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Sample records for zno np toxicity

  1. Involvement of PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy in ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity in BV-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Limin; Wang, Jianfeng; Chen, Aijie; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Shao, Longquan

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing application of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in biological materials, the neurotoxicity caused by these particles has raised serious concerns. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the toxic effect of ZnO NPs on brain cells remain unclear. Mitochondrial damage has been reported to be a factor in the toxicity of ZnO NPs. PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy is a newly emerging additional function of autophagy that selectively degrades impaired mitochondria. Here, a PINK1 gene knockdown BV-2 cell model was established to determine whether PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy was involved in ZnO NP-induced toxicity in BV-2 cells. The expression of total parkin, mito-parkin, cyto-parkin, and PINK1 both in wild type and PINK1 -/- BV-2 cells was evaluated using Western blot analysis after the cells were exposed to 10 μg/mL of 50 nm ZnO NPs for 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. The findings suggested that the downregulation of PINK1 resulted in a significant reduction in the survival rate after ZnO NP exposure compared with that of control cells. ZnO NPs were found to induce the transportation of parkin from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria, implying the involvement of mitophagy in ZnO NP-induced toxicity. The deletion of the PINK1 gene inhibited the recruitment of parkin to the mitochondria, causing failure of the cell to trigger mitophagy. The present study demonstrated that apart from autophagy, PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy plays a protective role in ZnO NP-induced cytotoxicity.

  2. Involvement of PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy in ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity in BV-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Limin; Wang, Jianfeng; Chen, Aijie; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Shao, Longquan

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing application of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in biological materials, the neurotoxicity caused by these particles has raised serious concerns. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the toxic effect of ZnO NPs on brain cells remain unclear. Mitochondrial damage has been reported to be a factor in the toxicity of ZnO NPs. PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy is a newly emerging additional function of autophagy that selectively degrades impaired mitochondria. Here, a PINK1 gene knockdown BV-2 cell model was established to determine whether PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy was involved in ZnO NP-induced toxicity in BV-2 cells. The expression of total parkin, mito-parkin, cyto-parkin, and PINK1 both in wild type and PINK1−/− BV-2 cells was evaluated using Western blot analysis after the cells were exposed to 10 μg/mL of 50 nm ZnO NPs for 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. The findings suggested that the downregulation of PINK1 resulted in a significant reduction in the survival rate after ZnO NP exposure compared with that of control cells. ZnO NPs were found to induce the transportation of parkin from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria, implying the involvement of mitophagy in ZnO NP-induced toxicity. The deletion of the PINK1 gene inhibited the recruitment of parkin to the mitochondria, causing failure of the cell to trigger mitophagy. The present study demonstrated that apart from autophagy, PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy plays a protective role in ZnO NP-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:28331313

  3. Sorption, dissolution and pH determine the long-term equilibration and toxicity of coated and uncoated ZnO nanoparticles in soil.

    PubMed

    Waalewijn-Kool, Pauline L; Diez Ortiz, Maria; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2013-07-01

    To assess the effect of long-term dissolution on bioavailability and toxicity, triethoxyoctylsilane coated and uncoated zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NP), non-nano ZnO and ZnCl2 were equilibrated in natural soil for up to twelve months. Zn concentrations in pore water increased with time for all ZnO forms but peaked at intermediate concentrations of ZnO-NP and non-nano ZnO, while for coated ZnO-NP such a clear peak only was seen after 12 months. Dose-related increases in soil pH may explain decreased soluble Zn levels due to fixation of Zn released from ZnO at higher soil concentrations. At T = 0 uncoated ZnO-NP and non-nano ZnO were equally toxic to the springtail Folsomia candida, but not as toxic as coated ZnO-NP, and ZnCl2 being most toxic. After three months equilibration toxicity to F. candida was already reduced for all Zn forms, except for coated ZnO-NP which showed reduced toxicity only after 12 months equilibration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Soil pH effects on the comparative toxicity of dissolved zinc, non-nano and nano ZnO to the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Heggelund, Laura R; Diez-Ortiz, Maria; Lofts, Stephen; Lahive, Elma; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Wojnarowicz, Jacek; Cedergreen, Nina; Spurgeon, David; Svendsen, Claus

    2014-08-01

    To determine how soil properties influence nanoparticle (NP) fate, bioavailability and toxicity, this study compared the toxicity of nano zinc oxide (ZnO NPs), non-nano ZnO and ionic ZnCl2 to the earthworm Eisenia fetida in a natural soil at three pH levels. NP characterisation indicated that reaction with the soil media greatly controls ZnO properties. Three main conclusions were drawn. First that Zn toxicity, especially for reproduction, was influenced by pH for all Zn forms. This can be linked to the influence of pH on Zn dissolution. Secondly, that ZnO fate, toxicity and bioaccumulation were similar (including relationships with pH) for both ZnO forms, indicating the absence of NP-specific effects. Finally, earthworm Zn concentrations were higher in worms exposed to ZnO compared to ZnCl2, despite the greater toxicity of the ionic form. This observation suggests the importance of considering the relationship between uptake and toxicity in nanotoxicology studies.

  5. The endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer thapsigargin enhances the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to macrophages and macrophage-endothelial co-culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui; Shen, Yuexin; Li, Xiyue; Jiang, Qin; Cheng, Shanshan; Gu, Yuxiu; Liu, Liangliang; Cao, Yi

    2017-03-01

    It was recently shown that exposure to ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) could induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress both in vivo and in vitro, but the role of ER stress in ZnO NP induced toxicity remains unclear. Because macrophages are sensitive to ER stress, we hypothesized that stressing macrophages with ER stress inducer could enhance the toxicity of ZnO NPs. In this study, the effects of ER stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) on the toxicity of ZnO NPs to THP-1 macrophages were investigated. The results showed that TG enhanced ZnO NP induced cytotoxicity as revealed by water soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1) and neutral red uptake assays, but not lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. ZnO NPs dose-dependently enhanced the accumulation of intracellular Zn ions without the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the presence of TG did not significantly affect these effects. In the co-culture, exposure of THP-1 macrophages in the upper chamber to ZnO NPs and TG significantly reduced the viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in the lower chamber, but the release of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) was not induced. In summary, our data showed that stressing THP-1 macrophages with TG enhanced the cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs to macrophages and macrophage-endothelial co-cultures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Aerosolized ZnO nanoparticles induce toxicity in alveolar type II epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yumei; Williams, Nolann G.; Tolic, Ana

    The majority of in vitro studies characterizing the impact of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cells that line the respiratory tract were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in suspension. This approach introduces processes that are unlikely to occur during inhaled NP exposures in vivo, such as the shedding of toxic doses of dissolved ions. ZnO NPs are used extensively and pose significant sources for human exposure. Exposures to airborne ZnO NPs can induce adverse effects, but the relevance of the dissolved Zn2+ to the observed effects in vivo is still unclear. Our goal was to mimic in vivo exposures tomore » airborne NPs and decipher the contribution of the intact NP from the contribution of the dissolved ions to airborne ZnO NP toxicity. We established the exposure of alveolar type II epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI), and compared the impact of aerosolized ZnO NPs and NPs in suspension at the same cellular doses, measured as the number of particles per cell. By evaluating membrane integrity and cell viability 6 and 24 hours post exposure we found that aerosolized NPs induced toxicity at the ALI at doses that were in the same order of magnitude as doses required to induce toxicity in submersed cultures. In addition, distinct patterns of oxidative stress were observed in the two exposure systems. These observations unravel the ability of airborne ZnO NPs to induce toxicity without the contribution of dissolved Zn2+ and suggest distinct mechanisms at the ALI and in submersed cultures.« less

  7. Effect of different spiking procedures on the distribution and toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in soil.

    PubMed

    Waalewijn-Kool, Pauline L; Diez Ortiz, Maria; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2012-10-01

    Due to the difficulty in dispersing some engineered nanomaterials in exposure media, realizing homogeneous distributions of nanoparticles (NP) in soil may pose major challenges. The present study investigated the distribution of zinc oxide (ZnO) NP (30 nm) and non-nano ZnO (200 nm) in natural soil using two different spiking procedures, i.e. as dry powder and as suspension in soil extract. Both spiking procedures showed a good recovery (>85 %) of zinc and based on total zinc concentrations no difference was found between the two spiking methods. Both spiking procedures resulted in a fairly homogeneous distribution of the ZnO particles in soil, as evidenced by the low variation in total zinc concentration between replicate samples (<12 % in most cases). Survival of Folsomia candida in soil spiked at concentrations up to 6,400 mg Zn kg(-1) d.w. was not affected for both compounds. Reproduction was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner with EC50 values of 3,159 and 2,914 mg Zn kg(-1) d.w. for 30 and 200 nm ZnO spiked as dry powder and 3,593 and 5,633 mg Zn kg(-1) d.w. introduced as suspension. Toxicity of ZnO at 30 and 200 nm did not differ. We conclude that the ZnO particle toxicity is not size related and that the spiking of the soil with ZnO as dry powder or as a suspension in soil extract does not affect its toxicity to F. candida.

  8. The effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer thapsigargin on the toxicity of ZnO or TiO2 nanoparticles to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuxiu; Cheng, Shanshan; Chen, Gui; Shen, Yuexin; Li, Xiyue; Jiang, Qin; Li, Juan; Cao, Yi

    2017-03-01

    It was recently shown that ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) could induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). If ER stress is associated the toxicity of ZnO NPs, the presence of ER stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) should alter the response of HUVECs to ZnO NP exposure. In this study, we addressed this issue by assessing cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in ZnO NP exposed HUVECs with or without the presence of TG. Moreover, TiO 2 NPs were used to compare the effects. Exposure to 32 μg/mL ZnO NPs (p < 0.05), but not TiO 2 NPs (p > 0.05), significantly induced cytotoxicity as assessed by WST-1 and neutral red uptake assay, as well as intracellular ROS. ZnO NPs dose-dependently increased the accumulation of intracellular Zn ions, and ZnSO 4 induced similar cytotoxic effects as ZnO NPs, which indicated a role of Zn ions. The release of inflammatory proteins tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) or the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to HUVECs was not significantly affected by ZnO or TiO 2 NP exposure (p > 0.05). The presence of 250 nM TG significantly induced cytotoxicity, release of IL-6 and THP-1 monocyte adhesion (p < 0.01), but did not significantly affect intracellular ROS or release of TNFα (p > 0.05). ANOVA analysis indicated no interaction between exposure to ZnO NPs and the presence of TG on almost all the endpoints (p > 0.05) except neutral red uptake assay (p < 0.01). We concluded ER stress is probably not associated with ZnO NP exposure induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in HUVECs.

  9. Adaptive response of trivial activated sludge towards toxic effect of oNP, PCP and combination oNP/PCP

    SciTech Connect

    Topalova, Y.; Dimkov, R.; Kozuharov, D.

    1999-01-01

    The reaction of the real aerobic activated sludge taken from the Sofia Waste Water Treatment Plant (SWWTP) and treated with the xenobiotics pentachlorphenol (PCP) (0.16 mMol), ortho-nitrophenol (oNP) (0.58 mMol) and with a combination of PCP (0.08 mMol), oNP (0.29 mMol) has been investigated in a model detoxification process. The adaptive changes are studied in the microbial structure level and at the level of changes in the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the macro-organisms in the activated sludge (consuments of 1 and 2 level). The presence of several different taxonomic groups has been shown by other researchers to be essentialmore » in the detoxification process. The quantitative changes in these taxonomic and physiological groups of micro-organisms are studied. The number of micro-organisms from Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and the bacteria from the xenobiotic-catabolizing complex considerably increased with the individual and the combined effect of the xenobiotics oNP, PCP and oNP PCP. At the same time the toxic shock leads to a remarkable reduction of NH[sub 3] releasing, nitrifying bacteria and those from family Enterobacteriaceae. It is ascertained that the number of Ciliata, Flagellata apochromata, Oligochaeta and Rotatoria is strongly decreased in the series of samples treated with xenobiotics. The leading role of micro-organisms in the real detoxification of hazardous pollutants was experimentally confirmed by research.« less

  10. A mixture toxicity approach to predict the toxicity of Ag decorated ZnO nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, S L; Holz, T; Rodrigues, J; Monteiro, T; Costa, F M; Soares, A M V M; Loureiro, S

    2017-02-01

    Nanotechnology is a rising field and nanomaterials can now be found in a vast variety of products with different chemical compositions, sizes and shapes. New nanostructures combining different nanomaterials are being developed due to their enhancing characteristics when compared to nanomaterials alone. In the present study, the toxicity of a nanostructure composed by a ZnO nanomaterial with Ag nanomaterials on its surface (designated as ZnO/Ag nanostructure) was assessed using the model-organism Daphnia magna and its toxicity predicted based on the toxicity of the single components (Zn and Ag). For that ZnO and Ag nanomaterials as single components, along with its mixture prepared in the laboratory, were compared in terms of toxicity to ZnO/Ag nanostructures. Toxicity was assessed by immobilization and reproduction tests. A mixture toxicity approach was carried out using as starting point the conceptual model of Concentration Addition. The laboratory mixture of both nanomaterials showed that toxicity was dependent on the doses of ZnO and Ag used (immobilization) or presented a synergistic pattern (reproduction). The ZnO/Ag nanostructure toxicity prediction, based on the percentage of individual components, showed an increase in toxicity when compared to the expected (immobilization) and dependent on the concentration used (reproduction). This study demonstrates that the toxicity of the prepared mixture of ZnO and Ag and of the ZnO/Ag nanostructure cannot be predicted based on the toxicity of their components, highlighting the importance of taking into account the interaction between nanomaterials when assessing hazard and risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative study on toxicity of ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles on Artemia salina: effect of pre-UV-A and visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneshwari, M; Sagar, Bhawana; Doshi, Siddharth; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2017-02-01

    This study evaluated the toxicity potential of ZnO and TiO 2 nanoparticles under pre-UV-A irradiation and visible light condition on Artemia salina. The nanoparticle suspension was prepared in seawater medium and exposed under pre-UV-A (0.23 mW/cm 2 ) and visible light (0.18 mW/cm 2 ) conditions. The aggregation profiles of both nanoparticles (NPs) and dissolution of ZnO NPs under both irradiation conditions at various kinetic intervals (1, 24, 48 h) were studied. The 48-h LC 50 values were found to be 27.62 and 71.63 mg/L for ZnO NPs and 117 and 120.9 mg/L for TiO 2 NPs under pre-UV-A and visible light conditions. ZnO NPs were found to be more toxic to A. salina as compared to TiO 2 NPs. The enhanced toxicity was observed under pre-UV-A-irradiated ZnO NPs, signifying its phototoxicity. Accumulation of ZnO and TiO 2 NPs into A. salina depends on the concentration of particles and type irradiations. Elimination of accumulated nanoparticles was also evident under both irradiation conditions. Other than ZnO NPs, the dissolved Zn 2+ also had a significant effect on toxicity and accumulation in A. salina. Increased catalase (CAT) activity in A. salina indicates the generation of oxidative stress due to NP interaction. Thus, this study provides an understanding of the toxicity of photoreactive ZnO and TiO 2 NPs as related to the effects of pre-UV-A and visible light irradiation.

  12. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions. PMID:27094203

  13. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions.

  14. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-04-20

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te ((particle)) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs' nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te ((particle)) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te ((ion)) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions.

  15. Comparative evaluation of impact of Zn and ZnO nanoparticles on brine shrimp (Artemia salina) larvae: effects of particle size and solubility on toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ates, Mehmet; Daniels, James; Arslan, Zikri; Farah, Ibrahim O; Rivera, Hilsamar Félix

    2013-01-01

    Brine shrimp (Artemia salina) larvae were exposed to different sizes of zinc (Zn) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) to evaluate their toxicity in marine aquatic ecosystems. Acute exposure was conducted in seawater with 10, 50 and 100 mg L(-1) concentrations of the NPs for 24 h and 96 h. Phase contrast microscope images confirmed the accumulation of the NPs inside the guts. Artemia were unable to eliminate the ingested particles, which was thought to be due to the formation of massive particles in the guts. Although the suspensions of the NPs did not exhibit any significant acute toxicity within 24 h, mortalities increased remarkably in 96 h and escalated with increasing concentration of NP suspension to 42% for Zn NPs (40-60 nm) (LC50∼ 100 mg L(-1)) and to about 34% for ZnO NPs (10-30 nm) (LC50 > 100 mg L(-1)). The suspensions of Zn NPs were more toxic to Artemia than those of ZnO NPs under comparable regimes. This effect was attributed to higher Zn(2+) levels (ca. up to 8.9 mg L(-1)) released to the medium from Zn NPs in comparison to that measured in the suspensions of ZnO NPs (ca. 5.5 mg L(-1)). In addition, the size of the nanopowders appeared to contribute to the observed toxicities. Although the suspensions possessed aggregates of comparable sizes, smaller Zn NPs (40-60 nm) were relatively more toxic than larger Zn NPs (80-100 nm). Likewise, the suspensions of 10-30 nm ZnO NPs caused higher toxicity than those of 200 nm ZnO NPs. Lipid peroxidation levels were substantially higher in 96 h (p < 0.05), indicating that the toxic effects were due to the oxidative stress.

  16. Toxicity evaluation of ZnO nanostructures on L929 fibroblast cell line using MTS assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhori, Siti Khadijah Mohd; Mahmud, Shahrom; Ann, Ling Chuo; Mohamed, Azman Seeni; Saifuddin, Siti Nazmin; Masudi, Sam'an Malik; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-04-01

    ZnO has wide applications in medical and dentistry apart from being used as optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, photodetectors, sensors and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Therefore, the toxicity evaluation is important to know the toxicity level on normal cell line. The toxicity of two grades ZnO nanostructures, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 have been carried out using cytotoxicity test of MTS assay on L929 rat fibroblast cell line. Prior to that, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 were characterized for its morphology, structure and optical properties using FESEM, X-ray diffraction, and Photoluminescence respectively. The two groups revealed difference in morphology and exhibit slightly shifted of near band edge emission of Photoluminescence other than having a similar calculated crystallite size of nanostructures. The viability of cells after 72h were obtained and the statistical significance value was calculated using SPSS v20. The p value is more than 0.05 between untreated and treated cell with ZnO. This insignificant value of p>0.05 can be summarized as a non-toxic level of ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 on the L929 cell line.

  17. Toxicity evaluation of ZnO nanostructures on L929 fibroblast cell line using MTS assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhori, Siti Khadijah Mohd; Mahmud, Shahrom; Ann, Ling Chuo

    2015-04-24

    ZnO has wide applications in medical and dentistry apart from being used as optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, photodetectors, sensors and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Therefore, the toxicity evaluation is important to know the toxicity level on normal cell line. The toxicity of two grades ZnO nanostructures, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 have been carried out using cytotoxicity test of MTS assay on L929 rat fibroblast cell line. Prior to that, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 were characterized for its morphology, structure and optical properties using FESEM, X-ray diffraction, and Photoluminescence respectively. The two groups revealed difference in morphology and exhibit slightly shiftedmore » of near band edge emission of Photoluminescence other than having a similar calculated crystallite size of nanostructures. The viability of cells after 72h were obtained and the statistical significance value was calculated using SPSS v20. The p value is more than 0.05 between untreated and treated cell with ZnO. This insignificant value of p>0.05 can be summarized as a non-toxic level of ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 on the L929 cell line.« less

  18. Differential gene expression in Daphnia magna suggests distinct modes of action and bioavailability for ZnO nanoparticles and Zn ions.

    PubMed

    Poynton, Helen C; Lazorchak, James M; Impellitteri, Christopher A; Smith, Mark E; Rogers, Kim; Patra, Manomita; Hammer, Katherine A; Allen, H Joel; Vulpe, Chris D

    2011-01-15

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are being rapidly developed for use in consumer products, wastewater treatment, and chemotherapy providing several possible routes for ZnO NP exposure to humans and aquatic organisms. Recent studies have shown that ZnO NPs undergo rapid dissolution to Zn(2+), but the relative contribution of Zn(2+) to ZnO NP bioavailability and toxicity is not clear. We show that a fraction of the ZnO NPs in suspension dissolves, and this fraction cannot account for the toxicity of the ZnO NP suspensions to Daphnia magna. Gene expression profiling of D. magna exposed to ZnO NPs or ZnSO(4) at sublethal concentrations revealed distinct modes of toxicity. There was also little overlap in gene expression between ZnO NPs and SiO(x) NPs, suggesting specificity for the ZnO NP expression profile. ZnO NPs effected expression of genes involved in cytoskeletal transport, cellular respiration, and reproduction. A specific pattern of differential expression of three biomarker genes including a multicystatin, ferritin, and C1q containing gene were confirmed for ZnO NP exposure and provide a suite of biomarkers for identifying environmental exposure to ZnO NPs and differentiating between NP and ionic exposure.

  19. Ameliorative role of nano-ceria against amine coated Ag-NP induced toxicity in Labeo rohita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Qureshi, Naureen Aziz; Jabeen, Farhat

    2018-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and its byproducts can spread pollution in aquatic habitat. Liver and gills are key target for toxicity. Oxidative stress, tissue alterations, and hemotoxicity are assumed to be associated with Ag-NPs in target animals. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nano-ceria) show antioxidant potential in scavenging the free radicals generated in Ag-NP-induced oxidative stress. We determined ameliorated role of nano-ceria against Ag-NP-induced toxicity in fresh water Labeo rohita (L. rohita). Four groups were used in study including control, nano-ceria, Ag-NPs, and Ag-NPs + nano-ceria. Ag-NPs (30 mg l-1) and nano-ceria (50 µg kg-1) were given through water and prepared feed, respectively. The samples were taken after 28 days. Results demonstrated that pre-treatment of nano-ceria recovered L. rohita from Ag-NP-induced toxicity and oxidative stress. Nano-ceria pre-treatment actively mimics the activity of GST, GSH, CAT, and SOD. Furthermore, Ag-NPs' treatment caused severe inflammation and necrosis in hepatic parenchyma which leaded to congestion of blood in hepatic tissues. Accumulation of a yellow pigment in hepatic tissue was also seen due to necrosis of affected cells. In nano-ceria pre-treatment, there was no congestion in hepatic tissue. Vacuolization of cells and necrosis in some area was recorded in nano-ceria pre-treated group, but the gill and hepatic tissue showed improvement against Ag-NP-induced damage. Nano-ceria pre-treatment also improved hematological parameters in Ag-NP-treated fish. This study concluded that Ag-NP-induced toxicity in treated fish and pre-treatment of nano-ceria show ameliorative role.

  20. In vitro toxicity of different-sized ZnO nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tianshu; Guan, Rongfa; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Song, Yijuan; Jiang, Han; Zhao, Jin

    2013-11-01

    There has been rapid growth in nanotechnology in both the public and private sectors worldwide, but concern about nanosafety exists. To assess size-dependent cytotoxicity on human cancer cells, we studied the cytotoxic effect of three kinds of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, distribution, and intensity. Multiple assays have been adopted to measure the cell activity and oxidative stress. The cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs was time dependent and dose dependent. The 24-h exposure was chosen to confirm the viability and accessibility of the cells and taken as the appropriate time for the following test system. The IC50 value was found at a low concentration. The oxidative stress elicited a significant reduction in glutathione with increase in reactive oxygen species and lactate dehydrogenase. The toxicity resulted in a deletion of cells in the G1 phase and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. One type of metallic oxide (ZnO) exerted different cytotoxic effects according to different particle sizes. Data from the previous experiments showed that 26-nm ZnO NPs appeared to have the highest toxicity to Caco-2 cells. The study demonstrated the toxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 cells and the impact of particle size, which could be useful in the medical applications.

  1. Toxicity of nanotitanium dioxide (TiO2-NP) on human monocytes and their mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ghanbary, Fatemeh; Seydi, Enaytollah; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Salimi, Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    The effect of nanotitanium dioxide (TiO 2 -NP) in human monocytes is still unknown. Therefore, an understanding of probable cytotoxicity of TiO 2 -NP on human monocytes and underlining the mechanisms involved is of significant interest. The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxicity of TiO 2 -NP on human monocytes. Using biochemical and flow cytometry assessments, we demonstrated that addition of TiO 2 -NP at 10 μg/ml concentration to monocytes induced cytotoxicity following 12 h. The TiO 2 -NP-induced cytotoxicity on monocytes was associated with intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) collapse, lysosomal membrane injury, lipid peroxidation, and depletion of glutathione. According to our results, TiO 2 -NP triggers oxidative stress and organelles damages in monocytes which are important cells in defense against foreign agents. Finally, our findings suggest that use of antioxidants and mitochondrial/lysosomal protective agents could be of benefit for the people in the exposure with TiO 2 -NP.

  2. Effect of culture medium on toxic effect of ZnO nanoparticles to freshwater microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravantinou, Andriana F.; Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Dailianis, Stefanos; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2014-05-01

    The widely use of nanoparticles (NPs) in many products, is increasing over time. The release of NPs into the environment may affect ecosystems, and therefore it is essential to study their impact on aquatic organisms. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs on microalgae, cultured in different mediums. Chlorococcum sp. and Scenedesmus rubescens were used as freshwater microalgae model species in order to investigate the toxic effects of ZnO NPs. Microalgae species exposed to ZnO NPs concentrations varying from 0.081 to 810 mg/L for different periods of time (24 to 96 h) and two different culture mediums. The aggregation level and particle size distribution of NPs were also determined during the experiments. The experimental results revealed significant differences on algae growth rates depending on the selected culture medium. Specifically, the toxic effect of ZnO NPs in Chlorococcum sp. was higher in cultures with 1/3N BG-11 medium than in BBM medium, despite the fact that the dissolved zinc concentration was higher in BBM medium. On the other hand, Scenedesmus rubescens exhibited the exact opposite behavior, with the highest toxic effect in cultures with BBM medium. Both species growth was significantly affected by the exposure time, the NPs concentrations, and mainly the culture medium.

  3. Toxicity of nano- and micro-sized ZnO particles in human lung epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weisheng; Xu, Yi; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Ma, Yinfa; Shannon, Katie B.; Chen, Da-Ren; Huang, Yue-Wern

    2009-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive study to evaluate the cytotoxicity, biochemical mechanisms of toxicity, and oxidative DNA damage caused by exposing human bronchoalveolar carcinoma-derived cells (A549) to 70 and 420 nm ZnO particles. Particles of either size significantly reduced cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner within a rather narrow dosage range. Particle mass-based dosimetry and particle-specific surface area-based dosimetry yielded two distinct patterns of cytotoxicity in both 70 and 420 nm ZnO particles. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulted in intracellular oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, cell membrane leakage, and oxidative DNA damage. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine on ZnO-induced cytotoxicity further implicated oxidative stress in the cytotoxicity. Free Zn2+ and metal impurities were not major contributors of ROS induction as indicated by limited free Zn2+ cytotoxicity, extent of Zn2+ dissociation in the cell culture medium, and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry metal analysis. We conclude that (1) exposure to both sizes of ZnO particles leads to dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity reflected in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, cell membrane damage, and oxidative DNA damage, (2) ZnO particles exhibit a much steeper dose-response pattern unseen in other metal oxides, and (3) neither free Zn2+ nor metal impurity in the ZnO particle samples is the cause of cytotoxicity.

  4. Comparative assessment of toxicity of ZnO and amine-functionalized ZnO nanorods toward Daphnia magna in acute and chronic multigenerational tests.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Renata Amanda; de Oliveira Franco Rossetto, Ana Letícia; Nogueira, Diego José; Vicentini, Denice Schulz; Matias, William Gerson

    2018-04-01

    Zinc oxide nanomaterials (ZnO NM) have been used in a large number of applications due to their interesting physicochemical properties. However, the increasing use of ZnO NM has led to concerns regarding their environmental impacts. In this study, the acute and chronic toxicity of ZnO nanorods (NR) bare (ZnONR) and amine-functionalized (ZnONR@AF) toward the freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia magna was evaluated. The ZnO NR were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the zeta potential and hydrodynamic diameter (HD). The acute EC50 (48h) values for D. magna revealed that the ZnONR@AF were more toxic than the ZnONR. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed in both NM. Regarding the chronic toxicity, the ZnONR@AF were again found to be more toxic than the ZnONR toward D. magna. An effect on longevity was observed for ZnONR, while ZnONR@AF affected the reproduction, growth and longevity. In the multigenerational recovery test, we observed that maternal exposure can affect the offspring even when these organisms are not directly exposed to the ZnO NR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO and TiO2) to developing zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicario-Parés, Unai; Castañaga, Luis; Lacave, Jose Maria; Oron, Miriam; Reip, Paul; Berhanu, Deborah; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Cajaraville, Miren P.; Orbea, Amaia

    2014-08-01

    Increasing use of nanomaterials is resulting in their release into the environment, making necessary to determine the toxicity of these materials. With this aim, the effects of CuO, ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on zebrafish development were assessed in comparison with the effects caused by the ionic forms (for copper and zinc), bulk counterparts and the stabilizer used for rutile TiO2 NPs. None of the NPs caused significant embryo mortality. CuO NPs were the most toxic affecting hatching and increasing malformation prevalence (≥1 mg Cu/L), followed by ZnO NPs that affected hatching at ≥5 mg Zn/L and stabilized TiO2 NPs that caused mortality and decreased hatching at 100 mg Ti/L. Exposure to the stabilizer alone provoked the same effect. Thus, toxicity of the TiO2 NP suspension can be linked to the surfactant. For all the endpoints, the greatest effects were exerted by the ionic forms, followed by the NPs and finally by the bulk compounds. By autometallography, metal-bearing deposits were observed in embryos exposed to CuO and ZnO NPs, being more abundant in the case of embryos exposed to CuO NPs. The largest and most abundant metal-bearing deposits were detected in embryos exposed to ionic copper. In conclusion, metal oxide NPs affected zebrafish development altering hatching and increasing the prevalence of malformations. Thus, the use and release of metal oxide NPs to the environment may pose a risk to aquatic organisms as a result of the toxicity caused by NPs themselves or by the additives used in their production.

  6. The Toxic Effects and Mechanisms of CuO and ZnO Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Mingyi; Xia, Lin; Zhang, Jun; Xing, Gengmei

    2012-01-01

    Recent nanotechnological advances suggest that metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been expected to be used in various fields, ranging from catalysis and opto-electronic materials to sensors, environmental remediation, and biomedicine. However, the growing use of NPs has led to their release into environment and the toxicity of metal oxide NPs on organisms has become a concern to both the public and scientists. Unfortunately, there are still widespread controversies and ambiguities with respect to the toxic effects and mechanisms of metal oxide NPs. Comprehensive understanding of their toxic effect is necessary to safely expand their use. In this review, we use CuO and ZnO NPs as examples to discuss how key factors such as size, surface characteristics, dissolution, and exposure routes mediate toxic effects, and we describe corresponding mechanisms, including oxidative stress, coordination effects and non-homeostasis effects.

  7. Accumulation and Toxicity of CuO and ZnO Nanoparticles through Waterborne and Dietary Exposure of Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Mehmet; Arslan, Zikri; Demir, Veysel; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary and waterborne exposure to CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was conducted using a simplified model of an aquatic food chain consisting of zooplankton (Artemia salina) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) to determine bioaccumulation, toxic effects and particle transport through trophic levels. Artemia contaminated with NPs were used as food in dietary exposure. Fish were exposed to suspensions of the NPs in waterborne exposure. ICP-MS analysis showed that accumulation primarily occurred in the intestine, followed by the gills and liver. Dietary uptake was lower, but was found to be a potential pathway for transport of NPs to higher organisms. Waterborne exposure resulted in about a tenfold higher accumulation in the intestine. The heart, brain and muscle tissue had no significant Cu or Zn. However, concentrations in muscle increased with NP concentration, which was ascribed to bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn released from NPs. Free Cu concentration in the medium was always higher than that of Zn, indicating CuO NPs dissolved more readily. ZnO NPs were relatively benign, even in waterborne exposure (p≥0.05). In contrast, CuO NPs were toxic. Malondialdehyde levels in the liver and gills increased substantially (p<0.05). Despite lower Cu accumulation, the liver exhibited significant oxidative stress, which could be from chronic exposure to Cu ions. PMID:24860999

  8. Accumulation and toxicity of CuO and ZnO nanoparticles through waterborne and dietary exposure of goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Ates, Mehmet; Arslan, Zikri; Demir, Veysel; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O

    2015-01-01

    Dietary and waterborne exposure to copper oxide (CuO) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) was conducted using a simplified model of an aquatic food chain consisting of zooplankton (Artemia salina) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) to determine bioaccumulation, toxic effects, and particle transport through trophic levels. Artemia contaminated with NPs were used as food in dietary exposure. Fish were exposed to suspensions of the NPs in waterborne exposure. ICP-MS analysis showed that accumulation primarily occurred in the intestine, followed by the gills and liver. Dietary uptake was lower, but was found to be a potential pathway for transport of NPs to higher organisms. Waterborne exposure resulted in about a 10-fold higher accumulation in the intestine. The heart, brain, and muscle tissue had no significant Cu or Zn. However, concentrations in muscle increased with NP concentration, which was ascribed to bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn released from NPs. Free Cu concentration in the medium was always higher than that of Zn, indicating CuO NPs dissolved more readily. ZnO NPs were relatively benign, even in waterborne exposure (p ≥ 0.05). In contrast, CuO NPs were toxic. Malondialdehyde levels in the liver and gills increased substantially (p < 0.05). Despite lower Cu accumulation, the liver exhibited significant oxidative stress, which could be from chronic exposure to Cu ions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Toxicity of ZnO and TiO2 to Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Yu Hang; Xu, Xiaoying; Ma, Angel P. Y.; Liu, Fangzhou; Ng, Alan M. C.; Shen, Zhiyong; Gethings, Lee A.; Guo, Mu Yao; Djurišić, Aleksandra B.; Lee, Patrick K. H.; Lee, Hung Kay; Chan, Wai Kin; Leung, Frederick C. C.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a comprehensive investigation of the toxicity of ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles using Escherichia coli as a model organism. Both materials are wide band gap n-type semiconductors and they can interact with lipopolysaccharide molecules present in the outer membrane of E. coli, as well as produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) under UV illumination. Despite the similarities in their properties, the response of the bacteria to the two nanomaterials was fundamentally different. When the ROS generation is observed, the toxicity of nanomaterial is commonly attributed to oxidative stress and cell membrane damage caused by lipid peroxidation. However, we found that significant toxicity does not necessarily correlate with up-regulation of ROS-related proteins. TiO2 exhibited significant antibacterial activity, but the protein expression profile of bacteria exposed to TiO2 was different compared to H2O2 and the ROS-related proteins were not strongly expressed. On the other hand, ZnO exhibited lower antibacterial activity compared to TiO2, and the bacterial response involved up-regulating ROS-related proteins similar to the bacterial response to the exposure to H2O2. Reasons for the observed differences in toxicity and bacterial response to the two metal oxides are discussed. PMID:27731373

  10. Toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Escherichia coli: mechanism and the influence of medium components.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Zhu, Lizhong; Lin, Daohui

    2011-03-01

    Water chemistry can be a major factor regulating the toxicity mechanism of ZnO nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) in water. The effect of five commonly used aqueous media with various chemical properties on the toxicity of nano-ZnO to Escherichia coli O111 (E. coli) was investigated, including ultrapure water, 0.85% NaCl, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), minimal Davis (MD), and Luria-Bertani (LB). Combined results of physicochemical characterization and antibacterial tests of nano-ZnO in the five media suggest that the toxicity of nano-ZnO is mainly due to the free zinc ions and labile zinc complexes. The toxicity of nano-ZnO in the five media deceased as follows: ultrapure water > NaCl > MD > LB > PBS. The generation of precipitates (Zn(3)(PO(4))(2) in PBS) and zinc complexes (of zinc with citrate and amino acids in MD and LB, respectively) dramatically decreased the concentration of Zn(2+) ions, resulting in the lower toxicity in these media. Additionally, the isotonic and rich nutrient conditions improved the tolerance of E. coli to toxicants. Considering the dramatic difference of the toxicity of nano-ZnO in various aqueous media, the effect of water chemistry on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles should be paid more attention in future nanotoxicity evaluations.

  11. Impact of solar UV radiation on toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles through photocatalytic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and photo-induced dissolution

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study investigated the impact of solar UV radiation on ZnO nanoparticle toxicity through photocatalytic ROS generation and photo-induced dissolution. Toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Daphnia magna was examined under laboratory light versus simulated solar UV radiatio...

  12. Physico-chemical characteristics of ZnO nanoparticles-based discs and toxic effect on human cervical cancer HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirelkhatim, Amna; Mahmud, Shahrom; Seeni, Azman; Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd.; Sendi, Rabab

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we investigated physico-chemical properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-based discs and their toxicity on human cervical cancer HeLa cell lines. ZnO NPs (80 nm) were produced by the conventional ceramic processing method. FESEM analysis indicated dominant structure of nanorods with dimensions 100-500 nm in length, and 20-100 nm in diameter. The high content of ZnO nanorods in the discs probably played significant role in toxicity towards HeLa cells. Structural defects (oxygen vacancies and zinc/oxygen interstitials) were revealed by PL spectra peaks at 370-376 nm and 519-533 nm for the ZnO discs. The structural, optical and electrical properties of prepared sample have influenced the toxicological effects of ZnO discs towards HeLa cell lines via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), internalization, membrane damage, and eventually cell death. The larger surface to volume area of the ZnO nanorods, combined with defects, stimulated enhanced toxicity via ROS generation hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals, and superoxide anion. The preliminary results confirmed the ZnO-disc toxicity on HeLa cells was significantly associated with the unique physicochemical properties of ZnO NPs and to our knowledge, this is the first cellular study for treatment of HeLa cells with ZnO discs made from 80 nm ZnO particles.

  13. Impact of solar UV radiation on toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles through photocatalytic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and photo-induced dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongbo; Wallis, Lindsay K; Diamond, Steve; Li, Shibin; Canas-Carrell, Jaclyn; Parra, Amanda

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the impact of solar UV radiation on ZnO nanoparticle toxicity through photocatalytic ROS generation and photo-induced dissolution. Toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Daphnia magna was examined under laboratory light versus simulated solar UV radiation (SSR). Photocatalytic ROS generation and particle dissolution were measured on a time-course basis. Two toxicity mitigation assays using CaCl2 and N-acetylcysteine were performed to differentiate the relative importance of these two modes of action. Enhanced ZnO nanoparticle toxicity under SSR was in parallel with photocatalytic ROS generation and enhanced particle dissolution. Toxicity mitigation by CaCl2 to a less extent under SSR than under lab light demonstrates the role of ROS generation in ZnO toxicity. Toxicity mitigation by N-acetylcysteine under both irradiation conditions confirms the role of particle dissolution and ROS generation. These findings demonstrate the importance of considering environmental solar UV radiation when assessing ZnO nanoparticle toxicity and risk in aquatic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioavailability of Zn in ZnO nanoparticle-spiked soil and the implications to maize plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueqin; Wang, Fayuan; Shi, Zhaoyong; Tong, Ruijian; Shi, Xiaojun

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the relationships between Zn bioavailability in ZnO nanoparticle (NP)-spiked soil and the implications to crops. The present pot culture experiment studied Zn bioavailability in soil spiked with different doses of ZnO NPs, using the diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) extraction method, as well as the toxicity and Zn accumulation in maize plants. Results showed that ZnO NPs exerted dose-dependent effects on maize growth and nutrition, photosynthetic pigments, and root activity (dehydrogenase), ranging from stimulatory (100-200 mg/kg) through to neutral (400 mg/kg) and toxic effect (800-3200 mg/kg). Both Zn concentration in shoots and roots correlated positively ( P < 0.01) with ZnO NPs dose and soil DTPA-extractable Zn concentration. The BCF of Zn in shoots and roots ranged from 1.02 to 3.83 when ZnO NPs were added. In most cases, the toxic effects on plants elicited by ZnO NPs were overall similar to those caused by bulk ZnO and soluble Zn (ZnSO4) at the same doses, irrespective of some significant differences suggesting a higher toxicity of ZnO NPs. Oxidative stress in plants via superoxide free radical production was induced by ZnO NPs at 800 mg/kg and above, and was more severe than the same doses of bulk ZnO and ZnSO4. Although significantly lower compared to bulk ZnO and ZnSO4, at least 16 % of the Zn from ZnO NPs was converted into DTPA-extractable (bioavailable) forms. The dissolved Zn2+ from ZnO NPs may make a dominant contribution to their phytotoxicity. Although low amounts of ZnO NPs exhibited some beneficial effects, the accumulation of Zn from ZnO NPs into maize tissues could pose potential health risks for both plants and human.

  15. Effects of different surface modifying agents on the cytotoxic and antimicrobial properties of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Esparza-González, S C; Sánchez-Valdés, S; Ramírez-Barrón, S N; Loera-Arias, M J; Bernal, J; Meléndez-Ortiz, H Iván; Betancourt-Galindo, R

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) have received considerable attention in the medical field because of their antibacterial properties, primarily for killing and reducing the activity of numerous microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether surface-modified ZnO NPs exhibit different properties compared with unmodified ZnO. The antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties of modified ZnO NPs as well as their effects on inflammatory cytokine production were evaluated. ZnO NPs were prepared using a wet chemical method. Then, the surfaces of these NPs were modified using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as modifying agents via a chemical hydrolysis method. According to infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR), the structure of the ZnO remained unchanged after modification. Antibacterial assays demonstrated that APTES modification is more effective at inducing an antimicrobial effect against Gram-negative bacteria than against Gram-positive bacteria. Cytotoxicity studies showed that cell viability was dose-dependent; moreover, pristine and APTES-modified ZnO exhibited low cytotoxicity, whereas DMSO-modified ZnO exhibited toxicity even at a low NP concentration. An investigation of inflammatory cytokine production demonstrated that the extent of stimulation was related to the ZnO NP concentration but not to the surface modification, except for IFN-γ and IL-10, which were not detected even at high NP concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxicity of nanoparticles of CuO, ZnO and TiO2 to microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Aruoja, Villem; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Kasemets, Kaja; Kahru, Anne

    2009-02-01

    Toxicities of ZnO, TiO2 and CuO nanoparticles to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were determined using OECD 201 algal growth inhibition test taking in account potential shading of light. The results showed that the shading effect by nanoparticles was negligible. ZnO nanoparticles were most toxic followed by nano CuO and nano TiO2. The toxicities of bulk and nano ZnO particles were both similar to that of ZnSO4 (72 h EC50 approximately 0.04 mg Zn/l). Thus, in this low concentration range the toxicity was attributed solely to solubilized Zn2+ ions. Bulk TiO2 (EC50=35.9 mg Ti/l) and bulk CuO (EC50=11.55 mg Cu/l) were less toxic than their nano formulations (EC50=5.83 mg Ti/l and 0.71 mg Cu/l). NOEC (no-observed-effect-concentrations) that may be used for risk assessment purposes for bulk and nano ZnO did not differ (approximately 0.02 mg Zn/l). NOEC for nano CuO was 0.42 mg Cu/l and for bulk CuO 8.03 mg Cu/l. For nano TiO2 the NOEC was 0.98 mg Ti/l and for bulk TiO2 10.1 mg Ti/l. Nano TiO2 formed characteristic aggregates entrapping algal cells that may contribute to the toxic effect of nano TiO2 to algae. At 72 h EC50 values of nano CuO and CuO, 25% of copper from nano CuO was bioavailable and only 0.18% of copper from bulk CuO. Thus, according to recombinant bacterial and yeast Cu-sensors, copper from nano CuO was 141-fold more bioavailable than from bulk CuO. Also, toxic effects of Cu oxides to algae were due to bioavailable copper ions. To our knowledge, this is one of the first systematic studies on effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on algal growth and the first describing toxic effects of nano CuO towards algae.

  17. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chiang, Chao-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (≥ 50 ppm), with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5-10 ppm, with concentrations ≤ 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles.

  18. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chiang, Chao-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (≥ 50 ppm), with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5–10 ppm, with concentrations ≤ 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles. PMID:26039692

  19. Oxidative Stress and Nano-Toxicity Induced by TiO2 and ZnO on WAG Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Akhilesh; Goswami, Mukunda; Yadav, Kamalendra; Chaudhary, Dharmendra

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, food products and textile industry. These particles are known to cause respiratory toxicity and epithelial inflammation. They are eventually released to aquatic environment necessitating toxicity studies in cells from respiratory organs of aquatic organisms. Hence, we have developed and characterized a new cell line, WAG, from gill tissue of Wallago attu for toxicity assessment of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles. The efficacy of the cell line as an in vitro system for nanoparticles toxicity studies was established using electron microscopy, cytotoxicity assays, genotoxicity assays and oxidative stress biomarkers. Results obtained with MTT assay, neutral red uptake assay and lactate dehydrogenase assay showed acute toxicity to WAG cells with IC50 values of 25.29±0.12, 34.99±0.09 and 35.06±0.09 mg/l for TiO2 and 5.716±0.1, 3.160±0.1 and 5.57±0.12 mg/l for ZnO treatment respectively. The physicochemical properties and size distribution of nanoparticles were characterized using electron microscopy with integrated energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Zetasizer. Dose dependent increase in DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation along with a significant decrease in activity of Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, total Glutathione levels and total antioxidant capacity with increasing concentration of exposed nanoparticles indicated that the cells were under oxidative stress. The study established WAG cell line as an in vitro system to study toxicity mechanisms of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms. PMID:26011447

  20. Comparison of the in vitro and in vivo toxic effects of three sizes of zinc oxide (ZnO) particles using flounder gill (FG) cells and zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Li; Zhai, Yanan; Liu, Yang; Hao, Linhua; Guo, Huarong

    2017-02-01

    Nano-sized zinc oxide (nZnO) particles are one kind of the most commonly used metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs). This study compared the cytotoxic and embryotoxic effects of three increasing sized ZnO particles (ϕ 30 nm, 80-150 nm and 2 μm) in the flounder gill (FG) cells and zebrafish embryos, and analyzed the contribution of size, agglomeration and released Zn2+ to the toxic effects. All the tested ZnO particles were found to be highly toxic to both FG cells and zebrafish embryos. They induced growth inhibition, LDH release, morphological changes and apoptosis in FG cells in a concentration-, size- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, the release of LDH from the exposed FG cells into the medium occurred before the observable morphological changes happened. The ultrasonication treatment and addition of serum favored the dispersion of ZnO particles and alleviated the agglomeration, thus significantly increased the corresponding cytotoxicity. The released Zn2+ ions from ZnO particles into the extracellular medium only partially contributed to the cytotoxicity. All the three sizes of ZnO particles tested induced developmental malformations, decrease of hatching rates and lethality in zebrafish embryos, but size- and concentration- dependent toxic effects were not so obvious as in FG cells possibly due to the easy aggregation of ZnO particles in freshwater. In conclusion, both FG cells and zebrafish embryos are sensitive bioassay systems for safety assessment of ZnO particles and the environmental release of ZnO particles should be closely monitored as far as the safety of aquatic organisms is concerned.

  1. Cytotoxicity of ZnO Nanoparticles Can Be Tailored by Modifying Their Surface Structure: A Green Chemistry Approach for Safer Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Punnoose, Alex; Dodge, Kelsey; Rasmussen, John W; Chess, Jordan; Wingett, Denise; Anders, Catherine

    2014-07-07

    ZnO nanoparticles (NP) are extensively used in numerous nanotechnology applications; however, they also happen to be one of the most toxic nanomaterials. This raises significant environmental and health concerns and calls for the need to develop new synthetic approaches to produce safer ZnO NP, while preserving their attractive optical, electronic, and structural properties. In this work, we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of ZnO NP can be tailored by modifying their surface-bound chemical groups, while maintaining the core ZnO structure and related properties. Two equally sized (9.26 ± 0.11 nm) ZnO NP samples were synthesized from the same zinc acetate precursor using a forced hydrolysis process, and their surface chemical structures were modified by using different reaction solvents. X-ray diffraction and optical studies showed that the lattice parameters, optical properties, and band gap (3.44 eV) of the two ZnO NP samples were similar. However, FTIR spectroscopy showed significant differences in the surface structures and surface-bound chemical groups. This led to major differences in the zeta potential, hydrodynamic size, photocatalytic rate constant, and more importantly, their cytotoxic effects on Hut-78 cancer cells. The ZnO NP sample with the higher zeta potential and catalytic activity displayed a 1.5-fold stronger cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. These results suggest that by modifying the synthesis parameters/conditions and the surface chemical structures of the nanocrystals, their surface charge density, catalytic activity, and cytotoxicity can be tailored. This provides a green chemistry approach to produce safer ZnO NP.

  2. Cytotoxicity of ZnO Nanoparticles Can Be Tailored by Modifying Their Surface Structure: A Green Chemistry Approach for Safer Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NP) are extensively used in numerous nanotechnology applications; however, they also happen to be one of the most toxic nanomaterials. This raises significant environmental and health concerns and calls for the need to develop new synthetic approaches to produce safer ZnO NP, while preserving their attractive optical, electronic, and structural properties. In this work, we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of ZnO NP can be tailored by modifying their surface-bound chemical groups, while maintaining the core ZnO structure and related properties. Two equally sized (9.26 ± 0.11 nm) ZnO NP samples were synthesized from the same zinc acetate precursor using a forced hydrolysis process, and their surface chemical structures were modified by using different reaction solvents. X-ray diffraction and optical studies showed that the lattice parameters, optical properties, and band gap (3.44 eV) of the two ZnO NP samples were similar. However, FTIR spectroscopy showed significant differences in the surface structures and surface-bound chemical groups. This led to major differences in the zeta potential, hydrodynamic size, photocatalytic rate constant, and more importantly, their cytotoxic effects on Hut-78 cancer cells. The ZnO NP sample with the higher zeta potential and catalytic activity displayed a 1.5-fold stronger cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. These results suggest that by modifying the synthesis parameters/conditions and the surface chemical structures of the nanocrystals, their surface charge density, catalytic activity, and cytotoxicity can be tailored. This provides a green chemistry approach to produce safer ZnO NP. PMID:25068096

  3. Calcium ions rescue human lung epithelial cells from the toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hanagata, Nobutaka; Morita, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Contradictory results have been reported for in vitro evaluations of whether zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are cytotoxic. Though there have been reports of ZnO NPs cytotoxicity due to Zn ions released from the nanoparticles, there have also been reports concluding that Zn ions are not cytotoxic. This inconsistency is mostly attributed to the types of cells used. In this research, we investigated the difference in the level of ZnO NPs cytotoxicity due to culturing conditions. The sensitivity of human lung epithelial cells to ZnO NPs cytotoxicity differed depending on the dispersing medium, physiological state of the cells resulting from their growth stage, and composition of the medium. Further, with regard to the toxicity of ZnO NPs, NPs internalized into cells had a greater cytotoxic effect than Zn ions released from ZnO NPs. Instead of inducing cell death, ZnO NPs internalized into cells slowed the rate of cell proliferation. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs depended greatly on the concentration of calcium ions (Ca2+) in the medium. When the concentration of Ca2+ was low, the cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs increased markedly. However, the toxicity of ZnO NPs was mitigated by the addition of CaCl2 to the medium. Global gene expression analysis revealed that Ca2+ -induced upregulation of cell cycle functions could be attributable to the mitigation of ZnO NP toxicity by Ca2+.

  4. Studies on Bacterial Proteins Corona Interaction with Saponin Imprinted ZnO Nanohoneycombs and Their Toxic Responses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepali; Ashaduzzaman, Md; Golabi, Mohsen; Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Bisetty, Krishna; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-11-04

    Molecular imprinting generates robust, efficient, and highly mesoporous surfaces for biointeractions. Mechanistic interfacial interaction between the surface of core substrate and protein corona is crucial to understand the substantial microbial toxic responses at a nanoscale. In this study, we have focused on the mechanistic interactions between synthesized saponin imprinted zinc oxide nanohoneycombs (SIZnO NHs), average size 80-125 nm, surface area 20.27 m(2)/g, average pore density 0.23 pore/nm and number-average pore size 3.74 nm and proteins corona of bacteria. The produced SIZnO NHs as potential antifungal and antibacterial agents have been studied on Sclerotium rolfsii (S. rolfsii), Pythium debarynum (P. debarynum) and Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), respectively. SIZnO NHs exhibited the highest antibacterial (∼50%) and antifungal (∼40%) activity against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) and fungus (P. debarynum), respectively at concentration of 0.1 mol. Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) observation showed that the ZnO NHs ruptured the cell wall of bacteria and internalized into the cell. The molecular docking studies were carried out using binding proteins present in the gram negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharide and lipocalin Blc) and gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcal Protein A, SpA). It was envisaged that the proteins present in the bacterial cell wall were found to interact and adsorb on the surface of SIZnO NHs thereby blocking the active sites of the proteins used for cell wall synthesis. The binding affinity and interaction energies were higher in the case of binding proteins present in gram negative bacteria as compared to that of gram positive bacteria. In addition, a kinetic mathematical model (KMM) was developed in MATLAB to predict the internalization in the bacterial cellular uptake of the ZnO NHs for better understanding of their controlled toxicity. The results obtained from KMM exhibited a good

  5. Effect of soil organic matter content and pH on the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Folsomia candida.

    PubMed

    Waalewijn-Kool, Pauline L; Rupp, Svenja; Lofts, Stephen; Svendsen, Claus; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2014-10-01

    Organic matter (OM) and pH may influence nanoparticle fate and effects in soil. This study investigated the influence of soil organic matter content and pH on the toxicity of ZnO-NP and ZnCl2 to Folsomia candida in four natural soils, having between 2.37% and 14.7% OM and [Formula: see text] levels between 5.0 and 6.8. Porewater Zn concentrations were much lower in ZnO-NP than in ZnCl2 spiked soils, resulting in higher Freundlich sorption constants for ZnO-NP. For ZnCl2 the porewater Zn concentrations were significantly higher in less organic soils, while for ZnO-NP the highest soluble Zn level (23mgZn/l) was measured in the most organic soil, which had the lowest pH. Free Zn(2+) ion concentrations were higher for ZnCl2 than for ZnO-NP and were greatly dependent on pH (pHpw) and dissolved organic carbon content of the pore water. The 28-d EC50 values for the effect of ZnCl2 on the reproduction of F. candida increased with increasing OM content from 356 to 1592mgZn/kg d.w. For ZnO-NP no correlation between EC50 values and OM content was found and EC50 values ranged from 1695 in the most organic soil to 4446mgZn/kg d.w. in the higher pH soil. When based on porewater and free Zn(2+) concentrations, EC50 values were higher for ZnCl2 than for ZnO-NP, and consistently decreased with increasing pHpw. This study shows that ZnO-NP toxicity is dependent on soil properties, but is mainly driven by soil pH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The potentiation effect makes the difference: non-toxic concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles enhance Cu nanoparticle toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingxiangyu; Fernández-Cruz, María Luisa; Connolly, Mona; Conde, Estefanía; Fernández, Marta; Schuster, Michael; Navas, José María

    2015-02-01

    Here we examined whether the addition of a non-toxic concentration (6.25 μg/mL) of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs: 19, 35 and 57 nm, respectively) modulates the cytotoxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs, 63 nm in size) in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. The cytotoxic effect of CuNPs on HepG2 cells was markedly enhanced by the ZnONPs, the largest ZnONPs causing the highest increase in toxicity. However, CuNPs cytotoxicity was not affected by co-incubation with medium containing only zinc ions, indicating the increase in toxicity might be attributed to the particle form of ZnONPs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of CuNPs and ZnONPs inside the cells co-exposed to both types of NP and outflow of cytoplasm through the damaged cell membrane. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) determined an increase in the concentration of zinc and a decrease in that of copper in co-exposed cells. On the basis of these results, we propose that accumulation of large numbers of ZnONPs in the cells alters cellular membranes and the cytotoxicity of CuNPs is increased. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ZnO, TiO(2), SiO(2,) and Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles-induced toxic effects on human fetal lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao Qiang; Yin, Li Hong; Tang, Meng; Pu, Yue Pu

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to investigate and compare the toxic effects of four types of metal oxide (ZnO, TiO(2), SiO(2,) and Al(2)O(3)) nanoparticles with similar primary size (∼20 nm) on human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL1) in vitro. The HFL1 cells were exposed to the nanoparticles, and toxic effects were analyzed by using MTT assay, cellular morphology observation and Hoechst 33 258 staining. The results show that the four types of metal oxide nanoparticles lead to cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, morphological modifications and apoptosis at the concentration range of 0.25-1.50 mg/mL and the toxic effects are obviously displayed in dose-dependent manner. ZnO is the most toxic nanomaterials followed by TiO(2), SiO(2), and Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles in a descending order. The results highlight the differential cytotoxicity associated with exposure to ZnO, TiO(2), SiO(2), and Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles, and suggest an extreme attention to safety utilization of these nanomaterials. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. TiO2 nanoparticles alleviate toxicity by reducing free Zn2+ ion in human primary epidermal keratinocytes exposed to ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathawala, Mustafa Hussain; Ng, Kee Woei; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles have been a subject of intense safety screenings due to their influx in various applications. Although recent studies have reported on the plausible cytotoxicity of nanoparticles, many of these focused only on single-material nanoparticles, while the cytotoxicity of dual-nanoparticle systems (e.g., ZnO with TiO2) has remained unexplored. For example, commercial products like sunscreens and cosmetics contain both nano-sized ZnO and TiO2, but cytotoxicity studies of such systems are meager. In this paper, the cytotoxicity of this dual-nanoparticle system comprising both ZnO and TiO2 was evaluated in vitro on skin-mimicking human primary epidermal keratinocytes (HPEKs). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy were used to investigate the uptake of nanoparticles and free ions. Results revealed that ZnO nanoparticles were partially soluble (up to 20 μg ml-1 after 1 day) and could induce strong cytotoxicity as compared to the insoluble TiO2 nanoparticles which remained non-toxic until very high concentrations. It was found that TiO2 nanoparticles could play "vigilante" by protecting keratinocytes from acute toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles. This is in agreement with the observation that TiO2 nanoparticles caused an attenuation of free intracellular Zn2+ ions concentration, by adsorbing and immobilizing free Zn2+ ions. This study reveals a unique dual-nanoparticle observation in vitro on HPEKs, and highlights the importance of dual-nanoparticulate toxicity studies, especially in applications where more than one nanoparticle material-type is present.

  9. Gene transcription patterns and energy reserves in Daphnia magna show no nanoparticle specific toxicity when exposed to ZnO and CuO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nathalie; Vergauwen, Lucia; Blust, Ronny; Knapen, Dries

    2015-04-01

    There is still a lot of contradiction on whether metal ions are solely responsible for the observed toxicity of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles to aquatic species. While most experiments have studied nanoparticle effects at organismal levels (e.g. mortality, reproduction), effects at lower levels of biological organization may clarify the role of metal ions, nanoparticles and nanoparticle aggregates. In this study, the effect of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles was tested at two lower levels: energy reserves and gene transcription and compared with zinc and copper salts. Daphnia magna was exposed during 96h to 10% immobilization concentrations of all chemicals, after which daphnids were sampled for determination of glycogen, lipid and protein concentration and for a differential gene transcription analysis using microarray. The dissolved, nanoparticle and aggregated fraction in the medium was characterized. The results showed that ZnO nanoparticles had largely dissolved directly after addition to the test medium. The CuO nanoparticles mostly formed aggregates, while only a small fraction dissolved. The exposure to zinc (both nano and metal salt) had no effect on the available energy reserves. However, in the copper exposure, the glycogen, lipid and protein concentration in the exposed daphnids was lower than in the unexposed ones. When comparing the nanoparticle (ZnO or CuO) exposed daphnids to the metal salt (zinc or copper salt) exposed daphnids, the microarray results showed no significantly differentially transcribed gene fragments. The results indicate that under the current exposure conditions the toxicity of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles to D. magna is solely caused by toxic metal ions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative Toxicity of Nanoparticulate CuO and ZnO to Soil Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rousk, Johannes; Ackermann, Kathrin; Curling, Simon F.; Jones, Davey L.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing industrial application of metal oxide Engineered Nano-Particles (ENPs) is likely to increase their environmental release to soils. While the potential of metal oxide ENPs as environmental toxicants has been shown, lack of suitable control treatments have compromised the power of many previous assessments. We evaluated the ecotoxicity of ENP (nano) forms of Zn and Cu oxides in two different soils by measuring their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. We could show a direct acute toxicity of nano-CuO acting on soil bacteria while the macroparticulate (bulk) form of CuO was not toxic. In comparison, CuSO4 was more toxic than either oxide form. Unlike Cu, all forms of Zn were toxic to soil bacteria, and the bulk-ZnO was more toxic than the nano-ZnO. The ZnSO4 addition was not consistently more toxic than the oxide forms. Consistently, we found a tight link between the dissolved concentration of metal in solution and the inhibition of bacterial growth. The inconsistent toxicological response between soils could be explained by different resulting concentrations of metals in soil solution. Our findings suggested that the principal mechanism of toxicity was dissolution of metal oxides and sulphates into a metal ion form known to be highly toxic to bacteria, and not a direct effect of nano-sized particles acting on bacteria. We propose that integrated efforts toward directly assessing bioavailable metal concentrations are more valuable than spending resources to reassess ecotoxicology of ENPs separately from general metal toxicity. PMID:22479561

  11. Decreased Dissolution of ZnO by Iron Doping Yields Nanoparticles with Reduced Toxicity in the Rodent Lung and Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Zhao, Yan; Sager, Tina; George, Saji; Pokhrel, Suman; Li, Ning; Schoenfeld, David; Meng, Huan; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Meiying; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Mädler, Lutz; Castranova, Vincent; Lin, Shuo; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that the dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn2+ shedding leads to a series of sub-lethal and lethal toxicological responses at cellular level that can be alleviated by iron-doping. Iron-doping changes the particle matrix and slows the rate of particle dissolution. To determine whether iron doping of ZnO also leads to lesser toxic effects in vivo, toxicity studies were performed in rodent and zebrafish models. First, we synthesized a fresh batch of ZnO nanoparticles doped with 1–10 wt % of Fe. These particles were extensively characterized to confirm their doping status, reduced rate of dissolution in an exposure medium and reduced toxicity in a cellular screen. Subsequent studies compared the effects of undoped to doped particles in the rat lung, mouse lung and the zebrafish embryo. The zebrafish studies looked at embryo hatching and mortality rates as well as the generation of morphological defects, while the endpoints in the rodent lung included an assessment of inflammatory cell infiltrates, LDH release and cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Iron doping, similar to the effect of the metal chelator, DTPA, interfered in the inhibitory effects of Zn2+ on zebrafish hatching. In the oropharyngeal aspiration model in the mouse, iron doping was associated with decreased polymorphonuclear cell counts and IL-6 mRNA production. Doped particles also elicited decreased heme oxygenase 1 expression in the murine lung. In the intratracheal instillation studies in the rat, Fe-doping was associated with decreased polymorphonuclear cell counts, LDH and albumin levels. All considered, the above data show that Fe-doping is a possible safe design strategy for preventing ZnO toxicity in animals and the environment. PMID:21250651

  12. Integrating ecotoxicity and chemical approaches to compare the effects of ZnO nanoparticles, ZnO bulk, and ZnCl2 on plants and microorganisms in a natural soil.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, C; Babin, M; Obrador, A; Álvarez, J M; Fernández, M D

    2015-11-01

    This work compared the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs), ZnO bulk, and ZnCl2 on microbial activity (C and N transformations and dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities) and their uptake and toxic effects (emergence, root elongation, and shoot growth) on three plant species namely wheat, radish, and vetch in a natural soil at 1000 mg Zn kg(-1). Additionally, plants were also tested at 250 mg Zn kg(-1). The effects of the chemical species on Zn extractability in soil were studied by performing single and sequential extractions. ZnCl2-1000 presented the highest toxicity for both taxonomic groups. For microorganisms, ZnO-NPs demonstrated adverse effects on all measured parameters, except on N transformations. The effects of both ZnO forms were similar. For plants, ZnO-NPs affected the growth of more plant species than ZnO bulk, although the effects were small in all cases. Regarding accumulation, the total Zn amounts were higher in plants exposed to ZnO-NP than those exposed to ZnO bulk, except for vetch shoots. The soil sequential extraction revealed that the Zn concentration in the most labile forms (water soluble (WS) and exchangeable (EX)) was similar in soil treated with ZnO (NP and bulk) and lower than that of ZnCl2-treated soil, indicating the higher availability of the ionic forms. The strong correlations obtained between WS-Zn fraction and the Zn concentrations in the roots, shoots, and the effects on shoot weight show the suitability of this soil extraction method for predicting bioavailable Zn soil for the three plant species when it was added as ZnO-NPs, ZnO bulk, or ZnCl2. In this work, the hazard associated with the ZnO-NPs was similar to ZnO bulk in most cases.

  13. Complete transformation of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles in culture medium and lymphocyte cells during toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Ivask, Angela; Scheckel, Kirk G; Kapruwan, Pankaj; Stone, Vicki; Yin, Hong; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Lombi, Enzo

    2017-03-01

    Here, we present evidence on complete transformation of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles, which are among the most heavily studied metal oxide particles, during 24 h in vitro toxicological testing with human T-lymphocytes. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy results revealed that Zn speciation profiles of 30 nm and 80 nm ZnO nanoparticles, and ZnSO 4 - exposed cells were almost identical with the prevailing species being Zn-cysteine. This suggests that ZnO nanoparticles are rapidly transformed during a standard in vitro toxicological assay, and are sequestered intracellularly, analogously to soluble Zn. Complete transformation of ZnO in the test conditions was further supported by almost identical Zn spectra in medium to which ZnO nanoparticles or ZnSO 4 was added. Likewise, Cu XANES spectra for CuO and CuSO 4 -exposed cells and cell culture media were similar. These results together with our observation on similar toxicological profiles of ZnO and soluble Zn, and CuO and soluble Cu, underline the importance of dissolution and subsequent transformation of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles during toxicological testing and provide evidence that the nano-specific effect of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles is negligible in this system. We strongly suggest to account for this aspect when interpreting the toxicological results of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles.

