets were bonded, 10 metallic and 10 ceramic polycrystalline brackets, were prepared for this research. SBS has been testedby Universal Testing Machine, with a load applied using a knife edged rod moving at a fixed rate of 1 mm/min, until failure occurred. The force required to debond the brackets was recorded in Newton, then SBS was calculated to MPa. In addition, the samples were analyzed using a digital camera magnifier to determine Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Statistical data were processed using t-test, and the level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Results Higher shear bond strength values were observed in metallic brackets bonded to zirconium crowns compared tothoseof ceramic brackets, with a significant difference. During the test, two of the ceramic brackets were partially or totally damaged. Conclusion Metallic brackets, compared to ceramic polycrystalline brackets, seemed tocreate stronger adhesion with all-zirconium surfaces due to their better retention mode. Also, ceramic brackets showed higher fragility during debonding. PMID:28827846

  2. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Zirconium Crowns.

    PubMed

    Mehmeti, Blerim; Azizi, Bleron; Kelmendi, Jeta; Iljazi-Shahiqi, Donika; Alar, Željko; Anić-Milošević, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of all-ceramic restorations, such as zirconium. However, one of the challenges the orthodontist must be willing to face is how to increase bond strength between the brackets and various ceramic restorations.Bond strength can beaffected bybracket type, by the material that bracketsaremade of, and their base surface design or retention mode. ​: A im: of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to all-zirconium ceramic surfaces used for prosthetic restorations, and also to evaluate the fracture mode of these two types of orthodontic brackets. Twenty samples/semi-crowns of all-zirconium ceramic, on which orthodontic brackets were bonded, 10 metallic and 10 ceramic polycrystalline brackets, were prepared for this research. SBS has been testedby Universal Testing Machine, with a load applied using a knife edged rod moving at a fixed rate of 1 mm/min, until failure occurred. The force required to debond the brackets was recorded in Newton, then SBS was calculated to MPa. In addition, the samples were analyzed using a digital camera magnifier to determine Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Statistical data were processed using t-test, and the level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Higher shear bond strength values were observed in metallic brackets bonded to zirconium crowns compared tothoseof ceramic brackets, with a significant difference. During the test, two of the ceramic brackets were partially or totally damaged. Metallic brackets, compared to ceramic polycrystalline brackets, seemed tocreate stronger adhesion with all-zirconium surfaces due to their better retention mode. Also, ceramic brackets showed higher fragility during debonding.

  3. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1996-11-05

    A silicon nitride ceramic is disclosed comprising: (a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, (b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and (c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa. 4 figs.

  4. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of significant interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted wide attention. Both materials have potentially unique and important properties for structural and electronic applications. However of even more consequence than their similarities may be the complementary differences between carbon and boron nitride nanotubes While BNNT possess a very high modulus similar to CNT, they also possess superior chemical and thermal stability. Additionally, BNNT have more uniform electronic properties, with a uniform band gap of 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductive to highly conductive behavior. Boron nitride nanotubes have been synthesized both in the literature and at NASA Glenn Research Center, by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistent large scale production of a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in the reproducible synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of boron nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  5. Alkaline fuel cell with nitride membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shen-Huei; Pilaski, Moritz; Wartmann, Jens; Letzkus, Florian; Funke, Benedikt; Dura, Georg; Heinzel, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work is to fabricate patterned nitride membranes with Si-MEMS-technology as a platform to build up new membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEA) for alkaline fuel cell applications. Two 6-inch wafer processes based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were developed for the fabrication of separated nitride membranes with a nitride thickness up to 1 μm. The mechanical stability of the perforated nitride membrane has been adjusted in both processes either by embedding of subsequent ion implantation step or by optimizing the deposition process parameters. A nearly 100% yield of separated membranes of each deposition process was achieved with layer thickness from 150 nm to 1 μm and micro-channel pattern width of 1μm at a pitch of 3 μm. The process for membrane coating with electrolyte materials could be verified to build up MEA. Uniform membrane coating with channel filling was achieved after the optimization of speed controlled dip-coating method and the selection of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as electrolyte solvent. Finally, silver as conductive material was defined for printing a conductive layer onto the MEA by Ink-Technology. With the established IR-thermography setup, characterizations of MEAs in terms of catalytic conversion were performed successfully. The results of this work show promise for build up a platform on wafer-level for high throughput experiments.

  6. Solar cell with a gallium nitride electrode

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1979-01-01

    A solar cell which comprises a body of silicon having a P-N junction therein with a transparent conducting N-type gallium nitride layer as an ohmic contact on the N-type side of the semiconductor exposed to solar radiation.

  7. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Tracey, Dennis M.; Foley, Michael R.; Paille, Norman I.; Pelletier, Paul J.; Sales, Lenny C.; Willkens, Craig A.; Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon nitride ceramic comprising: a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa.

  8. REACTIVE SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF CHROMIUM NITRIDE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of substrate temperature and sputtering gas compositon on the structure and properties of chromium-chromium nitride films deposited on C-1040 steel using r.f. magnetron sputter deposition was investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the structure ...

  9. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  10. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  11. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  12. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-09

    while retaining the nanotube structure. This project involves the use of computational quantum chemistry to study interactions of aluminium (Al...small clusters of 1–4 metal atoms. The effect of varying the radius of the nanotubes and the size of aluminium and titanium clusters was considered...15. SUBJECT TERMS Boron Nitride Nanotubes, composite materials, Aluminum Alloys , Titanium Alloy , Theoretical Chemistry 16. SECURITY

  13. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    SciT

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstratemore » such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.« less

  14. Boron nitride solid state neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2004-04-27

    The present invention describes an apparatus useful for detecting neutrons, and particularly for detecting thermal neutrons, while remaining insensitive to gamma radiation. Neutrons are detected by direct measurement of current pulses produced by an interaction of the neutrons with hexagonal pyrolytic boron nitride.

  15. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.

    1998-01-01

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  16. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  17. Titanium nitride electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Novak, Robert F.; Schmatz, Duane J.; Hunt, Thomas K.

    1987-12-22

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a thin film of titanium nitride as an electrode deposited onto solid electrolyte. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  18. Characterization of Reaction Sintered Silicon Nitride Radomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    A. Ossin , "A Three Dtraenslonal Stress Analysis on the Effects of a Laser Induced Local Hot Spot on a Silicon Nitride Shell, " Martin Marietta...not stated by Ossin , et al, these boundary conditions are extremes and bracket the realistic case. ** In cases where only a few large flaws limit

  19. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  20. Multifunctional zirconium nitride/copper multilayer coatings on medical grade 316L SS and titanium substrates for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D Dinesh; Kaliaraj, Gobi Saravanan

    2018-01-01

    Protecting from wear and corrosion of many medical devices in the biomedical field is an existing scientific challenge. Surface modification with multilayer ZrN/Cu coating was deposited on medical grade stainless steel (SS) and titanium substrates to enhance their surface properties. Structural results revealed that the ZrN/Cu coatings are highly crystalline and uniform microstructure on both the substrates. Dry and wet tribological measurements of the coated titanium substrate exhibit enhanced wear resistance and low friction coefficient due to the improved microstructure. Similarly, the corrosion resistance was exceptionally improved on titanium substrates, resulting from the high inertness of coating to the SBF electrolyte solution. Antibacterial activity and epifluorescence results signify the effective killing of pathogens by means of ion release killing as well as contact killing mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrostatic Assembly Preparation of High-Toughness Zirconium Diboride-Based Ceramic Composites with Enhanced Thermal Shock Resistance Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoxi; Zhang, Xinghong; Hong, Changqing; Qiu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Jia; Han, Jiecai; Hu, PingAn

    2016-05-11

    The central problem of using ceramic as a structural material is its brittleness, which associated with rigid covalent or ionic bonds. Whiskers or fibers of strong ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon nitride (Si3N4) are widely embedded in a ceramic matrix to improve the strength and toughness. The incorporation of these insulating fillers can impede the thermal flow in ceramic matrix, thus decrease its thermal shock resistance that is required in some practical applications. Here we demonstrate that the toughness and thermal shock resistance of zirconium diboride (ZrB2)/SiC composites can be improved simultaneously by introducing graphene into composites via electrostatic assembly and subsequent sintering treatment. The incorporated graphene creates weak interfaces of grain boundaries (GBs) and optimal thermal conductance paths inside composites. In comparison to pristine ZrB2-SiC composites, the toughness of (2.0%) ZrB2-SiC/graphene composites exhibited a 61% increasing (from 4.3 to 6.93 MPa·m(1/2)) after spark plasma sintering (SPS); the retained strength after thermal shock increased as high as 74.8% at 400 °C and 304.4% at 500 °C. Present work presents an important guideline for producing high-toughness ceramic-based composites with enhanced thermal shock properties.

  2. Nuclear-grade zirconium prepared by combining combustion synthesis with molten-salt electrorefining technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Nersisyan, Hayk H.; Park, Kyung-Tae; Park, Sung-Bin; Kim, Jeong-Guk; Lee, Jeong-Min; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2011-06-01

    Zirconium has a low absorption cross-section for neutrons, which makes it an ideal material for use in nuclear reactor applications. However, hafnium typically contained in zirconium causes it to be far less useful for nuclear reactor materials because of its high neutron-absorbing properties. In the present study, a novel effective method has been developed for the production of hafnium-free zirconium. The process includes two main stages: magnesio-thermic reduction of ZrSiO 4 under a combustion mode, to produce zirconium silicide (ZrSi), and recovery of hafnium-free zirconium by molten-salt electrorefining. It was found that, depending on the electrorefining procedure, it is possible to produce zirconium powder with a low hafnium content: 70 ppm, determined by ICP-AES analysis.

  3. Anticorrosive Behavior and Porosity of Tricationic Phosphate and Zirconium Conversion Coating on Galvanized Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasquez, Camilo S.; Pimenta, Egnalda P. S.; Lins, Vanessa F. C.

    2018-05-01

    This work evaluates the corrosion resistance of galvanized steel treated with tricationic phosphate and zirconium conversion coating after painting, by using electrochemical techniques, accelerated and field corrosion tests. A non-uniform and heterogeneous distribution of zirconium on the steel surface was observed due to preferential nucleation of the zirconium on the aluminum-rich sites on the surface of galvanized steel. The long-term anti-corrosion performance in a saline solution was better for the phosphate coating up to 120 days. The coating capacitance registered a higher increase for the zirconium coatings than the phosphate coatings up to 120 days of immersion. This result agrees with the higher porosity of zirconium coating in relation to the phosphate coating. After 3840 h of accelerated corrosion test, and after 1 year of accelerated field test, zirconium-treated samples showed an average scribe delamination length higher than the phosphate-treated samples.

  4. Anticorrosive Behavior and Porosity of Tricationic Phosphate and Zirconium Conversion Coating on Galvanized Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasquez, Camilo S.; Pimenta, Egnalda P. S.; Lins, Vanessa F. C.

    2018-04-01

    This work evaluates the corrosion resistance of galvanized steel treated with tricationic phosphate and zirconium conversion coating after painting, by using electrochemical techniques, accelerated and field corrosion tests. A non-uniform and heterogeneous distribution of zirconium on the steel surface was observed due to preferential nucleation of the zirconium on the aluminum-rich sites on the surface of galvanized steel. The long-term anti-corrosion performance in a saline solution was better for the phosphate coating up to 120 days. The coating capacitance registered a higher increase for the zirconium coatings than the phosphate coatings up to 120 days of immersion. This result agrees with the higher porosity of zirconium coating in relation to the phosphate coating. After 3840 h of accelerated corrosion test, and after 1 year of accelerated field test, zirconium-treated samples showed an average scribe delamination length higher than the phosphate-treated samples.

  5. Overcoming the crystallization and designability issues in the ultrastable zirconium phosphonate framework system

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tao; Yang, Zaixing; Gui, Daxiang; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiangxiang; Dai, Xing; Liu, Shengtang; Zhang, Linjuan; Gao, Yang; Chen, Lanhua; Sheng, Daopeng; Wang, Yanlong; Diwu, Juan; Wang, Jianqiang; Zhou, Ruhong; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Wang, Shuao

    2017-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based on zirconium phosphonates exhibit superior chemical stability suitable for applications under harsh conditions. These compounds mostly exist as poorly crystallized precipitates, and precise structural information has therefore remained elusive. Furthermore, a zero-dimensional zirconium phosphonate cluster acting as secondary building unit has been lacking, leading to poor designability in this system. Herein, we overcome these challenges and obtain single crystals of three zirconium phosphonates that are suitable for structural analysis. These compounds are built by previously unknown isolated zirconium phosphonate clusters and exhibit combined high porosity and ultrastability even in fuming acids. SZ-2 possesses the largest void volume recorded in zirconium phosphonates and SZ-3 represents the most porous crystalline zirconium phosphonate and the only porous MOF material reported to survive in aqua regia. SZ-2 and SZ-3 can effectively remove uranyl ions from aqueous solutions over a wide pH range, and we have elucidated the removal mechanism. PMID:28555656

  6. Liquid flow cells having graphene on nitride for microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Adiga, Vivekananda P.; Dunn, Gabriel; Zettl, Alexander K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to liquid flow cells for microscopy. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate having a first and a second oxide layer disposed on surfaces of the substrate. A first and a second nitride layer are disposed on the first and second oxide layers, respectively. A cavity is defined in the first oxide layer, the first nitride layer, and the substrate, with the cavity including a third nitride layer disposed on walls of the substrate and the second oxide layer that define the cavity. A channel is defined in the second oxide layer. An inlet port and an outlet port are defined in the second nitride layer and in fluid communication with the channel. A plurality of viewports is defined in the second nitride layer. A first graphene sheet is disposed on the second nitride layer covering the plurality of viewports.

  7. Low-loss binder for hot pressing boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    1991-01-01

    Borazine derivatives used as low-loss binders and precursors for making ceramic boron nitride structures. The derivative forms the same composition as the boron nitride starting material, thereby filling the voids with the same boron nitride material upon forming and hot pressing. The derivatives have a further advantage of being low in carbon thus resulting in less volatile byproduct that can result in bubble formation during pressing.

  8. Oxidation of boron nitride in an arc heated jet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    Two grades of hot pressed boron nitride and a boron nitride composite were subjected to oxidation tests in a 2.5 megawatt atmospheric arc jet. The results showed that fabrication and/or composition influenced thermal shock and oxidation resistance. Changes in surface structure and recession due to oxidation suggest correlation with specimen composition. The boron nitride composite reacted with the oxygen in the hot subsonic airstream to produce a glassy coating on the hot face surface.

  9. Evaluation of macrocyclic hydroxyisophthalamide ligands as chelators for zirconium-89

    SciT

    Bhatt, Nikunj B.; Pandya, Darpan N.; Xu, Jide

    The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) for zirconium-89 immuno-PET applications is an area of active research. We report the synthesis and evaluation of octadentate hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (1 and 2) as zirconium-89 chelators. And while both radiometal complexes could be prepared quantitatively and with excellent specific activity, preparation of 89Zr-1 required elevated temperature and an increased reaction time. 89Zr-1 was more stable than 89Zr-2 when challenged in vitro by excess DTPA or serum proteins and in vivo during acute biodistribution studies. The differences in radiometal complex stability arise from structural changes between the two ligand systems, and suggest further ligand optimizationmore » is necessary to enhance 89Zr chelation.« less

  10. Evaluation of macrocyclic hydroxyisophthalamide ligands as chelators for zirconium-89

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jide; Tatum, David; Magda, Darren

    2017-01-01

    The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) for zirconium-89 immuno-PET applications is an area of active research. Herein we report the synthesis and evaluation of octadentate hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (1 and 2) as zirconium-89 chelators. While both radiometal complexes could be prepared quantitatively and with excellent specific activity, preparation of 89Zr-1 required elevated temperature and an increased reaction time. 89Zr-1 was more stable than 89Zr-2 when challenged in vitro by excess DTPA or serum proteins and in vivo during acute biodistribution studies. Differences in radiometal complex stability arise from structural changes between the two ligand systems, and suggest further ligand optimization is necessary to enhance 89Zr chelation. PMID:28575044

  11. Evaluation of macrocyclic hydroxyisophthalamide ligands as chelators for zirconium-89.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikunj B; Pandya, Darpan N; Xu, Jide; Tatum, David; Magda, Darren; Wadas, Thaddeus J

    2017-01-01

    The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) for zirconium-89 immuno-PET applications is an area of active research. Herein we report the synthesis and evaluation of octadentate hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (1 and 2) as zirconium-89 chelators. While both radiometal complexes could be prepared quantitatively and with excellent specific activity, preparation of 89Zr-1 required elevated temperature and an increased reaction time. 89Zr-1 was more stable than 89Zr-2 when challenged in vitro by excess DTPA or serum proteins and in vivo during acute biodistribution studies. Differences in radiometal complex stability arise from structural changes between the two ligand systems, and suggest further ligand optimization is necessary to enhance 89Zr chelation.

  12. Evaluation of macrocyclic hydroxyisophthalamide ligands as chelators for zirconium-89

    DOE PAGES

    Bhatt, Nikunj B.; Pandya, Darpan N.; Xu, Jide; ...

    2017-06-02

    The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) for zirconium-89 immuno-PET applications is an area of active research. We report the synthesis and evaluation of octadentate hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (1 and 2) as zirconium-89 chelators. And while both radiometal complexes could be prepared quantitatively and with excellent specific activity, preparation of 89Zr-1 required elevated temperature and an increased reaction time. 89Zr-1 was more stable than 89Zr-2 when challenged in vitro by excess DTPA or serum proteins and in vivo during acute biodistribution studies. The differences in radiometal complex stability arise from structural changes between the two ligand systems, and suggest further ligand optimizationmore » is necessary to enhance 89Zr chelation.« less

  13. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM IONS FROM SOLUTION BY ADSORPTION ON ZIRCONIUM PYROPHOSPHATE

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.

    1961-01-31

    A method is given for separating plutonium in its reduced, phosphate- insoluble state from other substances. It involves contacting a solution containing the plutonium with granular zirconium pyrophosphate.

  14. Distribution coefficients of rare earth ions in cubic zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, H.; Luther, K.-D.; Assmus, W.

    1994-08-01

    Cubic zirconium dioxide crystals are grown with the skull melting technique. The effective distribution coefficients for Nd(exp 3+), Sm(exp 3+) and Er(sup 3+) as dopants are determined experimentally as a function of the crystal growth velocity. With the Burton-Prim-Slichter theory, the equilibrium distribution coefficients can be calculated. The distribution coefficients of all other trivalent rare earth ions can be estimated by applying the correlation towards the ionic radii.

  15. Translucency and Strength of High Translucency Monolithic Zirconium Oxide Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    Zirconium-Oxide Materials presented at/published to the Journal of General Dentistry with MDWI 41-108, and has been assigned local file #16208. 2...PUBLISHED/PRESENTED. D 11a. PUBLICATION/JOURNAL (list intended publication/journal.) General Dentistry D 11b. PUBLISHED ABSTRACT (List intended...the most esthetic full veneer restorative material in dentistry for many years. In the mid-1900’s, dental materials researchers began marketing and

  16. Zirconium as a Structural Material for Naval Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-29

    case with the technologically critical chemical elements chromium and cobalt, for example, from a military perspective. The case, therefore, for...By adding small amounts of tin, iron, nickel, and chromium , the impurities were effectively bound or coalesced within the metal and the corrosion...and nitrogen from the atmosphere, embrittling the weld. The techniques used for zirconium welding are gas tungsten arc welding ( GTAW ), tungsten inert

  17. Electrochemical Study of Corrosion Phenomena in Zirconium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    required reaction rates [1.1]. Based predominantly on this fact, zirconium alloys were chosen to sheath, or clad, the fuel. With the increasing demand...cathode or anode. As the oxidation and reduction reactions occur, a galvanic cell is developed. The electrons on the anode are released from the metallic...matrix as the ions are released into the aqueous solution in the initial half-cell reaction . The second half-cell reaction , taking place on the

  18. Modeling the Gas Nitriding Process of Low Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Zimmerman, C.; Donahue, D.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    The effort to simulate the nitriding process has been ongoing for the last 20 years. Most of the work has been done to simulate the nitriding process of pure iron. In the present work a series of experiments have been done to understand the effects of the nitriding process parameters such as the nitriding potential, temperature, and time as well as surface condition on the gas nitriding process for the steels. The compound layer growth model has been developed to simulate the nitriding process of AISI 4140 steel. In this paper the fundamentals of the model are presented and discussed including the kinetics of compound layer growth and the determination of the nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone. The excellent agreements have been achieved for both as-washed and pre-oxided nitrided AISI 4140 between the experimental data and simulation results. The nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone is determined to be constant and only depends on the nitriding temperature, which is ~5 × 10-9 cm2/s at 548 °C. It proves the concept of utilizing the compound layer growth model in other steels. The nitriding process of various steels can thus be modeled and predicted in the future.

  19. Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots

    DOEpatents

    White, Jack C.; Traut, Davis E.; Oden, Laurance L.; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1992-01-01

    A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  20. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Lawton, L. M.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devices and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.

  1. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  2. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    SciT

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.