  14. Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy Shows RGD-Targeted ZnO Nanoparticles Dissolve in the Intracellular Environment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells and Cause Apoptosis with Intratumor Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Othman, Basmah A; Greenwood, Christina; Abuelela, Ayman F; Bharath, Anil A; Chen, Shu; Theodorou, Ioannis; Douglas, Trevor; Uchida, Maskai; Ryan, Mary; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-06-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are reported to show a high degree of cancer cell selectivity with potential use in cancer imaging and therapy. Questions remain about the mode by which the ZnO NPs cause cell death, whether they exert an intra- or extracellular effect, and the resistance among different cancer cell types to ZnO NP exposure. The present study quantifies the variability between the cellular toxicity, dynamics of cellular uptake, and dissolution of bare and RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp)-targeted ZnO NPs by MDA-MB-231 cells. Compared to bare ZnO NPs, RGD-targeting of the ZnO NPs to integrin αvβ3 receptors expressed on MDA-MB-231 cells appears to increase the toxicity of the ZnO NPs to breast cancer cells at lower doses. Confocal microscopy of live MDA-MB-231 cells confirms uptake of both classes of ZnO NPs with a commensurate rise in intracellular Zn(2+) concentration prior to cell death. The response of the cells within the population to intracellular Zn(2+) is highly heterogeneous. In addition, the results emphasize the utility of dynamic and quantitative imaging in understanding cell uptake and processing of targeted therapeutic ZnO NPs at the cellular level by heterogeneous cancer cell populations, which can be crucial for the development of optimized treatment strategies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Toxicity of herbal extracts used in ethno-veterinary medicine and green-encapsulated ZnO nanoparticles against Aedes aegypti and microbial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Banumathi, Balan; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Ishwarya, Ramachandran; Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Alharbi, Naiyf S; Kadaikunnan, Shine; Khaled, Jamal M; Benelli, Giovanni

    2017-06-01

    Dengue and chikungunya are arboviral diseases mainly vectored by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Presently, there is no treatment for these viral diseases and their prevention is still based on vector control measures. Nanopesticides fabricated using herbal extracts as reducing and capping agents currently represent an excellent platform for pest control. In this scenario, the present study assessed the acute toxicity of seven plants employed in ethno-veterinary medicine of southern India, as well as the green synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles, on third-instar larvae of A. aegypti. Larvae were exposed to extracts of the seven plants obtained with solvents of different polarity (acetone, ethanol, petroleum ether, and water) for 24 h. Maximum efficacy was observed for Lobelia leschenaultiana leaf extracts prepared using all the four solvent extracts (LC 50  = 22.83, 28.12, 32.61, and 36.85 mg/L, respectively). Therefore, this plant species was used for the synthesis and stabilization of ZnO nanoparticles based on its maximum efficacy against third-instar larvae of A. aegypti. L. leschenaultiana-encapsulated ZnO nanoparticles showed 100% mortality when tested at 10 mg/L, the LC 50 was extremely low,  1.57 mg/L. Zinc acetate achieved only 65.33% when tested at 60 mg/L, with a LC 50 of 51.62 mg/L. Additionally, ZnO nanoparticles inhibited growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Shigella sonnei, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus and also inhibited biofilm formation on selected microbila pathogens, showing impact on EPS production and hydrophobicity. Overall, our results suggest that L. leschenaultiana-fabricated ZnO nanoparticles have a significant potential to control A. aegypti mosquitoes and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  16. Responses and recovery assessment of continuously cultured Nitrosomonas europaea under chronic ZnO nanoparticle stress: Effects of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junkang; Chang, Yan; Gao, Huan; Liang, Geyu; Yu, Ran; Ding, Zhen

    2018-03-01

    Although the antibacterial performances of emerging nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively explored in the nitrifying systems, the impacts of dissolved oxygen (DO) levels on their bio-toxicities to the nitrifiers and the impaired cells' recovery potentials have seldom been addressed yet. In this study, the physiological and transcriptional responses of the typical ammonia oxidizers - Nitrosomonas europaea in a chemostat to the chronic ZnO NP exposure under different DO conditions were investigated. The results indicated that the cells in steady-growth state in the chemostat were more persevering than batch cultured ones to resist ZnO NP stress despite the dose-dependent NP inhibitory effects were observed. In addition, the occurred striking over-expressions of amoA and hao genes at the initial NP exposure stage suggested the cells' self-regulation potentials at the transcriptional level. The low DO (0.5 mg/L) cultured cells displayed higher sensitivity to NP stress than the high DO (2.0 mg/L) cultured ones, probably owning to the inefficient oxygen-dependent electron transfer from ammonia oxidation for energy conversion/production. The following 12-h NP-free batch recovery assays revealed that both high and low DO cultured cells possessed the physiological and metabolic activity recovery potentials, which were in negative correlation with the NP exposure time. The duration of NP stress and the resulting NP dissolution were critical for the cells' damage levels and their performance recoverability. The membrane preservation processes and the associated metabolism regulations were expected to actively participate in the cells' self-adaption to NP stress and thus be responsible for their metabolic activities recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preferential cytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticle towards cervical cancer cells induced by ROS-mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirelkhatim, Amna; Mahmud, Shahrom; Seeni, Azman; Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to synthesize multifunctional ZnO-NP samples, namely ZnO-20, ZnO-40, and ZnO-80 nm, using different approaches, to be used as efficient anticancer agents. Systematic characterizations revealed their particle sizes and demonstrated nanostructures of nanorods (ZnO-80 nm) and nanogranules (ZnO-20 and ZnO-40 nm). They exhibited significant ( p < 0.05) toxicity to HeLa cancer cells. HeLa cell viabilities at 1 mM dose reduced to 37, 32, 15 %, by ZnO-80, ZnO-40, and ZnO-20 nm, respectively, at 48 h. However, the same dose exerted different effects of 79.6, 76, and 75 % on L929 normal cells at 48 h. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) showed a considerable ROS yields on HeLa cells by all samples with a pronounced percentage (50 %) displayed by ZnO-20 nm. Moreover, ROS-mediated apoptosis induction and blocked cell cycle progression in the S, G2/M, and G0/G1 phases significantly ( p < 0.05). Apoptosis induction was further confirmed by DNA fragmentation and Hoechst-PI costained images viewed under fluorescence microscope. Additionally, morphological changes of HeLa cells visualized under light microscope showed assortment of cell death involved shrinkage, vacuolization and apoptotic bodies' formation. Most importantly, results exposed the impact of size and morphology of ZnO samples on their toxicity to Hela cells mediated mainly by ROS production. ZnO-20 nm in disk form with its nanogranule shape and smallest particle size was the most toxic sample, followed by ZnO-40 nm and then ZnO-80 nm. An additional proposed mechanism contributed in the cell death herein was ZnO decomposition producing zinc ions (Zn2+) into the acidic cancer microenvironment due to the smaller sizes of ZnO-NPs. This mechanism has been adopted in the literatures as a size-dependent phenomenon. The emerged findings were suggested to provide new platforms in the development of therapeutics as selective agents to the fatal cervical cancer, and to benefit from the

  18. Improving the selective cancer killing ability of ZnO nanoparticles using Fe doping.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Aaron; Wingett, Denise G; Rasmussen, John W; Layne, Janet; Johnson, Lydia; Tenne, Dmitri A; Zhang, Jianhui; Hanna, Charles B; Punnoose, Alex

    2012-06-01

    This work reports a new method to improve our recent demonstration of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) selectively killing certain human cancer cells, achieved by incorporating Fe ions into the NPs. Thoroughly characterized cationic ZnO NPs (∼6 nm) doped with Fe ions (Zn(1-x )Fe (x) O, x = 0-0.15) were used in this work, applied at a concentration of 24 μg/ml. Cytotoxicity studies using flow cytometry on Jurkat leukemic cancer cells show cell viability drops from about 43% for undoped ZnO NPs to 15% for ZnO NPs doped with 7.5% Fe. However, the trend reverses and cell viability increases with higher Fe concentrations. The non-immortalized human T cells are markedly more resistant to Fe-doped ZnO NPs than cancerous T cells, confirming that Fe-doped samples still maintain selective toxicity to cancer cells. Pure iron oxide samples displayed no appreciable toxicity. Reactive oxygen species generated with NP introduction to cells increased with increasing Fe up to 7.5% and decreased for >7.5% doping.

  19. Complete transformation of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles in culture medium and lymphocyte cells during toxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here, we present evidence on complete transformation of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles, which are among the most heavily studied metal oxide particles, during 24 h in vitro toxicological testing with human T-lymphocytes. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray absorption near edge st...

  20. Development and validation of TOF-SIMS and CLSM imaging method for cytotoxicity study of ZnO nanoparticles in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Ling; Chen, Bo-Chia; Gollavelli, Ganesh; Shen, Sin-Yu; Yin, Yu-Sheng; Lei, Shiu-Ling; Jhang, Cian-Ling; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2014-07-30

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) exhibit novel physiochemical properties and have found increasing use in sunscreen products and cosmetics. The potential toxicity is of increasing concern due to their close association with human skin. A time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging method was developed and validated for rapid and sensitive cytotoxicity study of ZnO NPs using human skin equivalent HaCaT cells as a model system. Assorted material, chemical, and toxicological analysis methods were used to confirm their shape, size, crystalline structure, and aggregation properties as well as dissolution behavior and effect on HaCaT cell viability in the presence of various concentrations of ZnO NPs in aqueous media. Comparative and correlative analyses of aforementioned results with TOF-SIMS and CLSM imaging results exhibit reasonable and acceptable outcome. A marked drop in survival rate was observed with 50μg/ml ZnO NPs. The CLSM images reveal the absorption and localization of ZnO NPs in cytoplasm and nuclei. The TOF-SIMS images demonstrate elevated levels of intracellular ZnO concentration and associated Zn concentration-dependent (40)Ca/(39)K ratio, presumably caused by the dissolution behavior of ZnO NPs. Additional validation by using stable isotope-labeled (68)ZnO NPs as tracers under the same experimental conditions yields similar cytotoxicity effect. The imaging results demonstrate spatially-resolved cytotoxicity relationship between intracellular ZnO NPs, (40)Ca/(39)K ratio, phosphocholine fragments, and glutathione fragments. The trend of change in TOF-SIMS spectra and images of ZnO NPs treated HaCaT cells demonstrate the possible mode of actions by ZnO NP involves cell membrane disruption, cytotoxic response, and ROS mediated apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxicity assessment of inorganic nanoparticles to acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity in anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2013-09-15

    Release of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to municipal wastewater from industrial and residential sources could impact biological systems in wastewater treatment plants. Methanogenic inhibition can cause failure of anaerobic waste(water) treatment. This study investigated the inhibitory effect of a wide array of inorganic NPs (Ag(0), Al₂O₃, CeO₂, Cu(0), CuO, Fe(0), Fe₂O₃, Mn₂O₃, SiO₂, TiO₂, and ZnO supplied up to 1500 mgL(-1)) to acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge. Of all the NPs tested, only Cu(0) and ZnO caused severe methanogenic inhibition. The 50% inhibiting concentrations determined towards acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were 62 and 68 mgL(-1) for Cu(0) NP; and 87 and 250 mgL(-1) for ZnO NP, respectively. CuO NPs also caused inhibition of acetoclastic methanogens. Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) salts caused similar levels of inhibition as Cu(0) and ZnO NPs based on equilibrium soluble metal concentrations measured during the assays, suggesting that the toxicity was due to the release of metal ions by NP-corrosion. A commercial dispersant, Dispex, intended to increase NP stability did not affect the inhibitory impact of the NPs. The results taken as a whole suggest that Zn- and Cu-containing NPs can release metal ions that are inhibitory for methanogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. AAV2 production with optimized N/P ratio and PEI-mediated transfection results in low toxicity and high titer for in vitro and in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinping; Hartley, Antja-Voy; Yin, Yishi; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Lah, James J; Ressler, Kerry J

    2013-11-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) is one of the most useful viral vectors for gene delivery for both in vivo and in vitro applications. A variety of methods have been established to produce and characterize recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors; however most methods are quite cumbersome and obtaining consistently high titer can be problematic. This protocol describes a triple-plasmid co-transfection approach with 25 kDa linear polyethylenimine (PEI) in 293 T cells for the production of AAV serotype 2. Seventy-two hours post-transfection, supernatant and cells were harvested and purified by a discontinuous iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation, then dialyzed and concentrated with an Amicon 15 100,000 MWCO concentration unit. To optimize the protocol for AAV2 production using PEI, various N/P ratios and DNA amounts were compared. We found that an N/P ratio of 40 coupled with 1.05 μg DNA per ml of media (21 μg DNA/15 cm dish) was found to produce the highest yields for viral replication and assembly measured multiple ways. The infectious units, as determined by serial dilution, were between 1×10(8) and 2×10(9) IU/ml. The genomic titer of the viral stock was determined by qPCR and ranged from 2×10(12) to 6×10(13) VG/ml. These viral vectors showed high expression both in vivo within the brain and in vitro in cell culture. The use of linear 25 kDa polyethylenamine PEI as a transfection reagent is a simple, more cost-effective, and stable means of high-throughput production of high-titer AAV serotype 2. The use of PEI also eliminates the need to change cell medium post-transfection, lowering cost and workload, while producing high-titer, efficacious AAV2 vectors for routine gene transfer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of EDC/NHS coupling chemistry on stability and cytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles modified with proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keleştemur, Seda; Altunbek, Mine; Culha, Mustafa

    2017-05-01

    The toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) is a growing concern due to its increasing use in several products including sunscreens, paints, pigments and ceramics for its antibacterial, antifungal, anti-corrosive and UV filtering properties. The toxicity of ZnO NPs is mostly attributed to the Zn2+ release causing an increase in the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. The surface modification with a biocompatible ligand or a polymer can be a good strategy to reduce dissolution based toxicity. In two previous studies, the conflicting results with EDC/NHS coupling chemistry for ZnO NPs were reported. In this study, the same surface modification strategy with an emphasis on the stability of ZnO NPs is clarified. First, the density of -OH groups on the ZnO NPs is increased with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment, and then a silica coating on the ZnO NPs (Si-ZnO) surface is performed. Finally, a covalent attachment of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on three different concentrations of ZnO-Si is carried out by EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. ZnO NPs have a very high dissolution rate under acidic conditions of EDC/NHS coupling chemistry as determined from the ICP-MS analysis. In addition, the amount of ZnO NPs in coupling reaction has an important effect on the dissolution rate of Zn2+ and dependently BSA attached on the ZnO NP surfaces. Finally, the cytotoxicity of the BSA modified Si-ZnO NPs on human lung cancer (A549) and human skin fibroblast (HSF) is evaluated. Although an increased association of BSA modified ZnO NPs with cells was observed, the modification significantly decreased their cytotoxicity. This can be explained with the decreased active surface area of ZnO NPs with the surface modification. However, an increase in the mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production was observed depending on the amount of BSA coverage.

  4. Developmental Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles to Zebrafish (Danio rerio): A Transcriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Soo; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Yoon, Seokjoo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are being utilized in an increasing number of fields and commercial applications. While their general toxicity and associated oxidative stress have been extensively studied, the toxicological pathways that they induce in developmental stages are still largely unknown. In this study, the developmental toxicity of ZnO NPs to embryonic/larval zebrafish was investigated. The transcriptional expression profiles induced by ZnO NPs were also investigated to ascertain novel genomic responses related to their specific toxicity pathway. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/L ZnO NPs for 96 h post-fertilization. The toxicity of ZnO NPs, based on their Zn concentration, was quite similar to that in embryonic/larval zebrafish exposed to corresponding ZnSO4 concentrations. Pericardial edema and yolk-sac edema were the principal malformations induced by ZnO NPs. Gene-expression profiling using microarrays demonstrated 689 genes that were differentially regulated (fold change >1.5) following exposure to ZnO NPs (498 upregulated, 191 downregulated). Several genes that were differentially regulated following ZnO NP exposure shared similar biological pathways with those observed with ZnSO4 exposure, but six genes (aicda, cyb5d1, edar, intl2, ogfrl2 and tnfsf13b) associated with inflammation and the immune system responded specifically to ZnO NPs (either in the opposite direction or were unchanged in ZnSO4 exposure). Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed that the responses of these genes to ZnO NPs were significantly different from their response to ZnSO4 exposure. ZnO NPs may affect genes related to inflammation and the immune system, resulting in yolk-sac edema and pericardia edema in embryonic/larval developmental stages. These results will assist in elucidating the mechanisms of toxicity of ZnO NPs during development of zebrafish. PMID:27504894

  5. Protein functionalization of ZnO nanostructure exhibits selective and enhanced toxicity to breast cancer cells through oxidative stress-based cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, Sailendra; Prathap, S; Ban, Deependra Kumar; Paul, Subhankar

    2017-08-01

    Zinc oxide nanostructure (ZnONS) was chemically synthesized and functionalized (FZnONS BLA ) with a small protein bovine α-lactalbumin (BLA) by chemical cross-linking methods. Both nano-structures were characterized using various techniques such as electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR, photo-luminescence and X-ray diffraction. Electron microscopy and DLS analysis revealed their (ZnONS and FZnONS BLA ) average size of 200nm and 450nm, respectively. When cytotoxicity of both the nanostructures were assessed in breast cancer cells MCF-7 and MDAMB231 by MTT assay and PI/Annexin V staining (FACS), FZnONS BLA demonstrated higher cell death than ZnONS primarily due to generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our experimental results also suggested that such enhanced toxicity was due to the lethal structural variant of BLA in FZnONS BLA as well as higher cellular uptake than ZnONS by cancer cells. The death kinetics study with time in cancer cells further proved that FZnONS BLA caused toxicity much faster than ZnONS, thus suggested a strong role of lethal variant of BLA in FZnONS BLA as a cytotoxic agent in cancer cells. Furthermore, FZnONS BLA demonstrated excellent cytocompatibility (normal cells) and hemocompatibility compared to ZnONS. Hence, considering the biodegradable nature of ZnO nonmaterial, our results demonstrated that BLA functionalized ZnONS could be used to develop a suitable therapeutic strategy in cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Short-term effects of TiO2, CeO2, and ZnO nanoparticles on metabolic activities and gene expression of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ran; Fang, Xiaohua; Somasundaran, Ponisseril; Chandran, Kartik

    2015-06-01

    Nanosized TiO2 (n-TiO2), CeO2 (n-CeO2), and ZnO (n-ZnO) and bulk ZnO were chosen for a 4-h exposure study on a model ammonia oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosomonas europaea. n-ZnO displayed the most serious cytotoxicity while n-TiO2 was the least toxic one. The change of cell morphologies, the retardance of specific oxygen uptake rates and ammonia oxidation rates, and the depression of amoA gene expressions under NP stresses were generally observed when the cell densities and membrane integrities were not significantly impaired yet. The TEM imaging and the synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy of the NPs impacted cells revealed the increase of the corresponding intracellular Ti, Ce or Zn contents and suggested the intracellular NP accumulation. The elevation of intracellular S contents accompanied with higher K contents implied the possible activation of thiol-containing glutathione and thioredoxin production for NP stress alleviation. The NP cytotoxicity was not always a function of NP concentration. The 200 mg L(-1) n-TiO2 or n-CeO2 impacted cells displayed the similar ammonia oxidation activities but higher amoA gene expression levels than the 20 mg L(-1) NPs impacted ones. Such phenomenon further indicated the possible establishment of an anti-toxicity mechanism in N. europaea at the genetic level to redeem the weakened AMO activities along with the NP aggregation effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental thermochemistry of neptunium oxides: Np2O5 and NpO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Dzik, Ewa A.; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Burns, Peter C.

    2018-04-01

    Neptunium (Np) compounds are important in the nuclear fuel cycle because of the buildup and long half-life (2.14 Ma) of Np-237 in nuclear waste, especially during long-term disposal in a geological repository. Neptunium in environmental conditions exists mainly in two oxidation states (+5 and + 4) and can substitute for uranium and/or rare earths in solid phases. Yet thermochemical data for solid neptunium compounds are scarce, despite being critical for evaluating the environmental transport of this radioactive and toxic element. Although high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry has proven very useful in obtaining thermodynamic data for the formation of uranium and thorium oxide materials, it has not yet been applied to transuranium compounds. Continuing a program at Notre Dame to study the thermodynamics of transuranium compounds, we report the first determination of the enthalpies of drop solution of well-characterized neptunium oxides (Np2O5 and NpO2) using oxide melt solution calorimetry in molten sodium molybdate solvent at 973 K. The enthalpy of the decomposition reaction, Np2O5(cr) = 2NpO2(cr) + 1/2O2(g) at 298 K, is determined to be 7.70 ± 5.86 kJ/mol, and this direct measurement is consistent with existing thermodynamic data. The calorimetric methodology is straightforward and produces reliable data using milligram quantities of radioactive materials, and can be applied to many other transuranium compounds.

  8. Toxicity assessment of zinc oxide nanoparticles using sub-acute and sub-chronic murine inhalation models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many commercial products and the potential for human exposure is increasing, few in vivo studies have addressed their possible toxic effects after inhalation. We sought to determine whether ZnO NPs induce pulmonary toxicity in mice following sub-acute or sub-chronic inhalation exposure to realistic exposure doses. Methods Mice (C57Bl/6) were exposed to well-characterized ZnO NPs (3.5 mg/m3, 4 hr/day) for 2 (sub-acute) or 13 (sub-chronic) weeks and necropsied immediately (0 wk) or 3 weeks (3 wks) post exposure. Toxicity was assessed by enumeration of total and differential cells, determination of total protein, lactate dehydrogenase activity and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid as well as measurements of pulmonary mechanics. Generation of reactive oxygen species was assessed in the lungs. Lungs were evaluated for histopathologic changes and Zn content. Zn concentration in blood, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, brain and BAL fluid was measured. Results An elevated concentration of Zn2+ was detected in BAL fluid immediately after exposures, but returned to baseline levels 3 wks post exposure. Dissolution studies showed that ZnO NPs readily dissolved in artificial lysosomal fluid (pH 4.5), but formed aggregates and precipitates in artificial interstitial fluid (pH 7.4). Sub-acute exposure to ZnO NPs caused an increase of macrophages in BAL fluid and a moderate increase in IL-12(p40) and MIP-1α, but no other inflammatory or toxic responses were observed. Following both sub-acute and sub-chronic exposures, pulmonary mechanics were no different than sham-exposed animals. Conclusions Our ZnO NP inhalation studies showed minimal pulmonary inflammation, cytotoxicity or lung histopathologic changes. An elevated concentration of Zn in the lung and BAL fluid indicates dissolution of ZnO NPs in the respiratory system after inhalation. Exposure concentration, exposure mode and time post

  9. Toxicity assessment of zinc oxide nanoparticles using sub-acute and sub-chronic murine inhalation models.

    PubMed

    Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Stebounova, Larissa V; Kim, Jong Sung; Vorrink, Sabine U; Ault, Andrew P; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T; Grassian, Vicki H; Thorne, Peter S

    2014-04-01

    Although ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many commercial products and the potential for human exposure is increasing, few in vivo studies have addressed their possible toxic effects after inhalation. We sought to determine whether ZnO NPs induce pulmonary toxicity in mice following sub-acute or sub-chronic inhalation exposure to realistic exposure doses. Mice (C57Bl/6) were exposed to well-characterized ZnO NPs (3.5 mg/m3, 4 hr/day) for 2 (sub-acute) or 13 (sub-chronic) weeks and necropsied immediately (0 wk) or 3 weeks (3 wks) post exposure. Toxicity was assessed by enumeration of total and differential cells, determination of total protein, lactate dehydrogenase activity and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid as well as measurements of pulmonary mechanics. Generation of reactive oxygen species was assessed in the lungs. Lungs were evaluated for histopathologic changes and Zn content. Zn concentration in blood, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, brain and BAL fluid was measured. An elevated concentration of Zn2+ was detected in BAL fluid immediately after exposures, but returned to baseline levels 3 wks post exposure. Dissolution studies showed that ZnO NPs readily dissolved in artificial lysosomal fluid (pH 4.5), but formed aggregates and precipitates in artificial interstitial fluid (pH 7.4). Sub-acute exposure to ZnO NPs caused an increase of macrophages in BAL fluid and a moderate increase in IL-12(p40) and MIP-1α, but no other inflammatory or toxic responses were observed. Following both sub-acute and sub-chronic exposures, pulmonary mechanics were no different than sham-exposed animals. Our ZnO NP inhalation studies showed minimal pulmonary inflammation, cytotoxicity or lung histopathologic changes. An elevated concentration of Zn in the lung and BAL fluid indicates dissolution of ZnO NPs in the respiratory system after inhalation. Exposure concentration, exposure mode and time post exposure played an important role in the toxicity

  10. Comparative effect of ZnO NPs, ZnO bulk and ZnSO4 in the antioxidant defences of two plant species growing in two agricultural soils under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Concepción; Obrador, Ana; González, Demetrio; Babín, Mar; Fernández, María Dolores

    2017-07-01

    The present study has investigated the toxicity of ZnO NPs to bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) crops grown to maturity under greenhouse conditions using an acidic (soil pH5.4) and a calcareous soil (soil pH8.3). The potentially available Zn in the soils and the Zn accumulation in the leaves from NPs applied to the soil (3, 20 and 225mgZnkg -1 ) and changes in the chlorophylls, carotenoids and oxidative stress biomarkers were measured at 15, 30, 60 and 90days and compared with those caused by bulk ZnO and ZnSO 4 . The available Zn in the soil and the leaf Zn content did not differ among the Zn chemical species, except in the acidic soil at the highest concentration of Zn applied as Zn ions, where the highest values of the two variables were found. The ZnO NPs showed comparable Zn toxicity or biostimulation to their bulk counterparts and Zn salts, irrespective of certain significant differences suggesting a higher activity of the Zn ion. The treatments altered the photosynthetic pigment concentration and induced oxidative stress in plants. ROS formation was observed at Zn plant concentrations ranging from 590 to 760mgkg -1 , but the effects on the rest of the parameters were highly dependent on the plant species, exposure time and especially soil type. In general, the effects were higher in the acidic soil than in the calcareous soil for the bean and the opposite for the tomato. The similar uptakes and toxicities of the different Zn forms suggest that the Zn ions derived from the ZnO NPs exerted a preferential toxicity in plants. However, several results obtained in soils treated with NPs at 3mgZnkg -1 soil indicated that may exist other underlying mechanisms related to the intrinsic nanoparticle properties, especially at low NP concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Iron Sulfide Attenuates the Methanogenic Toxicity of Elemental Copper and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and their Soluble Metal Ion Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2016-01-01

    Elemental copper (Cu0) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25–75 µm) and coarse (500 to 1200 µm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu0 and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu0 NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excesses of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. PMID:26803736

  12. The use of multiwell culture plates in the duckweed toxicity test-a case study on Zn nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kalčíková, Gabriela; Marolt, Gregor; Kokalj, Anita Jemec; Gotvajn, Andreja Žgajnar

    2018-06-11

    Extensive production of nanomaterials of various properties needs to be coupled with rapid toxicity testing in order to provide information about their potential risks to the environment and human health. Miniaturization of toxicity tests may accelerate economical testing of nanomaterials, but is not a common practice. We describe a case study to miniaturize a commonly used toxicity test with plant duckweed Lemna minor. 6-well, 12-well and 24-well culture plates were used to assess their potential use for the duckweed toxicity test with potassium chloride as reference material. The results were compared to the standard test design using 100 mL glass beakers. The comparison showed that the best agreement was with the 6-well vessels. This set-up was further used for toxicity testing of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NP) and zinc chlorides. Zinc was not adsorbed onto either glass or plastic walls of the miniaturized system. We assume that in both vessels a fast agglomeration and settling of ZnO NP took place. Linear regression and statistical testing indicated a good correlation between the toxicity results obtained in the standard test and miniaturized 6-well vessels. The miniaturization of the test system for assessing the biological effect of nanomaterials on Lemna minor could become an appropriate alternative to the traditionally used high volume vessels. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Differential gene expression in Daphnia magna suggests distinct modes of action and bioavailability for ZnO nanoparticles and Zn ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are being rapidly developed for use in consumer products, wastewater treatment and chemotherapy, providing several possible routes for ZnO NP exposure to humans and aquatic organisms. Recent studies have shown that ZnO NPs undergo rapid dissolut...

  14. Influence of humic acid on the stability and bacterial toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles in water.

    PubMed

    Akhil, K; Chandran, Preethy; Sudheer Khan, S

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the stability of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) by the adsorption of humic acid (HA) and the mechanism of adsorption. The effect of humic acid on NP toxicity was determined by Escherichia coli (ATCC 13534), E. coli (ATCC 25922), and Pseudomonas putida (MTCC 4910). The nanoparticles showed low zeta potential and were least stable in the absence of HA. However, the negative surface charge of the particles increased in the presence of HA (0-50mg/L) that reduced the propensity of nanoparticles to aggregate in water. A decrease in absorbance of ZnO NPs at 375 nm (plasmon peak) was noted in the presence of HA by UV-visible spectrophotometric analysis. A blue shift towards 370 nm was noted when the concentration of HA was above 20mg/L. The HA adsorbed ZnO NPs showed higher zeta potential (>-30 mV) and were highly stable. HA reduced the photocatalytic activity of ZnO and at the same time increased the photostability of ZnO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanostructured ZnO films on stainless steel are highly safe and effective for antimicrobial applications.

    PubMed

    Shim, Kyudae; Abdellatif, Mohamed; Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongkyun

    2017-04-01

    The safety and effectiveness of antimicrobial ZnO films must be established for general applications. In this study, the antimicrobial activity, skin irritation, elution behavior, and mechanical properties of nanostructured ZnO films on stainless steel were evaluated. ZnO nanoparticle (NP) and ZnO nanowall (NW) structures were prepared with different surface roughnesses, wettability, and concentrations using an RF magnetron sputtering system. The thicknesses of ZnO NP and ZnO NW were approximately 300 and 620 nm, respectively, and ZnO NW had two diffraction directions of [0002] and [01-10] based on high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The ZnO NW structure demonstrated 99.9% antimicrobial inhibition against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Penicillium funiculosum, and no skin irritation was detected using experimental rabbits. Approximately 27.2 ± 3.0 μg L -1 Zn ions were eluted from the ZnO NW film at 100 °C for 24 h, which satisfies the WHO guidelines for drinking water quality. Furthermore, the Vickers hardness and fracture toughness of ZnO NW films on stainless steel were enhanced by 11 and 14% compared to those of the parent stainless steel. Based on these results, ZnO NW films on STS316L sheets are useful for household supplies, such as water pipes, faucets, and stainless steel containers.

  16. ZnO Nanoparticles Protect RNA from Degradation Better than DNA.

    PubMed

    McCall, Jayden; Smith, Joshua J; Marquardt, Kelsey N; Knight, Katelin R; Bane, Hunter; Barber, Alice; DeLong, Robert K

    2017-11-08

    Gene therapy and RNA delivery require a nanoparticle (NP) to stabilize these nucleic acids when administered in vivo. The presence of degradative hydrolytic enzymes within these environments limits the nucleic acids' pharmacologic activity. This study compared the effects of nanoscale ZnO and MgO in the protection afforded to DNA and RNA from degradation by DNase, serum or tumor homogenate. For double-stranded plasmid DNA degradation by DNase, our results suggest that the presence of MgO NP can protect DNA from DNase digestion at an elevated temperature (65 °C), a biochemical activity not present in ZnO NP-containing samples at any temperature. In this case, intact DNA was remarkably present for MgO NP after ethidium bromide staining and agarose gel electrophoresis where these same stained DNA bands were notably absent for ZnO NP. Anticancer RNA, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) is now considered an anti-metastatic RNA targeting agent and as such there is great interest in its delivery by NP. For it to function, the NP must protect it from degradation in serum and the tumor environment. Surprisingly, ZnO NP protected the RNA from degradation in either serum-containing media or melanoma tumor homogenate after gel electrophoretic analysis, whereas the band was much more diminished in the presence of MgO. For both MgO and ZnO NP, buffer-dependent rescue from degradation occurred. These data suggest a fundamental difference in the ability of MgO and ZnO NP to stabilize nucleic acids with implications for DNA and RNA delivery and therapy.

  17. Effect of annealing on the spectral and optical characteristics of nano ZnO: Evaluation of adsorption of toxic metal ions from industrial waste water.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Asha; Rejani, P; Shanavas Khan, J; Beena, B

    2016-11-01

    The present work accentuates an unexploited and environmentally benign method of synthesizing ZnO nanomaterials using Sugar cane juice. The synthesized nanomaterials were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, BET, EDS and FTIR. UV-visible and photoluminescence studies were also carried out to understand the absorption properties of synthesized nanomaterial. From the adsorption studies, it would be clear that synthesized ZnO should be used as an effective adsorbent for Pb(ll) and Cd(ll) removal. The kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium attained at 120min and isotherm follows the order Sips>Langmuir>Freundlich. The adsorption-desorption studies conducted over 6 cycles illustrate the viability and repeated use of the adsorbent for the removal of Pb(ll)and Cd(ll) from aqueous solutions. The practical efficiency and usefulness of the adsorbent was tested using real industrial wastewater also. Cytotoxicity result shows that, ZnO was biocompatible at lower concentrations, and it was used as an ecofriendly nanoadsorbent for industrial and environmental applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Solution processed ZnO hybrid nanocomposite with tailored work function for improved electron transport layer in organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Ju; Wang, Jian; Cheng, Samuel R; Hsu, Julia W P

    2013-09-25

    We demonstrate improved organic photovoltaic device performance using solution processed electron transport layers of ZnO nanoparticle (NP) films containing organic additives, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), or diethanolamine (DEA), that do not require post processing after film deposition. Inclusion of PVP or DEA decreased the ZnO work function by 0.4 eV through interfacial dipole formation. While PVP did not change the ZnO NP shape or size, DEA modified the ZnO shape from 5 nm × 15 nm nanorods to 5 nm nanoparticles. At an optimized PVP concentration of 0.7 wt %, ZnO NP:PVP electron transport layers (ETLs) improved the efficiency of inverted P3HT:PCBM devices by 37%, primarily through higher fill factor. ZnO NP:PVP and ZnO NP:DEA ETLs increased the open circuit voltage of inverted P3HT:ICBA devices by 0.07 V due to decreasing ETL work function, leading to enhanced built-in field. The relationship between ZnO nanocomposite ETL work function, donor-acceptor energy offset, and device performance is discussed. The effects of the two additives are compared.

  19. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2015-01-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in-vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air–liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submerged cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly three-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submerged cultures, and eight-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs. PMID:24289294

  20. Improved conversion efficiency of amorphous Si solar cells using a mesoporous ZnO pattern

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To provide a front transparent electrode for use in highly efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film solar cells, porous flat layer and micro-patterns of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) layers were prepared through ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) and deposited on Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layers. Through this, it was found that a porous micro-pattern of ZnO NPs dispersed in resin can optimize the light-trapping pattern, with the efficiency of solar cells based on patterned or flat mesoporous ZnO layers increased by 27% and 12%, respectively. PMID:25276101

  1. Sonochemical assisted hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO: Cr nanoparticles loaded activated carbon for simultaneous ultrasound-assisted adsorption of ternary toxic organic dye: Derivative spectrophotometric, optimization, kinetic and isotherm study.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, M; Ghaedi, M; Dashtian, K; Hajati, S; Bazrafshan, A A

    2016-09-01

    Chromium doped zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO: Cr-NPs) was synthesized by ultrasonically assisted hydrothermal method and characterized by FE-SEM, XRD and TEM analysis. Subsequently, this composite ultrasonically assisted was deposited on activated carbon (ZnO: Cr-NPs-AC) and used for simultaneous ultrasound-assisted removal of three toxic organic dye namely of malachite green (MG), eosin yellow (EY) and Auramine O (AO). Dyes spectra overlap in mixture (major problem for simultaneous investigation) of this systems was extensively resolved by derivative spectrophotometric method. The magnitude of variables like initial dyes concentration, adsorbent mass and sonication time influence on dyes removal was optimized using small central composite design (CCD) combined with desirability function (DF) approach, while pH was studied by one-a-time approach. The maximized removal percentages at desirability of 0.9740 was set as follow: pH 6.0, 0.019g ZnO: Cr-NPs-AC, 3.9min sonication at 4.5, 4.8 and 4.7mgL(-1) of MG, EY and AO, respectively. Above optimized points lead to achievement of removal percentage of 98.36%, 97.24%, and 99.26% correspond to MG, EY and AO, respectively. ANOVA for each dyes based p-value less than (<0.0001) suggest highly efficiency of CCD model for prediction of data concern to simultaneous removal of these dyes within 95% confidence interval, while their F-value for MG, EY and AO is 935, 800.2, and 551.3, respectively, that confirm low participation of this them in signal. The value of multiple correlation coefficient R(2), adjusted and predicted R(2) for simultaneous removal of MG is 0.9982, 0.9972 and 0.9940, EY is 0.9979, 0.9967 and 0.9930 and for AO is 0.9970, 0.9952 and 0.9939. The adsorption rate well fitted by pseudo second-order and Langmuir model via high, economic and profitable adsorption capacity of 214.0, 189.7 and 211.6mgg(-1) for MG, EY and AO, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Highly photoresponsive, ZnO nanorod-based photodetector for operation in the visible spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Daniel S.; Hansen, Matthew; Van Keuren, Edward; Hahm, Jong-in

    2017-04-01

    While significant advances have been made for gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-coupled zinc oxide (ZnO) as visibly blind, ultraviolet photodetection devices, very few ZnO nanomaterial systems have been developed specifically for use in the visible wavelength regime. Further efforts to develop ZnO-based visible photodetectors (PDs) are still highly warranted in order to better understand the precise effect of AuNP load, operation wavelength, and beam position on the device output. In this study, we demonstrate significantly enhanced, photoresponse behaviors of AuNP-coupled ZnO nanorod (NR) network devices in the visible wavelength range with their photoresponse capacity comparable to, if not far exceeding, most commercial PDs as well as recently reported, visible, AuNP-coupled ZnO detectors. In addition, the nature and degree of the photoresponsivity enhancement are systematically elucidated by investigating their light-triggered electrical signals under varying incident wavelengths, AuNP amounts, and illumination positions. We discuss a possible photoconduction mechanism of our AuNP-coupled ZnO NR PDs and the origins of the high photoresponsivity. Specifically related to the AuNP amount-dependent photoresponse behaviors, the nanoparticle density yielding photoresponse maxima is explained as the interplay between localized surface plasmon resonance, plasmonic heating, and scattering in our photothermoelectric effect-driven device. We show that the AuNP-coupled ZnO NR PDs can be constructed via a straightforward method without the need for ultrahigh vacuum, sputtering procedures, or photo/electron-beam lithographic tools. Hence, the approach demonstrated in this study may serve as a convenient and viable means to advance the current state of ZnO-based PDs for operation in the visible spectral range with greatly increased photoresponsivity.

  3. Antifungal mechanisms of ZnO and Ag nanoparticles to Sclerotinia homoeocarpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junli; Sang, Hyunkyu; Guo, Huiyuan; Popko, James T.; He, Lili; White, Jason C.; Parkash Dhankher, Om; Jung, Geunhwa; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-04-01

    Fungicides have extensively been used to effectively combat fungal diseases on a range of plant species, but resistance to multiple active ingredients has developed in pathogens such as Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, the causal agent of dollar spot on cool-season turfgrasses. Recently, ZnO and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have received increased attention due to their antimicrobial activities. In this study, the NPs’ toxicity and mechanisms of action were investigated as alternative antifungal agents against S. homoeocarpa isolates that varied in their resistance to demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicides. S. homoeocarpa isolates were treated with ZnO NPs and ZnCl2 (25-400 μg ml-1) and Ag NPs and AgNO3 (5-100 μg ml-1) to test antifungal activity of the NPs and ions. The mycelial growth of S. homoeocarpa isolates regardless of their DMI sensitivity was significantly inhibited on ZnO NPs (≥200 μg ml-1), Ag NPs (≥25 μg ml-1), Zn2+ ions (≥200 μg ml-1), and Ag+ ions (≥10 μg ml-1) amended media. Expression of stress response genes, glutathione S-transferase (Shgst1) and superoxide dismutase 2 (ShSOD2), was significantly induced in the isolates by exposure to the NPs and ions. In addition, a significant increase in the nucleic acid contents of fungal hyphae, which may be due to stress response, was observed upon treatment with Ag NPs using Raman spectroscopy. We further observed that a zinc transporter (Shzrt1) might play an important role in accumulating ZnO and Ag NPs into the cells of S. homoeocarpa due to overexpression of Shzrt1 significantly induced by ZnO or Ag NPs within 3 h of exposure. Yeast mutants complemented with Shzrt1 became more sensitive to ZnO and Ag NPs as well as Zn2+ and Ag+ ions than the control strain and resulted in increased Zn or Ag content after exposure. This is the first report of involvement of the zinc transporter in the accumulation of Zn and Ag from NP exposure in filamentous plant pathogenic fungi. Understanding the molecular

  4. Surfactants present complex joint effects on the toxicities of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dali; Lin, Zhifen; Yao, Zhifeng; Yu, Hongxia

    2014-08-01

    The potential toxicities of nanoparticles (NPs) have been intensively discussed over the past decade. In addition to their single toxicities, NPs can interact with other environmental chemicals and thereby exert joint effects on biological systems and the environment. The present study investigated the combined toxicities of NPs and surfactants, which are among the chemicals that most likely coexist with NPs. Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed as the model organism. The results indicate that surfactants with different ion types can alter the properties of NPs (i.e., particle size and surface charge) in different ways and present complex joint effects on NP toxicities. Mixtures of different NPs and surfactants exhibited antagonistic, synergistic, and additive effects. In particular, the toxicity of ZnO was observed to result from its dissolved Zn(2+); thus, the joint effects of the ZnO NPs and surfactants can be explained by the interactions between the Zn ions and the surfactants. Our study suggests that the potential hazards caused by mixtures of NPs and surfactants are different from those caused by single NPs. Because surfactants are extensively used in the field of nanotechnology and are likely to coexist with NPs in natural waters, the ecological risk assessments of NPs should consider the impacts of surfactants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Trioctylphosphine-assisted morphology control of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yun-Kun; Cho, GeonHee; Park, YoonSu; Oh, Soong Ju; Ha, Don-Hyung

    2018-06-01

    This study investigates the morphological change in colloidal ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized with trioctylphosphine (TOP). The addition of TOP to the synthesis causes an evolution in the shape of ZnO NPs to tadpole-like particles from quasi-spherical particles at 300 °C. The total length of the tadpole-like ZnO NPs can be modified by controlling the molar ratio of TOP to oleylamine (OLAM). The tadpole-like particles are elongated as the concentration of TOP increased but decreased when the addition of TOP is excessive. These tadpole-like ZnO NPs transform to quasi-spherical NPs regardless of the amount of TOP at a reaction time of 3 h at 300 °C. At 200 °C, the effect of TOP on the ZnO NP synthesis differs from that at 300 °C. The ZnO NPs synthesized by controlling the molar ratios of surfactant ligands (TOP:OLAM = 2:100 and 70:100) at 200 °C share similar amorphous structures, while a crystalline ZnO phase is formed when the reaction time is 3 h. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that TOP influences the oxidation of ZnO and suggests that a combination of OLAM and TOP plays a role in controlling the shape of ZnO NPs. These results provide critical insights to the utilization of TOP for a shape controlling ligand in ZnO NPs and suggest a new route to design oxide NPs.

  6. Trioctylphosphine-assisted morphology control of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yun-Kun; Cho, GeonHee; Park, YoonSu; Oh, Soong Ju; Ha, Don-Hyung

    2018-06-01

    This study investigates the morphological change in colloidal ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized with trioctylphosphine (TOP). The addition of TOP to the synthesis causes an evolution in the shape of ZnO NPs to tadpole-like particles from quasi-spherical particles at 300 °C. The total length of the tadpole-like ZnO NPs can be modified by controlling the molar ratio of TOP to oleylamine (OLAM). The tadpole-like particles are elongated as the concentration of TOP increased but decreased when the addition of TOP is excessive. These tadpole-like ZnO NPs transform to quasi-spherical NPs regardless of the amount of TOP at a reaction time of 3 h at 300 °C. At 200 °C, the effect of TOP on the ZnO NP synthesis differs from that at 300 °C. The ZnO NPs synthesized by controlling the molar ratios of surfactant ligands (TOP:OLAM = 2:100 and 70:100) at 200 °C share similar amorphous structures, while a crystalline ZnO phase is formed when the reaction time is 3 h. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that TOP influences the oxidation of ZnO and suggests that a combination of OLAM and TOP plays a role in controlling the shape of ZnO NPs. These results provide critical insights to the utilization of TOP for a shape controlling ligand in ZnO NPs and suggest a new route to design oxide NPs.

  7. Neutron induced fission of 237Np - status, challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, Ivan; Goverdovski, Andrei; Furman, Walter; Kopatch, Yury; Shcherbakov, Oleg; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Oberstedt, Stephan; Oberstedt, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, there is an increased interest in a complete study of the neutron-induced fission of 237Np. This is due to the need of accurate and reliable nuclear data for nuclear science and technology. 237Np is generated (and accumulated) in the nuclear reactor core during reactor operation. As one of the most abundant long-lived isotopes in spent fuel ("waste"), the incineration of 237Np becomes an important issue. One scenario for burning of 237Np and other radio-toxic minor actinides suggests they are to be mixed into the fuel of future fast-neutron reactors, employing the so-called transmutation and partitioning technology. For testing present fission models, which are at the basis of new generation nuclear reactor developments, highly accurate and detailed neutron-induced nuclear reaction data is needed. However, the EXFOR nuclear database for 237Np on neutron-induced capture cross-section, σγ, and fission cross-section, σf, as well as on the characteristics of capture and fission resonance parameters (Γγ, Γf, σoΓf, fragments mass-energy yield distributions, multiplicities of neutrons vn and γ-rays vγ), has not been updated for decades.

  8. Photoelectrocatalytic activity of a hydrothermally grown branched Zno nanorod-array electrode for paracetamol degradation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin Jung; Liao, Shu-Jun; Kao, Li-Cheng; Liou, Sofia Ya Hsuan

    2015-06-30

    Hierarchical branched ZnO nanorod (B-ZnR) arrays as an electrode for efficient photoelectrocatalytic degradation of paracetamol were grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide substrates using a solution route. The morphologic and structural studies show the ZnO trunks are single-crystalline hexagonal wurtzite ZnO with a [0001] growth direction and are densely covered by c-axis-oriented ZnO branches. The obvious enhancement in photocurrent response of the B-ZnR electrode was obtained than that in the ZnO nanoparticle (ZnO NP) electrode. For the photoelectrocatalytic degradation of paracetamol in 20 h, the conversion fraction of the drug increased from 32% over ZnO NP electrode to 62% over B-ZnR arrays with about 3-fold increase in initial reaction rate. The light intensity-dependent photoelectrocatalytic experiment indicated that the superior performance over the B-ZnR electrode was mainly ascribed to the increased specific surface area without significantly sacrificing the charge transport and pollutant diffusion efficiencies. Two aromatic intermediate compounds were observed and eventually converted into harmless carboxylic acids and ammonia. Hierarchical tree-like ZnO arrays can be considered effective alternatives to improve photoelectro degradation rates without the need for expensive additives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Physiological effects of nanoparticulate ZnO in green peas (Pisum sativum L.) cultivated in soil.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Rico, Cyren M; Zhao, Lijuan; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2014-01-01

    The toxicological effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in plants are still largely unknown. In the present study, green pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants were treated with 0, 125, 250, and 500 mg kg(-1) of either ZnO NPs or bulk ZnO in organic matter enriched soil. Corresponding toxicological effects were measured on the basis of plant growth, chlorophyll production, Zn bioaccumulation, H2O2 generation, stress enzyme activity, and lipid peroxidation using different cellular, molecular, and biochemical approaches. Compared to control, all ZnO NP concentrations significantly increased (p ≤ 0.05) root elongation but no effects were observed in the stem. Whereas all bulk ZnO treatments significantly increased both root and stem length. After 25 days, chlorophyll in leaves decreased, compared to control, by ~61%, 67%, and 77% in plants treated with 125, 250, and 500 mg kg(-1) ZnO NPs, respectively. Similar results were found in bulk ZnO treated plants. At all ZnO NP concentrations CAT was significantly reduced in leaves (p ≤ 0.05), while APOX was reduced in both roots and leaves. In the case of bulk ZnO, APOX activity was down-regulated in the root and leaf and CAT was unaffected. At 500 mg kg(-1) treatment, the H2O2 in leaves increased by 61% with a twofold lipid peroxidation, which would be a predictive biomarker of nanotoxicity. This study could be pioneering in evaluating the phytotoxicity of ZnO NPs to green peas and can serve as a good indicator for measuring the effects on ZnO NPs in plants grown in organic matter enriched soil.

  10. Understanding and Interpreting Japanese NP1 "wa" NP2 "da" Sentences: Mechanism and Contextual Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Megumi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the contextual factors that affect the understanding and interpretation of one Japanese topicalized construction, NP[subscript 1] wa NP[subscript 2] da sentences, by native speakers of Japanese. The construction allows two possibilities in the relation between the NP[subscript 1] and the NP[subscript 2]. When the two…

  11. Photoluminescent ZnO Nanoparticles and Their Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng-Yong; Xiong, Huan-Ming

    2015-01-01

    During the past decades, numerous achievements concerning luminescent zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have been reported due to their improved luminescence and good biocompatibility. The photoluminescence of ZnO NPs usually contains two parts, the exciton-related ultraviolet (UV) emission and the defect-related visible emission. With respect to the visible emission, many routes have been developed to synthesize and functionalize ZnO NPs for the applications in detecting metal ions and biomolecules, biological fluorescence imaging, nonlinear multiphoton imaging, and fluorescence lifetime imaging. As the biological applications of ZnO NPs develop rapidly, the toxicity of ZnO NPs has attracted more and more attention because ZnO can produce the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release Zn2+ ions. Just as a coin has two sides, both the drug delivery and the antibacterial effects of ZnO NPs become attractive at the same time. Hence, in this review, we will focus on the progress in the synthetic methods, luminescent properties, and biological applications of ZnO NPs.

  12. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles for Dunaliella tertiolecta and comparison with SiO2 and TiO2 effects at population growth inhibition levels.

    PubMed

    Schiavo, S; Oliviero, M; Miglietta, M; Rametta, G; Manzo, S

    2016-04-15

    The increasing use of oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial products has intensified the potential release into the aquatic environment where algae represent the basis of the trophic chain. NP effects upon algae population growth were indeed already reported in literature, but the concurrent effects at cellular and genomic levels are still largely unexplored. Our work investigates the genotoxic (by COMET assay) and cytotoxic effects (by qualitative ROS production and cell viability) of ZnO nanoparticles toward marine microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta. A comparison at defined population growth inhibition levels (i.e. 50% Effect Concentration, EC50, and No Observed Effect Concentration, NOEC) with SiO2 and TiO2 genotoxic effects and previously investigated cytotoxic effects (Manzo et al., 2015) was performed in order to elucidate the possible diverse mechanisms leading to algae growth inhibition. After 72h exposure, ZnO particles act firstly at the level of cell division inhibition (EC50: 2mg Zn/L) while the genotoxic action is evident only starting from 5mg Zn/L. This outcome could be ascribable mainly to the release of toxic ions from the aggregate of ZnO particle in the proximity of cell membrane. In the main, at EC50 and NOEC values for ZnO NPs showed the lowest cytotoxic and genotoxic effect with respect to TiO2 and SiO2. Based on Mutagenic Index (MI) the rank of toxicity is actually: TiO2>SiO2>ZnO with TiO2 and SiO2 that showed similar MI values at both NOEC and EC50 concentrations. The results presented herein suggest that up to TiO2 NOEC (7.5mg/L), the algae DNA repair mechanism is efficient and the DNA damage does not result in an evident algae population growth inhibition. A similar trend for SiO2, although at lower effect level with respect to TiO2, is observable. The comparison among all the tested nanomaterial toxicity patterns highlighted that the algae population growth inhibition occurred through pathways specific for each NP also related to their

  13. Formation of p-type ZnO thin film through co-implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Teng; Liou, Jhe-Wei; Woon, Wei-Yen

    2017-01-01

    We present a study on the formation of p-type ZnO thin film through ion implantation. Group V dopants (N, P) with different ionic radii are implanted into chemical vapor deposition grown ZnO thin film on GaN/sapphire substrates prior to thermal activation. It is found that mono-doped ZnO by N+ implantation results in n-type conductivity under thermal activation. Dual-doped ZnO film with a N:P ion implantation dose ratio of 4:1 is found to be p-type under certain thermal activation conditions. Higher p-type activation levels (1019 cm-3) under a wider thermal activation range are found for the N/P dual-doped ZnO film co-implanted by additional oxygen ions. From high resolution x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy it is concluded that the observed p-type conductivities are a result of the promoted formation of PZn-4NO complex defects via the concurrent substitution of nitrogen at oxygen sites and phosphorus at zinc sites. The enhanced solubility and stability of acceptor defects in oxygen co-implanted dual-doped ZnO film are related to the reduction of oxygen vacancy defects at the surface. Our study demonstrates the prospect of the formation of stable p-type ZnO film through co-implantation.

  14. Impact of water chemistry on the particle-specific toxicity of copper nanoparticles to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yinlong; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Chen, Guangchao; Vijver, Martina G

    2018-01-01

    Toxicity of metallic nanoparticle suspensions (NP (total) ) is generally assumed to result from the combined effect of the particles present in suspensions (NP (particle) ) and their released ions (NP (ion) ). Evaluation and consideration of how water chemistry affects the particle-specific toxicity of NP (total) are critical for environmental risk assessment of nanoparticles. In this study, it was found that the toxicity of Cu NP (particle) to Daphnia magna, in line with the trends in toxicity for Cu NP (ion) , decreased with increasing pH and with increasing concentrations of divalent cations and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Without the addition of DOC, the toxicity of Cu NP (total) to D. magna at the LC50 was driven mainly by Cu NP (ion) (accounting for ≥53% of the observed toxicity). However, toxicity of Cu NP (total) in the presence of DOC at a concentration ranging from 5 to 50mg C/L largely resulted from the NP (particle) (57%-85%), which could be attributable to the large reduction of the concentration of Cu NP (ion) and the enhancement of the stability of Cu NP (particle) when DOC was added. Our results indicate that water chemistry needs to be explicitly taken into consideration when evaluating the role of NP (particle) and NP (ion) in the observed toxicity of NP (total) . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of NpO2+x in the binary Np-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, Akhil; Conradson, Steven D.; Baldinozzi, Gianguido; Namdeo, Sonu; Roberts, Kevin E.; Allen, Patrick G.; Shuh, David K.

    2017-07-01

    In contrast to UO2 and PuO2, there is no consensus on the existence of mixed valence NpO2+x, resulting in a gap between NpO2 and Np2O5 (the highest binary oxide of Np) in the Np-O phase diagram. We now show NpO2+x via Np LIII Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra of three samples of NpO2 that, analogous to U and Pu, exhibit multisite Np-O distributions with varying numbers of oxygen atoms at 1.87-1.91 Å. This is supported by the diffraction pattern of the sample with the largest amount of this oxo-type species that can be refined with both the simple fluorite structure and a trigonal one related to α-U4O9. The implied Np(V)-bridging oxo moieties as well as possible indications of OHbar found by detailed EXAFS analysis suggest that NpO2+x more closely resembles PuO2+x than UO2+x. An additional common characteristic suggested by the EXAFS and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) is the phase separation into NpO2 and what would be previously unreported Np4O9(-δ), indicative of O clustering.

  16. Vegetable Peel Waste for the Production of ZnO Nanoparticles and its Toxicological Efficiency, Antifungal, Hemolytic, and Antibacterial Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendra, T. V.; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Sarkar, Gargi; Suthindhiran, K.

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) are important materials when making different products like sun screens, textiles, and paints. In the current study, the photocatalytic effect of prepared ZnO NPs from Moringa oleifera ( M. oleifera) was evaluated on degradation of crystal violet (CV) dye, which is largely released from textile industries and is harmful to the environment. Preliminarily, ZnO NP formation was confirmed using a double beam ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer; further, the NP size was estimated using XRD analysis and the functional group analysis was determined using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The morphology of the synthesized NPs was found to be a hexagonal shape using SEM and TEM analysis and elemental screening was analyzed using EDX. ZnO NPs were shown sized 40-45 nm and spherical in shape. The degradation percentage of ZnO NPs was calculated as 94% at 70 min and the rate of the reaction -k = 0.0282. The synthesized ZnO NPs were determined for effectiveness on biological activities such as antifungal, hemolytic, and antibacterial activity. ZnO NPs showed good antifungal activity against Alternaria saloni and Sclerrotium rolfii strains. Further, we have determined the hemolytic and antibacterial activity of ZnO NPs and we got successive results in antibacterial and hemolytic activities.

  17. New vision to CuO, ZnO, and TiO2 nanoparticles: their outcome and effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibber, Sandesh; Ansari, Shakeel Ahmed; Satar, Rukhsana

    2013-04-01

    Nanomaterials and nanotechnology have attracted more and more attention due to their wide ranges of applications in various fields. With a high level of surface energy, high magnetism, high surface area, and low melting point, engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) has been widely used in industry for various applications. Metal nanoparticles, in particular, have been shown to cause significant biological effects. Review discusses cytotoxic to neurotoxic effects of CuO, ZnO, and TiO2 nanoparticles based on the scenario drawn from various in vitro and in vivo studies. ENPs such as TiO2 and ZnO NPs have great practical importance in industrial applications. CuO NPs is also widely used in biomedical applications as catalyst supports, drug carriers, and gene delivery. However, study conducted on TiO2 NPs have forecast that oxidative DNA damage could be attributed due to reduced glutathione levels with concomitant increase in lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species generation. Moreover, there are many evidences showing that ZnO NP and CuO NPs generates ROS production and can cause cell death in different types of cultured cell. Nanoparticle toxicity is assessed by set of tests designed to characterize a given risk and also the mechanism for related outcomes. Conclusively, it becomes more and more important for nanotechnologist to understand the potential health effects of ENPs and what new methodology can be applied to reveal problems like gene silencing and inhibition in antioxidant defense mechanism which can be occurred on severe effects to oxidative stress by ENPs.

  18. Size control mechanism of ZnO nanoparticles obtained in microwave solvothermal synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowicz, Jacek; Chudoba, Tadeusz; Koltsov, Iwona; Gierlotka, Stanislaw; Dworakowska, Sylwia; Lojkowski, Witold

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to explain the mechanism of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) size control, which enables the size control of ZnO NPs obtained in microwave solvothermal synthesis (MSS) within the size range between circa 20 and 120 nm through the control of water content in the solution of zinc acetate in ethylene glycol. Heavy water was used in the tests. The mechanism of ZnO NPs size control was explained, discussed and experimentally verified. The discovery and investigation of this mechanism was possible by tracking the fate of water molecules during the whole synthesis process. All the synthesis products were identified. It was indicated that the MSS of ZnO NPs proceeded through the formation and conversion of intermediates such as Zn5(OH)8(CH3COO)2 · xH2O. Esters and H2O were the by-products of the MSS reaction of ZnO NPs. We justified that the esterification reaction is the decisive stage that is a prerequisite of the formation of ZnO NPs. The following parameters of the obtained ZnO NPs and of the intermediate were determined: pycnometric density, specific surface area, phase purity, average particles size, particles size distribution and chemical composition. The ZnO NPs morphology and structure were determined using scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    DOE PAGES

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; ...

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn 2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn 2+, togethermore » with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn 2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn 2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn 2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn 2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn 2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn 2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn 2+ following exposures to ZnSO 4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn 2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.« less

  20. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A; Smith, Jordan N; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Orr, Galya

    2015-02-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in-vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn(2+), together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn(2+) in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn(2+) values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submerged cultures, intracellular Zn(2+) values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn(2+) values that were nearly three-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submerged cultures, and eight-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn(2+). At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn(2+) was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn(2+) following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn(2+) have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.

  1. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn 2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn 2+, togethermore » with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn 2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn 2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn 2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn 2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn 2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn 2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn 2+ following exposures to ZnSO 4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn 2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.« less

  2. Long-term effect of ZnO nanoparticles on waste activated sludge anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Mu, Hui; Chen, Yinguang

    2011-11-01

    The increasing use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) raises concerns about their environmental impacts, but the potential effect of ZnO NPs on sludge anaerobic digestion remains unknown. In this paper, long-term exposure experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of ZnO NPs on methane production during waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic digestion. The presence of 1 mg/g-TSS of ZnO NPs did not affect methane production, but 30 and 150 mg/g-TSS of ZnO NPs induced 18.3% and 75.1% of inhibition respectively, which showed that the impact of ZnO NPs on methane production was dosage dependant. Then, the mechanisms of ZnO NPs affecting sludge anaerobic digestion were investigated. It was found that the toxic effect of ZnO NPs on methane production was mainly due to the release of Zn(2+) from ZnO NPs, which may cause the inhibitory effects on the hydrolysis and methanation steps of sludge anaerobic digestion. Further investigations with enzyme and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays indicated that higher concentration of ZnO NPs decreased the activities of protease and coenzyme F(420), and the abundance of methanogenesis Archaea. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on liver function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hua-Qiao; Xu, Min; Rong, Qian; Jin, Ru-Wen; Liu, Qi-Ji; Li, Ying-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is widely incorporated as a food additive in animal diets. In order to optimize the beneficial effects of ZnO and minimize any resultant environmental pollution, ZnO nanoparticles are often used for delivery of the zinc. However, the possible toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles, including effects on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, have not been evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effect of ZnO nanoparticles, in doses used in animal feeds, on CYP450 enzymes, liver and intestinal enzymes, liver and kidney histopathology, and hematologic indices in rats. We found that liver and kidney injury occurred when the concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles in feed were 300–600 mg/kg. Also, liver mRNA expression for constitutive androstane receptor was suppressed and mRNA expression for pregnane X receptor was induced when feed containing ZnO nanoparticles was given at a concentration of 600 mg/kg. Although the expression of mRNA for CYP 2C11 and 3A2 enzymes was induced by ZnO nanoparticles, the activities of CYP 2C11 and 3A2 were suppressed. While liver CYP 1A2 mRNA expression was suppressed, CYP 1A2 activity remained unchanged at all ZnO nanoparticle doses. Therefore, it has been concluded that ZnO nanoparticles, in the doses customarily added to animal feed, changed the indices of hematology and blood chemistry, altered the expression and activity of hepatic CYP enzymes, and induced pathological changes in liver and kidney tissues of rats. These findings suggest that greater attention needs to be paid to the toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles in animal feed, with the possibility that the doses of ZnO should be reduced. PMID:27621621

  4. 237Np analytical method using 239Np tracers and application to a contaminated nuclear disposal facility.

    PubMed

    Snow, Mathew S; Morrison, Samuel S; Clark, Sue B; Olson, John E; Watrous, Matthew G

    2017-06-01

    Environmental 237 Np analyses are challenged by low 237 Np concentrations and lack of an available yield tracer; we report a rapid, inexpensive 237 Np analytical approach employing the short lived 239 Np (t 1/2  = 2.3 days) as a chemical yield tracer followed by 237 Np quantification using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 239 Np tracer is obtained via separation from a 243 Am stock solution and standardized using gamma spectrometry immediately prior to sample processing. Rapid digestions using a commercial, 900 W "Walmart" microwave and Parr microwave vessels result in 99.8 ± 0.1% digestion yields, while chromatographic separations enable Np/U separation factors on the order of 10 6 and total Np yields of 95 ± 4% (2σ). Application of this method to legacy soil samples surrounding a radioactive disposal facility (the Subsurface Disposal Area at Idaho National Laboratory) reveal the presence of low level 237 Np contamination within 600 m of this site, with maximum 237 Np concentrations on the order of 10 3 times greater than nuclear weapons testing fallout levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 237Np analytical method using 239Np tracers and application to a contaminated nuclear disposal facility

    DOE PAGES

    Snow, Mathew S.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Clark, Sue B.; ...

    2017-03-21

    In this study, environmental 237Np analyses are challenged by low 237Np concentrations and lack of an available yield tracer; we report a rapid, inexpensive 237Np analytical approach employing the short lived 239Np (t1/2 = 2.3 days) as a chemical yield tracer followed by 237Np quantification using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 239Np tracer is obtained via separation from a 243Am stock solution and standardized using gamma spectrometry immediately prior to sample processing. Rapid digestions using a commercial, 900 W "Walmart" microwave and Parr microwave vessels result in 99.8 ± 0.1% digestion yields, while chromatographic separations enable Np/U separation factors on themore » order of 10 6 and total Np yields of 95 ± 4% (2σ). Application of this method to legacy soil samples surrounding a radioactive disposal facility (the Subsurface Disposal Area at Idaho National Laboratory) reveal the presence of low level 237Np contamination within 600 m of this site, with maximum 237Np concentrations on the order of 10 3 times greater than nuclear weapons testing fallout levels.« less

  6. 237 Np analytical method using 239 Np tracers and application to a contaminated nuclear disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Mathew S.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Clark, Sue B.

    2017-06-01

    Environmental 237Np analyses are challenged by low 237Np concentrations and lack of an available yield tracer; we report a rapid, inexpensive 237Np analytical approach employing the short lived 239Np (t1/2 = 2.3 days) as a chemical yield tracer followed by 237Np quantification using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 239Np tracer is obtained via separation from a 243Am stock solution and standardized using gamma spectrometry immediately prior to sample processing. Rapid digestions using a commercial, 900 watt “Walmart” microwave and Parr microwave vessels result in 99.8 ± 0.1% digestion yields, while chromatographic separations enable Np/U separation factors on the order of 106more » and total Np yields of 95 ± 4% (2σ). Application of this method to legacy soil samples surrounding a radioactive disposal facility (the Subsurface Disposal Area at Idaho National Laboratory) reveal the presence of low level 237Np contamination within 600 meters of this site, with maximum 237Np concentrations on the order of 103 times greater than nuclear weapons testing fallout levels.« less

  7. Near-infrared mediated tumor destruction by photothermal effect of PANI-Np in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, L. E.; Yslas, E. I.; Molina, M. A.; Rivarola, C. R.; Romanini, S.; Barbero, C. A.; Rivarola, V. A.; Bertuzzi, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    Photothermal therapy is a therapy in which photon energy is converted into heat to kill cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of photothermal therapy, toxicity and hepatic and renal function of polyaniline nanoparticles (PANI-Np) in a tumor-bearing mice model. The in vivo efficacy of nanoparticles, following NIR light exposure, was assessed by examining tumor growth over time compared to the untreated control. Signs of drug toxicity and the histopathology and morphology of tumor and tissues, after intratumoral injection treatment, were examined or monitored. Excellent photothermal therapy efficacy is achieved upon intratumoral injection of PANI-Np followed by near-infrared light exposure. These results suggest that PANI-Np could be considered as an effective photothermal agent and pave the way to future cancer therapeutics.