    2016-03-28

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devicesmore » and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.« less

  3. Ferrier rearrangement promoted by an electrochemically generated zirconium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Stevanović, Dragana; Pejović, Anka; Damljanović, Ivan; Minić, Aleksandra; Bogdanović, Goran A; Vukićević, Mirjana; Radulović, Niko S; Vukićević, Rastko D

    2015-04-30

    In situ generated zirconium catalyst from a sacrificial zirconium anode was successfully applied to promote Ferrier rearrangement of 3,4,5-tri-O-acetyl-D-glucal and 6-deoxy-3,4-di-O-acetyl-L-glucal (3,4-di-O-acetyl-L-rhamnal) in the presence of three thiols and eleven thiophenols as nucleophiles. A simple constant current electrolysis (20 mA, 0.4 F mol(-1)) of an acetonitrile solution of lithium perchlorate (0.1 M) containing the corresponding glycal and S-nucleophiles, using a zirconium anode and a platinum cathode resulted in the successful synthesis of the corresponding 2,3-unsaturated peracetylated thioglycosides (with an average anomer ratio α/β=4.129 in the case of peracetylated D-glucal and 8.740 in the case of L-rhamnal). The same procedure proved to be appropriate in synthesizing dihydropyran derivatives ('C-glycosides') using allyltrimethylsilane as the nucleophile (only 'α-anomers' were obtained). All new compounds were fully characterized by spectral data, whereas single-crystal X-ray analysis was performed for two thioglycosides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  5. Development of silicon nitride of improved toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The application of reaction sintered Si2N4 energy absorbing surface layers to hot-pressed Si3N4 was investigated. The surface layer was formed by in-place nitridation of silicon powder. It was found that reaction sintered Si3N4 layers of 1 mm thickness, fabricated from either -100, +200, -200, or -325 mesh Si powder and nitrided in 96% N2/4% H2 so that approximately 20-25 vol % unnitrided Si remained in the layer, resulted in a sevenfold increase in ballistic impact resistance of a 0.64 cm thick hot-pressed SI3N4 substrate from RT 1370 C. Both NC-132 SI3N4, with MgO additive, and NCX-34 Si3N4, with Y2O3 additive, were evaluated as substrate material. The finer grain size -200 and -325 mesh nitrided Si layers were for their smoothness and relatively high density. It was found that nitriding in N2/H2 mixtures, rather than pure N2, resulted in a microstructure that did not substantially degrade the strength of the hot-pressed Si3N4 substrate. Thermal cycling tests on the RSSN/HPSN combinations from 200 C to 1370 C for 75 cycles in air did not degrade the impact resistance nor the interfacial bonding, although a large amount of internal silica formation occurred within the RSSN layer. Mach 0.8, 5 hr, hot gas erosion tests showed no surface recession of RSSN layers at 1200 C and slight surface recession at 1370 C.

  6. Silicon Nitride Antireflection Coatings for Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C.; Wydeven, T.; Donohoe, K.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical-vapor deposition adapted to yield graded index of refraction. Silicon nitride deposited in layers, refractive index of which decreases with distance away from cell/coating interface. Changing index of refraction allows adjustment of spectral transmittance for wavelengths which cell is most effective at converting light to electric current. Average conversion efficiency of solar cells increased from 8.84 percent to 12.63 percent.

  7. Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2011-07-01

    Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride have been prepared using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane as a template. The amine groups present on the surface of these nanopillars were exploited for functionalization with oleic acid in order to stabilize the nanostructure at the aqueous-organic interface and also for the immobilization of metal nanoparticles and protein. These immobilised nanoparticles were found to have good catalytic activity.

  8. Silicon Nitride Ceramic Fibers from Preceramic Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    the preceramic fibers into high strength Si3 N and silicon carbide nitride (SiCN) fibers. In the past year, we have learned to prepare polysilazanes...INTHELOY, Given the Empirical Formula for a Material, It Should be Possible to Prepare a Chemical Analog CERAMC CHMIAL MONOMERIC UNIT MONOMERIC UNIT SI3 N4...e a d e nf u ible B y. POLYSILAZANE PRECURSORS TO Si3 Nj IN PRACTICE: It Is Difficult to Synthesize Even Simple, High Molecular Weight Preceramic

  9. Anomalous thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride

    SciT

    Tabarraei, Alireza, E-mail: atabarra@uncc.edu; Wang, Xiaonan

    In this paper, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons under uniaxial strain along their longitudinal axis. Our simulations predict that hexagonal boron nitride shows an anomalous thermal response to the applied uniaxial strain. Contrary to three dimensional materials, under uniaxial stretching, the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanoribbons first increases rather than decreasing until it reaches its peak value and then starts decreasing. Under compressive strain, the thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride ribbons monolithically reduces rather than increasing. We use phonon spectrum and dispersion curves to investigate themore » mechanism responsible for the unexpected behavior. Our molecular dynamics modeling and density functional theory results show that application of longitudinal tensile strain leads to the reduction of the group velocities of longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes. Such a phonon softening mechanism acts to reduce the thermal conductivity of the nanoribbons. On the other hand, a significant increase in the group velocity (stiffening) of the flexural acoustic modes is observed, which counteracts the phonon softening effects of the longitudinal and transverse modes. The total thermal conductivity of the ribbons is a result of competition between these two mechanisms. At low tensile strain, the stiffening mechanism overcomes the softening mechanism which leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity. At higher tensile strain, the softening mechanism supersedes the stiffening and the thermal conductivity slightly reduces. Our simulations show that the decrease in the thermal conductivity under compressive strain is attributed to the formation of buckling defects which reduces the phonon mean free path.« less

  10. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The elevated temperature mechanical properties of silicon nitride/boron nitride fibrous monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trice, Rodney Wayne

    A unique, all-ceramic material capable of non-brittle fracture via crack deflection has been characterized from 25sp°C through 1400sp°C. This material, called fibrous monoliths (FMs), was comprised of unidirectionally aligned 250 mum diameter cells of silicon nitride surrounded by 10 mum thick cell boundaries of boron nitride. Six weight percent yttria and two weight percent alumina were added to the silicon nitride to aid in densification. TEM experiments revealed that the sintering aids used to densify the silicon nitride cells were migrating into the boron nitride cell boundary during hot-pressing and that a fine network of micro-cracks existed between basal planes of boron nitride. Elevated temperature four point bending tests were performed on fibrous monolith ceramics from room temperature through 1400sp°C. Peak strengths of FMs averaged 510 MPa for specimens tested at room temperature through 176 MPa at 1400sp°C. Work of fractures ranged from 7300 J/msp2 to 3200 J/msp2 under the same temperature conditions. The interfacial fracture energy of boron nitride, GammasbBN, as a function of temperature has been determined using the Charalambides method. The fracture energy of boron nitride is approximately 40 J/msp2 and remained constant from 25sp°C through 950sp°C. A sharp increase in GammasbBN, to about 60 J/msp2, was observed at 1000sp°C-1050sp°C. This increase in GammasbBN was attributed to interactions of the crack tip with the cell boundary glassy phase. Subsequent measurements at 1075sp°C indicated a marked decrease in GammasbBN to near 40 J/msp2 before plateauing at 17-20 J/msp2 in the 1200sp°C-1300sp°C regime. The Mode I fracture toughness of silicon nitride was also determined using the single edge precracked beam method as a function of temperature. The He and Hutchinson model relating crack deflection at an interface to the Dundurs' parameter was applied to the current data set using the temperature dependent fracture energies of the boron

  12. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  13. Gallium nitride based logpile photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Wang, George T; Fischer, Arthur J

    2011-11-09

    We demonstrate a nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ∼100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a "line-defect" cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25-30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride based optoelectronic devices.

  14. L2 Milestone: Neutron Capture Cross Sections from Surrogate (p, d) Measurements: Determination of the Unknown 87Y(n, g) Cross Section and Assessment of the Method Via the 90Zr(n, g) Benchmark Case: Theory Report

    SciT

    Escher, J. E.

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions involving unstable targets are important for many applications, but can often not be measured directly. Here we describe a method for extracting cross sections for neutron-capture on unstable isotopes from indirect (surrogate) measurements. The surrogate reaction, which produces the compound nucleus of interest, has to be described and the decay of the nucleus has to be modeled. We outline the approach for one-neutron pickup and report on the determination of the 90Zr(n, γ ) reaction from surrogate 92Zr(p,d) data, which is compared to the directly-measured capture cross section and thus provides a benchmark for themore » method. We then apply the method to determine the 87Y(n, γ ) cross section, which has not been measured directly. The work was carried out in the context of an LLNL L2 Milestone. This report addresses the theory aspects of the milestone. A complementary document summarizes the experimental efforts [1].« less

  15. 40 CFR 721.10152 - Oxirane, substituted silylmethyl-, hydrolysis products with alkanol zirconium(4+) salt and silica...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-, hydrolysis products with alkanol zirconium(4+) salt and silica, acetates (generic). 721.10152 Section 721... Oxirane, substituted silylmethyl-, hydrolysis products with alkanol zirconium(4+) salt and silica... zirconium(4+) salt and silica, acetates (PMN P-07-674) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  16. Process for producing ceramic nitrides anc carbonitrides and their precursors

    DOEpatents

    Brown, G.M.; Maya, L.

    1987-02-25

    A process for preparing ceramic nitrides and carbon nitrides in the form of very pure, fine particulate powder. Appropriate precursors is prepared by reaching a transition metal alkylamide with ammonia to produce a mixture of metal amide and metal imide in the form of an easily pyrolyzable precipitate.

  17. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-02-06

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  18. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-01-01

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  19. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  20. Vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode

    SciT

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan; Fischer, Arthur J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2017-03-14

    A vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode can hold off high voltages (kV's) when operated under reverse bias. The III-nitride device layers can be grown on a wider bandgap template layer and growth substrate, which can be removed by laser lift-off of the epitaxial device layers grown thereon.

  1. Nitriding of super alloys for enhancing physical properties

    DOEpatents

    Purohit, A.

    1984-06-25

    The invention teaches the improvement of certain super alloys by exposing the alloy to an atmosphere of elemental nitrogen at elevated temperatures in excess of 750/sup 0/C but less than 1150/sup 0/C for an extended duration, viz., by nitriding the surface of the alloy, to establish barrier nitrides of the order of 25 to 100 micrometers thickness. These barrier

  2. A physical model for evaluating uranium nitride specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. G.; Devyatko, Yu. N.; Tenishev, A. V.; Khlunov, A. V.; Khomyakov, O. V.

    2013-03-01

    Nitride fuel is one of perspective materials for the nuclear industry. But unlike the oxide and carbide uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium fuel, the nitride fuel is less studied. The present article is devoted to the development of a model for calculating UN specific heat on the basis of phonon spectrum data within the solid state theory.

  3. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide.

  4. Blueish green photoluminescence from nitrided GaAs(100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Goro; Udagawa, Takashi

    1999-04-01

    Optical and structural studies were made on the Si-doped (100)GaAs surfaces nitrided at a temperature between 650° and 750°C for 15 min in the flowing NH 3 gas. The wavelength of photoluminescence (PL) spectra were observed to be shortened from 820 nm of the GaAs nitrided at 650°C with increasing nitridation temperature. Blueish green PL with wavelengths of approx. 490 nm and 470 nm were emitted from the nitrided surfaces at 700° and 750°C, respectively. Results of AES and SIMS indicated that the surfaces are nitrided as GaAs 1- xN x, (0< x≤1) alloy layer, and the nitrided region also tended to increase as the temperature raised. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM), transmission electron diffraction (TED) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) results showed that films peeled off from the nitrided surfaces consisted mainly of hexagonal, wurtzite-type gallium nitride (GaN) with stacking faults and microtwins.

  5. Effect of manufacturing process sequence on the corrosion resistance characteristics of coated metallic bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dur, Ender; Cora, Ömer Necati; Koç, Muammer

    2014-01-01

    Metallic bipolar plate (BPP) with high corrosion and low contact resistance, durability, strength, low cost, volume, and weight requirements is one of the critical parts of the PEMFC. This study is dedicated to understand the effect of the process sequence (manufacturing then coating vs. coating then manufacturing) on the corrosion resistance of coated metallic bipolar plates. To this goal, three different PVD coatings (titanium nitride (TiN), chromium nitride (CrN), zirconium nitride (ZrN)), with three thicknesses, (0.1, 0.5, 1 μm) were applied on BPPs made of 316L stainless steel alloy before and after two types of manufacturing (i.e., stamping or hydroforming). Corrosion test results indicated that ZrN coating exhibited the best corrosion protection while the performance of TiN coating was the lowest among the tested coatings and thicknesses. For most of the cases tested, in which coating was applied before manufacturing, occurrence of corrosion was found to be more profound than the case where coating was applied after manufacturing. Increasing the coating thickness was found to improve the corrosion resistance. It was also revealed that hydroformed BPPs performed slightly better than stamped BPPs in terms of the corrosion behavior.

  6. Zirconium carbide as an electrocatalyst for the chromous-chromic redox couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, R. F.; Reid, M. A.; Yang, C. Y. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is used as a catalyst in a REDOX cell for the oxidation of chromous ions to chromic ions and for the reduction of chromic ions to chromous ions. The zirconium carbide is coated on an inert electronically conductive electrode which is present in the anode fluid of the cell.

  7. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium. 700.16 Section 700.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... and other organs of experimental animals. When used in aerosol form, some zirconium will reach the...

  8. Lithium aluminate/zirconium material useful in the production of tritium

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Trapp, T.J.

    1984-10-09

    A composition is described useful in the production of tritium in a nuclear reactor. Lithium aluminate particles are dispersed in a matrix of zirconium. Tritium produced by the reactor of neutrons with the lithium are absorbed by the zirconium, thereby decreasing gas pressure within capsules carrying the material.

  9. Lithium aluminate/zirconium material useful in the production of tritium

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.; Trapp, Turner J.

    1984-10-09

    A composition is described useful in the production of tritium in a nuclear eactor. Lithium aluminate particles are dispersed in a matrix of zirconium. Tritium produced by the reactor of neutrons with the lithium are absorbed by the zirconium, thereby decreasing gas pressure within capsules carrying the material.

  10. Lithium aluminate/zirconium material useful in the production of tritium

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Trapp, T.J.

    A composition is described useful in the production of tritium in a nuclear reactor. Lithium aluminate particles are dispersed in a matrix of zirconium. Tritium produced by the reactor of neutrons with the lithium are absorbed by the zirconium, thereby decreasing gas pressure within capsules carrying the material.

  11. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing... SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.16 Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium. (a) Zirconium-containing complexes have been used as an ingredient...

  12. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing... SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.16 Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium. (a) Zirconium-containing complexes have been used as an ingredient...

  13. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing... SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.16 Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium. (a) Zirconium-containing complexes have been used as an ingredient...

  14. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Iron Nitrides on Zinc-Blende Gallium Nitride(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Jeongihm; Lin, Wenzhi; Chinchore, Abhijit; Wang, Kangkang; Smith, Arthur R.

    2008-03-01

    Iron nitrides are attractive materials for their high magnetic moments, corrosion, and oxidation resistance. We present the successful epitaxial growth of iron nitride on zinc-blende gallium nitride (c-GaN) in order to develop a novel magnetic transition metal nitride/semiconductor system. First, GaN is grown on magnesium oxide (MgO) substrates having (001) orientation using rf N2-plasma molecular beam epitaxy. Then we grow FeN at substrate temperature of ˜ 210 ^oC up to a thickness of ˜ 10.5 nm. In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to monitor the surface during growth. Initial results suggest that the epitaxial relationship is FeN[001] || GaN[001] and FeN[100] || GaN[100]. Work in progress is to investigate the surface using in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to reveal the surface structure at atomic scale, as well as to explore more Fe-rich magnetic phases.

  15. Exploring electrolyte preference of vanadium nitride supercapacitor electrodes

    SciT

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Zhaohui; Lu, Gang

    Highlights: • Hierarchical VN nanostructures were prepared on graphite foam. • Electrolyte preference of VN supercapacitor electrodes was explored. • VN showed better capacitive property in organic and alkaline electrolytes than LiCl. - Abstract: Vanadium nitride hierarchical nanostructures were prepared through an ammonia annealing procedure utilizing vanadium pentoxide nanostructures grown on graphite foam. The electrochemical properties of hierarchical vanadium nitride was tested in aqueous and organic electrolytes. As a result, the vanadium nitride showed better capacitive energy storage property in organic and alkaline electrolytes. This work provides insight into the charge storage process of vanadium nitride and our findings canmore » shed light on other transition metal nitride-based electrochemical energy storage systems.« less

  16. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    SciT

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Elliott, Amy M.

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to anmore » azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.« less

  17. The Effect of Polymer Char on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Rickmond C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of polymer char on nitridation kinetics of attrition milled silicon powder have been investigated from 1200 to 1350 C. Results indicate that at and above 1250 C, the silicon compacts containing 3.5 wt percent polymer char were fully converted to Si3N4 after 24 hr exposure in nitrogen. In contrast, the silicon compacts without polymer char could not be fully converted to Si3N4 at 1350 C under similar exposure conditions. At 1250 and 1350 C, the silicon compacts with polymer char showed faster nitridation kinetics than those without the polymer char. As the polymer char content is increased, the amount of SiC in the nitrided material is also increased. By adding small amounts (approx. 2.5 wt percent) of NiO, the silicon compacts containing polymer char can be completely nitrided at 1200 C. The probable mechanism for the accelerated nitridation of silicon containing polymer char is discussed.

  18. Safety Assessment of Boron Nitride as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of boron nitride which functions in cosmetics as a slip modifier (ie, it has a lubricating effect). Boron nitride is an inorganic compound with a crystalline form that can be hexagonal, spherical, or cubic; the hexagonal form is presumed to be used in cosmetics. The highest reported concentration of use of boron nitride is 25% in eye shadow formulations. Although boron nitride nanotubes are produced, boron nitride is not listed as a nanomaterial used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel reviewed available chemistry, animal data, and clinical data and concluded that this ingredient is safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetic formulations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Investigation of Nitride Morphology After Self-Aligned Contact Etch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Keil, J.; Helmer, B. A.; Chien, T.; Gopaladasu, P.; Kim, J.; Shon, J.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Self-Aligned Contact (SAC) etch has emerged as a key enabling technology for the fabrication of very large-scale memory devices. However, this is also a very challenging technology to implement from an etch viewpoint. The issues that arise range from poor oxide etch selectivity to nitride to problems with post etch nitride surface morphology. Unfortunately, the mechanisms that drive nitride loss and surface behavior remain poorly understood. Using a simple langmuir site balance model, SAC nitride etch simulations have been performed and compared to actual etched results. This approach permits the study of various etch mechanisms that may play a role in determining nitride loss and surface morphology. Particle trajectories and fluxes are computed using Monte-Carlo techniques and initial data obtained from double Langmuir probe measurements. Etched surface advancement is implemented using a shock tracking algorithm. Sticking coefficients and etch yields are adjusted to obtain the best agreement between actual etched results and simulated profiles.

  20. A simple spectrophotometric method for determination of zirconium or hafnium in selected molybdenum-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A simple analytical procedure is described for accurately and precisely determining the zirconium or hafnium content of molybdenum-base alloys. The procedure is based on the reaction of the reagent Arsenazo III with zirconium or hafnium in strong hydrochloric acid solution. The colored complexes of zirconium or hafnium are formed in the presence of molybdenum. Titanium or rhenium in the alloy have no adverse effect on the zirconium or hafnium complex at the following levels in the selected aliquot: Mo, 10 mg; Re, 10 mg; Ti, 1 mg. The spectrophotometric measurement of the zirconium or hafnium complex is accomplished without prior separation with a relative standard deviation of 1.3 to 2.7 percent.

  1. Efficient One-Pot Synthesis of Colloidal Zirconium Oxide Nanoparticles for High-Refractive-Index Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hajagos, Tibor Jacob; Chen, Dustin; Chen, Yi; Kishpaugh, David; Pei, Qibing

    2016-02-01

    Zirconium oxide nanoparticles are promising candidates for optical engineering, photocatalysis, and high-κ dielectrics. However, reported synthetic methods for the colloidal zirconium oxide nanoparticles use unstable alkoxide precursors and have various other drawbacks, limiting their wide application. Here, we report a facile one-pot method for the synthesis of colloidally stable zirconium oxide nanoparticles. Using a simple solution of zirconium trifluoroacetate in oleylamine, highly stable zirconium oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized with high yield, following a proposed amidization-assisted sol-gel mechanism. The nanoparticles can be readily dispersed in nonpolar solvents, forming a long-term stable transparent solution, which can be further used to fabricate high-refractive-index nanocomposites in both monolith and thin-film forms. In addition, the same method has also been extended to the synthesis of titanium oxide nanoparticles, demonstrating its general applicability to all group IVB metal oxide nanoparticles.

  2. Minimalistic Liquid-Assisted Route to Highly Crystalline α-Zirconium Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Wang, Xiaodong Tony; Jaenicke, Stephan; Chuah, Gaik-Khuan

    2017-08-24

    Zirconium phosphates have potential applications in areas of ion exchange, catalysis, photochemistry, and biotechnology. However, synthesis methodologies to form crystalline α-zirconium phosphate (Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 ⋅H 2 O) typically involve the use of excess phosphoric acid, addition of HF or oxalic acid and long reflux times or hydrothermal conditions. A minimalistic sustainable route to its synthesis has been developed by using only zirconium oxychloride and concentrated phosphoric acid to form highly crystalline α-zirconium phosphate within hours. The morphology can be changed from platelets to rod-shaped particles by fluoride addition. By varying the temperature and time, α-zirconium phosphate with particle sizes from nanometers to microns can be obtained. Key features of this minimal solvent synthesis are the excellent yields obtained with high atom economy under mild conditions and ease of scalability. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The Deformation Mechanism of Fatigue Behaviour in a N36 Zirconium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingzhu

    2018-05-01

    Zirconium alloys are widely used as claddings in nuclear reactor. A N36 zirconium alloy has been deformed into a sheet with highly texture according to the result of electron back scatter diffraction test. Then this N36 zirconium alloy sheet has been cut into small beam samples with 12 x 3 x 3 mm3 in size. In this experiment, a three-point bending test was carried out to investigate the fatigue behaviour of N36 zirconium alloy. Cyclic loadings were applied on the top middle of the beam samples. The region of interest (ROI) is located at the middle bottom of the front face of the beam sample where slip band was observed in deformed beam sample due to strain concentration by using scanning electron microscopy. Twinning also plays an important role to accommodate the plastic deformation of N36 zirconium alloy in fatigue, which displays competition with slip.

  4. Nano-particulate Aluminium Nitride/Al: An Efficient and Versatile Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Synthesis of Biginelli Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekale, S. U.; Tekale, A. B.; Kanhe, N. S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Pawar, R. P.

    2011-12-01

    Nano-particulate aluminium nitride/Al (7:1) is reported as a new heterogeneous solid acid catalyst for the synthesis of 3, 4-dihydroxypyrimidi-2-(1H)-ones and their sulphur analogues using the Biginelli reaction. This method involves short reaction time, easy separation, high yields and purity of products.

  5. Titanium nitride thin films for minimizing multipactoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Kimo M.

    1979-01-01

    Applying a thin film coating to the surface of a workpiece, in particular, applying a coating of titanium nitride to a klystron window by means of a crossed-field diode sputtering array. The array is comprised of a cohesive group of numerous small hollow electrically conducting cylinders and is mounted so that the open ends of the cylinders on one side of the group are adjacent a titanium cathode plate. The workpiece is mounted so as to face the open ends of the other side of the group. A magnetic field is applied to the array so as to be coaxial with the cylinders and a potential is applied across the cylinders and the cathode plate, the cylinders as an anode being positive with respect to the cathode plate. The cylinders, the cathode plate and the workpiece are situated in an atmosphere of nitrogen which becomes ionized such as by field emission because of the electric field between the cylinders and cathode plate, thereby establishing an anode-cathode discharge that results in sputtering of the titanium plate. The sputtered titanium coats the workpiece and chemically combines with the nitrogen to form a titanium nitride coating on the workpiece. Gas pressure, gas mixtures, cathode material composition, voltages applied to the cathode and anode, the magnetic field, cathode, anode and workpiece spacing, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to inner diameter) of the anode cylinders, all may be controlled to provide consistent optimum thin film coatings of various compositions and thicknesses. Another facet of the disclosure is the coating of microwave components per se with titanium nitride to reduce multipactoring under operating conditions of the components.

  6. Ternary cobalt-molybdenum-zirconium coatings for alternative energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yar-Mukhamedova, Gulmira; Ved', Maryna; Sakhnenko, Nikolay; Koziar, Maryna

    2017-11-01

    Consistent patterns for electrodeposition of Co-Mo-Zr coatings from polyligand citrate-pyrophosphate bath were investigated. The effect of both current density amplitude and pulse on/off time on the quality, composition and surface morphology of the galvanic alloys were determined. It was established the coating Co-Mo-Zr enrichment by molybdenum with current density increasing up to 8 A dm-2 as well as the rising of pulse time and pause duration promotes the content of molybdenum because of subsequent chemical reduction of its intermediate oxides by hydrogen ad-atoms. It was found that the content of the alloying metals in the coating Co-Mo-Zr depends on the current density and on/off times extremely and maximum Mo and Zr content corresponds to the current density interval 4-6 A dm-2, on-/off-time 2-10 ms. Chemical resistance of binary and ternary coatings based on cobalt is caused by the increased tendency to passivity and high resistance to pitting corrosion in the presence of molybdenum and zirconium, as well as the acid nature of their oxides. Binary coating with molybdenum content not less than 20 at.% and ternary ones with zirconium content in terms of corrosion deep index are in a group ;very proof;. It was shown that Co-Mo-Zr alloys exhibits the greatest level of catalytic properties as cathode material for hydrogen electrolytic production from acidic media which is not inferior a platinum electrode. The deposits Co-Mo-Zr with zirconium content 2-4 at.% demonstrate high catalytic properties in the carbon(II) oxide conversion. This confirms the efficiency of materials as catalysts for the gaseous wastes purification and gives the reason to recommend them as catalysts for red-ox processes activating by oxygen as well as electrode materials for red-ox batteries.

  7. Lamellar zirconium phosphates to host metals for catalytic purposes.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Plata, Daniel; Infantes-Molina, Antonia; Rodríguez-Aguado, Elena; Braos-García, Pilar; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique

    2018-02-27

    In the present study a porous lamellar zirconium phosphate heterostructure (PPH) formed from zirconium(iv) phosphate expanded with silica galleries (P/Zr molar ratio equal to 2 and (Si + Zr)/P equal to 3) was prepared to host noble metals. Textural and structural characterization of PPH-noble metal materials was carried out in order to elucidate the location and dispersion of the metallic particles and the properties of the resulting material to be used in catalytic processes. In the present paper, their activity in the catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reaction of dibenzofuran (DBF) was evaluated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) evidenced that the structure of the pillared zirconium phosphate material was not modified by the incorporation of Pt and Pd. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a different dispersion of the noble metal. The acidity of the resulting PPH-noble metal materials also changed, although in all cases the acidity was of weak nature, and the incorporation of noble metals affected Brønsted acid sites as observed from 31 P NMR spectra. In general, the textural, structural and acidic properties of the resulting materials suggest that PPH can be considered a good candidate to be used as a catalytic support. Thus, the catalytic results of the PPH-noble metal samples indicated that the Pd sample showed a stable behavior probably ascribed to a high dispersion of the active phase. However, the Pt sample suffered from fast deactivation. The selectivity to the reaction products was strongly dependent on the noble metal employed.

  8. Wettability of Pyrolytic Boron Nitride by Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    1991-01-01

    The wetting of pyrolytic boron nitride by molten 99.9999 percent pure aluminum was investigated by using the sessile drop method in a vacuum operating at approximately 660 micro-Pa at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 C. The equilibrium contact angle decreased with an increase in temperature. For temperatures at 900 C or less, the equilibrium contact angle was greater than 90 deg. At 1000 C a nonwetting-to-wetting transition occurred and the contact angle stabilized at 49 deg.

  9. Slow crack growth in sintered silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Chang, J.; Heitman, P. W.

    1986-01-01

    The strength and crack growth characteristics of a sintered silicon nitride were studied at 1000 C. Fractographic analysis of material failing in dynamic fatigue revealed the presence of slow crack growth (SCG) at stressing rates below 6 ksi/min. This material can sustain a 40-ksi flexural stress at 1000 C for 400 h or more but is susceptible to both SCG and creep deformation at higher stress levels. The crack velocity exponent (N) determined both from dynamic and static fatigue experiments lies in a range from 13 to 22. The subcritical crack growth and creep behavior at 1000 C is primarily controlled by the deformation of an intergranular glassy phase.

  10. Improved superconducting qubit coherence using titanium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Josephine B.; Vissers, Michael R.; Córcoles, Antonio D.; Sandberg, Martin; Gao, Jiansong; Abraham, David W.; Chow, Jerry M.; Gambetta, Jay M.; Beth Rothwell, Mary; Keefe, George A.; Steffen, Matthias; Pappas, David P.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate enhanced relaxation and dephasing times of transmon qubits, up to ˜60 μs, by fabricating the interdigitated shunting capacitors using titanium nitride (TiN). Compared to qubits made with lift-off aluminum deposited simultaneously with the Josephson junction, this represents as much as a six-fold improvement and provides evidence that surface losses from two-level system (TLS) defects residing at or near interfaces contribute to decoherence. Concurrently, we observe an anomalous temperature dependent frequency shift of TiN resonators, which is inconsistent with the predicted TLS model.

  11. High pressure study on layered nitride superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Y.; Hisakabe, M.; Ohishi, Y.; Yamanaka, S.; Iwasa, Y.

    2004-03-01

    Pressure dependence of critical temperature, lattice constant, and phonon frequency has been investigated for layered nitride superconductors, Li_0.5(THF)_yHfNCl and ZrNCl_0.7. The data have been analyzed in terms of MacMillan's theory, and electron-phonon coupling constant λ (=1.3), Coulomb pseudopotential μ^* (=0.31), and relevant phonon frequency (=630 cm-1) have been extracted. The obtained value of λ exceeds 1 in contrast with previous experimental and theoretical results. The present result indicates that, if the superconductivity is within a MacMillan scheme, it is mediated by high frequency phonons in a strong coupling regime.

  12. Packing C60 in Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, W.; Aloni, S.; Han, Wei-Qiang; Cumings, John; Zettl, A.

    2003-04-01

    We have created insulated C60 nanowire by packing C60 molecules into the interior of insulating boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). For small-diameter BNNTs, the wire consists of a linear chain of C60 molecules. With increasing BNNT inner diameter, unusual C60 stacking configurations are obtained (including helical, hollow core, and incommensurate) that are unknown for bulk or thin-film forms of C60. C60 in BNNTs thus presents a model system for studying the properties of dimensionally constrained ``silo'' crystal structures. For the linear-chain case, we have fused the C60 molecules to form a single-walled carbon nanotube inside the insulating BNNT.

  13. SCDFT Study of High Tc Nitride Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, R.

    Based on the density functional theory for superconductors (SCDFT), we study the pairing mechanism of the layered nitride superconductors, β-LixMNCl (M=Zr, Hf). Recently, it has been shown that SCDFT reproduces experimental superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) of conventional superconductors very accurately. Here we use SCDFT as a "litmus paper" to determine whether the system is a conventional or unconventional superconductor. We show that Tc estimated by SCDFT is less than half of the experimental Tc and its doping dependence is opposite to that observed in the experiments. The present result suggests that β- LixMNCl is not a Migdal-Eliashberg type superconductor.

  14. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  15. Nanopipes in gallium nitride nanowires and rods.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Benjamin W; Crimp, Martin A; McElroy, Kaylee; Ayres, Virginia M

    2008-12-01

    Gallium nitride nanowires and rods synthesized by a catalyst-free vapor-solid growth method were analyzed with cross section high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The cross section studies revealed hollow core screw dislocations, or nanopipes, in the nanowires and rods. The hollow cores were located at or near the center of the nanowires and rods, along the axis of a screw dislocation. The formation of the hollow cores is consistent with effect of screw dislocations with giant Burgers vector predicted by Frank.

  16. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  17. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  18. The chemistry of PET imaging with zirconium-89.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Jonathan R; Pascu, Sofia I

    2018-04-23

    This Tutorial Review aims to provide an overview of the use of zirconium-89 complexes in biomedical imaging. Over the past decade there have been many new papers in this field, ranging from chemistry through to preclinical and clinical applications. Here we attempt to summarise the main developments that have occurred in this period. The primary focus is on coordination chemistry but other aspects such as isotope production, isotope properties, handling and radiochemical techniques and characterisation of cold and labelled complexes are included. Selected results from animal and human clinical studies are presented in the context of the stabilities and properties of the labelled bioconjugates.

  19. METHOD FOR ANNEALING AND ROLLING ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Picklesimer, M.L.

    1959-07-14

    A fabrication procedure is presented for alpha-stabilized zirconium-base alloys, and in particular Zircaloy-2. The alloy is initially worked at a temperature outside the alpha-plus-beta range (810 to 970 deg ), held at a temperature above 970 deg C for 30 minutes and cooled rapidly. The alloy is then cold-worked to reduce the size at least 20% and annealed at a temperature from 700 to 810 deg C. This procedure serves both to prevent the formation of stringers and to provide a randomly oriented crystal structure.

  20. Impedance spectroscopy of water soluble resin modified by zirconium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Anandraj; Joshi, Girish M.

    2018-04-01

    We successfully modified water soluble resin polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by loading zirconium sulphate (ZrSO4). We demonstrated the measurement of electrical properties by using impedance analyser across frequency range (10 Hz-1 MHz) and the temperature range of (30°C to 150°C). The impedance spectroscopy demonstrates decrease in bulk resistance as a function of temperature loading of zirconia 2.5 wt. %. Increase in AC (10-5 S/cm and DC conductivity (10- 2 S/m) observed due to ionic contribution of zirconia. However, the electrical properties of PVA/ZrSO4 composite useful to develop battery electrolyte applications.

  1. Clusterization Effects in III-V Nitrides: Nitrogen Vacancies, and Si and Mg Impurities in Aluminum Nitride and Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, V. A.; Pentaleri, E. A.; Boekema, C.; Fong, C. Y.; Klein, B. M.

    1997-03-01

    We have investigated clusterization of nitrogen vacancies and Si and Mg doping impurities in zinc-blende aluminum nitride (c-AlN) and gallium nitride (c-GaN) by the tight-binding LMTO technique. The calculations used 128-site supercells. Si and Mg atoms replacing ions in both the cation and anion sublattices of the host lattices of the host crystals have been considered. The Mg impurity at cation sites is found to form partially occupied states at the valence-band edge, and may result in p-type conductivity. When Si substitutes for Ga, the impurity band is formed at the conduction-band edge, resulting in n-type conductivity. Si impurities at cation sites, and Mg impurity at anion sites are able to form resonance states in the gap. The influence of impurity clusterization in the host lattice and interstitial sites on electronic properties of c-AlN and c-GaN crystals are modeled. The changes in vacancy- and impurity-state energies, bonding type, localization, density of states at the Fermi level in different host lattices, their dependence on impurity/vacancy concentration are analyzed and compared with the experimental data.

  2. Evaluation of coated metallic bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Wonseok; Huang, Xinyu; Fazzino, Paul; Reifsnider, Kenneth L.; Akkaoui, Michael A.

    Metallic bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells typically require coatings for corrosion protection. Other requirements for the corrosion protective coatings include low electrical contact resistance, good mechanical robustness, low material and fabrication cost. The authors have evaluated a number of protective coatings deposited on stainless steel substrates by electroplating and physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods. The coatings are screened with an electrochemical polarization test for corrosion resistance; then the contact resistance test was performed on selected coatings. The coating investigated include Gold with various thicknesses (2 nm, 10 nm, and 1 μm), Titanium, Zirconium, Zirconium Nitride (ZrN), Zirconium Niobium (ZrNb), and Zirconium Nitride with a Gold top layer (ZrNAu). The substrates include three types of stainless steel: 304, 310, and 316. The results show that Zr-coated samples satisfy the DOE target for corrosion resistance at both anode and cathode sides in typical PEM fuel cell environments in the short-term, but they do not meet the DOE contact resistance goal. Very thin gold coating (2 nm) can significantly decrease the electrical contact resistance, however a relatively thick gold coating (>10 nm) with our deposition method is necessary for adequate corrosion resistance, particularly for the cathode side of the bipolar plate.

  3. Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Wang, George T [Albuquerque, NM; Li, Qiming [Albuquerque, NM; Creighton, J Randall [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-03-02

    A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

  4. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Urgen, Mustafa; Cakir, Ali Fuat; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Kazmanli, Kursat; Keles, Ozgul

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  5. Thermodynamic Routes to Novel Metastable Nitrogen-Rich Nitrides

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Wenhao; Holder, Aaron; Orvañanos, Bernardo; ...

    2017-07-17

    Compared to oxides, the nitrides are relatively unexplored, making them a promising chemical space for novel materials discovery. Of particular interest are nitrogen-rich nitrides, which often possess useful semiconducting properties for electronic and optoelectronic applications. However, such nitrogen-rich compounds are generally metastable, and the lack of a guiding theory for their synthesis has limited their exploration. Here, we review the remarkable metastability of observed nitrides, and examine the thermodynamics of how reactive nitrogen precursors can stabilize metastable nitrogen-rich compositions during materials synthesis. We map these thermodynamic strategies onto a predictive computational search, training a data-mined ionic substitution algorithm specifically formore » nitride discovery, which we combine with grand-canonical DFT-SCAN phase stability calculations to compute stabilizing nitrogen chemical potentials. We identify several new nitrogen-rich binary nitrides for experimental investigation, notably the transition metal nitrides Mn3N4, Cr3N4, V3N4, and Nb3N5, the main group nitride SbN, and the pernitrides FeN2, CrN2, and Cu2N2. By formulating rational thermodynamic routes to metastable compounds, we expand the search space for functional technological materials beyond equilibrium phases and compositions.« less

  6. Thermodynamic Routes to Novel Metastable Nitrogen-Rich Nitrides

    SciT

    Sun, Wenhao; Holder, Aaron; Orvañanos, Bernardo

    Compared to oxides, the nitrides are relatively unexplored, making them a promising chemical space for novel materials discovery. Of particular interest are nitrogen-rich nitrides, which often possess useful semiconducting properties for electronic and optoelectronic applications. However, such nitrogen-rich compounds are generally metastable, and the lack of a guiding theory for their synthesis has limited their exploration. Here, we review the remarkable metastability of observed nitrides, and examine the thermodynamics of how reactive nitrogen precursors can stabilize metastable nitrogen-rich compositions during materials synthesis. We map these thermodynamic strategies onto a predictive computational search, training a data-mined ionic substitution algorithm specifically formore » nitride discovery, which we combine with grand-canonical DFT-SCAN phase stability calculations to compute stabilizing nitrogen chemical potentials. We identify several new nitrogen-rich binary nitrides for experimental investigation, notably the transition metal nitrides Mn3N4, Cr3N4, V3N4, and Nb3N5, the main group nitride SbN, and the pernitrides FeN2, CrN2, and Cu2N2. By formulating rational thermodynamic routes to metastable compounds, we expand the search space for functional technological materials beyond equilibrium phases and compositions.« less

  7. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided ferrous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portolan, E.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Figueroa, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The electronic structures of the near-surface regions of two different nitrided steels (AISI 316 and 4140) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectron groups from all main chemical elements involved were addressed for steel samples with implanted-N concentrations in the range 16-32 at.%. As the implanted-N concentrations were increased, rather contrasting behaviors were observed for the two kinds of steel. The N1s photoelectrons had spectral shifts toward lower (nitrided AISI 316) or higher (nitrided AISI 4140) binding energies, whereas the Fe2p 3/2 photoelectron spectrum remains at a constant binding energy (nitrided AISI 316) or shifts toward higher binding energies (AISI 4140). These trends are discussed in terms of the metallic nitride formation and the overlapping of atomic orbitals. For nitrided AISI 316, a semi-classical approach of charge transfer between Cr and N is used to explain the experimental facts (formation of CrN), while for nitrided AISI 4140 we propose that the interaction between orbitals 4s from Fe and 2p from N promotes electrons to the conduction band increasing the electrical attraction of the N1s and Fe2p electrons in core shells (formation of FeN x). The increase in hardness of the steel upon N implantation is attributed to the localization of electrons in specific bonds, which diminishes the metallic bond character.

  8. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Fink, J. M.; Kalaee, M.; Pitanti, A.; Norte, R.; Heinzle, L.; Davanço, M.; Srinivasan, K.; Painter, O.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom—mechanical, optical and microwave—would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments. PMID:27484751

  9. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Fink, J M; Kalaee, M; Pitanti, A; Norte, R; Heinzle, L; Davanço, M; Srinivasan, K; Painter, O

    2016-08-03

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom-mechanical, optical and microwave-would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments.

  10. Structure refinement for tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various morphologies

    SciT

    Liu, Lianyun; School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shang Yuan Cun, Haidian District, Beijing 100044; Huang, Kai

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various phases and morphologies for the first time have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. Highlights: ► The spherical TaN, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. ► The crystal structures of different tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement on the X-ray diffraction data and the examinations of electron microcopies. ► The specific surface area of the tantalum nitrides powders was around 10 m{supmore » 2} g{sup −1}. ► Tantalum nitrides powders could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance. -- Abstract: Tantalum nitrides (TaN{sub x}) nanocrystals with different phase and morphology have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. The crystal structures of tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement based on the X-ray diffraction data. The morphologies of various tantalum nitrides nanocrystals in high quality were analyzed through the electron microcopies examinations. The spherical TaN nanoparticles, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been selectively prepared at different annealing temperatures. In addition, the specific surface areas of the tantalum nitrides nanocrystals measured by BET method were around 9.87–11.64 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, indicating that such nano-sized tantalum nitrides could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance.« less

  11. Zirconium: The material of the future in modern implantology.

    PubMed

    Kubasiewicz-Ross, Paweł; Dominiak, Marzena; Gedrange, Tomasz; Botzenhart, Ute U

    2017-01-01

    The authors present the contemporary state of knowledge concerning alternative materials for dental implantology. First of all, factors influencing osseointegration are stated. The most important factors seem to be the type of implant surface. Among the numerous parameters describing them, the most important are: average roughness and porous density. Some studies proved that materials with comparable surface roughness provide similar osseointegration. In modern implantology titanium is the material still considered as a "gold standard". However, aesthetic features of titanium still bear several disadvantages, especially in the case of periodontium with a thin biotype in the anterior, aesthetic sensitive area of the jaw. If a titanium implant is used in such a case, the mucosa at the implant's neck may become grayish and, consequently limits the success of the overall treatment. That was the reason for seeking alternative materials to manufacture dental implants. Initiated by general medicine, mainly orthopedics, the search led to the discovery of zirconium dioxide used in dental implantology. A small number of complications, good chemical parameters, anticorrosion, mechanical strength, elasticity module close to the one of steel, and especially biocompatibility made zirconium a perfect material for this purpose, although this material presents several problems in achieving optimal roughness. In this overview one of the probable methods, a process of partial synterization, is presented.