  8. Oriented Attachment Is a Major Control Mechanism To Form Nail-like Mn-Doped ZnO Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Samuel; Arora, Priyanka; Price, Paige; Dittmar, Jasper W; Das, Vijay Kumar; Pink, Maren; Stein, Barry; Morgan, David Gene; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Koczkur, Kallum M; Skrabalak, Sara E; Bronstein, Lyudmila M

    2017-12-26

    Here, we present a controlled synthesis of Mn-doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) with predominantly nail-like shapes, whose formation occurs via tip-to-base-oriented attachment of initially formed nanopyramids, followed by leveling of sharp edges that lead to smooth single-crystalline "nails". This shape is prevalent in noncoordinating solvents such as octadecene and octadecane. Yet, the double bond in the former promotes oriented attachment. By contrast, Mn-doped ZnO NP synthesis in a weakly coordinating solvent, benzyl ether, results in dendritic structures because of random attachment of initial NPs. Mn-doped ZnO NPs possess a hexagonal wurtzite structure, and in the majority of cases, the NP surface is enriched with Mn, indicating a migration of Mn 2+ ions to the NP surface during the NP formation. When the NP formation is carried out without the addition of octadecyl alcohol, which serves as a surfactant and a reaction initiator, large, concave pyramid dimers are formed whose attachment takes place via basal planes. UV-vis and photoluminescence spectra of these NPs confirm the utility of controlling the NP shape to tune electro-optical properties.

  9. Ecotoxicity of Manufactured ZnO Nanoparticles - A Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an exhaustive literature review on the toxicity of manufactured ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to ecological receptors across different phylum: bacteria, algae and plants, aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates and freshwater fish. Results show that the majority of s...

  10. ZnO based potentiometric and amperometric nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Willander, Magnus; Khun, Kimleang; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain

    2014-09-01

    The existence of nanomaterials provides the solid platform for sensing applications due to owing of high sensitivity and a low concentration limit of detection. More likely used nanomaterials for sensing applications includes gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, magnetic nanoparticles such as Fe3O4, quantum dots and metal oxides etc. Recently nanomaterial and biological detection becomes an interdisciplinary field and is very much focussed by the researchers. Among metal oxides ZnO is largely considered due to its less toxic nature, biocompatible, cheap and easy to synthesis. ZnO nanomaterial is highly used for the chemical sensing, especially electrochemical sensing due to its fascinating properties such as high surface to volume ratio, atoxic, biosafe and biocompatible. Moreover, ZnO nanostructures exhibit unique features which could expose a suitable nanoenviroment for the immobilization of proteineous material such as enzymes, DNA, antibodies, etc. and in doing so it retains the biological efficiency of the immobilized bio sensitive material. The following review describes the two different coatings (i.e., ionophore and enzyme) on the surface of ZnO nanorods for the chemical sensing of zinc ion detection, thallium (I) ion detection, and L-lactic acid and the measurement of galactose molecules. ZnO nanorods provide the excellent transducing properties in the generation of strong electrical signals. Moreover, this review is very much focused on the applications of ZnO nanostructures in the sensing field.

  11. Hierarchical ZnO Nanowires-loaded Sb-doped SnO2-ZnO Micrograting Pattern via Direct Imprinting-assisted Hydrothermal Growth and Its Selective Detection of Acetone Molecules.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hak-Jong; Choi, Seon-Jin; Choo, Soyoung; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Heon

    2016-01-08

    We propose a novel synthetic route by combining imprinting transfer of a Sb-doped SnO2 (ATO)-ZnO composite micrograting pattern (MP), i.e., microstrip lines, on a sensor substrate and subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) for producing a hierarchical ZnO NW-loaded ATO-ZnO MP as an improved chemo-resistive sensing layer. Here, ATO-ZnO MP structure with 3-μm line width, 9-μm pitch, and 6-μm height was fabricated by direct transfer of mixed ATO and ZnO nanoparticle (NP)-dispersed resists, which are pre-patterned on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. ZnO NWs with an average diameter of less than 50 nm and a height of 250 nm were quasi-vertically grown on the ATO-ZnO MP, leading to markedly enhanced surface area and heterojunction composites between each ATO NP, ZnO NP, and ZnO NW. A ZnO NW-loaded MP sensor with a relative ratio of 1:9 between ATO and ZnO (1:9 ATO-ZnO), exhibited highly sensitive and selective acetone sensing performance with 2.84-fold higher response (R air/R gas = 12.8) compared to that (R air/R gas = 4.5) of pristine 1:9 ATO-ZnO MP sensor at 5 ppm. Our results demonstrate the processing advantages of direct imprinting-assisted hydrothermal growth for large-scale homogeneous coating of hierarchical oxide layers, particularly for applications in highly sensitive and selective chemical sensors.

  12. Hierarchical ZnO Nanowires-loaded Sb-doped SnO2-ZnO Micrograting Pattern via Direct Imprinting-assisted Hydrothermal Growth and Its Selective Detection of Acetone Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hak-Jong; Choi, Seon-Jin; Choo, Soyoung; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Heon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel synthetic route by combining imprinting transfer of a Sb-doped SnO2 (ATO)-ZnO composite micrograting pattern (MP), i.e., microstrip lines, on a sensor substrate and subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) for producing a hierarchical ZnO NW-loaded ATO-ZnO MP as an improved chemo-resistive sensing layer. Here, ATO-ZnO MP structure with 3-μm line width, 9-μm pitch, and 6-μm height was fabricated by direct transfer of mixed ATO and ZnO nanoparticle (NP)-dispersed resists, which are pre-patterned on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. ZnO NWs with an average diameter of less than 50 nm and a height of 250 nm were quasi-vertically grown on the ATO-ZnO MP, leading to markedly enhanced surface area and heterojunction composites between each ATO NP, ZnO NP, and ZnO NW. A ZnO NW-loaded MP sensor with a relative ratio of 1:9 between ATO and ZnO (1:9 ATO-ZnO), exhibited highly sensitive and selective acetone sensing performance with 2.84-fold higher response (Rair/Rgas = 12.8) compared to that (Rair/Rgas = 4.5) of pristine 1:9 ATO-ZnO MP sensor at 5 ppm. Our results demonstrate the processing advantages of direct imprinting-assisted hydrothermal growth for large-scale homogeneous coating of hierarchical oxide layers, particularly for applications in highly sensitive and selective chemical sensors. PMID:26743814

  13. Hierarchical ZnO Nanowires-loaded Sb-doped SnO2-ZnO Micrograting Pattern via Direct Imprinting-assisted Hydrothermal Growth and Its Selective Detection of Acetone Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hak-Jong; Choi, Seon-Jin; Choo, Soyoung; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Heon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel synthetic route by combining imprinting transfer of a Sb-doped SnO2 (ATO)-ZnO composite micrograting pattern (MP), i.e., microstrip lines, on a sensor substrate and subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) for producing a hierarchical ZnO NW-loaded ATO-ZnO MP as an improved chemo-resistive sensing layer. Here, ATO-ZnO MP structure with 3-μm line width, 9-μm pitch, and 6-μm height was fabricated by direct transfer of mixed ATO and ZnO nanoparticle (NP)-dispersed resists, which are pre-patterned on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. ZnO NWs with an average diameter of less than 50 nm and a height of 250 nm were quasi-vertically grown on the ATO-ZnO MP, leading to markedly enhanced surface area and heterojunction composites between each ATO NP, ZnO NP, and ZnO NW. A ZnO NW-loaded MP sensor with a relative ratio of 1:9 between ATO and ZnO (1:9 ATO-ZnO), exhibited highly sensitive and selective acetone sensing performance with 2.84-fold higher response (Rair/Rgas = 12.8) compared to that (Rair/Rgas = 4.5) of pristine 1:9 ATO-ZnO MP sensor at 5 ppm. Our results demonstrate the processing advantages of direct imprinting-assisted hydrothermal growth for large-scale homogeneous coating of hierarchical oxide layers, particularly for applications in highly sensitive and selective chemical sensors.

  14. The Fate of ZnO Nanoparticles Administered to Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Fakra, Sirine C.; Xia, Tian; Pokhrel, Suman; Mädler, Lutz; Nel, André E.

    2014-01-01

    A particular challenge for nanotoxicology is the evaluation of the biological fate and toxicity of nanomaterials that dissolve in aqueous fluids. Zinc oxide nanomaterials are of particular concern because dissolution leads to release of the toxic divalent zinc ion. Although dissolved zinc ions have been implicated in ZnO cytotoxicity, direct identification of the chemical form of zinc taken up by cells exposed to ZnO nanoparticles, and its intracellular fate, has not yet been achieved. We combined high resolution X-ray spectromicroscopy and high elemental sensitivity X-ray microprobe analyses to determine the fate of ZnO and less soluble iron-doped ZnO nanoparticles following exposure to cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells, BEAS-2B. We complemented two-dimensional X-ray imaging methods with atomic force microscopy of cell surfaces to distinguish between nanoparticles that were transported inside the cells from those that adhered to the cell exterior. The data suggest cellular uptake of ZnO nanoparticles is a mechanism of zinc accumulation in cells. Following uptake, ZnO nanoparticles dissolved completely generating intracellular Zn2+ complexed by molecular ligands. These results corroborate a model for ZnO nanoparticle toxicity that is based on nanoparticle uptake followed by intracellular dissolution. PMID:22646753

  15. In vitro toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2015-03-01

    The toxic effect of ZnO nanoparticles is due to their solubility. ZnO nanoparticles dissolve in the extracellular region, which in turn increases the intracellular [Zn2+] level. The mechanism for increased intracellular [Zn2+] level and ZnO nanoparticles dissolution in the medium is still unclear. Cytotoxicity, increased oxidative stress, increased intracellular [Ca2+] level, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and interleukin-8 productions occur in the BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells and A549 alveolar adenocarcinoma cells following the exposure of ZnO nanoparticles. Confluent C2C12 cells are more resistant to ZnO nanoparticles compared to the sparse monolayer. Loss of 3T3-L1 cell viability, membrane leakage, and morphological changes occurs due to exposure of ZnO nanoparticles. ZnO nanoparticle induces cytotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction in RKO colon carcinoma cells. The occurrence of apoptosis, increased ROS level, reduced mitochondrial activity and formation of tubular intracellular structures are reported following exposure of ZnO nanoparticles in skin cells. Macrophages, monocytes, and dendritic cells are affected by ZnO nanoparticles. In addition, genotoxicity is also induced. The present review summarizes the literature on in vitro toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles (10-100 nm) on various cell lines.

  16. The NP Draconii Multiple Star System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Barker, Thurburn; McNaughton, Abby; Robertson, Rachel; Smith, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Otero and Dubovsky used the ASAS-3 (Pojmanski 2002), Hipparcos (Perryman et al 1997) and Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS; Wozniak et al 2004) databases to determine elements for 80 eclipsing binaries. NP Draconii (NSV 22984) was identified by Otero and Dubovsky (IBVS Number 5557, 2004) as a possible Algol type variable with an ephemeris of HJD Min I = 2448604.780+3.10886E days based on 84 observations over 326 days with about 2 to 4 observations on any one night. We decided to further refine the ephemeris and observe NP Dra in VRI filters, with the goal of determining the elements of the system.NP Dra is a V = 9.0 system located at J2000 = 17h 35m 16s and +55d 00' 12". We observed NP Dra August 2, 3 and September 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19 2015 UT using the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute 0.4-m telescope in V, R, and I with 20 second exposure times in each filter. Observations in each filter were repeated about every 3 minutes each night of observing.From our light curves we determined the period using the Date Compensated Discrete Fourier Transform function (Ferraz-Mello 1981) which is part of the open source code VSTAR (AAVSO). The period derived from the observations is 2.2755 days. Superimposed on this period is another period of 0.6398 days. We will present the V, R, and I light curves, period determination and implication

  17. Computing quantum discord is NP-complete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yichen

    2014-03-01

    We study the computational complexity of quantum discord (a measure of quantum correlation beyond entanglement), and prove that computing quantum discord is NP-complete. Therefore, quantum discord is computationally intractable: the running time of any algorithm for computing quantum discord is believed to grow exponentially with the dimension of the Hilbert space so that computing quantum discord in a quantum system of moderate size is not possible in practice. As by-products, some entanglement measures (namely entanglement cost, entanglement of formation, relative entropy of entanglement, squashed entanglement, classical squashed entanglement, conditional entanglement of mutual information, and broadcast regularization of mutual information) and constrained Holevo capacity are NP-hard/NP-complete to compute. These complexity-theoretic results are directly applicable in common randomness distillation, quantum state merging, entanglement distillation, superdense coding, and quantum teleportation; they may offer significant insights into quantum information processing. Moreover, we prove the NP-completeness of two typical problems: linear optimization over classical states and detecting classical states in a convex set, providing evidence that working with classical states is generically computationally intractable.

  18. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure was investigated. Results from 7-d sediment toxicity tests indicate that Ag...

  19. Spectroscopic studies of Np(V) complexation

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, B.E.

    The complexation of Np(V) with aliphatic (oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, and maleic) and aromatic (phthalic, pyromellitic, hemimellitic, trimellitic, and mellitic) polycarboxylic acids was studied by spectrophotometry at 1 M ionic strength (NaClO{sub 4}) and 23 C. For the aliphatic systems, the stability of the neptunyl complexes was found to decrease as the carbon chain length of the ligand increased which was attributed to an entropy effect. In polycarboxylate systems, the stability constant decreased in the order hemimellitate > mellitate > pyromellitate > trimellitate, phthalate. With the exception of hemimellitate, this trend follows the order of decreasing basicity of the ligand.more » After correction of the stability constant for statistical effects, the stability of the mellitate, pyromellitate, trimellitate, and phthalate complexes were approximately the same. The unexpected strength the hemimellitate complexation was attributed to an increase in electron density at the binding site from the non-chelating carboxylate group through induction. The complexation of phthalate, trimellitate and hemimellitate and mellitate were studied as a function of pH. Trimellitate and mellitate were found to form ML as well as ML complexes while for phthalate and hemimellitate only ML species were observed. The stability constants of the cation-cation complexes Np(V)-U(VI) and Np(V)-Np(V), measured at 6 M ionic strength (HClO{sub 4}) and 25 C, were found to be 2.45 {+-} 0.05 and 1.41 {+-} 0.14, respectively. The change in enthalpy for the Np(V)-U(VI) system as determined by the measurement of the stability constant as function of temperature was -14.3 {+-} 1.6 kJ/mol.« less

  20. Understanding the role of silica nanospheres with their light scattering and energy barrier properties in enhancing the photovoltaic performance of ZnO based solar cells.

    PubMed

    Banik, Avishek; Ansari, Mohammad Shaad; Sahu, Tushar Kanta; Qureshi, Mohammad

    2016-10-12

    The present study discusses the design and development of a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) using a hybrid composite of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NP) and silica nanospheres (SiO 2 NS). A ≈22% enhancement in the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE, η) was observed for the device fabricated with a binary hybrid composite of 1 wt% SiO 2 NS and ZnO NP compared to the pristine ZnO NP device. A systematic investigation revealed the dual function of the silica nanospheres in enhancing the device efficacy compared to the bare ZnO NP based device. Sub-micron sized SiO 2 NS can boost the light harvesting efficiency of the photoanode by optical confinement, resulting in increased propagation length of the incident light by multiple internal reflections, which was confirmed by UV-Vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) analysis showed a reduced recombination of photo-generated electrons to the I - /I 3 - redox shuttle in the case of the composite photoanode. The higher recombination resistance (R ct ) in the case of a 1 wt% composite indicates that the SiO 2 NS serves as a partial energy barrier layer to retard the interfacial recombination (back transfer) of photo-generated electrons at the working electrode/electrolyte interface, increasing the device efficiency.

  1. Protective effects of chlorogenic acid in 3-nitropropionic acid induced toxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Herrera, Norberto; Flores-Maya, Saúl; Bellido, Belén; García-Bores, Ana M; Mendoza, Ernesto; Ávila-Acevedo, Guillermo; Hernández-Echeagaray, Elizabeth

    2017-11-01

    Mitochondrial inhibition with the toxin 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) has been used to study the underlying mechanisms in striatal neurodegeneration, but few experiments have evaluated its toxicity and genotoxicity of in vivo administration. Furthermore, different antioxidant molecules may prevent degeneration induced by the toxic effects of 3-NP. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicity and genotoxicity induced by 3-NP (15 mg/kg) in the micronuclei assay method; also, we assessed chlorogenic acid (CGA, 100 mg/kg) for its anti-toxic and anti-genotoxic effect in damage produced by in vivo treatment with 3-NP. 3-NP induced toxicity and genotoxicity. CGA administered as a co-treatment with 3-NP (3-NP + CA) reduced toxicity by 32.76%, as a pre-treatment for 5 days only, followed by 3-NP treatment (P/CA, 3-NP) inhibiting toxicity by 24.04%, or as a pre-treatment, plus a co-treatment with 3-NP (P/CA, 3-NP + CA) avoided any toxic effect. CGA alone did not exhibit any toxic effect. Only P/CGA, 3-NP + CGA group, avoided toxicity and genotoxicity, suggesting that CGA could be suitable to prevent, reduce or delay toxicity and cell death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical Sensing Applications of ZnO Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Savita; Umar, Ahmad; Bhasin, K. K.

    2018-01-01

    Recent advancement in nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed numerous triumphs of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanomaterials due to their various exotic and multifunctional properties and wide applications. As a remarkable and functional material, ZnO has attracted extensive scientific and technological attention, as it combines different properties such as high specific surface area, biocompatibility, electrochemical activities, chemical and photochemical stability, high-electron communicating features, non-toxicity, ease of syntheses, and so on. Because of its various interesting properties, ZnO nanomaterials have been used for various applications ranging from electronics to optoelectronics, sensing to biomedical and environmental applications. Further, due to the high electrochemical activities and electron communication features, ZnO nanomaterials are considered as excellent candidates for electrochemical sensors. The present review meticulously introduces the current advancements of ZnO nanomaterial-based chemical sensors. Various operational factors such as the effect of size, morphologies, compositions and their respective working mechanisms along with the selectivity, sensitivity, detection limit, stability, etc., are discussed in this article. PMID:29439528

  3. Composite multifunctional nanostructures based on ZnO tetrapods and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Villani, M; Rimoldi, T; Calestani, D; Lazzarini, L; Chiesi, V; Casoli, F; Albertini, F; Zappettini, A

    2013-04-05

    A nanocomposite material is obtained by coupling superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NP) and vapor phase grown zinc oxide nanostructures with 'tetrapod' morphology (ZnO TP). The aim is the creation of a multifunctional material which retains the attractive features of ZnO (e.g. surface reactivity, strong UV emission, piezoelectricity) together with added magnetism. Structural, morphological, optical, magnetic and functional characterization are performed. In particular, the high saturation magnetization of Fe3O4 NP (above 50 A m(2) kg(-1)), the strong UV luminescence and the enhanced photocatalytic activity of coupled nanostructures are discussed. Thus the nanocomposite turns out to be suitable for applications in energy harvesting and conversion, gas- and bio-sensing, bio-medicine and filter-free photocatalysis.

  4. Model resin composites incorporating ZnO-NP: activity against S. mutans and physicochemical properties characterization

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Natasha Lamego; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Maia, Luciane Cople; Antônio, Andréa; Silva, Vanessa Loureiro Moreira e

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Although resin composites are widely used in the clinical practice, the development of recurrent caries at composite-tooth interface still remains as one of the principal shortcomings to be overcome in this field. Objectives To evaluate the activity against S. mutans biofilm of model resin composites incorporating different concentrations of ZnO-nanoparticles (ZnO-NP) and characterize their physicochemical properties. Materials and Methods Different concentrations of ZnO-NP (wt.%): E1=0, E2=0.5, E3=1, E4=2, E5=5 and E6=10 were incorporated into a model resin composite consisting of Bis-GMA-TEGDMA and barium borosilicate particles. The activity against S. mutans biofilm was evaluated by metabolic activity and lactic acid production. The following physicochemical properties were characterized: degree of conversion (DC%), flexural strength (FS), elastic modulus (EM), hardness (KHN), water sorption (Wsp), water solubility (Wsl) and translucency (TP). Results E3, E4, E5 and E6 decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and E5 and E6 decreased the lactic acid production (p<0.05). E6 presented the lowest DC% (p<0.05). No significant difference in FS and EM was found for all resin composites (p>0.05). E5 and E6 presented the lowest values of KHN (p<0.05). E6 presented a higher Wsp than E1 (p<0.05) and the highest Wsl (p<0.05). The translucency significantly decreased as the ZnO- NP concentration increased (p<0.05). Conclusions The incorporation of 2 – 5 wt.% of ZnO-NP could endow antibacterial activity to resin composites, without jeopardizing their physicochemical properties. PMID:29742262

  5. Model resin composites incorporating ZnO-NP: activity against S. mutans and physicochemical properties characterization.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Natasha Lamego; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Maia, Luciane Cople; Antônio, Andréa; Silva, Vanessa Loureiro Moreira E; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da

    2018-01-01

    Although resin composites are widely used in the clinical practice, the development of recurrent caries at composite-tooth interface still remains as one of the principal shortcomings to be overcome in this field. Objectives To evaluate the activity against S. mutans biofilm of model resin composites incorporating different concentrations of ZnO-nanoparticles (ZnO-NP) and characterize their physicochemical properties. Materials and Methods Different concentrations of ZnO-NP (wt.%): E1=0, E2=0.5, E3=1, E4=2, E5=5 and E6=10 were incorporated into a model resin composite consisting of Bis-GMA-TEGDMA and barium borosilicate particles. The activity against S. mutans biofilm was evaluated by metabolic activity and lactic acid production. The following physicochemical properties were characterized: degree of conversion (DC%), flexural strength (FS), elastic modulus (EM), hardness (KHN), water sorption (Wsp), water solubility (Wsl) and translucency (TP). Results E3, E4, E5 and E6 decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and E5 and E6 decreased the lactic acid production (p<0.05). E6 presented the lowest DC% (p<0.05). No significant difference in FS and EM was found for all resin composites (p>0.05). E5 and E6 presented the lowest values of KHN (p<0.05). E6 presented a higher Wsp than E1 (p<0.05) and the highest Wsl (p<0.05). The translucency significantly decreased as the ZnO- NP concentration increased (p<0.05). Conclusions The incorporation of 2 - 5 wt.% of ZnO-NP could endow antibacterial activity to resin composites, without jeopardizing their physicochemical properties.

  6. Optimization of liquid media and biosafety assessment for algae-lysing bacterium NP23.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunli; Liu, Xiaobo; Shan, Linna

    2014-09-01

    To control algal bloom caused by nutrient pollution, a wild-type algae-lysing bacterium was isolated from the Baiguishan reservoir in Henan province of China and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain NP23. Algal culture medium was optimized by applying a Placket-Burman design to obtain a high cell concentration of NP23. Three minerals (i.e., 0.6% KNO3, 0.001% MnSO4·H2O, and 0.3% K2HPO4) were found to be independent factors critical for obtaining the highest cell concentration of 10(13) CFU/mL, which was 10(4) times that of the control. In the algae-lysing experiment, the strain exhibited a high lysis rate for the 4 algae test species, namely, Chlorella vulgari, Scenedesmus, Microcystis wesenbergii, and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Acute toxicity and mutagenicity tests showed that the bacterium NP23 had no toxic and mutagenic effects on fish, even in large doses such as 10(7) or 10(9) CFU/mL. Thus, Enterobacter sp. strain NP23 has strong potential application in the microbial algae-lysing project.

  7. Comparative toxicity of nonylphenol, nonylphenol-4-ethoxylate and nonylphenol-10-ethoxylate to wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingming; Wang, Feifei; Xue, Changhui; Wang, Caixia; Chi, Shengqi; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2016-09-01

    Nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs) are a group of surfactants that are widely used in industrial and household products and often detected in the environment. The metabolite of NPEOs, named nonylphenol (NP), has proven to be an endocrine disruptor, and its environmental behavior and eco-toxicity have been widely investigated in previous studies. However, to the best of our knowledge, insight into the toxicity differences of NP and NPEOs on important crops remains limited. Therefore, this study investigated the comparative toxicity of NP, nonylphenol-4-ethoxylate (NP4EO), and nonylphenol-10-ethoxylate (NP10EO) on wheat seedlings using hydroponic experiments. The results indicated that NP is most toxic to wheat followed by NP4EO, and NP10EO is the least toxic to wheat. The adverse effects of NP on wheat were observed for all the tested parameters including germination, shoot length, root length, chlorophyll, lipid peroxidation, and enzymatic activities. To gain insight into the molecular response, we analyzed the transcript abundance of SOD-Cu/Zn and CAT with NP, NP4EO, and NP10EO exposure using quantitative real-time PCR. The data revealed that both genes exhibited up- or down-regulated expression patterns that were consistent with the activities of the two enzymes. This result further conformed that NP is most toxic to wheat plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cu0-loaded SBA-15@ZnO with improved electrical properties and affinity towards hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazizi, N.; Louhichi, S.; Ouargli, R.; Bargougui, R.; Vieillard, J.; Derf, F. Le; Azzouz, A.

    2017-05-01

    A core-shell material was prepared using SBA-15 crystallites as cores for the growth of a ZnO shell, followed by Cu0 dispersion. The resulting Cu/SBA-15@ZnO nanostructure displayed higher specific surface area (SSA) and higher number of smaller pores as compared to the starting materials. Dispersion of fine Cu0NPs induced a compaction of the host matrice and a marked decay of the hydrophilic character, explained in terms of the involvement of terminal hydroxyl groups in competitive sbnd HO:Cu interaction at the expense of H-bridges with water. Heating at 400-450 °C seems to trigger ZnO dehydroxylation with possible self-polycondensation and/or the formation of Si-O-Zn bridges. This is an additional explanation of the significant SSA increase and decrease in the average pore diameter. Both ZnO and Cu0NP incorporation induced shifts in the UV-vis absorption band towards higher wavelengths, indicating a decrease in the optical band gap energy and an improvement of the conductance properties. As compared to ZnO, Cu0NPs produced stronger improvement of the conductance, which was found to increase with higher frequencies. Cu/SBA-15@ZnO also displayed higher affinity towards hydrogen as compared to SBA-15@ZnO and SBA-15 at ambient conditions. These outstanding properties combined to an appreciable thermal stability are worth to be prone to deeper investigations, because they can open promising prospects for Cu/SBA-15@ZnO as sensor, electrode material, electrocatalyst and/or hydrogen capture matrice.

  9. Are silver nanoparticles always toxic in the presence of environmental anions?

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi; Chen, Guiqiu; Zeng, Guangming; Yan, Ming; Huang, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Luhua; Peng, Chuan; Wang, Jiajia; Xiao, Zhihua

    2017-03-01

    Increasing amounts of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are expected to enter the ecosystems where their toxicity in the environment is proposed. In this study, we exploited the effect of environmental anions on AgNP toxicity. AgNP were mixed with various environmental anions, and then exposed to Escherichia coli to determine the effect on bacteria growth inhibition. The results demonstrated that AgNP are not always toxic in the presence of sulfide, but can stimulate microbial growth at certain concentrations. Environmental chloride and phosphate anions cannot induce the stimulation because of their weak capacity to control the release of Ag + from AgNP. Ag + that released from AgNP is proven to be responsible for AgNP toxicity. Moreover, we found that AgNP toxicity is dependent on sulfuration rate. At the same sulfuration rate, AgNP shows an identical pattern of toxicity. This study indicates that only sulfide of the tested environmental anions can induce AgNP stimulation to microbial growth in a sulfuration rate dependent pattern and the toxicity originate from Ag + that released from AgNP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Human eosinophils are direct targets to nanoparticles: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO) delay apoptosis and increase the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luis Rafael; Girard, Denis

    2016-09-30

    Zinc oxide NPs (ZnO) have been recently proposed as novel candidates for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases. Paradoxically, recent data suggested that ZnO could cause eosinophilic airway inflammation in rodents. Despite the above observations, there are currently no studies reporting direct interaction between a given NP and human eosinophils themselves. In this study, freshly isolated human eosinophils were incubated with ZnO and several cellular functions were studied. We found that ZnO delay human eosinophil apoptosis, partially by inhibiting caspases and by preventing caspase-4 and Bcl-xL degradation. ZnO do not induce production of reactive oxygen species but increase de novo protein synthesis. In addition, ZnO were found to increase the production of the proinflammatory IL-1β and IL-8 cytokines. Using a pharmacological approach, we demonstrated that inhibition of caspase-1 reversed the ability of ZnO to induce IL-1β and IL-8 production, whereas inhibition of caspase-4 only reversed that of IL-8. Our results indicate the necessity of conducting studies to determine the potential of using NP as nanotherapies, particularly in diseases in which eosinophils may be involved. We conclude that, indeed, human eosinophils represent potential new direct targets to NPs, ZnO in the present case. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. ZnO deposition on metal substrates: Relating fabrication, morphology, and wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaini, Sara S.; Kronawitter, Coleman X.; Carey, Van P.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2013-05-01

    It is not common practice to deposit thin films on metal substrates, especially copper, which is a common heat exchanger metal and practical engineering material known for its heat transfer properties. While single crystal substrates offer ideal surfaces with uniform structure for compatibility with oxide deposition, metallic surfaces needed for industrial applications exhibit non-idealities that complicate the fabrication of oxide nanostructure arrays. The following study explored different ZnO fabrication techniques to deposit a (super)hydrophobic thin film of ZnO on a metal substrate, specifically copper, in order to explore its feasibility as an enhanced condensing surface. ZnO was selected for its non-toxicity, ability to be made (super)hydrophobic with hierarchical roughness, and its photoinduced hydrophilicity characteristic, which could be utilized to pattern it to have both hydrophobic-hydrophilic regions. We investigated the variation of ZnO's morphology and wetting state, using SEMs and sessile drop contact angle measurements, as a function of different fabrication techniques: sputtering, pulsed laser deposition (PLD), electrodeposition and annealing Zn. We successfully fabricated (super)hydrophobic ZnO on a mirror finish, commercially available copper substrate using the scalable electrodeposition technique. PLD for ZnO deposition did not prove viable, as the ZnO samples on metal substrates were hydrophilic and the process does not lend itself to scalability. The annealed Zn sheets did not exhibit consistent wetting state results.

  12. Can visible light impact litter decomposition under pollution of ZnO nanoparticles?

    PubMed

    Du, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuyan; Liu, Lina; Qv, Mingxiang; Lv, Yanna; Yin, Yifei; Zhou, Yinfei; Cui, Minghui; Zhu, Yanfeng; Zhang, Hongzhong

    2017-11-01

    ZnO nanoparticles is one of the most used materials in a wide range including antibacterial coating, electronic device, and personal care products. With the development of nanotechnology, ecotoxicology of ZnO nanoparticles has been received increasing attention. To assess the phototoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in aquatic ecosystem, microcosm experiments were conducted on Populus nigra L. leaf litter decomposition under combined effect of ZnO nanoparticles and visible light radiation. Litter decomposition rate, pH value, extracellular enzyme activity, as well as the relative contributions of fungal community to litter decomposition were studied. Results showed that long-term exposure to ZnO nanoparticles and visible light led to a significant decrease in litter decomposition rate (0.26 m -1 vs 0.45 m -1 ), and visible light would increase the inhibitory effect (0.24 m -1 ), which caused significant decrease in pH value of litter cultures, fungal sporulation rate, as well as most extracellular enzyme activities. The phototoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles also showed impacts on fungal community composition, especially on the genus of Varicosporium, whose abundance was significantly and positively related to decomposition rate. In conclusion, our study provides the evidence for negatively effects of ZnO NPs photocatalysis on ecological process of litter decomposition and highlights the contribution of visible light radiation to nanoparticles toxicity in freshwater ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Highly active lanthanum doped ZnO nanorods for photodegradation of metasystox.

    PubMed

    Korake, P V; Dhabbe, R S; Kadam, A N; Gaikwad, Y B; Garadkar, K M

    2014-01-05

    La-doped ZnO nanorods with different La contents were synthesized by microwave assisted method and characterized by various sophisticated techniques such as XRD, UV-Vis., EDS, XPS, SEM and TEM. The XRD patterns of the La-doped ZnO indicate hexagonal crystal structure with an average crystallite size of 30nm. It was found that the crystallite size of La-doped ZnO is much smaller as compared to pure ZnO and decreases with increasing La content. The photocatalytic activity of 0.5mol% La-doped ZnO in the degradation of metasystox was studied. It was observed that degradation efficiency of metasystox over La-doped ZnO increases up to 0.5mol% doping then decreases for higher doping levels. Among the catalyst studied, the 0.5mol% La-doped ZnO was the most active, showing high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of metasystox. The maximum reduction of concentration of metasystox was observed under static condition at pH 8. Reduction in the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of metasystox was observed after 150min. The cytotoxicological studies of meristematic root tip cells of Allium cepa were studied. The results obtained indicate that photocatalytically degraded products of metasystox were less toxic as compared to metasystox. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance improvement for solution-processed high-mobility ZnO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha Li, Chen; Li, Yu Ning; Wu, Yi Liang; Ong, Beng S.; Loutfy, Rafik O.

    2008-06-01

    The fabrication technology of stable, non-toxic, transparent, high performance zinc oxide (ZnO) thin-film semiconductors via the solution process was investigated. Two methods, which were, respectively, annealing a spin-coated precursor solution and annealing a drop-coated precursor solution, were compared. The prepared ZnO thin-film semiconductor transistors have well-controlled, preferential crystal orientation and exhibit superior field-effect performance characteristics. But the ZnO thin-film transistor (TFT) fabricated by annealing a drop-coated precursor solution has a distinctly elevated linear mobility, which further approaches the saturated mobility, compared with that fabricated by annealing a spin-coated precursor solution. The performance of the solution-processed ZnO TFT was further improved when substituting the spin-coating process by the drop-coating process.

  15. Phytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles and the released Zn(II) ion to corn (Zea mays L.) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) during germination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruichang; Zhang, Haibo; Tu, Chen; Hu, Xuefeng; Li, Lianzhen; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Toxicity of engineered nanoparticles on organisms is of concern worldwide due to their extensive use and unique properties. The impacts of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on seed germination and root elongation of corn (Zea mays L.) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) were investigated in this study. The role of seed coats of corn in the mitigation toxicity of nanoparticles was also evaluated. ZnO NPs (1,000 mg L(-1)) reduced root length of corn and cucumber by 17 % (p < 0.05) and 51 % (p < 0.05), respectively, but exhibited no effects on germination. In comparison with Zn(2+), toxicity of ZnO NPs on the root elongation of corn could be attributed to the nanoparticulate ZnO, while released Zn ion from ZnO could solely contribute to the inhibition of root elongation of cucumber. Zn uptake in corn exposed to ZnO NPs during germination was much higher than that in corn exposed to Zn(2+), whereas Zn uptake in cucumber was significantly correlated with soluble Zn in suspension. It could be inferred that Zn was taken up by corn and cucumber mainly in the form of ZnO NPs and soluble Zn, respectively. Transmission electron microscope confirmed the uptake of ZnO NPs into root of corn. Although isolation of the seed coats might not be the principal factor that achieved avoidance from toxicity on germination, seed coats of corn were found to mitigate the toxicity of ZnO NPs on root elongation and prevent approximately half of the Zn from entering into root and endosperm.

  16. Rapid dissolution of ZnO nanocrystals in acidic cancer microenvironment leading to preferential apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasidharan, Abhilash; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Raman, Sreerekha; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-09-01

    The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in acidic (pH ~5-6) cancer microenvironment causing elevated ROS stress, mitochondrial superoxide formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and cell cycle arrest at S/G2 phase leading to apoptosis. In effect, by elucidating the unique toxicity mechanism of ZnO NCs, we show that ZnO NCs can destabilize cancer cells by utilizing its own hostile acidic microenvironment, which is otherwise critical for its survival.The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Doped ZnO Nanomaterials: Potential Application in Third Generation Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock Smith, Echo D.

    ZnO nanomaterials are being incorporated into next-generation solar cell designs including dye-sensitized solar cells, multijunction solar cells, and quantum dot sensitized solar cells. ZnO nanorod (NR) arrays and nanoparticles (NP) used in these devices are typically fabricated using chemical vapor deposition and/or high-temperature reaction conditions. These methods are costly, require high energy, pressure or excessive time, but produce repeatable, defined growth that is capable of easily incorporating metal dopants. Less expensive methods of fabrication such as chemical bath deposition (CBD) eliminate the costly steps but can suffer from undefined growth, excessive waste and have a difficult time incorporating dopants into ZnO materials without additives or increased pH. This dissertation presents a novel method of growing cobalt and vanadium doped ZnO nanomaterials through microwave synthesis. The cobalt growth was compared to standard CBD and found to be faster, less wasteful, reproducible and better at incorporating cobalt ions into the ZnO lattice than typical oven CBD method. The vanadium doped ZnO microwave synthesis procedure was found to produce nanorods, nanorod arrays, and nanoparticles simultaneously. Neither the cobalt nor the vanadium growth required pH changes, catalysts or additives to assist in doping and therefore use less materials than traditional CBD. This research is important because it offers a simple, quick way to grow ZnO nanostructures and is the first to report on growing both cobalt and vanadium doped zinc oxide nanorod arrays using microwave synthesis. This synthesis method presented is a viable candidate for replacing conventional growth synthesis which will result in lowering the cost and time of production of photovoltaics while helping drive forward the development of next-generation solar cells.

  18. An alternative approach to studying the effects of ZnO nanoparticles in cultured human lymphocytes: combining electrochemistry and genotoxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Branica, Gina; Mladinić, Marin; Omanović, Dario; Želježić, Davor

    2016-12-01

    Nanoparticle use has increased radically raising concern about possible adverse effects in humans. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most common nanomaterials in consumer and medical products. Several studies indicate problems with their safe use. The aim of our study was to see at which levels ZnO NPs start to produce adverse cytogenetic effects in human lymphocytes as an early attempt toward establishing safety limits for ZnO NP exposure in humans. We assessed the genotoxic effects of low ZnO NP concentrations (1.0, 2.5, 5, and 7.5 μg mL-1) in lymphocyte cultures over 14 days of exposure. We also tested whether low and high-density lymphocytes differed in their ability to accumulate ZnO NPs in these experimental conditions. Primary DNA damage (measured with the alkaline comet assay) increased with nanoparticle concentration in unseparated and high density lymphocytes. The same happened with the fragmentation of TP53 (measured with the comet-FISH). Nanoparticle accumulation was significant only with the two highest concentrations, regardless of lymphocyte density. High-density lymphocytes had significantly more intracellular Zn2+ than light-density ones. Our results suggest that exposure to ZnO NPs in concentrations above 5 μg mL-1 increases cytogenetic damage and intracellular Zn2+ levels in lymphocytes.

  19. 237Np absolute delayed neutron yield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doré, D.; Ledoux, X.; Nolte, R.; Gagnon-Moisan, F.; Thulliez, L.; Litaize, O.; Roettger, S.; Serot, O.

    2017-09-01

    237Np absolute delayed neutron yields have been measured at different incident neutron energies from 1.5 to 16 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) facility where the Van de Graaff accelerator and the cyclotron CV28 delivered 9 different neutron energy beams using p+T, d+D and d+T reactions. The detection system is made up of twelve 3He tubes inserted into a polyethylene cylinder. In this paper, the experimental setup and the data analysis method are described. The evolution of the absolute DN yields as a function of the neutron incident beam energies are presented and compared to experimental data found in the literature and data from the libraries.

  20. Nuclear Physics Research at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamfir, N. V.

    2018-05-01

    The new research facility Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Romania, on the Magurele Physics campus. Valued more than 300 Meuros the center will be operational in 2019. The research center will use a high brilliance Gamma Beam and a High-power Laser beam, with unprecedented characteristics worldwide, to investigate the interaction of very intense radiation with matter with specific focus on nuclear phenomena and their applications. The energetic particle beams and radiation produced by the 2x10 PW laser beam interacting with matter will be studied. The precisely tunable energy and excellent bandwidth of the gamma-ray beam will allow for new experimental approaches regarding nuclear astrophysics, nuclear resonance fluorescence, and applications. The experimental equipment is presented, together with the main directions of the research envisioned with special emphasizes on nuclear physics studies.

  1. Single and combined effects of aluminum (Al2O3) and zinc (ZnO) oxide nanoparticles in a freshwater fish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Benavides, María; Fernández-Lodeiro, Javier; Coelho, Pedro; Lodeiro, Carlos; Diniz, Mário S

    2016-12-01

    The increasing use of nanoparticles (NPs) worldwide has raised some concerns about their impact on the environment. The aim of the study was to assess the toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles, singly or combined, in a freshwater fish (Carassius auratus). The fish were exposed for 7, 14, and 21 days to different concentrations of NPs (10 μg Al 2 O 3 .L -1 , 10 μg ZnO.L -1 , 10 μg Al 2 O 3 .L -1 plus 10 μg ZnO.L -1 , 100 μg Al 2 O 3 .L -1 , 100 μg ZnO.L -1 , and 100 μg Al 2 O 3 .L -1 plus 100 μg ZnO.L -1 ). At the end of each exposure period, antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase), lipid peroxidation, and histopathology were assessed in the gills and livers of C. auratus. The results show an increase in catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the gills and livers of fish, especially after 14 days of exposure to single and combined NPs, followed by a reduction at 21 days. An increase in glutathione S-transferase (GST) was observed in gills after 7 days for all tested NP concentrations (single and combined); while in livers, a significant increase was determined after 14 days of exposure to 100 μg.L -1 of both single ZnO and Al 2 O 3 NPs. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) significantly increased in gills after 7 days of exposure to 100 μg.L -1 Al 2 O 3 NPs (single or combined). In livers, LPO increased significantly after 7 days of exposure to all tested concentrations of both single ZnO and Al 2 O 3 (except for 10 μg Al 2 O 3 .L -1 ), and after 14 days of exposure to ZnO (10 and 100 μg.L -1 ) and Al 2 O 3 (100 μg.L -1 ) . The results from histological observations suggest that exposure to metal oxide NPs affected both livers and gills, presenting alterations such as gill hyperplasia and liver degeneration. However, the most pronounced effects were found in gills. In general, this study shows that the tested NPs, single or combined, are capable of causing sub-lethal effects

  2. Engineering safer-by-design, transparent, silica-coated ZnO nanorods with reduced DNA damage potential

    PubMed Central

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Watson, Christa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Elder, Alison; Brain, Joseph D.; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles absorb UV light efficiently while remaining transparent in the visible light spectrum rendering them attractive in cosmetics and polymer films. Their broad use, however, raises concerns regarding potential environmental health risks and it has been shown that ZnO nanoparticles can induce significant DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Even though research on ZnO nanoparticle synthesis has made great progress, efforts on developing safer ZnO nanoparticles that maintain their inherent optoelectronic properties while exhibiting minimal toxicity are limited. Here, a safer-by-design concept was pursued by hermetically encapsulating ZnO nanorods in a biologically inert, nanothin amorphous SiO2 coating during their gas-phase synthesis. It is demonstrated that the SiO2 nanothin layer hermetically encapsulates the core ZnO nanorods without altering their optoelectronic properties. Furthermore, the effect of SiO2 on the toxicological profile of the core ZnO nanorods was assessed using the Nano-Cometchip assay by monitoring DNA damage at a cellular level using human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6). Results indicate significantly lower DNA damage (>3 times) for the SiO2-coated ZnO nanorods compared to uncoated ones. Such an industry-relevant, scalable, safer-by-design formulation of nanostructured materials can liberate their employment in nano-enabled products and minimize risks to the environment and human health. PMID:24955241

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Xu, Yijun; Xu, Pengyu; Pan, Zhenghui; Chen, Sheng; Shen, Qishen; Zhan, Li; Zhang, Yuegang; Ni, Weihai

    2015-10-01

    We developed a facile approach toward hybrid AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched structures using self-organized monolayered AgNPs from wet chemical synthesis for the optimized enhancement of the Raman response of monolayer graphene. We demonstrate that the Raman scattering of graphene can be enhanced 530 fold in the hybrid structure. The Raman enhancement is sensitively dependent on the hybrid structure, incident angle, and excitation wavelength. A systematic simulation is performed, which well explains the enhancement mechanism. Our study indicates that the enhancement resulted from the plasmonic coupling between the AgNPs on the opposite sides of graphene. Our approach towards ideal substrates offers great potential to produce a ``hot surface'' for enhancing the Raman response of two-dimensional materials.We developed a facile approach toward hybrid AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched structures using self-organized monolayered AgNPs from wet chemical synthesis for the optimized enhancement of the Raman response of monolayer graphene. We demonstrate that the Raman scattering of graphene can be enhanced 530 fold in the hybrid structure. The Raman enhancement is sensitively dependent on the hybrid structure, incident angle, and excitation wavelength. A systematic simulation is performed, which well explains the enhancement mechanism. Our study indicates that the enhancement resulted from the plasmonic coupling between the AgNPs on the opposite sides of graphene. Our approach towards ideal substrates offers great potential to produce a ``hot surface'' for enhancing the Raman response of two-dimensional materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, electric field enhancement profiles, Raman scattering spectra, and structure-dependent peak ratios. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04500b

  4. Ferro- and antiferro-magnetism in (Np, Pu)BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimczuk, T.; Shick, A. B.; Kozub, A. L.; Griveau, J.-C.; Colineau, E.; Falmbigl, M.; Wastin, F.; Rogl, P.

    2015-04-01

    Two new transuranium metal boron carbides, NpBC and PuBC, have been synthesized. Rietveld refinements of powder XRD patterns of {Np,Pu}BC confirmed in both cases isotypism with the structure type of UBC. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility data reveal antiferromagnetic ordering for PuBC below TN = 44 K, whereas ferromagnetic ordering was found for NpBC below TC = 61 K. Heat capacity measurements prove the bulk character of the observed magnetic transition for both compounds. The total energy electronic band structure calculations support formation of the ferromagnetic ground state for NpBC and the antiferromagnetic ground state for PuBC.

  5. Characterization of planar pn heterojunction diodes constructed with Cu2O nanoparticle films and single ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kiyeol; Cho, Kyoungah; Kim, Sangsig

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we fabricate planar pn heterojunction diodes composed of Cu2O nanoparticle (NP) films and single ZnO nanowires (NWs) on SiO2 (300 nm)/Si substrates and investigate their characteristics in the dark and under the illumination of white light and 325 nm wavelength light. The diode at bias voltages of +/- 1 V shows rectification ratios of 10 (in the dark) and 34 (under the illumination of white light). On the other hand, the diode exposed to the 325 nm wavelength light exhibits Ohmic characteristics which are associated with efficient photocurrent generation in both the Cu2O NP film and the single ZnO NW.

  6. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure were investigated. Results from 7-d sedimen...

  7. Nanomaterial Toxicity Screening in Developing Zebrafish Embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess nanomaterial vertebrate toxicity, a high-content screening assay was created using developing zebrafish, Danio rerio. This included a diverse group of nanomaterials (n=42 total) ranging from metallic (Ag, Au) and metal oxide (CeO2, CuO, TiO2, ZnO) nanoparticles, to non...

  8. Antitubercular activity of ZnO nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion synthesis using lemon juice as bio-fuel.

    PubMed

    Gopala Krishna, Prashanth; Paduvarahalli Ananthaswamy, Prashanth; Trivedi, Priyanka; Chaturvedi, Vinita; Bhangi Mutta, Nagabhushana; Sannaiah, Ananda; Erra, Amani; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis, structural and morphological characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles using solution combustion synthesis method where lemon juice was used as the fuel. In vitro anti-tubercular activity of the synthesized ZnO nanoparticles and their biocompatibility studies, both in vitro and in vivo were carried out. The synthesized nanoparticles showed inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra strain at concentrations as low as 12.5μg/mL. In vitro cytotoxicity study performed with normal mammalian cells (L929, 3T3-L1) showed that ZnO nanoparticles are non-toxic with a Selectivity Index (SI) >10. Cytotoxicity performed on two human cancer cell lines DU-145 and Calu-6 indicated the anti-cancer activity of ZnO nanoparticles at varied concentrations. Results of blood hemolysis indicated the biocompatibility of ZnO nanoparticles. Furthermore, in vivo toxicity studies of ZnO nanoparticles conducted on Swiss albino mice (for 14days as per the OECD 423 guidelines) showed no evident toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. ZnO Nanostructures for Drug Delivery and Theranostic Applications.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Carmona, Marina; Gun'ko, Yurii; Vallet-Regí, María

    2018-04-23

    In the last two decades, zinc oxide (ZnO) semiconductor Quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to have fantastic luminescent properties, which together with their low-cost, low-toxicity and biocompatibility have turned these nanomaterials into one of the main candidates for bio-imaging. The discovery of other desirable traits such as their ability to produce destructive reactive oxygen species (ROS), high catalytic efficiency, strong adsorption capability and high isoelectric point, also make them promising nanomaterials for therapeutic and diagnostic functions. Herein, we review the recent progress on the use of ZnO based nanoplatforms in drug delivery and theranostic in several diseases such as bacterial infection and cancer.

  10. ZnO Nanostructures for Drug Delivery and Theranostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Carmona, Marina

    2018-01-01

    In the last two decades, zinc oxide (ZnO) semiconductor Quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to have fantastic luminescent properties, which together with their low-cost, low-toxicity and biocompatibility have turned these nanomaterials into one of the main candidates for bio-imaging. The discovery of other desirable traits such as their ability to produce destructive reactive oxygen species (ROS), high catalytic efficiency, strong adsorption capability and high isoelectric point, also make them promising nanomaterials for therapeutic and diagnostic functions. Herein, we review the recent progress on the use of ZnO based nanoplatforms in drug delivery and theranostic in several diseases such as bacterial infection and cancer. PMID:29690644

  11. Neyman-Pearson classification algorithms and NP receiver operating characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Feng, Yang; Li, Jingyi Jessica

    2018-01-01

    In many binary classification applications, such as disease diagnosis and spam detection, practitioners commonly face the need to limit type I error (that is, the conditional probability of misclassifying a class 0 observation as class 1) so that it remains below a desired threshold. To address this need, the Neyman-Pearson (NP) classification paradigm is a natural choice; it minimizes type II error (that is, the conditional probability of misclassifying a class 1 observation as class 0) while enforcing an upper bound, α, on the type I error. Despite its century-long history in hypothesis testing, the NP paradigm has not been well recognized and implemented in classification schemes. Common practices that directly limit the empirical type I error to no more than α do not satisfy the type I error control objective because the resulting classifiers are likely to have type I errors much larger than α, and the NP paradigm has not been properly implemented in practice. We develop the first umbrella algorithm that implements the NP paradigm for all scoring-type classification methods, such as logistic regression, support vector machines, and random forests. Powered by this algorithm, we propose a novel graphical tool for NP classification methods: NP receiver operating characteristic (NP-ROC) bands motivated by the popular ROC curves. NP-ROC bands will help choose α in a data-adaptive way and compare different NP classifiers. We demonstrate the use and properties of the NP umbrella algorithm and NP-ROC bands, available in the R package nproc, through simulation and real data studies. PMID:29423442

  12. Neyman-Pearson classification algorithms and NP receiver operating characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Feng, Yang; Li, Jingyi Jessica

    2018-02-01

    In many binary classification applications, such as disease diagnosis and spam detection, practitioners commonly face the need to limit type I error (that is, the conditional probability of misclassifying a class 0 observation as class 1) so that it remains below a desired threshold. To address this need, the Neyman-Pearson (NP) classification paradigm is a natural choice; it minimizes type II error (that is, the conditional probability of misclassifying a class 1 observation as class 0) while enforcing an upper bound, α, on the type I error. Despite its century-long history in hypothesis testing, the NP paradigm has not been well recognized and implemented in classification schemes. Common practices that directly limit the empirical type I error to no more than α do not satisfy the type I error control objective because the resulting classifiers are likely to have type I errors much larger than α, and the NP paradigm has not been properly implemented in practice. We develop the first umbrella algorithm that implements the NP paradigm for all scoring-type classification methods, such as logistic regression, support vector machines, and random forests. Powered by this algorithm, we propose a novel graphical tool for NP classification methods: NP receiver operating characteristic (NP-ROC) bands motivated by the popular ROC curves. NP-ROC bands will help choose α in a data-adaptive way and compare different NP classifiers. We demonstrate the use and properties of the NP umbrella algorithm and NP-ROC bands, available in the R package nproc, through simulation and real data studies.

  13. Photocatalytic activity of ZnO doped with Ag on the degradation of endocrine disrupting under UV irradiation and the investigation of its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechambi, Olfa; Chalbi, Manel; Najjar, Wahiba; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-08-01

    Ag-doped ZnO photocatalysts with different Ag molar content (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0%) were prepared via hydrothermal method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), Nitrogen physisorption at 77 K, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV--Visible spectroscopy, Photoluminescence spectra (PL) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural, textural and optical properties of the samples. The results showed that Ag-doping does not change the average crystallite size with the Ag low content (≤1.0%) but slightly decreases with Ag high content (>1.0%). The specific surface area (SBET) increases with the increase of the Ag content. The band gap values of ZnO are decreased with the increase of the Ag doping level. The results of the photocatalytic degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) in aqueous solutions under UV irradiation and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) showed that silver ions doping greatly improved the photocatalytic efficiency of ZnO. The TOC conversion BPA and NP are 72.1% and 81.08% respectively obtained using 1% Ag-doped ZnO. The enhancement of photocatalytic activity is ascribed to the fact that the modification of ZnO with an appropriate amount of Ag can increase the separation efficiency of the photogenerated electrons-holes in ZnO. The antibacterial activity of the catalysts which uses Escherichia coli as a model for Gram-negative bacteria confirmed that Ag-doped ZnO possessed more antibacterial activity than the pure ZnO.

  14. Comparison of the toxicity of silver, gold and platinum nanoparticles in developing zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Asharani, P V; Lianwu, Yi; Gong, Zhiyuan; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2011-03-01

    Nanoparticles have diverse applications in electronics, medical devices, therapeutic agents and cosmetics. While the commercialization of nanoparticles is rapidly expanding, their health and environmental impact is not well understood. Toxicity assays of silver, gold, and platinum nanoparticles, using zebrafish embryos to study their developmental effects were carried out. Gold (Au-NP, 15-35 nm), silver (Ag-NP, 5-35 nm) and platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NP, 3-10 nm) were synthesized using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a capping agent. Toxicity was recorded in terms of mortality, hatching delay, phenotypic defects and metal accumulation. The addition of Ag-NP resulted in a concentration-dependant increase in mortality rate. Both Ag-NP and Pt-NP induced hatching delays, as well as a concentration dependant drop in heart rate, touch response and axis curvatures. Ag-NP also induced other significant phenotypic changes including pericardial effusion, abnormal cardiac morphology, circulatory defects and absence or malformation of the eyes. In contrast, Au-NP did not show any indication of toxicity. Uptake and accumulation of nanoparticles in embryos was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), which revealed detectable levels in embryos within 72 hpf. Ag-NP and Au-NP were taken up by the embryos in relatively equal amounts whereas lower Pt concentrations were observed in embryos exposed to Pt-NP. This was probably due to the small size of the Pt nanoparticles compared to Ag-NP and Au-NP, thus resulting in fewer metal atoms being retained in the embryos. Among the nanoparticles studied, Ag-NPs were found to be the most toxic and Au-NPs the non-toxic. The toxic effects exhibited by the zebrafish embryos as a consequence of nanoparticle exposure, accompanied by the accumulation of metals inside the body calls for urgent further investigations in this field.

  15. Investigations of rapid thermal annealing induced structural evolution of ZnO: Ge nanocomposite thin films via GISAXS

    SciTech Connect

    Ceylan, Abdullah, E-mail: aceylanabd@yahoo.com; Ozcan, Yusuf; Orujalipoor, Ilghar

    2016-06-07

    In this work, we present in depth structural investigations of nanocomposite ZnO: Ge thin films by utilizing a state of the art grazing incidence small angle x-ray spectroscopy (GISAXS) technique. The samples have been deposited by sequential r.f. and d.c. sputtering of ZnO and Ge thin film layers, respectively, on single crystal Si(100) substrates. Transformation of Ge layers into Ge nanoparticles (Ge-np) has been initiated by ex-situ rapid thermal annealing of asprepared thin film samples at 600 °C for 30, 60, and 90 s under forming gas atmosphere. A special attention has been paid on the effects of reactive and nonreactivemore » growth of ZnO layers on the structural evolution of Ge-np. GISAXS analyses have been performed via cylindrical and spherical form factor calculations for different nanostructure types. Variations of the size, shape, and distributions of both ZnO and Ge nanostructures have been determined. It has been realized that GISAXS results are not only remarkably consistent with the electron microscopy observations but also provide additional information on the large scale size and shape distribution of the nanostructured components.« less

  16. Magnetic susceptibility of DHCP NpPd3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, H. C.; McEwen, K. A.; Boulet, P.; Colineau, E.; Wastin, F.

    2005-04-01

    We have measured the magnetic susceptibility and magnetisation of the double-hexagonal close-packed (DHCP) phase of NpPd3 from T=2-300 K in magnetic fields up to 7 T. Our results clearly indicate the presence of two phase transitions in this compound, at 10 and 30 K. At higher temperatures, the susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behaviour, with an effective moment of 2.8 μB/Np atom. This result implies that the Np ions are trivalent, with a 5f4 electronic configuration. Below the 30 K transition, the magnetisation of NpPd3 displays hysteresis in fields below 0.1 T with a residual ferromagnetic moment of the order of 0.06 μB/Np atom.

  17. Retarder action of isosorbide in a microemulsion for a targeted delivery of ceramide NP into the stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, S C; Triani, R; Bennedsen, L; Gabel, A; Haeusler, O; Wohlrab, J; Neubert, R H H

    2017-08-01

    Ceramide [NP] is an integral component of the stratum corneum (SC) lipid matrix and is capable of forming tough and stable lamellar structures. It was proven, that in skin diseases as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis different ceramide (CER) classes, including [NP], are degraded. It is obvious that topically application of CER on impaired skin is useful for repairing the skin barrier but a tendency for low penetration due to its poor solubility in conventional dosage forms was observed. Therefore, a stable and physiologic compatible colloidal carrier system, a microemulsion (ME), was developed and characterized. The increasing knowledge of the new colloidal systems in this last decade shows their benefits in dermal application. Isosorbide (Polysorb P) was incorporated into the ME developed. It was expected that Polysorb P has a retarder potential in order to accumulate the CER in the SC, the outermost layer of the skin. Thereby the CER [NP] would be able to interact with the affected skin layers to strengthen the skin barrier. The release and penetration behavior of the CER [NP] from the ME was assessed ex vivo in a Franz diffusion cell. The results of the study showed that CER [NP] penetrate largely in the upper layers of the skin (from SC to stratum basale), which was the desired region. A recovery in the acceptor could not be detected that underlines an accumulation in upper layers. Furthermore, significantly increased values for the SC for the ME with retarder were not received. No differences in the concentrations of CER [NP] were observed. However, the toxicity of MEs was investigated using heńs egg test chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM). For the isosorbide-containing ME no difference was obtained in comparison to the non-containing. The results showed that both MEs are safe to be used on the skin for the controlled penetration of CER [NP] into the skin. The isosorbide had no effect on the irritating effect as well as on the penetration of the used CER.

  18. Highly sensitive NO2 sensor using brush-coated ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Lalit; Dwivedi, R.; Mishra, V. N.

    2017-10-01

    This work reports the sensing properties of a ZnO nanoparticle (NP) based gas sensor. A sol-gel method was used for the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles, and a brush coating technique for applying these in a thick film over the gold electrode. The structural properties of the ZnO film so developed have been studied using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing a hexagonal wurtzite structure having particle size of ~25 to ~110 nm and roughness of ~136.303 nm. The sensitivity of the sensor to NO2, H2, CO, ethanol and propanol gases in the temperature range from 150 to 350 °C has been tested. Among all these gases, sensitivity to NO2 was found to be highest, at around fifty times greater than the next highest sensitivity, for ethanol gas. The sensor’s response to NO2 gas has been measured at ~945.12%/ppt (parts per thousand), with fast response time and recovery time at operating temperature 280 °C. The obtained result has been discussed with the help of surface and subsurface adsorption and desorption of NO2 molecules at the available trap sites (oxygen ions) on the ZnO nanoparticle surface. This sensor also exhibits excellent repeatability.

  19. AuNP-PE interface/phase and its effects on the tensile behaviour of AuNP-PE composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Wang, Ruijie; Wang, Chengyuan; Yu, Xiaozhu

    2018-06-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted for a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-polyethylene (PE) composite. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were employed to construct the AuNP-PE systems, achieve their constitutive relations, and measure their tensile properties. Specifically, the AuNP-PE interface/phase was studied via the mass density profile, and its effect was evaluated by comparing the composite with a pure PE matrix. These research studies were followed by the study of the fracture mechanisms and the size and volume fraction effects of AuNPs. Efforts were also made to reveal the underlying physics of the MD simulations. In the present work, an AuNP-PE interface and a densified PE interphase were achieved due to the AuNP-PE van der Waals interaction. Such an interface/phase is found to enhance the Young's modulus and yield stress but decrease the fracture strength and strain.

  20. Role of surface modification in zinc oxide nanoparticles and its toxicity assessment toward human dermal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Das, Minakshi; An, Seong Soo A; Yi, Dong Kee

    2014-01-01

    The wide-scale applications of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) in photocatalysts, gas sensors, and cosmetics may cause toxicity to humans and environments. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to reduce the toxicity of ZnO NPs by coating them with a silica (SiO2) layer, which could be used in human applications, such as cosmetic preparations. The sol–gel method was used to synthesize core ZnO with SiO2-shelled NPs (SiO2/ZnO NPs) with varying degrees of coating. Diverse studies were performed to analyze the toxicity of NPs against cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To ensure the decreased toxicity of the produced SiO2/ZnO NPs, cytotoxicity in membrane damage and/or intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by employing 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, lactate dehydrogenase, 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin, and lipid peroxide estimations. The cores of ZnO NPs exhibited cytotoxicity over time, regardless of shell thickness. Nevertheless, the thicker SiO2/ZnO NPs revealed reduced enzyme leakage, decreased peroxide production, and less oxidative stress than their bare ZnO NPs or thinner SiO2/ZnO NPs. Therefore, thicker SiO2/ZnO NPs moderated the toxicity of ZnO NPs by restricting free radical formation and the release of zinc ions, and decreasing surface contact with cells. PMID:25143723

  1. Role of surface modification in zinc oxide nanoparticles and its toxicity assessment toward human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Das, Minakshi; An, Seong Soo A; Yi, Dong Kee

    2014-01-01

    The wide-scale applications of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) in photocatalysts, gas sensors, and cosmetics may cause toxicity to humans and environments. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to reduce the toxicity of ZnO NPs by coating them with a silica (SiO2) layer, which could be used in human applications, such as cosmetic preparations. The sol-gel method was used to synthesize core ZnO with SiO2-shelled NPs (SiO2/ZnO NPs) with varying degrees of coating. Diverse studies were performed to analyze the toxicity of NPs against cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To ensure the decreased toxicity of the produced SiO2/ZnO NPs, cytotoxicity in membrane damage and/or intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by employing 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, lactate dehydrogenase, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin, and lipid peroxide estimations. The cores of ZnO NPs exhibited cytotoxicity over time, regardless of shell thickness. Nevertheless, the thicker SiO2/ZnO NPs revealed reduced enzyme leakage, decreased peroxide production, and less oxidative stress than their bare ZnO NPs or thinner SiO2/ZnO NPs. Therefore, thicker SiO2/ZnO NPs moderated the toxicity of ZnO NPs by restricting free radical formation and the release of zinc ions, and decreasing surface contact with cells.

  2. Unusual ordering in c-NpPd3

    SciTech Connect

    Gofryk, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    NpPd{sub 3} exhibits two crystal structures. At room temperature, the equilibrium structure is the dhcp TiNi{sub 3}-type, but rapid cooling from melt produces the cubic AuCu{sub 3}-type structure. In both cases, the Np-Np distance is 4.1 {angstrom}, so that the Np ions are expected to be localized. Both phases of NpPd{sub 3} were first studied at the ANL in the early 1970s. Nellis et al measured the magnetic susceptibility and the electrical resistivity of cubic NpPd{sub 3}, and found evidence of magnetic ordering setting in below T{sub N} = 54 K. The magnetic order in this phase was confirmed bymore » Moessbauer and neutron studies. The neutron data revealed several magnetic Bragg peaks with an ordering wave-vector of (1/2,1/2, 1/2). In contrast, no evidence for any long-range magnetic ordering was found for dhcp NpPd{sub 3}, despite the presence of an anomaly at 30 K in the bulk magnetic data. Our recent measurements of the magnetic (magnetization, susceptibility), thermal (heat capacity) and transport (electrical resistivity, magnetoresistivity, thermopower and Hall effect) properties of cubic NpPd{sub 3} indicated highly unusual nature of the magnetic ordering. At T{sub N}, the specific heat exhibits an extremely large peak [as large as 1000 J/(mol K)] and the magnetic susceptibility shows a clear jump. The transport properties of c-NpPd{sub 3} indicate a dramatic Fermi-surface reconstruction at T{sub N}, which shows up as pronounced anomalies at this temperature in the electrical resistivity, the magnetoresistivity, the Seebeck coefficient and the Hall coefficient.« less

  3. Toxicity of nonylphenol diethoxylate in lab-scale anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Hande; Sanin, F Dilek

    2014-06-01

    Nonylphenol compounds have high commercial, industrial and domestic uses owing to their surface active properties. In addition to their toxic, carcinogenic and persistent characteristics; they have drawn the attention of scientists lately due to their endocrine disrupting properties. Their widespread use and disposal cause them to enter wastewater treatment systems at high concentrations. Since they are highly persistent and hydrophobic, they accumulate mostly on sludge. In this study using Anaerobic Toxicity Assay (ATA) tests, the toxicity of a model nonylphenol compound, nonylphenol diethoxylate (NP2EO), for anaerobic digestion of sludge was determined. The test bottles were dosed with NP2EO in acetone, with concentrations ranging from 1 mg L(-1) to 30 mg L(-1). During the tests, gas productions and compositions in terms of methane and carbon dioxide were monitored. To be able to judge about the fate, the target compounds were extracted from water and sludge and analyzed using GC/MS. The sludge samples used for assembling the reactors were found to contain NP and NP1EO but no NP2EO. After the assay was completed, all the NP2EO spiked into the live reactors was found to disappear. The increase seen in NP1EO and NP and further accumulation of NP in the system, indicated the conversion of NP2EO to these metabolites. On the other hand, no conversion was observed in abiotic reactors. Inhibition of NP2EO for anaerobic microorganisms was not observed throughout the tests considering the biogas production of the test reactors in comparison to the control reactors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. ZnO Nanoparticles Treatment Induces Apoptosis by Increasing Intracellular ROS Levels in LTEP-a-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caixia; Hu, Xiaoke; Gao, Yan; Ji, Yinglu

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the wide use of novel nanoparticles (NPs) such as zinc oxide (ZnO) in all aspects of life, toxicological research on ZnO NPs is receiving increasing attention in these days. In this study, the toxicity of ZnO NPs in a human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line LTEP-a-2 was tested in vitro. Log-phase cells were exposed to different levels of ZnO NPs for hours, followed by colorimetric cell viability assay using tetrazolium salt and cell survival rate assay using trypan blue dye. Cell morphological changes were observed by Giemsa staining and light microscopy. Apoptosis was detected by using fluorescence microscopy and caspase-3 activity assay. Both intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were examined by a microplate-reader method. Results showed that ZnO NPs (≥ 0.01 μg/mL) significantly inhibited proliferation (P < 0.05) and induced substantial apoptosis in LTEP-a-2 cells after 4 h of exposure. The intracellular ROS level rose up to 30-40% corresponding to significant depletion (approximately 70-80%) in GSH content in LTEP-a-2 cells (P < 0.05), suggesting that ZnO NPs induced apoptosis mainly through increased ROS production. This study elucidates the toxicological mechanism of ZnO NPs in human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells and provides reference data for application of nanomaterials in the environment.