  12. Extensive Bone Reaction From Catastrophic Oxidized Zirconium Wear.

    PubMed

    Cassar-Gheiti, Adrian J; Collins, Dennis; McCarthy, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The use of alternative bearing surfaces for total hip arthroplasty has become popular to minimize wear and increase longevity, especially in young patients. Oxidized zirconium (Oxinium; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) femoral heads were introduced in the past decade for use in total hip arthroplasty. The advantages of oxidized zirconium include less risk of fracture compared with traditional ceramic heads. This case report describes a patient with a history of bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Nonoperative management of avascular necrosis failed, and the patient was treated with bilateral total hip arthroplasty. The patient was followed at regular intervals and had slow eccentric polyethylene wear during a 10-year period. After 10 years, the patient had accelerated wear, with femoral and acetabular bone changes as a result of Oxinium and ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene wear during a 6-month period. This article highlights the unusual accelerated bone changes that occurred as a result of Oxinium wear particles. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Wear Analysis in THA Utilizing Oxidized Zirconium and Crosslinked Polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Kevin L.; Mangla, Jimmi; Murdoch, Nathan; Martell, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidized zirconium, a material with a ceramic surface on a metal substrate, and highly cross-linked polyethylene are two materials developed to reduce wear. We measured in vivo femoral head penetration in patients with these advanced bearings. We hypothesized the linear wear rates would be lower than those published for cobalt-chrome and standard polyethylene. We retrospectively reviewed a select series of 56 THAs in a relatively young, active patient population utilizing oxidized zirconium femoral heads and highly cross-linked polyethylene acetabular liners. Femoral head penetration was determined using the Martell computerized edge-detection method. All patients were available for 2-year clinical and radiographic followup. True linear wear was 4 μm/year (95% confidence intervals, ± 59 μm/year). The early wear rates in this cohort of relatively young, active patients were low and we believe justify the continued study of these alternative bearing surfaces. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18946711

  14. Reaction of Titanium and Zirconium Particles in Cylindrical Explosive Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, David; Cairns, Malcolm; Goroshin, Samuel; Zhang, Fan

    2007-06-01

    The critical conditions for the reaction of high melting-point metallic particles (Ti, Zr) dispersed during the detonation of long cylindrical explosive charges have been investigated experimentally. The charges consisted of packed beds of either spherical titanium particles (with diameters of 35, 90, or 215 μm; AP&C, Inc.) or nonspherical zirconium particles (250 -- 500 μm or 500 -- 600 μm, Atlantic Equipment Eng., NJ) saturated with sensitized liquid nitromethane. For the titanium particles, a threshold particle diameter exists, above which self-sustained particle reaction is not observed, although some particle reaction occurs immediately behind the detonation front then rapidly quenches. For the smallest particles, the proportion of the conical particle cloud that reacts increases with charge diameter, suggesting that the reaction initiation is a competition between particle heating and expansion cooling of the products. For zirconium particles, no critical conditions exist; particle ignition was observed for all particle and charge diameters tested. In this case, interaction of the high pressure detonation wave with the particles is sufficient to initiate reaction at the particle surface after a delay time (˜ 10's μs), which is much less than the time required for thermal equilibration of the particles.

  15. Aqueous sodium borohydride induced thermally stable porous zirconium oxide for quick removal of lead ions

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nadiya B.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is well known for its reducing property and well-established for the development of metal nanoparticles through reduction method. In contrary, this research paper discloses the importance of aqueous NaBH4 as a precipitating agent towards development of porous zirconium oxide. The boron species present in aqueous NaBH4 play an active role during gelation as well as phase separated out in the form of boron complex during precipitation, which helps to form boron free zirconium hydroxide [Zr(OH)4] in the as-synthesized condition. Evolved in-situ hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles also play an important role to develop as-synthesized loose zirconium hydroxide and the presence of intra-particle voids in the loose zirconium hydroxide help to develop porous zirconium oxide during calcination process. Without any surface modification, this porous zirconium oxide quickly adsorbs almost hundred percentages of toxic lead ions from water solution within 15 minutes at normal pH condition. Adsorption kinetic models suggest that the adsorption process was surface reaction controlled chemisorption. Quick adsorption was governed by surface diffusion process and the adsorption kinetic was limited by pore diffusion. Five cycles of adsorption-desorption result suggests that the porous zirconium oxide can be reused efficiently for removal of Pb (II) ions from aqueous solution. PMID:26980545

  16. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    SciT

    Spencer, Barry B.; Walker, T. B.; Bruffey, S. H.

    2016-08-31

    Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when themore » solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using nonradioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.« less

  17. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    SciT

    Spencer, Barry B.; Walker, T. B.; Bruffey, Stephanie H.

    2016-08-31

    This report is issued as the first revision to FCRD-MRWFD-2016-000297. Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-basedmore » cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using non-radioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.« less

  18. Effect of hydrogenation conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of zirconium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muta, Hiroaki; Nishikane, Ryoji; Ando, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Junji; Sakamoto, Kan; Harjo, Stefanus; Kawasaki, Takuro; Ohishi, Yuji; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2018-03-01

    Precipitation of brittle zirconium hydrides deteriorate the fracture toughness of the fuel cladding tubes of light water reactor. Although the hydride embrittlement has been studied extensively, little is known about physical properties of the hydride due to the experimental difficulties. In the present study, to elucidate relationship between mechanical properties and microstructure, two δ-phase zirconium hydrides and one ε-phase zirconium hydride were carefully fabricated considering volume changes at the metal-to-hydride transformation. The δ-hydride that was fabricated from α-zirconium exhibits numerous inner cracks due to the large volume change. Analyses of the neutron diffraction pattern and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data show that the sample displays significant stacking faults in the {111} plane and in the pseudo-layered microstructure. On the other hand, the δ-hydride sample fabricated from β-zirconium at a higher temperature displays equiaxed grains and no cracks. The strong crystal orientation dependence of mechanical properties were confirmed by indentation test and EBSD observation. The δ-hydride hydrogenated from α-zirconium displays a lower Young's modulus than that prepared from β-zirconium. The difference is attributed to stacking faults within the {111} plane, for which the Young's modulus exhibits the highest value in the perpendicular direction. The strong influence of the crystal orientation and dislocation density on the mechanical properties should be considered when evaluating hydride precipitates in nuclear fuel cladding.

  19. Modelling of the modulation properties of arsenide and nitride VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiak, Michał; Śpiewak, Patrycja; Moser, Philip; Gebski, Marcin; Schmeckebier, Holger; Sarzała, Robert P.; Lott, James A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, using our model of capacitance in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), we analyze certain differences between an oxide-confined arsenide VCSEL emitting in the NIR region, and a nitride VCSEL emitting violet radiation. In the nitride laser its high differential resistance, caused partially by the low conductivity of p-type GaN material and the bottom contact configuration, is one of the main reasons why the nitride VCSEL has much worse modulation properties than the arsenide VCSEL. Using the complicated arsenide structure, we also analyze different possible ways of constructing the laser's equivalent circuit.

  20. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan; Goyal, Amit; Barnett, Scott A.; Kim, Ilwon; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-08-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metal and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layers. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may be super conducting properties.

  1. Magnetoresistance measurements of superconducting molybdenum nitride thin films

    SciT

    Baskaran, R., E-mail: baskaran@igcar.gov.in; Arasu, A. V. Thanikai; Amaladass, E. P.

    2016-05-23

    Molybdenum nitride thin films have been deposited on aluminum nitride buffered glass substrates by reactive DC sputtering. GIXRD measurements indicate formation of nano-crystalline molybdenum nitride thin films. The transition temperature of MoN thin film is 7.52 K. The transition width is less than 0.1 K. The upper critical field Bc{sub 2}(0), calculated using GLAG theory is 12.52 T. The transition width for 400 µA current increased initially upto 3 T and then decreased, while that for 100 µA current transition width did not decrease.

  2. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  3. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  4. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  5. Monolithic Gyroidal Mesoporous Mixed Titanium–Niobium Nitrides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous transition metal nitrides are interesting materials for energy conversion and storage applications due to their conductivity and durability. We present ordered mixed titanium–niobium (8:2, 1:1) nitrides with gyroidal network structures synthesized from triblock terpolymer structure-directed mixed oxides. The materials retain both macroscopic integrity and mesoscale ordering despite heat treatment up to 600 °C, without a rigid carbon framework as a support. Furthermore, the gyroidal lattice parameters were varied by changing polymer molar mass. This synthesis strategy may prove useful in generating a variety of monolithic ordered mesoporous mixed oxides and nitrides for electrode and catalyst materials. PMID:25122534

  6. Nitriding of super alloys for enhancing physical properties

    DOEpatents

    Purohit, Ankur

    1986-01-01

    The invention teaches the improvement of certain super alloys by exposing the alloy to an atmosphere of elemental nitrogen at elevated temperatures in excess of 750.degree. C. but less than 1150.degree. C. for an extended duration, viz., by nitriding the surface of the alloy, to establish barrier nitrides of the order of 25-100 micrometers thickness. These barrier nitrides appear to shield the available oxidizing metallic species of the alloy for up to a sixfold improved resistance against oxidation and also appear to impede egress of surface dislocations for increased fatigue and creep strengths.

  7. Preparation of boron nitride fiber by organic precursor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yingying; Sun, Runjun; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Fan, Wei; Zhou, Dan; Sheng, Cuihong

    In this paper, boron nitride polymer precursor was made by boric acid, melamine, twelve sodium alkyl sulfate as raw materials and pure water as medium which is heated to 70 °C. Boron nitride precursor polymer was soluble in formic acid solution. The boron nitride precursor can be electrostatically spun at the voltage in 23 kV and the distance between the positive and negative poles is 15 cm. The formed fiber is very uniform. The properties of the precursors were analyzed through electron microscope, infrared spectrum, X-ray and ultraviolet spectrum. The aim of the job is to got the precursor of BN and spun it.

  8. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1988-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  9. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1984-07-20

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate prior to metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  10. Iron-Nitride Alloy Magnets: Transformation Enabled Nitride Magnets Absent Rare Earths (TEN Mare)

    SciT

    None

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Case Western is developing a highly magnetic iron-nitride alloy to use in the magnets that power electric motors found in EVs and renewable power generators. This would reduce the overall price of the motor by eliminating the expensive imported rare earth minerals typically found in today’s best commercial magnets. The iron-nitride powder is sourced from abundant and inexpensive materials found in the U.S. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate this new magnet system, which contains no rare earths, in a prototype electric motor. This could significantly reduce the amount of greenhouse gases emitted in themore » U.S. each year by encouraging the use of clean alternatives to oil and coal.« less

  11. Evaluation of boron nitride nanotubes and hexagonal boron nitrides as nanocarriers for cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Emanet, Melis; Şen, Özlem; Çulha, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and hexagonal boron nitrides (hBNs) are novel nanostructures with high mechanical strengths, large surface areas and excellent biocompatibilities. Here, the potential use of BNNTs and hBNs as nanocarriers was comparatively investigated for use with cancer drugs. Doxorubicin (Dox) and folate are used as model drugs and targeting agents, respectively. The obtained results indicate that BNNTs have about a threefold higher Dox loading capacity than hBNs. It was also found that cellular uptake of folate-Dox-BNNTs was much higher when compared with Dox-BNNTs for HeLa cells, due to the presence of folate receptors on the cell surface, leading to increased cancer cell death. In summary, folate and Dox conjugated BNNTs are promising agents in nanomedicine and may have potential drug delivery applications.

  12. Thin films of aluminum nitride and aluminum gallium nitride for cold cathode applications

    SciT

    Sowers, A.T.; Christman, J.A.; Bremser, M.D.

    1997-10-01

    Cold cathode structures have been fabricated using AlN and graded AlGaN structures (deposited on n-type 6H-SiC) as the thin film emitting layer. The cathodes consist of an aluminum grid layer separated from the nitride layer by a SiO{sub 2} layer and etched to form arrays of either 1, 3, or 5 {mu}m holes through which the emitting nitride surface is exposed. After fabrication, a hydrogen plasma exposure was employed to activate the cathodes. Cathode devices with 5 {mu}m holes displayed emission for up to 30 min before failing. Maximum emission currents ranged from 10{endash}100 nA and required grid voltages rangingmore » from 20{endash}110 V. The grid currents were typically 1 to 10{sup 4} times the collector currents. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}« less

  13. High Temperature Oxidation of Boron Nitride. Part 1; Monolithic Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Farmer, Serene; Moore, Arthur; Sayir, Haluk

    1997-01-01

    High temperature oxidation of monolithic boron nitride (BN) is examined. Hot pressed BN and both low and high density CVD BN were studied. It is shown that oxidation rates are quite sensitive to microstructural factors such as orientation, porosity, and degree of crystallinity. In addition small amounts of water vapor lead to volatilization of the B2O3 oxide as H(x)B(y)O(z). For these reasons, very different oxidation kinetics were observed for each type of BN.

  14. Thermodynamic Analysis and Growth of Zirconium Carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sun; Hua, Hao Zheng; Xiang, Xiong

    Equilibrium calculations were used to optimize conditions for the chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide from zirconium halide + CxHy+H2+Ar system. The results show the CVD-ZrC phase diagram is divided into ZrC+C, ZrC and ZrC+Zr zones by C, Zr generating lines. For the same mole of ZrCl4 reactant, it needs higher concentration of CH4 to generate single ZrC phase than that of C3H6. Using these calculations as a guide, single-phase cubic zirconium carbide coatings were deposited onto graphite substrate.

  15. Isomerization of Cyclooctadiene to Cyclooctyne with a Zinc/Zirconium Heterobimetallic Complex.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael J; White, Andrew J P; Crimmin, Mark R

    2016-06-06

    Reaction of a zinc/zirconium heterobimetallic complex with 1,5-cyclooctadiene (1,5-COD) results in slow isomerization to 1,3-cyclooctadiene (1,3-COD), along with the formation of a new complex that includes a cyclooctyne ligand bridging two metal centers. While analogous magnesium/zirconium and aluminum/zirconium heterobimetallic complexes are competent for the catalytic isomerization of 1,5-COD to 1,3-COD, only in the case of the zinc species is the cyclooctyne adduct observed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Isomerization of Cyclooctadiene to Cyclooctyne with a Zinc/Zirconium Heterobimetallic Complex

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Michael J.; White, Andrew J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reaction of a zinc/zirconium heterobimetallic complex with 1,5‐cyclooctadiene (1,5‐COD) results in slow isomerization to 1,3‐cyclooctadiene (1,3‐COD), along with the formation of a new complex that includes a cyclooctyne ligand bridging two metal centers. While analogous magnesium/zirconium and aluminum/zirconium heterobimetallic complexes are competent for the catalytic isomerization of 1,5‐COD to 1,3‐COD, only in the case of the zinc species is the cyclooctyne adduct observed. PMID:27071992

  17. Reactivity of zirconium basic sulfate in the reactions with carbonate, oxalate, and phosphate reagents

    SciT

    Nekhamkin, L.G.; Kondrashova, I.A.; Kerina, V.R.

    1987-08-20

    The reactivity of zirconium basic sulfate is determined by the possibility of replacement of oxo- and hydroxo-ligands and decreases with increasing temperature of its precipitation. The interaction of the less reactive zirconium basic sulfate with carbonate and oxalate reagents occurs at 25/sup 0/C without any change in basicity and that with phosphate reagents occurs with a decrease in it, up to the formation of a monophosphate with basicity about 20%. In the interaction of the more reactive zirconium basic sulfate, obtained without heating, oxo- and hydroxo groups can be entirely replaced by acido-ligands with the formation of unhydrolyzed compounds.

  18. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    SciT

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J.; Börner, K.

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steelmore » samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.« less

  19. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  20. Structural stability and electronic properties of an octagonal allotrope of two dimensional boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Lauren; Takahashi, Keisuke

    2017-03-27

    An octagonal allotrope of two dimensional boron nitride is explored through first principles calculations. Calculations show that two dimensional octagonal boron nitride can be formed with a binding energy comparable to two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. In addition, two dimensional octagonal boron nitride is found to have a band gap smaller than two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride, suggesting the possibility of semiconductive attributes. Two dimensional octagonal boron nitride also has the ability to layer through physisorption. Defects present within two dimensional octagonal boron nitride also lead toward the introduction of a magnetic moment through the absence of boron atoms. The presence of defects is also found to render both hexagonal and octagonal boron nitrides reactive against hydrogen, where greater reactivity is seen in the presence of nitrogen. Thus, two dimensional octagonal boron nitride is confirmed with potential to tailor properties and reactivity through lattice shape and purposeful introduction of defects.

  1. Iron Carbides and Nitrides: Ancient Materials with Novel Prospects.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhantong; Zhang, Peng; Lei, Xiang; Wang, Xiaobai; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Hua

    2018-02-07

    Iron carbides and nitrides have aroused great interest in researchers, due to their excellent magnetic properties, good machinability and the particular catalytic activity. Based on these advantages, iron carbides and nitrides can be applied in various areas such as magnetic materials, biomedical, photo- and electrocatalysis. In contrast to their simple elemental composition, the synthesis of iron carbides and nitrides still has great challenges, particularly at the nanoscale, but it is usually beneficial to improve performance in corresponding applications. In this review, we introduce the investigations about iron carbides and nitrides, concerning their structure, synthesis strategy and various applications from magnetism to the catalysis. Furthermore, the future prospects are also discussed briefly. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  3. Process for manufacture of semipermeable silicon nitride membranes

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul Charles; Shul, Randy J.; Willison, Christi Gober

    2003-12-09

    A new class of semipermeable membranes, and techniques for their fabrication, have been developed. These membranes, formed by appropriate etching of a deposited silicon nitride layer, are robust, easily manufacturable, and compatible with a wide range of silicon micromachining techniques.

  4. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; ...

    2016-12-19

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  5. Effect of processing parameters on reaction bonding of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, M. H.; Gregory, O. J.; Magida, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    Reaction bonded silicon nitride was developed. The relationship between the various processing parameters and the resulting microstructures was to design and synthesize reaction bonded materials with improved room temperature mechanical properties.

  6. Osteoblastlike cell adhesion on titanium surfaces modified by plasma nitriding.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jose Sandro Pereira; Amico, Sandro Campos; Rodrigues, Almir Olegario Neves; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvao; Alves, Clodomiro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of various titanium surfaces modified by cold plasma nitriding in terms of adhesion and proliferation of rat osteoblastlike cells. Samples of grade 2 titanium were subjected to three different surface modification processes: polishing, nitriding by plasma direct current, and nitriding by cathodic cage discharge. To evaluate the effect of the surface treatment on the cellular response, the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblastlike cells (MC3T3) were quantified and the results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman statistical tests. Cellular morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. There was more MC3T3 cell attachment on the rougher surfaces produced by cathodic cage discharge compared with polished samples (P < .05). Plasma nitriding improves titanium surface roughness and wettability, leading to osteoblastlike cell adhesion.

  7. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; Varma, Rajender S.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature. PMID:27991593

  8. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Wimmer, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Silicon nitride is a high temperature material currently under consideration for heat engine and other applications. The objective is to improve the net shape fabrication technology of Si3N4 by injection molding. This is to be accomplished by optimizing the process through a series of statistically designed matrix experiments. To provide input to the matrix experiments, a wide range of alternate materials and processing parameters was investigated throughout the whole program. The improvement in the processing is to be demonstrated by a 20 percent increase in strength and a 100 percent increase in the Weibull modulus over that of the baseline material. A full characterization of the baseline process was completed. Material properties were found to be highly dependent on each step of the process. Several important parameters identified thus far are the starting raw materials, sinter/hot isostatic pressing cycle, powder bed, mixing methods, and sintering aid levels.

  9. Apparatus for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    DOEpatents

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1995-04-04

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  10. Method for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    DOEpatents

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  11. Slurry-pressing consolidation of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, William A.; Kiser, James D.; Freedman, Marc R.

    1988-01-01

    A baseline slurry-pressing method for a silicon nitride material is developed. The Si3N4 composition contained 5.8 wt percent SiO2 and 6.4 wt percent Y2O3. Slurry-pressing variables included volume percent solids, application of ultrasonic energy, and pH. Twenty vol percent slurry-pressed material was approximately 11 percent stronger than both 30 vol percent slurry-pressed and dry-pressed materials. The Student's t-test showed the difference to be significant at the 99 percent confidence level. Twenty volume percent (300 h) slurry-pressed test bars exhibited strengths as high as 980 MPa. Large, columnar beta-Si3N4 grains caused failure in the highest strength specimens. The improved strength correlated with better structural uniformity as determined by radiography, optical microscopy, and image analysis.

  12. Rebar Graphene from Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of rebar graphene on Cu substrates is described using functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) that were annealed or subjected to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. Characterization shows that the BNNTs partially unzip and form a reinforcing bar (rebar) network within the graphene layer that enhances the mechanical strength through covalent bonds. The rebar graphene is transferrable to other substrates without polymer assistance. The optical transmittance and conductivity of the hybrid rebar graphene film was tested, and a field effect transistor was fabricated to explore its electrical properties. This method of synthesizing 2D hybrid graphene/BN structures should enable the hybridization of various 1D nanotube and 2D layered structures with enhanced mechanical properties. PMID:25486451

  13. Rebar graphene from functionalized boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilun; Peng, Zhiwei; Larios, Eduardo; Wang, Gunuk; Lin, Jian; Yan, Zheng; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Tour, James M

    2015-01-27

    The synthesis of rebar graphene on Cu substrates is described using functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) that were annealed or subjected to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. Characterization shows that the BNNTs partially unzip and form a reinforcing bar (rebar) network within the graphene layer that enhances the mechanical strength through covalent bonds. The rebar graphene is transferrable to other substrates without polymer assistance. The optical transmittance and conductivity of the hybrid rebar graphene film was tested, and a field effect transistor was fabricated to explore its electrical properties. This method of synthesizing 2D hybrid graphene/BN structures should enable the hybridization of various 1D nanotube and 2D layered structures with enhanced mechanical properties.

  14. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Harry C.; Fang, Ho T.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a four year program to improve the strength and reliability of injection-molded silicon nitride are summarized. Statistically designed processing experiments were performed to identify and optimize critical processing parameters and compositions. Process improvements were monitored by strength testing at room and elevated temperatures, and microstructural characterization by optical, scanning electron microscopes, and scanning transmission electron microscope. Processing modifications resulted in a 20 percent strength and 72 percent Weibull slope improvement of the baseline material. Additional sintering aids screening and optimization experiments succeeded in developing a new composition (GN-10) capable of 581.2 MPa at 1399 C. A SiC whisker toughened composite using this material as a matrix achieved a room temperature toughness of 6.9 MPa m(exp .5) by the Chevron notched bar technique. Exploratory experiments were conducted on injection molding of turbocharger rotors.

  15. Gap discrete breathers in strained boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barani, Elham; Korznikova, Elena A.; Chetverikov, Alexander P.; Zhou, Kun; Dmitriev, Sergey V.

    2017-11-01

    Linear and nonlinear dynamics of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) lattice is studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations with the use of the Tersoff interatomic potentials. It is found that sufficiently large homogeneous elastic strain along zigzag direction opens a wide gap in the phonon spectrum. Extended vibrational mode with boron and nitrogen sublattices vibrating in-plane as a whole in strained h-BN has frequency within the phonon gap. This fact suggests that a nonlinear spatially localized vibrational mode with frequencies in the phonon gap, called discrete breather (also often termed as intrinsic localized mode), can be excited. Properties of the gap discrete breathers in strained h-BN are contrasted with that for analogous vibrational mode found earlier in strained graphene. It is found that h-BN modeled with the Tersoff potentials does not support transverse discrete breathers.

  16. Sputtered silicon nitride coatings for wear protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride films were deposited by RF sputtering on 304 stainless steel substrates in a planar RF sputtering apparatus. The sputtering was performed from a Si3N4 target in a sputtering atmosphere of argon and nitrogen. The rate of deposition, the composition of the coatings, the surface microhardness and the adhesion of the coatings to the substrates were investigated as a function of the process parameters, such as: substrate target distance, fraction nitrogen in the sputtering atmosphere and sputtering pressure. Silicon rich coating was obtained for fraction nitrogen below 0.2. The rate of deposition decreases continuously with increasing fraction nitrogen and decreasing sputtering pressure. It was found that the adherence of the coatings improves with decreasing sputtering pressure, almost independently of their composition.

  17. Thermal expansion of quaternary nitride coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnádi, Ferenc; Wang, Fei; Odén, Magnus; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2018-04-01

    The thermal expansion coefficient of technologically relevant multicomponent cubic nitride alloys are predicted using the Debye model with ab initio elastic constants calculated at 0 K and an isotropic approximation for the Grüneisen parameter. Our method is benchmarked against measured thermal expansion of TiN and Ti(1-x)Al x N as well as against results of molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the thermal expansion coefficients of Ti(1-x-y)X y Al x N (X  =  Zr, Hf, Nb, V, Ta) solid solutions monotonously increase with the amount of alloying element X at all temperatures except for Zr and Hf, for which they instead decrease for y≳ 0.5 .

  18. Boron Nitride Nanotube: Synthesis and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha I.; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; hide

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800 C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  19. III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor are disclosed. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V materials varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V material can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  20. Boron nitride nanotubes for gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Şen, Özlem; Çobandede, Zehra; Emanet, Melis; Bayrak, Ömer Faruk; Çulha, Mustafa

    2017-09-01

    Non-viral gene delivery is increasingly investigated as an alternative to viral vectors due to low toxicity and immunogenicity, easy preparation, tissue specificity, and ability to transfer larger sizes of genes. In this study, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are functionalized with oligonucleotides (oligo-BNNTs). The morpholinos complementary to the oligonucleotides attached to the BNNTs (morpholino/oligo-BNNTs) are hybridized to silence the luciferase gene. The morpholino/oligo-BNNTs conjugates are administered to luciferase-expressing cells (MDA-MB-231-luc2) and the luciferase activity is monitored. The luciferase activity is decreased when MDA-MB-231-luc2 cells were treated with morpholino/oligo-BNNTs. The study suggests that BNNTs can be used as a potential vector to transfect cells. BNNTs are potential new nanocarriers for gene delivery applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    SciT

    Wu, Yanbin; Aluru, Narayana R., E-mail: aluru@illinois.edu; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics andmore » ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.« less

  2. Boron nitride nanotube: synthesis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Yamakov, Vesselin; Wise, Kristopher E.; Su, Ji; Fay, Catharine C.

    2014-04-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA/JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800°C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  3. Excitons in boron nitride single layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvani, Thomas; Paleari, Fulvio; Miranda, Henrique P. C.; Molina-Sánchez, Alejandro; Wirtz, Ludger; Latil, Sylvain; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François

    2016-09-01

    Boron nitride single layer belongs to the family of two-dimensional materials whose optical properties are currently receiving considerable attention. Strong excitonic effects have already been observed in the bulk and still stronger effects are predicted for single layers. We present here a detailed study of these properties by combining ab initio calculations and a tight-binding Wannier analysis in both real and reciprocal space. Due to the simplicity of the band structure with single valence (π ) and conduction (π*) bands the tight-binding analysis becomes quasiquantitative with only two adjustable parameters and provides tools for a detailed analysis of the exciton properties. Strong deviations from the usual hydrogenic model are evidenced. The ground-state exciton is not a genuine Frenkel exciton, but a very localized tightly bound one. The other ones are similar to those found in transition-metal dichalcogenides and, although more localized, can be described within a Wannier-Mott scheme.

  4. Hall effect of copper nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, G. H.; Liu, J. Z.; Li, M.; Yuan, X. M.; Yan, P. X.; Liu, J. L.

    2005-08-01

    The Hall effect of copper nitride (Cu3N) thin films was investigated in our work. Cu3N films were deposited on glass substrates by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering at different temperatures using pure copper as the sputtering target. The Hall coefficients of the films are demonstrated to be dependent on the deposition gas flow rate and the measuring temperature. Both the Hall coefficient and resistance of the Cu3N films increase with the nitrogen gas flow rate at room temperature, while the Hall mobility and the carrier density of the films decrease. As the temperature changed from 100 K to 300 K, the Hall coefficient and the resistivity of the films decreased, while the carrier density increased and Hall mobility shows no great change. The energy band gap of the Cu3N films deduced from the curve of the common logarithm of the Hall coefficient against 1/T is 1.17-1.31 eV.

  5. Process for preparing titanium nitride powder

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-06-17

    A process for making titanium nitride powder by reaction of titanium phosphates with sodium cyanide. The process of this invention may comprise mixing one or more phosphates of Ti with a cyanide salt in the absence of oxygen and heating to a temperature sufficient to cause reaction to occur. In the preferred embodiment the ratio of cyanide salt to Ti should be at least 2 which results in the major Ti-containing product being TiN rather than sodium titanium phosphate byproducts. The process is an improvement over prior processes since the byproducts are water soluble salts of sodium which can easily be removed from the preferred TiN product by washing. 2 tabs.

  6. Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-05

    Hutchinson, Adv. Appl . Mech. 29 (1992). [34] H. Ming-Yuan, J.W. Hutchinson, Int. J. Solids Struct. 25 (1989) 1053. [35] J. Salem , L. Ghosn, Int. J...Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot- Pressed Aluminum Nitride by Guangli Hu, C. Q. Chen, K. T. Ramesh, and J. W. McCauley ARL-RP-0487...Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-RP-0487 June 2014 Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot- Pressed Aluminum Nitride

  7. Defect reduction in seeded aluminum nitride crystal growth

    SciT

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Morgan, Kenneth E.; Schowalter, Leo J.

    2017-04-18

    Bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN) having an areal planar defect density.ltoreq.100 cm.sup.-2. Methods for growing single crystal aluminum nitride include melting an aluminum foil to uniformly wet a foundation with a layer of aluminum, the foundation forming a portion of an AlN seed holder, for an AlN seed to be used for the AlN growth. The holder may consist essentially of a substantially impervious backing plate.

  8. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, R.A.

    1994-04-05

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

  9. Fabrication of turbine components and properties of sintered silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neil, J. T.; French, K. W.; Quackenbush, C. L.; Smith, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a status report on the injection molding of sinterable silicon nitride at GTE Laboratories. The effort involves fabrication of single axial turbine blades and monolithic radial turbine rotors. The injection molding process is reviewed and the fabrication of the turbine components discussed. Oxidation resistance and strength results of current injection molded sintered silicon nitride as well as dimensional checks on sintered turbine blades demonstrate that this material is a viable candidate for high temperature structural applications.

  10. Hydrolytic Unzipping of Boron Nitride Nanotubes in Nitric Acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dukeun; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yoong Ahm

    2017-12-01

    Boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNRs) have very attractive electrical and optical properties due to their unique edge states and width-related properties. Herein, for the first time, BNNRs were produced by a simple reflux of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in nitric acid containing water, which had led to unzipped sidewalls through hydrolysis. Their high reactivity that originated from edges was verified via a strong interaction with methylene blue.

  11. Infrared Dielectric Properties of Low-stress Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Beall, James A.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; McAndrew, Brendan; Niemack, Michael D.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nitride thin films play an important role in the realization of sensors, filters, and high-performance circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-IR regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectra for a commonly employed low-stress silicon nitride formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric parameters with an accuracy of approximately 4% are presented.

  12. Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2014-06-17

    An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

  13. Synthesis of Continuous Boron Nitride Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia; Wen, G.; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Long; Zhong, Bo; Fan, Shaoyu

    Continuous boron nitride nanofibers (BNNFs) have been gotten by electrospinning. The appropriate precursor of BNNFs was electrospinned to green born nitride nanofibers (GBNNFs) with temperatures from 80°C to 100°C in the protection of N2. By successive heat treatments in N2, the organics in GBNNFs disappeared and BN ceramics nanofibers came into being. The average diameters of BNNFs by electrospinning are less than 10 μm

  14. Nitriding of Polymer by Low Energy Nitrogen Neutral Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Takeda, Keigo; Yamakawa, Koji; Den, Shoji; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2012-03-01

    Nitriding of polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) has been carried out at room temperature using a nitrogen neutral beam with kinetic energy of less than 100 eV. The surface hardness of nitrided samples increased to two times that of the untreated sample, when the acceleration voltage was between 30 and 50 V. The thickness of the hardened polymer layer was estimated to be 1 µm. It was concluded that the hardness enhancement was caused by the diffusion of nitrogen atoms into the polymer.

  15. Defect reduction in seeded aluminum nitride crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Morgan, Kenneth E.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Slack, Glen A.

    2017-06-06

    Bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN) having an areal planar defect density .ltoreq.100 cm.sup.-2. Methods for growing single crystal aluminum nitride include melting an aluminum foil to uniformly wet a foundation with a layer of aluminum, the foundation forming a portion of an AlN seed holder, for an AlN seed to be used for the AlN growth. The holder may consist essentially of a substantially impervious backing plate.

  16. Defect reduction in seeded aluminum nitride crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Morgan, Kenneth; Slack, Glen A; Rao, Shailaja P.; Gibb, Shawn Robert

    2017-09-26

    Bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN) having an areal planar defect density.ltoreq.100 cm.sup.-2. Methods for growing single crystal aluminum nitride include melting an aluminum foil to uniformly wet a foundation with a layer of aluminum, the foundation forming a portion of an AlN seed holder, for an AlN seed to be used for the AlN growth. The holder may consist essentially of a substantially impervious backing plate.

  17. Coaxial group III-nitride nanowire photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yajie; Tian, Bozhi; Kempa, Thomas J; Lieber, Charles M

    2009-05-01

    Coaxial core/shell nanowires represent an important class of nanoscale building blocks with substantial potential for exploring new concepts and materials for solar energy conversion. Here, we report the first experimental realization of coaxial group III-nitride nanowire photovoltaic (PV) devices, n-GaN/i-In(x)Ga(1-x)N/p-GaN, where variation of indium mole fraction is used to control the active layer band gap and hence light absorption. Current-voltage data reveal clear diode characteristics with ideality factors from 3.9 to 5.6. Electroluminescence measurements demonstrate tunable emission from 556 to 371 nm and thus confirm band gap variations in the In(x)Ga(1-x)N active layer from 2.25 to 3.34 eV as In composition is varied. Simulated one-sun AM 1.5G illumination yielded open-circuit voltages (V(oc)) from 1.0 to 2.0 V and short-circuit current densities (J(sc)) from 0.39 to 0.059 mA/cm(2) as In composition is decreased from 0.27 to 0 and a maximum efficiency of approximately 0.19%. The n-GaN/i-In(x)Ga(1-x)N/p-GaN nanowire devices are highly robust and exhibit enhanced efficiencies for concentrated solar light illuminations as well as single nanowire J(sc) values as high as 390 mA/cm(2) under intense short-wavelength illumination. The ability to rationally tune the structure and composition of these core/shell III-nitride nanowires will make them a powerful platform for exploring nanoenabled PVs in the future.

  18. Theoretical study of nitride short period superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, N. E.; Svane, A.

    2018-02-01

    Discussion of band gap behavior based on first principles calculations of electronic band structures for various short period nitride superlattices is presented. Binary superlattices, as InN/GaN and GaN/AlN as well as superlattices containing alloys, as InGaN/GaN, GaN/AlGaN, and GaN/InAlN are considered. Taking into account different crystallographic directions of growth (polar, semipolar and nonpolar) and different strain conditions (free-standing and pseudomorphic) all the factors influencing the band gap engineering are analyzed. Dependence on internal strain and lattice geometry is considered, but the main attention is devoted to the influence of the internal electric field and the hybridization of well and barrier wave functions. The contributions of these two important factors to band gap behavior are illustrated and estimated quantitatively. It appears that there are two interesting ranges of layer thicknesses; in one (few atomic monolayers in barriers and wells) the influence of the wave function hybridization is dominant, whereas in the other (layers thicker than roughly five to six monolayers) dependence of electric field on the band gaps is more important. The band gap behavior in superlattices is compared with the band gap dependence on composition in the corresponding ternary and quaternary alloys. It is shown that for superlattices it is possible to exceed by far the range of band gap values, which can be realized in ternary alloys. The calculated values of the band gaps are compared with the photoluminescence emission energies, when the corresponding data are available. Finally, similarities and differences between nitride and oxide polar superlattices are pointed out by comparison of wurtzite GaN/AlN and ZnO/MgO.

  19. Synthesis of reduced carbon nitride at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O

    SciT

    Kharlamov, Alexey; Bondarenko, Marina, E-mail: mebondarenko@ukr.net; Kharlamova, Ganna

    For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene) is obtained. It is differed from usually synthesized carbon nitride by a significantly large (on 0.09 nm) interplanar distance is. At the same time, the chemical bonds between atoms in a heteroatomic plane of reduced carbon nitride correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The samples of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide were synthesized under the special reactionary conditions of a pyrolysis of melamine and urea. We believe that reduced carbon nitride consists ofmore » weakly connected carbon-nitrogen monosheets (azagraphene sheets) as well as reduced (from graphene oxide) graphene contains weakly connected graphene sheets. - Graphical abstract: XRD pattern and schematic atomic model of one layer of reduced carbon nitride, carbon nitride oxide and synthesized carbon nitride. For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of the water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O is obtained the reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene). Display Omitted - Highlights: • First the reduced carbon nitride (RCN) at the reduction of the carbon nitride oxide was obtained. • Water-soluble carbon nitride oxide was reduced by hydroquinone. • The chemical bonds in a heteroatomic plane of RCN correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • Reduced carbon nitride consists of poorly connected heteroatomic azagraphene layers.« less

  20. Spherical boron nitride particles and method for preparing them

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Gleiman, Seth S.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2003-11-25

    Spherical and polyhedral particles of boron nitride and method of preparing them. Spherical and polyhedral particles of boron nitride are produced from precursor particles of hexagonal phase boron nitride suspended in an aerosol gas. The aerosol is directed to a microwave plasma torch. The torch generates plasma at atmospheric pressure that includes nitrogen atoms. The presence of nitrogen atoms is critical in allowing boron nitride to melt at atmospheric pressure while avoiding or at least minimizing decomposition. The plasma includes a plasma hot zone, which is a portion of the plasma that has a temperature sufficiently high to melt hexagonal phase boron nitride. In the hot zone, the precursor particles melt to form molten particles that acquire spherical and polyhedral shapes. These molten particles exit the hot zone, cool, and solidify to form solid particles of boron nitride with spherical and polyhedral shapes. The molten particles can also collide and join to form larger molten particles that lead to larger spherical and polyhedral particles.

  1. Nanotribological response of a plasma nitrided bio-steel.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Aniruddha; Chakraborty, Himel; Bhattacharya, Manjima; Ghosh, Jiten; Sreemany, Monjoy; Bysakh, Sandip; Rane, Ramkrishna; Joseph, Alphonsa; Jhala, Ghanshyam; Mukherjee, Subroto; Das, Mitun; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop K

    2017-01-01

    AISI 316L is a well known biocompatible, austenitic stainless steel (SS). It is thus a bio-steel. Considering its importance as a bio-prosthesis material here we report the plasma nitriding of AISI 316L (SS) followed by its microstructural and nanotribological characterization. Plasma nitriding of the SS samples was carried out in a plasma reactor with a hot wall vacuum chamber. For ease of comparison these plasma nitrided samples were termed as SSPN. The experimental results confirmed the formations of an embedded nitrided metal layer zone (ENMLZ) and an interface zone (IZ) between the ENMLZ and the unnitrided bulk metallic layer zone (BMLZ) in the SSPN sample. These ENMLZ and IZ in the SSPN sample were richer in iron nitride (FeN) chromium nitride (CrN) along with the austenite phase. The results from nanoindentation, microscratch, nanoscratch and sliding wear studies confirmed that the static contact deformation resistance, the microwear, nanowear and sliding wear resistance of the SSPN samples were much better than those of the SS samples. These results were explained in terms of structure-property correlations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitride microlens arrays for blue and ultraviolet wavelength applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oder, T. N.; Shakya, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2003-05-01

    Nitride microlens arrays with sizes as small as 10 μm in diameter have been fabricated on GaN and AlN epilayers using the method of photoresist reflow and inductively coupled plasma dry etching. The focal lengths of the microlenses varied from 7-30 μm as determined by theoretical fitting as well as by the near-field scanning optical microscopy measurement. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopies were used to obtain the surface profile of the microlenses which were found to match very well with hemispherical fitting and a surface roughness value around 1 nm was obtained. Nitride microlens arrays would be naturally chosen for green/blue to deep ultraviolet wavelength applications. In addition, nitride microlenses offer the possibility of integrating nitride-based microsize photonic devices as well as of coupling light into, out of, and between arrays of III-nitride emitters for other applications, such as spatially resolved fluorescence spectroscopy studies of biological and medical systems and optical links, thereby further expanding the applications of III nitrides.

  3. Excellent electrical conductivity of the exfoliated and fluorinated hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yafang; Liu, Qian; He, Guanjie; Xu, Kaibing; Jiang, Lin; Hu, Xianghua; Hu, Junqing

    2013-01-24

    The insulator characteristic of hexagonal boron nitride limits its applications in microelectronics. In this paper, the fluorinated hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets were prepared by doping fluorine into the boron nitride nanosheets exfoliated from the bulk boron nitride in isopropanol via a facile chemical solution method with fluoboric acid; interestingly, these boron nitride nanosheets demonstrate a typical semiconductor characteristic which were studied on a new scanning tunneling microscope-transmission electron microscope holder. Since this property changes from an insulator to a semiconductor of the boron nitride, these nanosheets will be able to extend their applications in designing and fabricating electronic nanodevices.

  4. Fretting wear behavior of zirconium alloy in B-Li water at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lefu; Lai, Ping; Liu, Qingdong; Zeng, Qifeng; Lu, Junqiang; Guo, Xianglong

    2018-02-01

    The tangential fretting wear of three kinds of zirconium alloys tube mated with 304 stainless steel (SS) plate was investigated. The tests were conducted in an autoclave containing 300 °C pressurized B-Li water for tube-on-plate contact configuration. The worn surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and 3D microscopy. The cross-section of wear scar was examined with transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results indicated that the dominant wear mechanism of zirconium alloys in this test condition was delamination and oxidation. The oxide layer on the fretted area consists of outer oxide layer composed of iron oxide and zirconium oxide and inner oxide layer composed of zirconium oxide.

  5. Calcification of MC3T3-E1 cells on titanium and zirconium.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Takayuki; Chen, Peng; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Doi, Hisashi; Ashida, Maki; Suzuki, Shoichi; Moriyama, Keiji; Hanawa, Takao

    2015-01-01

    To confirm similarity of hard tissue compatibility between titanium and zirconium, calcification of MC3T3-E1 cells on titanium and zirconium was evaluated in this study. Mirror-polished titanium (Ti) and zirconium (Zr) disks and zirconium-sputter deposited titanium (Zr/Ti) were employed in this study. The surface of specimens were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Then, the cellular proliferation, differentiation and calcification of MC3T3-E1 cells on specimens were investigated. The surface of Zr/Ti was much smoother and cleaner than those of Ti and Zr. The proliferation of the cell was the same among three specimens, while the differentiation and calcification on Zr/Ti were faster than those on Ti and Zr. Therefore, Ti and Zr showed the identical hard tissue compatibility according to the evaluation with MC3T3-E1 cells. Sputter deposition may improve cytocompatibility.