  5. Ag nanoparticles-decorated ZnO nanorod array on a mechanical flexible substrate with enhanced optical and antimicrobial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Tse, Wai Hei; Chen, Longyan; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Heteronanostructured zinc oxide nanorod (ZnO NR) array are vertically grown on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through a hydrothermal method followed by an in situ deposition of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) through a photoreduction process. The Ag-ZnO heterostructured nanorods on PDMS are measured with an average diameter of 160 nm and an average length of 2 μm. ZnO NRs measured by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) shows highly crystalline with a lattice fringe of 0.255 nm, which corresponds to the (0002) planes in ZnO crystal lattice. The average diameter of the Ag NPs in situ deposited on the ZnO NRs is estimated at 22 ± 2 nm. As compared to the bare ZnO NRs, the heterostructured Ag-ZnO nanorod array shows enhanced ultraviolet (UV) absorption at 440 nm, and significant emission in the visible region (λem = 542 nm). In addition, the antimicrobial efficiency of Ag-ZnO heterostructured nanorod array shows obvious improvement as compared to bare ZnO nanorod array. The cytotoxicity of ZnO nanorod array with and without Ag NPs was studied by using 3 T3 mouse fibroblast cell line. No significant toxic effect is imposed on the cells.

  6. Ag nanoparticles-decorated ZnO nanorod array on a mechanical flexible substrate with enhanced optical and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Tse, Wai Hei; Chen, Longyan; Zhang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Heteronanostructured zinc oxide nanorod (ZnO NR) array are vertically grown on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through a hydrothermal method followed by an in situ deposition of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) through a photoreduction process. The Ag-ZnO heterostructured nanorods on PDMS are measured with an average diameter of 160 nm and an average length of 2 μm. ZnO NRs measured by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) shows highly crystalline with a lattice fringe of 0.255 nm, which corresponds to the (0002) planes in ZnO crystal lattice. The average diameter of the Ag NPs in situ deposited on the ZnO NRs is estimated at 22 ± 2 nm. As compared to the bare ZnO NRs, the heterostructured Ag-ZnO nanorod array shows enhanced ultraviolet (UV) absorption at 440 nm, and significant emission in the visible region (λem = 542 nm). In addition, the antimicrobial efficiency of Ag-ZnO heterostructured nanorod array shows obvious improvement as compared to bare ZnO nanorod array. The cytotoxicity of ZnO nanorod array with and without Ag NPs was studied by using 3 T3 mouse fibroblast cell line. No significant toxic effect is imposed on the cells.

  7. ZnO nanoparticles modulate the ionic transport and voltage regulation of lysenin nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Sheenah L; Eixenberger, Josh E; Rossland, Steven; Apsley, Holly; Hoffmann, Connor; Shrestha, Nisha; McHugh, Michael; Punnoose, Alex; Fologea, Daniel

    2017-12-16

    The insufficient understanding of unintended biological impacts from nanomaterials (NMs) represents a serious impediment to their use for scientific, technological, and medical applications. While previous studies have focused on understanding nanotoxicity effects mostly resulting from cellular internalization, recent work indicates that NMs may interfere with transmembrane transport mechanisms, hence enabling contributions to nanotoxicity by affecting key biological activities dependent on transmembrane transport. In this line of inquiry, we investigated the effects of charged nanoparticles (NPs) on the transport properties of lysenin, a pore-forming toxin that shares fundamental features with ion channels such as regulation and high transport rate. The macroscopic conductance of lysenin channels greatly diminished in the presence of cationic ZnO NPs. The inhibitory effects were asymmetrical relative to the direction of the electric field and addition site, suggesting electrostatic interactions between ZnO NPs and a binding site. Similar changes in the macroscopic conductance were observed when lysenin channels were reconstituted in neutral lipid membranes, implicating protein-NP interactions as the major contributor to the reduced transport capabilities. In contrast, no inhibitory effects were observed in the presence of anionic SnO 2 NPs. Additionally, we demonstrate that inhibition of ion transport is not due to the dissolution of ZnO NPs and subsequent interactions of zinc ions with lysenin channels. We conclude that electrostatic interactions between positively charged ZnO NPs and negative charges within the lysenin channels are responsible for the inhibitory effects on the transport of ions. These interactions point to a potential mechanism of cytotoxicity, which may not require NP internalization.

  8. Nanostructured TiO2 and ZnO prepared by using pressurized hot water and their eco-toxicological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troppová, Ivana; Matějová, Lenka; Sezimová, Hana; Matěj, Zdeněk; Peikertová, Pavlína; Lang, Jaroslav

    2017-06-01

    The eco-toxicological effects of unconventionally prepared nanostructured TiO2 and ZnO were evaluated in this study, since both oxides are keenly investigated semiconductor photocatalysts in the last three decades. Unconventional processing by pressurized hot water was applied in order to crystallize oxide materials as an alternative to standard calcination. Acute biological toxicity of the synthesized oxides was evaluated using germination of Sinapis alba seed (ISO 11269-1) and growth of Lemna minor fronds (ISO 20079) and was compared to commercially available TiO2 Degussa P25. Toxicity results revealed that synthesized ZnO as well as TiO2 is toxic contrary to commercial TiO2 Degussa P25 which showled stimulation effect to L. minor and no toxicity to S. alba. ZnO was significantly more toxic than TiO2. The effect of crystallite size was considered, and it was revealed that small crystallite size and large surface area are not the toxicity-determining factors. Factors such as the rate of nanosized crystallites aggregation and concentration, shape and surface properties of TiO2 nanoparticles affect TiO2 toxicity to both plant species. Seriously, the dissolution of Ti4+ ions from TiO2 was also observed which may contribute to its toxicity. In case of ZnO, the dissolution of Zn2+ ions stays the main cause of its toxicity.

  9. Acceptors in ZnO

    DOE PAGES

    Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Corolewski, Caleb; Lv, Jinpeng; ...

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence shows that these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.5, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO2 contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peakmore » in ZnO nanocrystals has been attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a zinc vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g = 2.0033 and g = 2.0075, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0053.« less

  10. Impact of ZnO and Ag Nanoparticles on Bacterial Growth and Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, M. S.; Digiovanni, K. A.

    2007-12-01

    Hundreds of consumer products containing nanomaterials are currently available in the U.S., including computers, clothing, cosmetics, sports equipment, medical devices and product packaging. Metallic nanoparticles can be embedded in or coated on product surfaces to provide antimicrobial, deodorizing, and stain- resistant properties. Although these products have the potential to provide significant benefit to the user, the impact of these products on the environment remains largely unknown. The purpose of this project is to study the effect of metallic nanoparticles released to the environment on bacterial growth and viability. Inhibition of bacterial growth was tested by adding doses of suspended ZnO and Ag nanoparticles into luria broth prior to inoculation of Escherichia coli cells. ZnO particles (approximately 40 nm) were obtained commercially and Ag particles (12-14 nm) were fabricated by reduction of silver nitrate with sodium borohydride. Toxicity assays were performed to test the viability of E. coli cells exposed to both ZnO and Ag nanoparticles using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit (Invitrogen). Live cells stain green whereas cells with compromised membranes that are considered dead or dying stain red. Cells were first grown, stained, and exposed to varying doses of metallic nanoparticles, and then bacterial viability was measured hourly using fluorescence microscopy. Results indicate that both ZnO and Ag nanoparticles inhibit the growth of E. coli in liquid media. Preliminary results from toxicity assays confirm the toxic effect of ZnO and Ag nanoparticles on active cell cultures. Calculated death rates resulting from analyses of toxicity studies will be presented.

  11. Synthesis and Property of Ag(NP)/catechin/Gelatin Nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Muhamad; Apriani, Dita

    2017-12-01

    Nanomaterial play important role future industry such as for the medical, food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. Ag (NP) and catechin exhibit antibacterial property. Ag(NP) with diameter around 15 nm was synthesis by microwaved method. We have successfully produce Ag(NP)/catechin/gelatin nanofiber composite by electrospinning process. Ag(NP)/catechin/gelatin nanofiber was synthesized by using gelatin from tuna fish, polyethylene oxide (PEO), acetic acid as solvent and silver nanoparticle(NP)/catechin as bioactive component, respectively. Morphology and structure of bioactive catechin-gelatin nanofiber were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. SEM analysis showed that morphology of nanofiber composite was smooth and had average diameter 398.97 nm. FTIR analysis results were used to confirm structure of catechin-gelatin nanofiber. It was confirmed by FTIR that specific vibration band peak amide A (N-H) at 3286,209 cm-1, amide B (N-H) 3069,396 cm-1, amide I (C=O) at 1643,813 cm-1, amide II (N-H and CN) at 1538,949 cm-1, amide III (C-N) at 1276,789 cm-1, C-O-C from polyethylene oxide at 1146,418 cm-1, respectively. When examined to S. Aureus bacteria, Ag/catechin/gelatin nanofiber show inhabitation performance around 40.44%. Ag(NP)/catechin/gelatin nanofiber has potential application antibacterial medical application.

  12. Ag-NP@Ge-nanotaper/Si-micropillar ordered arrays as ultrasensitive and uniform surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Meng, Guowen; Li, Zhongbo; Huang, Zhulin; Li, Xiangdong

    2015-10-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is considered to be an excellent candidate for analytical detection schemes, because of its molecular specificity, rapid response and high sensitivity. Here, SERS-substrates of Ag-nanoparticle (Ag-NP) decorated Ge-nanotapers grafted on hexagonally ordered Si-micropillar (denoted as Ag-NP@Ge-nanotaper/Si-micropillar) arrays are fabricated via a combinatorial process of two-step etching to achieve hexagonal Si-micropillar arrays, chemical vapor deposition of flocky Ge-nanotapers on each Si-micropillar and decoration of Ag-NPs onto the Ge-nanotapers through galvanic displacement. With high density three-dimensional (3D) ``hot spots'' created from the large quantities of the neighboring Ag-NPs and large-scale uniform morphology, the hierarchical Ag-NP@Ge-nanotaper/Si-micropillar arrays exhibit strong and reproducible SERS activity. Using our hierarchical 3D SERS-substrates, both methyl parathion (a commonly used pesticide) and PCB-2 (one congener of highly toxic polychlorinated biphenyls) with concentrations down to 10-7 M and 10-5 M have been detected respectively, showing great potential in SERS-based rapid trace-level detection of toxic organic pollutants in the environment.Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is considered to be an excellent candidate for analytical detection schemes, because of its molecular specificity, rapid response and high sensitivity. Here, SERS-substrates of Ag-nanoparticle (Ag-NP) decorated Ge-nanotapers grafted on hexagonally ordered Si-micropillar (denoted as Ag-NP@Ge-nanotaper/Si-micropillar) arrays are fabricated via a combinatorial process of two-step etching to achieve hexagonal Si-micropillar arrays, chemical vapor deposition of flocky Ge-nanotapers on each Si-micropillar and decoration of Ag-NPs onto the Ge-nanotapers through galvanic displacement. With high density three-dimensional (3D) ``hot spots'' created from the large quantities of the neighboring Ag-NPs and large-scale uniform

  13. Structural, morphological, optical and biological properties of pure ZnO and agar/zinc oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Magesh, G; Bhoopathi, G; Nithya, N; Arun, A P; Ranjith Kumar, E

    2018-05-26

    In this work, ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by in situ chemical precipitation method in the presence of Agar biopolymer. The influence of Agar concentrations on the structural, morphological and optical properties of ZnO have been investigated. The XRD pattern of Pure ZnO and Agar/ZnO nanocomposites indicates the hexagonal wurtzite phase of ZnO. The crystallite size of pure ZnO and Agar/ZnO nanocomposites was found to be in the range of 35.5 to 19.73 nm. Pure ZnO and Agar/ZnO nanocomposites showed nanospheroid and nanopaddy shaped morphology from FESEM studies. The interplanar distance observed from the HRTEM image confirms the plane of the prepared material. The elemental composition of the samples were characterized by EDX. The optical properties of Pure ZnO and Agar/ZnO nanocomposites were characterized by UV, FTIR and PL. The band gap of Agar/ZnO nanocomposites were varied with the Agar concentration. Oxygen vacancy induced photoluminescence of ZnO are observed and its intensity is found to be increased linearly with the Agar concentration. The antibacterial activity of ZnO and Agar/ZnO nanocomposites was evaluated by disc diffusion method against Gram-positive (B.subtilis) and Gram-negative (P. aeruginosa) bacteria. The cytotoxicity of Agar/ZnO nanocomposites was studied against Normal (L929) and Breast cancer cell line (MB231). The result of this investigation reveals that the Agar/ZnO nanocomposites deliver a dose dependent toxicity in normal and cancer cell line. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Performance and temperature dependencies of proton irradiated n/p GaAs and n/p silicon cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The n/p homojunction GaAs cell is found to be more radiation resistant than p/nheteroface GaAs under 10 MeV proton irradiation. Both GaAs cell types outperform conventional silicon n/p cells under the same conditions. An increase temperature dependency of maximum power for the GaAs n/p cells is attributed largely to differences in Voc between the two GaAs cell types. These results and diffusion length considerations are consistent with the conclusion that p-type GaAs is more radiation resistant than n-type and therefore that the n/p configuration is possibly favored for use in the space radiation environment. However, it is concluded that additional work is required in order to choose between the two GaAs cell configurations.

  15. Study on the aerobic biodegradability and degradation kinetics of 3-NP; 2,4-DNP and 2,6-DNP.

    PubMed

    She, Zonglian; Xie, Tian; Zhu, Yingjie; Li, Leilei; Tang, Gaifeng; Huang, Jian

    2012-11-30

    Four biodegradability tests (BOD(5)/COD ratio, production of carbon dioxide, relative oxygen uptake rate and relative enzymatic activity) were used to determine the aerobic biodegradability of 3-nitrophenol (3-NP), 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) and 2,6-dinitrophenol (2,6-DNP). Furthermore, biodegradation kinetics of the compounds was investigated in sequencing batch reactors both in the presence of glucose (co-substrate) and with nitrophenol as the sole carbon source. Among the three tested compounds, 3-NP showed the best biodegradability while 2,6-DNP was the most difficult to be biodegraded. The Haldane equation was applied to the kinetic test data of the nitrophenols. The kinetic constants are as follows: the maximum specific degradation rate (K(max)), the saturation constants (K(S)) and the inhibition constants (K(I)) were in the range of 0.005-2.98 mg(mgSS d)(-1), 1.5-51.9 mg L(-1) and 1.8-95.8 mg L(-1), respectively. The presence of glucose enhanced the degradation of the nitrophenols at low glucose concentrations. The degradation of 3-NP was found to be accelerated with the increasing of glucose concentrations from 0 to 660 mg L(-1). At high (1320-2000 mg L(-1)) glucose concentrations, the degradation rate of 3-NP was reduced and the K(max) of 3-NP was even lower than the value obtained in the absence of glucose, suggesting that high concentrations of co-substrate could inhibit 3-NP biodegradation. At 2,4-DNP concentration of 30 mg L(-1), the K(max) of 2,4-DNP with glucose as co-substrate was about 30 times the value with 2,4-DNP as sole substrate. 2,6-DNP preformed high toxicity in the case of sole carbon source degradation and the kinetic data was hardly obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. One-dimensional ZnO nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Jayadevan, K P; Tseng, T Y

    2012-06-01

    The wide-gap semiconductor ZnO with nanostructures such as nanoparticle, nanorod, nanowire, nanobelt, nanotube has high potential for a variety of applications. This article reviews the fundamentals of one-dimensional ZnO nanostructures, including processing, structure, property, application and their processing-microstructure-property correlation. Various fabrication methods of the ZnO nanostructures including vapor-liquid-solid process, vapor-solid growth, solution growth, solvothermal growth, template-assisted growth and self-assembly are introduced. The characterization and properties of the ZnO nanostructures are described. The possible applications of these nanostructures are also discussed.

  17. Study of Np(V) Sorption by Ionic Exchange on Na, K, Ca and Mg-Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedicto, A.; Begg, J.; Zhao, P.; Kersting, A. B.; Zavarin, M.

    2012-12-01

    The transport behavior of actinides in soil and ground water are highly influenced by clay minerals due to their ubiquity in the environment, reactivity and colloidal properties. Neptunium(V) has been introduced in the environment as a result of nuclear weapons testing [e.g. 1, 2] and is a radionuclide of potential interest for safety assessment of high level radioactive waste disposal because its long half-life and high toxicity [3]. Surface complexation and ionic exchange have been identified as Np(V) sorption mechanisms onto montmorillonite. At pH below 5, Np(V) sorption is mainly attributed to ionic exchange. This study examines Np(V) ion exchange on Na, K, Ca and Mg forms of montmorillonite. Experiments were carried out using 237Np concentrations between 2 x 10-8 M and 5 x 10-6 M at three different ionic strengths 0.1, 0.01 and 0.001M. The pH was maintained at 4.5. Np(V) sorption to montmorillonite homoionized with monovalent cations (Na and K) demonstrated a markedly different behavior to that observed for montmorillonite homoionized with divalent cations (Ca and Mg). Np sorption to Na and K-montmorillonite was greater than Np sorption to Ca and Mg-montmorillonite. Isotherms with Na and K-montmorillonite showed a strong dependence on ionic strength: the percentage of Np adsorbed was near zero at 0.1M ionic strength, but increased to 30% at 0.001 M ionic strength. This suggests ionic exchange is the main Np adsorption mechanism under the experimental conditions investigated. Dependence on ionic strength was not observed in the Np sorption isotherms for Ca and Mg-montmorillonite indicating a low exchange capacity between Np and divalent cations. Modeling of the sorption experimental data will allow determination of the Na+↔NpO2+ and K+↔NpO2+ ionic exchange constants on montmorillonite. References: [1] A. R. Felmy; K. J. Cantrell; S. D. Conradson, Phys. Chem. Earth 2010, 35, 292-297 [2] D. K. Smith; D. L. Finnegan; S. M. Bowen, J. Environ. Radioact. 2003, 67

  18. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of ZnO Containing Glasses.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Prado, Catuxa; Cabal, Belén; Sanz, Jesús; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José Serafín

    2015-01-01

    A new family of non-toxic biocides based on low melting point (1250°C) transparent glasses with high content of ZnO (15-40wt%) belonging to the miscibility region of the B2O3-SiO2-Na2O-ZnO system has been developed. These glasses have shown an excellent biocide activity (logarithmic reduction >3) against Gram- (E. coli), Gram+ (S. aureus) and yeast (C. krusei); they are chemically stable in different media (distilled water, sea-like water, LB and DMEN media) as well as biocompatible. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the Neutral Red Uptake using NIH-3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cells) and the cell viability was >80%. These new glasses can be considered in several and important applications in the field of inorganic non-toxic biocide agents such as medical implants, surgical equipment, protective apparels in hospitals, water purifications systems, food packaging, food storages or textiles.

  19. Unusual behaviour of (Np,Pu)B2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimczuk, Tomasz; Boulet, Pascal; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Colineau, Eric; Bauer, Ernst; Falmbigl, Matthias; Rogl, Peter; Wastin, Franck

    2015-02-01

    Two transuranium metal boron carbides, NpB2C and PuB2C have been synthesized by argon arc melting. The crystal structures of the {Np,Pu}B2C compounds were determined from single-crystal X-ray data to be isotypic with the ThB2C-type (space group ?, a = 0.6532(2) nm; c = 1.0769(3) nm for NpB2C and a = 0.6509(2) nm; c = 1.0818(3) nm for PuB2C; Z = 9). Physical properties have been derived from polycrystalline bulk material in the temperature range from 2 to 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 9 T. Magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity data indicate the occurrence of antiferromagnetic ordering for NpB2C with a Neel temperature TN = 68 K. PuB2C is a Pauli paramagnet most likely due to a strong hybridization of s(p,d) electrons with the Pu-5f states. A pseudo-gap, as concluded from the Sommerfeld value and the electronic transport, is thought to be a consequence of the hybridization. The magnetic behaviour of {Np,Pu}B2C is consistent with the criterion of Hill.

  20. Using ruthenium polypyridyl functionalized ZnO mesocrystals and gold nanoparticle dotted graphene composite for biological recognition and electrochemiluminescence biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Suli; Zhang, Jinxing; Tu, Wenwen; Bao, Jianchun; Dai, Zhihui

    2014-01-01

    Using ruthenium polypyridyl functionalized ZnO mesocrystals as bionanolabels, a universal biological recognition and biosensing platform based on gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dotted reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite was developed. AuNP-rGO accelerated electron transfer between the detection probe and the electrode, and increased the surface area of the working electrode to load greater amounts of the capture antibodies. The large surface area of ZnO mesocrystals was beneficial for loading a high content ruthenium polypyridyl complex, leading to an enhanced electrochemiluminescence signal. Using α-fetoprotein (AFP) as a model, a simple and sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence biosensor with tripropylamine (TPrA) as a coreactant for detection of AFP was constructed. The designed biosensor provided a good linear range from 0.04 to 500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.031 ng mL-1 at a S/N of 3 for AFP determination. The proposed biological recognition and biosensing platform extended the application of ruthenium polypyridyl functionalized ZnO mesocrystals, which provided a new promising prospect.

  1. Biokinetics of /sup 237/Np in mussels and shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Guary, J.C.; Fowler, S.W.

    1977-01-01

    Neptunium-237 kinetics were studied in marine shrimp and mussels using a thick source alpha counting technique. Bioaccumulation of /sup 237/Np from water was relatively slow in both species, reaching whole body concentration factors of only 15 to 20 after three months. Surface adsorption was implicated in the initial uptake. Both uptake and loss of the radioisotope were not significantly affected by temperature; this may be a reflection of the physical nature of the uptake. By virtue of the large amounts of accumulated /sup 237/Np associated with the exoskeleton of shrimp, molting will play an important role in the biogeochemical cyclingmore » of this transuranic in the marine environment. Rapid growth of organisms like mussels acts to reduce the /sup 237/Np concentration in tissues during a period of decontamination.« less

  2. NMR studies of the dynamics of high-spin nitrophorins: comparative studies of NP4 and NP2 at close to physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Berry, Robert E; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Yang, Fei; Walker, F Ann

    2015-01-20

    The β-barrel nitrophorin (NP) heme proteins are found in the saliva of the blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus, which synthesizes and stores nitric oxide (NO) in the salivary glands. NO is bound to iron of the NPs and is released by dilution and an increase in pH when the insect spits its saliva into the tissues of a victim, to aid in obtaining a blood meal. In the adult insect, there are four nitrophorins, NP1-NP4, which have sequence similarities in two pairs, NP1 and NP4 (90% identical) and NP2 and NP3 (80% identical). The available crystal structures of NP4 have been used to propose that pH-dependent changes in the conformation of two loops between adjacent β-strands at the front opening of the protein, the A-B and G-H loops, determine the rate of NO release. At pH 7.3, NP4 releases NO 17 times faster than NP2 does. In this work, the aqua complexes of NP4 and NP2 have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements to probe the pico- to nanosecond and micro- to millisecond time scale motions at two pH values, 6.5 and 7.3. It is found that NP4-OH2 is fairly rigid and only residues in the loop regions show dynamics at pH 6.5; at pH 7.3, much more dynamics of the loops and most of the β-strands are observed while the α-helices remain fairly rigid. In comparison, NP2-OH2 shows much less dynamics, albeit somewhat more than that of the previously reported NP2-NO complex [Muthu, D., Berry, R. E., Zhang, H., and Walker, F. A. (2013) Biochemistry 52, 7910-7925]. The reasons for this major difference between NP4 and NP2 are discussed.

  3. Acute toxicity of 353-nonylphenol and its metabolites for zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Kammann, Ulrike; Vobach, Michael; Wosniok, Werner; Schäffer, Andreas; Telscher, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) can be detected in the aquatic environment all over the world. It is applied as a technical mixture of isomers of which 353-NP is the most relevant both in terms of abundance (about 20% of total mass) and endocrine potential. 353-NP is metabolised in sewage sludge. The aims of the present study were to determine and to compare the acute toxicity of t-NP, 353-NP and its metabolites as well as to discuss if the toxicity of 353-NP changes during degradation. 353-NP and two of its metabolites were synthesised. The zebrafish embryo test was performed according to standard protocols. Several lethal and non-lethal endpoints during embryonal development were reported. NOEL, LOEL and EC50 were calculated. All tested compounds caused lethal as well as non-lethal malformations during embryo development. 353-NP showed a higher toxicity (EC50 for lethal endpoints 6.7 mg/L) compared to its metabolites 4-(3.5-dimethyl-3-heptyl)-2-nitrophenol (EC50 13.3 mg/L) and 4-(3,5-dimethyl-3-heptyl)-2-bromophenol (EC50 27.1 mg/L). In surface water, concentrations of NP are far below the NOEC identified by the zebrafish embryo test. However, in soils and sewage sludge, concentrations may reach or even exceed these concentrations. Therefore, sludge-treated sites close to surface waters should be analysed for NP and its metabolites in order to detect an unduly high contamination due to runoff events. The results of the present study point out that the toxicity of 353-NP probably declines during metabolisation in water, sediment and soil, but does not vanish since the major metabolites exhibit a clear toxic potential for zebrafish embryos. Metabolites of environmental pollutants should be included in the ecotoxicological test strategy for a proper risk assessment.

  4. Electrochemical growth of controlled tip shapes of ZnO nanorod arrays on silicon substrate and enhanced photoluminescence emission from nanopyramid arrays compared with flat-head nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimanesh, Mahmoud; Hassan, Z.; Zainal, Norzaini

    2017-10-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays (NRAs) with different morphologies such as; perfect hexagon flat-head, pyramidal, compact pencil, nail-shaped, and high-compact ZnO nanorod thin films, were successfully grown on silicon substrates. These NRAs were formed on substrates using a simple low-temperature electrochemical method without adding any catalyst or template via the precursors of zinc nitrate hexahydrate [Zn(NO3)2·6H2O] and hexamethylenetetramine [HMT; C6H12N4] with an equal molar concentration of 0.025 mol/l. The morphologies of the ZnO nanorods (NRs) could be controlled and transformed successfully in to other morphologies by changing the growth conditions, such as; growth temperature and applied current density. Detailed structural investigations reveal that the synthesized various NRs are single crystalline with wurtzite hexagonal phase and preferentially grow along the c-axis direction. The room temperature photoluminescence spectra show that each spectrum consists of an ultraviolet (UV) band and a relative broad visible light emission and infrared emission peak. The enhanced light emission intensity at UV peak (∼375 nm) is observed significantly from ZnO nanopyramid (NP) arrays because of the conical shape of NP. The photoluminescence intensity of the UV peak from the NPs is found to be 1.5-17 times larger than those from the other various NRs.

  5. Ag-NP@Ge-nanotaper/Si-micropillar ordered arrays as ultrasensitive and uniform surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Meng, Guowen; Li, Zhongbo; Huang, Zhulin; Li, Xiangdong

    2015-11-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is considered to be an excellent candidate for analytical detection schemes, because of its molecular specificity, rapid response and high sensitivity. Here, SERS-substrates of Ag-nanoparticle (Ag-NP) decorated Ge-nanotapers grafted on hexagonally ordered Si-micropillar (denoted as Ag-NP@Ge-nanotaper/Si-micropillar) arrays are fabricated via a combinatorial process of two-step etching to achieve hexagonal Si-micropillar arrays, chemical vapor deposition of flocky Ge-nanotapers on each Si-micropillar and decoration of Ag-NPs onto the Ge-nanotapers through galvanic displacement. With high density three-dimensional (3D) "hot spots" created from the large quantities of the neighboring Ag-NPs and large-scale uniform morphology, the hierarchical Ag-NP@Ge-nanotaper/Si-micropillar arrays exhibit strong and reproducible SERS activity. Using our hierarchical 3D SERS-substrates, both methyl parathion (a commonly used pesticide) and PCB-2 (one congener of highly toxic polychlorinated biphenyls) with concentrations down to 10(-7) M and 10(-5) M have been detected respectively, showing great potential in SERS-based rapid trace-level detection of toxic organic pollutants in the environment.

  6. Salts affect the interaction of ZnO or CuO nanoparticles with wheat.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jacob; Hansen, Trevor; McLean, Joan E; McManus, Paul; Das, Siddhartha; Britt, David W; Anderson, Anne J; Dimkpa, Christian O

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) that release metals with potential phytotoxicity could pose problems in agriculture. The authors of the present study used growth in a model growth matrix, sand, to examine the influence of 5 mmol/kg of Na, K, or Ca (added as Cl salts) and root exudates on transformation and changes to the bioactivity of copper(II) oxide (CuO) and zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs on wheat. These salt levels are found in saline agricultural soils. After 14 d of seedling growth, particles with crystallinity typical of CuO or ZnO remained in the aqueous fraction from the sand; particles had negative surface charges that differed with NP type and salt, but salt did not alter particle agglomeration. Reduction in shoot and root elongation and lateral root induction by ZnO NPs were mitigated by all salts. However, whereas Na and K promoted Zn loading into shoots, Ca reduced loading, suggesting that competition with Zn ions for uptake occurred. With CuO NPs, plant growth and loading was modified equally by all salts, consistent with major interaction with the plant with CuO rather than Cu ions. Thus, for both NPs, loading into plant tissues was not solely dependent on ion solubility. These findings indicated that salts in agricultural soils could modify the phytotoxicity of NPs. © 2015 SETAC.

  7. Tissue distribution of zinc and subtle oxidative stress effects after dietary administration of ZnO nanoparticles to rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mona; Fernández, Marta; Conde, Estefanía; Torrent, Fernando; Navas, José M; Fernández-Cruz, María L

    2016-05-01

    The increasing use of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in different fields has raised concerns about the possible environmental risks associated with these NPs entering aquatic systems. In this study, using a dietary exposure route, we have analysed the tissue distribution and depuration pattern of Zn as well as any associated redox balance disturbances in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following exposure to ZnO NPs (20-30nm). Fish were fed a diet spiked with ZnO NPs prepared from a dispersion in sunflower oil at doses of 300 or 1000mg ZnO NPs/kg feed for 10days. This uptake phase was followed by a 28days depuration phase in which fish from all groups received untreated feed. While no overt signs of toxicity were observed and no important effects in fish growth (weight and length) or in the hepatosomatic index among groups were recorded, we observed high levels of Zn bioaccumulation in the gills and intestine of exposed fish following exposure to both dose levels. Zn levels were not eliminated during the depuration phase and we have evidenced oxidative stress responses in gills associated with such long term ZnO NPs bioaccumulation and lack of elimination. Furthermore, exposures to higher doses of ZnO NPs (1000mg/kg feed) resulted in Zn distribution to the liver of fish following 10days of exposure. Fish from this exposure group experienced biochemical disturbances associated with oxidative stress in the liver and ethoxy-resorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity which may point to the ability of ZnO NPs or its ions to interfere with cytochrome P450 metabolic processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Multimethod Approach for Investigating Algal Toxicity of Platinum Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Sara N; Engelbrekt, Christian; Lützhøft, Hans-Christian H; Jiménez-Lamana, Javier; Noori, Jafar S; Alatraktchi, Fatima A; Delgado, Cristina G; Slaveykova, Vera I; Baun, Anders

    2016-10-04

    The ecotoxicity of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) widely used in for example automotive catalytic converters, is largely unknown. This study employs various characterization techniques and toxicity end points to investigate PtNP toxicity toward the green microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Growth rate inhibition occurred in standard ISO tests (EC 50 values of 15-200 mg Pt/L), but also in a double-vial setup, separating cells from PtNPs, thus demonstrating shading as an important artifact for PtNP toxicity. Negligible membrane damage, but substantial oxidative stress was detected at 0.1-80 mg Pt/L in both algal species using flow cytometry. PtNPs caused growth rate inhibition and oxidative stress in P. subcapitata, beyond what was accounted for by dissolved Pt, indicating NP-specific toxicity of PtNPs. Overall, P. subcapitata was found to be more sensitive toward PtNPs and higher body burdens were measured in this species, possibly due to a favored binding of Pt to the polysaccharide-rich cell wall of this algal species. This study highlights the importance of using multimethod approaches in nanoecotoxicological studies to elucidate toxicity mechanisms, influence of NP-interactions with media/organisms, and ultimately to identify artifacts and appropriate end points for NP-ecotoxicity testing.

  9. Comparison of the Carba NP, Modified Carba NP, and Updated Rosco Neo-Rapid Carb Kit Tests for Carbapenemase Detection

    PubMed Central

    AbdelGhani, Sameh; Thomson, Gina K.; Snyder, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The accurate detection of carbapenemase-producing organisms is a major challenge for clinical laboratories. The Carba NP test is highly accurate but inconvenient, as it requires frequent preparation of fresh imipenem solution. The current study was designed to compare the Carba NP test to two alternative tests for accuracy and convenience. These were a modified Carba NP test that utilized intravenous (i.v.) imipenem-cilastatin, which is less expensive than reference standard imipenem powder, and an updated version of the Rosco Neo-Rapid Carb kit, which does not require the preparation of imipenem solution and has a shelf life of 2 years. The comparison included 87 isolates that produced class A carbapenemases (including KPC-2, -3, -4, -5, -6, and -8, NMC-A, and SME type), 40 isolates that produced metallo-β-lactamases (including NDM-1, GIM-1, SPM-1, IMP-1, -2, -7, -8, -18, and -27, and VIM-1, -2, and -7), 11 isolates that produced OXA-48, and one isolate that produced OXA-181. Negative controls consisted of 50 isolates that produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpCs (including hyperproducers), K1, other limited-spectrum β-lactamases, and porin and efflux mutants. Each test exhibited 100% specificity and high sensitivity (Carba NP, 100%; Rosco, 99% using modified interpretation guidelines; and modified Carba NP, 96%). A modified approach to interpretation of the Rosco test was necessary to achieve the sensitivity of 99%. If the accuracy of the modified interpretation is confirmed, the Rosco test is an accurate and more convenient alternative to the Carba NP test. PMID:26311862

  10. Comparative study of textured and epitaxial ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Y. R.; Zhu, S.; Wrobel, J. M.; Jeong, H. M.; Miceli, P. F.; White, H. W.

    2000-06-01

    ZnO films were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on GaAs and α-Al 2O 3 substrates. The properties of ZnO films on GaAs and α-Al 2O 3 have been investigated to determine the differences between epitaxial and textured ZnO films. ZnO films on GaAs show very strong emission features associated with exciton transitions as do ZnO films on α-Al 2O 3, while the crystalline structural qualities for ZnO films on α-Al 2O 3 are much better than those for ZnO films on GaAs. The properties of ZnO films are studied by comparing highly oriented, textured ZnO films on GaAs with epitaxial ZnO films on α-Al 2O 3 synthesized along the c-axis.

  11. Toxicity assessment of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production and applications of nanoparticles (NP) in diverse fields has steadily increased in recent decades; however, knowledge about risks of NP to human health and ecosystems is still scarce. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used engineere...

  12. Effects of serum on cytotoxicity of nano- and micro-sized ZnO particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, I.-Lun; Huang, Yuh-Jeen

    2013-09-01

    Although an increasing number of in vitro studies are being published regarding the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials, the components of the media for toxicity assays have often varied according to the needs of the scientists. Our aim for this study was to evaluate the influence of serum—in this case, fetal bovine serum—in a cell culture medium on the toxicity of nano-sized (50-70 nm) and micro-sized (<1 μm) ZnO on human lung epithelial cells (A549). The nano- and micro-sized ZnO both exhibited their highest toxicity when exposed to serum-free media, in contrast to exposure in media containing 5 or 10 % serum. This mainly comes not only from the fact that ZnO particles in the serum-free media have a higher dosage-per-cell ratio, which results from large aggregates of particles, rapid sedimentation, absence of protein protection, and lower cell growth rate, but also that extracellular Zn2+ release contributes to cytotoxicity. Although more extracellular Zn2+ release was observed in serum-containing media, it did not contribute to nano-ZnO cytotoxicity. Furthermore, non-dissolved particles underwent size-dependent particle agglomeration, resulting in size-dependent toxicity in both serum-containing and serum-free media. A low correlation between cytotoxicity and inflammation endpoints in the serum-free medium suggested that some signaling pathways were changed or induced. Since cell growth, transcription behavior for protein production, and physicochemical properties of ZnO particles all were altered in serum-free media, we recommend the use of a serum-containing medium when evaluating the cytotoxicity of NPs.

  13. Investigating the Implementation of ZnO Nanoparticles as a Tunable UV Detector for Different Skin Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosayebi, Pegah; Dorranian, Davoud; Behzad, Kasra

    A facile chemical reduction method was used to synthesize ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) in ethylene glycol solvent at two different calcination temperatures. As a result of variation in the calcination temperature, ZnO NPs with two different sizes were achieved. The NPs were investigated for their structural and optical characteristics using X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet (UV)-Vis spectroscopy. The synthesized ZnO NPs exhibited a hexagonal structure with sizes of 46 and 65nm. The synthesized NPs were then used to investigate dye photocatalytic behavior of products as a tunable UV detector for different skin types. The dye degradation and decolorization of methylene blue in the presence of ZnO NP, following UV radiation as a function of time, were studied at different pH levels. The optical absorption spectra were then taken every 15min for all samples. The UV-Vis spectroscopy spectra revealed that optical absorption of solution was decreased upon UV exposure as a function of time. Photocatalytic reaction indicated that the dye degradation and decolorization rate were accelerated with the increase of pH level. Therefore, a tunable UV detector for different skin types could be engineered by varying the pH level of solution to avoid human skin burning.

  14. Agreement of NP and VP Coordination in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sung-Ryong; Na, Won-Shik

    2011-01-01

    There have been long argumentations about this topic and people are still having difficulty in explaining precisely what the agreement values the mother NP phrase should have from two conjunct daughters which have different AGR (Agreement) values. Especially, this could be more complicated when the values of gender, number, and person of each…

  15. Low-cost synthesis of pure ZnO nanowalls showing three-fold symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Mario; Strano, Vincenzina; Spinella, Corrado; Nicotra, Giuseppe; Mirabella, Salvo

    2018-04-01

    ZnO nanowalls (NWLs) represent a non-toxic, Earth abundant, high surface-to-volume ratio, semiconducting nanostructure which has already showed potential applications in biosensing, environmental monitoring and energy. Low-cost synthesis of these nanostructures is extremely appealing for large scale upgrading of laboratory results, and its implementation has to be tested at the nanoscale, at least in terms of chemical purity and crystallographic orientation. Here, we have produced pure and texturized ZnO NWLs by using chemical bath deposition (CBD) synthesis followed by a thermal treatment at 300 °C. We examined the NWL formation process and the new obtained structure at the nanoscale, by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy in combination with x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. We have shown that only after annealing at 300 °C in nitrogen does the as-grown material, composed of a mixture of Zn compounds NWLs, show its peculiar crystal arrangement. The resulting ZnO sheets are in fact made by ZnO wurtzite domains (4-5 nm) that show a particular kind of texturization; indeed, they are aligned with their own c-axis always perpendicular to the sheets forming the wall and rotated (around the c-axis) by multiples of 20° from each other. The presented data show that low-cost CBD, followed by an annealing process, gives pure ZnO with a peculiarly ordered nanostructure that shows three-fold symmetry. Such evidence at the nanoscale will have significant implications for realizing sensing or catalyst devices based on ZnO NWLs.

  16. Nanoparticle delivery of chemosensitizers improve chemotherapy efficacy without incurring additional toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caster, Joseph M.; Sethi, Manish; Kowalczyk, Sonya; Wang, Edina; Tian, Xi; Nabeel Hyder, Sayed; Wagner, Kyle T.; Zhang, Ying-Ao; Kapadia, Chintan; Man Au, Kin; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2015-01-01

    Chemosensitizers can improve the therapeutic index of chemotherapy and overcome treatment resistance. Successful translation of chemosensitizers depends on the development of strategies that can preferentially deliver chemosensitizers to tumors while avoiding normal tissue. We hypothesized that nanoparticle (NP) formulation of chemosensitizers can improve their delivery to tumors which can in turn improve their therapeutic index. To demonstrate the proof of principle of this approach, we engineered NP formulations of two chemosensitizers, the PI3-kindase inhibitor wortmanin (Wtmn) and the PARP inhibitor olaparib. NP Wtmn and NP olaparib were evaluated as chemosensitizers using lung cancer cells and breast cancer cells respectively. We found Wtmn to be an efficient chemosensitizer in all tested lung-cancer cell lines reducing tumor cell growth between 20 and 60% compared to drug alone. NP formulation did not decrease its efficacy in vitro. Olaparib showed less consistent chemosensitization as a free drug or in NP formulation. NP Wtmn was further evaluated as a chemosensitizer using mouse models of lung cancer. We found that NP Wtmn is an effective chemosensitizer and more effective than free Wtmn showing a 32% reduction in tumor growth compared to free Wtmn when given with etoposide. Importantly, NP Wtmn was able to sensitize the multi-drug resistant H69AR cells to etoposide. Additionally, the combination of NP Wtmn and etoposide chemotherapy did not significantly increase toxicity. The present study demonstrates the proof of principle of using NP formulation of chemosensitizing drugs to improve the therapeutic index of chemotherapy.

  17. It's Not Just the "Heavy NP": Relative Phrase Length Modulates the Production of Heavy-NP Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Lynne M.; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2011-01-01

    Heavy-NP shift is the tendency for speakers to place long direct object phrases at the end of a clause rather than next to the verb. Though some analyses have focused on length of the direct object phrase alone, results from two experiments demonstrate that the length of the direct object relative to that of other phrases, and not the length of…

  18. Chitosan nanocomposite films based on Ag-NP and Au-NP biosynthesis by Bacillus Subtilis as packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Ahmed M; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed S; El-Sayed, Samah M

    2014-08-01

    Chitosan-silver (CS-Ag) and Chitosan-gold (CS-Au) nanocomposites films were synthesized by a simple chemical method. A local bacterial isolate identified as Bacillus subtilis ss subtilis was found to be capable to synthesize both silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) and gold nanoparticles (Au-NP) from silver nitrate (AgNO3) and chloroauric acid (AuCl(4-)) solutions, respectively. The biosynthesis of both Ag-NP and Au-NP characterize using UV/vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and then added to chitosan by different ratios (0.5, 1 and 2%). The prepared chitosan nanocomposites films were characterize using UV, XRD, SEM and TEM. Moreover, the antibacterial activity of the prepared films was evaluated against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aerugenosa), fungi (Aspergillus niger) and yeast (Candida albicans). Therefore, these materials can be potential used as antimicrobial agents in packaging applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparative analysis of green synthesis approach starch capped metal oxides (ZnO & CdO) nanoparticles and its bacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidhya, K.; Devarajan, V. P.; Viswanathan, C.; Nataraj, D.; Bhoopathi, G.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we have investigated the bacterial activity of starch capped ZnO & CdO NPs. The NPs were prepared through green technique under room temperature and then obtained samples were characterized by using XRD and PL techniques. XRD pattern confirms the crystal nature it shows hexagonal structure for ZnO NPs and monoclinic structure for CdO NPs and their average particle size is ±20 nm. Further, the optical properties of NPs were investigated using PL technique in which the starch capped ZnO NPs shows maximum emission at 440 nm whereas starch capped CdO NPs shows maximum emission at 545 nm. Finally, toxic test was performed with E.coli bacteria and their results were investigated. Hence, starch capped ZnO NPs induced less killing effect when compared with starch capped CdO NPs. Therefore, we conclude that the starch capped ZnO NPs may be less toxic to microorganisms when compared with starch capped CdO NPs. In addition, starch capped ZnO NPs is also suitable for anti-microbial activity.

  20. Toxicity of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Behzadi, Shahed; Laurent, Sophie; Forrest, M. Laird; Stroeve, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. There are few studies of the long-term consequences of nanoparticles on human health, but governmental agencies, including the United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and Japan’s Ministry of Health, have recently raised the question of whether seemingly innocuous materials such as carbon-based nanotubes should be treated with the same caution afforded known carcinogens such as asbestos. Since nanomaterials are increasing a part of everyday consumer products, manufacturing processes, and medical products, it is imperative that both workers and end-users be protected from inhalation of potentially toxic NPs. It also suggests that NPs may need to be sequestered into products so that the NPs are not released into the atmosphere during the product’s life or during recycling. Further, non-inhalation routes of NP absorption, including dermal and medical injectables, must be studied in order to understand possible toxic effects. Fewer studies to date have addressed whether the body can eventually eliminate nanomaterials to prevent particle build-up in tissues or organs. This critical review discusses the biophysicochemical properties of various nanomaterials with emphasis on currently available toxicology data and methodologies for evaluating nanoparticle toxicity. PMID:22170510

  1. SAFETY/TOXICITY ASSESSMENT OF CERIA (A MODEL ENGINEERED NP) TO THE BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results will indicate the influence of the size, shape and various surface chemistry properties of ENMs on their entrance into BBB cells and the brain, compared to selected peripheral organs, the effects they produce in the brain, their biopersistence and biotransformation...

  2. Using Synchrotron-Based Approaches To Examine the Foliar Application of ZnSO4 and ZnO Nanoparticles for Field-Grown Winter Wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Sun, Hongda; Lv, Zhiyuan; Cui, Lili; Mao, Hui; Kopittke, Peter M

    2018-03-21

    The effects of foliar-applied ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and ZnSO 4 on the winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) grain yield and grain quality were studied under field conditions, with the distribution and speciation of Zn within the grain examined using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Although neither of the two Zn compounds improved the grain yield or quality, both increased the grain Zn concentration (average increments were 5 and 10 mg/kg for ZnSO 4 and ZnO NP treatments, respectively). Across all treatments, this Zn was mainly located within the aleurone layer and crease of the grain, although the application of ZnO NPs also slightly increased Zn within the endosperm. This Zn within the grain was found to be present as Zn phosphate, regardless of the form in which Zn was applied. These results indicate that the foliar application of ZnO NPs appears to be a promising approach for Zn biofortification, as required to improve human health.

  3. A Cs(x)WO3/ZnO nanocomposite as a smart coating for photocatalytic environmental cleanup and heat insulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyong; Yin, Shu; Xue, Dongfeng; Komarneni, Sridhar; Sato, Tsugio

    2015-10-28

    A novel CsxWO3/ZnO smart coating was proposed to achieve multiple functions, such as heat insulation, photodecomposition of toxic NO gas, blocking of harmful UV light, etc. In this composite coating, CsxWO3 nanorods were used as a NIR and UV light shielding material while ZnO nanoparticles were utilized as a photocatalyst and a material to enhance visible light transmittance and block UV light. When the mass ratio of CsxWO3/ZnO was 1, the composite coating possessed a very good visible light transmittance of over 80% and an excellent UV-shielding ability. This novel coating showed heat insulation that is superior to the ITO coating and photocatalytic decontamination of NO gas that is superior to the standard TiO2 (P25). The proposed CsxWO3/ZnO smart coating is a promising material not only for energy saving but also for environmental cleanup.

  4. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  5. A dual-colored bio-marker made of doped ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. L.; Fu, S.; Tok, A. I. Y.; Zeng, X. T.; Lim, C. S.; Kwek, L. C.; Boey, F. C. Y.

    2008-08-01

    Bio-compatible ZnO nanocrystals doped with Co, Cu and Ni cations, surface capped with two types of aminosilanes and titania are synthesized by a soft chemical process. Due to the small particle size (2-5 nm), surface functional groups and the high photoluminescence emissions at the UV and blue-violet wavelength ranges, bio-imaging on human osteosarcoma (Mg-63) cells and histiocytic lymphoma U-937 monocyte cells showed blue emission at the nucleus and bright turquoise emission at the cytoplasm simultaneously. This is the first report on dual-color bio-images labeled by one semiconductor nanocrystal colloidal solution. Bright green emission was detected on mung bean seedlings labeled by all the synthesized ZnO nanocrystals. Cytotoxicity tests showed that the aminosilanes capped nanoparticles are non-toxic. Quantum yields of the nanocrystals varied from 79% to 95%. The results showed the potential of the pure ZnO and Co-doped ZnO nanocrystals for live imaging of both human cells and plant systems.

  6. Solvothermal synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles and anti-infection application in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiangyang; Li, Linlin; Liu, Huiyu; Tan, Longfei; Liu, Tianlong; Meng, Xianwei

    2015-01-21

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) have been widely studied as the bacteriostatic reagents. However, synthesis of small ZnO nanoparticles with good monodispersion and stability in aqueous solution is still a challenge. Anti-infection research of ZnONPs used as antibacterial agent in vivo is rare. In this paper, a novel, sustainable, and simple method to synthesize ZnO nanoparticles with good monodispersion in aqueous low-temperature conditions and with a small molecule agent is reported. Inhibition zone test and the minimum inhibitory concentration test were performed to examine the antibacterial activity of ZnONPs against bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in vitro. For further application in vivo, low cytotoxicity and low acute toxicity in mice of ZnO were demonstrated. Finally, 4 nm ZnONPs combined with poly(vinyl alcohol) gel was used as antibacterial agent in rodent elytritis model, and significant anti-infection effect was proven. In one word, the present research would shed new light on the designing of antibacterial materials like ZnO with promising application in disinfection.

  7. Covariant spectator theory of np scattering: Deuteron quadrupole moment

    DOE PAGES

    Gross, Franz

    2015-01-26

    The deuteron quadrupole moment is calculated using two CST model wave functions obtained from the 2007 high precision fits to np scattering data. Included in the calculation are a new class of isoscalar np interaction currents automatically generated by the nuclear force model used in these fits. The prediction for model WJC-1, with larger relativistic P-state components, is 2.5% smaller that the experiential result, in common with the inability of models prior to 2014 to predict this important quantity. However, model WJC-2, with very small P-state components, gives agreement to better than 1%, similar to the results obtained recently frommore » XEFT predictions to order N 3LO.« less

  8. Updated and revised neutron reaction data for 237Np

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guochang; Wang, Jimin; Cao, Wentian; Tang, Guoyou; Yu, Baosheng

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear data with high accuracy for minor actinides play an important role in nuclear technology applications, including reactor design and operation, fuel cycle, estimation of the amount of minor actinides in high burn-up reactors and the minor actinides transmutation. Based on the evaluated experimental data, the updated and revised evaluation of a full set of n+237Np nuclear data from 10-5 eV ˜ 20 MeV are carried out and recommended. Mainly revised quantities are neutron multiplicities from fission reaction, inelastic, fission, (n, 2n) and (n, γ) reaction cross sections as well as angular distribution and so on. The promising results are obtained when the renewal evaluated data of 237Np will be used to instead of the evaluated data in CENDL-3.1 database.

  9. Method for separating actinides. [Patent application; stripping of Np from organic extractant

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, H.A.; Toth, L.M.

    1980-11-10

    An organic solution used for processing spent nuclear reactor fuels is contacted with an aqueous nitric acid solution to strip Np(VI), U(VI), and Pu(IV) from the organic solution into the acid solution. The acid solution is exposed to ultraviolet light, which reduces Np(VI) to Np(V) without reducing U(VI) and Pu(IV). Since the solubility of Np(V) in the organic solution is much lower than that of Np(VI), U(VI), and Pu(IV), a major part of the Np is stripped from the organic solution while leaving most of the U and Pu therein.

  10. Learning optimal quantum models is NP-hard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Cyril J.

    2018-02-01

    Physical modeling translates measured data into a physical model. Physical modeling is a major objective in physics and is generally regarded as a creative process. How good are computers at solving this task? Here, we show that in the absence of physical heuristics, the inference of optimal quantum models cannot be computed efficiently (unless P=NP ). This result illuminates rigorous limits to the extent to which computers can be used to further our understanding of nature.

  11. Liver biomarker and in vitro assessment confirm the hepatic origin of aminotransferase elevations lacking histopathological correlate in beagle dogs treated with GABA{sub A} receptor antagonist NP260

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Alison H., E-mail: ahharrill@uams.edu; The Hamner-University of North Carolina Institute for Drug Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709; Eaddy, John S.

    NP260 was designed as a first-in-class selective antagonist of α4-subtype GABA{sub A} receptors that had promising efficacy in animal models of pain, epilepsy, psychosis, and anxiety. However, development of NP260 was complicated following a 28-day safety study in dogs in which pronounced elevations of serum aminotransferase levels were observed, although there was no accompanying histopathological indication of hepatocellular injury. To further investigate the liver effects of NP260, we assayed stored serum samples from the 28-day dog study for liver specific miRNA (miR-122) as well as enzymatic biomarkers glutamate dehydrogenase and sorbitol dehydrogenase, which indicate liver necrosis. Cytotoxicity assessments were conductedmore » in hepatocytes derived from dog, rat, and human liver samples to address the species specificity of the liver response to NP260. All biomarkers, except ALT, returned toward baseline by Day 29 despite continued drug treatment, suggesting adaptation to the initial injury. In vitro analysis of the toxicity potential of NP260 to primary hepatocytes indicated a relative sensitivity of dog > human > rat, which may explain, in part, why the liver effects were not evident in the rodent safety studies. Taken together, the data indicate that a diagnostic biomarker approach, coupled with sensitive in vitro screening strategies, may facilitate interpretation of toxicity potential when an adaptive event masks the underlying toxicity. - Highlights: • NP260 caused ALT elevations in dogs without evidence of hepatocellular injury. • SDH, GLDH, and miRNA-122 elevations occurred, confirming hepatocellular necrosis. • NP260 toxicity is greater in dog and human hepatocytes than in rat hepatocytes. • Species sensitivity may explain why the rodent studies failed to indicate risk. • Diagnostic biomarkers and hepatocyte studies aid interpretation of hepatotoxicity.« less

  12. Falling Leaves Inspired ZnO Nanorods-Nanoslices Hierarchical Structure for Implant Surface Modification with Two Stage Releasing Features.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hang; Miao, Xinxin; Ye, Jing; Wu, Tianlong; Deng, Zhongbo; Li, Chen; Jia, Jingyu; Cheng, Xigao; Wang, Xiaolei

    2017-04-19

    Inspired from falling leaves, ZnO nanorods-nanoslices hierarchical structure (NHS) was constructed to modify the surfaces of two widely used implant materials: titanium (Ti) and tantalum (Ta), respectively. By which means, two-stage release of antibacterial active substances were realized to address the clinical importance of long-term broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. At early stages (within 48 h), the NHS exhibited a rapid releasing to kill the bacteria around the implant immediately. At a second stage (over 2 weeks), the NHS exhibited a slow releasing to realize long-term inhibition. The excellent antibacterial activity of ZnO NHS was confirmed once again by animal test in vivo. According to the subsequent experiments, the ZnO NHS coating exhibited the great advantage of high efficiency, low toxicity, and long-term durability, which could be a feasible manner to prevent the abuse of antibiotics on implant-related surgery.

  13. Multifunctional transparent ZnO nanorod films.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Geunjae; Jung, Sungmook; Yong, Kijung

    2011-03-18

    Transparent ZnO nanorod (NR) films that exhibit extreme wetting states (either superhydrophilicity or superhydrophobicity through surface chemical modification), high transmittance, UV protection and antireflection have been prepared via the facile ammonia hydrothermal method. The periodic 1D ZnO NR arrays showed extreme wetting states as well as antireflection properties due to their unique surface structure and prevented the UVA region from penetrating the substrate due to the unique material property of ZnO. Because of the simple, time-efficient and low temperature preparation process, ZnO NR films with useful functionalities are promising for fabrication of highly light transmissive, antireflective, UV protective, antifogging and self-cleaning optical materials to be used for optical devices and photovoltaic energy devices.

  14. Stroop interference and negative priming (NP) suppression in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Mayas, J; Fuentes, L J; Ballesteros, S

    2012-01-01

    Age-related differences in the reduction of Stroop interference were explored by comparing the performance of 18 younger (of mean age: 30.0±3.9 years) and 18 older healthy adults (of mean age: 75±7.2 years) in a color-word Stroop task. The aim of this study was to determine whether a decrease in the efficiency of inhibitory mechanisms associated with aging could account for age-related differences in the ability to suppress a pre-potent response. Participants performed a Stroop task to assess Stroop interference and NP suppression concurrently. Results showed a greater Stroop interference in older than in young adults. On the other hand, the NP effect was only reliable in the younger group, the older group not showing NP suppression. These findings suggest that the slowing hypothesis alone cannot explain this pattern of results and that the age-related differences must also involve an inhibitory breakdown during aging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. NP-59 test for preoperative localization of primary hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Marcello; García Sanz, Iñigo; Muñoz de Nova, Jose Luis; Marín Campos, Cristina; Martínez Martín, Miguel; Domínguez Gadea, Luis

    2017-03-01

    Adrenal venous sampling is generally considered the gold standard to identify unilateral hormone production in cases of primary hyperaldosteronism. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the iodine-131-6-β-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol (NP-59) test may represent an alternative in selected cases. Patients submitted to laparoscopic adrenalectomy for suspected primary hyperaldosteronism (n = 27) were retrospectively reviewed. When nuclear medicine tests were preoperatively performed, their results were compared with the histopathologic findings and clinical improvement. Nuclear medicine tests were realized in 13 patients. In 11 (84.6%), a planar anterior and posterior NP-59 scintigraphy was performed and a SPECT/TC in two (15.4%). Scintigraphy indicated a preoperative lateralization in 12 out of 13 patients (92.3%). When the value of NP-59 tests was based on pathologic results, it showed a sensitivity of 90.9% and a positive predictive value of 83.3%. When the nuclear medicine test's performance was based on postoperative blood pressure control, both sensitivity and positive predictive value were 91.6%. Nuclear medicine tests represent a useful tool in the preoperative localisation of primary hyperaldosteronism with a high sensitivity and positive predictive value. In patients with contraindications to adrenal venous sampling like contrast allergies, or when it is inconclusive, scintigraphy can represent a useful and non-invasive alternative.

  16. Robust learning for optimal treatment decision with NP-dimensionality

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chengchun; Song, Rui; Lu, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify important variables that are involved in making optimal treatment decision, Lu, Zhang and Zeng (2013) proposed a penalized least squared regression framework for a fixed number of predictors, which is robust against the misspecification of the conditional mean model. Two problems arise: (i) in a world of explosively big data, effective methods are needed to handle ultra-high dimensional data set, for example, with the dimension of predictors is of the non-polynomial (NP) order of the sample size; (ii) both the propensity score and conditional mean models need to be estimated from data under NP dimensionality. In this paper, we propose a robust procedure for estimating the optimal treatment regime under NP dimensionality. In both steps, penalized regressions are employed with the non-concave penalty function, where the conditional mean model of the response given predictors may be misspecified. The asymptotic properties, such as weak oracle properties, selection consistency and oracle distributions, of the proposed estimators are investigated. In addition, we study the limiting distribution of the estimated value function for the obtained optimal treatment regime. The empirical performance of the proposed estimation method is evaluated by simulations and an application to a depression dataset from the STAR*D study. PMID:28781717

  17. Global Optimal Trajectory in Chaos and NP-Hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Vittorio; Gao, David Yang

    This paper presents an unconventional theory and method for solving general nonlinear dynamical systems. Instead of the direct iterative methods, the discretized nonlinear system is first formulated as a global optimization problem via the least squares method. A newly developed canonical duality theory shows that this nonconvex minimization problem can be solved deterministically in polynomial time if a global optimality condition is satisfied. The so-called pseudo-chaos produced by linear iterative methods are mainly due to the intrinsic numerical error accumulations. Otherwise, the global optimization problem could be NP-hard and the nonlinear system can be really chaotic. A conjecture is proposed, which reveals the connection between chaos in nonlinear dynamics and NP-hardness in computer science. The methodology and the conjecture are verified by applications to the well-known logistic equation, a forced memristive circuit and the Lorenz system. Computational results show that the canonical duality theory can be used to identify chaotic systems and to obtain realistic global optimal solutions in nonlinear dynamical systems. The method and results presented in this paper should bring some new insights into nonlinear dynamical systems and NP-hardness in computational complexity theory.

  18. Absorption spectroscopic studies of Np(IV) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D. T.

    2004-01-01

    The complexation of neptunium (IV) with selected inorganic and organic ligands was studied as part of an investigation to establish key subsurface interactions between neptunium and biological systems. The prevalence of reducing environments in most subsurface migation scenarios, which are in many cases induced by biological activity, has increased the role and importance of Np(IV) as a key subsurface neptunium oxidation state. The biodegradation of larger organics that often coexist with actinides in the subsurface leads to the formation of many organic acids as transient products that, by complexation, play a key role in defining the fate and speciation ofmore » neptunium in biologically active systems. These often compete with inorganic complexes e.g. hydrolysis and phosphate. Herein we report the results of a series of complexation studies based on new band formation of the characteristic 960 nm band for Np(IV). Formation constants for Np(IV) complexes with phosphate, hydrolysis, succinate, acetohydroxamic acid, and acetate were determined. These results show the 960 nm absorption band to be very amenable to these types of complexation studies.« less

  19. Expression of stress response HSP70 gene in Asian paddle crabs, Charybdis japonica, exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-nonylphenol (NP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kiyun; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2013-06-01

    The Asian paddle crab, Charybdis japonica, is a potential bio-indicator reflecting marine sediment toxicity as well as a commercially important species living along coastal areas in Korea. This study investigated its stress response by looking at the heat shock protein (HSP70) gene of C. japonica when the organism is exposed to bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-nonylphenol (NP). We characterized partial sequence of HSP70 as the stressresponse gene of C. japonica. The nucleotide sequence of C. japonica HSP70 is over 90% homologous with the corresponding gene of other crabs. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a close relationship between C. japonica HSP70 and HSP70 in other species of lobster and shrimps. HSP70 mRNA transcripts were detected in all the examined tissues of C. japonica, with the highest level in gills, the organ that most frequently came into contact with the external BPA or NP-laden water. As no reference data were available for C. japonica crab exposure, the BPA and NP 24-h LC50 values have not been previously determined. The expression of the C. japonica HSP70 gene to various BPA or NP concentrations during short and longer times was assessed. Gene expression was significantly induced in concentration- and time-dependent manners after BPA or NP exposures. These results support the postulation that crab C. japonica HSP70 could be a potential stress response molecular marker to monitor marine ecosystems.

  20. Assessment of polyaniline nanoparticles toxicity and teratogenicity in aquatic environment using Rhinella arenarum model.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Luis E; Tarres, Lucrecia; Bongiovanni, Silvestre; Barbero, César A; Kogan, Marcelo J; Rivarola, Viviana A; Bertuzzi, Mabel L; Yslas, Edith I

    2015-04-01

    With the rapid growth of nanotechnology and the applications of nanoparticles, environmental exposure to these particles is increasing. However, their impact in human and environmental health is not well studied. Anurans, with life stage comprising embryos, tadpoles and adults, have an extremely permeable skin which makes them excellent indicators of environmental health. This study evaluated the acute toxicity effects of polyaniline nanoparticles (PANI-Np) in different dispersant on embryos and larvae of Rhinella arenarum. The results showed that LC50 of PANI-Np dispersed in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were 1,500 mg/L, while LC50 by PANI-Np dispersed in PVP+PNIPAM (polyN-isopropylacrilamide) showed a highest toxicity (1,170 mg/L). The embryo teratogenicity increased with increasing exposure concentration in both kinds of PANI-Np although in PANI-Np1, there is an increased teratogenic effect associated with the polymer stabilizer PVP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Superhydrophobicity of Hierarchical and ZNO Nanowire Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2014-0141 SUPERHYDROPHOBICITY OF HIERARCHICAL ZNO NANOWIRE COATINGS (POSTPRINT) Shin Mou AFRL/RXAN JANUARY... SUPERHYDROPHOBICITY OF HIERARCHICAL ZNO NANOWIRE COATINGS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...or disclose the work. The final publication is available at www.rsc.org/MaterialsA. 14. ABSTRACT Hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces were

  2. ZnO nanoparticles and organic chemical UV-filters are equally well tolerated by human immune cells.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Sean J; Feltis, Bryce N; Piva, Terrence J; Turney, Terence W; Wright, Paul F A

    2016-11-01

    An important part of assessing the toxic potential of nanoparticles for specific applications should be the direct comparison of biological activities with those of alternative materials for the same application. Nanoparticulate inorganic ultraviolet (UV) filters, such as zinc oxide (ZnO), are commonly incorporated into transparent sunscreen and cosmetic formulations. However, concerns have been raised about potential unwanted effects, despite their negligible skin penetration and inherent advantages over organic chemical UV-filters. To provide useful application-relevant assessments of their potential hazard with/without UVA co-exposure, we directly compared cytotoxic and immune response profiles of human THP-1 monocytic cells to ZnO nanoparticles (30 nm) with bulk ZnO particulates (200 nm) and five conventional organic chemical UV-filters - butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane (avobenzone), octylmethoxycinnamate, octylsalicylate, homosalate and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor. High exposure concentrations of both organic and particulate UV-filters were required to cause cytotoxicity in monocyte and macrophage cultures after 24 h. Co-exposure with UVA (6.7 J/cm(2)) did not alter cytotoxicity profiles. Particle surface area-based dose responses showed that ZnO NPs were better tolerated than bulk ZnO. Organic and particulate UV-filters increased apoptosis at similar doses. Only particulates increased the generation of reactive oxygen species. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) release was increased by all particulates, avobenzone, homosalate and octylsalicylate. IL-1β release was only increased in macrophages by exposure to avobenzone and homosalate. In conclusion, direct effects were caused in monocytes and macrophages at similar concentrations of both organic UV-filters and ZnO nanoparticulates - indicating that their intrinsic cytotoxicity is similar. With their lower skin penetration, ZnO nanoparticles are expected to have lower bioactivity when used in sunscreens.