  6. About structural phase state of coating based on zirconium oxide formed by microplasma oxidation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidulina, Tatiana A.; Sergeev, Viktor P.; Kuzmin, Oleg S.; Fedorischeva, Marina V.; Kalashnikov, Mark P.

    2017-12-01

    The oxide-ceramic coating based of zirconium oxide is formed by the method of microplasma oxidation. The producing modes of the oxide layers on E110 zirconium alloy are under testing. It was found that using microplasma treatment of E110 zirconium in aluminosilicate electrolyte makes possible the formation of porous oxide-ceramic coatings based on zirconium alloyed by aluminum and niobium. The study is focused on the modes how to form heat-shielding coatings with controlled porosity and minimal amount of microcracks. The structural-phase state of the coating is studied by X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the ratio of the monoclinic and tetragonal phases changes with the change occurring in the coating formation modes.

  7. Synthesis, microstructure and dielectric properties of zirconium doped barium titanate

    SciT

    Kumar, Rohtash; School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi; Asokan, K.

    2016-05-23

    We report on synthesis, microstructural and relaxor ferroelectric properties of Zirconium(Zr) doped Barium Titanate (BT) samples with general formula Ba(Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x})O{sub 3} (x=0.20, 0.35). These lead-free ceramics were prepared by solid state reaction route. The phase transition behavior and temperature dependent dielectric properties and composition dependent ferroelectric properties were investigated. XRD analysis at room temperature confirms phase purity of the samples. SEM observations revealed retarded grain growth with increasing Zr mole fraction. Dielectric properties of BZT ceramics is influenced significantly by small addition of Zr mole fraction. With increasing Zr mole fraction, dielectric constant decreases while FWHM and frequencymore » dispersion increases. Polarization vs electric field hysteresis measurements reveal ferroelectric relaxor phase at room temperature. The advantages of such substitution maneuvering towards optimizing ferroelectric properties of BaTiO{sub 3} are discussed.« less

  8. Titanium-Zirconium-Nickel Alloy Inside Marshall's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This Photo, which appeared on the July cover of `Physics Today', is of the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber allowing scientists to record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. Once inside the chamber, a laser heats the sample until it melts. The laser is then turned off and the sample cools, changing from a liquid drop to a solid sphere. In this particular shot, the ESL contains a solid metal sample of titanium-zirconium-nickel alloy. Since 1977, the ESL has been used at MSFC to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds. Materials created as a result of these tests include new optical materials, special metallic glasses, and spacecraft components.

  9. Titanium-Zirconium-Nickel Alloy Inside Marshall's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This is a close-up of a sample of titanium-zirconium-nickel alloy inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber allowing scientists to record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. Once inside the chamber, a laser heats the sample until it melts. The laser is then turned off and the sample cools, changing from a liquid drop to a solid sphere. Since 1977, the ESL has been used at MSFC to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds. Materials created as a result of these tests include new optical materials, special metallic glasses, and spacecraft components.

  10. Defect kinetics and resistance to amorphization in zirconium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2015-02-01

    To better understand the radiation response of zirconium carbide (ZrC), and in particular its excellent resistance to amorphization, we have used density functional theory methods to study the kinetics of point defects in ZrC. The migration barriers and recombination barriers of the simple point defects are calculated using the ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and the nudged elastic band method. These barriers are used to estimate C and Zr interstitial and vacancy diffusion and Frenkel pair recombination rates. A significant barrier for C Frenkel pair recombination is found but it is shown that a large concentration of C vacancies reduces this barrier dramatically, allowing facile healing of radiation damage. The mechanisms underlying high resistance to amorphization of ZrC were analyzed from the perspectives of structural, thermodynamic, chemical and kinetic properties. This study provides insights into the amorphization resistance of ZrC as well as a foundation for understanding general radiation damage in this material.

  11. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi; Suud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  12. Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium-Oxide Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-12

    APPROV~, Col Drew W. Fallis Dean, Air Force Postgraduate Dental School r UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES AIR FORCE...POSTGRADUATE DENTAL SCHOOL 2450 Pepperrell Street Lackland AFB Texas, 78236-5345 http://www.usuhs.mil "The author hereby certifies that the use of any...Translucency Monolithic Zirconium-Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials manufacturers have developed more translucent monolithic zirconium oxide

  13. Mechanical resistance of zirconium implant abutments: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    The increase of aesthetic demands, together with the successful outcome of current implants, has renewed interest in the search for new materials with enough mechanical properties and better aesthetic qualities than the materials customarily used in implanto-prosthetic rehabilitation. Among these materials, zirconium has been used in different types of implants, including prosthetic abutments. The aim of the present review is to analyse current scientific evidence supporting the use of this material for the above mentioned purposes. We carried out the review of the literature published in the last ten years (2000 through 2010) of in vitro trials of dynamic and static loading of zirconium abutments found in the databases of Medline and Cochrane using the key words zirconium abutment, fracture resistance, fracture strength, cyclic loading. Although we have found a wide variability of values among the different studies, abutments show favourable clinical behaviour for the rehabilitation of single implants in the anterior area. Such variability may be explained by the difficulty to simulate daily mastication under in vitro conditions. The clinical evidence, as found in our study, does not recommend the use of implanto-prosthetic zirconium abutments in the molar area. Key words: Zirconium abutment, zirconium implant abutment, zirconia abutment, fracture resistance, fracture strength, cyclic loading. PMID:22143702

  14. Overcoming the crystallization and designability issues in the ultrastable zirconium phosphonate framework system

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Tao; Yang, Zaixing; Gui, Daxiang; ...

    2017-05-30

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based on zirconium phosphonates exhibit superior chemical stability suitable for applications under harsh conditions. These compounds mostly exist as poorly crystallized precipitates, and precise structural information has therefore remained elusive. Furthermore, a zero-dimensional zirconium phosphonate cluster acting as secondary building unit has been lacking, leading to poor designability in this system. We overcome these challenges and obtain single crystals of three zirconium phosphonates that are suitable for structural analysis. Furthermore, these compounds are built by previously unknown isolated zirconium phosphonate clusters and exhibit combined high porosity and ultrastability even in fuming acids. SZ-2 possesses the largest voidmore » volume recorded in zirconium phosphonates and SZ-3 represents the most porous crystalline zirconium phosphonate and the only porous MOF material reported to survive in aqua regia. SZ-2 and SZ-3 can effectively remove uranyl ions from aqueous solutions over a wide pH range, and we have elucidated the removal mechanism.« less

  15. Comparison of Zirconium Phosphonate-Modified Surfaces for Immobilizing Phosphopeptides and Phosphate-Tagged Proteins.

    PubMed

    Forato, Florian; Liu, Hao; Benoit, Roland; Fayon, Franck; Charlier, Cathy; Fateh, Amina; Defontaine, Alain; Tellier, Charles; Talham, Daniel R; Queffélec, Clémence; Bujoli, Bruno

    2016-06-07

    Different routes for preparing zirconium phosphonate-modified surfaces for immobilizing biomolecular probes are compared. Two chemical-modification approaches were explored to form self-assembled monolayers on commercially available primary amine-functionalized slides, and the resulting surfaces were compared to well-characterized zirconium phosphonate monolayer-modified supports prepared using Langmuir-Blodgett methods. When using POCl3 as the amine phosphorylating agent followed by treatment with zirconyl chloride, the result was not a zirconium-phosphonate monolayer, as commonly assumed in the literature, but rather the process gives adsorbed zirconium oxide/hydroxide species and to a lower extent adsorbed zirconium phosphate and/or phosphonate. Reactions giving rise to these products were modeled in homogeneous-phase studies. Nevertheless, each of the three modified surfaces effectively immobilized phosphopeptides and phosphopeptide tags fused to an affinity protein. Unexpectedly, the zirconium oxide/hydroxide modified surface, formed by treating the amine-coated slides with POCl3/Zr(4+), afforded better immobilization of the peptides and proteins and efficient capture of their targets.

  16. Overcoming the crystallization and designability issues in the ultrastable zirconium phosphonate framework system

    SciT

    Zheng, Tao; Yang, Zaixing; Gui, Daxiang

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based on zirconium phosphonates exhibit superior chemical stability suitable for applications under harsh conditions. These compounds mostly exist as poorly crystallized precipitates, and precise structural information has therefore remained elusive. Furthermore, a zero-dimensional zirconium phosphonate cluster acting as secondary building unit has been lacking, leading to poor designability in this system. We overcome these challenges and obtain single crystals of three zirconium phosphonates that are suitable for structural analysis. Furthermore, these compounds are built by previously unknown isolated zirconium phosphonate clusters and exhibit combined high porosity and ultrastability even in fuming acids. SZ-2 possesses the largest voidmore » volume recorded in zirconium phosphonates and SZ-3 represents the most porous crystalline zirconium phosphonate and the only porous MOF material reported to survive in aqua regia. SZ-2 and SZ-3 can effectively remove uranyl ions from aqueous solutions over a wide pH range, and we have elucidated the removal mechanism.« less

  17. Analysis of the influence of the macro- and microstructure of dental zirconium implants on osseointegration: a minipig study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Cornelia Katharina; Solcher, Philipp; Peisker, Andrè; Mtsariashvilli, Maia; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Hildebrand, Gerhard; Rost, Juergen; Liefeith, Klaus; Chen, Jiang; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    It was the aim of this study to analyze the influence of implant design and surface topography on the osseointegration of dental zirconium implants. Six different implant designs were tested in the study. Nine or 10 test implants were inserted in the frontal skull in each of 10 miniature pigs. Biopsies were harvested after 2 and 4 months and subjected to microradiography. No significant differences between titanium and zirconium were found regarding the microradiographically detected bone-implant contact (BIC). Cylindric zirconium implants showed a higher BIC at the 2-month follow-up than conic zirconium implants. Among zirconium implants, those with an intermediate Ra value showed a significantly higher BIC compared with low and high Ra implants 4 months after surgery. Regarding osseointegration, titanium and zirconium showed equal properties. Cylindric implant design and intermediate surface roughness seemed to enhance osseointegration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microstructure and antibacterial properties of microwave plasma nitrided layers on biomedical stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hsiang; Chen, Shih-Chung; Wu, Ching-Zong; Hung, Jing-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2011-06-01

    Nitriding of AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel using microwave plasma system at various temperatures was conducted in the present study. The nitrided layers were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness tester. The antibacterial properties of this nitrided layer were evaluated. During nitriding treatment between 350 °C and 550 °C, the phase transformation sequence on the nitrided layers of the alloys was found to be γ → (γ + γ N) → (γ + α + CrN). The analytical results revealed that the surface hardness of AISI 303 stainless steel could be enhanced with the formation of γ N phase in nitriding process. Antibacterial test also demonstrated the nitrided layer processed the excellent antibacterial properties. The enhanced surface hardness and antibacterial properties make the nitrided AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel to be one of the essential materials in the biomedical applications.

  19. Method of densifying an article formed of reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangels, John A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method of densifying an article formed of reaction bonded silicon nitride is disclosed. The reaction bonded silicon nitride article is packed in a packing mixture consisting of silicon nitride powder and a densification aid. The reaction bonded silicon nitride article and packing powder are sujected to a positive, low pressure nitrogen gas treatment while being heated to a treatment temperature and for a treatment time to cause any open porosity originally found in the reaction bonded silicon nitride article to be substantially closed. Thereafter, the reaction bonded silicon nitride article and packing powder are subjected to a positive high pressure nitrogen gas treatment while being heated to a treatment temperature and for a treatment time to cause a sintering of the reaction bonded silicon nitride article whereby the strength of the reaction bonded silicon nitride article is increased.

  20. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm2 using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si. PMID:25593562

  1. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Ghazali, Norizzawati Mohd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm(2) using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si.

  2. Concept Feasibility Report for Electroplating Zirconium onto Uranium Foil - Year 2

    SciT

    Coffey, Greg W.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2015-03-01

    The Fuel Fabrication Capability within the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversion Program is funded through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) NA-26 (Office of Material Management and Minimization). An investigation was commissioned to determine the feasibility of using electroplating techniques to apply a coating of zirconium onto depleted uranium/molybdenum alloy (U-10Mo). Electroplating would provide an alternative method to the existing process of hot roll-bonding zirconium foil onto the U-10Mo fuel foil during the fabrication of fuel elements for high-performance research reactors. The objective of this research was to develop a reproducible and scalable plating process that will produce amore » uniform, 25 μm thick zirconium metal coating on U-10Mo foil. In previous work, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established a molten salt electroplating apparatus and protocol to plate zirconium metal onto molybdenum foil (Coffey 2015). During this second year of the research, PNNL furthered this work by moving to the U-10Mo alloy system (90 percent uranium:10 percent molybdenum). The original plating apparatus was disassembled and re-assembled in a laboratory capable of handling low-level radioactive materials. Initially, the work followed the previous year’s approach, and the salt bath composition was targeted at the eutectic composition (LiF:NaF:ZrF4 = 26:37:37 mol%). Early results indicated that the formation of uranium fluoride compounds would be problematic. Other salt bath compositions were investigated in order to eliminate the uranium fluoride production (LiF:NaF = 61:39 mol% and LiF:NaF:KF = 46.5:11.5:42 mol% ). Zirconium metal was used as the crucible for the molten salt. Three plating methods were used—isopotential, galvano static, and pulsed plating. The molten salt method for zirconium metal application provided high-quality plating on molybdenum in PNNL’s previous work. A key advantage of this approach is

  3. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  4. 77 FR 54897 - Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium from the Russian Federation: Revocation of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... nitrided vanadium from the Russian Federation (Russia) would not be likely to lead to continuation or... the antidumping duty order on ferrovanadium and nitrided vanadium from Russia. \\1\\ See Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia, 77 FR 51825 (August 27, 2012) (ITC Final). DATES: Effective Date...

  5. Physical fundamentals of criterial estimation of nitriding technology for parts of friction units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenova, L. I.; Gerasimov, S. A.; Lapteva, V. G.; Alekseeva, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    Characteristics of the structure and properties of surface layers of nitrided structural steels and alloys, which affect the level of surface fracture under friction, are studied. A generalized structural parameter for optimizing the nitriding process and a rapid method for estimating the quality of the surface layer of nitrided parts of friction units are developed.

  6. Synthesis of nanowires and nanoparticles of cubic aluminium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, C.; Godbole, V. P.; Rohatgi, V. K.; Das, A. K.; Bhoraskar, S. V.

    2004-03-01

    Nanostructures of cubic aluminium nitride were synthesized by DC arc-plasma-induced melting of aluminium in a nitrogen-argon ambient. The material flux ejected from the molten aluminium surface was found to react with nitrogen under highly non-equilibrium conditions and subsequently condense on a water-cooled surface to yield a mixture of nanowires and nanoparticles of crystalline cubic aluminium nitride. Both x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction measurements revealed that the as-synthesized nitrides adopted the cubic phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to understand the bonding configuration. Microstructural features of the synthesized material were best studied by transmission electron microscopy. From these analyses cubic aluminium nitride was found to be the dominating phase for both nanowires and nanoparticles synthesized at low currents. The typical particle size distribution was found to range over 15-80 nm, whereas the wires varied from 30 to 100 nm in diameter and 500 to 700 nm in length, depending upon the process parameters such as arc current and the nitrogen pressure. The reaction products inside the plasma zone were also obtained theoretically by minimization of free energy and the favourable zone temperature necessary for the formation of aluminium nitride was found to be {\\sim } 6000 K. Results are discussed in view of the highly non-equilibrium conditions that prevail during the arc-plasma synthesis.

  7. Functional carbon nitride materials — design strategies for electrochemical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Fabian K.; Zheng, Yun; Schwarz, Dana; Merschjann, Christoph; Schnick, Wolfgang; Wang, Xinchen; Bojdys, Michael J.

    2017-06-01

    In the past decade, research in the field of artificial photosynthesis has shifted from simple, inorganic semiconductors to more abundant, polymeric materials. For example, polymeric carbon nitrides have emerged as promising materials for metal-free semiconductors and metal-free photocatalysts. Polymeric carbon nitride (melon) and related carbon nitride materials are desirable alternatives to industrially used catalysts because they are easily synthesized from abundant and inexpensive starting materials. Furthermore, these materials are chemically benign because they do not contain heavy metal ions, thereby facilitating handling and disposal. In this Review, we discuss the building blocks of carbon nitride materials and examine how strategies in synthesis, templating and post-processing translate from the molecular level to macroscopic properties, such as optical and electronic bandgap. Applications of carbon nitride materials in bulk heterojunctions, laser-patterned memory devices and energy storage devices indicate that photocatalytic overall water splitting on an industrial scale may be realized in the near future and reveal a new avenue of 'post-silicon electronics'.

  8. Interface formation in monolayer graphene-boron nitride heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Sutter, P; Cortes, R; Lahiri, J; Sutter, E

    2012-09-12

    The ability to control the formation of interfaces between different materials has become one of the foundations of modern materials science. With the advent of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, low-dimensional equivalents of conventional interfaces can be envisioned: line boundaries separating different materials integrated in a single 2D sheet. Graphene and hexagonal boron nitride offer an attractive system from which to build such 2D heterostructures. They are isostructural, nearly lattice-matched, and isoelectronic, yet their different band structures promise interesting functional properties arising from their integration. Here, we use a combination of in situ microscopy techniques to study the growth and interface formation of monolayer graphene-boron nitride heterostructures on ruthenium. In a sequential chemical vapor deposition process, boron nitride grows preferentially at the edges of existing monolayer graphene domains, which can be exploited for synthesizing continuous 2D membranes of graphene embedded in boron nitride. High-temperature growth leads to intermixing near the interface, similar to interfacial alloying in conventional heterostructures. Using real-time microscopy, we identify processes that eliminate this intermixing and thus pave the way to graphene-boron nitride heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces.

  9. Photoinduced doping in heterostructures of graphene and boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Ju, L; Velasco, J; Huang, E; Kahn, S; Nosiglia, C; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Yang, W; Taniguchi, T; Watanabe, K; Zhang, Y; Zhang, G; Crommie, M; Zettl, A; Wang, F

    2014-05-01

    The design of stacks of layered materials in which adjacent layers interact by van der Waals forces has enabled the combination of various two-dimensional crystals with different electrical, optical and mechanical properties as well as the emergence of novel physical phenomena and device functionality. Here, we report photoinduced doping in van der Waals heterostructures consisting of graphene and boron nitride layers. It enables flexible and repeatable writing and erasing of charge doping in graphene with visible light. We demonstrate that this photoinduced doping maintains the high carrier mobility of the graphene/boron nitride heterostructure, thus resembling the modulation doping technique used in semiconductor heterojunctions, and can be used to generate spatially varying doping profiles such as p-n junctions. We show that this photoinduced doping arises from microscopically coupled optical and electrical responses of graphene/boron nitride heterostructures, including optical excitation of defect transitions in boron nitride, electrical transport in graphene, and charge transfer between boron nitride and graphene.

  10. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Li, H F; Zhou, F Y; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are <1%, much lower than 5%, the safe value for biomaterials according to ISO 10993-4 standard. Compared with conventional biomedical 316L stainless steel, Co-Cr alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)-1.29 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1) for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, ~3.5 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1), CP Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb, ~3.0 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)), and one-sixth that of Co-Cr alloys (Co-Cr-Mo, ~7.7 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)). Among the Zr-Ru alloy series, Zr-1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr-Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments.

  11. Bioactivity and biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite-based bioceramic coatings on zirconium by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Aktuğ, Salim Levent; Durdu, Salih; Yalçın, Emine; Çavuşoğlu, Kültigin; Usta, Metin

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, hydroxyapatite (HAP)-based plasma electrolytic oxide (PEO) coatings were produced on zirconium at different current densities in a solution containing calcium acetate and β-calcium glycerophosphate by a single step. The phase structure, surface morphology, functional groups, thickness and roughness of the coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), eddy current method and surface profilometer, respectively. The phases of cubic-zirconia, calcium zirconate and HAP were detected by XRD. The amount of HAP and calcium zirconate increased with increasing current density. The surface of the coatings was very porous and rough. Moreover, bioactivity and biocompatibility of the coatings were analyzed in vitro immersion simulated body fluid (SBF) and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay, hemolysis assay and bacterial formation. The apatite-forming ability of the coatings was evaluated after immersion in SBF up to 28days. After immersion, the bioactivity of HAP-based coatings on zirconium was greater than the ones of uncoated zirconium and zirconium oxide-based surface. The bioactivity of PEO surface on zirconium was significantly improved under SBF conditions. The bacterial adhesion of the coatings decreased with increasing current density. The bacterial adhesion of the coating produced at 0.370A/cm 2 was minimum compared to uncoated zirconium coated at 0.260 and 0.292A/cm 2 . The hemocompatibility of HAP-based surfaces was improved by PEO. The cell attachment and proliferation of the PEO coatings were better than the one of uncoated zirconium according to MTT assay results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Li, H.F.; Zhou, F.Y.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y.F.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are <1%, much lower than 5%, the safe value for biomaterials according to ISO 10993-4 standard. Compared with conventional biomedical 316L stainless steel, Co–Cr alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10−6 cm3·g−1–1.29 × 10−6 cm3·g−1 for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti–6Al–4V, ~3.5 × 10−6 cm3·g−1, CP Ti and Ti–6Al–7Nb, ~3.0 × 10−6 cm3·g−1), and one-sixth that of Co–Cr alloys (Co–Cr–Mo, ~7.7 × 10−6 cm3·g−1). Among the Zr–Ru alloy series, Zr–1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr–Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. PMID:27090955

  13. Boron Nitride Nanostructures: Fabrication, Functionalization and Applications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Li, Jidong; Hang, Yang; Yu, Jin; Tai, Guoan; Li, Xuemei; Zhang, Zhuhua; Guo, Wanlin

    2016-06-01

    Boron nitride (BN) structures are featured by their excellent thermal and chemical stability and unique electronic and optical properties. However, the lack of controlled synthesis of quality samples and the electrically insulating property largely prevent realizing the full potential of BN nanostructures. A comprehensive overview of the current status of the synthesis of two-dimensional hexagonal BN sheets, three dimensional porous hexagonal BN materials and BN-involved heterostructures is provided, highlighting the advantages of different synthetic methods. In addition, structural characterization, functionalizations and prospective applications of hexagonal BN sheets are intensively discussed. One-dimensional BN nanoribbons and nanotubes are then discussed in terms of structure, fabrication and functionality. In particular, the existing routes in pursuit of tunable electronic and magnetic properties in various BN structures are surveyed, calling upon synergetic experimental and theoretical efforts to address the challenges for pioneering the applications of BN into functional devices. Finally, the progress in BN superstructures and novel B/N nanostructures is also briefly introduced. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Biofunctionalized silicon nitride platform for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Hiofan; Rezaie, Salva S; Gong, Lu; Sen, Payel; Zeng, Hongbo; Montemagno, Carlo; Gupta, Manisha

    2018-04-15

    Silicon nitride (SiN x ) based biosensors have the potential to converge on the technological achievements of semiconductor microfabrication and biotechnology. Development of biofunctionalized SiN x surface and its integration with other devices will allow us to integrate the biosensing capability with probe control, data acquisition and data processing. Here we use the hydrogen plasma generated by inductively coupled plasma-reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) technique to produce amino-functionality on the surface of SiN x which can then be readily used for biomolecule immobilization. ICP-RIE produces high-density hydrogen ions/radicals at low energy, which produces high-density amino group on the SiN x surface within a short duration of time and with minimal surface damage. In this work, we have demonstrated selective amination of SiN x surface as compared to Si surface. The as-activated SiN x surface can be readily biofunctionalized with both protein and oligonucleotide through covalent immobilization. N-5-azido-2-nitrobenzoyloxysuccinimide, a photoactivable amino reactive bifunctional crosslinker, was used and greater than 90% surface coverage was achieved for protein immobilization. In addition, ssDNA immobilization and hybridization with its complemented strand was shown. Thus, we demonstrate a uniform, reliable, fast and economical technique for creating biofunctionalized SiN x surface that can be used for developing compact high-sensitivity biosensors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxidation of Boron Nitride in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1998-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) is a prime candidate for fiber coatings in silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites. The properties of BN allow the fiber to impart beneficial composite properties to the matrix, even at elevated temperatures. The problem with BN is that it is readily attacked by oxygen. Although BN is an internal component of the composite, a matrix crack or pore can create a path for hot oxygen to attack the BN. This type of attack is not well understood. A variety of phenomena have been observed. These include borosilicate glass formation, volatilization of the BN, and under some conditions, preservation of the BN. In this study at the NASA Lewis Research Center, a series of BN materials and BN-containing model composites were methodically examined to understand the various issues dealing with the oxidation of BN in composites. Initial studies were done with a series of monolithic BN materials prepared by hot pressing and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). From these studies, we found that BN showed a strong orientation effect in oxidation and was extremely sensitive to the presence of water vapor in the environment. In addition, CVD material deposited at a high temperature showed much better oxidation behavior than CVD material deposited at a lower temperature.

  16. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  17. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Wimmer, J. M.; Huang, H. H.; Rorabaugh, M. E.; Schienle, J.; Styhr, K. H.

    1985-01-01

    The AiResearch Casting Company baseline silicon nitride (92 percent GTE SN-502 Si sub 3 N sub 4 plus 6 percent Y sub 2 O sub 3 plus 2 percent Al sub 2 O sub 3) was characterized with methods that included chemical analysis, oxygen content determination, electrophoresis, particle size distribution analysis, surface area determination, and analysis of the degree of agglomeration and maximum particle size of elutriated powder. Test bars were injection molded and processed through sintering at 0.68 MPa (100 psi) of nitrogen. The as-sintered test bars were evaluated by X-ray phase analysis, room and elevated temperature modulus of rupture strength, Weibull modulus, stress rupture, strength after oxidation, fracture origins, microstructure, and density from quantities of samples sufficiently large to generate statistically valid results. A series of small test matrices were conducted to study the effects and interactions of processing parameters which included raw materials, binder systems, binder removal cycles, injection molding temperatures, particle size distribution, sintering additives, and sintering cycle parameters.

  18. Xenon migration behaviour in titanium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavarini, S.; Toulhoat, N.; Peaucelle, C.; Martin, P.; Mende, J.; Pipon, Y.; Jaffrezic, H.

    2007-05-01

    Titanium nitride is one of the inert matrixes proposed to surround the fuel in gas cooled fast reactor (GFR) systems. These reactors operate at high temperature and necessitate refractory materials presenting a high chemical stability and good mechanical properties. A total retention of the most volatile fission products, such as Xe, I or Cs, by the inert matrix is needed during the in pile process. The thermal migration of xenon in TiN was studied by implanting 800 keV Xe++ ions in sintered samples at an ion fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2. Annealing was performed at temperatures ranging from 1673 to 1923 K for 1 and 3 h. Xenon concentration profiles were studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) using 2.5 MeV α-particles. The migration behaviour of xenon corresponds to a gas migration model. It is dominated by a surface directed transport with a slight diffusion component. The mean activation energy corresponding to the diffusion component was found to be 2.2 ± 0.3 eV and corresponds to the Brownian motion of xenon bubbles. The directed Xe migration can be interpreted in term of bubble transport using Evans model. This last process is mostly responsible for xenon release from TiN.

  19. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    SciT

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305; Naik, Gururaj V.

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements onmore » plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.« less

  20. Interfacing epitaxial oxides to gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losego, Mark Daniel

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is lauded for its ability to control thin film material structures at the atomic level. This precision of control can improve performance of microelectronic devices and cultivate the development of novel device structures. This thesis explores the utility of MBE for designing interfaces between oxide epilayers and the wide band gap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN). The allure of wide gap semiconductor microelectronics (like GaN, 3.4 eV) is their ability to operate at higher frequencies, higher powers, and higher temperatures than current semiconductor platforms. Heterostructures between ferroelectric oxides and GaN are also of interest for studying the interaction between GaN's fixed polarization and the ferroelectric's switchable polarization. Two major obstacles to successful integration of oxides with GaN are: (1) interfacial trap states; and (2) small electronic band offsets across the oxide/nitride interface due to the semiconductor's large band gap. For this thesis, epitaxial rocksalt oxide interfacial layers (˜8 eV band gap) are investigated as possible solutions to overcoming the challenges facing oxide integration with GaN. The cubic close-packed structure of rocksalt oxides forms a suitable epitaxial interface with the hexagonal close-packed wurtzite lattice of GaN. Three rocksalt oxide compounds are investigated in this thesis: MgO, CaO, and YbO. All are found to have a (111) MO || (0001) GaN; <1 10> MO || <11 20> GaN epitaxial relationship. Development of the epilayer microstructure is dominated by the high-energy polar growth surface (drives 3D nucleation) and the interfacial symmetry, which permits the formation of twin boundaries. Using STEM, strain relief for these ionicly bonded epilayers is observed to occur through disorder within the initial monolayer of growth. All rocksalt oxides demonstrate chemical stability with GaN to >1000°C. Concurrent MBE deposition of MgO and CaO is known to form complete solid

  1. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hun C.; Fang, Ho T.

    1987-01-01

    The technology base required to fabricate silicon nitride components with the strength, reliability, and reproducibility necessary for actual heat engine applications is presented. Task 2 was set up to develop test bars with high Weibull slope and greater high temperature strength, and to conduct an initial net shape component fabrication evaluation. Screening experiments were performed in Task 7 on advanced materials and processing for input to Task 2. The technical efforts performed in the second year of a 5-yr program are covered. The first iteration of Task 2 was completed as planned. Two half-replicated, fractional factorial (2 sup 5), statistically designed matrix experiments were conducted. These experiments have identified Denka 9FW Si3N4 as an alternate raw material to GTE SN502 Si3N4 for subsequent process evaluation. A detailed statistical analysis was conducted to correlate processing conditions with as-processed test bar properties. One processing condition produced a material with a 97 ksi average room temperature MOR (100 percent of goal) with 13.2 Weibull slope (83 percent of goal); another condition produced 86 ksi (6 percent over baseline) room temperature strength with a Weibull slope of 20 (125 percent of goal).

  2. Graphene nanoribbons epitaxy on boron nitride

    SciT

    Lu, Xiaobo; Wang, Shuopei; Wu, Shuang

    2016-03-14

    In this letter, we report a pilot study on epitaxy of monolayer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We found that GNRs grow preferentially from the atomic steps of h-BN, forming in-plane heterostructures. GNRs with well-defined widths ranging from ∼15 nm to ∼150 nm can be obtained reliably. As-grown GNRs on h-BN have high quality with a carrier mobility of ∼20 000 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for ∼100-nm-wide GNRs at a temperature of 1.7 K. Besides, a moiré pattern induced quasi-one-dimensional superlattice with a periodicity of ∼15 nm for GNR/h-BN was also observed, indicating zero crystallographic twisting angle between GNRs and h-BNmore » substrate. The superlattice induced band structure modification is confirmed by our transport results. These epitaxial GNRs/h-BN with clean surfaces/interfaces and tailored widths provide an ideal platform for high-performance GNR devices.« less

  3. Gallium nitride photocathodes for imaging photon counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Hull, Jeffrey S.; Tremsin, Anton S.; McPhate, Jason B.; Dabiran, Amir M.

    2010-07-01

    Gallium nitride opaque and semitransparent photocathodes provide high ultraviolet quantum efficiencies from 100 nm to a long wavelength cutoff at ~380 nm. P (Mg) doped GaN photocathode layers ~100 nm thick with a barrier layer of AlN (22 nm) on sapphire substrates also have low out of band response, and are highly robust. Opaque GaN photocathodes are relatively easy to optimize, and consistently provide high quantum efficiency (70% at 120 nm) provided the surface cleaning and activation (Cs) processes are well established. We have used two dimensional photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors, with an active area of 25 mm diameter, to investigate the imaging characteristics of semitransparent GaN photocathodes. These can be produced with high (20%) efficiency, but the thickness and conductivity of the GaN must be carefully optimized. High spatial resolution of ~50 μm with low intrinsic background (~7 events sec-1 cm-2) and good image uniformity have been achieved. Selectively patterned deposited GaN photocathodes have also been used to allow quick diagnostics of optimization parameters. GaN photocathodes of both types show great promise for future detector applications in ultraviolet Astrophysical instruments.

  4. Silicon nitride boundary lubrication: Effect of oxygenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Richard S.; Hsu, Stephen M.

    1995-07-01

    A ball-on-three-flat (BTF) wear tester was used to investigate the boundary lubricating characteristics of oxygenates on a commercial silicon nitride. A wide variety of oxygen-containing compounds containing hydroxyl functioal groups were more effective compared to a base case of neat paraffin oil. Decreases of up to 58% in friction coefficient, and 95% in wear were obtained. In most cases, films were obseved in and around the wear scar, suggesting chemical reactions had taken place in the contact. Additional wear tests, conducted using neat shorter-chain linear primary alcohols, i.e., 6-10 carbons, demonstrated boundary lubrication protection, with longer chain length providing better antiwear performance. A study of several C8 compounds with specific oxygen-containing functional groups (primary alcohol, secondary alcohols, acid, aldehyde, and ketone) demonstrated that the primary alcohol had the strongest boundary lubricating effect. Varying the amount of water in the alcohols had little effect on friction and wear, suggesting that the boundary lubrication effects observed were not merely due to dissolved water in these fluids, but some characteristic chemical interaction with the hydroxyl functional group of the alcohols and acids.

  5. Device performance of in situ steam generated gate dielectric nitrided by remote plasma nitridation

    SciT

    Al-Shareef, H. N.; Karamcheti, A.; Luo, T. Y.

    2001-06-11

    In situ steam generated (ISSG) oxides have recently attracted interest for use as gate dielectrics because of their demonstrated reliability improvement over oxides formed by dry oxidation. [G. Minor, G. Xing, H. S. Joo, E. Sanchez, Y. Yokota, C. Chen, D. Lopes, and A. Balakrishna, Electrochem. Soc. Symp. Proc. 99-10, 3 (1999); T. Y. Luo, H. N. Al-Shareef, G. A. Brown, M. Laughery, V. Watt, A. Karamcheti, M. D. Jackson, and H. R. Huff, Proc. SPIE 4181, 220 (2000).] We show in this letter that nitridation of ISSG oxide using a remote plasma decreases the gate leakage current of ISSGmore » oxide by an order of magnitude without significantly degrading transistor performance. In particular, it is shown that the peak normalized transconductance of n-channel devices with an ISSG oxide gate dielectric decreases by only 4% and the normalized drive current by only 3% after remote plasma nitridation (RPN). In addition, it is shown that the reliability of the ISSG oxide exhibits only a small degradation after RPN. These observations suggest that the ISSG/RPN process holds promise for gate dielectric applications. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.« less

  6. Formation of graphitic carbon nitride and boron carbon nitride film on sapphire substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Maito; Urakami, Noriyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshio

    2018-02-01

    As a novel production method of boron carbon nitride (BCN) films, in this paper, we present the incorporation of B into graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). First, we investigated the formation of g-C3N4 films via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using melamine powder as the precursor. The formation of g-C3N4 films on a c-plane sapphire substrate was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The deposition temperature of g-C3N4 films was found to be suitable between 550 and 600 °C since the degradation and desorption of hexagonal C-N bonds should be suppressed. As for BCN films, we prepared BCN films via two-zone extended CVD using ammonia borane as the B precursor. Several XPS signals from B, C, and N core levels were detected from B-incorporated g-C3N4 films. While the N composition was almost constant, the marked tendencies for increasing B composition and decreasing C composition were achieved with the increase in the B incorporation, indicating the incorporation of B atoms by the substitution for C atoms. Optical absorptions were shifted to the high-energy side by B incorporation, which indicates the successful formation of BCN films using melamine and ammonia borane powders as precursors.

  7. In vitro assessment of artifacts induced by titanium, titanium-zirconium and zirconium dioxide implants in cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Benic, Goran I

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether or not the intensity of artifacts around implants in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) differs between titanium, titanium-zirconium and zirconium dioxide implants. Twenty models of a human mandible, each containing one implant in the single-tooth gap position 45, were cast in dental stone. Five test models were produced for each of the following implant types: titanium 4.1 mm diameter (Ti4.1 ), titanium 3.3 mm diameter (Ti3.3 ), titanium-zirconium 3.3 mm diameter (TiZr3.3 ) and zirconium dioxide 3.5-4.5 mm diameter (ZrO3.5-4.5 ) implants. For control purposes, three models without implants were produced. Each model was scanned using a CBCT device. Gray values (GV) were recorded at eight circumferential positions around the implants at 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 2 mm from the implant surface (GVT est ). GV were assessed in the corresponding volumes of interest (VOI) in the control models without implants (GVC ontrol ). Differences of gray values (ΔGV) between GVT est and GVC ontrol were calculated as percentages. One-way ANOVA and post hoc tests were applied to detect differences between implant types. Mean ΔGV for ZrO3.5-4.5 presented the highest absolute values, generally followed by TiZr3.3 , Ti4.1 and Ti3.3 implants. The differences of ΔGV between ZrO3.5-4.5 and the remaining groups were statistically significant in the majority of the VOI (P ≤ 0.0167). ΔGV for TiZr3.3 , Ti4.1 and Ti3.3 implants did not differ significantly in the most VOI. For all implant types, ΔGV showed positive values buccally, mesio-buccally, lingually and disto-lingually, whereas negative values were detected mesially and distally. Zirconium dioxide implants generate significantly more artifacts as compared to titanium and titanium-zirconium implants. The intensity of artifacts around zirconium dioxide implants exhibited in average the threefold in comparison with titanium implants. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  8. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  9. Effect of oxygen plasma on nanomechanical silicon nitride resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, Niklas; Jachimowicz, Artur; Schalko, Johannes; Sadeghi, Pedram; Sauer, Markus; Foelske-Schmitz, Annette; Schmid, Silvan

    2017-08-01

    Precise control of tensile stress and intrinsic damping is crucial for the optimal design of nanomechanical systems for sensor applications and quantum optomechanics in particular. In this letter, we study the influence of oxygen plasma on the tensile stress and intrinsic damping of nanomechanical silicon nitride resonators. Oxygen plasma treatments are common steps in micro and nanofabrication. We show that oxygen plasma for only a few minutes oxidizes the silicon nitride surface, creating several nanometer thick silicon dioxide layers with a compressive stress of 1.30(16) GPa. Such oxide layers can cause a reduction in the effective tensile stress of a 50 nm thick stoichiometric silicon nitride membrane by almost 50%. Additionally, intrinsic damping linearly increases with the silicon dioxide film thickness. An oxide layer of 1.5 nm grown in just 10 s in a 50 W oxygen plasma almost doubled the intrinsic damping. The oxide surface layer can be efficiently removed in buffered hydrofluoric acid.

  10. Nanoparticles of wurtzite aluminum nitride from the nut shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, S. B.; Gorzkowski, E. P.; Rath, B. B.; Feng, C. R.; Amarasinghe, R.

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticles of aluminum nitride were produced from a thermal treatment of a mixture of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and shells of almond, cashew, coconuts, pistachio, and walnuts in a nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures in excess of 1450 °C. By selecting the appropriate ratios of each nut powder to Al2O3, it is shown that stoichiometric aluminum nitride can be produced by carbo-thermal reduction in nitrogen atmosphere. Using x-ray diffraction analysis, Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, it is demonstrated that aluminum nitride consists of pure wurtzite phase. Transmission electron microscopy showed the formation of nanoparticles and in some cases nanotubes of AlN.

  11. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of ion-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1983-01-01

    Three steels AISI 4140, AISI 4340 and AISI 304 stainless steel were ion nitrided in a plasma consisting of a 75:25 mixture of H2:N2, sometimes with a trace of CH4. Their surface topography was characterized by SEM and two distinct compound phases were identified: the gamma and the epsilon. The core-case hardness profiles were also established. The low Cr alloy steels have an extended diffusion zone in contrast to the 304 stainless steels which have a sharp interface. The depth of ion-nitriding is increased as the Cr content is decreased. Friction tests reveal that the gamma surface phase has a lower coefficient of friction than the epsilon phase. The lowest coefficient of friction is achieved when both the rider and the specimen surface are ion nitrided.

  12. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of ion-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1983-01-01

    Three steels AISI 4140, AISI 4340 and AISI 304 stainless steel were ion nitrided in a plasma consisting of a 75:25 mixture of H2:N2, sometimes with a trace of CH4. Their surface topography was characterized by SEM and two distinct compound phases were identified: the gamma and the epsilon. The core-case hardness profiles were also established. The low Cr alloy steels have an extended diffusion zone in contrast to the 3034 stainless steels which have a sharp interface. The depth of ion-nitriding is increased as the Cr content is decreased. Friction tests reveal that the gamma surface phase has a lower coefficient of friction than the epsilon phase. The lowest coefficient of friction is achieved when both the rider and the specimen surface are ion nitrided. Previously announced in STAR as N83-24635

  13. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  14. Kinetic modelling of chlorination of nitrided ilmenite using MATLAB

    SciT

    Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar, E-mail: srsivakumar@usm.my; Kwok, Teong Chen, E-mail: ctck@live.com; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul, E-mail: rezanshk@gmail.com

    In the present study, chlorination of nitride ilmenite using 2{sup k} factorial design was investigated. The reduction experiments were carried out in a temperature range of 400°C to 500°C, chlorination duration from 1 hour to 3 hours and using different type of carbon reactant. Phases of raw materials and reduced samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ilmenite was reduced to TiO{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub z} through carbothermal and nitridation for further chlorination into titanium tetrachloride. The Design of Experiment analysis suggested that the types of carbon reactant contribute most influence to the extent of chlorination of nitride ilmenite. The extentmore » of chlorination was highest at 500°C with 3 hours chlorination time and carbon nanotube as carbon reactant.« less

  15. Design, Control and in Situ Visualization of Gas Nitriding Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ratajski, Jerzy; Olik, Roman; Suszko, Tomasz; Dobrodziej, Jerzy; Michalski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of time, as well as possibilities to predict the properties of nitrided layers. For in situ visualization of the growth of the nitrided layer, computer procedures were developed which make use of the results of the correlations of direct and differential voltage and time runs of the process result sensor (magnetic sensor), with the proper layer growth stage. Computer procedures make it possible to combine, in the duration of the process, the registered voltage and time runs with the models of the process. PMID:22315536

  16. Infrared absorption spectra of metal carbides, nitrides and sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammori, O.; Sato, K.; Kurosawa, F.