  3. NP1EC Degradation Pathways Under Oxic and Microxic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery-Brown, John; Li, Yongmei; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2008-03-22

    The degradation pathway of nonylphenol ethoxyacetic acid (NP1EC) and the conditions favoring CAP1EC formation were studied in aerobic microcosms constructed with soil from the Mesa soil aquifer treatment (SAT) facility (Arizona, USA) and pristine sediments from Coyote Creek (California, USA). In the Mesa microcosms, para-NP1EC was transformed to para-NP, before being rapidly transformed to nonyl alcohols via ipso-hydroxylation. While the formation of NP from APEMs has been observed by several researchers under anaerobic conditions, this is the first time the transient formation of NP from APEMs has been observed under aerobic conditions. Unlike the Mesa microcosms, large quantities of CAP1ECsmore » were observed in the Coyote Creek microcosms. Initially, CA8P1ECs were the dominant metabolites, but as biodegradation continued, CA6P1ECs became the dominant metabolites. Compared to the CA8P1ECs, the number of CA6P1ECs peaks observed was small (<6) even though their concentrations were high. This suggests that several CA8P1ECs are degraded to only a few CA6P1EC isomers (i.e., the degradation pathway converges) or that some CA6P1EC metabolites are significantly more recalcitrant than others. The different biodegradation pathways observed in the Mesa and Coyote Creek microcosms result from the limited availability of dissolved oxygen in the Coyote Creek microcosms. In both sets of microcosms, the ortho isomers were transformed more slowly than the para isomers and in the Coyote Creek microcosms several ortho-CAP1ECs were observed. In addition, several unknown metabolites were observed in the Coyote Creek microcosms that were not seen in the abiotic or Mesa microcosms; these metabolites appear to be CAP1EC metabolites, have a -CH2-C6H4- fragment, and contain one carboxylic acid. Nitro-nonylphenol was observed in the Mesa microcosms, however, further experimentation illustrated that it was the product of an abiotic reaction between nitrite and nonylphenol under acidic

  4. Biological Mechanism of Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Najealicka Nicole

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), like almost all nanoparticles, are potentially toxic beyond a certain concentration because the survival of the organism is compromised due to scores of pathophysiological abnormalities above that concentration. However, the mechanism of AgNP toxicity remains undetermined. Instead of applying a toxic dose, these investigations were attempted to monitor the effects of AgNPs at a non-lethal concentration on wild type Drosophila melanogaster by exposing them to nanoparticles throughout their development. All adult flies raised in AgNP doped food indicated that of not more than 50 mg/L had no negative influence on median survival; however, these flies appeared uniformly lighter in body color due to the loss of melanin pigments in their cuticle. Additionally, fertility and vertical movement ability were compromised after AgNP feeding. The determination of the amount of free ionic silver (Ag+) indicated that the observed biological effects had resulted from the AgNPs and not from Ag+. Biochemical analysis suggests that the activity of copper dependent enzymes, namely tyrosinase and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, were decreased significantly following the consumption of AgNPs, despite the constant level of copper present in the tissue. Furthermore, copper supplementation restored the loss of AgNP induced demelanization, and the reduction of functional Ctr1 in Ctr1 heterozygous mutants caused the flies to be resistant to demelanization. Consequently, these studies proposed a mechanism whereby consumption of excess AgNPs in association with membrane bound copper transporter proteins cause sequestration of copper, thus creating a condition that resembles copper starvation. This model also explained the cuticular demelanization effect resulting from AgNP since tyrosinase activity is essential for melanin biosynthesis. Finally, these investigations demonstrated that Drosophila, an established genetic model system, can be well utilized for further

  5. NMR Studies of the Dynamics of High-Spin Nitrophorins: Comparative Studies of NP4 and NP2 at Close to Physiological pH

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The β-barrel nitrophorin (NP) heme proteins are found in the saliva of the blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus, which synthesizes and stores nitric oxide (NO) in the salivary glands. NO is bound to iron of the NPs and is released by dilution and an increase in pH when the insect spits its saliva into the tissues of a victim, to aid in obtaining a blood meal. In the adult insect, there are four nitrophorins, NP1–NP4, which have sequence similarities in two pairs, NP1 and NP4 (90% identical) and NP2 and NP3 (80% identical). The available crystal structures of NP4 have been used to propose that pH-dependent changes in the conformation of two loops between adjacent β-strands at the front opening of the protein, the A–B and G–H loops, determine the rate of NO release. At pH 7.3, NP4 releases NO 17 times faster than NP2 does. In this work, the aqua complexes of NP4 and NP2 have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements to probe the pico- to nanosecond and micro- to millisecond time scale motions at two pH values, 6.5 and 7.3. It is found that NP4-OH2 is fairly rigid and only residues in the loop regions show dynamics at pH 6.5; at pH 7.3, much more dynamics of the loops and most of the β-strands are observed while the α-helices remain fairly rigid. In comparison, NP2-OH2 shows much less dynamics, albeit somewhat more than that of the previously reported NP2-NO complex [Muthu, D., Berry, R. E., Zhang, H., and Walker, F. A. (2013) Biochemistry 52, 7910–7925]. The reasons for this major difference between NP4 and NP2 are discussed. PMID:25486224

  6. Does doping with aluminum alter the effects of ZnO nanoparticles on the metabolism of soil pseudomonads?

    PubMed

    Fang, Tommy; Watson, Jean-Luc; Goodman, Jordan; Dimkpa, Christian O; Martineau, Nicole; Das, Siddhartha; McLean, Joan E; Britt, David W; Anderson, Anne J

    2013-02-22

    Doping of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) is being used to increase their commercialization in the optical and semiconductor fields. This paper addresses whether doping with Al alters how ZnO NPs at nonlethal levels modifies the metabolism of soil-borne pseudomonads which are beneficial in performing bioremediation or promoting plant growth. The differences in X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, observed between commercial ZnO and Al-doped ZnO NPs indicated the aluminum was present as Al NPs. Both particles aggregated in the bacterial growth medium and formed colloids of different surface charges. They had similar effects on bacterial metabolism: rapid, dose-dependent loss in light output indicative of temporary toxicity in a biosensor constructed in Pseudomonas putida KT2440; increased production of a fluorescent pyoverdine-type siderophore, and decreased levels of indole acetic acid and phenazines in Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. Solubilization of Zn and Al from the NPs contributed to these responses to different extents. These findings indicate that Al-doping of the ZnO NPs did not reduce the ability of the NPs to alter bacterial metabolism in ways that could influence performance of the pseudomonads in their soil environment. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-11-01

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L-1, or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L-1, there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L-1 of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L-1 of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the

  8. Investigation of the phototoxic effect of ZnO nanorods on fibroblasts and melanoma human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishwar, S.; Siddique, M.; Israr-Qadir, M.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.; Öllinger, K.

    2014-11-01

    Photocytotoxic effects of as-grown and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods coated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) have been studied on human cells, i.e. melanoma and foreskin fibroblast, under dark and ultraviolet light exposures. Zinc oxide nanorods have been grown on the very sharp tip (diameter = 700 nm) of borosilicate glass pipettes and then were coated by the photosensitizer for targeted investigations inside human cells. The coated glass pipette’s tip with photosensitizer has been inserted inside the cells with the help of a micro-manipulator and irradiated through ultraviolet light (UVA), which reduces the membrane potential of the mitochondria leading to cell death. Cell viability loss has been detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay when exposed to the dissolved ZnO nanorods and the production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been detected along with the enhanced cytotoxic effect under UVA irradiation. Additionally, the influence of the lipid soluble antioxidant vitamin E and water-soluble N-acetyl-cysteine toward the enhancement or reduction of the toxicity has been investigated. A comparative analysis of the toxic nature of ZnO nanorods has been drawn between normal human fibroblast and melanoma cells, which can be favorable for understanding the clinical setting for killing tumor cells.

  9. Interaction study of rice stripe virus proteins reveals a region of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) required for NP self-interaction and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Lian, Sen; Cho, Won Kyong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2014-04-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV), which belongs to the genus Tenuivirus, is an emergent virus problem. The RSV genome is composed of four single-strand RNAs (RNA1-RNA4) and encodes seven proteins. We investigated interactions between six of the RSV proteins by yeast-two hybrid (Y2H) assay in vitro and by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) in planta. Y2H identified self-interaction of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) and NS3, while BiFC revealed self-interaction of NP, NS3, and NCP. To identify regions(s) and/or crucial amino acid (aa) residues required for NP self-interaction, we generated various truncated and aa substitution mutants. Y2H assay showed that the N-terminal region of NP (aa 1-56) is necessary for NP self-interaction. Further analysis with substitution mutants demonstrated that additional aa residues located at 42-47 affected their interaction with full-length NP. These results indicate that the N-terminal region (aa 1-36 and 42-47) is required for NP self-interaction. BiFC and co-localization studies showed that the region required for NP self-interaction is also required for NP localization at the nucleus. Overall, our results indicate that the N-terminal region (aa 1-47) of the NP is important for NP self-interaction and that six aa residues (42-47) are essential for both NP self-interaction and nuclear localization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of an Electrochemically Oxidized ZnO Seed Layer on ZnO Nanorods Grown by using Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Woosung; Leem, Jae-Young

    2018-05-01

    ZnO nanorods were prepared on a Si substrate with and without a ZnO seed layer formed by electro-oxidation to investigate the effect of the seed layer on their growth. The ZnO nanorods grown on the ZnO seed layer had top surfaces that were flat whereas those grown without it had rough top surfaces, as observed in field-emission scanning electron microscopy images. In the Xray diffraction analysis, all ZnO nanorods showed preferential orientation with the (002) plane. In the case of ZnO nanorods prepared with a ZnO seed layer, the residual stress decreased, and the full width at half maximum of the ZnO (002) plane peak decreased. The photoluminescence spectra show a strong and narrow near-band-edge emission peak and high near-band-edge emission to deep-level emission peak ratio for the ZnO nanorods prepared with the seed layer. With respect to the photoresponse properties, the ZnO nanorods grown with the ZnO seed layer showed higher responsivity and faster rise/decay curves than those grown without it. Thus, the ZnO seed layer formed by electro-oxidation improves the structural, optical, and photoresponse properties of the ZnO nanorods formed on it. This method could serve as a new route for improving the properties of optoelectronic devices.

  11. 77 FR 72408 - Amy S. Benjamin, N.P.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Amy S. Benjamin, N.P.; Decision and Order On... Administration, issued an Order to Show Cause to Amy S. Benjamin, N.P. (Respondent), of Wheeler, Mississippi. The... CFR 0.100(b), I order that the Order to Show Cause issued to Amy S. Benjamin, N.P., be, and it hereby...

  12. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-12-21

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L(-1), or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L(-1), there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L(-1) of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L(-1) of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.

  13. Morphology engineering of ZnO nanostructures for high performance supercapacitors: enhanced electrochemistry of ZnO nanocones compared to ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoli; Yoo, Joung Eun; Lee, Min Ho; Bae, Joonho

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the morphology of ZnO nanostructures is engineered to demonstrate enhanced supercapacitor characteristics of ZnO nanocones (NCs) compared to ZnO nanowires (NWs). ZnO NCs are obtained by chemically etching ZnO NWs. Electrochemical characteristics of ZnO NCs and NWs are extensively investigated to demonstrate morphology dependent capacitive performance of one dimensional ZnO nanostructures. Cyclic voltammetry measurements on these two kinds of electrodes in a three-electrode cell confirms that ZnO NCs exhibit a high specific capacitance of 378.5 F g-1 at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1, which is almost twice that of ZnO NWs (191.5 F g-1). The charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements also clearly result in enhanced capacitive performance of NCs as evidenced by higher specific capacitances and lower internal resistance. Asymmetric supercapacitors are fabricated using activated carbon (AC) as the negative electrode and ZnO NWs and NCs as positive electrodes. The ZnO NC⫽AC can deliver a maximum specific capacitance of 126 F g-1 at a current density of 1.33 A g-1 with an energy density of 25.2 W h kg-1 at the power density of 896.44 W kg-1. In contrast, ZnO NW⫽AC displays 63% of the capacitance obtained from the ZnO NC⫽AC supercapacitor. The enhanced performance of NCs is attributed to the higher surface area of ZnO nanostructures after the morphology is altered from NWs to NCs.

  14. Morphology engineering of ZnO nanostructures for high performance supercapacitors: enhanced electrochemistry of ZnO nanocones compared to ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoli; Yoo, Joung Eun; Lee, Min Ho; Bae, Joonho

    2017-06-16

    In this work, the morphology of ZnO nanostructures is engineered to demonstrate enhanced supercapacitor characteristics of ZnO nanocones (NCs) compared to ZnO nanowires (NWs). ZnO NCs are obtained by chemically etching ZnO NWs. Electrochemical characteristics of ZnO NCs and NWs are extensively investigated to demonstrate morphology dependent capacitive performance of one dimensional ZnO nanostructures. Cyclic voltammetry measurements on these two kinds of electrodes in a three-electrode cell confirms that ZnO NCs exhibit a high specific capacitance of 378.5 F g -1 at a scan rate of 20 mV s -1 , which is almost twice that of ZnO NWs (191.5 F g -1 ). The charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements also clearly result in enhanced capacitive performance of NCs as evidenced by higher specific capacitances and lower internal resistance. Asymmetric supercapacitors are fabricated using activated carbon (AC) as the negative electrode and ZnO NWs and NCs as positive electrodes. The ZnO NC⫽AC can deliver a maximum specific capacitance of 126 F g -1 at a current density of 1.33 A g -1 with an energy density of 25.2 W h kg -1 at the power density of 896.44 W kg -1 . In contrast, ZnO NW⫽AC displays 63% of the capacitance obtained from the ZnO NC⫽AC supercapacitor. The enhanced performance of NCs is attributed to the higher surface area of ZnO nanostructures after the morphology is altered from NWs to NCs.

  15. Effects of subtoxic concentrations of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles on human lymphocytes, dendritic cells and exosome production

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson-Willman, Britta; Gehrmann, Ulf; Cansu, Zekiye

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in the paint and coating industry as well as in cosmetics, but the knowledge of their possible interactions with the immune system is very limited. Our aims were to investigate if commercially available TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles may affect different human immune cells and their production of exosomes, nano-sized vesicles that have a role in cell to cell communication. We found that the TiO{sub 2} or ZnO nanoparticles at concentrations from 1 to 100 μg/mL did not affect the viability of primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In contrast, monocyte-derived dendritic cellsmore » (MDDC) reacted with a dose dependent increase in cell death and caspase activity to ZnO but not to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Non-toxic exposure, 10 μg/mL, to TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles did not significantly alter the phenotype of MDDC. Interestingly, ZnO but not TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles induced a down regulation of FcγRIII (CD16) expression on NK-cells in the PBMC population, suggesting that subtoxic concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles might have an effect on FcγR-mediated immune responses. The phenotype and size of exosomes produced by PBMC or MDDC exposed to the nanoparticles were similar to that of exosomes harvested from control cultures. TiO{sub 2} or ZnO nanoparticles could not be detected within or associated to exosomes as analyzed with TEM. We conclude that TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles differently affect immune cells and that evaluations of nanoparticles should be performed even at subtoxic concentrations on different primary human immune cells when investigating potential effects on immune functions. -- Highlights: ► ZnO nanoparticles induce cell death of MDDC but not of PBMC. ► ZnO nanoparticles induce caspase activation and DNA fragmentation in MDDC. ► TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are taken up by MDDC but have no effect on their phenotype. ► ZnO nanoparticles induce a significant reduction of CD16

  16. Toxic Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-02-01

    Prepared for the United States Air Force Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Theodore Karasik Project AIR FORCE R TOXIC WARFARE...Report Documentation Page Report Date 000002002 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Toxic Warfare Contract Number Grant...310) 451-6915; Email: order@rand.org Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Karasik, Theodore William. Toxic warfare / Theodore Karasik

  17. Synthesis of biocompatible SiO2 coated ZnO quantum dots for cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Qian; Chen, Haiyan; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) is a promising candidate for biomedical imaging. However, the bio-toxicity of traditional quantum dots obstructed their further application seriously. In this work, a simple solution growth method was utilized to synthesize ZnO QDs. However, their self-assemble feature makes them unstable in aqueous solution. Furthermore, (3-Aminopropyl) triethoxysilane was selected as a capping agent to stabilize ZnO QDs and then ZnO@SiO2 nanoparticles were obtained. They dispersed excellently in water and exhibited favorable fluorescence properties owing to the protection of silane. The biocompatability of ZnO@SiO2 nanoparticles was verified by MTT assy. The cell affinity studies demonstrated that ZnO@SiO2 nanoparticles could be uptaken by cells efficiently. Therefore, the as-prepared ZnO@SiO2 nanoparticles is a promising candidate for applications in cell imaging.

  18. Application of ZnO Nanoparticle as Sulphide Gas Sensor Using UV/VIS/NIR-Spectrophotometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliasih, N.; Buchari; Noviandri, I.

    2017-04-01

    The nanoparticle of metal oxides has great unique characteristics that applicable to the wide industrial as sensors and catalysts for reducing environmental pollution. Sulphide gas monitors and detectors are required for assessing safety aspects, due to its toxicity level. A thin film of ZnO as the sulphide gas sensor was synthesised by the simple method of chemical liquid deposition with variation of annealing temperature from 200 ºC to 500 ºC, and characterised by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and UV/VIS/NIR-Spectrophotometer. Characterization studies showed nanoparticle size from the range 62 - 92 nm of diameters. The application this ZnO thin film to sulfide gas, detected by UV/VIS/NIR Spectrophotometer with diffuse reflectance, showed specific chemical reaction by the shifting of maximum % Reflectance peak. The gas sensing using this method is applicable at room.

  19. Barriers to NP Practice that Impact Healthcare Redesign.

    PubMed

    Hain, Debra; Fleck, Laureen M

    2014-05-31

    As healthcare reform evolves, nurse practitioners (NP) will play key roles in improving health outcomes of diverse populations. According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change Advancing Health, nurses should be change advocates by caring for populations within complex healthcare systems. The IOM reports asserts, "advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) should be able to practice to the fullest extent of their education and training" (IOM, 2011, s8). However, existing barriers in the healthcare arena limit APRN practice. This article will discuss some of these barriers and provide suggestions for possible ways to decrease the barriers.

  20. NP-hardness of the cluster minimization problem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adib, Artur B.

    2005-10-01

    The computational complexity of the 'cluster minimization problem' is revisited (Wille and Vennik 1985 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 18 L419). It is argued that the original NP-hardness proof does not apply to pairwise potentials of physical interest, such as those that depend on the geometric distance between the particles. A geometric analogue of the original problem is formulated, and a new proof for such potentials is provided by polynomial time transformation from the independent set problem for unit disk graphs. Limitations of this formulation are pointed out, and new subproblems that bear more direct consequences to the numerical study of clusters are suggested.

  1. A novel approach reveals that zinc oxide nanoparticles are bioavailable and toxic after dietary exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Dybowska, A.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2011-01-01

    If engineered nanomaterials are released into the environment, some are likely to end up associated with the food of animals due to aggregation and sorption processes. However, few studies have considered dietary exposure of nanomaterials. Here we show that zinc (Zn) from isotopically modified 67ZnO particles is efficiently assimilated by freshwater snails when ingested with food. The 67Zn from nano-sized 67ZnO appears as bioavailable as 67Zn internalized by diatoms. Apparent agglomeration of the zinc oxide (ZnO) particles did not reduce bioavailability, nor preclude toxicity. In the diet, ZnO nanoparticles damage digestion: snails ate less, defecated less and inefficiently processed the ingested food when exposed to high concentrations of ZnO. It was not clear whether the toxicity was due to the high Zn dose achieved with nanoparticles or to the ZnO nanoparticles themselves. Further study of exposure from nanoparticles in food would greatly benefit assessment of ecological and human health risks. ?? 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  2. Complexation-assisted reduction: complexes of glutaroimide-dioxime with tetravalent actinides (Np( iv ) and Th( iv ))

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Parker, Bernard F.; Lohrey, Trevor D.; ...

    2018-01-01

    Glutaroimide-dioxime forms strong complexes with Np( iv ) and Th( iv ) in aqueous solution and in crystals. The formation of Np( iv ) complexes from initial Np( v ) is interpreted by a complexation-assisted reduction mechanism.

  3. Complexation-assisted reduction: complexes of glutaroimide-dioxime with tetravalent actinides (Np( iv ) and Th( iv ))

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Parker, Bernard F.; Lohrey, Trevor D.

    Glutaroimide-dioxime forms strong complexes with Np( iv ) and Th( iv ) in aqueous solution and in crystals. The formation of Np( iv ) complexes from initial Np( v ) is interpreted by a complexation-assisted reduction mechanism.

  4. Zinc bioaccumulation in a terrestrial invertebrate fed a diet treated with particulate ZnO or ZnCl2 solution.

    PubMed

    Pipan-Tkalec, Ziva; Drobne, Damjana; Jemec, Anita; Romih, Tea; Zidar, Primoz; Bele, Marjan

    2010-03-10

    A number of reports on potential toxicity of nanoparticles are available, but there is still a lack of knowledge concerning bioaccumulation. The aim of this work was to investigate how different sources of zinc, such as uncoated and unmodified ZnO nanoparticles, ZnCl(2) in solution, and macropowder ZnO influence the bioaccumulation of this metal in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber. After exposure to different sources of Zn in the diet, the amount of assimilated Zn in whole body, the efficiency of zinc assimilation, and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were assessed. The bioaccumulation potential of Zn was found to be the same regardless of Zn source. The amount of assimilated Zn and BAF were dose-dependent, and Zn assimilation efficiency was independent of exposure concentrations. The Zn assimilation capacity was found to be up to 16% of ingested Zn. It is known that as much as approximately 20% of Zn can be accreted from ZnO particles by dissolution. We conclude that bioaccumulation of Zn in isopods exposed to particulate ZnO depends most probably on Zn dissolution from ZnO particles and not on bioaccumulation of particulate ZnO.

  5. Dynamic development of the protein corona on silica nanoparticles: composition and role in toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Ninell P.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Wang, Wei; Foster, Carmen M.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Retterer, Scott T.

    2013-06-01

    The formation and composition of the protein corona on silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NP) with different surface chemistries was evaluated over time. Native SiO2, amine (-NH2) and carboxy (-COO-) modified NP were examined following incubation in mammalian growth media containing fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 1, 4, 24 and 48 hours. The protein corona transition from its early dynamic state to the later more stable corona was evaluated using mass spectrometry. The NP diameter was 22.4 +/- 2.2 nm measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Changes in hydrodynamic diameter and agglomeration kinetics were studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The initial surface chemistry of the NP played an important role in the development and final composition of the protein corona, impacting agglomeration kinetics and NP toxicity. Particle toxicity, indicated by changes in membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity, was measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and tetrazolium reduction (MTT), respectively, in mouse alveolar macrophages (RAW264.7) and mouse lung epithelial cells (C10). SiO2-COO- NP had a slower agglomeration rate, formed smaller aggregates, and exhibited lower cytotoxicity compared to SiO2 and SiO2-NH2. Composition of the protein corona for each of the three NP was unique, indicating a strong dependence of corona development on NP surface chemistry. This work underscores the need to understand all aspects of NP toxicity, particularly the influence of agglomeration on effective dose and particle size. Furthermore, the interplay between materials and local biological environment is emphasized and highlights the need to conduct toxicity profiling under physiologically relevant conditions that provide an appropriate estimation of material modifications that occur during exposure in natural environments.The formation and composition of the protein corona on silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NP) with different surface chemistries was evaluated

  6. Complex and oriented ZnO nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhengrong R; Voigt, James A; Liu, Jun; McKenzie, Bonnie; McDermott, Matthew J; Rodriguez, Mark A; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang

    2003-12-01

    Extended and oriented nanostructures are desirable for many applications, but direct fabrication of complex nanostructures with controlled crystalline morphology, orientation and surface architectures remains a significant challenge. Here we report a low-temperature, environmentally benign, solution-based approach for the preparation of complex and oriented ZnO nanostructures, and the systematic modification of their crystal morphology. Using controlled seeded growth and citrate anions that selectively adsorb on ZnO basal planes as the structure-directing agent, we prepared large arrays of oriented ZnO nanorods with controlled aspect ratios, complex film morphologies made of oriented nanocolumns and nanoplates (remarkably similar to biomineral structures in red abalone shells) and complex bilayers showing in situ column-to-rod morphological transitions. The advantages of some of these ZnO structures for photocatalytic decompositions of volatile organic compounds were demonstrated. The novel ZnO nanostructures are expected to have great potential for sensing, catalysis, optical emission, piezoelectric transduction, and actuations.

  7. Closed DTU fuel cycle with Np recycle and waste transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, D.E.; Sailor, W.C.; Venneri, F.

    1999-09-01

    A nuclear energy scenario for the 21st century that included a denatured thorium-uranium-oxide (DTU) fuel cycle and new light water reactors (LWRs) supported by accelerator-driven transmutation of waste (ATW) systems was previously described. This coupled system with the closed DTU fuel cycle provides several improvements beyond conventional LWR (CLWR) (once-through, UO{sub 2} fuel) nuclear technology: increased proliferation resistance, reduced waste, and efficient use of natural resources. However, like CLWR fuel cycles, the spent fuel in the first one-third core discharged after startup contains higher-quality Pu than the equilibrium fuel cycle. To eliminate this high-grade Pu, Np is separated and recycledmore » with Th and U--rather than with higher actinides [(HA) including Pu]. The presence of Np in the LWR feed greatly increases the production of {sup 238}Pu so that a few kilograms of Pu generated enough alpha-decay heat that the separated Pu is highly resistant to proliferation. This alternate process also simplifies the pyrochemical separation of fuel elements (Th and U) from HAs. To examine the advantages of this concept, the authors modeled a US deployment scenario for nuclear energy that includes DTU-LWRs plus ATW`s to burn the actinides produced by these LWRs and to close the back-end of the DTU fuel cycle.« less

  8. Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics Eli-Np Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.

    2015-06-01

    The development of high power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular High energy, Nuclear and Astrophysics as well as societal applications in Material Science, Nuclear Energy and Medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) has selected a proposal based on these new premises called "ELI" for Extreme Light Infrastructure. ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for Nuclear Physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW class lasers and a Back Compton Scattering High Brilliance and Intense Low Energy Gamma Beam , a marriage of Laser and Accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility, the present status of the project as well as the science, applications and future perspectives will be discussed.

  9. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  10. Preparation and characterization of novel polyimide/functionalized ZnO bionanocomposite for gas separation and study of their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaielzadeh, Sheida; Ahmadizadegan, Hashem

    2018-04-01

    In the present investigation novel Polyimide/functionalized ZnO (PI/ZnO) bionanocomposites containing amino acid (Methionine) and benzimidazole pendent groups with different amounts of modified ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) were successfully prepared through ultrasonic irradiation technique. Due to the high surface energy and tendency for agglomeration, the surface ZnO NPs was modified by a coupling agent as 3- methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS) to form MPS-ZnO nanoparticles. The ultrasonic irradiation effectively changes the rheology and the glass transition temperature and the crystallinity of the composite polymer. PI/ZnO nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). TEM analysis showed that the modified ZnO nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed in polymer matrix. The TGA results of PI/ZnO nanocomposites showed that the thermal stability is obviously improved the presence of MPS-ZnO NPs in comparison with the pure PI and that this increase is higher when the NP content increases. The permeabilities of pure H2, CH4, O2, and N2 gases through prepared membranes were determined at room temperature (25 °C) and 20 bar feed pressure. The membranes having 20% ZnO showed higher values of H2 permeability, and H2/CH4 and H2/N2 ideal selectivities (the ratio of pair gas permeabilities) compared with other membranes. The antibacterial activity of bionanocomposite films was tested against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Further, it was observed that antibacterial activity of the resulting hybrid biofilms showed somewhat higher for gram-positive bacteria compared to gram-negative bacteria.

  11. Down-top nanofabrication of binary (CdO)x (ZnO)1-x nanoparticles and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Hada, Naif Mohammed; Mohamed Kamari, Halimah; Abdullah, Che Azurahanim Che; Saion, Elias; Shaari, Abdul H; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Matori, Khamirul Amin

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, binary oxide (cadmium oxide [CdO]) x (zinc oxide [ZnO]) 1-x nanoparticles (NPs) at different concentrations of precursor in calcination temperature were prepared using thermal treatment technique. Cadmium and zinc nitrates (source of cadmium and zinc) with polyvinylpyrrolidone (capping agent) have been used to prepare (CdO) x (ZnO) 1-x NPs samples. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. XRD patterns analysis revealed that NPs were formed after calcination, which showed a cubic and hexagonal crystalline structure of (CdO) x (ZnO) 1-x NPs. The phase analysis using EDX spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the presence of Cd and Zn as the original compounds of prepared (CdO) x (ZnO) 1-x NP samples. The average particle size of the samples increased from 14 to 33 nm as the concentration of precursor increased from x=0.20 to x=0.80, as observed by TEM results. The surface composition and valance state of the prepared product NPs were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. Diffuse UV-visible reflectance spectra were used to determine the optical band gap through the Kubelka-Munk equation; the energy band gap was found to decrease for CdO from 2.92 to 2.82 eV and for ZnO from 3.22 to 3.11 eV with increasing x value. Additionally, photoluminescence (PL) spectra revealed that the intensity in PL increased with an increase in particle size. In addition, the antibacterial activity of binary oxide NP was carried out in vitro against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 Gram (-ve), Salmonella choleraesuis ATCC 10708, and Bacillus subtilis UPMC 1175 Gram (+ve). This study indicated that the zone of inhibition of 21 mm has good antibacterial activity toward the Gram-positive B. subtilis UPMC 1175.

  12. A ZnO nanowire resistive switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, K. R. G.; Ramanujam Prabhakar, Rajiv; Hai, L.; Batabyal, Sudip K.; Huang, Y. Z.; Mhaisalkar, S. G.

    2013-09-01

    An individual ZnO nanowire resistive switch is evaluated with Pt/ZnO nanowire/Pt topology. A detailed DC I-V curve analysis is performed to bring both the conduction mechanism and the device characteristics to light. The device is further studied at various vacuum pressures to ascertain the presence of polar charges in ZnO nanowires as the phenomenon leading to the formation of the switch. The disappearance of the resistive switching is also analyzed with two kinds of fabrication approaches Focused Ion/Electron Beam involved in the making the device and a summary of both length and fabrication dependences of resistive switching in the ZnO nanowire is presented.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis of In2O3 nanoparticles hybrid twins hexagonal disk ZnO heterostructures for enhanced photocatalytic activities and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hairui; Zhai, Haifa; Hu, Chunjie; Yang, Jien; Liu, Zhiyong

    2017-07-01

    In2O3 nanoparticles hybrid twins hexagonal disk (THD) ZnO with different ratios were fabricated by a hydrothermal method. The as-obtained ZnO/In2O3 composites are constituted by hexagonal disks ZnO with diameters of about 1 μm and In2O3 nanoparticles with sizes of about 20-50 nm. With the increase of In2O3 content in ZnO/In2O3 composites, the absorption band edges of samples shifted from UV to visible light region. Compared with pure ZnO, the ZnO/In2O3 composites show enhanced photocatalytic activities for degradation of methyl orange (MO) and 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) under solar light irradiation. Due to suitable alignment of their energy band-gap structure of the In2O3 and ZnO, the formation of type п heterostructure can enhance efficient separation of photo-generate electro-hole pairs and provides convenient carrier transfer paths.

  14. Magnetic properties of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M A; Merino, J M; Fernández Pinel, E; Quesada, A; de la Venta, J; Ruíz González, M L; Castro, G R; Crespo, P; Llopis, J; González-Calbet, J M; Hernando, A

    2007-06-01

    We experimentally show that it is possible to induce room-temperature ferromagnetic-like behavior in ZnO nanoparticles without doping with magnetic impurities but simply inducing an alteration of their electronic configuration. Capping ZnO nanoparticles ( approximately 10 nm size) with different organic molecules produces an alteration of their electronic configuration that depends on the particular molecule, as evidenced by photoluminescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and altering their magnetic properties that varies from diamagnetic to ferromagnetic-like behavior.

  15. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of ZnO Containing Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Prado, Catuxa; Cabal, Belén; Sanz, Jesús; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José Serafín

    2015-01-01

    A new family of non-toxic biocides based on low melting point (1250°C) transparent glasses with high content of ZnO (15–40wt%) belonging to the miscibility region of the B2O3-SiO2-Na2O-ZnO system has been developed. These glasses have shown an excellent biocide activity (logarithmic reduction >3) against Gram- (E. coli), Gram+ (S. aureus) and yeast (C. krusei); they are chemically stable in different media (distilled water, sea-like water, LB and DMEN media) as well as biocompatible. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the Neutral Red Uptake using NIH-3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cells) and the cell viability was >80%. These new glasses can be considered in several and important applications in the field of inorganic non-toxic biocide agents such as medical implants, surgical equipment, protective apparels in hospitals, water purifications systems, food packaging, food storages or textiles. PMID:26230940

  16. Acaricidal, pediculicidal and larvicidal activity of synthesized ZnO nanoparticles using Momordica charantia leaf extract against blood feeding parasites.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, P Rajiv; Jayaseelan, C; Mary, R Regina; Mathivanan, D; Suseem, S R

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acaricidal, pediculicidal and larvicidal effect of synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) using Momordica charantia leaf extract against the larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, adult of Pediculus humanus capitis, and the larvae of Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus. The ZnO NPs were characterized by using UV, XRD, FTIR and SEM-EDX. The SEM image confirms that the synthesized nanoparticles were spherical in shape with a size of 21.32 nm. The results of GC-MS analysis indicates the presence of the major compound of Nonacosane (C 29 H 60 ) in the M. charantia leaf extract. Cattle tick, head lice and mosquito larvae were exposed to a varying concentrations of the synthesized ZnO NPs and M. charantia leaf extract for 24 h. Compared to the leaf aqueous extract, biosynthesized ZnO NPs showed higher toxicity against R. microplus, P. humanus capitis, An. stephensi, and Cx. Quinquefasciatus with the LC 50 values of 6.87, 14.38, 5.42, and 4.87 mg/L, respectively. The findings revealed that synthesized ZnO NPs possess excellent anti-parasitic activity. These results suggest that the green synthesized ZnO NPs has the potential to be used as an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of R. microplus, P. humanus capitis and the mosquito larvae of An. Stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrochemical modification of properties of ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Koji; Okubo, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Hirohito

    2017-12-01

    The properties of Al-doped ZnO films and Li- and Al-doped ZnO films were modified by electrochemical treatment. A constant current was applied between a ZnO film and a Pt electrode in an electrolyte solution. The sheet resistance of the ZnO film increased and decreased depending on the direction of current flow during the electrochemical treatment. When the ZnO film was used as a cathode (forward biased condition), the sheet resistance of the ZnO film decreased with increasing treatment time. The optical bandgap of the H2-annealed ZnO film also depended on the direction of current flow and increased under the forward biased condition. The electrochemical treatment caused the Burstein-Moss effect.

  18. Miniaturized accelerometer made with ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sangho; Kim, Jeong Woong; Kim, Hyun Chan; Yun, Youngmin; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-04-01

    Miniaturized accelerometer is required in many applications, such as, robotics, haptic devices, gyroscopes, simulators and mobile devices. ZnO is an essential semiconductor material with wide direct band gap, thermal stability and piezoelectricity. Especially, well aligned ZnO nanowire is appropriate for piezoelectric applications since it can produce high electrical signal under mechanical load. To miniaturize accelerometer, an aligned ZnO nanowire is adopted to implement active piezoelectric layer of the accelerometer and copper is chosen for the head mass. To grow ZnO nanowire on the copper head mass, hydrothermal synthesis is conducted and the effect of ZnO nanowire length on the accelerometer performance is investigated. Refresh hydrothermal synthesis can increase the length of ZnO nanowire. The performance of the fabricated ZnO accelerometers is compared with a commercial accelerometer. Sensitivity and linearity of the fabricated accelerometers are investigated.

  19. Photodisintegration reactions for nuclear astrophysics studies at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, C.; Balabanski, D.; Filipescu, D. M.; Tesileanu, O.

    2018-01-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility will come online in Bucharest-Magurele, Romania, in 2018 and will deliver high intensity laser and brilliant gamma beams. We present the physics cases and instruments proposed at ELI-NP to measure capture reactions by means of the inverse photodisintegration reaction. We propose to study the 16O(γ, α)12C reaction using a Time Projection Chamber detector with electronic readout. Several other reactions, such as 24Mg(γ, α)20Ne and reactions on heavy nuclei relevant in the p-process, are central to stellar evolution and will be investigated with a proposed Silicon Strip Detector array and a 4π neutron detector. The status of the experimental facilities and first-day experiments will be presented in detail.

  20. NP-hardness of decoding quantum error-correction codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Min-Hsiu; Le Gall, François

    2011-05-01

    Although the theory of quantum error correction is intimately related to classical coding theory and, in particular, one can construct quantum error-correction codes (QECCs) from classical codes with the dual-containing property, this does not necessarily imply that the computational complexity of decoding QECCs is the same as their classical counterparts. Instead, decoding QECCs can be very much different from decoding classical codes due to the degeneracy property. Intuitively, one expects degeneracy would simplify the decoding since two different errors might not and need not be distinguished in order to correct them. However, we show that general quantum decoding problem is NP-hard regardless of the quantum codes being degenerate or nondegenerate. This finding implies that no considerably fast decoding algorithm exists for the general quantum decoding problems and suggests the existence of a quantum cryptosystem based on the hardness of decoding QECCs.

  1. Intrinsic and extrinsic doping of ZnO and ZnO alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellmer, Klaus; Bikowski, André

    2016-10-01

    In this article the doping of the oxidic compound semiconductor ZnO is reviewed with special emphasis on n-type doping. ZnO naturally exhibits n-type conductivity, which is used in the application of highly doped n-type ZnO as a transparent electrode, for instance in thin film solar cells. For prospective application of ZnO in other electronic devices (LEDs, UV photodetectors or power devices) p-type doping is required, which has been reported only minimally. Highly n-type doped ZnO can be prepared by doping with the group IIIB elements B, Al, Ga, and In, which act as shallow donors according to the simple hydrogen-like substitutional donor model of Bethe (1942 Theory of the Boundary Layer of Crystal Rectifiers (Boston, MA: MIT Rad Lab.)). Group IIIA elements (Sc, Y, La etc) are also known to act as shallow donors in ZnO, similarly explainable by the shallow donor model of Bethe. Some reports showed that even group IVA (Ti, Zr, Hf) and IVB (Si, Ge) elements can be used to prepare highly doped ZnO films—which, however, can no longer be explained by the simple hydrogen-like substitutional donor model. More probably, these elements form defect complexes that act as shallow donors in ZnO. On the other hand, group V elements on oxygen lattice sites (N, P, As, and Sb), which were viewed for a long time as typical shallow acceptors, behave instead as deep acceptors, preventing high hole concentrations in ZnO at room temperature. Also, ‘self’-compensation, i.e. the formation of a large number of intrinsic donors at high acceptor concentrations seems to counteract the p-type doping of ZnO. At donor concentrations above about 1020 cm-3, the electrical activation of the dopant elements is often less than 100%, especially in polycrystalline thin films. Reasons for the electrical deactivation of the dopant atoms are (i) the formation of dopant-defect complexes, (ii) the compensation of the electrons by acceptors (Oi, VZn) or (iii) the formation of secondary phases, for

  2. Beryllium Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Beryllium Toxicity Patient Education Care Instruction Sheet ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Page last reviewed: May 23, 2008 Page ...

  3. Surface chemistry of gold nanoparticles determines the biocorona composition impacting cellular uptake, toxicity and gene expression profiles in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Parwathy; Riviere, Jim E; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the role of nanoparticle size and surface chemistry on biocorona composition and its effect on uptake, toxicity and cellular responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), employing 40 and 80 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), lipoic acid (LA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coatings. Proteomic analysis identified 59 hard corona proteins among the various AuNP, revealing largely surface chemistry-dependent signature adsorbomes exhibiting human serum albumin (HSA) abundance. Size distribution analysis revealed the relative instability and aggregation inducing potential of bare and corona-bound BPEI-AuNP, over LA- and PEG-AuNP. Circular dichroism analysis showed surface chemistry-dependent conformational changes of proteins binding to AuNP. Time-dependent uptake of bare, plasma corona (PC) and HSA corona-bound AuNP (HSA-AuNP) showed significant reduction in uptake with PC formation. Cell viability studies demonstrated dose-dependent toxicity of BPEI-AuNP. Transcriptional profiling studies revealed 126 genes, from 13 biological pathways, to be differentially regulated by 40 nm bare and PC-bound BPEI-AuNP (PC-BPEI-AuNP). Furthermore, PC formation relieved the toxicity of cationic BPEI-AuNP by modulating expression of genes involved in DNA damage and repair, heat shock response, mitochondrial energy metabolism, oxidative stress and antioxidant response, and ER stress and unfolded protein response cascades, which were aberrantly expressed in bare BPEI-AuNP-treated cells. NP surface chemistry is shown to play the dominant role over size in determining the biocorona composition, which in turn modulates cell uptake, and biological responses, consequently defining the potential safety and efficacy of nanoformulations.

  4. In vitro evaluation of cellular responses induced by ZnO nanoparticles, zinc ions and bulk ZnO in fish cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Dolores; García-Gómez, Concepción; Babín, Mar

    2013-05-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) are inevitably released into the environment and are potentially dangerous for aquatic life. However, the potential mechanisms of cytotoxicity of zinc nanoparticles remain unclear. Studying the toxicity of ZnO-NPs with In vitro systems will help to determine their interactions with cellular biomolecules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic potentials of ZnO-NPs in established fish cell lines (RTG-2, RTH-149 and RTL-W1) and compare them with those of bulk ZnO and Zn(2+) ions. Membrane function (CFDA-AM assay), mitochondrial function (MTT assay), cell growth (KBP assay), cellular stress (β-galactosidase assay), reductase enzyme activity (AB assay), reactive oxygen species (ROS), total glutathione cellular content (tGSH assay) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were assessed for all cell lines. ZnO-NPs cytotoxicity was greater than those of bulk ZnO and Zn(2+). ZnO-NPs induced oxidative stress is dependent on their dose. Low cost tests, such as CFDA-AM, ROS, GST activity and tGSH cell content test that use fish cell lines, may be used to detect oxidative stress and redox status changes. Particle dissolution of the ZnO-NPs did not appear to play an important role in the observed toxicity in this study. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. CuO and ZnO nanoparticles: phytotoxicity, metal speciation, and induction of oxidative stress in sand-grown wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimkpa, Christian O.; McLean, Joan E.; Latta, Drew E.; Manangón, Eliana; Britt, David W.; Johnson, William P.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Anderson, Anne J.

    2012-09-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are reported to impact plant growth in hydroponic systems. This study describes the impact of commercial CuO (<50 nm) and ZnO (<100 nm) NPs on wheat ( Triticum aestivum) grown in a solid matrix, sand. The NPs contained both metallic and non-metallic impurities to different extents. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy (AFM) assessments confirmed aggregation of the NPs to submicron sizes. AFM showed transformation of ZnO NPs from initial rhomboid shapes in water to elongated rods in the aqueous phase of the sand matrix. Solubilization of metals occurred in the sand at similar rates from CuO or ZnO NPs as their bulk equivalents. Amendment of the sand with 500 mg Cu and Zn/kg sand from the NPs significantly ( p = 0.05) reduced root growth, but only CuO NPs impaired shoot growth; growth reductions were less with the bulk amendments. Dissolved Cu from CuO NPs contributed to their phytotoxicity but Zn release did not account for the changes in plant growth. Bioaccumulation of Cu, mainly as CuO and Cu(I)-sulfur complexes, and Zn as Zn-phosphate was detected in the shoots of NP-challenged plants. Total Cu and Zn levels in shoot were similar whether NP or bulk materials were used. Oxidative stress in the NP-treated plants was evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and oxidized glutathione in roots and decreased chlorophyll content in shoots; higher peroxidase and catalase activities were present in roots. These findings correlate with the NPs causing increased production of reactive oxygen species. The accumulation of Cu and Zn from NPs into edible plants has relevance to the food chain.

  6. NXT1, a Novel Influenza A NP Binding Protein, Promotes the Nuclear Export of NP via a CRM1-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Aida, Yoko

    2016-07-28

    Influenza remains a serious worldwide public health problem. After infection, viral genomic RNA is replicated in the nucleus and packed into viral ribonucleoprotein, which will then be exported to the cytoplasm via a cellular chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent pathway for further assembly and budding. However, the nuclear export mechanism of influenza virus remains controversial. Here, we identify cellular nuclear transport factor 2 (NTF2)-like export protein 1 (NXT1) as a novel binding partner of nucleoprotein (NP) that stimulates NP-mediated nuclear export via the CRM1-dependent pathway. NXT1-knockdown cells exhibit decreased viral replication kinetics and nuclear accumulated viral RNA and NP. By contrast, NXT1 overexpression promotes nuclear export of NP in a CRM1-dependent manner. Pull-down assays suggest the formation of an NXT1, NP, and CRM1 complex, and demonstrate that NXT1 binds to the C-terminal region of NP. These findings reveal a distinct mechanism for nuclear export of the influenza virus and identify the NXT1/NP interaction as a potential target for antiviral drug development.

  7. Heteroagglomeration of zinc oxide nanoparticles with clay mineral modulates the bioavailability and toxicity of nanoparticle in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Senapati, Violet Aileen; Dhawan, Alok; Shanker, Rishi

    2017-06-01

    The extensive use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in cosmetics, sunscreens and healthcare products increases their release in the aquatic environment. The present study explored the possible interaction of ZnO NPs with montmorillonite clay minerals in aqueous conditions. An addition of ZnO NPs on clay suspension significantly (p<0.05) increases the hydrodymic size of clay particles from 1652±90nm to 2158±13nm due to heteroagglomeration. The electrokinetic measurements showed a significant (p<0.05) difference in the electrophoretic mobilities of bare (-1.80±0.03μmcm/Vs) and ZnO NPs-clay association (-1.37±0.03μmcm/Vs) that results to the electrostatic interaction between ZnO NPs and clay particles. The attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of ZnO NPs-clay association demonstrated the binding of ZnO NPs with the Si-O-Al region on the edges of clay particles. The increase in size of ZnO NPs-clay heteroagglomerates further leads to their sedimentation at 24h. Although, the stability of ZnO NPs in the clay suspension was decreased due to heteroagglomeration, but the bioavailability and toxicity of ZnO NPs-clay heteroagglomerates in Tetrahymena pyriformis was enhanced. These observations provide an evidence on possible mechanisms available in natural environment that can facilitate nanoparticles entry into the organisms present in lower trophic levels of the food web. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ΔNp63 mediates cellular survival and metastasis in canine osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ryan D.; Fenger, Joelle M.; Guttridge, Denis C.; London, Cheryl A.; Cam, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a structural homolog within the 53 family encoding two isoforms, ΔNp63 and TAp63. The oncogenic activity of ΔNp63 has been demonstrated in multiple cancers, however the underlying mechanisms that contribute to tumorigenesis are poorly characterized. Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common primary bone tumor in dogs, exhibiting clinical behavior and molecular biology essentially identical to its human counterpart. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential contribution of ΔNp63 to the biology of canine OSA. As demonstrated by qRT-PCR, nearly all canine OSA cell lines and tissues overexpressed ΔNp63 relative to normal control osteoblasts. Inhibition of ΔNp63 by RNAi selectively induced apoptosis in the OSA cell lines overexpressing ΔNp63. Knockdown of ΔNp63 upregulated expression of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members Puma and Noxa independent of p53. However the effects of ΔNp63 required transactivating isoforms of p73, suggesting that ΔNp63 promotes survival in OSA by repressing p73-dependent apoptosis. In addition, ΔNp63 modulated angiogenesis and invasion through its effects on VEGF-A and IL-8 expression, and STAT3 phosphorylation. Lastly, the capacity of canine OSA cell lines to form pulmonary metastasis was directly related to expression levels of ΔNp63 in a murine model of metastatic OSA. Together, these data demonstrate that ΔNp63 inhibits apoptosis and promotes metastasis, supporting continued evaluation of this oncogene as a therapeutic target in both human and canine OSA. PMID:27391430

  9. Nonylphenol biodegradation characterizations and bacterial composition analysis of an effective consortium NP-M2.

    PubMed

    Bai, Naling; Abuduaini, Rexiding; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Meinan; Zhu, Xufen; Zhao, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), ubiquitously detected as the degradation product of nonionic surfactants nonylphenol polyethoxylates, has been reported as an endocrine disrupter. However, most pure microorganisms can degrade only limited species of NP with low degradation efficiencies. To establish a microbial consortium that can effectively degrade different forms of NP, in this study, we isolated a facultative microbial consortium NP-M2 and characterized the biodegradation of NP by it. NP-M2 could degrade 75.61% and 89.75% of 1000 mg/L NP within 48 h and 8 days, respectively; an efficiency higher than that of any other consortium or pure microorganism reported so far. The addition of yeast extract promoted the biodegradation more significantly than that of glucose. Moreover, surface-active compounds secreted into the extracellular environment were hypothesized to promote high-efficiency metabolism of NP. The detoxification of NP by this consortium was determined. The degradation pathway was hypothesized to be initiated by oxidization of the benzene ring, followed by step-wise side-chain biodegradation. The bacterial composition of NP-M2 was determined using 16S rDNA library, and the consortium was found to mainly comprise members of the Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas, Alicycliphilus, and Acidovorax genera, with the former two accounting for 86.86% of the consortium. The high degradation efficiency of NP-M2 indicated that it could be a promising candidate for NP bioremediation in situ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. ΔNp63 mediates cellular survival and metastasis in canine osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Cam, Maren; Gardner, Heather L; Roberts, Ryan D; Fenger, Joelle M; Guttridge, Denis C; London, Cheryl A; Cam, Hakan

    2016-07-26

    p63 is a structural homolog within the 53 family encoding two isoforms, ΔNp63 and TAp63. The oncogenic activity of ΔNp63 has been demonstrated in multiple cancers, however the underlying mechanisms that contribute to tumorigenesis are poorly characterized. Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common primary bone tumor in dogs, exhibiting clinical behavior and molecular biology essentially identical to its human counterpart. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential contribution of ΔNp63 to the biology of canine OSA. As demonstrated by qRT-PCR, nearly all canine OSA cell lines and tissues overexpressed ΔNp63 relative to normal control osteoblasts. Inhibition of ΔNp63 by RNAi selectively induced apoptosis in the OSA cell lines overexpressing ΔNp63. Knockdown of ΔNp63 upregulated expression of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members Puma and Noxa independent of p53. However the effects of ΔNp63 required transactivating isoforms of p73, suggesting that ΔNp63 promotes survival in OSA by repressing p73-dependent apoptosis. In addition, ΔNp63 modulated angiogenesis and invasion through its effects on VEGF-A and IL-8 expression, and STAT3 phosphorylation. Lastly, the capacity of canine OSA cell lines to form pulmonary metastasis was directly related to expression levels of ΔNp63 in a murine model of metastatic OSA. Together, these data demonstrate that ΔNp63 inhibits apoptosis and promotes metastasis, supporting continued evaluation of this oncogene as a therapeutic target in both human and canine OSA.

  11. Effect of media composition on bioavailability and toxicity of silver and silver nanoparticles in fish intestinal cells (RTgutGC).

    PubMed

    Minghetti, Matteo; Schirmer, Kristin

    2016-12-01

    To understand conditions affecting bioavailability and toxicity of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (cit-AgNP) and dissolved silver at the luminal enterocyte interface, we exposed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gut cells (RTgutGC) in media of contrasting composition: two amino acid-containing media, one of which was supplemented with proteins, as can be expected during digestion; and two protein and amino acid-free media contrasting low and high chloride content, as can be expected in the lumen of fish adapting to freshwater or seawater, respectively. Dose-response curves were generated measuring cell metabolic activity, membrane and lysosome integrity over a period of 72 hours. Then, nontoxic doses were applied and total silver accumulation, metallothionein and glutathione reductase mRNA levels were determined. The presence of proteins stabilized cit-AgNP keeping them in suspension. Conversely, in protein-free media, cit-AgNP agglomerated and settled, resulting in higher cellular accumulation of silver and toxicity. Chloride concentrations in exposure media modulated the toxicity of AgNO 3 but not of cit-AgNP. Moreover, while amino acid-containing media are protective against AgNO 3 , likely due to the formation of thiolate complexes, they are only partially protective against cit-AgNP. Viability assays indicated that lysosomes are targets of cit-AgNP, supporting the hypothesis that cit-AgNP exert toxicity intracellularly. Metallothionein, a sensor of metal bioavailability, was induced by cit-AgNP in high chloride medium but not in low chloride medium, indicating that chloride might have a role in mobilizing silver from intercellular vesicles. Overall, this study shows that AgNP bioavailability and toxicity in the intestine is linked to its luminal content.

  12. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asharani, P. V.; Lian Wu, Yi; Gong, Zhiyuan; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2008-06-01

    This study was initiated to enhance our insight on the health and environmental impact of silver nanoparticles (Ag-np). Using starch and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as capping agents, silver nanoparticles were synthesized to study their deleterious effects and distribution pattern in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). Toxicological endpoints like mortality, hatching, pericardial edema and heart rate were recorded. A concentration-dependent increase in mortality and hatching delay was observed in Ag-np treated embryos. Additionally, nanoparticle treatments resulted in concentration-dependent toxicity, typified by phenotypes that had abnormal body axes, twisted notochord, slow blood flow, pericardial edema and cardiac arrhythmia. Ag+ ions and stabilizing agents showed no significant defects in developing embryos. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the embryos demonstrated that nanoparticles were distributed in the brain, heart, yolk and blood of embryos as evident from the electron-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS). Furthermore, the acridine orange staining showed an increased apoptosis in Ag-np treated embryos. These results suggest that silver nanoparticles induce a dose-dependent toxicity in embryos, which hinders normal development.

  13. Controls on the Fate and Speciation of Np(V) During Iron (Oxyhydr)oxide Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Bots, Pieter; Shaw, Samuel; Law, Gareth T W; Marshall, Timothy A; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Morris, Katherine

    2016-04-05

    The speciation and fate of neptunium as Np(V)O2(+) during the crystallization of ferrihydrite to hematite and goethite was explored in a range of systems. Adsorption of NpO2(+) to iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide phases was reversible and, for ferrihydrite, occurred through the formation of mononuclear bidentate surface complexes. By contrast, chemical extractions and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analyses showed the incorporation of Np(V) into the structure of hematite during its crystallization from ferrihydrite (pH 10.5). This occurred through direct replacement of octahedrally coordinated Fe(III) by Np(V) in neptunate-like coordination. Subsequent analyses on mixed goethite and hematite crystallization products (pH 9.5 and 11) showed that Np(V) was incorporated during crystallization. Conversely, there was limited evidence for Np(V) incorporation during goethite crystallization at the extreme pH of 13.3. This is likely due to the formation of a Np(V) hydroxide precipitate preventing incorporation into the goethite particles. Overall these data highlight the complex behavior of Np(V) during the crystallization of iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides, and demonstrate clear evidence for neptunium incorporation into environmentally important mineral phases. This extends our knowledge of the range of geochemical conditions under which there is potential for long-term immobilization of radiotoxic Np in natural and engineered environments.

  14. Search For Anomalous n-p Scattering At 60 eV-140 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Moreh, R.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.

    2009-01-28

    A search for an anomalous n-p scattering from a polyethylene sample (CH{sub 2}) at 8 final energies between 64 eV and 2.5 keV was carried out. The scattering intensities were compared to that from a graphite (C) sample. The results were found to confirm our previous n-p results on H{sub 2}O at a final energy of 24.3 keV where no n-p scattering anomaly was observed. The present results refute all proposed models attempting to explain the occurrence of any n-p scattering anomaly at keV neutron energies.

  15. Rice No Pollen 1 (NP1) is required for anther cuticle formation and pollen exine patterning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Lin, Sen; Shi, Jianxin; Yu, Jing; Zhu, Lu; Yang, Xiujuan; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2017-07-01

    Angiosperm male reproductive organs (anthers and pollen grains) have complex and interesting morphological features, but mechanisms that underlie their patterning are poorly understood. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a male sterile mutant of No Pollen 1 (NP1) in rice (Oryza sativa). The np1-4 mutant exhibited smaller anthers with a smooth cuticle surface, abnormal Ubisch bodies, and aborted pollen grains covered with irregular exine. Wild-type exine has two continuous layers; but np1-4 exine showed a discontinuous structure with large granules of varying size. Chemical analysis revealed reduction in most of the cutin monomers in np1-4 anthers, and less cuticular wax. Map-based cloning suggested that NP1 encodes a putative glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase; and expression analyses found NP1 preferentially expressed in the tapetal layer from stage 8 to stage 10 of anther development. Additionally, the expression of several genes involved in biosynthesis and in the transport of lipid monomers of sporopollenin and cutin was decreased in np1-4 mutant anthers. Taken together, these observations suggest that NP1 is required for anther cuticle formation, and for patterning of Ubisch bodies and the exine. We propose that products of NP1 are likely important metabolites in the development of Ubisch bodies and pollen exine, necessary for polymerization, assembly, or both. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. ZnO thin films and nanostructures for emerging optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D. J.; Teherani, F. H.; Sandana, V. E.; Razeghi, M.

    2010-02-01

    ZnO-based thin films and nanostructures grown by PLD for various emerging optoelectronic applications. AZO thin films are currently displacing ITO for many TCO applications due to recent improvements in attainable AZO conductivity combined with processing, cost and toxicity advantages. Advances in the channel mobilities and Id on/off ratios in ZnO-based TTFTs have opened up the potential for use as a replacement for a-Si in AM-OLED and AM-LCD screens. Angular-dependent specular reflection measurements of self-forming, moth-eye-like, nanostructure arrays grown by PLD were seen to have <0.5% reflectivity over the whole visible spectrum for angles of incidence between 10 and 60 degrees. Such nanostructures may be useful for applications such as AR coatings on solar cells. Compliant ZnO layers on mismatched/amorphous substrates were shown to have potential for MOVPE regrowth of GaN. This approach could be used as a means to facilitate lift-off of GaN-based LEDs from insulating sapphire substrates and could allow the growth of InGaN-based solar cells on cheap substrates. The green gap in InGaN-based LEDs was combated by substituting low Ts PLD n-ZnO for MOCVD n-GaN in inverted hybrid heterojunctions. This approach maintained the integrity of the InGaN MQWs and gave LEDs with green emission at just over 510 nm. Hybrid n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunctions were also seen to have the potential for UV (375 nm) EL, characteristic of ZnO NBE emission. This suggests that there was significant hole injection into the ZnO and that such LEDs could profit from the relatively high exciton binding energy of ZnO.

  17. Performance and temperature dependencies of proton irradiated n/p and p/n GaAs and n/p silicon cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    n/p homojunction GaAs cells are found to be more radiation resistant than p/n heteroface GaAs under 10 MeV proton irradiation. Both GaAs cell types outperform conventional silicon n/p cells under the same conditions. An increased temperature dependency of maximum power for the GaAs n/p cells is attributed to differences in Voc between the two GaAs cell types. These results and diffusion length considerations are consistent with the conclusion that p-type GaAs is more radiation resistant than n-type and therefore that the n/p configuration is possibly favored for use in the space radiation environment. However, it is concluded that additional work is required in order to choose between the two GaAs cell configurations.

  18. Highly stable precursor solution containing ZnO nanoparticles for the preparation of ZnO thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Heh-Chang; Hsieh, Tsung-Eong

    2010-07-23

    ZnO particles with an average size of about 5 nm were prepared via a sol-gel chemical route and the silane coupling agent, (3-glycidyloxypropyl)-trimethoxysilane (GPTS), was adopted to enhance the dispersion of the ZnO nanoparticles in ethyl glycol (EG) solution. A ZnO surface potential as high as 66 mV was observed and a sedimentation test showed that the ZnO precursor solution remains transparent for six months of storage, elucidating the success of surface modification on ZnO nanoparticles. The ZnO thin films were then prepared by spin coating the precursor solution on a Si wafer and annealing treatments at temperatures up to 500 degrees C were performed for subsequent preparation of ZnO thin film transistors (TFTs). Microstructure characterization revealed that the coalescence of ZnO nanoparticles occurs at temperatures as low as 200 degrees C to result in a highly uniform, nearly pore-free layer. However, annealing at higher temperatures was required to remove organic residues in the ZnO layer for satisfactory device performance. The 500 degrees C-annealed ZnO TFT sample exhibited the best electrical properties with on/off ratio = 10(5), threshold voltage = 17.1 V and mobility (micro) = 0.104 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1).

  19. 1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) induces apoptosis and apparently a non-apoptotic programmed cell death (paraptosis) in Hepa1c1c7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asare, Nana; Landvik, Nina E.; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique

    2008-07-15

    Mechanistic studies of nitro-PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) of interest might help elucidate which chemical characteristics are most important in eliciting toxic effects. 1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) is the predominant nitrated PAH emitted in diesel exhaust. 1-NP-exposed Hepa1c1c7 cells exhibited marked changes in cellular morphology, decreased proliferation and different forms of cell death. A dramatic increase in cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed already after 6 h of exposure and the cells started to round up at 12 h. The rate of cell proliferation was markedly reduced at 24 h and apoptotic as well as propidium iodide (PI)-positive cells appeared. Electron microscopic examination revealed thatmore » the vacuolization was partly due to mitochondria swelling. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK inhibited only the apoptotic cell death and Nec-1 (an inhibitor of necroptosis) exhibited no inhibitory effects on either cell death or vacuolization. In contrast, cycloheximide markedly reduced both the number of apoptotic and PI-positive cells as well as the cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting that 1-NP induced paraptotic cell death. All the MAPKs; ERK1/2, p38 and JNK, appear to be involved in the death process since marked activation was observed upon 1-NP exposure, and their inhibitors partly reduced the induced cell death. The ERK1/2 inhibitor PD 98057 completely blocked the induced vacuolization, whereas the other MAPKs inhibitors only had minor effects on this process. These findings suggest that 1-NP may cause apoptosis and paraptosis. In contrast, the corresponding amine (1-aminopyrene) elicited only minor apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and cells with characteristics typical of paraptosis were absent.« less

  20. Oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stogner, S W; Payne, D K

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the biochemistry of oxygen metabolism, including the formation of free radicals and the role of endogenous antioxidants. Pathophysiologic correlates underlying the clinical manifestations of oxygen toxicity are reviewed and management strategies are outlined. References from basic science and clinical journals were selected from the authors' files and from a search of a computerized database of the biomedical literature. Articles selected for review included both historical and current literature concerning the biochemistry and pathophysiology of oxygen toxicity in animals and humans. The benefits of oxygen therapy have been known for many years; however, its potential toxicity has not been recognized until the last two decades. The lungs, the eyes, and, under certain conditions, the central nervous system are the organs most affected by prolonged exposure to hyperoxic environments. Free radical formation during cellular metabolism under hyperoxic conditions is recognized as the biochemical basis of oxygen injury to cells and organs. Endogenous antioxidants are a primary means of detoxifying reactive oxygen species and preventing hyperoxia-induced cellular damage. When this defense fails or is overwhelmed by the excessive production of hyperoxia-induced free-radical species, distinctive morphologic changes occur at the cellular level. The amount of hyperoxia required to cause cellular damage and the time course of these changes vary from species to species and from individual to individual within the same species. Age, nutritional status, presence of underlying diseases, and certain drugs may influence the development of oxygen toxicity. There is currently no reliably effective drug for preventing or delaying the development of oxygen toxicity in humans. Use of the lowest effective oxygen concentration, the avoidance of certain drugs, and attention to nutritional and metabolic factors remain the best means

  1. Dependence of Nanoparticle Toxicity on Their Physical and Chemical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, Alyona; Bozrova, Svetlana; Sokolov, Pavel; Berestovoy, Mikhail; Karaulov, Alexander; Nabiev, Igor

    2018-02-01

    Studies on the methods of nanoparticle (NP) synthesis, analysis of their characteristics, and exploration of new fields of their applications are at the forefront of modern nanotechnology. The possibility of engineering water-soluble NPs has paved the way to their use in various basic and applied biomedical researches. At present, NPs are used in diagnosis for imaging of numerous molecular markers of genetic and autoimmune diseases, malignant tumors, and many other disorders. NPs are also used for targeted delivery of drugs to tissues and organs, with controllable parameters of drug release and accumulation. In addition, there are examples of the use of NPs as active components, e.g., photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy and in hyperthermic tumor destruction through NP incorporation and heating. However, a high toxicity of NPs for living organisms is a strong limiting factor that hinders their use in vivo. Current studies on toxic effects of NPs aimed at identifying the targets and mechanisms of their harmful effects are carried out in cell culture models; studies on the patterns of NP transport, accumulation, degradation, and elimination, in animal models. This review systematizes and summarizes available data on how the mechanisms of NP toxicity for living systems are related to their physical and chemical properties.

  2. Purification and biochemical characterization of NpABCG5/NpPDR5, a plant pleiotropic drug resistance transporter expressed in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Frédéric; Pierman, Baptiste; Bertin, Aurélie; Lévy, Daniel; Boutry, Marc

    2017-05-04

    Pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters belong to the ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and are involved in the transport of various molecules across plasma membranes. During evolution, PDR genes appeared independently in fungi and in plants from a duplication of a half-size ABC gene. The enzymatic properties of purified PDR transporters from yeast have been characterized. This is not the case for any plant PDR transporter, or, incidentally, for any purified plant ABC transporter. Yet, plant PDR transporters play important roles in plant physiology such as hormone signaling or resistance to pathogens or herbivores. Here, we describe the expression, purification, enzymatic characterization and 2D analysis by electron microscopy of NpABCG5/NpPDR5 from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia , which has been shown to be involved in the plant defense against herbivores. We constitutively expressed NpABCG5/NpPDR5, provided with a His-tag in a homologous system: suspension cells from Nicotiana tabacum (Bright Yellow 2 line). NpABCG5/NpPDR5 was targeted to the plasma membrane and was solubilized by dodecyl maltoside and purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The ATP-hydrolyzing specific activity (27 nmol min -1  mg -1 ) was stimulated seven-fold in the presence of 0.1% asolectin. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that NpABCG5/NpPDR5 is monomeric and with dimensions shorter than those of known ABC transporters. Enzymatic data (optimal pH and sensitivity to inhibitors) confirmed that plant and fungal PDR transporters have different properties. These data also show that N. tabacum suspension cells are a convenient host for the purification and biochemical characterization of ABC transporters. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. PA and NP productivity in the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Moran, Eileen A; Basa, Edesha; Gao, Jian; Woodmansee, Denni; Almenoff, Peter L; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-07-01

    This study assessed the 2014 clinical productivity of 5,959 physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in the US Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Total work relative value units divided by the direct clinical full-time equivalent measured annual productivity, and correlated factors were examined using weighted analysis of variance. PAs and NPs in adult primary care roles were more productive than those in other specialties. Both providers were more productive in rural than in nonrural settings and less productive in teaching than nonteaching hospitals. Men were slightly more productive than women but age and years of VHA employment were not correlates of productivity. PAs were more productive when their scope of practice allowed significant autonomy; NP productivity was unaffected by supervisory requirements. PAs and NPs are an important component of the VHA provider workforce, and their productivity correlates with a number of factors. More organizational research is necessary to better understand the contributing roles PAs and NPs provide in a rapidly evolving, vertically integrated, national health delivery system.