    1981-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of 12 kinds of metal carbides, 11 kinds of nitrides, and 7 kinds of sulfides, a total of 30 materials, were measured and the application of the infrared spectra of these materials to analytical chemistry was discussed. The measurements were done in the frequency (wave length) range of (1400 to 400/cm (7 to 25 mu). The carbides Al4C3, B4C, the nitrides AlN, BN, Si3N4, WB, and the sulfides Al2S3, FeS2, MnS, NiS and PbS were noted to have specific absorptions in the measured region. The sensitivity of Boron nitride was especially good and could be detected at 2 to 3 micrograms in 300 mg of potassium bromide.

  17. Structure and Growth of Hexagonal Boron Nitride on Ir(111).

    PubMed

    Farwick Zum Hagen, Ferdinand H; Zimmermann, Domenik M; Silva, Caio C; Schlueter, Christoph; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Jolie, Wouter; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J; Dombrowski, Daniela; Schröder, Ulrike A; Will, Moritz; Lazić, Predrag; Caciuc, Vasile; Blügel, Stefan; Lee, Tien-Lin; Michely, Thomas; Busse, Carsten

    2016-12-27

    Using the X-ray standing wave method, scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we precisely determine the lateral and vertical structure of hexagonal boron nitride on Ir(111). The moiré superstructure leads to a periodic arrangement of strongly chemisorbed valleys in an otherwise rather flat, weakly physisorbed plane. The best commensurate approximation of the moiré unit cell is (12 × 12) boron nitride cells resting on (11 × 11) substrate cells, which is at variance with several earlier studies. We uncover the existence of two fundamentally different mechanisms of layer formation for hexagonal boron nitride, namely, nucleation and growth as opposed to network formation without nucleation. The different pathways are linked to different distributions of rotational domains, and the latter enables selection of a single orientation only.

  18. Transition Metal Nitrides for Electrocatalytic Energy Conversion: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junfeng; Xie, Yi

    2016-03-07

    Electrocatalytic energy conversion has been considered as one of the most efficient and promising pathways for realizing energy storage and energy utilization in modern society. To improve electrocatalytic reactions, specific catalysts are needed to lower the overpotential. In the search for efficient alternatives to noble metal catalysts, transition metal nitrides have attracted considerable interest due to their high catalytic activity and unique electronic structure. Over the past few decades, numerous nitride-based catalysts have been explored with respect to their ability to drive various electrocatalytic reactions, such as the hydrogen evolution reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction to achieve water splitting and the oxygen reduction reaction coupled with the methanol oxidation reaction to construct fuel cells or rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. This Minireview provides a brief overview of recent progress on electrocatalysts based on transition metal nitrides, and outlines the current challenges and future opportunities. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Semipolar III-nitride laser diodes with zinc oxide cladding.

    PubMed

    Myzaferi, Anisa; Reading, Arthur H; Farrell, Robert M; Cohen, Daniel A; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P

    2017-07-24

    Incorporating transparent conducting oxide (TCO) top cladding layers into III-nitride laser diodes (LDs) improves device design by reducing the growth time and temperature of the p-type layers. We investigate using ZnO instead of ITO as the top cladding TCO of a semipolar (202¯1) III-nitride LD. Numerical modeling indicates that replacing ITO with ZnO reduces the internal loss in a TCO clad LD due to the lower optical absorption in ZnO. Lasing was achieved at 453 nm with a threshold current density of 8.6 kA/cm 2 and a threshold voltage of 10.3 V in a semipolar (202¯1) III-nitride LD with ZnO top cladding.

  20. Gadolinium-hydrogen ion exchange of zirconium phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, D. C.; Power, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The Gd(+3)/H(+) ion exchange on a commercial zirconium phosphate ion exchanger was investigated in chloride, sulfate, and phosphate solutions of Gd(+3) at gadolinium concentrations of 0.001 to 1 millimole per cc and in the pH range of 0 to 3.5. Relatively low Gd(+3) capacities, in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 millimole per g of ion exchanger were found at room temperature. A significant difference in Gd(+3) sorption was observed, depending on whether the ion exchanger was converted from initial conditions of greater or lesser Gd(+3) sorption than the specific final conditions. Correlations were found between decrease in Gd(+3) capacity and loss of exchanger phosphate groups due to hydrolysis during washing and between increase in capacity and treatment with H3PO4. Fitting of the experimental data to ideal ion exchange equilibrium expressions indicated that each Gd(+3) ion is sorbed on only one site of the ion exchanger. The selectivity quotient was determined to be 2.5 + or - 0.4 at room temperature on gadolinium desorption in chloride solutions.

  1. Revisiting Zirconium: New Abundance Determinations with Improved Oscillator Strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris, Debra L.; Jones, M.; Nichols, R.

    2006-12-01

    The element Zirconium is produced via neutron capture (n-capture). It resides in the mass range where there is uncertainty about the production mechanism at early time. The rapid n-capture process (r-process) was believed to be responsible for the production, but no study (Burris et al 2000, Gilroy et al 1988 and others) has been able to successfully use the r-process to reproduce the abundance signature for elements in this mass range for metal-poor halo stars. It has been suggested (Sneden and Cowan 2003) that there may be an undiscovered component to the r-process. New transition probabilities for Zr II have been reported by Malcheva et al (2006). We utilize these values to make new abundance determinations for Zr in the Sun and the metal-poor halo star BD +17 3248. This work is supported in part by the AAS Small Grant Program, the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium and the UCA Undergraduate Research Council.

  2. Iron state in iron nanoparticles with and without zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, V. P.; Khasanov, A. M.; Lauer, Yu. A.

    2017-11-01

    Mössbauer and X-ray methods are used for investigations of structure, stability and characteristics of pure-iron grain and two iron-zirconium alloys such as Fe + 5 wt.% Zr and Fe + 10 wt.% Zr. The used powder was ground for 24 h in a SPEX Model 8000 mill shaker. Complex nanoparticles are found, which change their properties under milling. Mössbauer spectral parameters are obtained for investigated materials. Milling results in formation of nanosized particles with two states of iron atoms: one main part is pure α-Fe and another part of iron atoms displaced in grain boundaries or defective zones in which hyperfine magnetic splitting decrease to ˜ 30.0 T. In alloys with Zr three iron states are formed in each alloy, main part of iron is in the form of α-Fe and another two states depend on the concentration of Zr and represent iron in grain boundaries with Zr atoms in nearest neighbor. The changing of iron states is discussed.

  3. Structural evolution of zirconium carbide under ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, D.; Dollé, M.; Simeone, D.; Baldinozzi, G.; Thomé, L.

    2008-02-01

    Zirconium carbide is one of the candidate materials to be used for some fuel components of the high temperature nuclear reactors planned in the frame of the Gen-IV project. Few data exist regarding its behaviour under irradiation. We have irradiated ZrC samples at room temperature with slow heavy ions (4 MeV Au, fluence from 10 11 to 5 × 10 15 cm -2) in order to simulate neutron irradiations. Grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis have been performed in order to study the microstructural evolution of the material versus ion fluence. A high sensitivity to oxidation is observed with the formation of zirconia precipitates during the ion irradiations. Three damage stages are observed. At low fluence (<10 12 cm -2), low modifications are observed. At intermediate fluence, high micro-strains appear together with small faulted dislocation loops. At the highest fluence (>10 14 cm -2), the micro-strains saturate and the loops coalesce to form a dense dislocation network. No other structural modification is observed. The material shows a moderate cell parameter increase, corresponding to a 0.6 vol.% swelling, which saturates around 10 14 ions/cm 2, i.e., a few Zr dpa. As a result, in spite of a strong covalent bonding component, ZrC seems to have a behaviour under irradiation close to cubic metals.

  4. Bioconjugation of zirconium uridine monophosphate: application to myoglobin direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuanbiao; Jian, Fangfang; Bai, Qian

    2008-03-14

    Porous nano-granule of zirconium uridine monophosphate, Zr(UMP)2.H2O is, for the first time, synthesized under mild experimental conditions and applied to the bioconjugation of myoglobin (Mb) to realize its direct electron transfer. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopies prove that Mb in the Zr(UMP)2.H2O film maintains its secondary structure similar to the native state. The conjugation film of the Mb-Zr(UMP)2.H2O on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode gives a well-defined and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram, which reflects the direct electron transfer of the heme Fe III/Fe II couple of Mb. On the basis of the satisfying bioelectrocatalysis of the nano-conjugation of Mb and genetic substrate, a kind of mediator-free biosensor for H2O2 is developed. The linear range for H2O2 detection is estimated to be 3.92-180.14 microM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and the detection limit based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 are found to be 196.1 microM and 1.52 microM, respectively. Both the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant and the detection limit herein are much lower than currently reported values from other Mb films. This kind of sensor possesses excellent stability, long-term life (more than 20 days) and good reproducibility.

  5. Zirconium Phosphate Nanoplatelet Potential for Anticancer Drug Delivery Applications.

    PubMed

    González, Millie L; Ortiz, Mayra; Hernández, Carmen; Cabán, Jennifer; Rodríguez, Axel; Colón, Jorge L; Báez, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets can intercalate anticancer agents via an ion exchange reaction creating an inorganic delivery system with potential for cancer treatment. ZrP delivery of anticancer agents inside tumor cells was explored in vitro. Internalization and cytotoxicity of ZrP nanoplatelets were studied in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. DOX-loaded ZrP nanoplatelets (DOX@ZrP) uptake was assessed by confocal (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity to MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells was determined by the MTT assay. Reactive Oxy- gen Species (ROS) production was analyzed by fluorometric assay, and cell cycle alterations and induction of apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. ZrP nanoplatelets were localized in the endosomes of MCF-7 cells. DOX and ZrP nanoplatelets were co-internalized into MCF-7 cells as detected by CLSM. While ZrP showed limited toxicity to MCF-7 cells, DOX@ZrP was cytotoxic at an IC₅₀ similar to that of free DOX. Meanwhile, DOX lC₅₀ was significantly lower than the equivalent concentration of DOX@ZrP in MCF-10A cells. ZrP did not induce apoptosis in both cell lines. DOX and DOX@ZrP induced significant oxidative stress in both cell models. Results suggest that ZrP nanoplatelets are promising as carriers of anticancer agents into cancer cells.

  6. Reaction of Titanium and Zirconium Particles in Cylindrical Explosive Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, David L.; Cairns, Malcolm; Goroshin, Samuel; Zhang, Fan

    2007-12-01

    The critical conditions for the reaction of particles of the transition metals titanium (Ti) and zirconium (Zr) dispersed during the detonation of long cylindrical explosive charges have been investigated experimentally. The charges consisted of packed beds of either spherical Ti particles or irregularly shaped Zr particles saturated with sensitized liquid nitromethane. For the Ti particles, a threshold particle diameter exists of 65±25 μm, above which self-sustained particle reaction is not observed for charge diameters up to 49 mm, although some particle reaction occurs immediately behind the detonation front then rapidly quenches. For the smallest particles (40 μm), the proportion of the conical particle cloud that reacts increases with charge diameter, suggesting that the reaction is a competition between particle heating and expansion cooling of the products. For 375 and 550 μm Zr particles, particle ignition was observed for 19 and 41 mm dia charges. In this case, interaction of the detonation wave with the particles is sufficient to initiate reaction at the particle surface after a delay time (˜5 μs), which is much less than the time required for thermal equilibration of the particles.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Zirconium Substituted Cobalt Ferrite Nanopowders

    DOE PAGES

    Rus, S. F.; Vlazan, P.; Herklotz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystalline ferrites; CoFe 2O 4 (CFO) and CoFe 1.9Zr 0.1O 4 (CFZO) have been synthesized through chemical coprecipitation method. Moreover, the role played by the zirconium ions in improving the magnetic and structural properties is analyzed. X-ray diffraction revealed a single-phase cubic spinel structure for both materials, where the crystallite size increases and the lattice parameter decreases with substitution of Zr. The average sizes of the nanoparticles are estimated to be 16-19 nm. These sizes are small enough to achieve the suitable signal to noise ratio in the high density recording media. An increase in the saturation magnetization with themore » substitution of Zr suggests the preferential occupation of Zr 4+ ions in the tetrahedral sites. A decrease in the coercivity values indicates the reduction of magneto-crystalline anisotropy. We investigated spinel ferrites can be used also in recoding media due to the large value of coercivity 1000 Oe which is comparable to those of hard magnetic materials.« less

  8. Transport property correlations for the niobium-1% zirconium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senor, David J.; Thomas, J. Kelly; Peddicord, K. L.

    1990-10-01

    Correlations were developed for the electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity ( k), and hemispherical total emittance (ɛ) of niobium-1% zirconium as functions of temperature. All three correlations were developed as empirical fits to experimental data. ρ = 5.571 + 4.160 × 10 -2(T) - 4.192 × 10 -6(T) 2 μΩcm , k = 13.16( T) 0.2149W/ mK, ɛ = 6.39 × 10 -2 + 4.98 × 10 -5( T) + 3.62 × 10 -8( T) 2 - 7.28 × 10 -12( T) 3. The relative standard deviation of the electrical resistivity correlation is 1.72% and it is valid over the temperature range 273 to 2700 K. The thermal conductivity correlation has a relative standard deviation of 3.24% and is valid over the temperature range 379 to 1421 K. The hemispherical total emittance correlation was developed for smooth surface materials only and represents a conservative estimate of the emittance of the alloy for space reactor fuel element modeling applications. It has a relative standard deviation of 9.50% and is valid over the temperature range 755 to 2670 K.

  9. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Gilad; Migonney, Véronique; Castner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film from titanium nitride surfaces via a two-step procedure: first modifying the surface with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and then grafting the pNaSS film from the MPS modified titanium through free radical polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used after each step to characterize success and completeness of each reaction. The surface region of the titanium nitride prior to MPS functionalization and NaSS grafting contained a mixture of titanium nitride, oxy-nitride, oxide species as well as adventitious surface contaminants. After MPS functionalization, Si was detected by XPS, and characteristic MPS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. After NaSS grafting, Na and S were detected by XPS and characteristic NaSS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. The XPS determined thicknesses of the MPS and NaSS overlayers were ∼1.5 and ∼1.7 nm, respectively. The pNaSS film density was estimated by the toluidine blue colorimetric assay to be 260 ± 70 ng/cm2. PMID:25280842

  10. A comparative study of zirconium and titanium implants in rat: osseointegration and bone material quality.

    PubMed

    Hoerth, Rebecca M; Katunar, María R; Gomez Sanchez, Andrea; Orellano, Juan C; Ceré, Silvia M; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Ballarre, Josefina

    2014-02-01

    Permanent metal implants are widely used in human medical treatments and orthopedics, for example as hip joint replacements. They are commonly made of titanium alloys and beyond the optimization of this established material, it is also essential to explore alternative implant materials in view of improved osseointegration. The aim of our study was to characterize the implant performance of zirconium in comparison to titanium implants. Zirconium implants have been characterized in a previous study concerning material properties and surface characteristics in vitro, such as oxide layer thickness and surface roughness. In the present study, we compare bone material quality around zirconium and titanium implants in terms of osseointegration and therefore characterized bone material properties in a rat model using a multi-method approach. We used light and electron microscopy, micro Raman spectroscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate the osseointegration in terms of compositional and structural properties of the newly formed bone. Regarding the mineralization level, the mineral composition, and the alignment and order of the mineral particles, our results show that the maturity of the newly formed bone after 8 weeks of implantation is already very high. In conclusion, the bone material quality obtained for zirconium implants is at least as good as for titanium. It seems that the zirconium implants can be a good candidate for using as permanent metal prosthesis for orthopedic treatments.

  11. Hopping conduction in zirconium oxynitrides thin film deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jie; Zhan, Guanghui; Liu, Jingquan; Yang, Bin; Xu, Bin; Feng, Jie; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chunsheng

    2015-10-01

    Zirconium oxynitrides thin film thermometers were demonstrated to be useful temperature sensors. However, the basic conduction mechanism of zirconium oxynitrides films has been a long-standing issue, which hinders the prediction and optimization of their ultimate performance. In this letter, zirconium oxynitrides films were grown on sapphire substrates by magnetron sputtering and their electric transport mechanism has been systemically investigated. It was found that in high temperatures region (>150 K) the electrical conductivity was dominated by thermal activation for all samples. In the low temperatures range, while Mott variable hopping conduction (VRH) was dominated the transport for films with relatively low resistance, a crossover from Mott VRH conduction to Efros-Shklovskii (ES) VRH was observed for films with relatively high resistance. This low temperature crossover from Mott to ES VRH indicates the presence of a Coulomb gap (~7 meV). These results demonstrate the competing and tunable conduction mechanism in zirconium oxynitrides thin films, which would be helpful for optimizing the performance of zirconium oxynitrides thermometer.

  12. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  13. Synthesis of reduced carbon nitride at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C3N4)O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamov, Alexey; Bondarenko, Marina; Kharlamova, Ganna; Fomenko, Veniamin

    2016-09-01

    For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C3N4)O reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene) is obtained. It is differed from usually synthesized carbon nitride by a significantly large (on 0.09 nm) interplanar distance is. At the same time, the chemical bonds between atoms in a heteroatomic plane of reduced carbon nitride correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C3N4. The samples of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide were synthesized under the special reactionary conditions of a pyrolysis of melamine and urea. We believe that reduced carbon nitride consists of weakly connected carbon-nitrogen monosheets (azagraphene sheets) as well as reduced (from graphene oxide) graphene contains weakly connected graphene sheets.

  14. FOREWORD: The physics of III-V nitrides The physics of III-V nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, B. K.

    2009-04-01

    The evolution of semiconductor physics is driven by the increasing sophistication of the art of crystal growing and fabrication techniques. From Ge at the birth of the transistor, possibly the purest material ever grown, through Si, the work-horse of the crystal revolution, to the III-Vs, whose optical properties opened up a second front, namely, optoelectronics. Crystal growth with monolayer control gave us quantum wells, superlattices, quantum wires and quantum dots, along with the quantum Hall effect and quantized resistance. The potential for high-power devices triggered interest in the III-V nitrides with their large bandgaps. The nitrides mostly crystallize in the hexagonal form, and this has introduced the phenomenon of spontaneous polarization into mainstream semiconductor physics. Its effect manifests itself in huge electric fields in heterostructures like AlGaN/GaN which, in turn, causes the induction of substantial electron populations in the channel of a HFET without the need for doping. High-power microwave transistors have been successfully fabricated, even though there are features associated with spontaneous polarization that still needs clarifying. Another strange effect is the large electron population on the surface of InN. The lack of a suitable substrate for growing GaN has meant that the dislocation density is higher than we would wish, but that situation is expected to steadily improve. Given the current interest in the physics of nitrides, it is natural to come across a special issue devoted to this topic. The difficulty presented by the surface layer in InN in the attempt to measure transport properties is discussed in the paper by King et al. A property that can affect transport is the lifetime of optical phonons and its dependence on electron density. Measurements of phonon lifetime in InN are reported by Tsen and Ferry, and in GaN channels, via the measure of hot-electron fluctuations, by Matulionis. The dependence on electron density is

  15. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J.B.; Kingman, D.D.; Bianchini, G.M.

    1992-04-28

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  16. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J. Birch; Kingman, deceased, Donald D.; Bianchini, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  17. Anisotropic Nanomechanics of Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Nanostructured "Skin" Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, KyeongJae

    2000-01-01

    The stiffness and plasticity of boron nitride nanotubes are investigated using generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics and ab-initio total energy methods. Due to boron-nitride BN bond buckling effects, compressed zigzag BN nanotubes are found to undergo novel anisotropic strain release followed by anisotropic plastic buckling. The strain is preferentially released towards N atoms in the rotated BN bonds. The tubes buckle anisotropically towards only one end when uniaxially compressed from both. A "skin-effect" model of smart nanocomposite materials is proposed which will localize the structural damage towards the 'skin' or surface side of the material.

  18. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Pugar, E.A.

    1985-11-12

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of whiskers'' or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900 C to about 1,200 C to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900 C. 6 figs.

  19. Molybdenum nitride fibers or tubes via ammonolysis of polysulfide precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shutao; Zhang, Zude; Zhang, Yange; Qian, Yitai

    2004-08-01

    Millimeter-sized molybdenum nitride (MoN), in the forms of fiber-like prisms or hollow tubes, has been successfully synthesized via thermal ammonolysis of molybdenum polysulfide precursor. The initial morphology of the precursor is well preserved in the final product. This method could be expanded to preparation of other fiber-like nonmetal ceramics without addition of template. The polysulfide precursor (abbreviated to PS), hydrothermally prepared at 30°C (PS1) or 150°C (PS2), was characterized by various methods for better comprehension of the sulfide-nitride topotactic conversion model.

  20. Silicon nitride photonics: from visible to mid-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micó, Gloria; Bru, Luis A.; Pastor, Daniel; Doménech, David; Fernández, Juan; Sánchez, Ana; Cirera, Josep M.; Domínguez, Carlos; Muñoz, Pascual

    2018-02-01

    Silicon nitride has received a lot of attention during the last ten years, for applications such as bio-photonics, tele/datacom, optical signal processing and sensing. In this paper, firstly an updated review of the state of the art of silicon nitride photonics integration platforms will be provided. Secondly, our developments on a moderate confinement Si3N4 platform in the near-infrared will be presented. Finally, our steps towards establishing a Si3N4 based platform for broadband operation spanning from visible to mid-infrared wavelengths will be introduced.