  4. REGULARIZATION FOR COX'S PROPORTIONAL HAZARDS MODEL WITH NP-DIMENSIONALITY.

    PubMed

    Bradic, Jelena; Fan, Jianqing; Jiang, Jiancheng

    2011-01-01

    High throughput genetic sequencing arrays with thousands of measurements per sample and a great amount of related censored clinical data have increased demanding need for better measurement specific model selection. In this paper we establish strong oracle properties of non-concave penalized methods for non-polynomial (NP) dimensional data with censoring in the framework of Cox's proportional hazards model. A class of folded-concave penalties are employed and both LASSO and SCAD are discussed specifically. We unveil the question under which dimensionality and correlation restrictions can an oracle estimator be constructed and grasped. It is demonstrated that non-concave penalties lead to significant reduction of the "irrepresentable condition" needed for LASSO model selection consistency. The large deviation result for martingales, bearing interests of its own, is developed for characterizing the strong oracle property. Moreover, the non-concave regularized estimator, is shown to achieve asymptotically the information bound of the oracle estimator. A coordinate-wise algorithm is developed for finding the grid of solution paths for penalized hazard regression problems, and its performance is evaluated on simulated and gene association study examples.

  5. Emergency physician evaluation of PA and NP practice patterns.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew W; Klauer, Kevin M; Kessler, Chad S

    2018-05-01

    The unprecedented surge in physician assistants (PAs) and NPs in the ED developed quickly in recent years, but scope of practice and practice patterns are not well described. We conducted two cross-sectional electronic surveys of the American College of Emergency Physicians' council. Survey construction was informed by interviews and evaluated with validity and reliability studies. Univariate analyses to establish associations also were performed. Most councilors' departments employ PAs and NPs (72.4% of 163 responses). Supervisory requirements varied greatly among respondents for the same emergency severity index (ESI) level. Regardless of experience level, NPs were reported to use significantly more resources than PAs; chi-square(4) = 105.292, P < .001 for less-experienced PAs or NPs; chi-square(4) = 120.415, P < .001 for more experienced PAs or NPs. Councilors reported great variation in PA and NP scope of practice. The results also suggest that new graduate PAs may be more clinically prepared to practice in the ED than new graduate NPs.

  6. Optimization of lattice surgery is NP-hard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Daniel; Nori, Franco; Devitt, Simon J.

    2017-09-01

    The traditional method for computation in either the surface code or in the Raussendorf model is the creation of holes or "defects" within the encoded lattice of qubits that are manipulated via topological braiding to enact logic gates. However, this is not the only way to achieve universal, fault-tolerant computation. In this work, we focus on the lattice surgery representation, which realizes transversal logic operations without destroying the intrinsic 2D nearest-neighbor properties of the braid-based surface code and achieves universality without defects and braid-based logic. For both techniques there are open questions regarding the compilation and resource optimization of quantum circuits. Optimization in braid-based logic is proving to be difficult and the classical complexity associated with this problem has yet to be determined. In the context of lattice-surgery-based logic, we can introduce an optimality condition, which corresponds to a circuit with the lowest resource requirements in terms of physical qubits and computational time, and prove that the complexity of optimizing a quantum circuit in the lattice surgery model is NP-hard.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Anilkumar, T. S., E-mail: anil24march@gmail.com; Girija, M. L., E-mail: girija.ml.grt1@gmail.com; Venkatesh, J., E-mail: phph9502@yahoo.com

    2016-05-06

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) Thin films were deposited on glass substrate using Spin coating method. Zinc acetate dehydrate, Carbinol and Mono-ethanolamine were used as the precursor, solvent and stabilizer respectively to prepare ZnO Thin-films. The molar ratio of Monoethanolamine to Zinc acetate was maintained as approximately 1. The thickness of the films was determined by Interference technique. The optical properties of the films were studied by UV Vis-Spectrophotometer. From transmittance and absorbance curve, the energy band gap of ZnO is found out. Electrical Conductivity measurements of ZnO are carried out by two probe method and Activation energy for the electrical conductivitymore » of ZnO are found out. The crystal structure and orientation of the films were analyzed by XRD. The XRD patterns show that the ZnO films are polycrystalline with wurtzite hexagonal structure.« less

  8. Enhanced photoluminescence properties of Al doped ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. X.; Ding, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    Al doped ZnO films are fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. In general, visible emission is related to various defects in ZnO films. However, too much defects will cause light emission quench. So it is still a controversial issue to control appropriate defect concentrations. In this paper, based on our previous results, appropriate Al doping concentration is chosen to introduce more both interstitial Zn and O vacancy defects, which is responsible for main visible emission of ZnO films. A strong emission band located at 405 nm and a long tail peak is observed in the samples. As Al is doped in ZnO films, the intensity of emission peaks increases. Zn interstitial might increase with the increasing Al3+ substitute because ZnO was a self-assembled oxide compound. So Zn interstitial defect concentration in Al doped ZnO films will increase greatly, which results in the intensity of emission peaks increases.

  9. Decomposition byproducts induced by gamma radiation and their toxicity: the case of 2-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Alsager, Omar A; Basfar, Ahmed A; Muneer, Majid

    2018-04-01

    The induced degradation and detoxification of 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) in aqueous media by gamma irradiation were carefully evaluated in this study. Gamma radiation at absorbed doses as low as 20 kGy was able to degrade 2-NP to reach a removal of at least 85% across the investigated range of concentration (50-150 ppm). 2-NP breaks down to aromatic-based compounds with increasing number of byproducts upon increasing the radiation treatment from the absorbed dose of 50% decomposition (D 50 ) to the absorbed dose of 90% decomposition (D 90 ), after which no byproducts could be detected, indicating the formation of undetectable aliphatic hydrocarbons, insoluble, or volatile byproducts. Toxicology studies showed that the degradation of 2-NP under absorbed doses up to D 90 resulted in a more toxic byproduct than the parent compound, and a remarkable reduction in the toxicity was observed with the irradiated samples with absorbed doses above D 90 . Varying the pH of the media to acidic or basic conditions did not significantly alter the degradation behavior of 2-NP. However, a notable improvement of the detoxification was associated with the samples of acidic pH. Adding 0.5% of H 2 O 2 to 2-NP solutions had a positive effect by reducing D 90 by a factor of nine and diminishing the toxicity by twofolds.

  10. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Cu doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Singh, Budhi; Khan, Zaheer Ahmed; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2018-05-01

    We report the room temperature ferromagnetism in 2% Cu doped ZnO films grown by RF magnetron sputtering in different argon and oxygen partial pressure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to ascertain the oxidation states of Cu in ZnO. The presence of defects within Cu-doped ZnO films can be revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance. It has been observed that saturated magnetic moment increase as we increase the zinc vacancies during deposition.

  11. Toxic remediation

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  12. Effect of aging on ZnO and nitrogen doped P-Type ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Sayanee; Bhunia, S.

    2012-06-01

    The withholding of p-type conductivity in as-prepared and 3% nitrogen (N) doped zinc oxide (ZnO) even after 2 months of preparation was systematically studied. The films were grown on glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at 350 °C under different conditions, viz. under vacuum and at oxygen (O) ambience using 2000 laser pulses. In O ambience for as-prepared ZnO the carrier concentration reduces and mobility increases with increasing number of laser shots. The resistivity of as-prepared and 3% N-doped ZnO is found to increase with reduction in hole concentration after 60 days of aging while maintaining its p-type conductivity irrespective of growth condition. AFM and electrical properties showed aging effect on the doped and undoped samples. For as-prepared ZnO, with time, O migration makes the film high resistive by reducing free electron concentrations. But for N-doped p-type ZnO, O-migration, metastable N and hydrogen atom present in the source induced instability in structure makes it less conducting p-type.

  13. Analysis of nuclear accumulation of influenza NP antigen in von Magnus virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Maeno, K; Aoki, H; Hamaguchi, M; Iinuma, M; Nagai, Y; Matsumoto, T; Takeura, S; Shibata, M

    1981-01-01

    When 1-5C-4 cells were infected with von Magnus virus derived from influenza A/RI/5+ virus by successive undiluted passages in chick embryos, virus-specific proteins were synthesized but production of infectious virus was inhibited. In these cells the synthesis of viral RNA was suppressed and the nucleoprotein (NP) antigen was found predominantly in the nucleus in contrast to standard virus-infected cells in which the antigen was distributed throughout the whole cell. The intracellular location and migration of NP were determined by isotope labeling and sucrose gradient centrifugation of subcellular fractions. In standard virus-infected cell NP polypeptide was present predominantly in the cytoplasm in the form of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) and intranuclear RNP was detected in reduced amounts. In contrast, in von Magnus virus-infected cells NP polypeptide was present predominantly in the nucleus in a nonassembled, soluble from and the amount of cytoplasmic RNP was considerably reduced. After short-pulse labeling NP was detected exclusively in the cytoplasm in a soluble form and after a chase a large proportion of such soluble NP was seen in the nucleus. It is suggested that a large proportion of the NP synthesized in von Magnus virus-infected cells in not assembled into cytoplasmic RNP because of the lack of available RNA and the NP migrated into the nucleus and remained there.

  14. Radiochemical determination of 237NP in soil samples contaminated with weapon grade plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M. P.; Espinosa, A.; Aragón, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Palomares terrestrial ecosystem (Spain) constitutes a natural laboratory to study transuranics. This scenario is partially contaminated with weapon-grade plutonium since the burnout and fragmentation of two thermonuclear bombs accidentally dropped in 1966. While performing radiometric measurements in the field, the possible presence of 237Np was observed through its 29 keV gamma emission. To accomplish a detailed characterization of the source term in the contaminated area using the isotopic ratios Pu-Am-Np, the radiochemical isolation and quantification by alpha spectrometry of 237Np was initiated. The selected radiochemical procedure involves separation of Np from Am, U and Pu with ionic resins, given that in soil samples from Palomares 239+240Pu levels are several orders of magnitude higher than 237Np. Then neptunium is isolated using TEVA organic resins. After electrodeposition, quantification is performed by alpha spectrometry. Different tests were done with blank solutions spiked with 236Pu and 237Np, solutions resulting from the total dissolution of radioactive particles and soil samples. Results indicate that the optimal sequential radionuclide separation order is Pu-Np, with decontamination percentages obtained with the ionic resins ranging from 98% to 100%. Also, the addition of NaNO2 has proved to be necessary, acting as a stabilizer of Pu-Np valences.

  15. The Ebola Virus VP30-NP Interaction Is a Regulator of Viral RNA Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Moyer, Crystal L.; Abelson, Dafna M.

    Filoviruses are capable of causing deadly hemorrhagic fevers. All nonsegmented negative-sense RNA-virus nucleocapsids are composed of a nucleoprotein (NP), a phosphoprotein (VP35) and a polymerase (L). However, the VP30 RNA-synthesis co-factor is unique to the filoviruses. The assembly, structure, and function of the filovirus RNA replication complex remain unclear. Here, we have characterized the interactions of Ebola, Sudan and Marburg virus VP30 with NP using in vitro biochemistry, structural biology and cell-based mini-replicon assays. We have found that the VP30 C-terminal domain interacts with a short peptide in the C-terminal region of NP. Further, we have solved crystal structures ofmore » the VP30-NP complex for both Ebola and Marburg viruses. These structures reveal that a conserved, proline-rich NP peptide binds a shallow hydrophobic cleft on the VP30 C-terminal domain. Structure-guided Ebola virus VP30 mutants have altered affinities for the NP peptide. Correlation of these VP30-NP affinities with the activity for each of these mutants in a cell-based mini-replicon assay suggests that the VP30-NP interaction plays both essential and inhibitory roles in Ebola virus RNA synthesis.« less

  16. The Wh-Adverbial & Which-NP Construction Asymmetry within Island Structures in Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakir, Sinan

    2017-01-01

    The present study is a follow-up study of Çakir (2016b) which focused on the wh-adverbial & which NP constructions asymmetry within island structures in Turkish. The characteristics of wh-adverbial nasil "how" is compared with the which-NP constructions "hangisekilde" "in what way" and "hangihalde"…

  17. 7 CFR 1955.115 - Sales steps for nonprogram (NP) property (housing).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Sales steps for nonprogram (NP) property (housing... Inventory Property Rural Housing (rh) Real Property § 1955.115 Sales steps for nonprogram (NP) property... following steps after repairs, if economically feasible, are completed. The appraisal will be updated to...

  18. 7 CFR 1955.118 - Processing cash sales or MFH credit sales on NP terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Processing cash sales or MFH credit sales on NP terms... Inventory Property Rural Housing (rh) Real Property § 1955.118 Processing cash sales or MFH credit sales on NP terms. (a) Cash sales. Cash sales will be closed by the servicing official collecting the purchase...

  19. Photoinduced toxicity of engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip Scott

    Engineered nanomaterials including metal, metal oxide and carbon based nanomaterials are extensively used in a wide variety of applications to the extent that their presence in the environment is expected to increase dramatically over the next century. These nanomaterials may be photodegraded by solar radiation and thereby release metal ions into the environment that can produce cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. Photoinduced toxicity experiments are performed exposing human lung epithelial carcinoma cells [H1650] to engineered semiconductor nanoparticles such as CdSe quantum dots and ZnO nanoparticles after exposure to 3, 6, and 9 hours of solar simulated radiation. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the metal ions are evaluated using ZnSO4 and CdCl2 solutions for the MTT assay and Comet assay respectively. The objective of the dissertation is to obtain quantitative information about the environmental transformation of engineered nanomaterials and their mechanism of toxicity. This information is critical for addressing the environmental health and safety risks of engineered nanomaterials to workers, consumers and the environment.

  20. Bactericidal impact of Ag, ZnO and mixed AgZnO colloidal nanoparticles on H37Rv Mycobacterium tuberculosis phagocytized by THP-1 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Alireza; Mosavari, Nader; Movahedzadeh, Farahnaz; Nodooshan, Saeedeh Jafari; Safarkar, Roya; Moro, Rossella; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Majidpour, Ali; Boustanshenas, Mina; Mosavi, Tahereh

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this research project was to infection of human macrophages (THP-1) cell lines by H 37 Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H 37 RvMTB) and find out the ratio/dilution of mixture silver (Ag NPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) whose ability to eliminate phagocytized bacteria compared to rifampicin. The colloidal Ag NPs and ZnO NPs were synthesized and their characteristics were evaluated. The THP-1 cell lines were infected with different concentration of H 37 RvMTB. Next, the infected cells were treated with different ratios/dilutions of Ag NPs, ZnO NPs and rifampicin. The THP-1 were lysed and were cultured in Lowenstein-Jensen agar medium, for eight weeks. The TEM and AFM images of NPs and H 37 RvMTB were supplied. It is observed that Ag NPs, 2 Ag :8 ZnO and 8 Ag :2 ZnO did not have any anti-tubercular effects on phagocytized H 37 RvMTB. Conversely, ZnO NPs somehow eliminated 18.7 × 10 4  CFU ml -1 of H 37 RvMTB in concentration of ∼ 0.468 ppm. To compare with 40 ppm of rifampicin, ∼ 0.663 ppm of 5 Ag :5 ZnO had the ability to kill of H 37 RvMTB, too. Based on previous research, ZnO NPs had strong anti-tubercular impact against H 37 RvMTB to in-vitro condition, but it was toxic in concentration of ∼ 0.468 ppm to both of THP-1 and normal lung (MRC-5) cell lines. It also seems that 5 Ag :5 ZnO is justified because in concentration of ∼ 0.663 ppm of 5 Ag :5 ZnO , phagocytized H 37 RvMTB into the THP-1 had died without any toxicity effects against THP-1 and also MRC-5 cell lines. It is obvious that the mixture of colloidal silver and zinc oxide NPs with ratio of 5 Ag :5 ZnO would be trustworthy options as anti-tubercular nano-drugs in future researches. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Sodium doping in ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, N. S.; Lynn, K. G.

    2015-01-01

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with sodium by thermal diffusion. Positron annihilations spectroscopy confirms the filling of zinc vacancies, to >6 μm deep in the bulk. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurement shows the diffusion of sodium up to 8 μm with concentration (1-3.5) × 1017 cm-3. Broad photoluminescence excitation peak at 3.1 eV, with onset appearance at 3.15 eV in Na:ZnO, is attributed to an electronic transition from a NaZn level at ˜(220-270) meV to the conduction band. Resistivity in Na doped ZnO crystals increases up to (4-5) orders of magnitude at room temperature.

  2. Calibration factors for the SNOOPY NP-100 neutron dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscu, D. F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chase, J.

    2007-10-01

    Within CANDU nuclear power facilities, only a small fraction of workers are exposed to neutron radiation. For these individuals, roughly 4.5% of the total radiation equivalent dose is the result of exposure to neutrons. When this figure is considered across all workers receiving external exposure of any kind, only 0.25% of the total radiation equivalent dose is the result of exposure to neutrons. At many facilities, the NP-100 neutron dosimeter, manufactured by Canberra Industries Incorporated, is employed in both direct and indirect dosimetry methods. Also known as "SNOOPY", these detectors undergo calibration, which results in a calibration factor relating the neutron count rate to the ambient dose equivalent rate, using a standard Am-Be neutron source. Using measurements presented in a technical note, readings from the dosimeter for six different neutron fields in six source-detector orientations were used, to determine a calibration factor for each of these sources. The calibration factor depends on the neutron energy spectrum and the radiation weighting factor to link neutron fluence to equivalent dose. Although the neutron energy spectra measured in the CANDU workplace are quite different than that of the Am-Be calibration source, the calibration factor remains constant - within acceptable limits - regardless of the neutron source used in the calibration; for the specified calibration orientation and current radiation weighting factors. However, changing the value of the radiation weighting factors would result in changes to the calibration factor. In the event of changes to the radiation weighting factors, it will be necessary to assess whether a change to the calibration process or resulting calibration factor is warranted.

  3. Improving ultraviolet photodetection of ZnO nanorods by Cr doped ZnO encapsulation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, S.; Mokhtari, S.; Khayatian, A.; Azimirad, R.

    2018-04-01

    Encapsulated ZnO nanorods (NRs) with different Cr concentration (0-4.5 at.%) were prepared in two different steps. First, ZnO NRs were grown by hydrothermal method. Then, they were encapsulated by dip coating method. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, and ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrophotometer analyses. XRD analysis proved that Cr incorporated into the ZnO structure successfully. Based on optical analysis, band gap changes in the range of 2.74-3.84 eV. Finally, UV responses of all samples were deeply investigated. It revealed 0.5 at.% Cr doped sample had the most photocurrent (0.75 mA) and photoresponsivity (0.8 A/W) of all which were about three times greater than photocurrent and photoresponsivity of the undoped sample.

  4. Release and toxicity comparison between industrial- and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many consumer products containing ZnO have raised concern for safety in regards toenvironmental impact and the public health. Widely used sunscreens for protectingagainst UV and avoiding sunburns represent a great exposure to nano-ZnO, one of theingredients commonly applied in sunscreens. Applying nano-products on beaches mayrelease nanoparticles unintentionally into the ocean. Despite the accumulation of suchnano-products in the ocean harming or being detrimental to critical marine organisms,few studies have investigated the release and potential toxicity of nanoparticlesextracted from products and compared them with those from industrial-typenanoparticles. Results show that the cytotoxicity of both industrial- and sunscreenderivednano-ZnO to the marine diatom algae, Thalassiosira pseudonana, increasedas exposure increases over time, as measured by growth inhibition (%) of the algae ata constant concentration of nano-ZnO (10 mg/L). The extent of toxicity appeared to behigher from industrial-type nano-ZnO compared to sunscreen-extracted nano-ZnO,though the extent becomes similar when concentrations increase to 50 mg/L. On theother hand, at a fixed exposure time of 48 hrs, the cytotoxicity increases asconcentrations increase with the higher toxicity shown from the industrial-typecompared to sunscreen-induced nano-ZnO. Results indicate that while industrial-typenano-ZnO shows higher toxicity than sunscreen-derived nano-ZnO, the release andextent of toxicity from n

  5. Spin noise spectroscopy of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, H.; Berski, F.; Balocchi, A.; Marie, X.; Mansur-Al-Suleiman, M.; Bakin, A.; Waag, A.; Hübner, J.; Oestreich, M.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the thermal equilibrium dynamics of electron spins bound to donors in nanoporous ZnO by optical spin noise spectroscopy. The spin noise spectra reveal two noise contributions: A weak spin noise signal from undisturbed localized donor electrons with a dephasing time of 24 ns due to hyperfine interaction and a strong spin noise signal with a spin dephasing time of 5 ns which we attribute to localized donor electrons which interact with lattice defects.

  6. Heptavalent Neptunium in a Gas-Phase Complex: (Np VIIO 3 +)(NO 3 –) 2

    DOE PAGES

    Dau, Phuong D.; Maurice, Remi; Renault, Eric; ...

    2016-09-15

    A central goal of chemistry is to achieve ultimate oxidation states, including in gas-phase complexes with no condensed phase perturbations. In the case of the actinide elements, the highest established oxidation states are labile Pu(VII) and somewhat more stable Np(VII). We have synthesized and characterized gas-phase AnO 3(NO 3) 2- complexes for An = U, Np, and Pu by endothermic NO 2 elimination from AnO 2(NO 3) 3-. It was previously demonstrated that the PuO 3+ core of PuO 3(NO 3) 2- has a Pu—O• radical bond such that the oxidation state is Pu(VI); it follows that in UO 3(NOmore » 3) 2- it is the stable U(VI) oxidation state. On the basis of the relatively more facile synthesis of NpO 3(NO 3) 2-, a Np(VII) oxidation state is inferred. This interpretation is substantiated by reactivity of the three complexes: NO 2 spontaneously adds to UO 3(NO 3) 2- and PuO 3(NO 3) 2- but not to NpO 3(NO 3) 2-. This unreactive character is attributed to a Np(VII)O 3+ core with three stable Np=O bonds, this in contrast to reactive U—O• and Pu—O• radical bonds. The computed structures and reaction energies for the three AnO 3(NO 3) 2- support the conclusion that the oxidation states are U(VI), Np(VII), and Pu(VI). These results establish the extreme Np(VII) oxidation state in a gas-phase complex, and demonstrate the inherently greater stability of Np(VII) versus Pu(VII).« less

  7. Cytotoxicity evaluation of ZnO-eugenol (ZOE) using different ZnO structure on human gingival fibroblast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhori, Siti Khadijah Mohd; Mahmud, Shahrom; Masudi, Sam'an Malik; Seeni, Azman; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Ann, Ling Chuo; Sirelkhatim, Amna

    2017-07-01

    Application of ZnO is widely used in many industries, such as in optoelectronic devices, automotive, textile, cosmetics, medical and dentistry. In this study, emphasis was given on ZnO-eugenol (ZOE) that has been used in dental restoration. ZOE contained 80% ZnO and 20% eugenol. ZOE exhibited selective toxicity that could kill bacteria but safe on human cells. The safety of ZOE on humans is critically important. Two types of ZnO with different morphology, namely ZnO-A and ZnO-K were used to make ZOE (ZOE-A and ZOE-K) and the cytotoxicity level on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cell line were evaluated. Both ZnO were characterized for its morphology and structural using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD), respectively. The cytotoxicity level was evaluated using CCK-8 assay where the percentage of viable cells after 72 h were observed. The result showed ZnO-A, containing mostly rod-like shape with a crystallite size of 37.5 nm, had a higher percentage of viable cells after 72 h. Sample ZnO-K, containing irregular shape morphology with bigger crystallite size of 42.2 nm, had a lower percentage of viable cells after 72 h. The HGF cell line was treated with extract dilution of ZOE-A and ZOE-K at 5, 10 and 15%, respectively. At 15% of extracts dilution, 97.3% of the HGF cells survived (for ZOE-A) while the survival percentage of ZOE-K was only 88.1%. This fact was probably due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio of ZnO-A that gave better interlocking bond in ZOE-A. This interlocking bond can prevent the ZnO and eugenol elements leaching out from the ZOE matrix thereby decrease in cytotoxicity effects on HGF.

  8. The Phase Relations in the In 2O 3-Al 2ZnO 4-ZnO System at 1350°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masaki; Kimizuka, Noboru; Mohri, Takahiko; Isobe, Mitsumasa

    1993-08-01

    Phase relations in the In 2O 3-Al 2ZnO 4-ZnO system at 1350°C are determined by a classical quenching method. This system consists of In 2O 3, Al 2ZnO 4, ZnO, and homologous phases InAlO 3(ZnO) m ( m = 2, 3, …) having solid solutions with LuFeO 3(ZnO) m-type crystal structures. These solid solution ranges are as follows: In 1+ x1Al 1- x1O 3(ZnO) 2 ( x1 = 0.70)-In 1+ x2Al 1- x2O 3(ZnO) 2 ( x2 = 0.316-0.320), In 2O 3(ZnO) 3-In 1+ xAl 1- xO 3(ZnO) 3 ( x = 0.230), In 2O 3(ZnO) 4-In 1+ xAl 1- xO 3(ZnO) 4 ( x = 0.15-0.16), In 2O 3(ZnO) 5-In 1+ xAl 1- xO 3(ZnO) 5 ( x = 0.116-0.130), In 2O 3(ZnO) 6-In 1+ xAl 1- xO 3(ZnO) 6 ( x = 0.000-0.111), In 2O 3(ZnO) 7-In 1+ xAl 1- xO 3(ZnO) 7 ( x = 0.08), In 2O 3(ZnO) 8-In 1+ xAl 1- xO 3(ZnO) 8 ( x: undetermined), and In 2O 3(ZnO) m-InAlO 3(ZnO) m ( m = 9, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19). The space groups of these homologous phases belong to R3¯ m for m = odd or P6 3/ mmc for m = even. Their crystal structures, In 1+ xAl 1- xO 3(ZnO) m (0 < x < 1), consist of three kinds of layers: an InO 1.5 layer, an (In xAl 1- xZn)O 2.5 layer, and ZnO layers. A comparison of the phase relations in the In 2O 3- M2ZnO 4-ZnO systems ( M = Fe, Ga, or Al) is made and their characteristic features are discussed in terms of the ionic radii and site preferences of the M cations.

  9. Toxic fungi.

    PubMed

    Lampe, K F

    1979-01-01

    Much progress in the areas of identification of active components and elucidation of the toxic mechanisms for the principal poisonous mushrooms has been made in the past decade. This affords a more rational approach to therapeutic management which has consequently resulted in a decrease in the morbidity and mortality associated with these species. However, the effectiveness of a large number of adjuvants for Amanita phalloides poisoning still needs critical laboratory evaluation. The current status of knowledge concerning the toxic potential and contituents of many mushroom species, including the gastroenteric irritants, is inadequate. The problem of geographic variation or genetic strain in the concentration of toxins of many species also requires further investigation. The recent awareness and interest in the pharmacology and toxicology of uncultivated mushrooms in North America and Great Britain should encourage continued active research.

  10. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  11. Studying toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elkus, A.; LeBlanc, L.; Kim, C.; Van Beneden, R.; Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    With funding from the George Mitchell Center for the Environment at the University of Maine, a team of scientists used a simple laboratory-based sediment resuspension design, and two well-established aquatic toxicology models, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), to evaluate if resuspension of Penobscot river sediment significantly elevates the toxicity of river water and to provide preliminary information on the types of chemicals likely to desorb during resuspension. The group collected sediments from two sites with known chemical contamination downstream of the Great Works and Veazie dams. The sediments were examined to determine the dynamics of PAH desorption and degradation under different resuspension frequencies. The scientists used clarified water from resuspension experiments for toxicity tests with the water-flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and other aquatic test organisms to infer toxicity from sediments from northern California rivers. Data from the study will help ascertain whether metals and/or xenoestrogens are present in the desorption water and give insight into possible avenues of sediment remediation.

  12. Exposure to Alumina Nanoparticles in Female Mice During Pregnancy Induces Neurodevelopmental Toxicity in the Offspring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinli; Ding, Yong; He, Kaihong; Li, Huan; Gao, Fuping; Moehling, Taylor J; Wu, Xiaohong; Duncan, Jeremy; Niu, Qiao

    2018-01-01

    Alumina nanoparticles (AlNP) have been shown to accumulate in organs and penetrate biological barriers which lead to toxic effects in many organ systems. However, it is not known whether AlNP exposure to female mice during pregnancy can affect the development of the central nervous system or induce neurodevelopmental toxicity in the offspring. The present study aims to examine the effect of AlNP on neurodevelopment and associated underlying mechanism. ICR strain adult female mice were randomly divided into four groups, which were treated with normal saline (control), 10 μm particle size of alumina (bulk-Al), and 50 and 13 nm AlNP during entire pregnancy period. Aluminum contents in the hippocampus of newborns were measured and neurodevelopmental behaviors were tracked in the offspring from birth to 1 month of age. Furthermore, oxidative stress and neurotransmitter levels were measured in the cerebral cortex of the adolescents. Our results showed that aluminum contents in the hippocampus of newborns in AlNP-treated groups were significantly higher than those in bulk-Al and controls. Moreover, the offspring delivered by AlNP-treated female mice displayed stunted neurodevelopmental behaviors. Finally, the offspring of AlNP-treated mice demonstrated significantly increased anxiety-like behavior with impaired learning and memory performance at 1 month of age. The underlying mechanism could be related to increased oxidative stress and decreased neurotransmitter levels in the cerebral cortex. We therefore conclude that AlNP exposure of female mice during pregnancy can induce neurodevelopmental toxicity in offspring.

  13. Evaluation of zinc oxide nanoparticles toxicity on marine algae chlorella vulgaris through flow cytometric, cytotoxicity and oxidative stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Suman, T Y; Radhika Rajasree, S R; Kirubagaran, R

    2015-03-01

    The increasing industrial use of nanomaterials during the last decades poses a potential threat to the environment and in particular to organisms living in the aquatic environment. In the present study, the toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) was investigated in Marine algae Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris). High zinc dissociation from ZnONPs, releasing ionic zinc in seawater, is a potential route for zinc assimilation and ZnONPs toxicity. To examine the mechanism of toxicity, C. vulgaris were treated with 50mg/L, 100mg/L, 200mg/L and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs for 24h and 72h. The detailed cytotoxicity assay showed a substantial reduction in the viability dependent on dose and exposure. Further, flow cytometry revealed the significant reduction in C. vulgaris viable cells to higher ZnO NPs. Significant reductions in LDH level were noted for ZnO NPs at 300 mg/L concentration. The activity of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) significantly increased in the C. vulgaris exposed to 200mg/L and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs. The content of non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione (GSH) significantly decreased in the groups with a ZnO NPs concentration of higher than 100mg/L. The level of lipid peroxidation (LPO) was found to increase as the ZnO NPs dose increased. The FT-IR analyses suggested surface chemical interaction between nanoparticles and algal cells. The substantial morphological changes and cell wall damage were confirmed through microscopic analyses (FESEM and CM). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimization of TiNP/Ti Content for Si3N4/42CrMo Joints Brazed With Ag-Cu-Ti+TiNP Composite Filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianpeng; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Chunfeng

    The Si3N4 ceramic was brazed to 42CrMo steel by using TiN particles modified braze, and the proportion of TiNp reinforcement and active element Ti was optimized to improve the joint strength. The brazed joints were examined by means of SEM. and EDS investigations. Microstructural examination showed that TiN+Ti5Si3 reaction layer was adjacent to Si3N4, whereas TiC was formed in 42CrMo/filler reaction layer. The Ag-Cu-Ti brazing alloy showed intimate bonding with TiNp and Cu-Ti intermetallics precipitated in the joint. The strength tests demonstrated that the mechanical properties of joints increased and then decreased by increasing the TiNp content when a low Ti content (6wt.%) was supplied. When the Ti content (>6wt.%) was offered sufficiently, the joint strength decreased firstly and then stayed stable with increasing the TiNp content. The maximum four-point bending strength (221 MPa) was obtained when the contents of TiNp and Ti were 10vol.% and 6wt.%, respectively.

  15. Nonylphenol induces liver toxicity and oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Sohrab; Mousavi Kani, Seydeh Narges; Ghasemi-Kasman, Maryam; Aghapour, Fahimeh; Khorasani, Hamidreza; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2016-10-07

    Nonylphenol (NP) is one of the most widely used synthetic xenoestrogens in detergents, plastic products, paints and the most important environmental degradation factor. In this study, the effects NP was investigated on hepatic oxidative stress-related gene expression in rats. Wistar male rats weighing 150-200 g were divided into control and NP receiving groups. NP was given in three doses (5, 25, and 125 μg/kg). All doses were given by gavage and the experiment continued for a consecutive 35 days. AST, ALT and ALP determined by the colorimetric method. The RNA was extracted from the rats liver tissue and RT- PCR was used to investigate the changes in gene expression. For this purpose, primers and specific probes of HO1 and Gadd45b genes as well as B-actin as control were prepared and the expression of each gene was separately assessed with ABI-7300. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for evaluating of cell death. The data from our study indicated nonylphenol increased alkaline phosphatase level but not changed aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in serum. That various doses of NP result in a dose-dependent increase in the expression of HO-1 gene. The intensified expression of HO-1 was statistically significant just at the doses of 25 and 125 μg/kg compared to control group (p < 0.05). In addition, it was shown that different doses of nonylphenol raised the expression of Gadd45b gene and this increase was significantly evident at 5 μg/kg (p < 0.05). Histological evaluation also indicated that NP increased hepatocytes cell death. We conclude that NP increased serum alkaline phosphatase, lead to liver damage and can increase the expression of HO1 and Gadd45b genes and may modify the toxic effects on liver through induction of oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ΔNp63 promotes pediatric neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma by regulating tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bid, Hemant K.; Roberts, Ryan D.; Cam, Maren; Audino, Anthony; Kurmasheva, Raushan T.; Lin, Jiayuh; Houghton, Peter J.; Cam, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 and its family members p63/p73 are critical determinants of tumorigenesis. ΔNp63 is a splice variant of p63, which lacks the N-terminal transactivation domain. It is thought to antagonize p53-, p63- and p73- dependent translation, thus blocking their tumor suppressor activity. In our studies of the pediatric solid tumors neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma, we find overexpression of ΔNp63; however, there is no correlation of ΔNp63 expression with p53 mutation status. Our data suggest that ΔNp63 itself endows cells with a gain of function that leads to malignant transformation, a function independent of any p53 antagonism. Here, we demonstrate that ΔNp63 overexpression, independent of p53, increases secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), leading to elevated phosphorylation of STAT-3 (Tyr-705). We show that elevated phosphorylation of STAT-3 leads to stabilization of HIF-1α protein, resulting in VEGF secretion. We also show human clinical data, which suggests a mechanistic role for ΔNp63 in osteosarcoma metastasis. In summary, our studies reveal the mechanism by which ΔNp63, as a master transcription factor, modulates tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24154873

  17. Structural study of the ammonium octafluoroneptunate, [NH 4] 4NpF 8

    DOE PAGES

    Poineau, Frederic; Silva, Chinthaka M.; Yeamans, Charles B.; ...

    2016-04-21

    The [NH 4] 4NpF 8 salt was prepared from the solid-state reaction of NpO 2 with NH 4HF 2 and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The diffraction results confirm the compound to be isostructural to [NH 4] 4UF 8 with the following lattice parameter (a = 13.054(4) Å, b = 6.681(2) Å, c = 13.676(5) Å, ß = 121.14 Å). For the first time, a Neptunium fluoride complex has been characterized by XAFS spectroscopy. The energy position of the white line and inflection of the XANES spectra of [NH 4] 4NpF 8 are consistentmore » with the presence of Np(IV). Adjustment of the EXAFS spectra indicates that the coordination number (7.4±1.5) and the average Np-F distance (2.26(1) Å) are consistent with the presence of the NpF8 dodecahedron. The average Np-F distance is ~0.02 Å shorter than the U-F distance in [NH 4] 4UF 8 and is a result of the actinide contraction.« less

  18. SERS-barcoded colloidal gold NP assemblies as imaging agents for use in biodiagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Priyanka; Olds, William; Blakey, Idriss; Thurecht, Kristofer J.; Izake, Emad L.; Fredericks, Peter M.

    2014-03-01

    There is a growing need for new biodiagnostics that combine high throughput with enhanced spatial resolution and sensitivity. Gold nanoparticle (NP) assemblies with sub-10 nm particle spacing have the benefits of improving detection sensitivity via Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and being of potential use in biomedicine due to their colloidal stability. A promising and versatile approach to form solution-stable NP assemblies involves the use of multi-branched molecular linkers which allows tailoring of the assembly size, hot-spot density and interparticle distance. We have shown that linkers with multiple anchoring end-groups can be successfully employed as a linker to assemble gold NPs into dimers, linear NP chains and clustered NP assemblies. These NP assemblies with diameters of 30-120 nm are stable in solution and perform better as SERS substrates compared with single gold NPs, due to an increased hot-spot density. Thus, tailored gold NP assemblies are potential candidates for use as biomedical imaging agents. We observed that the hot-spot density and in-turn the SERS enhancement is a function of the linker polymer concentration and polymer architecture. New deep Raman techniques like Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) have emerged that allow detection from beneath diffusely scattering opaque materials, including biological media such as animal tissue. We have been able to demonstrate that the gold NP assemblies could be detected from within both proteinaceous and high lipid containing animal tissue by employing a SORS technique with a backscattered geometry.

  19. NP001 regulation of macrophage activation markers in ALS: A phase I clinical and biomarker study

    PubMed Central

    MILLER, ROBERT G.; ZHANG, RONGZHEN; BLOCK, GILBERT; KATZ, JONATHAN; BAROHN, RICHARD; KASARSKIS, EDWARD; FORSHEW, DALLAS; GOPALAKRISHNAN, VIDHYA; MCGRATH, MICHAEL S.

    2017-01-01

    This is a phase I, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose safety and tolerability study of NP001 in patients with ALS. NP001 is a novel regulator of inflammatory macrophages and monocytes. As ALS progression is thought to be related to neuroinflammation, an additional objective of the study was to assess the effects of NP001 administration on monocyte activation markers. Thirty-two ALS patients were enrolled and received either placebo (eight) or one of four (six at each dose) ascending single i.v. doses (0.2, 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 mg/kg NP001). Patients were monitored for safety, and blood monocyte immune activation markers CD16 and HLA-DR were assessed pre- and 24 h post-dosing. Changes from baseline were calculated. Results showed that NP001 was generally safe and well tolerated. Importantly, a single dose of NP001 caused a dose-dependent reduction in expression of monocyte CD16, a marker of monocyte activation/inflammation. Additionally, monocyte HLA-DR expression was also decreased in those patients with elevated values at baseline. In conclusion, these data indicate that NP001 has an acute effect on inflammatory monocytes in ALS patient blood. The potential for modulation of inflammation in the context of ALS disease progression will require further study with long-term follow-up. PMID:25192333

  20. Fast synthesize ZnO quantum dots via ultrasonic method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Zhang, Bing; Ding, Nan; Ding, Wenhao; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-05-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic sol-gel method. The ZnO quantum dots were synthesized in various ultrasonic temperature and time. Photoluminescence properties of these ZnO quantum dots were measured. Time-resolved photoluminescence decay spectra were also taken to discover the change of defects amount during the reaction. Both ultrasonic temperature and time could affect the type and amount of defects in ZnO quantum dots. Total defects of ZnO quantum dots decreased with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time. The dangling bonds defects disappeared faster than the optical defects. Types of optical defects first changed from oxygen interstitial defects to oxygen vacancy and zinc interstitial defects. Then transformed back to oxygen interstitial defects again. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by both ultrasonic temperature and time as well. That is, with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased. Moreover, concentrated raw materials solution brought larger sizes and more optical defects of ZnO quantum dots. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Optical properties of P ion implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pong, Bao-Jen; Chou, Bo-Wei; Pan, Ching-Jen; Tsao, Fu-Chun; Chi, Gou-Chung

    2006-02-01

    Red and green emissions are observed from P ion implanted ZnO. Red emission at ~680 nm (1.82 eV) is associated with the donor-acceptor pair (DAP) transition, where the corresponding donor and acceptor are interstitial zinc (Zn i) and interstitial oxygen (O i), respectively. Green emission at ~ 516 nm (2.40 eV) is associated with the transition between the conduction band and antisite oxygen (O Zn). Green emission at ~516nm (2.403 eV) was observed for ZnO annealed at 800 oC under ambient oxygen, whereas, it was not visible when it was annealed in ambient nitrogen. Hence, the green emission is most likely not related to oxygen vacancies on ZnO sample, which might be related to the cleanliness of ZnO surface, a detailed study is in progress. The observed micro-strain is larger for N ion implanted ZnO than that for P ion implanted ZnO. It is attributed to the larger straggle of N ion implanted ZnO than that of P ion implanted ZnO. Similar phenomenon is also observed in Be and Mg ion implanted GaN.

  2. Influence of Dopants in ZnO Films on Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng-Xiao; Weng, Hui-Min; Zhang, Yang; Ma, Xing-Ping; Ye, Bang-Jiao

    2008-12-01

    The influence of dopants in ZnO films on defects is investigated by slow positron annihilation technique. The results show S that parameters meet SAl > Sun > SAg for Al-doped ZnO films, undoped and Ag-doped ZnO films. Zinc vacancies are found in all ZnO films with different dopants. According to S parameter and the same defect type, it can be induced that the zinc vacancy concentration is the highest in the Al-doped ZnO film, and it is the least in the Ag-doped ZnO film. When Al atoms are doped in the ZnO films grown on silicon substrates, Zn vacancies increase as compared to the undoped and Ag-doped ZnO films. The dopant concentration could determine the position of Fermi level in materials, while defect formation energy of zinc vacancy strongly depends on the position of Fermi level, so its concentration varies with dopant element and dopant concentration.

  3. ZnO Schottky barriers and Ohmic contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillson, Leonard J.; Lu, Yicheng

    2011-06-01

    ZnO has emerged as a promising candidate for optoelectronic and microelectronic applications, whose development requires greater understanding and control of their electronic contacts. The rapid pace of ZnO research over the past decade has yielded considerable new information on the nature of ZnO interfaces with metals. Work on ZnO contacts over the past decade has now been carried out on high quality material, nearly free from complicating factors such as impurities, morphological and native point defects. Based on the high quality bulk and thin film crystals now available, ZnO exhibits a range of systematic interface electronic structure that can be understood at the atomic scale. Here we provide a comprehensive review of Schottky barrier and ohmic contacts including work extending over the past half century. For Schottky barriers, these results span the nature of ZnO surface charge transfer, the roles of surface cleaning, crystal quality, chemical interactions, and defect formation. For ohmic contacts, these studies encompass the nature of metal-specific interactions, the role of annealing, multilayered contacts, alloyed contacts, metallization schemes for state-of-the-art contacts, and their application to n-type versus p-type ZnO. Both ZnO Schottky barriers and ohmic contacts show a wide range of phenomena and electronic behavior, which can all be directly tied to chemical and structural changes on an atomic scale.

  4. Variable range hopping in ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2018-04-01

    We report the variable range hopping in ZnO films grown by RF magnetron sputtering in different argon and oxygen partial pressure. It has been found that Mott variable range hopping dominant over Efros variable range hopping in all ZnO films. It also has been found that hopping distance and energy increases with increasing oxygen partial pressure.

  5. Sign of the Singlet ( np)-Scattering Length, Neutron Radiative Capture by the Proton and Problem of the Virtual Level of the ( np) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyuboshitz, V. L.; Lyuboshitz, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    It is shown that, taking into account the process of neutron radiative capture by the proton and the negative sign of the length of singlet ( np)-scattering ( a s = - f s (0) < 0), the singlet ( np)-scattering amplitude f s has a pole at a complex energy {widetilde{E}_s}, the real part of which is negative ({Re widetilde{E}_s < 0}) and the imaginary part is positive ({Im widetilde{E}_s > 0}). This means that a singlet state of the ( np) system, which would decay into the deuteron in the ground state and the γ quantum ("singlet deuteron") does not exist, and the pole {widetilde{E}_s} corresponds to the virtual but not true quasistationary level.

  6. Mechanistic insights into PEPT1-mediated transport of a novel antiepileptic, NP-647.

    PubMed

    Khomane, Kailas S; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Wahlang, Banrida; Bagul, Pravin; Shaikh, Naeem; Pawar, Yogesh B; Meena, Chhuttan Lal; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Jain, Rahul; Tikoo, K; Bansal, Arvind K

    2012-09-04

    The present study, in general, is aimed to uncover the properties of the transport mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the uptake of NP-647 into Caco-2 cells and, in particular, to understand whether it is a substrate for the intestinal oligopeptide transporter, PEPT1 (SLC15A1). NP-647 showed a carrier-mediated, saturable transport with Michaelis-Menten parameters K(m) = 1.2 mM and V(max) = 2.2 μM/min. The effect of pH, sodium ion (Na(+)), glycylsarcosine and amoxicillin (substrates of PEPT1), and sodium azide (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor) on the flux rate of NP-647 was determined. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies were carried out to investigate molecular interactions of NP-647 with transporter using homology model of human PEPT1. The permeability coefficient (P(appCaco-2)) of NP-647 (32.5 × 10(-6) cm/s) was found to be four times higher than that of TRH. Results indicate that NP-647 is transported into Caco-2 cells by means of a carrier-mediated, proton-dependent mechanism that is inhibited by Gly-Sar and amoxicillin. In turn, NP-647 also inhibits the uptake of Gly-Sar into Caco-2 cells and, together, this evidence suggests that PEPT1 is involved in the process. Docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies indicate high affinity of NP-647 toward PEPT1 binding site as compared to TRH. High permeability of NP-647 over TRH is attributed to its increased hydrophobicity which increases its affinity toward PEPT1 by interacting with the hydrophobic pocket of the transporter through hydrophobic forces.

  7. Toxic shock syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  8. Thermal Stress and Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at subthermoneutral te...

  9. Lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gidlow, D A

    2015-07-01

    Since the last In-Depth Review of lead toxicity in 2004 there have been further developments with regard to safe exposure levels for lead workers. To advise occupational health professionals of the latest research on the multi-system toxic effects of lead and the implications of this research for setting new safe and appropriate occupational suspension limits. An extensive review of the current literature and an investigation of the database used by lead users to produce their submission under the REACH Regulations. Much of the published research on lead toxicity is on the effects of lead on the general population where blood lead levels are considerably lower than those seen in lead-exposed workers. It is always difficult to compare such studies with those undertaken on exposed workers as they may not be directly comparable and may not have taken into account all confounding variables and the well-acknowledged 'healthy worker' concept. However, it is clear that there is substantial evidence that potential health effects on lead workers may be seen at levels which were previously accepted as 'safe'. There is undoubtedly a narrow margin of safety between current occupational blood lead suspension limits and subclinical effect. As a result, the lead users have produced a voluntary Code of Practice with suspension limits significantly below those seen in some national legislation, particularly the Control of Lead at Work Act 2002. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Nanotoxicity: challenging the myth of nano-specific toxicity.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig A

    2013-08-01

    The analysis of nanoparticle (NP) hazard is currently a major research pre-occupation for particle toxicologists since there is a pressing requirement for a comprehensive understanding of nanoparticle hazard because of the wide spectrum of NP varying in composition, shape and size that require testing for risk assessment. The Biologically Effective Doses (BEDs) of nanoparticles, the dose entity that drives toxicity include charge, solubility, contaminants, shape and the ability to translocate from the site of deposition in the lungs. We point out here that all of these modes of toxicity are relevant and described for conventional pathogenic particles. There is no evidence that particles below 100nm, the threshold definition of a NP, show any step-change in their hazard meaning that there is no evidence of novel 'nano-specific hazard'. Therefore conventional particle toxicology data are useful and relevant to the determination of the nanoparticle hazard. Emphasis away from 'nano-specific effects' and the availability of hazard data from conventional particles will focus limited resource towards a full understanding of the NP hazard. This will lead to improved ability to identify and test for their effects and measure their toxicokinetics and so contribute to their risk assessment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis, toxicity, occurrence and biodegradation of nonylphenol isomers: a review.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; Gan, Jay

    2014-12-01

    Over the last two decades, nonylphenols (NPs) have become to be known as a priority hazardous substance due primarily to its estrogenicity and ubiquitous occurrence in the environment. Nonylphenols are commonly treated as a single compound in the evaluation of their environmental occurrence, fate and transport, treatment or toxicity. However, technical nonylphenols (tNPs) are in fact a mixture of more than 100 isomers and congeners. Recent studies showed that some of these isomers behaved significantly differently in occurrence, estrogenicity and biodegradability. The most estrogenic isomer was about 2 to 4 times more active than tNP. Moreover, the half lives of the most recalcitrant isomers were about 3 to 4 times as long as those of readily-biodegradable isomers. Negligence of NP's isomer specificity may result in inaccurate assessment of its ecological and health effects. In this review, we summarized the recent publications on the analysis, occurrence, toxicity and biodegradation of NP at the isomer level and highlighted future research needs to improve our understanding of isomer-specificity of NP. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Toward blue emission in ZnO based LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, Bruno; Pauporté, Thierry; Lupan, Oleg; Le Bahers, Tangui; Ciofini, Ilaria

    2012-03-01

    The bandgap engineering of ZnO nanowires by doping is of great importance for tunable light emitting diode (LED) applications. We present a combined experimental and computational study of ZnO doping with Cd or Cu atoms in the nanomaterial. Zn1-xTMxO (TM=Cu, Cd) nanowires have been epitaxially grown on magnesium-doped p-GaN by electrochemical deposition. The Zn1-xTMxO/p-GaN heterojunction was integrated in a LED structure. Nanowires act as the light emitters and waveguides. At room temperature, TM-doped ZnO based LEDs exhibit low-threshold emission voltage and electroluminescence emission shifted from ultraviolet to violet-blue spectral region compared to pure ZnO LEDs. The emission wavelength can be tuned by changing the transition metal (TM) content in the ZnO nanomaterial and the shift is discussed, including insights from DFT computational investigations.

  13. Contrasting emission behaviour of phenanthroimidazole with ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, C; Jayabharathi, J; Sathishkumar, R; Jayamoorthy, K; Vimal, K

    2013-11-01

    A new fluorophore 2-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-phenyl-1H-phenanthro [9,10-d]imidazole has been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. Nanoparticulate ZnO enhances the fluorescence of the synthesised fluorophore. The absorption, fluorescence, lifetime, cyclic voltammetry and infrared studies reveal that fluorophore is attached to the surface of ZnO semiconductor. Photo-induced electron transfer (PET) explains the enhancement of fluorescence by nanoparticulate ZnO and the apparent binding constant has been obtained. Adsorption of the fluorophore on ZnO nanoparticle lowers the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the fluorophore. The strong adsorption of the phenanthrimidazole derivative on the surface of ZnO nanocrystals is likely due to the chemical affinity of the nitrogen atom of the organic molecule to the zinc ion on the surface of nanocrystal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fabrication and Performance Study on Individual Zno Nanowires Based Bioelectrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanguang; Yan, Xiaoqin; Kang, Zhuo; Lin, Pei

    2012-08-01

    One-dimensional zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) have unique advantages for use in biosensors as follows: oxide stable surface, excellent biosafety, high specific surface area, high isoelectric point (IEP = 9.5). In this work, we have prepared a kind of electrochemical bioelectrode based on individual ZnO NWs. Here, ZnO NWs with high quality were successfully synthesized by CVD method, which were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence. Then the Raman spectra and electrical characterization demonstrated the adsorption of uricase on ZnO wires. At last, a series of electrochemical measurements were carried out by using an electrochemical workstation with a conventional three-electrode system to obtain the cyclic voltammetry characteristics of the bioelectrodes. The excellent performance of the fabricated bioelectrode implies the potential application for single ZnO nanowire to construct electrochemical biosensor for the detection of uric acid.

  15. [Smart drug delivery systems based on nanoscale ZnO].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chun; Yi, Caixia; Zheng, Xi

    2018-04-01

    In view of the excellent biocompatibility as well as the low cost, nanoscale ZnO shows great potential for drug delivery application. Moreover, The charming character enable nanoscale ZnO some excellent features (e.g. dissolution in acid, ultrasonic permeability, microwave absorbing, hydrophobic/hydrophilic transition). All of that make nanoscale ZnO reasonable choices for smart drug delivery. In the recent decade, more and more studies have focused on controlling the drug release behavior via smart drug delivery systems based on nanoscale ZnO responsive to some certain stimuli. Herein, we review the recent exciting progress on the pH-responsive, ultrasound-responsive, microwave-responsive and UV-responsive nanoscale ZnO-based drug delivery systems. A brief introduction of the drug controlled release behavior and its effect of the drug delivery systems is presented. The biocompatibility of nanoscale ZnO is also discussed. Moreover, its development prospect is looked forward.

  16. Experiments with brilliant gamma beams at ELI-NP: A glimpse in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabanski, Dimiter L.

    2018-02-01

    The emerging experimental program with brilliant gamma beams at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility (ELI-NP), which is under construction in Magurele, Romania is presented with emphasis on the prepared day-one experiments. Experiments at ELI-NP will cover nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, studies of large-amplitude motions in nuclei, photofission and photonuclear reactions of astrophysics interest, and measurements of photonuclear reaction cross sections. The physics cases of the flagship experiments at ELI-NP are discussed, as well as the related instruments which are under construction for their realization.

  17. NpNn scheme and the saturation of collectivity in the A~=170 and 230 regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, M.; Sen, S.

    1993-02-01

    It is shown that the well known phenomenon of the saturation in the B(E20+1-->2+1), as well as the E+21 values near midshell in the even rare-earth and actinide nuclei, can be reproduced in the NpNn scheme through a very simple parametrization in terms of the maximum number of valence protons and neutrons available in the major shells under consideration. This parametrization leads to a product (NpNn)eff which is found to have a more universal character as a structure variable than the usual NpNn.

  18. Evaluation of the RAPIDEC® CARBA NP, the Rapid CARB Screen® and the Carba NP test for biochemical detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Dortet, Laurent; Agathine, Aurélie; Naas, Thierry; Cuzon, Gaëlle; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was the evaluation of the performance of two commercially available biochemical tests for the rapid detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae compared with a home-made technique. A collection of 150 enterobacterial isolates, including 132 isolates with decreased susceptibility to at least one carbapenem molecule, were tested for carbapenemase activity using the RAPIDEC(®) CARBA NP (bioMérieux), the Rapid CARB Screen(®) (Rosco Diagnostica) and the home-made Carba NP test. This strain collection included 55 non-carbapenemase producers, 21 KPC producers, 21 NDM producers, 17 VIM producers, 11 IMP producers, 16 OXA-48 producers and 9 OXA-48-like producers (OXA-162, OXA-181, OXA-204, OXA-232 and OXA-244). The RAPIDEC(®) CARBA NP detected all carbapenemase producers except a single OXA-244 producer. Using the Rapid CARB Screen(®), one KPC-2, two NDM-1, one OXA-48 and five OXA-48 variant producers gave equivocal results and one OXA-244 producer was not detected. Using the Carba NP test, the same OXA-244 producer was not detected and one OXA-181 producer and one OXA-244 producer gave equivocal results. Sensitivity and specificity were 99% (95% CI 94.3%-99.8%) and 100% (95% CI 93.5%-100%), respectively, for the RAPIDEC(®) CARBA NP test, 89.5% (95% CI 81.7%-94.2%) and 70.9% (95% CI 57.9%-81.2%) for the Rapid CARB Screen(®) and 96.8% (95% CI 91.1%-98.9%) and 100% (95% CI 93.5%-100%) for the Carba NP test. The impact of the use of an adequate bacterial inoculum for obtaining the optimal performance with the RAPIDEC(®) CARBA NP was noted. The RAPIDEC(®) CARBA NP possesses the best performance for rapid and efficient detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Down-top nanofabrication of binary (CdO)x (ZnO)1–x nanoparticles and their antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hada, Naif Mohammed; Mohamed Kamari, Halimah; Abdullah, Che Azurahanim Che; Saion, Elias; Shaari, Abdul H; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Matori, Khamirul Amin

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, binary oxide (cadmium oxide [CdO])x (zinc oxide [ZnO])1–x nanoparticles (NPs) at different concentrations of precursor in calcination temperature were prepared using thermal treatment technique. Cadmium and zinc nitrates (source of cadmium and zinc) with polyvinylpyrrolidone (capping agent) have been used to prepare (CdO)x (ZnO)1–x NPs samples. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. XRD patterns analysis revealed that NPs were formed after calcination, which showed a cubic and hexagonal crystalline structure of (CdO)x (ZnO)1–x NPs. The phase analysis using EDX spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the presence of Cd and Zn as the original compounds of prepared (CdO)x (ZnO)1–x NP samples. The average particle size of the samples increased from 14 to 33 nm as the concentration of precursor increased from x=0.20 to x=0.80, as observed by TEM results. The surface composition and valance state of the prepared product NPs were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. Diffuse UV–visible reflectance spectra were used to determine the optical band gap through the Kubelka–Munk equation; the energy band gap was found to decrease for CdO from 2.92 to 2.82 eV and for ZnO from 3.22 to 3.11 eV with increasing x value. Additionally, photoluminescence (PL) spectra revealed that the intensity in PL increased with an increase in particle size. In addition, the antibacterial activity of binary oxide NP was carried out in vitro against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 Gram (−ve), Salmonella choleraesuis ATCC 10708, and Bacillus subtilis UPMC 1175 Gram (+ve). This study indicated that the zone of inhibition of 21 mm has good antibacterial activity toward the Gram-positive B. subtilis UPMC 1175. PMID:29200844

  20. Synthesis of Co3O4 nanoparticles with block and sphere morphology, and investigation into the influence of morphology on biological toxicity

    PubMed Central

    RAMAN, VENKATARAMANAN; SURESH, SHRUTHI; SAVARIMUTHU, PHILIP ANTHONY; RAMAN, THIAGARAJAN; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDES MICHAEL; GOLOKHVAST, KIRIL SERGEEVICH; VADIVEL, VINOD KUMAR

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, cobalt oxide (Co3O4) magnetic nanoparticles with block and sphere morphologies were synthesized using various surfactants, and the toxicity of the particles was analyzed by monitoring biomarkers of nanoparticle toxicity in zebrafish. The use of tartarate as a surfactant produced highly crystalline blocks of Co3O4 nanoparticles with pores on the sides, whereas citrate lead to the formation of nanoparticles with a spherical morphology. Co3O4 structure, crystallinity, size and morphology were studied using X-ray diffractogram and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Following an increase in nanoparticle concentration from 1 to 200 ppm, there was a corresponding increase in nitric oxide (NO) generation, induced by both types of nanoparticles [Co3O4-NP-B (block), r=0.953; Co3O4-NP-S (sphere), r=1.140]. Comparative analyses indicated that both types of nanoparticle produced significant stimulation at ≥5 ppm (P<0.05) compared with a control. Upon analyzing the effect of nanoparticle morphology on NO generation, it was observed that Co3O4-NP-S was more effective compared with Co3O4-NP-B (5 and 100 ppm, P<0.05; 200 ppm, P<0.01). Exposure to both types of nanoparticles produced reduction in liver glutathione (GSH) activity with corresponding increase in dose (Co3O4-NP-B, r=−0.359; Co3O4-NP-S, r=−0.429). However, subsequent analyses indicated that Co3O4-NP-B was more potent in inhibiting liver GSH activity compared with Co3O4-NP-S. Co3O4-NP-B proved to be toxic at 5 ppm (P<0.05) and GSH activity was almost completely inhibited at 200 ppm. A similar toxicity was observed with both types of Co3O4-NPs against brain levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE; Co3O4-NP-B, r=−0.180; Co3O4-NP-S, r=−0.230), indicating the ability of synthesized Co3O4-NPs to cross the blood-brain barrier and produce neuronal toxicity. Co3O4-NP-B showed increased inhibition of brain AChE activity compared with Co3O4-NP-S (1,5, and 10 ppm, P<0.05; 50, 100 and 200 ppm, P

  1. Hydrothermal Growth of Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanorods Using a Biocomposite Seed Layer of ZnO Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Khun, Kimleang; Eriksson, Martin; AlSalhi, Mohammad; Atif, Muhammad; Ansari, Anees; Willander, Magnus

    2013-08-19

    Well aligned ZnO nanorods have been prepared by a low temperature aqueous chemical growth method, using a biocomposite seed layer of ZnO nanoparticles prepared in starch and cellulose bio polymers. The effect of different concentrations of biocomposite seed layer on the alignment of ZnO nanorods has been investigated. ZnO nanorods grown on a gold-coated glass substrate have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) techniques. These techniques have shown that the ZnO nanorods are well aligned and perpendicular to the substrate, and grown with a high density and uniformity on the substrate. Moreover, ZnO nanorods can be grown with an orientation along the c -axis of the substrate and exhibit a wurtzite crystal structure with a dominant (002) peak in an XRD spectrum and possessed a high crystal quality. A photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy study of the ZnO nanorods has revealed a conventional near band edge ultraviolet emission, along with emission in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum due to defect emission. This study provides an alternative method for the fabrication of well aligned ZnO nanorods. This method can be helpful in improving the performance of devices where alignment plays a significant role.

  2. Hydrothermal Growth of Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanorods Using a Biocomposite Seed Layer of ZnO Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Khun, Kimleang; Eriksson, Martin; AlSalhi, Mohammad; Atif, Muhammad; Ansari, Anees; Willander, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Well aligned ZnO nanorods have been prepared by a low temperature aqueous chemical growth method, using a biocomposite seed layer of ZnO nanoparticles prepared in starch and cellulose bio polymers. The effect of different concentrations of biocomposite seed layer on the alignment of ZnO nanorods has been investigated. ZnO nanorods grown on a gold-coated glass substrate have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) techniques. These techniques have shown that the ZnO nanorods are well aligned and perpendicular to the substrate, and grown with a high density and uniformity on the substrate. Moreover, ZnO nanorods can be grown with an orientation along the c-axis of the substrate and exhibit a wurtzite crystal structure with a dominant (002) peak in an XRD spectrum and possessed a high crystal quality. A photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy study of the ZnO nanorods has revealed a conventional near band edge ultraviolet emission, along with emission in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum due to defect emission. This study provides an alternative method for the fabrication of well aligned ZnO nanorods. This method can be helpful in improving the performance of devices where alignment plays a significant role. PMID:28811454

  3. Mechanical, structural and thermal properties of Ag-Cu and ZnO reinforced polylactide nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim; Arfat, Yasir Ali; Castro-Aguirre, Edgar; Auras, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    Plasticized polylactic acid (PLA) based nanocomposite films were prepared by incorporating polyethylene glycol (PEG) and two selected nanoparticles (NPs) [silver-copper (Ag-Cu) alloy (<100 nm) and zinc oxide (ZnO) (<50 and <100 nm)] through solvent casting method. Incorporation of Ag-Cu alloy into the PLA/PEG matrix increased the glass transition temperature (Tg) significantly. The crystallinity of the nanocomposites (NCs) was significantly influenced by NP incorporation as evidenced from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The PLA nanocomposite reinforced with NPs exhibited much higher tensile strength than that of PLA/PEG blend. Melt rheology of NCs exhibited a shear-thinning behavior. The mechanical property drastically reduced with a loading of NPs, which is associated with degradation of PLA. SEM micrographs exhibited that both Ag-Cu alloy and ZnO NPs were dispersed well in the PLA film matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Green Silver Nanoparticles Based Dual Sensor for Toxic Hg (II) Ions.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Maria; Aravind, Archana; Mathew, Beena

    2018-06-11

    The present study focuses on the utilization of green silver nanoparticles as they are more preferred for sensing applications due to their environment friendly nature. We have examined the optical and electrochemical sensing behavior of silver nanoparticles from Agaricus Bispores (AgNP-AB) towards Hg(II) ions. AgNP-AB was prepared by microwave reactor. The synthesized AgNPs have been used for the sensing of Hg(II) ions without the use of modifiers or further sophisticated instrumentation. The synthesized nanoparticles were successfully characterized by different techniques. AgNP-AB leads to aggregation with addition of Hg(II) ions in aqueous medium and developed a color change from brown to black which leads to the formation of AgNP-AB-Hg(II) complex. Moreover, the metal sensing ability of AgNPs has been explored using electrochemical studies. AgNP-AB modified platinum electrode (AgNP-AB/PE) was developed for the fast sensing of toxic Hg(II) ions. The sensor exhibits good limit of detection at 2.1x10-6M. The sensitivity of AgNP-AB/PE towards Hg(II) ion was analyzed with various metal ions. The sensing skill of developed system was successfully checked with real water sample from Vembanade Lake, Kumarakom, Kerala. The silver nanoparticles from Agaricus Bispoes are highly versatile and promising for different environmental applications. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Distinguishing neurocognitive deficits in adult patients with NP-C from early onset Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed

    Johnen, Andreas; Pawlowski, Matthias; Duning, Thomas

    2018-06-05

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare, progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the NPC1 or the NPC2 gene. Neurocognitive deficits are common in NP-C, particularly in patients with the adolescent/adult-onset form. As a disease-specific therapy is available, it is important to distinguish clinically between the cognitive profiles in NP-C and primary dementia (e.g., early Alzheimer's disease; eAD). In a prospective observational study, we directly compared the neurocognitive profiles of patients with confirmed NP-C (n = 7) and eAD (n = 15). All patients underwent neurocognitive assessment using dementia screening tests (mini-mental status examination [MMSE] and frontal assessment battery [FAB]) and an extensive battery of tests assessing verbal memory, visuoconstructive abilities, visual memory, executive functions and verbal fluency. Overall cognitive impairment (MMSE) was significantly greater in eAD vs. NP-C (p = 0.010). The frequency of patients classified as cognitively 'impaired' was also significantly greater in eAD vs. NP-C (p = 0.025). Patients with NP-C showed relatively preserved verbal memory, but frequent impairment in visual memory, visuoconstruction, executive functions and in particular, verbal fluency. In the eAD group, a wider profile of more frequent and more severe neurocognitive deficits was seen, primarily featuring severe verbal and visual memory deficits along with major executive impairment. Delayed verbal memory recall was a particularly strong distinguishing factor between the two groups. A combination of detailed yet easy-to-apply neurocognitive tests assessing verbal memory, executive functions and verbal fluency may help distinguish NP-C cases from those with primary dementia due to eAD.

  6. Role of electrostatic interactions in the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles toward Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pagnout, Christophe; Jomini, Stéphane; Dadhwal, Mandeep; Caillet, Céline; Thomas, Fabien; Bauda, Pascale

    2012-04-01

    The increasing production and use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NP-TiO(2)) has led to concerns about their possible impact on the environment. Bacteria play crucial roles in ecosystem processes and may be subject to the toxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we showed that at low ionic strength, the cell viability of Escherichia coli was more severely affected at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.0 and pH 9.5. At pH 5.5, nanoparticles (positively charged) strongly interacted with the bacterial cells (negatively charged) and accumulated on their surfaces. This phenomenon was observed in a much lower degree at pH 7.0 (NP-TiO(2) neutrally charged and cells negatively charged) and pH 9.5 (both NP-TiO(2) and cells negatively charged). It was also shown that the addition of electrolytes (NaCl, CaCl(2), Na(2)SO(4)) resulted in a gradual reduction of the NP-TiO(2) toxicity at pH 5.5 and an increase in this toxicity at pH 9.5, which was closely related to the reduction of the NP-TiO(2) and bacterial cell electrostatic charges. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxic terror

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E.M.

    A review of toxic materials in the environment explores the evolution of public awareness of the problem, public and governmental reaction, the effort to establish standards of safe levels and danger thresholds, and the struggle to implement and enforce environmental policy. Separate chapters deal with environmental premises and scientific realities, the DDT debate and birth of environmentalism, the disaster of Love Canal, pesticides, PCBs, PBBs, formaldehyde, dioxin, air pollution, water pollution, nuclear energy and radioactive materials, acid rain, and the status of American health. The book concludes with a chapter on the need for scientific research and hard evidence tomore » either prove or disprove the pessimism of those who warn of a threat to human health and survival.« less

  8. Changes in N:P stoichiometry influence taxonomic composition and nutritional quality of phytoplankton in the Peruvian upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauss, Helena; Franz, Jasmin M. S.; Sommer, Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    Inorganic dissolved macronutrient (nitrogen, N, and phosphorus, P) supply to surface waters in the eastern tropical South Pacific is influenced by expanding oxygen minimum zones, since N loss occurs due to microbial processes under anoxic conditions while P is increasingly released from the shelf sediments. To investigate the impact of decreasing N:P supply ratios in the Peruvian Upwelling, we conducted nutrient manipulation experiments using a shipboard mesocosm setup with a natural phytoplankton community. In a first experiment, either N or P or no nutrients were added with mesozooplankton present or absent. In a second experiment, initial nutrient concentrations were adjusted to four N:P ratios ranging from 2.5 to 16 using two "high N" and two "high P" levels in combination (i.e., + N, + P, + N and P, no addition). Over six and seven days, respectively, microalgal biomass development as well as nutrient uptake was monitored. Phytoplankton biomass strongly responded to N addition, in both mesozooplankton-grazed and not grazed treatments. The developing diatom bloom in the "high N" exceeded that in the "low N" treatments by a factor of two. No modulation of the total biomass by P-addition was observed, however, species-specific responses were more variable. Notably, some organisms were able to benefit from low N:P fertilization ratios, especially Heterosigma sp. and Phaeocystis globosa which are notorious for forming blooms that are toxic or inadequate for mesozooplankton nutrition. After the decline of the diatom bloom, the relative contribution of unsaturated fatty acid to the lipid content of seston was positively correlated to diatom biomass in the peak bloom, indicating that positive effects of diatom blooms on food quality of the protist community to higher trophic levels remain even after the phytoplankton biomass was incorporated by grazers. Our results indicate an overall N-limitation of the system, especially in the case of dominating diatoms, which were

  9. Piperine Enhances the Protective Effect of Curcumin Against 3-NP Induced Neurotoxicity: Possible Neurotransmitters Modulation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shamsher; Jamwal, Sumit; Kumar, Puneet

    2015-08-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is a fungal toxin well established model used for inducing symptoms of Huntington's disease. Curcumin a natural polyphenol has been reported to possess neuroprotective activity by decreasing oxidative stress. The aim of present study was to investigate neuroprotective effect of curcumin with piperine (bioavailability enhancer) against 3-NP induced neurotoxicity in rats. Administration of 3-NP (10 mg/kg for 21 days) showed loss in body weight, declined motor function and changes in biochemical (LPO, nitrite and glutathione level), neuroinflammatory (TNF-α and IL-1β level) and neurochemical (DA, NE, 5-HT, DOPAC, 5-HIAA and HVA). Chronic treatment with curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg) and curcumin (25 mg/kg) with piperine (2.5 mg/kg) once daily for 21 days prior to 3-NP administration. All the behavioral parameters were studied at 1st, 7th, 14th, and 21st day. On 22nd day all the animals was scarified and striatum was separated. Curcumin alone and combination (25 mg/kg) with piperine (2.5 mg/kg) showed beneficial effect against 3-NP induced motor deficit, biochemical and neurochemical abnormalities in rats. Piperine (2.5 mg/kg) with curcumin (25 mg/kg) significantly enhances its protective effect as compared with curcumin alone treated group. The results of the present study indicate that protective effect of curcumin potentiated in the presence of piperine (bioavailability enhancer) against 3-NP-induced behavioral and molecular alteration.

  10. Down-regulation of tissue N:P ratios in terrestrial plants by elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qi; Hui, Dafeng; Luo, Yiqi; Elser, James; Wang, Ying-ping; Loladze, Irakli; Zhang, Quanfa; Dennis, Sam

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations generally alter element stoichiometry in plants. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the elevated CO2 impact on plant nitrogen: phosphorus (N:P) ratios and the underlying mechanism has not been conducted. We synthesized the results from 112 previously published studies using meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of elevated CO2 on the N:P ratio of terrestrial plants and to explore the underlying mechanism based on plant growth and soil P dynamics. Our results show that terrestrial plants grown under elevated CO2 had lower N:P ratios in both above- and belowground biomass across different ecosystem types. The response ratio for plant N:P was negatively correlated with the response ratio for plant growth in croplands and grasslands, and showed a stronger relationship for P than for N. In addition, the CO2-induced down-regulation of plant N:P was accompanied by 19.3% and 4.2% increases in soil phosphatase activity and labile P, respectively, and a 10.1% decrease in total soil P. Our results show that down-regulation of plant N:P under elevated CO2 corresponds with accelerated soil P cycling. These findings should be useful for better understanding of terrestrial plant stoichiometry in response to elevated CO2 and of the underlying mechanisms affecting nutrient dynamics under climate change.

  11. Crystallographic and Mössbauer investigations on Np1- xPuxB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipaux, R.; Bonnisseau, D.; Bogé, M.; Larroque, J.

    1988-08-01

    The diborides of neptunium and plutonium and their solid solutions Np 1- xPu xB 2 have been synthesized by direct reaction with a good purity. The lattice parameters follow Vegard's law. The magnetic properties of the samples containing neptunium have been investigated by Mössbauer spectrometry. The isomer shift is almost constant in all compounds (-14.5 (0.2) mm/s resp. to NpAl 2), suggesting tetravalent Np ions. At high temperatures, a large quadrupolar interaction, clearly connected to the crystal structure, is observed in all compounds, decreasing slowly with the neptunium concentration. At low temperature, magnetic patterns appear for x ⩽ 0.5. The magnetic moments are ordered perpendicular to the c-axis and equal to 0.57μ B for x = 0. In Np 0.5Pu 0.5B 2 and, in less degree in Np 0.7Pu 0.3B 2 and Np 0.33Pu 0.67B 2, magnetic fluctuations are detec ted.

  12. Spectroscopic identification of binary and ternary surface complexes of Np(V) on gibbsite.

    PubMed

    Gückel, Katharina; Rossberg, André; Müller, Katharina; Brendler, Vinzenz; Bernhard, Gert; Foerstendorf, Harald

    2013-12-17

    For the first time, detailed molecular information on the Np(V) sorption species on amorphous Al(OH)3 and crystalline gibbsite was obtained by in situ time-resolved Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier-Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The results consistently demonstrate the formation of mononuclear inner sphere complexes of the NpO2(+) ion irrespective of the prevailing atmospheric condition. The impact of the presence of atmospheric equivalent added carbonate on the speciation in solution and on the surfaces becomes evident from vibrational data. While the 1:1 aqueous carbonato species (NpO2CO3(-)) was found to become predominant in the circumneutral pH range, it is most likely that this species is sorbed onto the gibbsite surface as a ternary inner sphere surface complex where the NpO2(+) moiety is directly coordinated to the functional groups of the gibbsite's surface. These findings are corroborated by results obtained from EXAFS spectroscopy providing further evidence for a bidentate coordination of the Np(V) ion on amorphous Al(OH)3. The identification of the Np(V) surface species on gibbsite constitutes a basic finding for a comprehensive description of the dissemination of neptunium in groundwater systems.

  13. Biological Surface Coating and Molting Inhibition as Mechanisms of TiO2 Nanoparticle Toxicity in Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Dabrunz, André; Duester, Lars; Prasse, Carsten; Seitz, Frank; Rosenfeldt, Ricki; Schilde, Carsten; Schaumann, Gabriele E.; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The production and use of nanoparticles (NP) has steadily increased within the last decade; however, knowledge about risks of NP to human health and ecosystems is still scarce. Common knowledge concerning NP effects on freshwater organisms is largely limited to standard short-term (≤48 h) toxicity tests, which lack both NP fate characterization and an understanding of the mechanisms underlying toxicity. Employing slightly longer exposure times (72 to 96 h), we found that suspensions of nanosized (∼100 nm initial mean diameter) titanium dioxide (nTiO2) led to toxicity in Daphnia magna at nominal concentrations of 3.8 (72-h EC50) and 0.73 mg/L (96-h EC50). However, nTiO2 disappeared quickly from the ISO-medium water phase, resulting in toxicity levels as low as 0.24 mg/L (96-h EC50) based on measured concentrations. Moreover, we showed that nTiO2 (∼100 nm) is significantly more toxic than non-nanosized TiO2 (∼200 nm) prepared from the same stock suspension. Most importantly, we hypothesized a mechanistic chain of events for nTiO2 toxicity in D. magna that involves the coating of the organism surface with nTiO2 combined with a molting disruption. Neonate D. magna (≤6 h) exposed to 2 mg/L nTiO2 exhibited a “biological surface coating” that disappeared within 36 h, during which the first molting was successfully managed by 100% of the exposed organisms. Continued exposure up to 96 h led to a renewed formation of the surface coating and significantly reduced the molting rate to 10%, resulting in 90% mortality. Because coating of aquatic organisms by manmade NP might be ubiquitous in nature, this form of physical NP toxicity might result in widespread negative impacts on environmental health. PMID:21647422

  14. Toxic effect of nonylphenol on the marine macroalgae Gracilaria lemaneiformis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta): antioxidant system and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Mingqin; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the toxic effect of nonylphenol (NP) on the antioxidant response and antitumor activity of Gracilaria lemaneiformis. An obvious oxidative damage was observed in this study. The thallus exposed to NP showed 1.2-2.0-fold increase in lipid peroxide and displayed a maximum level of 16.58 μmol g -1 Fw on 0.6 mg L -1 for 15-day exposure. The activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enhanced significantly by 1.1-3.2-fold and subsequently diminished at the high concentrations and prolonged exposure. The results of DNA damage in comet assay also supported that NP was obviously toxic on G. lemaneiformis with increasing the percentage of tail DNA in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the ethanol extract of G. lemaneiformis (EEGL) did exhibit antitumor potential against HepG-2 cells. While decreased in cell inhibition, ROS generation, apoptosis, and caspase-3 in HepG-2 cells treated with the EEGL were observed when G. lemaneiformis was exposed to NP for 15 days, and which were related to exposure concentration of NP. These suggested that NP has strongly toxic effect on the antitumor activity of G. lemaneiformis. The results revealed in this study imply that macroalgae can be useful biomarkers to evaluate marine pollutions.

  15. Toxicity of silver and copper to Cucurbita pepo: differential effects of nano and bulk-size particles.

    PubMed

    Musante, Craig; White, Jason C

    2012-09-01

    The phytotoxicity of bulk and nanoparticle Cu and Ag was directly compared. NP Ag reduced biomass and transpiration by 66-84% when compared with bulk Ag. The Ag ion concentration was 4.4-10-times greater in NP than bulk particle solutions. The Cu ion concentration was 1.4-4.4-times greater in bulk than NP amended solutions. Humic acid (50 mg/L) decreased the ion content of bulk Cu solution by 38-42% but increased ion Cu content of NP solutions by 1.4-2.9 times. Bulk and NP Cu were highly phytotoxic; growth and transpiration were reduced by 60-70% relative to untreated controls. NP Cu phytotoxicity was unaffected by solution type, but humic acid (50 mg/L) completely alleviated phytotoxicity caused by bulk Cu. The data demonstrate differential toxicity of Ag NP relative to bulk Ag. The finding that humic acid and solution chemistry differentially impact bulk and NP behavior highlights the importance of evaluating nanoparticles under environmentally relevant conditions. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Role of melatonin in mitigating nonylphenol-induced toxicity in frontal cortex and hippocampus of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Heena; Ashafaq, Mohammad; Parvez, Suhel; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2017-03-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), an environmental endocrine disruptor mimics estrogen and is a potential toxicant both under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In this study, the effect of melatonin on NP- induced neurotoxicity and cognitive alteration was investigated in adult male Wistar rats. Melatonin supplementation has been known to protect cells from neurotoxic injury. The animals were divided into three groups namely, control (vehicle) which received olive oil orally and treated rats received NP (25 mg/kg, per os) thrice a week for 45 days while the third group i.e., NP + melatonin, animals were co-administered melatonin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) along with NP. On the 46th day, rats were assessed for anxiety, motor co-ordination, grip strength and cognitive performance using Morris water maze test and then sacrificed for biochemical and histopathological assays in brain tissues. Melatonin improved the behavioral performance in NP exposed group. The results showed that NP significantly decreased the activity of acetylcholine esterase (AchE), monoamine oxidase (MAO) and Na + /K + -ATPase, in rat brain tissue along with other enzymes of antioxidant milieu. The outcome of the study shows that NP, like other persistent endocrine disrupting pollutants, creates a potential risk of cognitive, neurochemical and histopathological perturbations as a result of environmental exposure. Taken together, our study demonstrates that melatonin is protective against NP-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation, characterization and properties of ZnO nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiaolian; Zhang, Xiaoming; Chen, Ruxue; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhu, Ji; Wang, Xiaomin

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, using the hydrothermal synthesis method, NaOH, Zn(NO3)2, anhydrous ethanol, deionized water as raw material to prepare ZnO nanomaterial, and by X ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) on the synthesis of nano materials, surface morphology and phase luminescence characterization. The results show that the nano materials synthesized for single-phase ZnO, belonging to the six wurtzite structure; material surface shaped, arranged evenly distributed, and were the top six party structure; ZnO nano materials synthesized with strong emission spectra, emission peak is located at 394nm.

  18. Hierarchical structures of ZnO spherical particles synthesized solvothermally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Noriko; Haneda, Hajime

    2011-12-01

    We review the solvothermal synthesis, using a mixture of ethylene glycol (EG) and water as the solvent, of zinc oxide (ZnO) particles having spherical and flower-like shapes and hierarchical nanostructures. The preparation conditions of the ZnO particles and the microscopic characterization of the morphology are summarized. We found the following three effects of the ratio of EG to water on the formation of hierarchical structures: (i) EG restricts the growth of ZnO microcrystals, (ii) EG promotes the self-assembly of small crystallites into spheroidal particles and (iii) the high water content of EG results in hollow spheres.

  19. The growth of ZnO nanostructures using Arginine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Baljinder; Moudgil, Lovika; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman

    2018-05-01

    The growth mechanism of Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanomaterial with amino acid (Arginine) is explained at different shapes. The present study of ZnO nanostructures (NSs) in the presence of Arginine has enabled us to not only determine the growth mechanism of ZnO NSs but also to determine the effect of Arginine at different temperature of reactants. The synthesized samples are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results reveal that Arginine is responsible for formation of NSs. Based on these results, a plausible mechanism is explained.

  20. Bacterial toxicity comparison between nano- and micro-scaled oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Mashayekhi, Hamid; Xing, Baoshan

    2009-05-01

    Toxicity of nano-scaled aluminum, silicon, titanium and zinc oxides to bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) was examined and compared to that of their respective bulk (micro-scaled) counterparts. All nanoparticles but titanium oxide showed higher toxicity (at 20 mg/L) than their bulk counterparts. Toxicity of released metal ions was differentiated from that of the oxide particles. ZnO was the most toxic among the three nanoparticles, causing 100% mortality to the three tested bacteria. Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles had a mortality rate of 57% to B. subtilis, 36% to E. coli, and 70% to P. fluorescens. SiO(2) nanoparticles killed 40% of B. subtilis, 58% of E. coli, and 70% of P. fluorescens. TEM images showed attachment of nanoparticles to the bacteria, suggesting that the toxicity was affected by bacterial attachment. Bacterial responses to nanoparticles were different from their bulk counterparts; hence nanoparticle toxicity mechanisms need to be studied thoroughly.

  1. Zinc oxide nanoparticles alter hatching and larval locomotor activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Chen, Te-Hao; Lin, Chia-Chi; Meng, Pei-Jie

    2014-07-30

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NP) are extensively used in various consumer products such as sunscreens and cosmetics, with high potential of being released into aquatic environments. In this study, fertilized zebrafish (Danio rerio) eggs were exposed to various concentrations of ZnO NP suspensions (control, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10mg/L) or their respective centrifuged supernatants (0.03, 0.01, 0.08, 0.17, 0.75, and 1.21mg/L dissolved Zn ions measured) until reaching free swimming stage. Exposure to ZnO NP suspensions and their respective centrifuged supernatants caused similar hatching delay, but did not cause larval mortality or malformation. Larval activity level, mean velocity, and maximum velocity were altered in the groups exposed to high concentrations of ZnO NP (5-10mg/L) but not in the larvae exposed to the supernatants. To evaluate possible mechanism of observed effects caused by ZnO NP, we also manipulated the antioxidant environment by co-exposure to an antioxidant compound (N-acetylcysteine, NAC) or an antioxidant molecule suppressor (buthionine sulfoximine, BSO) with 5mg/L ZnO NP. Co-exposure to NAC did not alter the effects of ZnO NP on hatchability, but co-exposure to BSO caused further hatching delay. For larval locomotor activity, co-exposure to NAC rescued the behavioral effect caused by ZnO NP, but co-exposure to BSO did not exacerbate the effect. Our data indicated that toxicity of ZnO NP cannot be solely explained by dissolved Zn ions, and oxidative stress may involve in ZnO NP toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxic behavior of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on environmental microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Dhas, Sindhu Priya; Shiny, Punalur John; Khan, Sudheer; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natrajan

    2014-09-01

    Silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles (Ag and ZnO NPs) are widely used as antimicrobial agents. However, their potential toxicological impact on environmental microorganisms is largely unexplored. The aim of this work was to investigate the sensitivity and adaptability of five bacterial species isolated from sewage towards Ag and ZnO NPs. The bacterial species were exposed to increasing concentration of nanoparticles and the growth inhibitory effect, exopolysaccharides (EPSs) and extracellular proteins (ECPs) productions were determined. The involvement of surface charge in nanoparticles toxicity was also determined. The bacterial species were constantly exposed to nanoparticles to determine the adaptation behavior toward nanoparticles. The nanoparticles exhibited remarkable growth inhibitory effect on tested bacterial species. The toxicity of nanoparticles was found to be strongly dependent on surface charge effects. Though, these organisms are highly sensitive to Ag and ZnO NPs, the continuous exposure to these nanoparticles leads to moderate adaptation of bacterial species and the adapted bacterial species convert the highly toxic nano form to less toxic microform. Finally we predict that the continuing applications of nanoparticles in consumer products may lead to the development of nanoparticles resistant bacterial strains in future. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. [Fluoride toxicity].

    PubMed

    Giachini, M; Pierleoni, F

    2004-04-01

    Many years have passed since domestic water fluoridation was adopted to reduce the incidence of caries in developed countries; however, since there is an additional dose of fluorides ingested with foods and drinks prepared with such waters, the problem has emerged of possible adverse effects on health associated to them, so that in some countries fluorine integrator selling is allowed only with preventive medical prescription. Owing to the affinity for calcifited tissues, fluorine has a powerful effect on bone cellular order (mediated by growth factors' upregulation system IGF-2, TGF-beta, PDGF, bFGF, EGF, BMP-2 and PTH), on function and length, since it can provoke chronic joints-pain, ligaments-calcification, osteosclerosis. Moreover, sodium-fluoride may cause adverse effects on testicular activity (connected to oxidative-stress depending on increased activity of peroxidases and catalases) due to inhibition of 2 androgenesis-regulator enzymes DELTA(5)b-HSD and 17beta-HSD. Furthermore, insoluble gut formed calcium-fluoride may be responsible for hypocalcemia inducing a secondary hyperparathyroidism with bone matrix resorption, osteoporosis, osteomalacia and, perhaps, lowered level of phosphorus. At encephalic level, then, high doses of fluorine cause the onset of neurological symptoms and of a decreased spontaneous motor activity due to a reduction in the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Nevertheless, epidemiological studies about fluoride toxicity have established that such oligoelement may be safely used at odontoiatric dosages.

  4. MOF-Based Membrane Encapsulated ZnO Nanowires for Enhanced Gas Sensor Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Drobek, Martin; Kim, Jae-Hun; Bechelany, Mikhael; Vallicari, Cyril; Julbe, Anne; Kim, Sang Sub

    2016-04-06

    Gas sensors are of a great interest for applications including toxic or explosive gases detection in both in-house and industrial environments, air quality monitoring, medical diagnostics, or control of food/cosmetic properties. In the area of semiconductor metal oxides (SMOs)-based sensors, a lot of effort has been devoted to improve the sensing characteristics. In this work, we report on a general methodology for improving the selectivity of SMOx nanowires sensors, based on the coverage of ZnO nanowires with a thin ZIF-8 molecular sieve membrane. The optimized ZnO@ZIF-8-based nanocomposite sensor shows markedly selective response to H2 in comparison with the pristine ZnO nanowires sensor, while showing the negligible sensing response to C7H8 and C6H6. This original MOF-membrane encapsulation strategy applied to nanowires sensor architecture pave the way for other complex 3D architectures and various types of applications requiring either gas or ion selectivity, such as biosensors, photo(catalysts), and electrodes.

  5. ZnO transparent conductive oxide for thin film silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderström, T.; Dominé, D.; Feltrin, A.; Despeisse, M.; Meillaud, F.; Bugnon, G.; Boccard, M.; Cuony, P.; Haug, F.-J.; Faÿ, S.; Nicolay, S.; Ballif, C.

    2010-03-01

    There is general agreement that the future production of electric energy has to be renewable and sustainable in the long term. Photovoltaic (PV) is booming with more than 7GW produced in 2008 and will therefore play an important role in the future electricity supply mix. Currently, crystalline silicon (c-Si) dominates the market with a share of about 90%. Reducing the cost per watt peak and energy pay back time of PV was the major concern of the last decade and remains the main challenge today. For that, thin film silicon solar cells has a strong potential because it allies the strength of c-Si (i.e. durability, abundancy, non toxicity) together with reduced material usage, lower temperature processes and monolithic interconnection. One of the technological key points is the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) used for front contact, barrier layer or intermediate reflector. In this paper, we report on the versatility of ZnO grown by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (ZnO LP-CVD) and its application in thin film silicon solar cells. In particular, we focus on the transparency, the morphology of the textured surface and its effects on the light in-coupling for micromorph tandem cells in both the substrate (n-i-p) and superstrate (p-i-n) configurations. The stabilized efficiencies achieved in Neuchâtel are 11.2% and 9.8% for p-i-n (without ARC) and n-i-p (plastic substrate), respectively.

  6. Temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric behaviors of insulator/semiconductor (Al2O3/ZnO) nanolaminates with various ZnO thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Bi, Xiaofang

    2016-07-01

    Al2O3/ZnO nanolaminates (NLs) with various ZnO sublayer thicknesses were prepared by atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 sublayers are characterized as amorphous and the ZnO sublayers have an oriented polycrystalline structure. As the ZnO thickness decreases to a certain value, each NL exhibits a critical temperature at which its dielectric constant starts to rise quickly. Moreover, this temperature increases as the ZnO thickness is decreased further. On the other hand, the permittivity demonstrates a large value of several hundred at a frequency  ⩽1000 Hz, followed by a steplike decrease at a higher frequency. The change in the cut-off frequency with ZnO thickness is characterized by a hook function. It is revealed that the Coulomb confinement effect becomes predominant in the dielectric behaviors of the NLs with very thin ZnO. As the ZnO thickness decreases to about the same as or even smaller than the Bohr radius of ZnO, a great change in the carrier concentration and effective mass of ZnO is induced, which is shown to be responsible for the peculiar dielectric behaviors of Al2O3/ZnO with very thin ZnO. These findings provide insight into the prevailing mechanisms to optimize the dielectric properties of semiconductor/insulator laminates with nanoscale sublayer thickness.

  7. Surface coatings of ZnO nanoparticles mitigate differentially a host of transcriptional, protein and signalling responses in primary human olfactory cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inhaled nanoparticles have been reported in some instances to translocate from the nostril to the olfactory bulb in exposed rats. In close proximity to the olfactory bulb is the olfactory mucosa, within which resides a niche of multipotent cells. Cells isolated from this area may provide a relevant in vitro system to investigate potential effects of workplace exposure to inhaled zinc oxide nanoparticles. Methods Four types of commercially-available zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, two coated and two uncoated, were examined for their effects on primary human cells cultured from the olfactory mucosa. Human olfactory neurosphere-derived (hONS) cells from healthy adult donors were analyzed for modulation of cytokine levels, activation of intracellular signalling pathways, changes in gene-expression patterns across the whole genome, and compromised cellular function over a 24 h period following exposure to the nanoparticles suspended in cell culture medium. Results ZnO nanoparticle toxicity in hONS cells was mediated through a battery of mechanisms largely related to cell stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis, but not activation of mechanisms that repair damaged DNA. Surface coatings on the ZnO nanoparticles mitigated these cellular responses to varying degrees. Conclusions The results indicate that care should be taken in the workplace to minimize generation of, and exposure to, aerosols of uncoated ZnO nanoparticles, given the adverse responses reported here using multipotent cells derived from the olfactory mucosa. PMID:24144420

  8. Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Nanoparticle uptake in cells may be an important determinant of their potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. Six commercial TiO2 NP (A=Alfa Aesar,10nm, A*=Alfa Aesar 32nm, B=P25 27...

  9. Standardized toxicity testing may underestimate ecotoxicity: Environmentally relevant food rations increase the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Louise M; Krattenmaker, Katherine E; Johnson, Erica; Bowers, Alexandra J; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; McCauley, Edward; Nisbet, Roger M

    2017-11-01

    Daphnia in the natural environment experience fluctuations in algal food supply, with periods when algal populations bloom and seasons when Daphnia have very little algal food. Standardized chronic toxicity tests, used for ecological risk assessment, dictate that Daphnia must be fed up to 400 times more food than they would experience in the natural environment (outside of algal blooms) for a toxicity test to be valid. This disconnect can lead to underestimating the toxicity of a contaminant. We followed the growth, reproduction, and survival of Daphnia exposed to 75 and 200 µg/L silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at 4 food rations for up to 99 d and found that AgNP exposure at low, environmentally relevant food rations increased the toxicity of AgNPs. Exposure to AgNP at low food rations decreased the survival and/or reproduction of individuals, with potential consequences for Daphnia populations (based on calculated specific population growth rates). We also found tentative evidence that a sublethal concentration of AgNPs (75 µg/L) caused Daphnia to alter energy allocation away from reproduction and toward survival and growth. The present findings emphasize the need to consider resource availability, and not just exposure, in the environment when estimating the effect of a toxicant. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3008-3018. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  10. Hydrodynamic fabrication of structurally gradient ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Min; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Song, Young Seok

    2016-02-26

    We studied a new approach where structurally gradient nanostructures were fabricated by means of hydrodynamics. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized in a drag-driven rotational flow in a controlled manner. The structural characteristics of nanorods such as orientation and diameter were determined by momentum and mass transfer at the substrate surface. The nucleation of ZnO was induced by shear stress which plays a key role in determining the orientation of ZnO nanorods. The nucleation and growth of such nanostructures were modeled theoretically and analyzed numerically to understand the underlying physics of the fabrication of nanostructures controlled by hydrodynamics. The findings demonstrated that the precise control of momentum and mass transfer enabled the formation of ZnO nanorods with a structural gradient in diameter and orientation.

  11. Inverter Circuits using Pentacene and ZnO Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iechi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yasuyuki; Kudo, Kazuhiro

    2007-04-01

    We report two types of integrated circuits based on a pentacene static-induction transistor (SIT), a pentacene thin-film transistor (TFT) and a zinc oxide (ZnO) TFT. The operating characteristics of a p-p inverter using pentacene SITs and a complementary inverter using a p-channel pentacene TFT and an n-channel ZnO TFT are described. The basic operation of logic circuits at a low voltage was achieved for the first time using the pentacene SIT inverter and complementary circuits with hybrid inorganic and organic materials. Furthermore, we describe the electrical properties of the ZnO films depending on sputtering conditions, and the complementary circuits using ZnO and pentacene TFTs.

  12. Hexagonal and prismatic nanowalled ZnO microboxes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fenghua; Lin, Wenjiao; Wu, Mingmei; Xu, Ningsheng; Yang, Xianfeng; Tian, Z Ryan; Su, Qiang

    2006-04-17

    We hereby report hydrothermal syntheses of new microstructures of semiconducting ZnO. Single-crystalline prismatic ZnO microboxes formed by nanowalls and hexagonal hollow microdisks closed by plates with micron-sized inorganic fullerene-like structures have been made in a base-free medium through a one-step hydrothermal synthesis with the help of n-butanol (NB). Structures and morphologies of the products were confirmed by results from powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. NB has been found to play a crucial role in the growth of these hollow structures. It is indicated that these hollow ZnO crystals were grown from redissolution of interiors. These ZnO microboxes exhibit a band emission in the visible range, implying the possession of a high content of defects.

  13. Nanostructured ZnO Films for Room Temperature Ammonia Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhivya Ponnusamy; Sridharan Madanagurusamy

    2014-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited by a reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique onto a thoroughly cleaned glass substrate at room temperature. X-ray diffraction revealed that the deposited film was polycrystalline in nature. The field emission scanning electron micrograph (FE-SEM) showed the uniform formation of a rugby ball-shaped ZnO nanostructure. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) confirmed that the film was stoichiometric and the direct band gap of the film, determined using UV-Vis spectroscopy, was 3.29 eV. The ZnO nanostructured film exhibited better sensing towards ammonia (NH3) at room temperature (˜30°C). The fabricated ZnO film based sensor was capable of detecting NH3 at as low as 5 ppm, and its parameters, such as response, selectivity, stability, and response/recovery time, were also investigated.

  14. Enhanced antimicrobial activity in biosynthesized ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Niraj; Kumari, Priti; Jha, Anal K.; Prasad, K.

    2018-05-01

    Biological synthesis of different metallic and/or oxide nanoparticles and their applications especially in agriculture and biomedical sciences are gaining prominence nowadays due to their handy and reproducible synthetic protocols which are cost-effective and eco-friendly. In this work, green synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) using the alcoholic extract of Azadirachta indica as a reducing and stabilizing agent has been presented. Formation of ZnO NPs was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. The phytochemicals responsible for nano-transformation were principally alkaloids, flavanoids, terpenoids, tannins and organic acids present in the Azadirachta indica leaves. The synthesized ZnO NPs were used for antimicrobial assays by disc diffusion method against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Results showed that ZnO NPs may act as antimicrobial agent especially against skin infections.

  15. Controls over foliar N:P ratios in tropical rain forests.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Alan R; Cleveland, Cory C; Asner, Gregory P; Bustamante, Mercedes M C

    2007-01-01

    Correlations between foliar nutrient concentrations and soil nutrient availability have been found in multiple ecosystems. These relationships have led to the use of foliar nutrients as an index of nutrient status and to the prediction of broadscale patterns in ecosystem processes. More recently, a growing interest in ecological stoichiometry has fueled multiple analyses of foliar nitrogen:phosphorus (N:P) ratios within and across ecosystems. These studies have observed that N:P values are generally elevated in tropical forests when compared to higher latitude ecosystems, adding weight to a common belief that tropical forests are generally N rich and P poor. However, while these broad generalizations may have merit, their simplicity masks the enormous environmental heterogeneity that exists within the tropics; such variation includes large ranges in soil fertility and climate, as well as the highest plant species diversity of any biome. Here we present original data on foliar N and P concentrations from 150 mature canopy tree species in Costa Rica and Brazil, and combine those data with a comprehensive new literature synthesis to explore the major sources of variation in foliar N:P values within the tropics. We found no relationship between N:P ratios and either latitude or mean annual precipitation within the tropics alone. There is, however, evidence of seasonal controls; in our Costa Rica sites, foliar N:P values differed by 25% between wet and dry seasons. The N:P ratios do vary with soil P availability and/or soil order, but there is substantial overlap across coarse divisions in soil type, and perhaps the most striking feature of the data set is variation at the species level. Taken as a whole, our results imply that the dominant influence on foliar N:P ratios in the tropics is species variability and that, unlike marine systems and perhaps many other terrestrial biomes, the N:P stoichiometry of tropical forests is not well constrained. Thus any use of N:P

  16. Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approach combining chemical manipulations and aquatic toxicity testing, generally with whole organisms, to systematically characterize, identify and confirm toxic substances causing toxicity in whole sediments and sediment interstitial waters. The approach is divided into thre...

  17. Impacts of select organic ligands on the colloidal stability, dissolution dynamics, and toxicity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Lok R; Dubey, Brajesh; Scheuerman, Phillip R

    2013-11-19

    Key understanding of potential transformations that may occur on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) surface upon interaction with naturally ubiquitous organic ligands (e.g., -SH (thoil), humic acid, or -COO (carboxylate)) is limited. Herein we investigated how dissolved organic carbon (DOC), -SH (in cysteine, a well-known Ag(+) chelating agent), and -COO (in trolox, a well-known antioxidant) could alter the colloidal stability, dissolution rate, and toxicity of citrate-functionalized AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs) against a keystone crustacean Daphnia magna. Cysteine, DOC, or trolox amendment of citrate-AgNPs differentially modified particle size, surface properties (charge, plasmonic spectra), and ion release dynamics, thereby attenuating (with cysteine or trolox) or promoting (with DOC) AgNP toxicity. Except with DOC amendment, the combined toxicity of AgNPs and released Ag under cysteine or trolox amendment was lower than of AgNO3 alone. The results of this study show that citrate-AgNP toxicity can be associated with oxidative stress, ion release, and the organism biology. Our evidence suggests that specific organic ligands available in the receiving waters can differentially surface modify AgNPs and alter their environmental persistence (changing dissolution dynamics) and subsequently the toxicity; hence, we caveat to generalize that surface modified nanoparticles upon environmental release may not be toxic to receptor organisms.

  18. [Soil N/P ratio distribution characteristics of alpine grassland ecosystem in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Lin; Zhong, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Zhong-Hong; Chen, Bao-Xiong; Zhang, Xian-Zhou; Shen, Zhen-Xi; Hu, Xing-Xiang; Dacizhuoga

    2013-12-01

    The distribution characteristics of soil N/P ratio in alpine grassland ecosystem of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau were surveyed by field investigation and laboratory analysis. Horizontally, soil N/ P ratio was generally higher in west and lower in east in a manner of staggered patch distribution, with higher N/P ratios mainly centralized in the hinterland of northern part of Tibet Plateau and in the lake basin area of the northern foot of Himalayas. Significant differences in soil N/P ratio were observed among grassland types and natural transects. Vertically, the distribution of N/P ratio along the soil profile from aboveground to underground among different grass types could be categorized into five patterns, including low-high-low-high, low-high-low, low-high, high-low-high-low, and high-low-high. The N/P ratio showed a significant positive correlation with soil bulk density at 0-20 cm depth, soil water content at 20-30 cm depth, contents of soil available K and total nitrogen, respectively. However, it showed significant negative correlation with soil bulk density at 20-30 cm depth, contents of soil available P and total P, respectively.

  19. Chemical bonds and vibrational properties of ordered (U, Np, Pu) mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu; Zhang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    We use density functional theory +U to investigate the chemical bonding characters and vibrational properties of the ordered (U, Np, Pu) mixed oxides (MOXs), UNpO4,NpPuO4, and UPuO4. It is found that the 5f electronic states of different actinide elements keep their localized characters in all three MOXs. The occupied 5f electronic states of different actinide elements do not overlap with each other and tend to distribute over the energy band gap of the other actinide element's 5f states. As a result, the three ordered MOXs all show smaller band gaps than those of the component dioxides, with values of 0.91, 1.47, and 0.19 eV for UNpO4,NpPuO4, and UPuO4, respectively. Through careful charge density analysis, we further show that the U-O and Pu-O bonds in MOXs show more ionic character than in UO2 and PuO2, while the Np-O bonds show more covalent character than in NpO2. The change in covalencies in the chemical bonds leads to vibrational frequencies of oxygen atoms that are different in MOXs.

  20. Alpha decay properties of the semi-magic nucleus 219Np

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. B.; Ma, L.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Yang, C. L.; Gan, Z. G.; Zhang, M. M.; Huang, M. H.; Yu, L.; Jiang, J.; Tian, Y. L.; Wang, Y. S.; Wang, J. G.; Liu, Z.; Liu, M. L.; Duan, L. M.; Zhou, S. G.; Ren, Z. Z.; Zhou, X. H.; Xu, H. S.; Xiao, G. Q.

    2018-02-01

    The semi-magic nucleus 219Np was produced in the fusion reaction 187Re(36Ar, 4n)219Np at the gas-filled recoil separator SHANS (Spectrometer for Heavy Atoms and Nuclear Structure). A fast electronics system based on waveform digitizers was used in the data acquisition and the sampled pulses were processed by digital algorithms. The reaction products were identified using spatial and time correlations between the implants and subsequent α decays. According to the observed α-decay chain, an energy of Eα = 9039 (40) keV and a half-life of T1/2 =0.15-0.07 + 0.72 ms were determined for 219Np. The deduced proton binding energy of 219Np fits well into the systematics, which gives another evidence of that there is no sub-shell closure at Z = 92. The influence of the N = 126 shell closure on the stability of Np isotopes is discussed within the framework of α-decay reduced widths.

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Actions of a Novel Chimeric Natriuretic Peptide: CD-NP

    PubMed Central

    Lisy, Ondrej; Huntley, Brenda K.; McCormick, Daniel J.; Kurlansky, Paul A.; Burnett, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to design, synthesize and test in vivo and in vitro a new chimeric peptide that would combine the beneficial properties of 2 distinct natriuretic peptides with a biological profile that goes beyond native peptides. Background Studies have established the beneficial vascular and antiproliferative properties of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). While lacking renal actions, CNP is less hypotensive than the cardiac peptides atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide but unloads the heart due to venodilation. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide is a potent natriuretic and diuretic peptide that is markedly hypotensive and functions via a separate guanylyl cyclase receptor compared with CNP. Methods Here we engineered a novel chimeric peptide CD-NP that represents the fusion of the 22-amino acid peptide CNP together with the 15-amino acid linear C-terminus of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide. We also determined in vitro in cardiac fibroblasts cyclic guanosine monophosphate-activating and antiproliferative properties of CD-NP. Results Our studies demonstrate in vivo that CD-NP is natriuretic and diuretic, glomerular filtration rate enhancing, cardiac unloading, and renin inhibiting. CD-NP also demonstrates less hypotensive properties when compared with B-type natriuretic peptide. In addition, CD-NP in vitro activates cyclic guanosine monophosphate and inhibits cardiac fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions The current findings advance an innovative design strategy in natriuretic peptide drug discovery and development to create therapeutic peptides with favorable properties that may be preferable to those associated with native natriuretic peptides. PMID:18582636

  2. Design, synthesis, and actions of a novel chimeric natriuretic peptide: CD-NP.

    PubMed

    Lisy, Ondrej; Huntley, Brenda K; McCormick, Daniel J; Kurlansky, Paul A; Burnett, John C

    2008-07-01

    Our aim was to design, synthesize and test in vivo and in vitro a new chimeric peptide that would combine the beneficial properties of 2 distinct natriuretic peptides with a biological profile that goes beyond native peptides. Studies have established the beneficial vascular and antiproliferative properties of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). While lacking renal actions, CNP is less hypotensive than the cardiac peptides atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide but unloads the heart due to venodilation. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide is a potent natriuretic and diuretic peptide that is markedly hypotensive and functions via a separate guanylyl cyclase receptor compared with CNP. Here we engineered a novel chimeric peptide CD-NP that represents the fusion of the 22-amino acid peptide CNP together with the 15-amino acid linear C-terminus of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide. We also determined in vitro in cardiac fibroblasts cyclic guanosine monophosphate-activating and antiproliferative properties of CD-NP. Our studies demonstrate in vivo that CD-NP is natriuretic and diuretic, glomerular filtration rate enhancing, cardiac unloading, and renin inhibiting. CD-NP also demonstrates less hypotensive properties when compared with B-type natriuretic peptide. In addition, CD-NP in vitro activates cyclic guanosine monophosphate and inhibits cardiac fibroblast proliferation. The current findings advance an innovative design strategy in natriuretic peptide drug discovery and development to create therapeutic peptides with favorable properties that may be preferable to those associated with native natriuretic peptides.

  3. Toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Nadine; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Kockentiedt, Sarah; Hintz, Werner; Tomas, Jürgen; Sabel, Bernhard A.

    2014-06-01

    Polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PBCA NPs) are candidates for a drug delivery system, which can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Because little is known about their toxicity, we exposed cells to PBCA NPs in vitro and in vivo and monitored their life and death assays. PBCA NPs were fabricated with different surfactants according to the mini-emulsion technique. Viabilities of HeLa and HEK293 cells after NP incubation were quantified by analysing cellular metabolic activity (MTT-test). We then repetitively injected i.v. rhodamine-labelled PBCA NP variations into rats and monitored the survival and morphology of retrogradely labelled neurons by in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) for five weeks. To test for carrier-efficacy and safety, PBCA NPs loaded with Kyotorphin were injected in rats, and a hot plate test was used to quantify analgesic effects. In vitro, we found dose-dependent cell death which was, however, only detectable at very high doses and mainly seen in the cultures incubated with NPs fabricated with the tensids SDS and Tween. However, the in vivo experiments did not show any NP-induced neuronal death, even with particles which were toxic at high dose in vitro, i.e. NPs with Tween and SDS. The increased pain threshold at the hot plate test demonstrated that PBCA NPs are able to cross the BBB and thus comprise a useful tool for drug delivery into the central nervous system (CNS). Our findings showing that different nanoparticle formulations are non-toxic have important implications for the value of NP engineering approaches in medicine.

  4. ZnO for solar cell and thermoelectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanle; Ghods, Amirhossein; Yunghans, Kelcy L.; Saravade, Vishal G.; Patel, Paresh V.; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kucukgok, Bahadir; Lu, Na; Ferguson, Ian

    2017-03-01

    ZnO-based materials show promise in energy harvesting applications, such as piezoelectric, photovoltaic and thermoelectric. In this work, ZnO-based vertical Schottky barrier solar cells were fabricated by MOCVD de- position of ZnO thin films on ITO back ohmic contact, while Ag served as the top Schottky contact. Various rapid thermal annealing conditions were studied to modify the carrier density and crystal quality. Greater than 200 nm thick ZnO films formed polycrystalline crystal structure, and were used to demonstrate Schottky solar cells. I-V characterizations of the devices showed photovoltaic performance, but but need further development. This is the first demonstration of vertical Schottky barrier solar cell based on wide bandgap ZnO film. Thin film and bulk ZnO grown by MOCVD or melt growth were also investigated in regards to their room- temperature thermoelectric properties. The Seebeck coefficient of bulk ZnO was found to be much larger than that of thin film ZnO at room temperature due to the higher crystal quality in bulk materials. The Seebeck coefficients decrease while the carrier concentration increases due to the crystal defects caused by the charge carriers. The co-doped bulk Zn0:96Ga0:02Al0:02O showed enhanced power factors, lower thermal conductivities and promising ZT values in the whole temperature range (300-1300 K).

  5. Synthesis of p-type ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Y. R.; Zhu, S.; Look, D. C.; Wrobel, J. M.; Jeong, H. M.; White, H. W.

    2000-06-01

    p-Type ZnO obtained by arsenic (As) doping is reported for the first time. Arsenic-doped ZnO (ZnO : As) films have been deposited on (0 0 1)-GaAs substrates by pulsed laser ablation. The process of synthesizing p-type ZnO : As films was performed in an ambient gas of ultra-pure (99.999%) oxygen. The ambient gas pressure was 35 mTorr with the substrate temperature in the range 300-450°C. ZnO films grown at 400°C and 450°C are p-type and As is a good acceptor. The acceptor peak is located at 3.32 eV and its binding energy is about 100 meV. Acceptor concentrations of As atoms in ZnO films were in the range from high 10 17 to high 10 21 atoms/cm 3 as determined by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Hall effect measurements.

  6. ZnO nanorods for electronic and photonic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Gyu-Chul; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Park, Won Il; Jung, Sug Woo; An, Sung Jin; Kim, H. J.; Kim, D. W.

    2005-11-01

    We report on catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanorods and their nano-scale electrical and optical device applications. Catalyst-free metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) enables fabrication of size-controlled high purity ZnO single crystal nanorods. Various high quality nanorod heterostructures and quantum structures based on ZnO nanorods were also prepared using the MOVPE method and characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. From the photoluminescence spectra of ZnO/Zn 0.8Mg 0.2O nanorod multi-quantum-well structures, in particular, we observed a systematic blue-shift in their PL peak position due to quantum confinement effect of carriers in nanorod quantum structures. For ZnO/ZnMgO coaxial nanorod heterostructures, photoluminescence intensity was significantly increased presumably due to surface passivation and carrier confinement. In addition to the growth and characterizations of ZnO nanorods and their quantum structures, we fabricated nanoscale electronic devices based on ZnO nanorods. We report on fabrication and device characteristics of metal-oxidesemiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), Schottky diodes, and metal-semiconductor field effect transistors (MESFETs) as examples of the nanodevices. In addition, electroluminescent devices were fabricated using vertically aligned ZnO nanorods grown p-type GaN substrates, exhibiting strong visible electroluminescence.

  7. Synthesis of ZnO Photocatalysts Using Various Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chengli; Zhu, Jinmiao; Li, Hongying; Zheng, Bin; Wei, Yanxin

    2017-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructured materials have received significant attention because of their unique physicochemical and electronic properties. In particular, the functional properties of ZnO are owed to its morphology and defect structure. ZnO particles were successfully synthesized by chemical precipitation. CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide), BS-12 (dodecyl dimethyl betaine) and graphene oxide (GO) were selected as templates to induce the formation of ZnO, respectively. By varying the amount of surfactant added during the synthesis process, the structural properties and the crystalline phase of the synthesized nanospheres were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry (UV‒Vis). Simultaneously, photo catalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) was carried out under natural sunlight irradiation while ZnO or ZnO/GO particles were used as catalyst. GO is prone to induce formation of wurtzite hexagonal phase of ZnO. Compared with CTAB and BS-12, ZnO/GO composites had a remarkably photocatalytic degradation.

  8. Photoluminescent properties of electrochemically synthetized ZnO nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gracia Jiménez, J.M.

    ZnO nanotubes were prepared by a sequential combination of electrochemical deposition, chemical attack and regeneration. ZnO nanocolumns were initially electrodeposited on conductive substrates and then converted into nanotubes by a process involving chemical etching and subsequent regrowth. The morphology of these ZnO nanocolumns and derived nanotubes was monitored by Scanning Electron Microscopy and their optical properties was studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy. Photoluminescence were measured as a function of temperature, from 6 to 300 K, for both nanocolumns and nanotubes. In order to study the behaviour of induced intrinsic defect all ZnO films were annealed in air at 400 °C andmore » their photoluminescent properties were also registered before and after annealing. The behaviour of photoluminescence is explained taking into account the contribution of different point defects. A band energy diagram related to intrinsic defects was proposed to describe the behaviour of photoluminescence spectra. - Highlights: •ZnO nanotubes were obtained after etching and regrowth of electrodeposited ZnO films. •Photoluminescence spectra contain two parts involving excitonic and defects transitions. •Annealing produces a blue shift in the PL peaks in both ZnO nanocolumns and nanotubes. •Etching causes a blue shift in PL peaks due to confinement effect in nanotubes walls.« less

  9. ZnO Nanostructures for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Laurenti, Marco; Cauda, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on the most recent applications of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures for tissue engineering. ZnO is one of the most investigated metal oxides, thanks to its multifunctional properties coupled with the ease of preparing various morphologies, such as nanowires, nanorods, and nanoparticles. Most ZnO applications are based on its semiconducting, catalytic and piezoelectric properties. However, several works have highlighted that ZnO nanostructures may successfully promote the growth, proliferation and differentiation of several cell lines, in combination with the rise of promising antibacterial activities. In particular, osteogenesis and angiogenesis have been effectively demonstrated in numerous cases. Such peculiarities have been observed both for pure nanostructured ZnO scaffolds as well as for three-dimensional ZnO-based hybrid composite scaffolds, fabricated by additive manufacturing technologies. Therefore, all these findings suggest that ZnO nanostructures represent a powerful tool in promoting the acceleration of diverse biological processes, finally leading to the formation of new living tissue useful for organ repair. PMID:29113133

  10. Theory of copper impurities in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, John; Alkauskas, Audrius; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Due to its connection to deep luminescence signals and its potential use as an acceptor dopant, copper has been one the most studied impurities in ZnO. From experiment, copper incorporating on the Zn site (CuZn) is known to lead to an acceptor level residing near the conduction band of ZnO, making CuZn an exceedingly deep acceptor. CuZn in ZnO has also long been linked with broad 2.4 eV green luminescence (GL) signals. In this work we explore the electrical and optical properties of Cu in ZnO using density functional theory (DFT). Due to the limitations of traditional forms of DFT, an accurate theoretical description of the electrical and optical properties of such deep centers has been difficult to achieve. Here we employ a screened hybrid density functional (HSE) to calculate the properties of Cu in ZnO. We determine the thermodynamic transition levels associated with CuZn in ZnO as well as the associated luminescence lineshapes of characteristic optical transitions. We find that HSE-calculated optical transitions are in close agreement with experimental studies. This work was supported in part by NSF and by ARO.

  11. Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaki, A. Chinnammal; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26 nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity.

  12. N doped ZnO and ZnO nanorods based p-n homojunction fabricated by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Mohua; Thangavel, R.; Asokan, K.

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen (N) doped and undoped Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanorod p-n homojunctions were fabricated by ion implantation method. The structural and optical characterizations showed that the N atoms doped into the ZnO crystal lattice. The UV-Vis absorption spectra revealed shift in optical absorption edge towards higher wavelength with ion implantation on ZnO, which attributed N acceptor levels above the valence band. The current-voltage (I-V) measurements exhibit a typical semiconductor rectification characteristic indicating the electrical conductivity of the N-doped ZnO nanorod have p-type conductivity. Moreover, a high photocurrent response has been observed with these p-n homojunctions.

  13. A dual channel three-terminal np-LDMOS with both majorities for conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Moufu; Yi, Bo; Zhang, Bingke

    2018-02-01

    A novel dual channel three-terminal np-LDMOS power device with both electrons and holes for conduction is proposed in this paper. Based on a new approach of inducing a large-signal which is processed by a simple circuit for controlling the gate of p-LDMOS inside the device, the new np-LDMOS only requires one external gate controlling voltage signal that can be performed as an n-LDMOS device. The SOA of the new device is improved in comparison with the n-LDMOS device, since the counteracting of electric flux density produced by the both type of carriers' currents. Furthermore, the specific on-resistance of the np-LDMOS device is reduced by about 19% when comparing with that of the conventional one. The control method and performances of the proposed power device are investigated and authenticated by numerical simulations.

  14. Status of the Neutron Capture Measurement on 237Np with the DANCE Array at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, E.-I.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T. A.

    2005-05-24

    Neptunium-237 is a major constituent of spent nuclear fuel. Estimates place the amount of 237Np bound for the Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository at 40 metric tons. The Department of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is evaluating methods for transmuting the actinide waste that will be generated by future operation of commercial nuclear power plants. The critical parameter that defines the transmutation efficiency of actinide isotopes is the neutron fission-to-capture ratio for the particular isotope in a given neutron spectrum. The calculation of transmutation efficiency therefore requires accurate fission and capture cross sections. Current 237Np evaluations available for transmutermore » system studies show significant discrepancies in both the fission and capture cross sections in the energy regions of interest. Herein we report on 237Np (n,{gamma}) measurements using the recently commissioned DANCE array.« less

  15. Ebola virus VP24 interacts with NP to facilitate nucleocapsid assembly and genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Banadyga, Logan; Hoenen, Thomas; Ambroggio, Xavier; Dunham, Eric; Groseth, Allison; Ebihara, Hideki

    2017-08-09

    Ebola virus causes devastating hemorrhagic fever outbreaks for which no approved therapeutic exists. The viral nucleocapsid, which is minimally composed of the proteins NP, VP35, and VP24, represents an attractive target for drug development; however, the molecular determinants that govern the interactions and functions of these three proteins are still unknown. Through a series of mutational analyses, in combination with biochemical and bioinformatics approaches, we identified a region on VP24 that was critical for its interaction with NP. Importantly, we demonstrated that the interaction between VP24 and NP was required for both nucleocapsid assembly and genome packaging. Not only does this study underscore the critical role that these proteins play in the viral replication cycle, but it also identifies a key interaction interface on VP24 that may serve as a novel target for antiviral therapeutic intervention.

  16. Transfer and expression of the rabbit defensin NP-1 gene in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    PubMed

    Song, D; Xiong, X; Tu, W F; Yao, W; Liang, H W; Chen, F J; He, Z Q

    2017-01-23

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is an annual plant of the daisy family, Asteraceae, with high food and medicinal value. However, the crop is susceptible to several viruses that are transmitted by aphids and is highly vulnerable to post-harvest diseases, as well as insect and mammal pests and fungal and bacterial diseases. Here, the rabbit defensin gene NP-1 was transferred into lettuce by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to obtain a broad-spectrum disease-resistant lettuce. Transgenic lettuce plants were selected and regenerated on selective media. The presence of the NP-1 gene in these plants was confirmed by western blot analyses. Resistance tests revealed native defensin NP-1 expression conferred partial resistance to Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which suggests new possibilities for lettuce disease resistance.

  17. Mechanisms of resistance change under pressure for AgNP-based conducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Zhentao; Liu, Liping; Huang, Han; Cheng, Xiong; Zhu, Xiaobo; Gu, Wenhua

    2018-02-01

    The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) based conducting wire is a fundamental element of flexible electronic devices, especially in the printing electronics area. Its resistance change mechanisms under pressure is of both scientific interest and practical importance. AgNP-based conducting wires were fabricated on flexible substrates by electrospraying printing technology, and three possible resistance change mechanisms were studied: vertical deformation (VD) of the AgNP wire due to vertical pressure, horizontal wire elongation (HWE) along with the flexible substrate due to vertical pressure, and local micro deformation (LMD) at the touching edge. Analysis of the experiment data revealed that the resistance change due to VD was negligible, the resistance change due to PWE was one order of magnitude smaller than the measured value, and the resistance change due to PWE was the dominating mechanism.

  18. Effect of Mg doping in ZnO buffer layer on ZnO thin film devices for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Pushpa; Chakrabarti, P.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin films have been grown on p-silicon (Si) substrate using magnesium doped ZnO (Mg: ZnO) buffer layer by radio-frequency (RF) sputtering method. In this paper, we have optimized the concentration of Mg (0-5 atomic percent (at. %)) ZnO buffer layer to examine its effect on ZnO thin film based devices for electronic and optoelectronic applications. The crystalline nature, morphology and topography of the surface of the thin film have been characterized. The optical as well as electrical properties of the active ZnO film can be tailored by varying the concentration of Mg in the buffer layer. The crystallite size in the active ZnO thin film was found to increase with the Mg concentration in the buffer layer in the range of 0-3 at. % and subsequently decrease with increasing Mg atom concentration in the ZnO. The same was verified by the surface morphology and topography studies carried out with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic electron microscopy (AFM) respectively. The reflectance in the visible region was measured to be less than 80% and found to decrease with increase in Mg concentration from 0 to 3 at. % in the buffer region. The optical bandgap was initially found to increase from 3.02 eV to 3.74 eV by increasing the Mg content from 0 to 3 at. % but subsequently decreases and drops down to 3.43 eV for a concentration of 5 at. %. The study of an Au:Pd/ZnO Schottky diode reveals that for optimum doping of the buffer layer the device exhibits superior rectifying behavior. The barrier height, ideality factor, rectification ratio, reverse saturation current and series resistance of the Schottky diode were extracted from the measured current voltage (I-V) characteristics.

  19. Flower-like ZnO nanorod arrays grown on HF-etched Si (111): constraining relation between ZnO seed layer and Si (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Liu, C.-W.; Huang, R.-J.; Chang, S.-J.; Lo, K.-Y.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the formation of self-assembled homogenous flower-like ZnO nanorods over a ZnO seed layer deposited on a HF-etched Si (111) substrate. The typical flower-like morphology of ZnO nanorod arrays is ascribed to the formation of the island-like seed layer which is deposited by the drop method followed by annealing at 300 °C. The island-like ZnO seed layer consists of larger ZnO grains, and is built by constraining of the Si (111) surface due to pattern matching. Pattern matching of Si with ZnO determines the shape and size of the seed layer and this controls the final morphology of ZnO nanorods to be either flower like or vertically aligned. The high quality of the island-like ZnO seed layer enhances the diameter and length of ZnO nanorods. Besides, while the amorphous layer formed during the annealing process would influence the strained ZnO grain, that subsequent amorphous layer will not block the constraining between the ZnO grain and the substrate.

  20. Microwave synthesis and photocatalytic activities of ZnO bipods with different aspect ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Fazhe; Zhao, Zengdian; Qiao, Xueliang, E-mail: xuelqiao@163.com

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We synthesized linked ZnO nanorods by a facile microwave method. • The effect of reaction parameters on ZnO was investigated. • ZnO bipods with different aspect ratios were prepared. • The photocatalytic performance of ZnO bipods was evaluated. - Abstract: Linked ZnO nanorods have been successfully prepared via a facile microwave method without any post-synthesis treatment. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated the precursor had completely transformed into the pure ZnO crystal. The images of field emitting scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that linked ZnO nanorods consisted predominantly of ZnO bipods. The formationmore » process of the ZnO bipods was clearly discussed. ZnO bipods with different aspect ratios have been obtained by tuning the concentrations of reagents and microwave power. Moreover, the photocatalytic performance of ZnO bipods with different aspect ratios for degradation of methylene blue was systematically evaluated. The results of photocatalytic experiments showed that the photocatalytic activity increased with the aspect ratios of ZnO bipods increased. The reason is that ZnO bipods with larger aspect ratio have higher surface area, which can absorb more MB molecules to react with ·OH radicals.« less

  1. Chemical manipulation of oxygen vacancy and antibacterial activity in ZnO.

    PubMed

    V, Lakshmi Prasanna; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2017-08-01

    Pure and doped ZnO (cation and anion doping) compositions have been designed in order to manipulate oxygen vacancy and antibacterial activity of ZnO. In this connection, we have synthesized and characterized micron sized ZnO, N doped micron sized ZnO, nano ZnO, nano Na and La doped ZnO. The intrinsic vacancies in pure ZnO and the vacancies created by N and Na doping in ZnO have been confirmed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy(XPS) and Photoluminiscence Spectroscopy(PL). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radicals, superoxide radicals and H 2 O 2 responsible for antibacterial activity have been estimated by PL, UV-Vis spectroscopy and KMnO 4 titrations respectively. It was found that nano Na doped ZnO releases highest amount of ROS followed by nano ZnO, micron N doped ZnO while micron ZnO releases the least amount of ROS. The concentration of vacancies follows the same sequence. This illustrates directly the correlation between ROS and oxygen vacancy in well designed pure and doped ZnO. For the first time, material design in terms of cation doping and anion doping to tune oxygen vacancies has been carried out. Interaction energy (E g ), between the bacteria and nanoparticles has been calculated based on Extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (EDLVO) theory and is correlated with antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Polylactic acid (PLA)/Silver-NP/VitaminE bionanocomposite electrospun nanofibers with antibacterial and antioxidant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, Bogdanel Silvestru; Aytac, Zeynep; Pricope, Gina M.; Uyar, Tamer; Vasile, Cornelia

    2014-10-01

    The antibacterial property of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and the antioxidant activity of Vitamin E have been combined by incorporation of these two active components within polylactic acid (PLA) nanofibers via electrospinning (PLA/Ag-NP/VitaminE nanofibers). The morphological and structural characterizations of PLA/Ag-NP/VitaminE nanofibers were performed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The average fiber diameter was 140 ± 60 nm, and the size of the Ag-NP was 2.7 ± 1.5 nm. PLA/Ag-NP/VitaminE nanofibers inhibited growth of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhymurium up to 100 %. The amount of released Ag ions from the nanofibers immersed in aqueous solution was determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, and it has been observed that the release of Ag ions was kept approximately constant after 10 days of immersion. The antioxidant activity of PLA/Ag-NP/VitaminE nanofibers was evaluated according to DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) method and determined as 94 %. The results of the tests on fresh apple and apple juice indicated that the PLA/Ag/VitaminE nanofiber membrane actively reduced the polyphenol oxidase activity. The multifunctional electrospun PLA nanofibers incorporating Ag-NP and Vitamin E may be quite applicable in food packaging due to the extremely large surface area of nanofibers along with antibacterial and antioxidant activities. These materials could find application in food industry as a potential preservative packaging for fruits and juices.

  3. Will the NP workforce grow in the future? New forecasts and implications for healthcare delivery.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I

    2012-07-01

    The nurse practitioner (NP) workforce has been a focus of considerable policy interest recently, particularly as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act may place additional demands on the healthcare professional workforce. The NP workforce has been growing rapidly in recent years, but fluctuation in enrollments in the past decades has resulted in a wide range of forecasts. To forecast the future NP workforce using a novel method that has been applied to the registered nurse and physician workforces and is robust to fluctuating enrollment trends. An age-cohort regression-based model was applied to the current and historical workforce, which was then forecasted to future years assuming stable age effects and a continuation of recent cohort trends. A total of 6798 NPs who were identified as having completed NP training in the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses between 1992 and 2008. The future workforce is projected to grow to 244,000 in 2025, an increase of 94% from 128,000 in 2008. If NPs are defined more restrictively as those who self-identify their position title as "NP," supply is projected to grow from 86,000 to 198,000 (130%) over this period. The large projected increase in NP supply is higher and more grounded than other forecasts and has several implications: NPs will likely fulfill a substantial amount of future demand for care. Furthermore, as the ratio of NPs to Nurse Practitioners to physicians will surely grow, there could be implications for quality of care and for the configuration of future care delivery systems.

  4. Different modes of TiO2 uptake by Ceriodaphnia dubia: relevance to toxicity and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Dalai, Swayamprava; Iswarya, V; Bhuvaneshwari, M; Pakrashi, Sunandan; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2014-07-01

    The extensive environmental exposure of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) may result in their bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms leading to their biotransfer in a food chain through various routes in a freshwater ecosystem. The present study focuses on the possible modes of TiO2 NP trophic transfer to Ceriodaphnia dubia, in presence and/absence of its diet, Scenedesmus obliquus (primary producer). The acute exposure studies (48h) were designed to have daphnids exposed to (i) the free NPs, (ii) both the free and the algae-borne NPs; and (iii) only the algae-borne NPs in separate tests to understand the possible routes of NP transfer. The dietary uptake of TiO2 NPs (algae-borne) was found to be the primary route for NP biotransfer with ∼70% of total NP uptake. Interestingly, in a separate study it was noticed that the NPs coated with algal exudates were easily taken up by daphnids as compared to pristine NPs of same concentrations, leading to their higher bioaccumulation. A chronic toxicity study, where daphnids were exposed to both free and algae-borne NPs for 21 days was undertaken to comprehend the TiO2 NP effect on daphnia growth and reproduction upon chronic exposure and also the bioaccumulation potential. Both acute and chronic exposure studies suggested higher bioaccumulation of TiO2 in daphnids when the particles were less toxic to the diet (algae). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural, optical, and LED characteristics of ZnO and Al doped ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, K. M.; Bhat, Shreesha; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    ZnO (pristine) and Al doped ZnO (AZO) films were prepared using sol-gel spin coating method. The XRD analysis showed the enhanced compressive stress in AZO film. The presence of extended states below the conduction band edge in AZO accounts for the redshift in optical bandgap. The PL spectra of AZO showed significant blue emission due to the carrier recombination from defect states. The TRPL curves showed the dominant DAP recombination in ZnO film, whereas defect related recombination in Al doped ZnO film. Color parameters viz: the dominant wavelength, color coordinates (x,y), color purity, luminous efficiency and correlated color temperature (CCT) of ZnO and AZO films are calculated using 1931 (CIE) diagram. Further, a strong blue emission with color purity more than 96% is observed in both the films. The enhanced blue emission in AZO significantly increased the luminous efficiency (22.8%) compared to ZnO film (10.8%). The prepared films may be used as blue phosphors in white light generation.

  6. Synthesis of ZnO nanorods and observation of resistive switching memory in ZnO based polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Manjula G.; Malakar, Meenakshi; Mohapatra, Saumya R.; Chowdhury, Avijit

    2018-05-01

    This research reports the observation of bipolar resistive switching memory in ZnO nanorod based polymer nanocomposites. We synthesized ZnO nanorods by wet-chemical method and characterized them using XRD, UV-VIS spectroscopy and SEM. The synthesized materials have hexagonal ZnO phase with grain size of 24 nm and having strong orientation along (101) direction as observed from XRD. The SEM micrograph confirms the formation of ZnO nanorods with diameter in the range of 10 to 20 nm and length of the order of 1 µm. From optical absorption spectra the band gap is estimated to be 2.42 eV. ZnO nanorods were dispersed in PVDF-HFP polymer matrix to prepare the nanocomposite. This nanocomposite was used as active layer in the devices having sandwich structure of ITO/PVDF-HFP+ZnO nanorods/Al. Bipolar non-volatile memory was observed with ON-OFF resistance ratio of the order of 103 and with a wide voltage window of 2.3V. The switching mechanism could be due to the trapping and de-trapping of electrons by the ZnO nanorods in the nanocomposite during ON and OFF states respectively.

  7. Trace amounts of Cu²⁺ ions influence ROS production and cytotoxicity of ZnO quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Hatem; Merlin, Christophe; Dezanet, Clément; Balan, Lavinia; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Schneider, Raphaël

    2016-03-05

    3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) was used as ligand to prepare ZnO@APTMS, Cu(2+)-doped ZnO (ZnO:Cu@APTMS) and ZnO quantum dots (QDs) with chemisorbed Cu(2+) ions at their surface (ZnO@APTMS/Cu). The dots have a diameter of ca. 5 nm and their crystalline and phase purities and composition were established by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopies and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of Cu(2+) location on the ability of the QDs to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under light irradiation was investigated. Results obtained demonstrate that all dots are able to produce ROS (OH, O2(-), H2O2 and (1)O2) and that ZnO@APTMS/Cu QDs generate more OH and O2(-) radicals and H2O2 than ZnO@APTMS and ZnO:Cu@APTMS QDs probably via mechanisms associating photo-induced charge carriers and Fenton reactions. In cytotoxicity experiments conducted in the dark or under light exposure, ZnO@APTMS/Cu QDs appeared slightly more deleterious to Escherichia coli cells than the two other QDs, therefore pointing out the importance of the presence of Cu(2+) ions at the periphery of the nanocrystals. On the other hand, with the lack of photo-induced toxicity, it can be inferred that ROS production cannot explain the cytotoxicity associated to the QDs. Our study demonstrates that both the production of ROS from ZnO QDs and their toxicity may be enhanced by chemisorbed Cu(2+) ions, which could be useful for medical or photocatalytic applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance studies of X3 silicon detectors for the future ELISSA array at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnevskaya, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Choudhury, D.; Constantin, P.; Filipescu, D. M.; Ghita, D. G.; Guardo, G. L.; Lattuada, D.; Matei, C.; Rotaru, A.; State, A.

    2018-05-01

    ELISSA is an array of silicon strip detectors under construction at the ELI-NP facility for measurements of photodissociation reactions using high-brilliance, quasi monoenergetic gamma beams. The detection system consists of 35 single-sided position-sensitive X3 detectors arranged in a cylindrical configuration and eight QQQ3 detectors as end-caps. A batch of forty X3 detectors have been tested at ELI-NP. The energy and position resolution, ballistic deficit, leakage currents, and depletion voltage were measured and analyzed. Measurements of the energy resolution were carried out using two read-out electronic chains, one based on multichannel preamplifiers and another based on multiplexers.

  9. Future prospects of nuclear reactions induced by gamma-ray beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipescu, D.; Balabanski, D. L.; Camera, F.; Gheorghe, I.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Kaur, J.; Ur, C. A.; Utsunomiya, H.; Varlamov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The future prospects of photonuclear reactions studies at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure—Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the pursuit of investigating the electromagnetic response of nuclei using γ-ray beams of unprecedented energy resolution and intensity characteristics. We present here the features of the γ-ray beam source, the emerging ELI-NP experimental program involving photonuclear reactions cross section measurements and spectroscopy and angular measurements of γ-rays and neutrons along with the detection arrays currently under implementation.

  10. New results of Δσ L( np) at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharov, V. I.; Adiasevich, B. P.; Anischenko, N. G.; Antonenko, V. G.; Averichev, S. A.; Azhgirey, L. S.; Bartenev, V. D.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Belyaev, A. A.; Blinov, N. A.; Borisov, N. S.; Borzakov, S. B.; Borzunov, Yu. T.; Bushuev, Yu. P.; Chernenko, L. P.; Chernykh, E. V.; Chumakov, V. F.; Dolgh, S. A.; Fedorov, A. N.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Golovanov, L. B.; Gurevich, G. M.; Janata, A.; Kirillov, A. D.; Kolomiets, V. G.; Komogorov, E. V.; Kopylov, S. A.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kovalev, A. I.; Krasnov, V. A.; Krstonoshich, P.; Kuzmin, E. S.; Ladygin, V. P.; Lazarev, A. B.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; Liburg, M. Yu.; Livanov, A. N.; Lukhanin, A. A.; Maniakov, P. K.; Matafonov, V. N.; Matyushevsky, E. A.; Moroz, V. D.; Morozov, A. A.; Neganov, A. B.; Nikolaevsky, G. P.; Nomofilov, A. A.; Panteleev, Tz.; Pilipenko, Yu. K.; Pisarev, I. L.; Plis, Yu. A.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Prokofiev, A. N.; Prytkov, V. Yu.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Schedrov, V. A.; Schevelev, O. N.; Shilov, S. N.; Shishov, Yu. A.; Shutov, V. B.; Slunečka, M.; Slunečková, V.; Starikov, A. Yu.; Stoletov, G. D.; Strunov, L. N.; Svetov, A. L.; Usov, Yu. A.; Vasiliev, T.; Volkov, V. I.; Vorobiev, E. I.; Yudin, I. P.; Zaitsev, I. V.; Zhdanov, A. A.; Zhmyrov, V. N.

    2002-03-01

    Preliminary results of the Δσ L( np) at 1.4, 1.7, 1.9 and 2.0 GeV are presented. They were obtained during the two data-taking runs at the JINR Dubna Synchrophasotron in 2001 and complete the existing data above 1.1 GeV. The data analysis is in progress. The aim of the present studies is to determine the imaginary and real parts of the np spin-dependent forward scattering amplitudes over this energy range.

  11. Fabrication of Well-Aligned ZnO Nanorods Using a Composite Seed Layer of ZnO Nanoparticles and Chitosan Polymer.

    PubMed

    Khun, Kimleang; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; AlSalhi, Mohamad S; Atif, Muhammad; Ansari, Anees A; Willander, Magnus

    2013-09-30

    In this study, by taking the advantage of both inorganic ZnO nanoparticles and the organic material chitosan as a composite seed layer, we have fabricated well-aligned ZnO nanorods on a gold-coated glass substrate using the hydrothermal growth method. The ZnO nanoparticles were characterized by the Raman spectroscopic techniques, which showed the nanocrystalline phase of the ZnO nanoparticles. Different composites of ZnO nanoparticles and chitosan were prepared and used as a seed layer for the fabrication of well-aligned ZnO nanorods. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic techniques were utilized for the structural characterization of the ZnO nanoparticles/chitosan seed layer-coated ZnO nanorods on a gold-coated glass substrate. This study has shown that the ZnO nanorods are well-aligned, uniform, and dense, exhibit the wurtzite hexagonal structure, and are perpendicularly oriented to the substrate. Moreover, the ZnO nanorods are only composed of Zn and O atoms. An optical study was also carried out for the ZnO nanoparticles/chitosan seed layer-coated ZnO nanorods, and the obtained results have shown that the fabricated ZnO nanorods exhibit good crystal quality. This study has provided a cheap fabrication method for the controlled morphology and good alignment of ZnO nanorods, which is of high demand for enhancing the working performance of optoelectronic devices.

  12. Fabrication of Well-Aligned ZnO Nanorods Using a Composite Seed Layer of ZnO Nanoparticles and Chitosan Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Khun, Kimleang; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; AlSalhi, Mohamad S.; Atif, Muhammad; Ansari, Anees A.; Willander, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    In this study, by taking the advantage of both inorganic ZnO nanoparticles and the organic material chitosan as a composite seed layer, we have fabricated well-aligned ZnO nanorods on a gold-coated glass substrate using the hydrothermal growth method. The ZnO nanoparticles were characterized by the Raman spectroscopic techniques, which showed the nanocrystalline phase of the ZnO nanoparticles. Different composites of ZnO nanoparticles and chitosan were prepared and used as a seed layer for the fabrication of well-aligned ZnO nanorods. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic techniques were utilized for the structural characterization of the ZnO nanoparticles/chitosan seed layer-coated ZnO nanorods on a gold-coated glass substrate. This study has shown that the ZnO nanorods are well-aligned, uniform, and dense, exhibit the wurtzite hexagonal structure, and are perpendicularly oriented to the substrate. Moreover, the ZnO nanorods are only composed of Zn and O atoms. An optical study was also carried out for the ZnO nanoparticles/chitosan seed layer-coated ZnO nanorods, and the obtained results have shown that the fabricated ZnO nanorods exhibit good crystal quality. This study has provided a cheap fabrication method for the controlled morphology and good alignment of ZnO nanorods, which is of high demand for enhancing the working performance of optoelectronic devices. PMID:28788336

  13. ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles as novel antimicrobial agents for oral hygiene: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-06-01

    Oral cavity is inhabited by more than 25,000 different bacterial phylotypes; some of them cause systemic infections in addition to dental and periodontal diseases. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistance among these bacteria necessitates the development of alternative antimicrobial agents that are safe, stable, and relatively economic. This review focuses on the significance of metal oxide nanoparticles, especially zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles as supplementary antimicrobials for controlling oral infections and biofilm formation. Indeed, the ZnO NPs and TiO2 NPs have exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against oral bacteria at concentrations which is not toxic in in vivo toxicity assays. These nanoparticles are being produced at an industrial scale for use in a variety of commercial products including food products. Thus, the application of ZnO and TiO2 NPs as nanoantibiotics for the development of mouthwashes, dental pastes, and other oral hygiene materials is envisaged. It is also suggested that these NPs could serve as healthier, innocuous, and effective alternative for controlling both the dental biofilms and oral planktonic bacteria with lesser side effects and antibiotic resistance.

  14. Biological N2 fixation mainly controlled by Sphagnum tissue N:P ratio in ombrotrophic bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivkovic, Tatjana; Moore, Tim R.

    2017-04-01

    Most of the 18 Pg nitrogen (N) accumulated in northern nutrient-poor and Sphagnum-dominated peatlands (bogs and fens) can be attributed to N2-fixation by diazotrophs either associated with the live Sphagnum or non-symbiotically in the deeper peat such as through methane consumption close to the water table. Where atmospheric N deposition is low (< 0.2 g m-2 y-1), ombrotrophic bogs rely on N2-fixation as the primary source of N that sustains primary production. Due to high energetic requirements, N2-fixation depends on the available phosphorus (P). Anthropogenic impacts in the last 200 years increased atmospheric N deposition, resulting in a switch from N to P limitation in Sphagnum, suggested by the increase in tissue N:P to >16. It is unclear how Sphagnum-hosted diazotrophic activity may be affected by N deposition and thus changes in N:P ratio. First, we investigated the effects of long-term addition of different sources of nitrogen (0, 1.6, 3.2 and 6.4 g N m-2 y-1as NH4Cl and NaNO3), and phosphorus (5 g P m-2 y-1as KH2PO4) on Sphagnum nutrient status (N, P and N:P ratio), net primary productivity (NPP) and Sphagnum-associated N2fixation at Mer Bleue, a temperate ombrotrophic bog. We show that N concentration in Sphagnum tissue increased with larger rates of N addition, with a stronger effect on Sphagnum from NH4 than NO3. The addition of P created a 3.5 fold increase in Sphagnum P content compared to controls. Sphagnum NPP decreased linearly with the rise in N:P ratio, while linear growth declined exponentially with increase in Sphagnum N content. Rates of N2-fixation determined in the laboratory significantly decreased in response to even the smallest addition of both N species. In contrast, the addition of P increased N2 fixation by up to 100 times compared to N treatments and up to 5-30 times compared to controls. The change in N2-fixation was best modeled by the N:P ratio, across all experimental treatments. Secondly, to test the role of N:P ratio on N2

  15. Fabrication and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanorods/perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shirahata, Yasuhiro; Tanaike, Kohei; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    ZnO nanorods/perovskite solar cells with different lengths of ZnO nanorods were fabricated. The ZnO nanorods were prepared by chemical bath deposition and directly confirmed to be hexagon-shaped nanorods. The lengths of the ZnO nanorads were controlled by deposition condition of ZnO seed layer. Photovoltaic properties of the ZnO nanorods/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cells were investigated by measuring current density-voltage characteristics and incident photon to current conversion efficiency. The highest conversion efficiency was obtained in ZnO nanorods/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} with the longest ZnO nanorods.

  16. Electrochemical Sensing, Photocatalytic and Biological Activities of ZnO Nanoparticles: Synthesis via Green Chemistry Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, L. S. Reddy; Archana, B.; Lingaraju, K.; Kavitha, C.; Suresh, D.; Nagabhushana, H.; Nagaraju, G.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have successfully synthesized ZnO nanoparticles (Nps) via solution combustion method using sugarcane juice as the novel fuel. The structure and morphology of the synthesized ZnO Nps have been analyzed using various analytical tools. The synthesized ZnO Nps exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue dye, indicating that the ZnO Nps are potential photocatalytic semiconductor materials. The synthesized ZnO Nps also show good electrochemical sensing of dopamine. ZnO Nps exhibit significant bactericidal activity against Klebsiella aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Eschesichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, the ZnO Nps show good antioxidant activity by potentially scavenging 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals. The above studies clearly demonstrate versatile applications of ZnO synthesized by simple eco-friendly route.

  17. Defect evolution in ZnO and its effect on radiation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinpeng; Li, Xingji

    2018-05-03

    The origin of ZnO radiation resistance is fascinating but still unclear. Herein, we found that radiation tolerance of ZnO can be tuned by engineering intrinsic defects into the ZnO. The role played by native defects in the radiation tolerance of ZnO was systematically explored by carrying out N+ implantation on a set of home-grown ZnO nanocrystals with various lattice defect types and concentrations. Interestingly, decreasing the VO and Zni concentration significantly aggravated N+ radiation damage, indicating the presence of O-deficient defects to be the potential cause of the radiation hardness of ZnO. A similar phenomenon was also observed for H+-implanted ZnO. This work offers a new way to manipulate ZnO and endow it with desired physicochemical properties, and is expected to pave the way for its application in radiative environments.

  18. Validation of an LDH Assay for Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xianglu; Gelein, Robert; Corson, Nancy; Wade-Mercer, Pamela; Jiang, Jingkun; Biswas, Pratim; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Elder, Alison; Oberdörster, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Studies showed that certain cytotoxicity assays were not suitable for assessing nanoparticle (NP) toxicity. We evaluated a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for assessing copper (Cu-40, 40 nm), silver (Ag-35, 35 nm; Ag-40, 40 nm), and titanium dioxide (TiO2-25, 25 nm) NPs by examining their potential to inactivate LDH and interference with β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), a substrate for the assay. We also performed a dissolution assay for some of the NPs. We found that the copper NPs, because of their high dissolution rate, could interfere with the LDH assay by inactivating LDH. Ag-35 could also inactivate LDH probably because of the carbon matrix used to cage the particles during synthesis. TiO2-25 NPs were found to adsorb LDH molecules. In conclusion, NP interference with the LDH assay depends on the type of NPs and the suitability of the assay for assessing NP toxicity should be examined case by case. PMID:21722700

  19. Biodegradation of toxic chemicals by Pleurotus eryngii in submerged fermentation and solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bea-Ven; Chang, Yi-Ming

    2016-04-01

    The toxic chemicals bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF), nonylphenol (NP), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) are endocrine-disrupting chemicals that have consequently drawn much concern regarding their effect on the environment. The objectives of this study were to investigate the degradation of BPA, BPF, NP, and TBBPA by enzymes from Pleurotus eryngii in submerged fermentation (SmF) and solid-state fermentation (SSF), and also to assess the removal of toxic chemicals in spent mushroom compost (SMC). BPA and BPF were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography; NP and TBBPA were analyzed by gas chromatography. NP degradation was enhanced by adding CuSO4 (1 mM), MnSO4 (0.5 mM), gallic acid (1 mM), tartaric acid (20 mM), citric acid (20 mM), guaiacol (1 mM), or 2,2'-azino-bis- (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid; 1 mM), with the last yielding a higher NP degradation rate than the other additives from SmF. The optimal conditions for enzyme activity from SSF were a sawdust/wheat bran ratio of 1:4 and a moisture content of 5 mL/g. The enzyme activities were higher with sawdust/wheat bran than with sawdust/rice bran. The optimal conditions for the extraction of enzyme from SMC required using sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0, solid/solution ratio 1:5), and extraction over 3 hours. The removal rates of toxic chemicals by P. eryngii, in descending order of magnitude, were SSF > SmF > SMC. The removal rates were BPF > BPA > NP > TBBPA. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. MicroRNA as biomarkers of mitochondrial toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, Bethany R., E-mail: bethany.baumgart@bms

    Mitochondrial toxicity can be difficult to detect as most cells can tolerate reduced activity as long as minimal capacity for function is maintained. However, once minimal capacity is lost, apoptosis or necrosis occurs quickly. Identification of more sensitive, early markers of mitochondrial toxicity was the objective of this work. Rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, and 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), a mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, were administered daily to male Sprague–Dawley rats at subcutaneous doses of 0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg/day and intraperitoneal doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 1 week. Samples of kidney, skeletal muscle (quadriceps femoris), and serummore » were collected for analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns. MtDNA was significantly decreased with administration of rotenone at 0.3 mg/kg/day and 3-NP at 5 and 10 mg/kg/day in the quadriceps femoris and with 3-NP at 10 mg/kg/day in the kidney. Additionally, rotenone and 3-NP treatment produced changes to miRNA expression that were similar in direction (i.e. upregulation, downregulation) to those previously linked to mitochondrial functions, such as mitochondrial damage and biogenesis (miR-122, miR-202-3p); regulation of ATP synthesis, abolished oxidative phosphorylation, and loss of membrane potential due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (miR-338-5p, miR-546, miR-34c); and mitochondrial DNA damage and depletion (miR-546). These results suggest that miRNAs may be sensitive biomarkers for early detection of mitochondrial toxicity. - Highlights: • MtDNA decreased after treatment with respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and 3-NP. • Decrease in mtDNA is generally dose-related and indicative of mitochondrial toxicity. • Altered miRNA has reported roles in regulating mitochondrial function. • Induction of miR-338-5p in kidney and serum suggests potential as renal biomarker. • Induction of miR-122

  1. Microstructure of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0185 MICROSTRUCTURE OF ZNO THIN FILMS DEPOSITED BY HIGH POWER IMPULSE MAGNETRON SPUTTERING (POSTPRINT) A. N. Reed...COVERED (From – To) 29 January 2013 – 16 February 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MICROSTRUCTURE OF ZNO THIN FILMS DEPOSITED BY HIGH POWER IMPULSE MAGNETRON...ABSTRACT High power impulse magnetron sputtering was used to deposit thin (~100 nm) zinc oxide (ZnO) films from a ceramic ZnO target onto substrates

  2. Effects of Chromium Dopant on Ultraviolet Photoresponsivity of ZnO Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, S.; Safa, S.; Khayatian, A.; Azimirad, R.

    2017-07-01

    Structural and optical properties of bare ZnO nanorods, ZnO-encapsulated ZnO nanorods, and Cr-doped ZnO-encapsulated ZnO nanorods have been investigated. Encapsulated ZnO nanorods were grown using a simple two-stage method in which ZnO nanorods were first grown on a glass substrate directly from a hydrothermal bath, then encapsulated with a thin layer of Cr-doped ZnO by dip coating. Comparative study of x-ray diffraction patterns showed that Cr was successfully incorporated into the shell layer of ZnO nanorods. Moreover, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirmed presence of Cr in this sample. It was observed that the thickness of the shell layer around the core of the ZnO nanorods was at least about 20 nm. Transmission electron microscopy of bare ZnO nanorods revealed single-crystalline structure. Based on optical results, both the encapsulation process and addition of Cr dopant decreased the optical bandgap of the samples. Indeed, the optical bandgap values of Cr-doped ZnO-encapsulated ZnO nanorods, ZnO-encapsulated ZnO nanorods, and bare ZnO nanorods were 2.89 eV, 3.15 eV, and 3.34 eV, respectively. The ultraviolet (UV) parameters demonstrated that incorporation of Cr dopant into the shell layer of ZnO nanorods considerably facilitated formation and transportation of photogenerated carriers, optimizing their performance as a practical UV detector. As a result, the photocurrent of the Cr-doped ZnO-encapsulated ZnO nanorods was the highest (0.6 mA), compared with ZnO-encapsulated ZnO nanorods and bare ZnO nanorods (0.21 mA and 0.06 mA, respectively).

  3. Hierarchical Carbon Fibers with ZnO Nanowires for Volatile Sensing in Composite Curing (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    needed to demonstrate the use of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanowire coated carbon fibers as a volatile sensor. ZnO nanowires are demonstrated to function as...processing. For this work, we report on the foundational study needed to demonstrate the use of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanowire coated carbon fibers as a...array of ZnO nanowires. Zinc oxide nanowires become more conductive in the presence of ethanol – as analyte sorbs to the surface, electron density

  4. Investigation of ZnO Nanowire Interfaces for Multi-Scale Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-06

    growth of zinc oxide ( ZnO ) nanowires on the surface of the...through the growth of zinc oxide ( ZnO ) nanowires on the surface of the reinforcing fibers. The nanowires functionally grade the interface, improve bonding...bulk composite. This has been accomplished through the growth of zinc oxide ( ZnO ) nanowires on the surface of the reinforcing fibers. ZnO

  5. Sulfur-Doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO) Nanostars: Synthesis and Simulation of Growth Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Zinc Oxide ( ZnO ) Nanostars: Synthesis and Simulation of Growth Mechanism Jinhyun Cho1, Qiubao Lin2,3, Sungwoo...characterization, and ab initio simulations of star-shaped hexagonal zinc oxide ( ZnO ) nanowires. The ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by a low...Introduction Zinc oxide ( ZnO ) is a wide bandgap (3.37 eV), Ⅱ–Ⅵ semiconductor of great interest for optoelectronic applications [1–3]. Its

  6. Comparative cytotoxicity of Al2O3, CeO2, TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles to human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Sun; Baek, Miri; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2010-05-01

    The increased applications of nanoparticles in a wide range of industrial fields raise the concern about their potential toxicity to human. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the toxicity of four different oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3, CeO2, TiO2 and ZnO) to human lung epithelial cells, A549 carcinoma cells and L-132 normal cells, in vitro. We focused on the toxicological effects of the present nanoparticles on cell proliferation, cell viability, membrane integrity and oxidative stress. The long-term cytotoxicity of nanoparticles was also evaluated by employing the clonogenic assay. Among four nanoparticles tested, ZnO exhibited the highest cytotoxicity in terms of cell proliferation, cell viability, membrane integrity and colony formation in both cell lines. Al2O3, CeO2 and TiO2 showed little adverse effects on cell proliferation and cell viability. However, TiO2 induced oxidative stress in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. CeO2 caused membrane damage and inhibited colony formation in long-term, but with different degree depending on cell lines. Al2O3 seems to be less toxic than the other nanoparticles even after long time exposure. These results highlight the need for caution during manufacturing process of nanomaterials as well as further investigation on the toxicity mechanism.

  7. Migration of nonylphenol from food-grade plastic is toxic to the coral reef fish species Pseudochromis fridmani.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Heather J; Marciano, Kathleen; Downs, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is a non-ionic surfactant used extensively in industrial applications, personal care products, and many plastics. We exposed marine orchid dottybacks (Pseudochromis fridmani) for 48h to either glass, Teflon, or two bags labeled as FDA food-grade polyethylene (PE1 and PE2) from different manufacturers. The PE2 bags leached high levels of NP into the contact water, which were taken up by the fish, and decreased short and long-term survival. Concentrations of NP that leached from the bags were consistent with 96h LC50 values determined in this study, indicating NP is the likely toxic agent. Despite being similarly labeled, the NP concentrations that leached from the bags and the resultant toxicity to the fish varied dramatically between manufacturers. This study highlights that some plastics, labeled as food-safe, can be highly toxic to aquatic animals, and could pose a greater threat to humans than previously realized. This study also highlights risks for aquatic animals exposed to increasing quantities of plastic waste. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Testing Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity Using the Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria Nitrosomonas Europaea and a High-throughput Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Bartow, S.; Radniecki, T.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles on ecologically significant wastewater microbiota, specifically ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), is critical due to the exponential increase in commercialization of nanoparticles as well as the sensitivity of AOB to inhibitors. A high-throughput activity assay was developed to rapidly screen for nanoparticle toxicity on AOB, using a multi-well plate method and AOB Nitrosomonas Europaea. This method demonstrated good agreement with previously established batch bottle assays utilizing both silver ions (Ag+) and nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) as nitrification inhibitors. The method was used to study the inhibition of Ag+ and Ag-NPs (20 nm) on the nitrification by N. Europaea cells grown in fill-and-draw reactors compared exponentially grown batch cells. Results indicate longer hydraulic residence times increased some protection against inhibition as measured by the production of nitrite over a three hour assay. The cells were more sensitive to Ag+ than Ag-NP, which is consistent with our past observations. Studies are currently being conducted to determine the effects that the presence of humic acid and cations on the inhibition and toxicity. Our initial results show that the presence of Mg++ provides protect from Ag-NP inhibition, which partly results from the aggregation of the Ag-NP and a decrease in the rate of oxidation of the Ag-NP to Ag+. The presence of humic acid also provides for some protection from Ag-NP inhibition.

  9. Nanoparticle-induced neuronal toxicity across placental barriers is mediated by autophagy and dependent on astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Simon J; Crompton, Lucy A; Sood, Aman; Saunders, Margaret; Boyle, Noreen T; Buckley, Amy; Minogue, Aedín M; McComish, Sarah F; Jiménez-Moreno, Natalia; Cordero-Llana, Oscar; Stathakos, Petros; Gilmore, Catherine E; Kelly, Stephen; Lane, Jon D; Case, C Patrick; Caldwell, Maeve A

    2018-05-01

    The potential for maternal nanoparticle (NP) exposures to cause developmental toxicity in the fetus without the direct passage of NPs has previously been shown, but the mechanism remained elusive. We now demonstrate that exposure of cobalt and chromium NPs to BeWo cell barriers, an in vitro model of the human placenta, triggers impairment of the autophagic flux and release of interleukin-6. This contributes to the altered differentiation of human neural progenitor cells and DNA damage in the derived neurons and astrocytes. Crucially, neuronal DNA damage is mediated by astrocytes. Inhibiting the autophagic degradation in the BeWo barrier by overexpression of the dominant-negative human ATG4B C74A significantly reduces the levels of DNA damage in astrocytes. In vivo, indirect NP toxicity in mice results in neurodevelopmental abnormalities with reactive astrogliosis and increased DNA damage in the fetal hippocampus. Our results demonstrate the potential importance of autophagy to elicit NP toxicity and the risk of indirect developmental neurotoxicity after maternal NP exposure.

  10. Nanoparticle-induced neuronal toxicity across placental barriers is mediated by autophagy and dependent on astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Simon J.; Crompton, Lucy A.; Sood, Aman; Saunders, Margaret; Boyle, Noreen T.; Buckley, Amy; Minogue, Aedín M.; McComish, Sarah F.; Jiménez-Moreno, Natalia; Cordero-Llana, Oscar; Stathakos, Petros; Gilmore, Catherine E.; Kelly, Stephen; Lane, Jon D.; Case, C. Patrick; Caldwell, Maeve A.

    2018-05-01

    The potential for maternal nanoparticle (NP) exposures to cause developmental toxicity in the fetus without the direct passage of NPs has previously been shown, but the mechanism remained elusive. We now demonstrate that exposure of cobalt and chromium NPs to BeWo cell barriers, an in vitro model of the human placenta, triggers impairment of the autophagic flux and release of interleukin-6. This contributes to the altered differentiation of human neural progenitor cells and DNA damage in the derived neurons and astrocytes. Crucially, neuronal DNA damage is mediated by astrocytes. Inhibiting the autophagic degradation in the BeWo barrier by overexpression of the dominant-negative human ATG4BC74A significantly reduces the levels of DNA damage in astrocytes. In vivo, indirect NP toxicity in mice results in neurodevelopmental abnormalities with reactive astrogliosis and increased DNA damage in the fetal hippocampus. Our results demonstrate the potential importance of autophagy to elicit NP toxicity and the risk of indirect developmental neurotoxicity after maternal NP exposure.

  11. Performance of CarbaNP and CIM tests in OXA-48 carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Serap Süzük; Kaşkatepe, Banu; Avcıküçük, Havva; Öztürk, Şükran

    2017-03-01

    This study applied two phenotypic tests, namely "Carbapenemase Nordmann-Poirel" (CarbaNP) test and "Carbapenem Inactivation Method" (CIM), against the isolates carrying the carbapenem resistance genes. The study included 83 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates producing oxacillinase-48 (OXA-48) and 30 carbapenem-sensitive Enterobacteriaceae isolates. Out of the total isolates studied, 77 isolates (92.77%) were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae and six isolates (7.23%) were identified as Escherichia coli by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method used to detect resistance genes found that 74 isolates (89.16%) produced OXA-48 carbapenemase, whereas nine isolates (10.84%) produced both OXA-48 and New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1). The isolates producing both OXA-48 and NDM-1 were found to be positive by both phenotypic tests. Among isolates carrying only bla OXA-48 gene alone, nine isolates (13.04%) for CarbaNP test and two isolates for CIM test (2.90%) displayed false negative results, respectively. The sensitivity of CarbaNP and CIM tests was found to be 89.16% and 97.59%, respectively, whereas the specificity was determined to be 100% for both tests. These findings suggest that CarbaNP and CIM tests are useful tools to identify the carbapenemase producers. Molecular methods like PCR are recommended to verify false negative tests predicted to have OXA-48 activity.

  12. Shifts in leaf N:P stoichiometry during rehabilitation in highly alkaline bauxite processing residue sand

    PubMed Central

    Goloran, Johnvie B.; Chen, Chengrong; Phillips, Ian R.; Elser, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Large quantities of sodic and alkaline bauxite residue are produced globally as a by-product from alumina refineries. Ecological stoichiometry of key elements [nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)] plays a critical role in establishing vegetation cover in bauxite residue sand (BRS). Here we examined how changes in soil chemical properties over time in rehabilitated sodic and alkaline BRS affected leaf N to P stoichiometry of native species used for rehabilitation. Both Ca and soil pH influenced the shifts in leaf N:P ratios of the study species as supported by consistently significant positive relationships (P < 0.001) between these soil indices and leaf N:P ratios. Shifts from N to P limitation were evident for N-fixing species, while N limitation was consistently experienced by non-N-fixing plant species. In older rehabilitated BRS embankments, soil and plant indices (Ca, Na, pH, EC, ESP and leaf N:P ratios) tended to align with those of the natural ecosystem, suggesting improved rehabilitation performance. These findings highlight that leaf N:P stoichiometry can effectively provide a meaningful assessment on understanding nutrient limitation and productivity of native species used for vegetating highly sodic and alkaline BRS, and is a crucial indicator for assessing ecological rehabilitation performance. PMID:26443331

  13. Constituent Length Affects Prosody and Processing for a Dative NP Ambiguity in Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Hyekyung; Schafer, Amy J.

    2009-01-01

    Two sentence processing experiments on a dative NP ambiguity in Korean demonstrate effects of phrase length on overt and implicit prosody. Both experiments controlled non-prosodic length factors by using long versus short proper names that occurred before the syntactically critical material. Experiment 1 found that long phrases induce different…

  14. Shifts in leaf N:P stoichiometry during rehabilitation in highly alkaline bauxite processing residue sand.

    PubMed

    Goloran, Johnvie B; Chen, Chengrong; Phillips, Ian R; Elser, James J

    2015-10-07

    Large quantities of sodic and alkaline bauxite residue are produced globally as a by-product from alumina refineries. Ecological stoichiometry of key elements [nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)] plays a critical role in establishing vegetation cover in bauxite residue sand (BRS). Here we examined how changes in soil chemical properties over time in rehabilitated sodic and alkaline BRS affected leaf N to P stoichiometry of native species used for rehabilitation. Both Ca and soil pH influenced the shifts in leaf N:P ratios of the study species as supported by consistently significant positive relationships (P < 0.001) between these soil indices and leaf N:P ratios. Shifts from N to P limitation were evident for N-fixing species, while N limitation was consistently experienced by non-N-fixing plant species. In older rehabilitated BRS embankments, soil and plant indices (Ca, Na, pH, EC, ESP and leaf N:P ratios) tended to align with those of the natural ecosystem, suggesting improved rehabilitation performance. These findings highlight that leaf N:P stoichiometry can effectively provide a meaningful assessment on understanding nutrient limitation and productivity of native species used for vegetating highly sodic and alkaline BRS, and is a crucial indicator for assessing ecological rehabilitation performance.

  15. Enhanced conversion efficiency in wide-bandgap GaNP solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Sukrittanon, Supanee; Liu, Ren; Ro, Yun Goo; ...

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we demonstrate –2.05 eV dilute nitride GaNP solar cells on GaP substrates for potential use as the top junction in dual-junction integrated cells on Si. By adding a small amount of N into indirect-bandgap GaP, GaNP has several extremely important attributes: a direct-bandgap that is also tunable, and easily attained lattice-match with Si. Our best GaNP solar cell ([N] –1.8%, E g –2.05 eV) achieves an efficiency of 7.9%, even in the absence of a window layer. This GaNP solar cell's efficiency is 3× higher than the most efficient GaP solar cell to date and higher thanmore » other solar cells with similar direct bandgap (InGaP, GaAsP). Through a systematic study of the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the device, efficient broadband optical absorption and enhanced solar cell performance are demonstrated.« less

  16. Ionization Spectroscopic Measurement of nP Rydberg Levels of 87Rb Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yufan; Zaheeruddin, Syed; Zhao, Dongmei; Ma, Xinwen; Yang, Jie

    2018-05-01

    We created an ultracold plasma via the spontaneous ionization of cold dense Rydberg atoms of 87Rb in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), and measured the nS1/2 (n = 50-80), nP1/2 (n = 16-23), nP3/2 (n = 16-98), and nD5/2 (n = 49-96) Rydberg levels by detecting the electrons in the ultracold plasma. By fitting the energy levels of Rydberg states, the first ionization potential of 33690.950(11) cm-1 and the quantum defects of S, P, and D orbitals were obtained. The absolute transition energies of nS1/2 (n = 66-80), nP1/2 (n = 16-23), nP3/2 (n = 16-98), and nD5/2 (n = 58-96) states of 87Rb, as well as the quantum defects for p1/2 and p3/2 series, are given for the first time.

  17. Statistical Model Analysis of (n,p) Cross Sections and Average Energy For Fission Neutron Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Odsuren, M.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2011-06-28

    Investigation of charged particle emission reaction cross sections for fast neutrons is important to both nuclear reactor technology and the understanding of nuclear reaction mechanisms. In particular, the study of (n,p) cross sections is necessary to estimate radiation damage due to hydrogen production, nuclear heating and transmutations in the structural materials of fission and fusion reactors. On the other hand, it is often necessary in practice to evaluate the neutron cross sections of the nuclides for which no experimental data are available.Because of this, we carried out the systematical analysis of known experimental (n,p) and (n,a) cross sections for fastmore » neutrons and observed a systematical regularity in the wide energy interval of 6-20 MeV and for broad mass range of target nuclei. To explain this effect using the compound, pre-equilibrium and direct reaction mechanisms some formulae were deduced. In this paper, in the framework of the statistical model known experimental (n,p) cross sections averaged over the thermal fission neutron spectrum of U-235 are analyzed. It was shown that the experimental data are satisfactorily described by the statistical model. Also, in the case of (n,p) cross sections the effective average neutron energy for fission spectrum of U-235 was found to be around 3 MeV.« less

  18. The Development of NP Selection in School-Age Children: Reference and Spanish Subject Pronouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Naomi Lapidus; Cairns, Helen Smith

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the development of the NP selection process, preferences for overt or null Spanish subject pronouns were elicited from 139 children (5;09 to 15;08) and 30 adults in Mexico. Participants were told stories in which consecutive grammatical subjects shared the same referent (same-reference), or did not (switch-reference). In the…

  19. Parameterized Algorithmics for Finding Exact Solutions of NP-Hard Biological Problems.

    PubMed

    Hüffner, Falk; Komusiewicz, Christian; Niedermeier, Rolf; Wernicke, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-parameter algorithms are designed to efficiently find optimal solutions to some computationally hard (NP-hard) problems by identifying and exploiting "small" problem-specific parameters. We survey practical techniques to develop such algorithms. Each technique is introduced and supported by case studies of applications to biological problems, with additional pointers to experimental results.

  20. Ab initio calculation of the $$np \\to d ³$$ radiative capture process

    DOE PAGES

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; ...

    2015-09-24

    In this study, lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture processmore » $$np \\to d\\gamma$$, and the photo-disintegration processes $$\\gamma^{(\\ast)} d \\to np$$. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of $$m_\\pi \\sim 450$$ and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine these low-energy inelastic processes. Extrapolating to the physical pion mass, a cross section of $$\\sigma^{lqcd}(np\\to d\\gamma)=332.4({\\tiny \\begin{array}{l}+5.4 \\\\ - 4.7\\end{array}})\\ mb$$ is obtained at an incident neutron speed of $$v=2,200\\ m/s$$, consistent with the experimental value of $$\\sigma^{expt}(np \\to d\\gamma) = 334.2(0.5)\\ mb$$.« less

  1. Enhanced ultraviolet photo-response in Dy doped ZnO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Ranveer; Pandey, Praveen C.

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, a Dy doped ZnO thin film deposited by the spin coating method has been studied for its potential application in a ZnO based UV detector. The investigations on the structural property and surface morphology of the thin film ensure that the prepared samples are crystalline and exhibit a hexagonal crystal structure of ZnO. A small change in crystallite size has been observed due to Dy doping in ZnO. AFM analysis ascertains the grain growth and smooth surface of the thin films. The Dy doped ZnO thin film exhibits a significant enhancement in UV region absorption as compared to the pure ZnO thin film, which suggests that Dy doped ZnO can be used as a UV detector. Under UV irradiation of wavelength 325 nm, the photocurrent value of Dy doped ZnO is 105.54 μA at 4.5 V, which is 31 times greater than that of the un-doped ZnO thin film (3.39 μA). The calculated value of responsivity is found to increase significantly due to the incorporation of Dy in the ZnO lattice. The observed higher value of photocurrent and responsivity could be attributed to the substitution of Dy in the ZnO lattice, which enhances the conductivity, electron mobility, and defects in ZnO and benefits the UV sensing property.

  2. Gd{sup 3+} incorporated ZnO nanoparticles: A versatile material

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Surender, E-mail: surender40@gmail.com; Sahare, P.D.

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Chemically synthesized Gd{sup 3+} doped ZnO nanoparticles. • The broad visible emission of the ZnO is dependent on the surface defects and can be tailored by Gd{sup 3+} doing. • PL and magnetic properties are modified by Gd{sup 3+} doping. • Photocatalysis experiment reveals that the ZnO: Gd{sup 3+} degrades the Rh B dye faster than the undoped ZnO. - Abstract: Gd{sup 3+} doped ZnO nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical route method and investigated through structural, optical, magnetic and photocatalytic properties. Transmission Electron Microscopy technique has been performed on undoped and Gd{sup 3+} dopedmore » ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman analyses are carried out in order to examine the desired phase formation and substitution of Gd{sup 3+} in the ZnO matrix. Gd{sup 3+} doped ZnO nanoparticles show enhanced photoluminescent and ferromagnetic properties as compared to undoped ZnO. The broad visible emission of ZnO is found to be largely dependent on the surface defects and these surface defects can be tailored by Gd{sup 3+} doping concentration. Furthermore, Gd{sup 3+} doped ZnO nanoparticles also show improved photocatalytic properties as compared with undoped ZnO nanoparticles under ultraviolet irradiation.« less

  3. Chronic dietary toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.): Tissue accumulation and physiological responses.

    PubMed

    Chupani, Latifeh; Niksirat, Hamid; Velíšek, Josef; Stará, Alžběta; Hradilová, Šárka; Kolařík, Jan; Panáček, Aleš; Zusková, Eliška

    2018-01-01

    Concerns regarding the potential toxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on aquatic organisms are growing due to the fact that NPs may be released into aquatic ecosystems. This study aimed to investigate the effects of dietary exposure to ZnO NPs on juvenile common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Fish were fed a spiked diets at doses 50 and 500mg of ZnO NPs per kg of feed for 6 weeks followed by a 2-week recovery period. Fish were sampled every 2 weeks for haematology trends, blood biochemistry measures, histology analyses, and determination of the accumulation of zinc in tissues. At the end of the exposure and post-exposure periods, fish were sampled for an assessment of lipid peroxidation levels. Dietborne ZnO NPs had no effects on haematology, blood biochemistry, and lipid peroxidation levels during the exposure period. After the recovery period, aspartate aminotransferase activity significantly (p < 0.05) increased and alanine transferase activity significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in the higher exposure group. The level of lipid peroxidation significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in liver of treated fish after 2 weeks post-exposure period. A histological examination revealed mild histopathological changes in kidneys during exposure. Our results did not show a significant increase of zinc content at the end of experiment in any of tested organs. However, chronic dietary exposure to ZnO NPs might affect kidney and liver function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ZnO Thin Film Electronics for More than Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Jose Israel

    Zinc oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) are investigated in this work for large-area electronic applications outside of display technology. A constant pressure, constant flow, showerhead, plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process has been developed to fabricate high mobility TFTs and circuits on rigid and flexible substrates at 200 °C. ZnO films and resulting devices prepared by PEALD and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) have been compared. Both PEALD and PLD ZnO films result in densely packed, polycrystalline ZnO thin films that were used to make high performance devices. PEALD ZnO TFTs deposited at 300 °C have a field-effect mobility of ˜ 40 cm2/V-s (and > 20 cm2/V-S deposited at 200 °C). PLD ZnO TFTs, annealed at 400 °C, have a field-effect mobility of > 60 cm2/V-s (and up to 100 cm2/V-s). Devices, prepared by either technique, show high gamma-ray radiation tolerance of up to 100 Mrad(SiO2) with only a small radiation-induced threshold voltage shift (VT ˜ -1.5 V). Electrical biasing during irradiation showed no enhanced radiation-induced effects. The study of the radiation effects as a function of material stack thicknesses revealed the majority of the radiation-induced charge collection happens at the semiconductor-passivation interface. A simple sheet-charge model at that interface can describe the radiation-induced charge in ZnO TFTs. By taking advantage of the substrate-agnostic process provided by PEALD, due to its low-temperature and excellent conformal coatings, ZnO electronics were monolithically integrated with thin-film complex oxides. Application-based examples where ZnO electronics provide added functionality to complex oxide-based devices are presented. In particular, the integration of arrayed lead zirconate titanate (Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 or PZT) thin films with ZnO electronics for microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) and deformable mirrors is demonstrated. ZnO switches can provide voltage to PZT capacitors with fast charging and slow

  5. Al-doped ZnO seed layer-dependent crystallographic control of ZnO nanorods by using electrochemical deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Hyo-Soo; Choi, Nak-Jung; Kim, Kyoung-Bo

    Highlights: • Polar and semipolar ZnO NRs were successfully achieved by hydrothermal synthesis. • Semipolar and polar ZnO NRs were grown on ZnO and AZO/m-sapphire, respectively. • Al % of AZO/m-sapphire enhanced the lateral growth rate of polar ZnO NRs. - Abstract: We investigated the effect of an Al-doped ZnO film on the crystallographic direction of ZnO nanorods (NRs) using electrochemical deposition. From high-solution X-ray diffraction measurements, the crystallographic plane of ZnO NRs grown on (1 0 0) ZnO/m-plane sapphire was (1 0 1). The surface grain size of the (100) Al-doped ZnO (AZO) film decreased with increasing Al contentmore » in the ZnO seed layer, implying that the Al dopant accelerated the three-dimensional (3D) growth of the AZO film. In addition, it was found that with increasing Al doping concentration of the AZO seed layer, the crystal orientation of the ZnO NRs grown on the AZO seed layer changed from [1 0 1] to [0 0 1]. With increasing Al content of the nonpolar (1 0 0) AZO seed layer, the small surface grains with a few crystallographic planes of the AZO film changed from semipolar (1 0 1) ZnO NRs to polar (0 0 1) ZnO NRs due to the increase of the vertical [0 0 1] growth rate of the ZnO NRs owing to excellent electrical properties.« less

  6. BPA and NP removal from municipal wastewater by tropical horizontal subsurface constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Toro-Vélez, A F; Madera-Parra, C A; Peña-Varón, M R; Lee, W Y; Bezares-Cruz, J C; Walker, W S; Cárdenas-Henao, H; Quesada-Calderón, S; García-Hernández, H; Lens, P N L

    2016-01-15

    It has been recognized that numerous synthetic compounds like Bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenols (NP) are present in effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) at levels of parts per billion (μg L(-1)) or even parts per trillion (ng L(-1)) with a high potential to cause endocrine disruption in the aquatic environment. Constructed wetlands (CW) are a cost-effective wastewater treatment alternative with promising performance to treat these afore mentioned compounds. This research was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of CW treatment of WWTP effluent for mitigating the effects endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). This research goal was accomplished by (1) quantifying the removal of BPA and NP in CWs; (2) isolating CW fungal strains and testing for laccase production; and (3) performing endocrine disruption (reproduction) bioassays using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Three pilot scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSF-CW) were operated for eight weeks: one planted with Phragmites australis; one planted with Heliconia psitacorum; and one unplanted. The Heliconia CW showed a removal efficiency of 73.3(± 19%) and 62.8(± 20.1%) for BPA and NP, respectively; while the Phragmites CW demonstrated a similar removal for BPA (70.2 ± 27%) and lower removal efficiency for NP 52.1(± 37.1%).The unplanted CW achieved 62.2 (± 33%) removal for BPA and 25.3(± 37%) removal for NP. Four of the eleven fungal strains isolated from the Heliconia-CW showed the capacity to produce laccase. Even though complete removal of EDCs was not achieved by the CWs, the bioassay confirmed a significant improvement (p < 0.05) in fly viability for all CWs, with Heliconia sp. being the most effective at mitigating adverse effects on first and second generational reproduction. This study showed that a CW planted with a native Heliconia sp. CW demonstrated a higher removal of endocrine disrupting compounds and better mitigation of reproductive disruption in the

  7. Diagnostic tests for Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C): A critical review.

    PubMed

    Vanier, Marie T; Gissen, Paul; Bauer, Peter; Coll, Maria J; Burlina, Alberto; Hendriksz, Christian J; Latour, Philippe; Goizet, Cyril; Welford, Richard W D; Marquardt, Thorsten; Kolb, Stefan A

    2016-08-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a neurovisceral lysosomal cholesterol trafficking and lipid storage disorder caused by mutations in one of the two genes, NPC1 or NPC2. Diagnosis has often been a difficult task, due to the wide range in age of onset of NP-C and clinical presentation of the disease, combined with the complexity of the cell biology (filipin) laboratory testing, even in combination with genetic testing. This has led to substantial delays in diagnosis, largely depending on the access to specialist centres and the level of knowledge about NP-C of the physician in the area. In recent years, advances in mass spectrometry has allowed identification of several sensitive plasma biomarkers elevated in NP-C (e.g. cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol, lysosphingomyelin isoforms and bile acid metabolites), which, together with the concomitant progress in molecular genetic technology, have greatly impacted the strategy of laboratory testing. Specificity of the biomarkers is currently under investigation and other pathologies are being found to also result in elevations. Molecular genetic testing also has its limitations, notably with unidentified mutations and the classification of new variants. This review is intended to increase awareness on the currently available approaches to laboratory diagnosis of NP-C, to provide an up to date, comprehensive and critical evaluation of the various techniques (cell biology, biochemical biomarkers and molecular genetics), and to briefly discuss ongoing/future developments. The use of current tests in proper combination enables a rapid and correct diagnosis in a large majority of cases. However, even with recent progress, definitive diagnosis remains challenging in some patients, for whom combined genetic/biochemical/cytochemical markers do not provide a clear answer. Expertise and reference laboratories thus remain essential, and further work is still required to fulfill unmet needs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by

  8. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obtaining nucleus pulposus (NP) water content with changing postures.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Jalil; Pope, Malcolm H; Graveling, Richard A

    2015-05-01

    Opportunities to evaluate spinal loading in vivo are limited and a large majority of studies on the mechanical functions of the spine have been in vitro cadaveric studies and/or models based on many assumptions that are difficult to validate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obtaining nucleus pulposus (NP) water content measurements with changing postures. MRI studies were conducted on 25 healthy males with no history of low back pain (age 20-38). The L1 to S1 intradiscal levels were imaged in supine, sitting and standing postures using an upright 0.6 Tesla magnet, where a set of H2O: D2O7 phantoms were mounted on the back of the subjects. A calibration curve, provided from these phantoms, was applied to the absolute proton density image, yielding a pixel-by-pixel map of the water content of the NP. The NP at all levels showed a highly significant water loss (p<0.001) in sitting and standing postures compared with the supine posture. A trend towards higher levels of water was observed at all levels in the standing posture relative to sitting postures, however statistically significant differences were found only at L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels. This study demonstrates that variations in water content of the NP in different postures are in agreement with those determined from published invasive disc pressure measurements. The result of study demonstrates the feasibility of using MRI to determine the water content of the NP with changing postures and to use these data to evaluate spinal loading in these postures. This measurement method of water content by quantitative MR imaging could become a powerful tool for both clinical and ergonomic applications. The proposed methodology does not require invasive pressure measurement techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolites of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (NP) in Serum Have the Potential to Delineate Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher; Vasu, Vihas T.; Fermin, Damian; Choi, Hyungwon; Creighton, Chad J.; Gayatri, Sitaram; Lan, Ling; Putluri, Nagireddy; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Kaur, Punit; Shabahang, Mohsen; Giri, Judith G.; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Asea, Alexander A. A.; Cashikar, Anil G.; Rao, Arundhati; McLoughlin, James; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the fourth highest cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, has the most aggressive presentation resulting in a very short median survival time for the affected patients. Early detection of PDAC is confounded by lack of specific markers that has motivated the use of high throughput molecular approaches to delineate potential biomarkers. To pursue identification of a distinct marker, this study profiled the secretory proteome in 16 PDAC, 2 carcinoma in situ (CIS) and 7 benign patients using label-free mass spectrometry coupled to 1D-SDS-PAGE and Strong Cation-Exchange Chromatography (SCX). A total of 431 proteins were detected of which 56 were found to be significantly elevated in PDAC. Included in this differential set were Parkinson disease autosomal recessive, early onset 7 (PARK 7) and Alpha Synuclein (aSyn), both of which are known to be pathognomonic to Parkinson's disease as well as metabolic enzymes like Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (NP) which has been exploited as therapeutic target in cancers. Tissue Microarray analysis confirmed higher expression of aSyn and NP in ductal epithelia of pancreatic tumors compared to benign ducts. Furthermore, extent of both aSyn and NP staining positively correlated with tumor stage and perineural invasion while their intensity of staining correlated with the existence of metastatic lesions in the PDAC tissues. From the biomarker perspective, NP protein levels were higher in PDAC sera and furthermore serum levels of its downstream metabolites guanosine and adenosine were able to distinguish PDAC from benign in an unsupervised hierarchical classification model. Overall, this study for the first time describes elevated levels of aSyn in PDAC as well as highlights the potential of evaluating NP protein expression and levels of its downstream metabolites to develop a multiplex panel for non-invasive detection of PDAC. PMID:21448452

  10. Metabolites of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (NP) in serum have the potential to delineate pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vareed, Shaiju K; Bhat, Vadiraja B; Thompson, Christopher; Vasu, Vihas T; Fermin, Damian; Choi, Hyungwon; Creighton, Chad J; Gayatri, Sitaram; Lan, Ling; Putluri, Nagireddy; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Kaur, Punit; Shabahang, Mohsen; Giri, Judith G; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Asea, Alexander A A; Cashikar, Anil G; Rao, Arundhati; McLoughlin, James; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-03-23

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the fourth highest cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, has the most aggressive presentation resulting in a very short median survival time for the affected patients. Early detection of PDAC is confounded by lack of specific markers that has motivated the use of high throughput molecular approaches to delineate potential biomarkers. To pursue identification of a distinct marker, this study profiled the secretory proteome in 16 PDAC, 2 carcinoma in situ (CIS) and 7 benign patients using label-free mass spectrometry coupled to 1D-SDS-PAGE and Strong Cation-Exchange Chromatography (SCX). A total of 431 proteins were detected of which 56 were found to be significantly elevated in PDAC. Included in this differential set were Parkinson disease autosomal recessive, early onset 7 (PARK 7) and Alpha Synuclein (aSyn), both of which are known to be pathognomonic to Parkinson's disease as well as metabolic enzymes like Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (NP) which has been exploited as therapeutic target in cancers. Tissue Microarray analysis confirmed higher expression of aSyn and NP in ductal epithelia of pancreatic tumors compared to benign ducts. Furthermore, extent of both aSyn and NP staining positively correlated with tumor stage and perineural invasion while their intensity of staining correlated with the existence of metastatic lesions in the PDAC tissues. From the biomarker perspective, NP protein levels were higher in PDAC sera and furthermore serum levels of its downstream metabolites guanosine and adenosine were able to distinguish PDAC from benign in an unsupervised hierarchical classification model. Overall, this study for the first time describes elevated levels of aSyn in PDAC as well as highlights the potential of evaluating NP protein expression and levels of its downstream metabolites to develop a multiplex panel for non-invasive detection of PDAC.

  11. Nanoporous structures on ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gür, Emre; Kılıç, Bayram; Coşkun, C.; Tüzemen, S.; Bayrakçeken, Fatma

    2010-01-01

    Porous structures were formed on ZnO thin films which were grown by an electrochemical deposition (ECD) method. The growth processes were carried out in a solution of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) zinc perchlorate, Zn(ClO 4) 2, at 120 ∘C on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. Optical and structural characterizations of electrochemically grown ZnO thin films have shown that the films possess high (0002) c-axis orientation, high nucleation, high intensity and low FWHM of UV emission at the band edge region and a sharp UV absorption edge. Nanoporous structures were formed via self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexanethiol (C 6SH) and dodecanethiol (C 12SH). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) measurements showed that while a nanoporous structure (pore radius 20 nm) is formed on the ZnO thin films by hexanathiol solution, a macroporous structure (pore radius 360 nm) is formed by dodecanethiol solution. No significant variation is observed in X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements on the ZnO thin films after pore formation. However, photoluminescence (PL) measurements showed that green emission is observed as the dominant emission for the macroporous structures, while no variation is observed for the thin film nanoporous ZnO sample.

  12. Hydrogen-Induced Plastic Deformation in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukáč, F.; Čížek, J.; Vlček, M.; Procházka, I.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Traeger, F.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.

    In the present work hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals covered with Pd over-layer were electrochemically loaded with hydrogen and the influence of hydrogen on ZnO micro structure was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) was employed for determination of depth profile of hydrogen concentration in the sample. NRA measurements confirmed that a substantial amount of hydrogen was introduced into ZnO by electrochemical charging. The bulk hydrogen concentration in ZnO determined by NRA agrees well with the concentration estimated from the transported charge using the Faraday's law. Moreover, a subsurface region with enhanced hydrogen concentration was found in the loaded crystals. Slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) investigations of hydrogen-loaded crystal revealed enhanced concentration of defects in the subsurface region. This testifies hydrogen-induced plastic deformation of the loaded crystal. Absorbed hydrogen causes a significant lattice expansion. At low hydrogen concentrations this expansion is accommodated by elastic straining, but at higher concentrations hydrogen-induced stress exceeds the yield stress in ZnO and plastic deformation of the loaded crystal takes place. Enhanced hydrogen concentration detected in the subsurface region by NRA is, therefore, due to excess hydrogen trapped at open volume defects introduced by plastic deformation. Moreover, it was found that hydrogen-induced plastic deformation in the subsurface layer leads to typical surface modification: formation of hexagonal shape pyramids on the surface due to hydrogen-induced slip in the [0001] direction.

  13. The thermodynamic activity of ZnO in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, R. A.; Gaskell, D. R.

    1983-12-01

    The activity of ZnO in ZnO-SiO2 and CaO-ZnO-SiO2 melts has been measured at 1560 °C using a transpiration technique with CO-CO2 mixtures as the carrier gas. The activities of ZnO in dilute solution in 42 wt pct SiO2-38 wt pct CaO-20 wt pct A12O3 in the range 1400° to 1550 °C and in 62 wt pct SiO2-23.3 wt pct CaO-14.7 wt pct A12O3 at 1550 °C have also been measured. The measured free energies of formation of ZnO-SiO2 melts are significantly more negative than published estimated values and this, together with the behavior observed in the system CaO-Al2O3-SiO2, indicate that ZnO is a relatively basic oxide. The results are discussed in terms of the polymerization model of binary silicate melts and ideal silicate mixing in ternary silicate melts. The behavior of ZnO in dilute solution in CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 melts is discussed in terms of the possibility of the fluxing of ZnO by iron blast furnace slags.

  14. Confocal Raman microscopy of one dimensional ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singamaneni, Srikanth; Gupta, Maneesh; Yang, Rusen; Wang, Zhong; Tsukruk, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    ZnO nanostructures with various shapes (vertically aligned nanorods, nanobelts, nanohelixes, nanorings) have been synthesized using both vapor phase and solution growth methods. In the simplest example of a nanobelt, the fast growth direction can be either (21 1 0) or (011 0) or (0001). Here, we show that confocal Raman microscopy can be employed as a fast and nondestructive analytical technique to identify the crystal planes and reveal the relative orientation of the ZnO nanostructure. Various features of the Raman spectrum of ZnO nanostructures (presence of the A1(TO) mode, width of the E2 mode) were found to be sensitive to relative orientation of the incident source laser and the crystal plane. Furthermore, owing to the optical anisotropy of ZnO, Raman scattering from the substrate is modulated (either enhanced or suppressed with respect to the background) depending on the polarization of the incident light with respect to orientation of the nanobelt. The results presented here describe a novel method to nondestructively identify the growth, relative orientation, and the waveguiding properties of the ZnO nanostructures.

  15. Am phases in the matrix of a U–Pu–Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Dawn E.; Kennedy, J. Rory; Madden, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr 2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ζ-(U, Pu)more » and the Zr content in δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr 2 is lower than that in δ-UZr 2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr 2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr 2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.« less

  16. Raw data of the effects of Chlorogenic acid in 3-Nitropropionic acid induced toxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Norberto, Alarcón-Herrera; Saúl, Flores-Maya; Belén, Bellido; García-Bores Ana, M; Ernesto, Mendoza; Guillermo, Ávila-Acevedo; Elizabeth, Hernández-Echeagaray

    2017-10-01

    The raw data showed in this article comes from the published research article entitled "Protective effects of Chlorogenic acid in 3-Nitropropionic acid induced toxicity and genotoxicity" Food Chem Toxicol. 2017 May 3. pii: S0278-6915(17)30226-0. DOI:10.1016/j.fct.2017.04.048. [1]. Data illustrates antitoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Chlorogenic acid (CGA) on toxicity and genotoxicity produced by the in vivo treatment with mitochondria toxin 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) in mice. Toxicity and genotoxicity was evaluated in erythrocytes of peripheral blood through the micronuclei assay. Data was share at the Elsevier repository under the reference number FCT9033.

  17. Zinc oxide nanoparticles and monocytes: Impact of size, charge and solubility on activation status

    SciTech Connect

    Prach, Morag; Stone, Vicki; Proudfoot, Lorna, E-mail: l.proudfoot@napier.ac.uk

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) particle induced cytotoxicity was dependent on size, charge and solubility, factors which at sublethal concentrations may influence the activation of the human monocytic cell line THP1. ZnO nanoparticles (NP; average diameter 70 nm) were more toxic than the bulk form (< 44 μm mesh) and a positive charge enhanced cytotoxicity of the NP despite their relatively high dissolution. A positive charge of the particles has been shown in other studies to have an influence on cell viability. Centrifugal filtration using a cut off of 5 kDa and Zn element analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy confirmed that exposuremore » of the ZnO particles and NP to 10% foetal bovine serum resulted in a strong association of the Zn{sup 2+} ion with protein. This association with protein may influence interaction of the ZnO particles and NP with THP1 cells. After 24 h exposure to the ZnO particles and NP at sublethal concentrations there was little effect on immunological markers of inflammation such as HLA DR and CD14, although they may induce a modest increase in the adhesion molecule CD11b. The cytokine TNFα is normally associated with proinflammatory immune responses but was not induced by the ZnO particles and NP. There was also no effect on LPS stimulated TNFα production. These results suggest that ZnO particles and NP do not have a classical proinflammatory effect on THP1 cells. -- Highlights: ► ZnO is cytotoxic to THP-1 monocytes. ► ZnO nanoparticles are more toxic than the bulk form. ► Positive charge enhances ZnO nanoparticle cytotoxicity. ► Sublethal doses of ZnO particles do not induce classical proinflammatory markers.« less

  18. Statistical optimization and artificial neural network modeling for acridine orange dye degradation using in-situ synthesized polymer capped ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Nitesh; Markandeya; Singh, Amrita; Verma, Neeraj K; Ajaria, Nidhi; Patnaik, Satyakam

    2017-05-01

    ZnO NPs were synthesized by a prudent green chemistry approach in presence of polyacrylamide grafted guar gum polymer (pAAm-g-GG) to ensure uniform morphology, and functionality and appraised for their ability to degrade photocatalytically Acridine Orange (AO) dye. These ZnO@pAAm-g-GG NPs were thoroughly characterized by various spectroscopic, XRD and electron microscopic techniques. The relative quantity of ZnO NPs in polymeric matrix has been estimated by spectro-analytical procedure; AAS and TGA analysis. The impact of process parameters viz. NP's dose, contact time and AO dye concentration on percentage photocatalytic degradation of AO dyes were evaluated using multivariate optimizing tools, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken Design (BBD) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). Congruity of the BBD statistical model was implied by R 2 value 0.9786 and F-value 35.48. At RSM predicted optimal condition viz. ZnO@pAAm-g-GG NP's dose of 0.2g/L, contact time of 210min and AO dye concentration 10mg/L, a maximum of 98% dye degradation was obtained. ANOVA indicated appropriateness of the model for dye degradation owing to "Prob.>F" less than 0.05 for variable parameters. We further, employed three layers feed forward ANN model for validating the BBD process parameters and suitability of our chosen model. The evaluation of Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (ANN1) and Gradient Descent with adaptive learning rate (ANN2) model employed to scrutinize the best method and found experimental values of AO dye degradation were in close to those with predicated value of ANN 2 modeling with minimum error. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fabrication of ZnO and doped ZnO waveguides deposited by Spin Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Rosmin Elsa; R, Neha P.; T, Shalu; C, Darshana K.; Sreelatha, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of ZnO and doped Zn1-xAgxO (where x=0.03) nanoparticles by co- precipitation is reported. The precursors used were Zinc Nitrate and Potassium hydroxide pellets. For doping, 3% AgNO3 in ZnNO3 was considered as a separate buffer solution. The prepared nanoparticles were subsequently spin coated onto silica glass substrates at a constant chuck rate of 3000 rpm. The substrate acts as the lower cladding of a waveguide structure. The upper cladding is assumed to be air in the present investigation. The nanostructures of the ZnO powders in the doped and undoped cases were studied using X-ray Diffraction patterns. There was a decrease in the grain size with doping which increase the tunability of the powders to be used as photoluminescent devices. The optical characteristics of the sample were also investigated using UV-Visible spectrophotometer at 200-900 nm wavelengths. The photoluminescence peaks also report a dramatic increase in intensity at the same wavelength for the doped case compared to the undoped one.

  20. Toxicity mechanism of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles against food pathogens.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubbu, G Devanand; Baskar, R; Anusuya, T; Seshan, C Arun; Chelliah, Ramachandran

    2016-12-01

    Food preservation is an important field of research. It extends the shelf life of major food products. Our current study is based on food preservation through TiO 2 and ZnO nanoparticles. TiO 2 and ZnO are biocompatible nanomaterial. The biocompatibility of the materials were established through toxicity studies on cell lines. Titanium dioxide and Zinc Oxide nanoparticle were synthesized by wet chemical process. They are characterized by X-Ray diffraction and TEM. The antibacterial activities of both the materials were analysed to ensure their effectiveness as food preservative against Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Shigella flexneri. The results indicates that TiO 2 and ZnO nanoparticle inhibits Salmonella, Klebsiella and Shigella. The mode of action is by the generation of ROS in cases of Salmonella, Klebsiella. Mode of action in Shigella is still unclear. It was also proved that TiO 2 and ZnO nanoparticle are biocompatible materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of soil pH on the toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles to the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Lofts, Stephen; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2013-12-01

    The effects of soil pH on the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus were evaluated. Isopods were exposed to a natural soil amended with CaCO3 to reach 3 different pH(CaCl2) levels (4.5, 6.2, and 7.3) and to standard LUFA 2.2 soil (pH 5.5) spiked with ZnO NPs (30 nm), non-nano ZnO (200 nm), and ionic Zn as ZnCl₂. Toxicity was expressed based on total Zn concentration in soil, as well as total Zn and free Zn²⁺ ion concentrations in porewater. Compared with ZnO-spiked soils, the ZnCl₂-spiked soils had lower pH and higher porewater Ca²⁺ and Zn levels. Isopod survival did not differ between Zn forms and soils, but survival was higher for isopods exposed to ZnO NPs at pH 4.5. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) for biomass change showed similar trends for all Zn forms in all soils, with higher values at intermediate pH. Median lethal concentration (LC50) and EC50 values based on porewater Zn or free Zn ion concentrations were much lower for ZnO than for ionic zinc. Zn body concentrations increased in a dose-related manner, but no effect of soil pH was found. It is suggested not only that dissolved or free Zn in porewater contributed to uptake and toxicity, but also that oral uptake (i.e., ingestion of soil particles) could be an important additional route of exposure. © 2013 SETAC.

  2. Development of preservative-free nanoparticles-based emulsions: Effects of NP surface properties and sterilization process.

    PubMed

    Rowenczyk, Laura; Picard, Céline; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Hucher, Nicolas; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Grisel, Michel

    2016-08-20

    Model emulsions were developed with or without commercial titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NP) carrying various surface treatments in order to get close physicochemical properties whatever the NP surface polarity (hydrophilic and hydrophobic). Rheology and texturometry highlighted that the macroscopic properties of the three formulated emulsions were similar. However, characterizations by optical microscopy, static light scattering and zetametry showed that their microstructures reflected the diversity of the incorporated NP surface properties. In order to use these model emulsions as tools for biological evaluations of the NP in use, they had to show the lowest initial microbiological charge and, specifically for the NP-free emulsion, the lowest bactericidal effect. Hence, formulae were developed preservative-free and a thermal sterilization step was conducted. Efficiency of the sterilization and its impact on the emulsion integrity were monitored. Results highlighted the effect of the NP surface properties: only the control emulsion and the emulsion containing hydrophilic NP fulfilled both requirements. To ensure the usability of these model emulsions as tools to evaluate the 'NP effect' on representative bacteria of the skin microflora (S. aureus and P. fluorescens), impact on the bacterial growth was measured on voluntary inoculated formulae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in BALB/c Mice by Feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The immune responses of 390 BALB/c mice fed the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51® and infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) were evaluated in a 6-month trial. Mice were randomized to nine treatment groups fed either viable- or heat-killed NP51 and inocula...

  4. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) Infection in BALB/c Mice by Feeding Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine effects of feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Mice were randomized to ten treatment groups; sentinels, control, heat-killed MAP, viable MAP, heat-killed NP51, viable ...

  5. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice by feeding probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine effects of feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease. We hypothesized that feeding NP51 would increase Th-1 responses and decrease prog...

  6. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) Infection in Balb/c Mice by Feeding Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine effects of feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease. We hypothesized that feeding NP51 would increase Th-1 responses and decrease prog...

  7. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in BALB/c mice by feeding probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine effects of feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspe