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Sample records for znse quantum dots

  1. Effects of multiple organic ligands on size uniformity and optical properties of ZnSe quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Archana, J., E-mail: archana.jayaram@yahoo.com; Navaneethan, M.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Highly monodispersed ZnSe quantum dots have been synthesized by wet chemical route. ► Strong quantum confinement effect have been observed in ∼ 4 nm ZnSe quantum dots. ► Enhanced ultraviolet near band emission have been obtained using long chain polymer. -- Abstract: The effects of multi-ligands on the formation and optical transitions of ZnSe quantum dots have been investigated. The dots are synthesized using 3-mercapto-1,2-propanediol and polyvinylpyrrolidone ligands, and have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. TEM reveals high monodispersion with an average size ofmore » 4 nm. Polymer-stabilized, organic ligand-passivated ZnSe quantum dots exhibit strong UV emission at 326 nm and strong quantum confinement in the UV–visible absorption spectrum. Uniform size and suppressed surface trap emission are observed when the polymer ligand is used. The possible growth mechanism is discussed.« less

  2. Aqueous synthesis of high bright and tunable near-infrared AgInSe2-ZnSe quantum dots for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Che, Dongchen; Zhu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Hongzhi; Duan, Yourong; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang

    2016-02-01

    Efficient synthetic methods for near-infrared quantum dots with good biophysical properties as bioimaging agents are urgently required. In this work, a simple and fast synthesis of highly luminescent, near-infrared AgInSe2-ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) with tunable emissions in aqueous media is reported. This method avoids high temperature and pressure and organic solvents to directly generate water-dispersible AgInSe2-ZnSe QDs. The photoluminescence emission peak of the AgInSe2-ZnSe QDs ranged from 625 to 940nm, with quantum yields up to 31%. The AgInSe2-ZnSe QDs with high quantum yield, near-infrared and low cytotoxic could be used as good cell labels, showing great potential applications in bio-imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of shift in energy of band edges and band gap of ZnSe spherical quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siboh, Dutem; Kalita, Pradip Kumar; Sarma, Jayanta Kumar; Nath, Nayan Mani

    2018-04-01

    We have determined the quantum confinement induced shifts in energy of band edges and band gap with respect to size of ZnSe spherical quantum dot employing an effective confinement potential model developed in our earlier communication "arXiv:1705.10343". We have also performed phenomenological analysis of our theoretical results in comparison with available experimental data and observe a very good agreement in this regard. Phenomenological success achieved in this regard confirms validity of the confining potential model as well as signifies the capability and applicability of the ansatz for the effective confining potential to have reasonable information in the study of real nano-structured spherical systems.

  4. Photogenerated carriers transport behaviors in L-cysteine capped ZnSe core-shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Qingsong; Li, Kuiying; Xue, Zhenjie; Lin, Yingying; Yin, Hua; Zhu, Ruiping

    2016-02-01

    The photoexcited carrier transport behavior of zinc selenide (ZnSe) quantum dots (QDs) with core-shell structure is studied because of their unique photoelectronic characteristics. The surface photovoltaic (SPV) properties of self-assembled ZnSe/ZnS/L-Cys core-shell QDs were probed via electric field induced surface photovoltage and transient photovoltage (TPV) measurements supplemented by Fourier transform infrared, laser Raman, absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopies. The ZnSe QDs displayed p-type SPV characteristics with a broader stronger SPV response over the whole ultraviolet-to-near-infrared range compared with those of other core-shell QDs in the same group. The relationship between the SPV phase value of the QDs and external bias was revealed in their SPV phase spectrum. The wide transient photovoltage response region from 3.3 × 10-8 to 2 × 10-3 s was closely related to the long diffusion distance of photoexcited free charge carriers in the interfacial space-charge region of the QDs. The strong SPV response corresponding to the ZnSe core mainly originated from an obvious quantum tunneling effect in the QDs.

  5. ZnSe quantum dots modified with a Ni(cyclam) catalyst for efficient visible-light driven CO2 reduction in water.

    PubMed

    Kuehnel, Moritz F; Sahm, Constantin D; Neri, Gaia; Lee, Jonathan R; Orchard, Katherine L; Cowan, Alexander J; Reisner, Erwin

    2018-03-07

    A precious metal and Cd-free photocatalyst system for efficient CO 2 reduction in water is reported. The hybrid assembly consists of ligand-free ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) as a visible-light photosensitiser combined with a phosphonic acid-functionalised Ni(cyclam) catalyst, NiCycP. This precious metal-free photocatalyst system shows a high activity for aqueous CO 2 reduction to CO (Ni-based TON CO > 120), whereas an anchor-free catalyst, Ni(cyclam)Cl 2 , produced three times less CO. Additional ZnSe surface modification with 2-(dimethylamino)ethanethiol (MEDA) partially suppresses H 2 generation and enhances the CO production allowing for a Ni-based TON CO of > 280 and more than 33% selectivity for CO 2 reduction over H 2 evolution, after 20 h visible light irradiation ( λ > 400 nm, AM 1.5G, 1 sun). The external quantum efficiency of 3.4 ± 0.3% at 400 nm is comparable to state-of-the-art precious metal photocatalysts. Transient absorption spectroscopy showed that band-gap excitation of ZnSe QDs is followed by rapid hole scavenging and very fast electron trapping in ZnSe. The trapped electrons transfer to NiCycP on the ps timescale, explaining the high performance for photocatalytic CO 2 reduction. With this work we introduce ZnSe QDs as an inexpensive and efficient visible light-absorber for solar fuel generation.

  6. Structural, morphological and optical properties of ZnSe quantum dot thin films.

    PubMed

    Zedan, I T; Azab, A A; El-Menyawy, E M

    2016-02-05

    ZnSe powder was prepared via hydrothermal technique using zinc acetate and sodium selenite as source materials. The prepared ZnSe powder was used for preparing film with different thickness values (95, 135 and 230 nm) via thermal evaporation technique. X-ray diffraction showed that the prepared powder has cubic zinc-blende structure with a space group, F43m. The high resolution transmittance electron microscope results show that the films are composed of spherical-shaped nanoparticles with a diameter in the range of 2-8 nm. The optical properties of ZnSe films with differing thicknesses are investigated by means of spectrophotometric measurements of the photoluminescence, transmittance and reflectance. The absorption coefficient of the films is calculated and the optical band gap is estimated. The refractive index of the films is determined and its normal dispersion behavior is analyzed on the basis of a single oscillator model, in which oscillator energy, dispersion energy and dielectric constant at high frequency are evaluated. Drude model is also applied to determine the lattice dielectric constant and the ratio of the carriers' concentration to their effective mass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between ZnSe ZnS quantum dots and bovine serum albumin in bioaffinity assays of anticancer drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chang; Ding, Li; Zhong, Wenying

    2014-10-01

    In the current work, using ZnSe ZnS quantum dots (QDs) as representative nanoparticles, the affinities of seven anticancer drugs for bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The FRET efficiency of BSA-QD conjugates can reach as high as 24.87% by electrostatic interaction. The higher binding constant (3.63 × 107 L mol-1) and number of binding sites (1.75) between ZnSe ZnS QDs and BSA demonstrated that the QDs could easily associate to plasma proteins and enhance the transport efficacy of drugs. The magnitude of binding constants (103-106 L mol-1), in the presence of QDs, was between drugs-BSA and drugs-QDs in agreement with common affinities of drugs for serum albumins (104-106 L mol-1) in vivo. ZnSe ZnS QDs significantly increased the affinities for BSA of Vorinostat (SAHA), Docetaxel (DOC), Carmustine (BCNU), Doxorubicin (Dox) and 10-Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT). However, they slightly reduced the affinities of Vincristine (VCR) and Methotrexate (MTX) for BSA. The recent work will not only provide useful information for appropriately understanding the binding affinity and binding mechanism at the molecular level, but also illustrate the ZnSe ZnS QDs are perfect candidates for nanoscal drug delivery system (DDS).

  8. Cadmium-free aqueous synthesis of ZnSe and ZnSe@ZnS core-shell quantum dots and their differential bioanalyte sensing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Irshad Ahmad; Rawat, Kamla; Bohidar, H. B.

    2016-10-01

    Herein we report a facile and cadmium-free approach to prepare water-soluble fluorescent ZnSe@ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs), using thioglycolic acid (TGA) ligand as a stabilizer and thiourea as a sulfur source. The optical properties and morphology of the obtained core-shell QDs were characterized by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), x-ray diffraction (XRD), electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. TEM analysis, and electrophoresis data showed that ZnSe core had an average size of 3.60 ± 0.12 nm and zeta potential of -38 mV; and for ZnSe@ZnS QDs, the mean size was 4.80 ± 0.20 nm and zeta potential was -45 mV. Compared to the core ZnSe QDs, the quantum yield of these core-shell structures was higher (13% versus 32%). These were interacted with five common bioanalytes such as, ascorbic acid, citric acid, oxalic acid, glucose and cholesterol which revealed fluorescence quenching due to concentration dependent binding of analytes to the core only, and core-shell QDs. The binding pattern followed the sequence: cholesterol < glucose < ascorbic acid < oxalic acid < citric acid for ZnSe, and cholesterol < glucose < oxalic acid < ascorbic acid < citric acid for core-shell QDs. Thus, enhanced binding was noticed for the analyte citric acid which may facilitate development of a fluorescence-based sensor based on the ZnSe core-only quantum dot platform. Further, the hydrophilic core-shell structure may find use in cell imaging applications.

  9. Ratiometric Phosphorescent Probe for Thallium in Serum, Water, and Soil Samples Based on Long-Lived, Spectrally Resolved, Mn-Doped ZnSe Quantum Dots and Carbon Dots.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Jinyi; Xie, Ya-Ni; Zhang, Xinfeng; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Peng

    2018-02-20

    Thallium (Tl) is an extremely toxic heavy metal and exists in very low concentrations in the environment, but its sensing is largely underexplored as compared to its neighboring elements in the periodic table (especially mercury and lead). In this work, we developed a ratiometric phosphorescent nanoprobe for thallium detection based on Mn-doped ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) and water-soluble carbon dots (C-dots). Upon excitation with 360 nm, Mn-doped ZnSe QDs and C-dots can emit long-lived and spectrally resolved phosphorescence at 580 and 440 nm, respectively. In the presence of thallium, the phosphorescence emission from Mn-doped ZnSe QDs could be selectively quenched, while that from C-dots retained unchanged. Therefore, a ratiometric phosphorescent probe was thus developed, which can eliminate the potential influence from both background fluorescence and other analyte-independent external environment factors. Several other heavy metal ions caused interferences to thallium detection but could be efficiently masked with EDTA. The proposed method offered a detection limit of 1 μg/L, which is among the most sensitive probes ever reported. Successful application of this method for thallium detection in biological serum as well as in environmental water and soil samples was demonstrated.

  10. Synthesis of ZnSe and ZnSe:Cu quantum dots by a room temperature photochemical (UV-assisted) approach using Na2 SeO3 as Se source and investigating optical properties.

    PubMed

    Khafajeh, R; Molaei, M; Karimipour, M

    2017-06-01

    In this study, ZnSe and ZnSe:Cu quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized using Na 2 SeO 3 as the Se source by a rapid and room temperature photochemical (UV-assisted) approach. Thioglycolic acid (TGA) was employed as the capping agent and UV illumination activated the chemical reactions. Synthesized QDs were successfully characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). XRD analysis demonstrated the cubic zinc blend phase QDs. TEM images indicated that round-shaped particles were formed, most of which had a diameter of about 4 nm. The band gap of the ZnSe QDs was higher than that for ZnSe in bulk. PL spectra indicated an emission with three peaks related to the excitonic, surface trap states and deep level (DL) states. The band gap and QD emission were tunable only by UV illumination time during synthesis. ZnSe:Cu showed green emission due to transition of electrons from the Conduction band (CB) or surface trap states to the 2 T 2 acceptor levels of Cu 2 + . The emission was increased by increasing the Cu 2 + ion concentration, such that the optimal value of PL intensity was obtained for the nominal mole ratio of Cu:Zn 1.5%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  12. Synthesis of quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    McDaniel, Hunter

    2017-10-17

    Common approaches to synthesizing alloyed quantum dots employ high-cost, air-sensitive phosphine complexes as the selenium precursor. Disclosed quantum dot synthesis embodiments avoid these hazardous and air-sensitive selenium precursors. Certain embodiments utilize a combination comprising a thiol and an amine that together reduce and complex the elemental selenium to form a highly reactive selenium precursor at room temperature. The same combination of thiol and amine acts as the reaction solvent, stabilizing ligand, and sulfur source in the synthesis of quantum dot cores. A non-injection approach may also be used. The optical properties of the quantum dots synthesized by this new approach can be finely tuned for a variety of applications by controlling size and/or composition of size and composition. Further, using the same approach, a shell can be grown around a quantum dot core that improves stability, luminescence efficiency, and may reduce toxicity.

  13. Double quantum dot memristor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Holloway, Gregory W.; Benjamin, Simon C.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Baugh, Jonathan; Mol, Jan A.

    2017-08-01

    Memristive systems are generalizations of memristors, which are resistors with memory. In this paper, we present a quantum description of quantum dot memristive systems. Using this model we propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and practical scheme for realizing memristive systems with quantum dots. The approach harnesses a phenomenon that is commonly seen as a bane of nanoelectronics, i.e., switching of a trapped charge in the vicinity of the device. We show that quantum dot memristive systems have hysteresis current-voltage characteristics and quantum jump-induced stochastic behavior. While our experiment requires low temperatures, the same setup could, in principle, be realized with a suitable single-molecule transistor and operated at or near room temperature.

  14. Quantum Dot Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnischtzke, Laura A.

    We report on several experiments using single excitons confined to single semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Electric and magnetic fields have previously been used as experimental knobs to understand and control individual excitons in single quantum dots. We realize new ways of electric field control by changing materials and device geometry in the first two experiments with strain-based InAs QDs. A standard Schottky diode heterostructure is demonstrated with graphene as the Schottky gate material, and its performance is bench-marked against a diode with a standard gate material, semi-transparent nickel-chromium (NiCr). This change of materials increases the photon collection rate by eliminating absorption in the metallic NiCr layer. A second set of experiments investigates the electric field response of QDs as a possible metrology source. A linear voltage potential drop in a plane near the QDs is used to describe how the spatially varying voltage profile is also imparted on the QDs. We demonstrate a procedure to map this voltage profile as a preliminary route towards a full quantum sensor array. Lastly, InAs QDs are explored as potential spin-photon interfaces. We describe how a magnetic field is used to realize a reversible exchange of information between light and matter, including a discussion of the polarization-dependence of the photoluminesence, and how that can be linked to the spin of a resident electron or hole. We present evidence of this in two wavelength regimes for InAs quantum dots, and discuss how an external magnetic field informs the spin physics of these 2-level systems. This thesis concludes with the discovery of a new class of quantum dots. As-yet unidentified defect states in single layer tungsten diselenide (WSe 2 ) are shown to host quantum light emission. We explore the spatial extent of electron confinement and tentatively identify a radiative lifetime of 1 ns for these single photon emitters.

  15. Quantum dots and nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Herman Sander

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), also known as semiconducting nanoparticles, are promising zero-dimensional advanced materials because of their nanoscale size and because they can be engineered to suit particular applications such as nonlinear optical devices (NLO), electro-optical devices, and computing applications. QDs can be joined to polymers in order to produce nanocomposites which can be considered a scientific revolution of the 21st century. One of the fastest moving and most exciting interfaces of nanotechnology is the use of QDs in medicine, cell and molecular biology. Recent advances in nanomaterials have produced a new class of markers and probes by conjugating semiconductor QDs with biomolecules that have affinities for binding with selected biological structures. The nanoscale of QDs ensures that they do not scatter light at visible or longer wavelengths, which is important in order to minimize optical losses in practical applications. Moreover, at this scale, quantum confinement and surface effects become very important and therefore manipulation of the dot diameter or modification of its surface allows the properties of the dot to be controlled. Quantum confinement affects the absorption and emission of photons from the dot. Thus, the absorption edge of a material can be tuned by control of the particle size. This paper reviews developments in the myriad of possibilities for the use of semiconductor QDs associated with molecules producing novel hybrid nanocomposite systems for nanomedicine and bioengineering applications.

  16. PREFACE: Quantum Dot 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert A.

    2010-09-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at Quantum Dot 2010 (QD2010). The conference was held in Nottingham, UK, on 26-30 April 2010. The conference addressed topics in research on: 1. Epitaxial quantum dots (including self-assembled and interface structures, dots defined by electrostatic gates etc): optical properties and electron transport quantum coherence effects spin phenomena optics of dots in cavities interaction with surface plasmons in metal/semiconductor structures opto-electronics applications 2. Novel QD structures: fabrication and physics of graphene dots, dots in nano-wires etc 3. Colloidal quantum dots: growth (shape control and hybrid nanocrystals such as metal/semiconductor, magnetic/semiconductor) assembly and surface functionalisation optical properties and spin dynamics electrical and magnetic properties applications (light emitting devices and solar cells, biological and medical applications, data storage, assemblers) The Editors Acknowledgements Conference Organising Committee: Maurice Skolnick (Chair) Alexander Tartakovskii (Programme Chair) Pavlos Lagoudakis (Programme Chair) Max Migliorato (Conference Secretary) Paola Borri (Publicity) Robert Taylor (Proceedings) Manus Hayne (Treasurer) Ray Murray (Sponsorship) Mohamed Henini (Local Organiser) International Advisory Committee: Yasuhiko Arakawa (Tokyo University, Japan) Manfred Bayer (Dortmund University, Germany) Sergey Gaponenko (Stepanov Institute of Physics, Minsk, Belarus) Pawel Hawrylak (NRC, Ottawa, Canada) Fritz Henneberger (Institute for Physics, Berlin, Germany) Atac Imamoglu (ETH, Zurich, Switzerland) Paul Koenraad (TU Eindhoven, Nethehrlands) Guglielmo Lanzani (Politecnico di Milano, Italy) Jungil Lee (Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Korea) Henri Mariette (CNRS-CEA, Grenoble, France) Lu Jeu Sham (San Diego, USA) Andrew Shields (Toshiba Research Europe, Cambridge, UK) Yoshihisa Yamamoto (Stanford University, USA) Artur

  17. Investigation of Quantum Dot Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-09

    Accomplishments: • Introduction Since the first demonstration of room-temperature operation of self-assembled quantum-dot (QD) lasers about a...regions (JGaAs), wetting layer (JWL), and Auger recombination in the dots ( JAug ). for the present 1.3µm dots, the temperature invariant measured

  18. Phosphorene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnoi, Pratap; Mazumder, Madhulika; Barua, Manaswee; Pati, Swapan K.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2018-05-01

    Phosphorene, a two-dimensional material, has been a subject of recent investigations. In the present study, we have prepared blue fluorescent phosphorene quantum dots (PQDs) by liquid phase exfoliation of black phosphorus in two non-polar solvents, toluene and mesitylene. The average particle sizes of PQDs decrease from 5.0 to 1.0 nm on increasing the sonicator power from 150 to 225 W. The photoluminescence spectrum of the PQDs is red-shifted in the 395-470 nm range on increasing the excitation-wavelength from 300 to 480 nm. Electron donor and acceptor molecules quench the photoluminescence, with the acceptors showing more marked effects.

  19. Quantum soldering of individual quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Roy, Xavier; Schenck, Christine L; Ahn, Seokhoon; Lalancette, Roger A; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin; Steigerwald, Michael L

    2012-12-07

    Making contact to a quantum dot: Single quantum-dot electronic circuits are fabricated by wiring atomically precise metal chalcogenide clusters with conjugated molecular connectors. These wired clusters can couple electronically to nanoscale electrodes and be tuned to control the charge-transfer characteristics (see picture). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Clinical Potential of Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Iga, Arthur M.; Robertson, John H. P.; Winslet, Marc C.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have led to the development of novel fluorescent probes called quantum dots. Quantum dots have revolutionalized the processes of tagging molecules within research settings and are improving sentinel lymph node mapping and identification in vivo studies. As the unique physical and chemical properties of these fluorescent probes are being unraveled, new potential methods of early cancer detection, rapid spread and therapeutic management, that is, photodynamic therapy are being explored. Encouraging results of optical and real time identification of sentinel lymph nodes and lymph flow using quantum dots in vivo models are emerging. Quantum dots have also superseded many of the limitations of organic fluorophores and are a promising alternative as a research tool. In this review, we examine the promising clinical potential of quantum dots, their hindrances for clinical use and the current progress in abrogating their inherent toxicity. PMID:18317518

  1. Graphene based quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H G; Hu, H; Pan, Y; Mao, J H; Gao, M; Guo, H M; Du, S X; Greber, T; Gao, H-J

    2010-08-04

    Laterally localized electronic states are identified on a single layer of graphene on ruthenium by low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The individual states are separated by 3 nm and comprise regions of about 90 carbon atoms. This constitutes a highly regular quantum dot-array with molecular precision. It is evidenced by quantum well resonances (QWRs) with energies that relate to the corrugation of the graphene layer. The dI/dV conductance spectra are modeled by a layer height dependent potential-well with a delta-function potential that describes the barrier for electron penetration into graphene. The resulting QWRs are strongest and lowest in energy on the isolated 'hill' regions with a diameter of 2 nm, where the graphene is decoupled from the surface.

  2. Self-assembled inorganic clusters of semiconducting quantum dots for effective solar hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Ji; Yang, Yichen; Li, Xu-Bing; Wu, Hao-Lin; Meng, Shu-Lin; Wang, Yang; Guo, Qing; Huang, Mao-Yong; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2018-05-08

    Owing to promoted electron-hole separation, the catalytic activity of semiconducting quantum dots (QDs) towards solar hydrogen (H2) production has been significantly enhanced by forming self-assembled clusters with ZnSe QDs made ex situ. Taking advantage of the favored interparticle hole transfer to ZnSe QDs, the rate of solar H2 evolution of CdSe QDs can be increased to ∼30 000 μmol h-1 g-1 with ascorbic acid as the sacrificial reagent, ∼150-fold higher than that of bare CdSe QDs clusters under the same conditions.

  3. Magnetic field insensitive photoluminescence decay of ZnSe/CdS core/shell type-II colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woojin; Park, Seongho; Murayama, Akihiro; Lee, Jong-soo; Kyhm, Kwangseuk

    2018-06-01

    We have synthesized ZnSe/CdS core/shell type-II colloidal quantum dots, where an electron and a hole are separated in the CdS shell and the ZnSe core, respectively. Our theoretical model has revealed that absorbance spectrum of bare ZnSe quantum dots in 2 nm radius becomes broadened with a large redshift (∼1.15 eV) when the electron in ZnSe core is separated by 3.2 nm CdS shell. Also, we found that our type-II QDs are insensitive to an external magnetic field up to 5 T in terms of central emission energy, degree of polarization, and photoluminescence decay time. This can be attributed to the electron–hole charge separation in a type-II structure, whereby the suppressed exchange interaction gives rise to a magnetic insensitivity with a small energy difference between the bright and dark exciton states.

  4. Optically active quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  5. Quantum dot quantum cascade infrared photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue-Jiao; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Zhuo, Ning

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate an InAs quantum dot quantum cascade infrared photodetector operating at room temperature with a peak detection wavelength of 4.3 μm. The detector shows sensitive photoresponse for normal-incidence light, which is attributed to an intraband transition of the quantum dots and the following transfer of excited electrons on a cascade of quantum levels. The InAs quantum dots for the infrared absorption were formed by making use of self-assembled quantum dots in the Stranski–Krastanov growth mode and two-step strain-compensation design based on InAs/GaAs/InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure, while the following extraction quantum stairs formed by LO-phonon energy are based on a strain-compensated InGaAs/InAlAs chirpedmore » superlattice. Johnson noise limited detectivities of 3.64 × 10{sup 11} and 4.83 × 10{sup 6} Jones at zero bias were obtained at 80 K and room temperature, respectively. Due to the low dark current and distinct photoresponse up to room temperature, this device can form high temperature imaging.« less

  6. Quantum dot in interacting environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylands, Colin; Andrei, Natan

    2018-04-01

    A quantum impurity attached to an interacting quantum wire gives rise to an array of new phenomena. Using the Bethe Ansatz we solve exactly models describing two geometries of a quantum dot coupled to an interacting quantum wire: a quantum dot that is (i) side coupled and (ii) embedded in a Luttinger liquid. We find the eigenstates and determine the spectrum through the Bethe Ansatz equations. Using this we derive exact expressions for the ground-state dot occupation. The thermodynamics are then studied using the thermodynamics Bethe Ansatz equations. It is shown that at low energies the dot becomes fully hybridized and acts as a backscattering impurity or tunnel junction depending on the geometry and furthermore that the two geometries are related by changing the sign of the interactions. Although remaining strongly coupled for all values of the interaction in the wire, there exists competition between the tunneling and backscattering leading to a suppression or enhancement of the dot occupation depending on the sign of the bulk interactions.

  7. Chiral Graphene Quantum Dots

    DOE PAGES

    Suzuki, Nozomu; Wang, Yichun; Elvati, Paolo; ...

    2016-01-15

    Chiral nanostructures from metals and semiconductors attract wide interest as components for polarization-enabled optoelectronic devices. Similarly to other fields of nanotechnology, graphene-based materials can greatly enrich physical and chemical phenomena associated with optical and electronic properties of chiral nanostructures and facilitate their applications in biology as well as other areas. Here, we report that covalent attachment of l/d-cysteine moieties to the edges of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) leads to their helical buckling due to chiral interactions at the “crowded” edges. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the GQDs revealed bands at ca. 210–220 and 250–265 nm that changed their signs formore » different chirality of the cysteine edge ligands. The high-energy chiroptical peaks at 210–220 nm correspond to the hybridized molecular orbitals involving the chiral center of amino acids and atoms of graphene edges. Diverse experimental and modeling data, including density functional theory calculations of CD spectra with probabilistic distribution of GQD isomers, indicate that the band at 250–265 nm originates from the three-dimensional twisting of the graphene sheet and can be attributed to the chiral excitonic transitions. The positive and negative low-energy CD bands correspond to the left and right helicity of GQDs, respectively. Exposure of liver HepG2 cells to l/d-GQDs reveals their general biocompatibility and a noticeable difference in the toxicity of the stereoisomers. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that d-GQDs have a stronger tendency to accumulate within the cellular membrane than l-GQDs. Finally, emergence of nanoscale chirality in GQDs decorated with biomolecules is expected to be a general stereochemical phenomenon for flexible sheets of nanomaterials.« less

  8. Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snider, Gregory

    2000-03-01

    Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) [1] is a promising architecture which employs quantum dots for digital computation. It is a revolutionary approach that holds the promise of high device density and low power dissipation. A basic QCA cell consists of four quantum dots coupled capacitively and by tunnel barriers. The cell is biased to contain two excess electrons within the four dots, which are forced to opposite "corners" of the four-dot cell by mutual Coulomb repulsion. These two possible polarization states of the cell will represent logic "0" and "1". Properly arranged, arrays of these basic cells can implement Boolean logic functions. Experimental results from functional QCA devices built of nanoscale metal dots defined by tunnel barriers will be presented. The experimental devices to be presented consist of Al islands, which we will call quantum dots, interconnected by tunnel junctions and lithographically defined capacitors. Aluminum/ aluminum-oxide/aluminum tunnel junctions were fabricated using a standard e-beam lithography and shadow evaporation technique. The experiments were performed in a dilution refrigerator at a temperature of 70 mK. The operation of a cell is evaluated by direct measurements of the charge state of dots within a cell as the input voltage is changed. The experimental demonstration of a functioning cell will be presented. A line of three cells demonstrates that there are no metastable switching states in a line of cells. A QCA majority gate will also be presented, which is a programmable AND/OR gate and represents the basic building block of QCA systems. The results of recent experiments will be presented. 1. C.S. Lent, P.D. Tougaw, W. Porod, and G.H. Bernstein, Nanotechnology, 4, 49 (1993).

  9. Quantum Dots for Molecular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    True, Lawrence D.; Gao, Xiaohu

    2007-01-01

    Assessing malignant tumors for expression of multiple biomarkers provides data that are critical for patient management. Quantum dot-conjugated probes to specific biomarkers are powerful tools that can be applied in a multiplex manner to single tissue sections of biopsies to measure expression levels of multiple biomarkers. PMID:17251330

  10. Optical Fiber Sensing Using Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Pedro; Martins, Manuel António; Trindade, Tito; Santos, José Luís; Farahi, Faramarz

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, as biochemical sensors are reviewed. Quantum dots have unique optical properties that make them promising alternatives to traditional dyes in many luminescence based bioanalytical techniques. An overview of the more relevant progresses in the application of quantum dots as biochemical probes is addressed. Special focus will be given to configurations where the sensing dots are incorporated in solid membranes and immobilized in optical fibers or planar waveguide platforms. PMID:28903308

  11. A high-temperature single-photon source from nanowire quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tribu, Adrien; Sallen, Gregory; Aichele, Thomas; André, Régis; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Bougerol, Catherine; Tatarenko, Serge; Kheng, Kuntheak

    2008-12-01

    We present a high-temperature single-photon source based on a quantum dot inside a nanowire. The nanowires were grown by molecular beam epitaxy in the vapor-liquid-solid growth mode. We utilize a two-step process that allows a thin, defect-free ZnSe nanowire to grow on top of a broader, cone-shaped nanowire. Quantum dots are formed by incorporating a narrow zone of CdSe into the nanowire. We observe intense and highly polarized photoluminescence even from a single emitter. Efficient photon antibunching is observed up to 220 K, while conserving a normalized antibunching dip of at most 36%. This is the highest reported temperature for single-photon emission from a nonblinking quantum-dot source and principally allows compact and cheap operation by using Peltier cooling.

  12. Designing quantum dots for solotronics.

    PubMed

    Kobak, J; Smoleński, T; Goryca, M; Papaj, M; Gietka, K; Bogucki, A; Koperski, M; Rousset, J-G; Suffczyński, J; Janik, E; Nawrocki, M; Golnik, A; Kossacki, P; Pacuski, W

    2014-01-01

    Solotronics, optoelectronics based on solitary dopants, is an emerging field of research and technology reaching the ultimate limit of miniaturization. It aims at exploiting quantum properties of individual ions or defects embedded in a semiconductor matrix. It has already been shown that optical control of a magnetic ion spin is feasible using the carriers confined in a quantum dot. However, a serious obstacle was the quenching of the exciton luminescence by magnetic impurities. Here we show, by photoluminescence studies on thus-far-unexplored individual CdTe dots with a single cobalt ion and CdSe dots with a single manganese ion, that even if energetically allowed, nonradiative exciton recombination through single-magnetic-ion intra-ionic transitions is negligible in such zero-dimensional structures. This opens solotronics for a wide range of as yet unconsidered systems. On the basis of results of our single-spin relaxation experiments and on the material trends, we identify optimal magnetic-ion quantum dot systems for implementation of a single-ion-based spin memory.

  13. Designing quantum dots for solotronics

    PubMed Central

    Kobak, J.; Smoleński, T.; Goryca, M.; Papaj, M.; Gietka, K.; Bogucki, A.; Koperski, M.; Rousset, J.-G.; Suffczyński, J.; Janik, E.; Nawrocki, M.; Golnik, A.; Kossacki, P.; Pacuski, W.

    2014-01-01

    Solotronics, optoelectronics based on solitary dopants, is an emerging field of research and technology reaching the ultimate limit of miniaturization. It aims at exploiting quantum properties of individual ions or defects embedded in a semiconductor matrix. It has already been shown that optical control of a magnetic ion spin is feasible using the carriers confined in a quantum dot. However, a serious obstacle was the quenching of the exciton luminescence by magnetic impurities. Here we show, by photoluminescence studies on thus-far-unexplored individual CdTe dots with a single cobalt ion and CdSe dots with a single manganese ion, that even if energetically allowed, nonradiative exciton recombination through single-magnetic-ion intra-ionic transitions is negligible in such zero-dimensional structures. This opens solotronics for a wide range of as yet unconsidered systems. On the basis of results of our single-spin relaxation experiments and on the material trends, we identify optimal magnetic-ion quantum dot systems for implementation of a single-ion-based spin memory. PMID:24463946

  14. Hydrogenic impurity bound polaron in an anisotropic quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi-Hua

    2018-01-01

    The effect of the electron-phonon interaction on an electron bound to a hydrogenic impurity in a three-dimensional (3D) anisotropic quantum dot (QD) is studied theoretically. We use the Landau-Pekar variational approach to calculate the binding energy of ground state (GS) and first-excited state (ES) with considering electron-phonon interaction. The expressions of the GS and ES energies under investigation depict a rich variety of dependent relationship with the variational parameters in three different limiting cases. Numerical calculations were performed for ZnSe QDs with different confinement lengths in the xy-plane and the z-direction, respectively. It is illustrated that binding energies of impurity polarons corresponding to each level are larger in small QDs. Furthermore, the contribution to binding energy from phonon is about 15% of the total binding energy.

  15. Thermoelectric energy harvesting with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sothmann, Björn; Sánchez, Rafael; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    We review recent theoretical work on thermoelectric energy harvesting in multi-terminal quantum-dot setups. We first discuss several examples of nanoscale heat engines based on Coulomb-coupled conductors. In particular, we focus on quantum dots in the Coulomb-blockade regime, chaotic cavities and resonant tunneling through quantum dots and wells. We then turn toward quantum-dot heat engines that are driven by bosonic degrees of freedom such as phonons, magnons and microwave photons. These systems provide interesting connections to spin caloritronics and circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  16. A tunable few electron triple quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudreau, L.; Kam, A.; Granger, G.; Studenikin, S. A.; Zawadzki, P.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we report on a tunable few electron lateral triple quantum dot design. The quantum dot potentials are arranged in series. The device is aimed at studies of triple quantum dot properties where knowing the exact number of electrons is important as well as quantum information applications involving electron spin qubits. We demonstrate tuning strategies for achieving required resonant conditions such as quadruple points where all three quantum dots are on resonance. We find that in such a device resonant conditions at specific configurations are accompanied by complex charge transfer behavior.

  17. Multi-Excitonic Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibner, M.; Stinaff, E. A.; Doty, M. F.; Ware, M. E.; Bracker, A. S.; Gammon, D.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Reinecke, T. L.; Korenev, V. L.

    2006-03-01

    With the ability to create coupled pairs of quantum dots, the next step towards the realization of semiconductor based quantum information processing devices can be taken. However, so far little knowledge has been gained on these artificial molecules. Our photoluminescence experiments on single InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules provide the systematics of coupled quantum dots by delineating the spectroscopic features of several key charge configurations in such quantum systems, including X, X^+,X^2+, XX, XX^+ (with X being the neutral exciton). We extract general rules which determine the formation of molecular states of coupled quantum dots. These include the fact that quantum dot molecules provide the possibility to realize various spin configurations and to switch the electron hole exchange interaction on and off by shifting charges inside the molecule. This knowledge will be valuable in developing implementations for quantum information processing.

  18. Charge reconfiguration in arrays of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Johannes C.; Wagner, Timo; Rugeramigabo, Eddy P.; Haug, Rolf J.

    2017-12-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are potential building blocks for scalable qubit architectures. Efficient control over the exchange interaction and the possibility of coherently manipulating electron states are essential ingredients towards this goal. We studied experimentally the shuttling of electrons trapped in serial quantum dot arrays isolated from the reservoirs. The isolation hereby enables a high degree of control over the tunnel couplings between the quantum dots, while electrons can be transferred through the array by gate voltage variations. Model calculations are compared with our experimental results for double, triple, and quadruple quantum dot arrays. We are able to identify all transitions observed in our experiments, including cotunneling transitions between distant quantum dots. The shuttling of individual electrons between quantum dots along chosen paths is demonstrated.

  19. Ultralow Noise Monolithic Quantum Dot Photonic Oscillators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-28

    HBCU/MI) ULTRALOW NOISE MONOLITHIC QUANTUM DOT PHOTONIC OSCILLATORS LUKE LESTER UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO 10/28/2013 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A...TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 24-10-2013 Final 01-06-2010 to 31-05-2013 Ultralow Noise Monolithic Quantum Dot Photonic Oscillators FA9550-10-1-0276...277-7647 Reset Grant Title: ULTRALOW NOISE MONOLITHIC QUANTUM DOT PHOTONIC OSCILLATORS Grant/Contract Number: FA9550-10-1-0276 Final Performance

  20. Optical signatures of coupled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Stinaff, E A; Scheibner, M; Bracker, A S; Ponomarev, I V; Korenev, V L; Ware, M E; Doty, M F; Reinecke, T L; Gammon, D

    2006-02-03

    An asymmetric pair of coupled InAs quantum dots is tuned into resonance by applying an electric field so that a single hole forms a coherent molecular wave function. The optical spectrum shows a rich pattern of level anticrossings and crossings that can be understood as a superposition of charge and spin configurations of the two dots. Coulomb interactions shift the molecular resonance of the optically excited state (charged exciton) with respect to the ground state (single charge), enabling light-induced coupling of the quantum dots. This result demonstrates the possibility of optically coupling quantum dots for application in quantum information processing.

  1. Optical Signatures of Coupled Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinaff, E. A.; Scheibner, M.; Bracker, A. S.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Korenev, V. L.; Ware, M. E.; Doty, M. F.; Reinecke, T. L.; Gammon, D.

    2006-02-01

    An asymmetric pair of coupled InAs quantum dots is tuned into resonance by applying an electric field so that a single hole forms a coherent molecular wave function. The optical spectrum shows a rich pattern of level anticrossings and crossings that can be understood as a superposition of charge and spin configurations of the two dots. Coulomb interactions shift the molecular resonance of the optically excited state (charged exciton) with respect to the ground state (single charge), enabling light-induced coupling of the quantum dots. This result demonstrates the possibility of optically coupling quantum dots for application in quantum information processing.

  2. Chiral quantum dot based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the use of stereospecific chiral stabilising molecules has also opened another avenue of interest in the area of quantum dot (QD) research. The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important quantum dot materials containing chiral defects, study their properties and explore their applications. The utilisation of chiral penicillamine stabilisers allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS quantum nanostructures which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. It was also demonstrated that all three types of QDs (D-, L-, and Rac penicillamine stabilised) show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. In this work the chiral CdS based quantum nanostructures have also been doped by copper metal ions and new chiral penicilamine stabilized CuS nanoparticles have been prepared and investigated. It was found that copper doping had a strong effect at low levels in the synthesis of chiral CdS nanostructures. We expect that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in biotechnology, sensing and asymmetric synthesis.

  3. Optical Spectroscopy Of Charged Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibner, M.; Bracker, A. S.; Stinaff, E. A.; Doty, M. F.; Gammon, D.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Reinecke, T. L.; Korenev, V. L.

    2007-04-01

    Coupling between two closely spaced quantum dots is observed by means of photoluminescence spectroscopy. Hole coupling is realized by rational crystal growth and heterostructure design. We identify molecular resonances of different excitonic charge states, including the important case of a doubly charged quantum dot molecule.

  4. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos, NM; Chen, Yongfen [Eugene, OR; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos, NM; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  5. Excitonic quantum interference in a quantum dot chain with rings.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suc-Kyoung; Nam, Seog Woo; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang

    2008-04-16

    We demonstrate excitonic quantum interference in a closely spaced quantum dot chain with nanorings. In the resonant dipole-dipole interaction model with direct diagonalization method, we have found a peculiar feature that the excitation of specified quantum dots in the chain is completely inhibited, depending on the orientational configuration of the transition dipole moments and specified initial preparation of the excitation. In practice, these excited states facilitating quantum interference can provide a conceptual basis for quantum interference devices of excitonic hopping.

  6. Quantum Entanglement of Quantum Dot Spin Using Flying Qubits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT OF QUANTUM DOT SPIN USING FLYING QUBITS UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN MAY 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...To) SEP 2012 – DEC 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT OF QUANTUM DOT SPIN USING FLYING QUBITS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-12-2-0333...been to advance the frontier of quantum entangled semiconductor electrons using ultrafast optical techniques. The approach is based on

  7. Enhanced Photon Extraction from a Nanowire Quantum Dot Using a Bottom-Up Photonic Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeannin, Mathieu; Cremel, Thibault; Häyrynen, Teppo; Gregersen, Niels; Bellet-Amalric, Edith; Nogues, Gilles; Kheng, Kuntheak

    2017-11-01

    Semiconductor nanowires offer the possibility to grow high-quality quantum-dot heterostructures, and, in particular, CdSe quantum dots inserted in ZnSe nanowires have demonstrated the ability to emit single photons up to room temperature. In this paper, we demonstrate a bottom-up approach to fabricate a photonic fiberlike structure around such nanowire quantum dots by depositing an oxide shell using atomic-layer deposition. Simulations suggest that the intensity collected in our NA =0.6 microscope objective can be increased by a factor 7 with respect to the bare nanowire case. Combining microphotoluminescence, decay time measurements, and numerical simulations, we obtain a fourfold increase in the collected photoluminescence from the quantum dot. We show that this improvement is due to an increase of the quantum-dot emission rate and a redirection of the emitted light. Our ex situ fabrication technique allows a precise and reproducible fabrication on a large scale. Its improved extraction efficiency is compared to state-of-the-art top-down devices.

  8. Biocompatible Quantum Dots for Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Sandra J.; Chang, Jerry C.; Kovtun, Oleg; McBride, James R.; Tomlinson, Ian D.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are quickly becoming a critical diagnostic tool for discerning cellular function at the molecular level. Their high brightness, long-lasting, sizetunable, and narrow luminescence set them apart from conventional fluorescence dyes. Quantum dots are being developed for a variety of biologically oriented applications, including fluorescent assays for drug discovery, disease detection, single protein tracking, and intracellular reporting. This review introduces the science behind quantum dots and describes how they are made biologically compatible. Several applications are also included, illustrating strategies toward target specificity, and are followed by a discussion on the limitations of quantum dot approaches. The article is concluded with a look at the future direction of quantum dots. PMID:21276935

  9. Biodetection using fluorescent quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speckman, Donna M.; Jennings, Travis L.; LaLumondiere, Steven D.; Klimcak, Charles M.; Moss, Steven C.; Loper, Gary L.; Beck, Steven M.

    2002-07-01

    Multi-pathogen biosensors that take advantage of sandwich immunoassay detection schemes and utilize conventional fluorescent dye reporter molecules are difficult to make into extremely compact and autonomous packages. The development of a multi-pathogen, immunoassay-based, fiber optic detector that utilizes varying sized fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as the reporter labels has the potential to overcome these problems. In order to develop such a quantum dot-based biosensor, it is essential to demonstrate that QDs can be attached to antibody proteins, such that the specificity of the antibody is maintained. We have been involved in efforts to develop a reproducible method for attaching QDs to antibodies for use in biodetection applications. We have synthesized CdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs of differing size, functionalized their surfaces with several types of organic groups for water solubility, and covalently attached these functionalized QDs to rabbit anti-ovalbumin antibody protein. We also demonstrated that these labeled antibodies exhibit selective binding to ovalbumin antigen. We characterized the QDs at each step in the overall synthesis by UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and by picosecond (psec) transient photoluminescence (TPL) spectroscopy. TPL spectroscopy measurements indicate that QD lifetime depends on the size of the QD, the intensity of the optical excitation source, and whether or not they are functionalized and conjugated to antibodies. We describe details of these experiments and discuss the impact of our results on our biosensor development program.

  10. Dicke states in multiple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, Anna; Manolescu, Andrei

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of the collective optical effects which can occur in groups of three and four quantum dots. We define conditions for stable subradiant (dark) states, rapidly decaying super-radiant states, and spontaneous trapping of excitation. Each quantum dot is treated like a two-level system. The quantum dots are, however, realistic, meaning that they may have different transition energies and dipole moments. The dots interact via a short-range coupling which allows excitation transfer across the dots, but conserves the total population of the system. We calculate the time evolution of single-exciton and biexciton states using the Lindblad equation. In the steady state the individual populations of each dot may have permanent oscillations with frequencies given by the energy separation between the subradiant eigenstates.

  11. Image simulations of quantum dots.

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.; Liao, Xiaozhou; Cockayne, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum dot (QD) nanostructures have drawn increased interest in recent years. Their small size leads to quantum confinement of the electrons, which is responsible for their unique electronic and optical properties. They promise to find use in a wide range of devices ranging from semiconductor lasers (Bimberg et al (2001), Ribbat et al (2001)) to quantum computing. The properties of QDs are also determined by their shape and composition. All three parameters (size, shape and composition) have a significant impact on their contrast in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), and consequently the possibility arises that these parameters can be extractedmore » from the images. Zone axis plan view images are especially sensitive to the composition of QDs, and image simulation is an important way to understand how the composition determines the contrast. This paper outlines a method of image simulation of QDs developed by Liao et. al. (1999) and presents an application of the method to QDs in wurtzite InN/GaN.« less

  12. Entanglement in a quantum neural network based on quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaisky, M. V.; Zolnikova, N. N.; Kaputkina, N. E.; Krylov, V. A.; Lozovik, Yu E.; Dattani, N. S.

    2017-05-01

    We studied the quantum correlations between the nodes in a quantum neural network built of an array of quantum dots with dipole-dipole interaction. By means of the quasiadiabatic path integral simulation of the density matrix evolution in a presence of the common phonon bath we have shown the coherence in such system can survive up to the liquid nitrogen temperature of 77 K and above. The quantum correlations between quantum dots are studied by means of calculation of the entanglement of formation in a pair of quantum dots with the typical dot size of a few nanometers and interdot distance of the same order. We have shown that the proposed quantum neural network can keep the mixture of entangled states of QD pairs up to the above mentioned high temperatures.

  13. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  14. Chiral Responsive Liquid Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ma, Junkai; Shi, Fangdan; Tian, Demei; Li, Haibing

    2017-08-01

    How to convert the weak chiral-interaction into the macroscopic properties of materials remains a huge challenge. Here, this study develops highly fluorescent, selectively chiral-responsive liquid quantum dots (liquid QDs) based on the hydrophobic interaction between the chiral chains and the oleic acid-stabilized QDs, which have been designated as (S)-1810-QDs. The fluorescence spectrum and liquidity of thermal control demonstrate the fluorescence properties and the fluidic behavior of (S)-1810-QDs in the solvent-free state. Especially, (S)-1810-QDs exhibit a highly chiral-selective response toward (1R, 2S)-2-amino-1,2-diphenyl ethanol. It is anticipated that this study will facilitate the construction of smart chiral fluidic sensors. More importantly, (S)-1810-QDs can become an attractive material for chiral separation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Spin-based quantum computation in multielectron quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xuedong; Das Sarma, S.

    2001-10-01

    In a quantum computer the hardware and software are intrinsically connected because the quantum Hamiltonian (or more precisely its time development) is the code that runs the computer. We demonstrate this subtle and crucial relationship by considering the example of electron-spin-based solid-state quantum computer in semiconductor quantum dots. We show that multielectron quantum dots with one valence electron in the outermost shell do not behave simply as an effective single-spin system unless special conditions are satisfied. Our work compellingly demonstrates that a delicate synergy between theory and experiment (between software and hardware) is essential for constructing a quantum computer.

  16. Quantum Dots Investigated for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe and CuInS2 for use in intermediate-bandgap solar cells. Using quantum dots in a solar cell to create an intermediate band will allow the harvesting of a much larger portion of the available solar spectrum. Theoretical studies predict a potential efficiency of 63.2 percent, which is approximately a factor of 2 better than any state-of-the-art devices available today. This technology is also applicable to thin-film devices--where it offers a potential four-fold increase in power-to-weight ratio over the state of the art. Intermediate-bandgap solar cells require that quantum dots be sandwiched in an intrinsic region between the photovoltaic solar cell's ordinary p- and n-type regions (see the preceding figure). The quantum dots form the intermediate band of discrete states that allow sub-bandgap energies to be absorbed. However, when the current is extracted, it is limited by the bandgap, not the individual photon energies. The energy states of the quantum dot can be controlled by controlling the size of the dot. Ironically, the ground-state energy levels are inversely proportional to the size of the quantum dots. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Ba Wendi et al., in the early 1990's. The most studied quantum dots prepared by this method have been of CdSe. To produce these dots, researchers inject a syringe of the desired organometallic precursors into heated triocytlphosphine oxide (TOPO) that has been vigorously stirred under an inert atmosphere (see the following figure). The solution immediately begins to change from colorless to yellow, then orange and red/brown, as the quantum dots increase in size. When the desired size is reached, the heat is removed from the flask. Quantum dots of different sizes can be identified by placing them under a "black light" and observing the various color differences in

  17. Synthetic Developments of Nontoxic Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Das, Adita; Snee, Preston T

    2016-03-03

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots (QDs), are candidates for biological sensing, photovoltaics, and catalysis due to their unique photophysical properties. The most studied QDs are composed of heavy metals like cadmium and lead. However, this engenders concerns over heavy metal toxicity. To address this issue, numerous studies have explored the development of nontoxic (or more accurately less toxic) quantum dots. In this Review, we select three major classes of nontoxic quantum dots composed of carbon, silicon and Group I-III-VI elements and discuss the myriad of synthetic strategies and surface modification methods to synthesize quantum dots composed of these material systems. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Nanomaterials: Earthworms lit with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Richard D.; Cheong, Soshan

    2013-01-01

    Yeast, bacteria and fungi have been used to synthesize a variety of nanocrystals. Now, the metal detoxification process in the gut of an earthworm is exploited to produce biocompatible cadmium telluride quantum dots.

  19. Submonolayer Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Chang, Yia-Chang

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed for inserting submonolayer (SML) quantum dots (QDs) or SML QD stacks, instead of conventional Stranski-Krastanov (S-K) QDs, into the active region of intersubband photodetectors. A typical configuration would be InAs SML QDs embedded in thin layers of GaAs, surrounded by AlGaAs barriers. Here, the GaAs and the AlGaAs have nearly the same lattice constant, while InAs has a larger lattice constant. In QD infrared photodetector, the important quantization directions are in the plane perpendicular to the normal incidence radiation. In-plane quantization is what enables the absorption of normal incidence radiation. The height of the S-K QD controls the positions of the quantized energy levels, but is not critically important to the desired normal incidence absorption properties. The SML QD or SML QD stack configurations give more control of the structure grown, retains normal incidence absorption properties, and decreases the strain build-up to allow thicker active layers for higher quantum efficiency.

  20. Phosphine-free synthesis and characterization of type-II ZnSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemzadeh, Roghayyeh; Armanmehr, Mohammad Hasan; Abedi, Mohammad; Fateh, Davood Sadeghi; Bahreini, Zaker

    2018-01-01

    A phosphine-free route for synthesis of type-II ZnSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots, using green, low cost and environmentally friendly reagents and phosphine-free solvents such as 1-octadecene (ODE) and liquid paraffin has been reported. Hot-injection technique has been used for the synthesis of ZnSe core quantum dots. The CdS shell quantum dots prepared by reaction of CdO precursor and S powder in 1-octadecene (ODE). The ZnSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots were synthesized via successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique. The characterization of produced quantum dots were performed by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed the formation of type-II ZnSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots with FWHM 32 nm and uniform size distribution.

  1. Fermionic entanglement via quantum walks in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Alexey A.; Fedichkin, Leonid E.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum walks are fundamentally different from random walks due to the quantum superposition property of quantum objects. Quantum walk process was found to be very useful for quantum information and quantum computation applications. In this paper we demonstrate how to use quantum walks as a tool to generate high-dimensional two-particle fermionic entanglement. The generated entanglement can survive longer in the presence of depolorazing noise due to the periodicity of quantum walk dynamics. The possibility to create two distinguishable qudits in a system of tunnel-coupled semiconductor quantum dots is discussed.

  2. Optical Signatures of Coupled Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-03

    Optical Signatures of Coupled Quantum Dots E. A. Stinaff,1 M. Scheibner,1 A. S . Bracker,1 I. V. Ponomarev,1 V. L. Korenev ,2 M. E. Ware,1 M. F. Doty,1...possibility of optically coupling quantum dots for application in quantum information processing. S emiconductor approaches to quantum information can...REPORTS 3 FEBRUARY 2006 VOL 311 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org636 o n A ug us t 1 4, 2 00 7 w w w . s ci en ce m ag .o rg D ow nl oa de d fr om Report

  3. Semiconductor Quantum Dots with Photoresponsive Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Lorenzo; Tang, Sicheng; Zhang, Yang; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Raymo, Françisco M; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    Photochromic or photocaged ligands can be anchored to the outer shell of semiconductor quantum dots in order to control the photophysical properties of these inorganic nanocrystals with optical stimulations. One of the two interconvertible states of the photoresponsive ligands can be designed to accept either an electron or energy from the excited quantum dots and quench their luminescence. Under these conditions, the reversible transformations of photochromic ligands or the irreversible cleavage of photocaged counterparts translates into the possibility to switch luminescence with external control. As an alternative to regulating the photophysics of a quantum dot via the photochemistry of its ligands, the photochemistry of the latter can be controlled by relying on the photophysics of the former. The transfer of excitation energy from a quantum dot to a photocaged ligand populates the excited state of the species adsorbed on the nanocrystal to induce a photochemical reaction. This mechanism, in conjunction with the large two-photon absorption cross section of quantum dots, can be exploited to release nitric oxide or to generate singlet oxygen under near-infrared irradiation. Thus, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and photoresponsive ligands offers the opportunity to assemble nanostructured constructs with specific functions on the basis of electron or energy transfer processes. The photoswitchable luminescence and ability to photoinduce the release of reactive chemicals, associated with the resulting systems, can be particularly valuable in biomedical research and can, ultimately, lead to the realization of imaging probes for diagnostic applications as well as to therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

  4. Carrier Dynamics and Application of the Phase Coherent Photorefractive Effect in ZnSe Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongol, Amit

    The intensity dependent diffraction efficiency of a phase coherent photorefractive (PCP) ZnSe quantum well (QW) is investigated at 80 K in a two-beam four-wave mixing (FWM) configuration using 100 fs laser pulses with a repetition rate of 80 MHz. The observed diffraction efficiencies of the first and second-order diffracted beam are on the order of 10-3 and 10-5, respectively, revealing nearly no intensity dependence. The first-order diffraction is caused by the PCP effect where the probe-pulse is diffracted due to a long-living incoherent electron density grating in the QW. The second-order diffraction is created by a combination of diffraction processes. For negative probe-pulse delay, the exciton polarization is diffracted at the electron grating twice by a cascade effect. For positive delay, the diffracted signal is modified by the destructive interference with a chi(5) generated signal due to a dynamical screening effect. Model calculations of the signal traces based on the optical Bloch equations considering inhomogeneous broadening of exciton energies are in good agreement with the experimental data. To study the carrier dynamics responsible for the occurrence of the PCP effect, threebeam FWM experiments are carried out. The non-collinear wave-vectors k1 , k2 and k3 at central wavelength of 441 nm (~2.81 eV) were resonantly tuned to the heavy-hole exciton transition energy at 20 K. In the FWM experiment the time coincident strong pump pulses k1 and k2 create both an exciton density grating in the QW and an electron-hole pair grating in the GaAs while the delayed weak pulse k3 simultaneously probes the exciton lifetime as well as the electron grating capture time. The model calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results also providing information about the transfer delay of electrons arriving from the substrate to the QW. For negative probe-pulse delay we still observe a diffracted signal due to the long living electron density grating in

  5. Spectroscopy of Charged Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinaff, E. A.; Scheibner, M.; Bracker, A. S.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Ware, M. E.; Doty, M. F.; Reinecke, T. L.; Gammon, D.; Korenev, V. L.

    2006-03-01

    Spins of single charges in quantum dots are attractive for many quantum information and spintronic proposals. Scalable quantum information applications require the ability to entangle and operate on multiple spins in coupled quantum dots (CQDs). To further the understanding of these systems, we present detailed spectroscopic studies of InAs CQDs with control of the discrete electron or hole charging of the system. The optical spectrum reveals a pattern of energy anticrossings and crossings in the photoluminescence as a function of applied electric field. These features can be understood as a superposition of charge and spin configurations of the two dots and represent clear signatures of quantum mechanical coupling. The molecular resonance leading to these anticrossings is achieved at different electric fields for the optically excited (trion) states and the ground (hole) states allowing for the possibility of using the excited states for optically induced coupling of the qubits.

  6. Quantum dot bioconjugates for ultrasensitive nonisotopic detection.

    PubMed

    Chan, W C; Nie, S

    1998-09-25

    Highly luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (zinc sulfide-capped cadmium selenide) have been covalently coupled to biomolecules for use in ultrasensitive biological detection. In comparison with organic dyes such as rhodamine, this class of luminescent labels is 20 times as bright, 100 times as stable against photobleaching, and one-third as wide in spectral linewidth. These nanometer-sized conjugates are water-soluble and biocompatible. Quantum dots that were labeled with the protein transferrin underwent receptor-mediated endocytosis in cultured HeLa cells, and those dots that were labeled with immunomolecules recognized specific antibodies or antigens.

  7. Spectroscopy characterization and quantum yield determination of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ortiz, S. N.; Mejía Ospino, E.; Cabanzo, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we show the characterization of two kinds of quantum dots: hydrophilic and hydrophobic, with core and core/shell respectively, using spectroscopy techniques such as UV-Vis, fluorescence and Raman. We determined the quantum yield in the quantum dots using the quinine sulphate as standard. This salt is commonly used because of its quantum yield (56%) and stability. For the CdTe excitation, we used a wavelength of 549nm and for the CdSe/ZnS excitation a wavelength of 527nm. The results show that CdSe/ZnS (49%) has better fluorescence, better quantum dots, and confirm the fluorescence result. The quantum dots have shown a good fluorescence performance, so this property will be used to replace dyes, with the advantage that quantum dots are less toxic than some dyes like the rhodamine. In addition, in this work we show different techniques to find the quantum dots emission: fluorescence spectrum, synchronous spectrum and Raman spectrum.

  8. Luminescent Quantum Dots as Ultrasensitive Biological Labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming

    2000-03-01

    Highly luminescent semiconductor quantum dots have been covalently coupled to biological molecules for use in ultrasensitive biological detection. This new class of luminescent labels is considerably brighter and more resistant againt photobleaching in comparison with organic dyes. Quantum dots labeled with the protein transferrin undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) in cultured HeLa cells, and those dots that were conjugated to immunomolecules recognize specific antibodies or antigens. In addition, we show that DNA functionalized quantum dots can be used to target specific genes by hybridization. We expect that quantum dot bioconjugates will have a broad range of biological applications, such as ligand-receptor interactions, real-time monitoring of molecular trafficking inside living cells, multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), high-sensitivity detection in miniaturized devices (e.g., DNA chips), and fluorescent tagging of combinatorial chemical libraries. A potential clinical application is the use of quantum dots for ultrasensitive viral RNA detection, in which as low as 100 copies of hepatitis C and HIV viruses per ml blood should be detected.

  9. Quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids.

    PubMed

    Ning, Zhijun; Gong, Xiwen; Comin, Riccardo; Walters, Grant; Fan, Fengjia; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Yassitepe, Emre; Buin, Andrei; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-07-16

    Heteroepitaxy-atomically aligned growth of a crystalline film atop a different crystalline substrate-is the basis of electrically driven lasers, multijunction solar cells, and blue-light-emitting diodes. Crystalline coherence is preserved even when atomic identity is modulated, a fact that is the critical enabler of quantum wells, wires, and dots. The interfacial quality achieved as a result of heteroepitaxial growth allows new combinations of materials with complementary properties, which enables the design and realization of functionalities that are not available in the single-phase constituents. Here we show that organohalide perovskites and preformed colloidal quantum dots, combined in the solution phase, produce epitaxially aligned 'dots-in-a-matrix' crystals. Using transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, we reveal heterocrystals as large as about 60 nanometres and containing at least 20 mutually aligned dots that inherit the crystalline orientation of the perovskite matrix. The heterocrystals exhibit remarkable optoelectronic properties that are traceable to their atom-scale crystalline coherence: photoelectrons and holes generated in the larger-bandgap perovskites are transferred with 80% efficiency to become excitons in the quantum dot nanocrystals, which exploit the excellent photocarrier diffusion of perovskites to produce bright-light emission from infrared-bandgap quantum-tuned materials. By combining the electrical transport properties of the perovskite matrix with the high radiative efficiency of the quantum dots, we engineer a new platform to advance solution-processed infrared optoelectronics.

  10. Studies of quantum dots in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldmann, Eyal

    We present two studies of quantum dots in the quantum Hall regime. In the first study, presented in Chapter 3, we investigate the edge reconstruction phenomenon believed to occur when the quantum dot filling fraction is n≲1 . Our approach involves the examination of large dots (≤40 electrons) using a partial diagonalization technique in which the occupancies of the deep interior orbitals are frozen. To interpret the results of this calculation, we evaluate the overlap between the diagonalized ground state and a set of trial wavefunctions which we call projected necklace (PN) states. A PN state is simply the angular momentum projection of a maximum density droplet surrounded by a ring of localized electrons. Our calculations reveal that PN states have up to 99% overlap with the diagonalized ground states, and are lower in energy than the states identified in Chamon and Wen's study of the edge reconstruction. In the second study, presented in Chapter 4, we investigate quantum dots in the fractional quantum Hall regime using a Hartree formulation of composite fermion theory. We find that under appropriate conditions, the chemical potential of the dots oscillates periodically with B due to the transfer of composite fermions between quasi-Landau bands. This effect is analogous the addition spectrum oscillations which occur in quantum dots in the integer quantum Hall regime. Period f0 oscillations are found in sharply confined dots with filling factors nu = 2/5 and nu = 2/3. Period 3 f0 oscillations are found in a parabolically confined nu = 2/5 dot. More generally, we argue that the oscillation period of dots with band pinning should vary continuously with B, whereas the period of dots without band pinning is f0 .

  11. Synthesis of colloidal Zn(Te,Se) alloy quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, H.; Arai, K.; Kita, M.; Omata, T.

    2017-10-01

    Colloidal Zn(Te1-x Se x ) quantum dots (QDs), which are highly mismatched semiconductor alloys, were synthesized by the hot injection of an organometallic solution, and the composition and size dependence of their optical gap were studied together with the theoretical calculation using the finite-depth-well effective mass approximation. The optical gaps exhibited considerable negative deviation from the mole fraction weighted mean optical gaps of ZnTe and ZnSe, i.e. a large optical gap bowing was observed, similar to the bulk and thin-film alloys. The composition and size dependence of optical gaps agreed well with theoretically calculated ones employing a bowing parameter similar to that of the bulk alloys; therefore, the extent of the optical gap bowing in these alloy QDs is concluded to be the same as that in bulk and thin-film alloys. The optical gaps of Zn(Te1-x Se x ) QDs with diameters of 3.5-5 nm, where x ~ 0.35, were close to the energy corresponding to green light, indicating that those QDs are very promising as green QD-phosphors.

  12. Origins and optimization of entanglement in plasmonically coupled quantum dots

    DOE PAGES

    Otten, Matthew; Larson, Jeffrey; Min, Misun; ...

    2016-08-11

    In this paper, a system of two or more quantum dots interacting with a dissipative plasmonic nanostructure is investigated in detail by using a cavity quantum electrodynamics approach with a model Hamiltonian. We focus on determining and understanding system configurations that generate multiple bipartite quantum entanglements between the occupation states of the quantum dots. These configurations include allowing for the quantum dots to be asymmetrically coupled to the plasmonic system. Analytical solution of a simplified limit for an arbitrary number of quantum dots and numerical simulations and optimization for the two- and three-dot cases are used to develop guidelines formore » maximizing the bipartite entanglements. For any number of quantum dots, we show that through simple starting states and parameter guidelines, one quantum dot can be made to share a strong amount of bipartite entanglement with all other quantum dots in the system, while entangling all other pairs to a lesser degree.« less

  13. Metamorphic quantum dots: Quite different nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Seravalli, L.; Frigeri, P.; Nasi, L.

    In this work, we present a study of InAs quantum dots deposited on InGaAs metamorphic buffers by molecular beam epitaxy. By comparing morphological, structural, and optical properties of such nanostructures with those of InAs/GaAs quantum dot ones, we were able to evidence characteristics that are typical of metamorphic InAs/InGaAs structures. The more relevant are: the cross-hatched InGaAs surface overgrown by dots, the change in critical coverages for island nucleation and ripening, the nucleation of new defects in the capping layers, and the redshift in the emission energy. The discussion on experimental results allowed us to conclude that metamorphic InAs/InGaAs quantummore » dots are rather different nanostructures, where attention must be put to some issues not present in InAs/GaAs structures, namely, buffer-related defects, surface morphology, different dislocation mobility, and stacking fault energies. On the other hand, we show that metamorphic quantum dot nanostructures can provide new possibilities of tailoring various properties, such as dot positioning and emission energy, that could be very useful for innovative dot-based devices.« less

  14. Dot-in-Well Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Bandara, Sumith; Ting, David; Hill, cory; Liu, John; Mumolo, Jason; Chang, Yia Chung

    2008-01-01

    Dot-in-well (DWELL) quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) [DWELL-QDIPs] are subjects of research as potentially superior alternatives to prior QDIPs. Heretofore, there has not existed a reliable method for fabricating quantum dots (QDs) having precise, repeatable dimensions. This lack has constituted an obstacle to the development of uniform, high-performance, wavelength-tailorable QDIPs and of focal-plane arrays (FPAs) of such QDIPs. However, techniques for fabricating quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) having multiple-quantum- well (MQW) structures are now well established. In the present research on DWELL-QDIPs, the arts of fabrication of QDs and QWIPs are combined with a view toward overcoming the deficiencies of prior QDIPs. The longer-term goal is to develop focal-plane arrays of radiationhard, highly uniform arrays of QDIPs that would exhibit high performance at wavelengths from 8 to 15 m when operated at temperatures between 150 and 200 K. Increasing quantum efficiency is the key to the development of competitive QDIP-based FPAs. Quantum efficiency can be increased by increasing the density of QDs and by enhancing infrared absorption in QD-containing material. QDIPs demonstrated thus far have consisted, variously, of InAs islands on GaAs or InAs islands in InGaAs/GaAs wells. These QDIPs have exhibited low quantum efficiencies because the numbers of QD layers (and, hence, the areal densities of QDs) have been small typically five layers in each QDIP. The number of QD layers in such a device must be thus limited to prevent the aggregation of strain in the InAs/InGaAs/GaAs non-lattice- matched material system. The approach being followed in the DWELL-QDIP research is to embed In- GaAs QDs in GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum- well (MQW) structures (see figure). This material system can accommodate a large number of QD layers without excessive lattice-mismatch strain and the associated degradation of photodetection properties. Hence, this material

  15. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    DOEpatents

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  16. Surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey; Fuke, Nobuhiro

    2015-02-03

    Provided are methods of surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition so as to exchange the native ligands of the quantum dots for exchange ligands that result in improvement in charge extraction from the nanocrystals.

  17. Carbon quantum dots and a method of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Washington, Aaron L.

    The present invention is directed to a method of preparing a carbon quantum dot. The carbon quantum dot can be prepared from a carbon precursor, such as a fullerene, and a complex metal hydride. The present invention also discloses a carbon quantum dot made by reacting a carbon precursor with a complex metal hydride and a polymer containing a carbon quantum dot made by reacting a carbon precursor with a complex metal hydride.

  18. Isotopically enhanced triple-quantum-dot qubit

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Smith, Aaron; Borselli, Matthew G.; Kiselev, Andrey A.; Fong, Bryan H.; Holabird, Kevin S.; Hazard, Thomas M.; Huang, Biqin; Deelman, Peter W.; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele E.; Ross, Richard S.; Gyure, Mark F.; Hunter, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Like modern microprocessors today, future processors of quantum information may be implemented using all-electrical control of silicon-based devices. A semiconductor spin qubit may be controlled without the use of magnetic fields by using three electrons in three tunnel-coupled quantum dots. Triple dots have previously been implemented in GaAs, but this material suffers from intrinsic nuclear magnetic noise. Reduction of this noise is possible by fabricating devices using isotopically purified silicon. We demonstrate universal coherent control of a triple-quantum-dot qubit implemented in an isotopically enhanced Si/SiGe heterostructure. Composite pulses are used to implement spin-echo type sequences, and differential charge sensing enables single-shot state readout. These experiments demonstrate sufficient control with sufficiently low noise to enable the long pulse sequences required for exchange-only two-qubit logic and randomized benchmarking. PMID:26601186

  19. Phonon impact on optical control schemes of quantum dots: Role of quantum dot geometry and symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüker, S.; Kuhn, T.; Reiter, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    Phonons strongly influence the optical control of semiconductor quantum dots. When modeling the electron-phonon interaction in several theoretical approaches, the quantum dot geometry is approximated by a spherical structure, though typical self-assembled quantum dots are strongly lens-shaped. By explicitly comparing simulations of a spherical and a lens-shaped dot using a well-established correlation expansion approach, we show that, indeed, lens-shaped dots can be exactly mapped to a spherical geometry when studying the phonon influence on the electronic system. We also give a recipe to reproduce spectral densities from more involved dots by rather simple spherical models. On the other hand, breaking the spherical symmetry has a pronounced impact on the spatiotemporal properties of the phonon dynamics. As an example we show that for a lens-shaped quantum dot, the phonon emission is strongly concentrated along the direction of the smallest axis of the dot, which is important for the use of phonons for the communication between different dots.

  20. Covalent functionalized black phosphorus quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotognella, Francesco; Kriegel, Ilka; Sassolini, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) nanostructures enable a new strategy to tune the electronic and optical properties of this atomically thin material. In this paper we show, via density functional theory calculations, the possibility to modify the optical properties of BP quantum dots via covalent functionalization. The quantum dot selected in this study has chemical formula P24H12 and has been covalent functionalized with one or more benzene rings or anthracene. The effect of functionalization is highlighted in the absorption spectra, where a red shift of the absorption is noticeable. The shift can be ascribed to an electron delocalization in the black phosphorus/organic molecule nanostructure.

  1. Resonant tunneling in graphene pseudomagnetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zenan; Bahamon, D A; Pereira, Vitor M; Park, Harold S; Campbell, D K; Neto, A H Castro

    2013-06-12

    Realistic relaxed configurations of triaxially strained graphene quantum dots are obtained from unbiased atomistic mechanical simulations. The local electronic structure and quantum transport characteristics of y-junctions based on such dots are studied, revealing that the quasi-uniform pseudomagnetic field induced by strain restricts transport to Landau level- and edge state-assisted resonant tunneling. Valley degeneracy is broken in the presence of an external field, allowing the selective filtering of the valley and chirality of the states assisting in the resonant tunneling. Asymmetric strain conditions can be explored to select the exit channel of the y-junction.

  2. Magnetic control of dipolaritons in quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Arias, J S; Rodríguez, B A; Vinck-Posada, H

    2016-12-21

    Dipolaritons are quasiparticles that arise in coupled quantum wells embedded in a microcavity, they are a superposition of a photon, a direct exciton and an indirect exciton. We propose the existence of dipolaritons in a system of two coupled quantum dots inside a microcavity in direct analogy with the quantum well case and find that, despite some similarities, dipolaritons in quantum dots have different properties and can lead to true dark polariton states. We use a finite system theory to study the effects of the magnetic field on the system, including the emission, and find that it can be used as a control parameter of the properties of excitons and dipolaritons, and the overall magnetic behaviour of the structure.

  3. Silicon based quantum dot hybrid qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohun

    2015-03-01

    The charge and spin degrees of freedom of an electron constitute natural bases for constructing quantum two level systems, or qubits, in semiconductor quantum dots. The quantum dot charge qubit offers a simple architecture and high-speed operation, but generally suffers from fast dephasing due to strong coupling of the environment to the electron's charge. On the other hand, quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, but their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications. This talk will present experimental progress of a `hybrid' qubit, formed by three electrons in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot, which combines desirable characteristics (speed and coherence) in the past found separately in qubits based on either charge or spin degrees of freedom. Using resonant microwaves, we first discuss qubit operations near the `sweet spot' for charge qubit operation. Along with fast (>GHz) manipulation rates for any rotation axis on the Bloch sphere, we implement two independent tomographic characterization schemes in the charge qubit regime: traditional quantum process tomography (QPT) and gate set tomography (GST). We also present resonant qubit operations of the hybrid qubit performed on the same device, DC pulsed gate operations of which were recently demonstrated. We demonstrate three-axis control and the implementation of dynamic decoupling pulse sequences. Performing QPT on the hybrid qubit, we show that AC gating yields π rotation process fidelities higher than 93% for X-axis and 96% for Z-axis rotations, which demonstrates efficient quantum control of semiconductor qubits using resonant microwaves. We discuss a path forward for achieving fidelities better than the threshold for quantum error correction using surface codes. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), NSF (PHY-1104660), DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028), and by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  4. Electrostatically confined trilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-04-01

    Electrically gating of trilayer graphene (TLG) opens a band gap offering the possibility to electrically engineer TLG quantum dots. We study the energy levels of such quantum dots and investigate their dependence on a perpendicular magnetic field B and different types of stacking of the graphene layers. The dots are modeled as circular and confined by a truncated parabolic potential which can be realized by nanostructured gates or position-dependent doping. The energy spectra exhibit the intervalley symmetry EKe(m ) =-EK'h(m ) for the electron (e ) and hole (h ) states, where m is the angular momentum quantum number and K and K ' label the two valleys. The electron and hole spectra for B =0 are twofold degenerate due to the intervalley symmetry EK(m ) =EK'[-(m +1 ) ] . For both ABC [α =1.5 (1.2) for large (small) R ] and ABA (α =1 ) stackings, the lowest-energy levels show approximately a R-α dependence on the dot radius R in contrast with the 1 /R3 one for ABC-stacked dots with infinite-mass boundary. As functions of the field B , the oscillator strengths for dipole-allowed transitions differ drastically for the two types of stackings.

  5. Imaging and Manipulating Energy Transfer Among Quantum Dots at Individual Dot Resolution.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Nguyen, Huy A; Lyding, Joseph W; Gruebele, Martin

    2017-06-27

    Many processes of interest in quantum dots involve charge or energy transfer from one dot to another. Energy transfer in films of quantum dots as well as between linked quantum dots has been demonstrated by luminescence shift, and the ultrafast time-dependence of energy transfer processes has been resolved. Bandgap variation among dots (energy disorder) and dot separation are known to play an important role in how energy diffuses. Thus, it would be very useful if energy transfer could be visualized directly on a dot-by-dot basis among small clusters or within films of quantum dots. To that effect, we report single molecule optical absorption detected by scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM) to image energy pooling from donor into acceptor dots on a dot-by-dot basis. We show that we can manipulate groups of quantum dots by pruning away the dominant acceptor dot, and switching the energy transfer path to a different acceptor dot. Our experimental data agrees well with a simple Monte Carlo lattice model of energy transfer, similar to models in the literature, in which excitation energy is transferred preferentially from dots with a larger bandgap to dots with a smaller bandgap.

  6. Zinc sulfide quantum dots for photocatalytic and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Alexander A.; Leonov, Andrei A.; Zhuikova, Elena I.; Postnova, Irina V.; Voznesenskiy, Sergey S.

    2017-09-01

    Herein, we report the photocatalytic and sensing applications of pure and Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots. The quantum dots were prepared by a chemical precipitation in an aqueous solution in the presence of glutathione as a stabilizing agent. The synthesized quantum dots were used as effective photocatalyst for the degradation of methylene blue dye. Interestingly, fully degradation of methylene blue dye was achieved in 5 min using pure ZnS quantum dots. Further, the synthesized quantum dots were used as efficient sensing element for methane fluorescent sensor. Interfering studies confirmed that the developed sensor possesses very good sensitivity and selectivity towards methane.

  7. Hybrid quantum-classical modeling of quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantner, Markus; Mittnenzweig, Markus; Koprucki, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The design of electrically driven quantum dot devices for quantum optical applications asks for modeling approaches combining classical device physics with quantum mechanics. We connect the well-established fields of semiclassical semiconductor transport theory and the theory of open quantum systems to meet this requirement. By coupling the van Roosbroeck system with a quantum master equation in Lindblad form, we introduce a new hybrid quantum-classical modeling approach, which provides a comprehensive description of quantum dot devices on multiple scales: it enables the calculation of quantum optical figures of merit and the spatially resolved simulation of the current flow in realistic semiconductor device geometries in a unified way. We construct the interface between both theories in such a way, that the resulting hybrid system obeys the fundamental axioms of (non)equilibrium thermodynamics. We show that our approach guarantees the conservation of charge, consistency with the thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by numerical simulations of an electrically driven single-photon source based on a single quantum dot in the stationary and transient operation regime.

  8. Magnon cotunneling through a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwacki, Łukasz

    2017-11-01

    I consider a single-level quantum dot coupled to two reservoirs of spin waves (magnons). Such systems have been studied recently from the point of view of possible coupling between electronic and magnonic spin currents. However, usually weakly coupled systems were investigated. When coupling between the dot and reservoirs is not weak, then higher order processes play a role and have to be included. Here I consider cotunneling of magnons through a spin-occupied quantum dot, which can be understood as a magnon (spin) leakage current in analogy to leakage currents in charge-based electronics. Particular emphasis has been put on investigating the effect of magnetic field and temperature difference between the magnonic reservoirs.

  9. Magnetic properties of graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Ortega, T.; Luk'yanchuk, I. A.; Rubo, Y. G.

    2013-05-01

    Using the tight-binding approximation we calculated the diamagnetic susceptibility of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) of different geometrical shapes and characteristic sizes of 2-10 nm, when the magnetic properties are governed by the electron edge states. Two types of edge states can be discerned: the zero-energy states (ZESs), located exactly at the zero-energy Dirac point, and the dispersed edge states (DESs), with the energy close but not exactly equal to zero. DESs are responsible for a temperature-independent diamagnetic response, while ZESs provide a temperature-dependent spin paramagnetism. Hexagonal, circular, and randomly shaped GQDs contain mainly DESs, and, as a result, they are diamagnetic. The edge states of the triangular GQDs are of ZES type. These dots reveal the crossover between spin paramagnetism, dominating for small dots and at low temperatures, and orbital diamagnetism, dominating for large dots and at high temperatures.

  10. Producing Quantum Dots by Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2006-01-01

    An improved process for making nanocrystallites, commonly denoted quantum dots (QDs), is based on spray pyrolysis. Unlike the process used heretofore, the improved process is amenable to mass production of either passivated or non-passivated QDs, with computer control to ensure near uniformity of size.

  11. Modification of quantum dots with nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocherginskaya, P. B.; Romanova, A. V.; Prokhorenko, I. A.; Itkis, Daniil M.; Korshun, V. A.; Goodilin, Eugene A.; Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2011-12-01

    The key principles and modern approaches to targeted modification of semiconductor colloidal nanoparticles, quantum dots, which exhibit unique photophysical properties and are a promising class of luminescent markers, are discussed. Attention is given to the preparation of their bioconjugates with nucleic acids, promising tools for biological microchips and resonance energy transfer sensors. The bibliography includes 80 references.

  12. Integrated photonics using colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Vinod M.; Husaini, Saima; Okoye, Nicky; Valappil, Nikesh V.

    2009-11-01

    Integrated photonic devices were realized using colloidal quantum dot composites such as flexible microcavity laser, microdisk emitters and integrated active-passive waveguides. The microcavity laser structure was realized using spin coating and consisted of an all-polymer distributed Bragg reflector with a poly-vinyl carbazole cavity layer embedded with InGaP/ZnS colloidal quantum dots. These microcavities can be peeled off the substrate yielding a flexible structure that can conform to any shape and whose emission spectra can be mechanically tuned. Planar photonic devices consisting of vertically coupled microring resonators, microdisk emitters, active-passive integrated waveguide structures and coupled active microdisk resonators were realized using soft lithography, photo-lithography, and electron beam lithography, respectively. The gain medium in all these devices was a composite consisting of quantum dots embedded in SU8 matrix. Finally, the effect of the host matrix on the optical properties of the quantum dots using results of steady-state and time-resolved luminescence measurements was determined. In addition to their specific functionalities, these novel device demonstrations and their development present a low-cost alternative to the traditional photonic device fabrication techniques.

  13. Influence of the quantum dot geometry on p -shell transitions in differently charged quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkemper, M.; Reiter, D. E.; Kuhn, T.

    2018-02-01

    Absorption spectra of neutral, negatively, and positively charged semiconductor quantum dots are studied theoretically. We provide an overview of the main energetic structure around the p -shell transitions, including the influence of nearby nominally dark states. Based on the envelope function approximation, we treat the four-band Luttinger theory as well as the direct and short-range exchange Coulomb interactions within a configuration interaction approach. The quantum dot confinement is approximated by an anisotropic harmonic potential. We present a detailed investigation of state mixing and correlations mediated by the individual interactions. Differences and similarities between the differently charged quantum dots are highlighted. Especially large differences between negatively and positively charged quantum dots become evident. We present a visualization of energetic shifts and state mixtures due to changes in size, in-plane asymmetry, and aspect ratio. Thereby we provide a better understanding of the experimentally hard to access question of quantum dot geometry effects. Our findings show a method to determine the in-plane asymmetry from photoluminescence excitation spectra. Furthermore, we supply basic knowledge for tailoring the strength of certain state mixtures or the energetic order of particular excited states via changes of the shape of the quantum dot. Such knowledge builds the basis to find the optimal QD geometry for possible applications and experiments using excited states.

  14. Non-Markovian full counting statistics in quantum dot molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Jiao, Hu-Jun; Liang, Jiu-Qing; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Full counting statistics of electron transport is a powerful diagnostic tool for probing the nature of quantum transport beyond what is obtainable from the average current or conductance measurement alone. In particular, the non-Markovian dynamics of quantum dot molecule plays an important role in the nonequilibrium electron tunneling processes. It is thus necessary to understand the non-Markovian full counting statistics in a quantum dot molecule. Here we study the non-Markovian full counting statistics in two typical quantum dot molecules, namely, serially coupled and side-coupled double quantum dots with high quantum coherence in a certain parameter regime. We demonstrate that the non-Markovian effect manifests itself through the quantum coherence of the quantum dot molecule system, and has a significant impact on the full counting statistics in the high quantum-coherent quantum dot molecule system, which depends on the coupling of the quantum dot molecule system with the source and drain electrodes. The results indicated that the influence of the non-Markovian effect on the full counting statistics of electron transport, which should be considered in a high quantum-coherent quantum dot molecule system, can provide a better understanding of electron transport through quantum dot molecules. PMID:25752245

  15. Quantum Dots and Their Multimodal Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Debasis; Qian, Lei; Tseng, Teng-Kuan; Holloway, Paul H.

    2010-01-01

    Semiconducting quantum dots, whose particle sizes are in the nanometer range, have very unusual properties. The quantum dots have band gaps that depend in a complicated fashion upon a number of factors, described in the article. Processing-structure-properties-performance relationships are reviewed for compound semiconducting quantum dots. Various methods for synthesizing these quantum dots are discussed, as well as their resulting properties. Quantum states and confinement of their excitons may shift their optical absorption and emission energies. Such effects are important for tuning their luminescence stimulated by photons (photoluminescence) or electric field (electroluminescence). In this article, decoupling of quantum effects on excitation and emission are described, along with the use of quantum dots as sensitizers in phosphors. In addition, we reviewed the multimodal applications of quantum dots, including in electroluminescence device, solar cell and biological imaging.

  16. Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopy of Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, A.; Machnikowski, P.

    2007-08-01

    We study theoretically the nonlinear four-wave mixing response of an ensemble of coupled pairs of quantum dots (quantum dot molecules). We discuss the shape of the echo signal depending on the parameters of the ensemble: the statistics of transition energies and the degree of size correlations between the dots forming the molecules.

  17. Quantum Computation Using Optically Coupled Quantum Dot Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Anantram, M. P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowhury, V. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A solid state model for quantum computation has potential advantages in terms of the ease of fabrication, characterization, and integration. The fundamental requirements for a quantum computer involve the realization of basic processing units (qubits), and a scheme for controlled switching and coupling among the qubits, which enables one to perform controlled operations on qubits. We propose a model for quantum computation based on optically coupled quantum dot arrays, which is computationally similar to the atomic model proposed by Cirac and Zoller. In this model, individual qubits are comprised of two coupled quantum dots, and an array of these basic units is placed in an optical cavity. Switching among the states of the individual units is done by controlled laser pulses via near field interaction using the NSOM technology. Controlled rotations involving two or more qubits are performed via common cavity mode photon. We have calculated critical times, including the spontaneous emission and switching times, and show that they are comparable to the best times projected for other proposed models of quantum computation. We have also shown the feasibility of accessing individual quantum dots using the NSOM technology by calculating the photon density at the tip, and estimating the power necessary to perform the basic controlled operations. We are currently in the process of estimating the decoherence times for this system; however, we have formulated initial arguments which seem to indicate that the decoherence times will be comparable, if not longer, than many other proposed models.

  18. Resonant pair tunneling in double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sela, Eran; Affleck, Ian

    2009-08-21

    We present exact results on the nonequilibrium current fluctuations for 2 quantum dots in series throughout a crossover from non-Fermi liquid to Fermi liquid behavior described by the 2 impurity Kondo model. The result corresponds to resonant tunneling of carriers of charge 2e for a critical interimpurity coupling. At low energy scales, the result can be understood from a Fermi liquid approach that we develop and use to also study nonequilibrium transport in an alternative double dot realization of the 2 impurity Kondo model under current experimental study.

  19. Mitigation of Quantum Dot Cytotoxicity by Microencapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Romoser, Amelia; Ritter, Dustin; Majitha, Ravish; Meissner, Kenith E.; McShane, Michael; Sayes, Christie M.

    2011-01-01

    When CdSe/ZnS-polyethyleneimine (PEI) quantum dots (QDs) are microencapsulated in polymeric microcapsules, human fibroblasts are protected from acute cytotoxic effects. Differences in cellular morphology, uptake, and viability were assessed after treatment with either microencapsulated or unencapsulated dots. Specifically, QDs contained in microcapsules terminated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) mitigate contact with and uptake by cells, thus providing a tool to retain particle luminescence for applications such as extracellular sensing and imaging. The microcapsule serves as the “first line of defense” for containing the QDs. This enables the individual QD coating to be designed primarily to enhance the function of the biosensor. PMID:21814567

  20. Quantum dot-polymer conjugates for stable luminescent displays.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sushant; Sivadas, Anjaly; Yuyama, Ken-Ichi; Takano, Yuta; Francis, Raju; Biju, Vasudevanpillai

    2018-05-23

    The broad absorption of light in the UV-Vis-NIR region and the size-based tunable photoluminescence color of semiconductor quantum dots make these tiny crystals one of the most attractive antennae in solar cells and phosphors in electrooptical devices. One of the primary requirements for such real-world applications of quantum dots is their stable and uniform distribution in optically transparent matrices. In this work, we prepare transparent thin films of polymer-quantum dot conjugates, where CdSe/ZnS quantum dots are uniformly distributed at high densities in a chitosan-polystyrene copolymer (CS-g-PS) matrix. Here, quantum dots in an aqueous solution are conjugated to the copolymer by a phase transfer reaction. With the stable conjugation of quantum dots to the copolymer, we prevent undesired phase separation between the two and aggregation of quantum dots. Furthermore, the conjugate allows us to prepare transparent thin films in which quantum dots are uniformly distributed at high densities. The CS-g-PS copolymer helps us in not only preserving the photoluminescence properties of quantum dots in the film but also rendering excellent photostability to quantum dots at the ensemble and single particle levels, making the conjugate a promising material for photoluminescence-based devices.

  1. Studies of silicon quantum dots prepared at different substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Agel, Faisal A.; Suleiman, Jamal; Khan, Shamshad A.

    2017-03-01

    In this research work, we have synthesized silicon quantum dots at different substrate temperatures 193, 153 and 123 K at a fixed working pressure 5 Torr. of Argon gas. The structural studies of these silicon quantum dots have been undertaken using X-ray diffraction, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The optical and electrical properties have been studied using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy and I-V measurement system. X-ray diffraction pattern of Si quantum dots prepared at different temperatures show the amorphous nature except for the quantum dots synthesized at 193 K which shows polycrystalline nature. FESEM images of samples suggest that the size of quantum dots varies from 2 to 8 nm. On the basis of UV-visible spectroscopy measurements, a direct band gap has been observed for Si quantum dots. FTIR spectra suggest that as-grown Si quantum dots are partially oxidized which is due exposure of as-prepared samples to air after taking out from the chamber. PL spectra of the synthesized silicon quantum dots show an intense peak at 444 nm, which may be attributed to the formation of Si quantum dots. Temperature dependence of dc conductivity suggests that the dc conductivity enhances exponentially by raising the temperature. On the basis above properties i.e. direct band gap, high absorption coefficient and high conductivity, these silicon quantum dots will be useful for the fabrication of solar cells.

  2. Peptide-Decorated Tunable-Fluorescence Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Bedanga; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Lin, Hao-Yu Greg; Liang, Wentao; Champion, Paul; Wanunu, Meni

    2017-03-22

    We report here the synthesis of graphene quantum dots with tunable size, surface chemistry, and fluorescence properties. In the size regime 15-35 nm, these quantum dots maintain strong visible light fluorescence (mean quantum yield of 0.64) and a high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section (6500 Göppert-Mayer units). Furthermore, through noncovalent tailoring of the chemistry of these quantum dots, we obtain water-stable quantum dots. For example, quantum dots with lysine groups bind strongly to DNA in solution and inhibit polymerase-based DNA strand synthesis. Finally, by virtue of their mesoscopic size, the quantum dots exhibit good cell permeability into living epithelial cells, but they do not enter the cell nucleus.

  3. Reconfigurable quadruple quantum dots in a silicon nanowire transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, A. C., E-mail: ab2106@cam.ac.uk; Broström, M.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.

    2016-05-16

    We present a reconfigurable metal-oxide-semiconductor multi-gate transistor that can host a quadruple quantum dot in silicon. The device consists of an industrial quadruple-gate silicon nanowire field-effect transistor. Exploiting the corner effect, we study the versatility of the structure in the single quantum dot and the serial double quantum dot regimes and extract the relevant capacitance parameters. We address the fabrication variability of the quadruple-gate approach which, paired with improved silicon fabrication techniques, makes the corner state quantum dot approach a promising candidate for a scalable quantum information architecture.

  4. Record Charge Carrier Diffusion Length in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids via Mutual Dot-To-Dot Surface Passivation.

    PubMed

    Carey, Graham H; Levina, Larissa; Comin, Riccardo; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-06-03

    Through a combination of chemical and mutual dot-to-dot surface passivation, high-quality colloidal quantum dot solids are fabricated. The joint passivation techniques lead to a record diffusion length for colloidal quantum dots of 230 ± 20 nm. The technique is applied to create thick photovoltaic devices that exhibit high current density without losing fill factor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Negative exchange interactions in coupled few-electron quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Kuangyin; Calderon-Vargas, F. A.; Mayhall, Nicholas J.; Barnes, Edwin

    2018-06-01

    It has been experimentally shown that negative exchange interactions can arise in a linear three-dot system when a two-electron double quantum dot is exchange coupled to a larger quantum dot containing on the order of one hundred electrons. The origin of this negative exchange can be traced to the larger quantum dot exhibiting a spin tripletlike rather than singletlike ground state. Here we show using a microscopic model based on the configuration interaction (CI) method that both tripletlike and singletlike ground states are realized depending on the number of electrons. In the case of only four electrons, a full CI calculation reveals that tripletlike ground states occur for sufficiently large dots. These results hold for symmetric and asymmetric quantum dots in both Si and GaAs, showing that negative exchange interactions are robust in few-electron double quantum dots and do not require large numbers of electrons.

  6. Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Rühle, Sven; Shalom, Menny; Zaban, Arie

    2010-08-02

    Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) are a promising low-cost alternative to existing photovoltaic technologies such as crystalline silicon and thin inorganic films. The absorption spectrum of quantum dots (QDs) can be tailored by controlling their size, and QDs can be produced by low-cost methods. Nanostructures such as mesoporous films, nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes and nanosheets with high microscopic surface area, redox electrolytes and solid-state hole conductors are borrowed from standard dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) to fabricate electron conductor/QD monolayer/hole conductor junctions with high optical absorbance. Herein we focus on recent developments in the field of mono- and polydisperse QDSCs. Stability issues are adressed, coating methods are presented, performance is reviewed and special emphasis is given to the importance of energy-level alignment to increase the light to electric power conversion efficiency.

  7. Plastic scintillator enhancement through Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Alan; Boyraz, Ozdal; Nilsson, Mikael

    2017-08-01

    Plastic scintillators such as Polyvinyl Toluene (PVT) are used for radiation detection but due to their poor performance they are not widely implemented. In order to circumnavigate this, dopants are added to enhance scintillation by energy transfer otherwise lost through non-radiative processes. In this work, we exploit the effects of energy transfer through the use of short wavelength emission Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dots (QD) as the transfer stimulant. Scintillation enhancement was observed as Cadmium Sulfide QD with scintillating dyes are embedded in PVT polymer matrix for beta and gamma radiation. Energy transfer was observed between Quantum Dots, scintillating dye, and the host polymer. Different concentrations of QD and 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) dye are investigated to characterize the energy transfer.

  8. Separability and dynamical symmetry of Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.-M., E-mail: zhpm@impcas.ac.cn; Zou, L.-P., E-mail: zoulp@impcas.ac.cn; Horvathy, P.A., E-mail: horvathy@lmpt.univ-tours.fr

    2014-02-15

    The separability and Runge–Lenz-type dynamical symmetry of the internal dynamics of certain two-electron Quantum Dots, found by Simonović et al. (2003), are traced back to that of the perturbed Kepler problem. A large class of axially symmetric perturbing potentials which allow for separation in parabolic coordinates can easily be found. Apart from the 2:1 anisotropic harmonic trapping potential considered in Simonović and Nazmitdinov (2013), they include a constant electric field parallel to the magnetic field (Stark effect), the ring-shaped Hartmann potential, etc. The harmonic case is studied in detail. -- Highlights: • The separability of Quantum Dots is derived frommore » that of the perturbed Kepler problem. • Harmonic perturbation with 2:1 anisotropy is separable in parabolic coordinates. • The system has a conserved Runge–Lenz type quantity.« less

  9. Theory of Charged Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, I. V.; Scheibner, M.; Stinaff, E. A.; Bracker, A. S.; Doty, M. F.; Ware, M. E.; Gammon, D.; Reinecke, T. L.; Korenev, V. L.

    2006-03-01

    Recent optical spectroscopy of excitonic molecules in coupled quantum dots (CQDs) tuned by electric field reveal a richer diversity in spectral line patterns than in their single quantum dot counterparts. We developed a theoretical model that allows us to classify energies and intensities of various PL transitions. In this approach the electric field induced resonance tunneling of the electron and hole states occurs at different biases due to the inherent asymmetry of CQDs. The truncated many-body basis configurations for each molecule are constructed from antisymmetrized products of single-particle states, where the electron occupies only one ground state level in single QD and the hole can occupy two lowest levels of CQD system. The Coulomb interaction between particles is treated with perturbation theory. As a result the observed PL spectral lines can be described with a small number of parameters. The theoretical predictions account well for recent experiments.

  10. The impact of quantum dot filling on dual-band optical transitions via intermediate quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiang, E-mail: jiang.wu@ucl.ac.uk; Passmore, Brandon; Manasreh, M. O.

    2015-08-28

    InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors with different doping levels were investigated to understand the effect of quantum dot filling on both intraband and interband optical transitions. The electron filling of self-assembled InAs quantum dots was varied by direct doping of quantum dots with different concentrations. Photoresponse in the near infrared and middle wavelength infrared spectral region was observed from samples with low quantum dot filling. Although undoped quantum dots were favored for interband transitions with the absence of a second optical excitation in the near infrared region, doped quantum dots were preferred to improve intraband transitions in the middle wavelengthmore » infrared region. As a result, partial filling of quantum dot was required, to the extent of maintaining a low dark current, to enhance the dual-band photoresponse through the confined electron states.« less

  11. Measurement back-action: Listening with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, Thaddeus D.

    2012-07-01

    Single electrons in quantum dots can be disturbed by the apparatus used to measure them. The disturbance can be mediated by incoherent phonons -- literally, noise. Engineering acoustic interference could negate these deleterious effects and bring quantum dots closer to becoming a robust quantum technology.

  12. Synthesis of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Quantum Dots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shekhirev, Mikhail; Goza, John; Teeter, Jacob D.; Lipatov, Alexey; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis of quantum dots is a valuable experiment for demonstration and discussion of quantum phenomena in undergraduate chemistry curricula. Recently, a new class of all-inorganic perovskite quantum dots (QDs) with a formula of CsPbX[subscript 3] (X = Cl, Br, I) was presented and attracted tremendous attention. Here we adapt the synthesis of…

  13. Peptide Coated Quantum Dots for Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Gopal; Pinaud, Fabien; Tsay, James; Li, Jack J.; Bentolila, Laurent A.; Michalet, Xavier; Weiss, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDOTs) have been widely recognized by the scientific community and the biotechnology industry, as witnessed by the exponential growth of this field in the past several years. We describe the synthesis and characterization of visible and near infrared QDots—a critical step for engineering organic molecules like proteins and peptides for building nanocomposite materials with multifunctional properties suitable for biological applications. PMID:17181021

  14. Correlation effects in superconducting quantum dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Vladislav; Žonda, Martin

    2018-05-01

    We study the effect of electron correlations on a system consisting of a single-level quantum dot with local Coulomb interaction attached to two superconducting leads. We use the single-impurity Anderson model with BCS superconducting baths to study the interplay between the proximity induced electron pairing and the local Coulomb interaction. We show how to solve the model using the continuous-time hybridization-expansion quantum Monte Carlo method. The results obtained for experimentally relevant parameters are compared with results of self-consistent second order perturbation theory as well as with the numerical renormalization group method.

  15. Using of Quantum Dots in Biology and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pleskova, Svetlana; Mikheeva, Elza; Gornostaeva, Ekaterina

    2018-01-01

    Quantum dots are nanoparticles, which due to their unique physical and chemical (first of all optical) properties, are promising in biology and medicine. There are many ways for quantum dots synthesis, both in the form of nanoislands self-forming on the surfaces, which can be used as single-photon emitters in electronics for storing information, and in the form of colloidal quantum dots for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in living systems. The paper describes the main methods of quantum dots synthesis and summarizes medical and biological ways of their use. The main emphasis is laid on the ways of quantum dots surface modification. Influence of the size and form of nanoparticles, charge on the surfaces of quantum dots, and cover type on the efficiency of internalization by cells and cell compartments is shown. The main mechanisms of penetration are considered.

  16. Three-terminal quantum-dot thermal management devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanchao; Zhang, Xin; Ye, Zhuolin; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2017-04-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that the heat flows can be manipulated by designing a three-terminal quantum-dot system consisting of three Coulomb-coupled quantum dots connected to respective reservoirs. In this structure, the electron transport between the quantum dots is forbidden, but the heat transport is allowed by the Coulomb interaction to transmit heat between the reservoirs with a temperature difference. We show that such a system is capable of performing thermal management operations, such as heat flow swap, thermal switch, and heat path selector. An important thermal rectifier, i.e., a thermal diode, can be implemented separately in two different paths. The asymmetric configuration of a quantum-dot system is a necessary condition for thermal management operations in practical applications. These results should have important implications in providing the design principle for quantum-dot thermal management devices and may open up potential applications for the thermal management of quantum-dot systems at the nanoscale.

  17. Quantum Dots for Solar Cell Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, Uma

    Solar energy has been anticipated as the most important and reliable source of renewable energy to address the ever-increasing energy demand. To harvest solar energy efficiently, diverse kinds of solar cells have been studied. Among these, quantum dot sensitized solar cells have been an interesting group of solar cells mainly due to tunable, size-dependent electronic and optical properties of quantum dots. Moreover, doping these quantum dots with transition metal elements such as Mn opens avenue for improved performance of solar cells as well as for spin based technologies. In this dissertation, Mn-doped CdSe QDs (Mn-CdSe) have been synthesized by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method. They are used in solar cells to study the effect of Mn doping in the performance of solar cells. Incident photon to current-conversion efficiency (IPCE) is used to record the effect of Mn-doping. Intensity modulated photovoltage and photocurrent spectroscopy (IMVS/PS) has been used to study the carrier dynamics in these solar cells. Additionally, the magnetic properties of Mn-CdSe QDs is studied and its possible origin is discussed. Moreover, CdS/CdSe QDs have been used to study the effect of liquid, gel and solid electrolyte in the performance and stability of the solar cells. Using IPCE spectra, the time decay measurements are presented and the possible reactions between the QD and the electrolytes are explained.

  18. Local Gate Control of a Carbon Nanotube Double Quantum Dot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-04

    Nanotube Double Quantum Dot N. Mason,*† M. J. Biercuk,* C. M. Marcus† We have measured carbon nanotube quantum dots with multiple electro- static gates and...computation. Carbon nanotubes have been considered lead- ing candidates for nanoscale electronic applica- tions (1, 2). Previous measurements of nano- tube...electronics have shown electron confine- ment (quantum dot) effects such as single- electron charging and energy-level quantization (3–5). Nanotube

  19. Spin fine structure of optically excited quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibner, M.; Doty, M. F.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Bracker, A. S.; Stinaff, E. A.; Korenev, V. L.; Reinecke, T. L.; Gammon, D.

    2007-06-01

    The interaction between spins in coupled quantum dots is revealed in distinct fine structure patterns in the measured optical spectra of InAs/GaAs double quantum dot molecules containing zero, one, or two excess holes. The fine structure is explained well in terms of a uniquely molecular interplay of spin-exchange interactions, Pauli exclusion, and orbital tunneling. This knowledge is critical for converting quantum dot molecule tunneling into a means of optically coupling not just orbitals but also spins.

  20. Semiconductor quantum dot scintillation under gamma-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Létant, S E; Wang, T-F

    2006-12-01

    We recently demonstrated the ability of semiconductor quantum dots to convert alpha radiation into visible photons. In this letter, we report on the scintillation of quantum dots under gamma irradiation and compare the energy resolution of the 59 keV line of americium-241 obtained with our quantum dot-glass nanocomposite to that of a standard sodium iodide scintillator. A factor 2 improvement is demonstrated experimentally and interpreted theoretically using a combination of energy-loss and photon-transport models.

  1. In situ electron-beam polymerization stabilized quantum dot micelles.

    PubMed

    Travert-Branger, Nathalie; Dubois, Fabien; Renault, Jean-Philippe; Pin, Serge; Mahler, Benoit; Gravel, Edmond; Dubertret, Benoit; Doris, Eric

    2011-04-19

    A polymerizable amphiphile polymer containing PEG was synthesized and used to encapsulate quantum dots in micelles. The quantum dot micelles were then polymerized using a "clean" electron beam process that did not require any post-irradiation purification. Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the polymerized micelles provided an organic coating that preserved the quantum dot fluorescence better than nonpolymerized micelles, even under harsh conditions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Realizing Rec. 2020 color gamut with quantum dot displays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ruidong; Luo, Zhenyue; Chen, Haiwei; Dong, Yajie; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-09-07

    We analyze how to realize Rec. 2020 wide color gamut with quantum dots. For photoluminescence, our simulation indicates that we are able to achieve over 97% of the Rec. 2020 standard with quantum dots by optimizing the emission spectra and redesigning the color filters. For electroluminescence, by optimizing the emission spectra of quantum dots is adequate to render over 97% of the Rec. 2020 standard. We also analyze the efficiency and angular performance of these devices, and then compare results with LCDs using green and red phosphors-based LED backlight. Our results indicate that quantum dot display is an outstanding candidate for achieving wide color gamut and high optical efficiency.

  3. Polarized quantum dot emission in electrohydrodynamic jet printed photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    See, Gloria G.; Xu, Lu; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2015-08-03

    Tailored optical output, such as color purity and efficient optical intensity, are critical considerations for displays, particularly in mobile applications. To this end, we demonstrate a replica molded photonic crystal structure with embedded quantum dots. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing is used to control the position of the quantum dots within the device structure. This results in significantly less waste of the quantum dot material than application through drop-casting or spin coating. In addition, the targeted placement of the quantum dots minimizes any emission outside of the resonant enhancement field, which enables an 8× output enhancement and highly polarized emission from themore » photonic crystal structure.« less

  4. A strongly interacting polaritonic quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ningyuan; Schine, Nathan; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Ryou, Albert; Clark, Logan W.; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2018-06-01

    Polaritons are promising constituents of both synthetic quantum matter1 and quantum information processors2, whose properties emerge from their components: from light, polaritons draw fast dynamics and ease of transport; from matter, they inherit the ability to collide with one another. Cavity polaritons are particularly promising as they may be confined and subjected to synthetic magnetic fields controlled by cavity geometry3, and furthermore they benefit from increased robustness due to the cavity enhancement in light-matter coupling. Nonetheless, until now, cavity polaritons have operated only in a weakly interacting mean-field regime4,5. Here we demonstrate strong interactions between individual cavity polaritons enabled by employing highly excited Rydberg atoms as the matter component of the polaritons. We assemble a quantum dot composed of approximately 150 strongly interacting Rydberg-dressed 87Rb atoms in a cavity, and observe blockaded transport of photons through it. We further observe coherent photon tunnelling oscillations, demonstrating that the dot is zero-dimensional. This work establishes the cavity Rydberg polariton as a candidate qubit in a photonic information processor and, by employing multiple resonator modes as the spatial degrees of freedom of a photonic particle, the primary ingredient to form photonic quantum matter6.

  5. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  6. Enhanced Materials Based on Submonolayer Type-II Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Tamargo, Maria C; Kuskovsky, Igor L.; Meriles, Carlos

    2017-04-15

    We have investigated a nanostructured material known as sub-monolayer type-II QDs, made from wide bandgap II-VI semiconductors. Our goal is to understand and exploit their tunable optical and electrical properties by taking advantage of the type-II band alignment and quantum confinement effects. Type-II ZnTe quantum dots (QDs) in a ZnSe host are particularly interesting because of their relatively large valence band and conduction band offsets. In the current award we have developed new materials based on sub-monolayer type-II QDs that may be advantageous for photovoltaic and spintronics applications. We have also expanded the structural characterization of these materials by refiningmore » the X-ray diffraction methodologies needed to investigate them. In particular, we have 1) demonstrated ZnCdTe/ZnCdSe type-II QDs materials that have ideal properties for the development of novel high efficiency “intermediate band solar cells”, 2) we developed a comprehensive approach to describe and model the growth of these ultra-small type-II QDs, 3) analysis of the evolution of the photoluminescence (PL) emission, combined with other characterization probes allowed us to predict the size and density of the QDs as a function of the growth conditions, 4) we developed and implemented novel sophisticated X-ray diffraction techniques from which accurate size and shape of the buried type-II QDs could be extracted, 5) a correlation of the shape anisotropy with polarization dependent PL was observed, confirming the QDs detailed shape and providing insight about the effects of this shape anisotropy on the physical properties of the type-II QD systems, and 6) a detailed “time-resolved Kerr rotation” investigation has led to the demonstration of enhanced electron spin lifetimes for the samples with large densities of type-II QDs and an understanding of the interplay between the QDs and Te-isoelectroic centers, a defect that forms in the spacer layers that separate the QDs.« less

  7. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M.; Pacheco, J. L.; Perry, D.; Garratt, E.; Ten Eyck, G.; Bishop, N. C.; Wendt, J. R.; Manginell, R. P.; Dominguez, J.; Pluym, T.; Luhman, D. R.; Bielejec, E.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  8. Silicon Quantum Dots with Counted Antimony Donor Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Meenakshi; Pacheco, Jose L.; Perry, Daniel Lee

    2015-10-01

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. A focused ion beam is used to implant close to quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of ions implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. Regular coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization, are observed in devices with counted implants.

  9. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M., E-mail: msingh@sandia.gov; Luhman, D. R.; Lilly, M. P.

    2016-02-08

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  10. Lateral excitonic switching in vertically stacked quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzynka, Jarosław R.; McDonald, Peter G.; Galbraith, Ian

    2016-06-14

    We show that the application of a vertical electric field to the Coulomb interacting system in stacked quantum dots leads to a 90° in-plane switching of charge probability distribution in contrast to a single dot, where no such switching exists. Results are obtained using path integral quantum Monte Carlo with realistic dot geometry, alloy composition, and piezo-electric potential profiles. The origin of the switching lies in the strain interactions between the stacked dots hence the need for more than one layer of dots. The lateral polarization and electric field dependence of the radiative lifetimes of the excitonic switch are alsomore » discussed.« less

  11. Study of extending carrier lifetime in ZnTe quantum dots coupled with ZnCdSe quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W. C.; Chou, W. C.; Lee, J. D.; Lee, Ling; Phu, Nguyen Dang; Hoang, Luc Huy

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrated the growth of a self-assembled type-II ZnTe/ZnSe quantum dot (QD) structure coupled with a type-I Zn0.88Cd0.12Se/ZnSe quantum well (QW) on the (001) GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). As the spacer thickness is less than 2 nm, the carrier lifetime increasing from 20 ns to nearly 200 ns was successfully achieved. By utilizing the time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) and PL with different excitation power, we identify the PL emission from the coupled QDs consisting of two recombination mechanisms. One is the recombination between electrons in ZnSe barrier and holes confined within ZnTe QDs, and the other is between electrons confined in Zn0.88Cd0.12Se QW and holes confined within ZnTe QDs. According to the band diagram and power-dependent PL, both of the two recombinations reveal the type-II transition. In addition, the second recombination mechanism dominates the whole carrier recombination as the spacer thickness is less than 2 nm. A significant extension of carrier lifetime by increasing the electron and hole separation is illustrated in a type-II ZnTe/ZnSe QD structure coupling with a type-I ZnCdSe/ZnSe QW. Current sample structure could be used to increase the quantum efficient of solar cell based on the II-VI compound semiconductors.

  12. Silicon quantum dots for energetic material applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Sarah K.; Piekiel, Nicholas W.; Ervin, Matthew H.; Morris, Christopher J.

    2018-06-01

    In its history as an energetic material, porous silicon has demonstrated flame speeds in excess of 3 km s-1, tunable combustion behavior, and high energy output, which in theory makes it a very attractive energetic system. In practice, its application within the field is limited by porous silicon's typical substrate-adhered form and caustic chemical processing requirements that limit how and when porous silicon is made. In this work, we have relieved porous silicon of these constraints by creating reactive silicon quantum dots from free-standing porous silicon films. The resulting material is composed of crystalline silicon nanoparticles with diameters as small as 2 nm that retain the chemical properties of the original films including the SiH2 termination layer. The fabricated silicon particles were characterized using FTIR Spectroscopy, TEM, and EDS for determining the size and the chemical composition. For testing as an energetic material fuel, porous silicon was mixed with an oft used oxidizer, sodium perchlorate. During open-channel combustion tests, silicon quantum dots mixed with sodium perchlorate demonstrated flame speeds over 2.5 km s-1, while bomb calorimetry tests showed an average heat of combustion of 7.4 kJ g-1. These results demonstrate the ability to retain the porous silicon material properties that allow for highly energetic material reactions to occur, despite the additional processing steps to create silicon quantum dots. This opens the door for the use of porous silicon in the bulk of the energetic material application space, much of which was previously limited due to the substrate-attached nature of typical porous silicon.

  13. Fast synthesize ZnO quantum dots via ultrasonic method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Zhang, Bing; Ding, Nan; Ding, Wenhao; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-05-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic sol-gel method. The ZnO quantum dots were synthesized in various ultrasonic temperature and time. Photoluminescence properties of these ZnO quantum dots were measured. Time-resolved photoluminescence decay spectra were also taken to discover the change of defects amount during the reaction. Both ultrasonic temperature and time could affect the type and amount of defects in ZnO quantum dots. Total defects of ZnO quantum dots decreased with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time. The dangling bonds defects disappeared faster than the optical defects. Types of optical defects first changed from oxygen interstitial defects to oxygen vacancy and zinc interstitial defects. Then transformed back to oxygen interstitial defects again. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by both ultrasonic temperature and time as well. That is, with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased. Moreover, concentrated raw materials solution brought larger sizes and more optical defects of ZnO quantum dots. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Polarized electrons, trions, and nuclei in charged quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracker, A. S.; Tischler, J. G.; Korenev, V. L.; Gammon, D.

    2003-07-01

    We have investigated spin polarization in GaAs quantum dots. Excitons and trions are polarized directly by optical excitation and studied through polarization of photoluminescence. Electrons and nuclei are polarized indirectly through subsequent relaxation processes. Polarized electrons are identified by the Hanle effect for exciton and trion photoluminescence, while polarized nuclei are identified through the Overhauser effect in individual charged quantum dots.

  15. A Nanowire-Based Plasmonic Quantum Dot Laser.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jinfa; Tatebayashi, Jun; Sergent, Sylvain; Fong, Chee Fai; Ota, Yasutomo; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-13

    Quantum dots enable strong carrier confinement and exhibit a delta-function like density of states, offering significant improvements to laser performance and high-temperature stability when used as a gain medium. However, quantum dot lasers have been limited to photonic cavities that are diffraction-limited and further miniaturization to meet the demands of nanophotonic-electronic integration applications is challenging based on existing designs. Here we introduce the first quantum dot-based plasmonic laser to reduce the cross-sectional area of nanowire quantum dot lasers below the cutoff limit of photonic modes while maintaining the length in the order of the lasing wavelength. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition grown GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowires containing InGaAs quantum dot stacks are placed directly on a silver film, and lasing was observed from single nanowires originating from the InGaAs quantum dot emission into the low-loss higher order plasmonic mode. Lasing threshold pump fluences as low as ∼120 μJ/cm(2) was observed at 7 K, and lasing was observed up to 125 K. Temperature stability from the quantum dot gain, leading to a high characteristic temperature was demonstrated. These results indicate that high-performance, miniaturized quantum dot lasers can be realized with plasmonics.

  16. NREL, University of Washington Scientists Elevate Quantum Dot Solar Cell

    Science.gov Websites

    World Record to 13.4 Percent | NREL | News | NREL NREL, University of Washington Scientists Elevate Quantum Dot Solar Cell World Record to 13.4 Percent News Release: NREL, University of Washington Scientists Elevate Quantum Dot Solar Cell World Record to 13.4 Percent October 27, 2017 Researchers at the

  17. Quantum Dots for Molecular Diagnostics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zdobnova, T.A.; Lebedenko, E.N.; Deyev, S.М.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are a new class of fluorophores with unique physical and chemical properties, which allow to appreciably expand the possibilities for the current methods of fluorescent imaging and optical diagnostics. Here we discuss the prospects of QD application for molecular diagnostics of tumors ranging from cancer-specific marker detection on microplates to non-invasive tumor imagingin vivo. We also point out the essential problems that require resolution in order to clinically promote QD, and we indicate innovative approaches to oncology which are implementable using QD. PMID:22649672

  18. Barrier Engineered Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    dual-color detectors using InAs/GaSb strained layer superlattices ." In Lester Eastman Conference on High Performance Devices (LEC), 2012, pp. 1-4. IEEE...Gautam, S. S. Krishna, E. P. Smith, S. Johnson, and S. Krishna. "Dual-band pBp detectors based on InAs/GaSb strained layer superlattices ." Infrared ...AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0111 TR-2015-0111 BARRIER ENGINEERED QUANTUM DOT INFRARED PHOTODETECTORS Sanjay Krishna Center for High Technology

  19. Protease sensing using nontoxic silicon quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoyu; McVey, Benjamin F P; Robinson, Andrew B; Longatte, Guillaume; O'Mara, Peter B; Tan, Vincent T G; Thordarson, Pall; Tilley, Richard D; Gaus, Katharina; Justin Gooding, John

    2017-08-01

    Herein is presented a proof-of-concept study of protease sensing that combines nontoxic silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The SiQDs serve as the donor and an organic dye as the acceptor. The dye is covalently attached to the SiQDs using a peptide linker. Enzymatic cleavage of the peptide leads to changes in FRET efficiency. The combination of interfacial design and optical imaging presented in this work opens opportunities for use of nontoxic SiQDs relevant to intracellular sensing and imaging. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  20. Improved photovoltaic performance and stability of quantum dot sensitized solar cells using Mn-ZnSe shell structure with enhanced light absorption and recombination control.

    PubMed

    Gopi, Chandu V V M; Venkata-Haritha, M; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-08-07

    To make quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) competitive, photovoltaic parameters comparable to those of other emerging solar cell technologies are necessary. In the present study, ZnSe was used as an alternative to ZnS, one of the most widely used passivation materials in QDSSCs. ZnSe was deposited on a TiO2-CdS-CdSe photoanode to form a core-shell structure, which was more efficient in terms of reducing the electron recombination in QDSSCs. The development of an efficient passivation layer is a requirement for preventing recombination processes in order to attain high-performance and stable QDSSCs. A layer of inorganic Mn-ZnSe was applied to a QD-sensitized photoanode to enhance the adsorption and strongly inhibit interfacial recombination processes in QDSSCs, which greatly improved the power conversion efficiency. Impedance spectroscopy revealed that the combined Mn doping with ZnSe treatment reduces interfacial recombination and increases charge collection efficiency compared with Mn-ZnS, ZnS, and ZnSe. A solar cell based on the CdS-CdSe-Mn-ZnSe photoanode yielded excellent performance with a solar power conversion efficiency of 5.67%, Voc of 0.584 V, and Jsc of 17.59 mA cm(-2). Enhanced electron transport and reduced electron recombination are responsible for the improved Jsc and Voc of the QDSSCs. The effective electron lifetime of the device with Mn-ZnSe was higher than those with Mn-ZnS, ZnSe, and ZnS, leading to more efficient electron-hole separation and slower electron recombination.

  1. Transcending binary logic by gating three coupled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michael; Rogge, S; Remacle, F; Levine, R D

    2007-09-01

    Physical considerations supported by numerical solution of the quantum dynamics including electron repulsion show that three weakly coupled quantum dots can robustly execute a complete set of logic gates for computing using three valued inputs and outputs. Input is coded as gating (up, unchanged, or down) of the terminal dots. A nanosecond time scale switching of the gate voltage requires careful numerical propagation of the dynamics. Readout is the charge (0, 1, or 2 electrons) on the central dot.

  2. Visible Light Responsive Catalysts Using Quantum Dot-Modified Ti02 for Air and Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Hintze, paul; Clausen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The method of photocatalysis utilizing titanium dioxide, TiO2, as the catalyst has been widely studied for trace contaminant control for both air and water applications because of its low energy consumption and use of a regenerable catalyst. Titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Traditionally, Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in PCO reactors and are a setback for the technology for space application due to the possibility of Hg contamination. The development of a visible light responsive (VLR) TiO2-based catalyst could lead to the use of solar energy in the visible region (approx.45% of the solar spectrum lies in the visible region; > 400 nm) or highly efficient LEDs (with wavelengths > 400 nm) to make PCO approaches more efficient, economical, and safe. Though VLR catalyst development has been an active area of research for the past two decades, there are few commercially available VLR catalysts; those that are available still have poor activity in the visible region compared to that in the UV region. Thus, this study was aimed at the further development of VLR catalysts by a new method - coupling of quantum dots (QD) of a narrow band gap semiconductor (e.g., CdS, CdSe, PbS, ZnSe, etc.) to the TiO2 by two preparation methods: 1) photodeposition and 2) mechanical alloying using a high-speed ball mill. A library of catalysts was developed and screened for gas and aqueous phase applications, using ethanol and 4-chlorophenol as the target contaminants, respectively. Both target compounds are well studied in photocatalytic systems serve as model contaminants for this research. Synthesized catalysts were compared in terms of preparation method, type of quantum dots, and dosage of quantum dots.

  3. Non-blinking quantum dot with a plasmonic nanoshell resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Botao; Giovanelli, Emerson; Habert, Benjamin; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Nasilowski, Michel; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lequeux, Nicolas; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Dubertret, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are fluorescent nanocrystals exhibiting exceptional optical properties, but their emission intensity strongly depends on their charging state and local environment. This leads to blinking at the single-particle level or even complete fluorescence quenching, and limits the applications of quantum dots as fluorescent particles. Here, we show that a single quantum dot encapsulated in a silica shell coated with a continuous gold nanoshell provides a system with a stable and Poissonian emission at room temperature that is preserved regardless of drastic changes in the local environment. This novel hybrid quantum dot/silica/gold structure behaves as a plasmonic resonator with a strong Purcell factor, in very good agreement with simulations. The gold nanoshell also acts as a shield that protects the quantum dot fluorescence and enhances its resistance to high-power photoexcitation or high-energy electron beams. This plasmonic fluorescent resonator opens the way to a new family of plasmonic nanoemitters with robust optical properties.

  4. 3D super-resolution imaging with blinking quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Fruhwirth, Gilbert; Cai, En; Ng, Tony; Selvin, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots are promising candidates for single molecule imaging due to their exceptional photophysical properties, including their intense brightness and resistance to photobleaching. They are also notorious for their blinking. Here we report a novel way to take advantage of quantum dot blinking to develop an imaging technique in three-dimensions with nanometric resolution. We first applied this method to simulated images of quantum dots, and then to quantum dots immobilized on microspheres. We achieved imaging resolutions (FWHM) of 8–17 nm in the x-y plane and 58 nm (on coverslip) or 81 nm (deep in solution) in the z-direction, approximately 3–7 times better than what has been achieved previously with quantum dots. This approach was applied to resolve the 3D distribution of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) molecules at, and inside of, the plasma membrane of resting basal breast cancer cells. PMID:24093439

  5. Tunability and Stability of Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots in Ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. Ryan; Hansen, Kameron

    Quantum dot solar cells have become one of the fastest growing solar cell technologies to date, and lead sulfide has proven to be an efficient absorber. However, one of the primary concerns in dye-sensitized quantum dot solar cell development is core degradation. We have synthesized lead sulfide quantum dots inside of the spherical protein ferritin in order to protect them from photocorrosion. We have studied the band gaps of these quantum dots and found them to be widely tunable inside ferritin just as they are outside the protein shell. In addition, we have examined their stability by measuring changes in photoluminescence as they are exposed to light over minutes and hours and found that the ferritin-enclosed PbS quantum dots have significantly better resistance to photocorrosion. Brigham Young University, National Science Foundation.

  6. Quantum Dots in Diagnostics and Detection: Principles and Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Pisanic, T. R.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit exceptional optical and electrical behaviors not found in their bulk counterparts. Following seminal work in the development of water-soluble quantum dots in the late 1990's, researchers have sought to develop interesting and novel ways of exploiting the extraordinary properties of quantum dots for biomedical applications. Since that time, over 10,000 articles have been published related to the use of quantum dots in biomedicine, many of which regard their use in detection and diagnostic bioassays. This review presents a didactic overview of fundamental physical phenomena associated with quantum dots and paradigm examples of how these phenomena can and have been readily exploited for manifold uses in nanobiotechnology with a specific focus on their implementation in in vitro diagnostic assays and biodetection. PMID:24770716

  7. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biomedicial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lijia; Gao, Yanfang; Yan, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometre-scale crystals, which have unique photophysical properties, such as size-dependent optical properties, high fluorescence quantum yields, and excellent stability against photobleaching. These properties enable QDs as the promising optical labels for the biological applications, such as multiplexed analysis of immunocomplexes or DNA hybridization processes, cell sorting and tracing, in vivo imaging and diagnostics in biomedicine. Meanwhile, QDs can be used as labels for the electrochemical detection of DNA or proteins. This article reviews the synthesis and toxicity of QDs and their optical and electrochemical bioanalytical applications. Especially the application of QDs in biomedicine such as delivering, cell targeting and imaging for cancer research, and in vivo photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer are briefly discussed. PMID:22247690

  8. Two Mechanisms Determine Quantum Dot Blinking.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gangcheng; Gómez, Daniel E; Kirkwood, Nicholas; Boldt, Klaus; Mulvaney, Paul

    2018-04-24

    Many potential applications of quantum dots (QDs) can only be realized once the luminescence from single nanocrystals (NCs) is understood. These applications include the development of quantum logic devices, single-photon sources, long-life LEDs, and single-molecule biolabels. At the single-nanocrystal level, random fluctuations in the QD photoluminescence occur, a phenomenon termed blinking. There are two competing models to explain this blinking: Auger recombination and surface trap induced recombination. Here we use lifetime scaling on core-shell chalcogenide NCs to demonstrate that both types of blinking occur in the same QDs. We prove that Auger-blinking can yield single-exponential on/off times in contrast to earlier work. The surface passivation strategy determines which blinking mechanism dominates. This study summarizes earlier studies on blinking mechanisms and provides some clues that stable single QDs can be engineered for optoelectronic applications.

  9. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Graphene based quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. G.; Hu, H.; Pan, Y.; Mao, J. H.; Gao, M.; Guo, H. M.; Du, S. X.; Greber, T.; Gao, H.-J.

    2010-08-01

    Laterally localized electronic states are identified on a single layer of graphene on ruthenium by low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The individual states are separated by 3 nm and comprise regions of about 90 carbon atoms. This constitutes a highly regular quantum dot-array with molecular precision. It is evidenced by quantum well resonances (QWRs) with energies that relate to the corrugation of the graphene layer. The dI/dV conductance spectra are modeled by a layer height dependent potential-well with a delta-function potential that describes the barrier for electron penetration into graphene. The resulting QWRs are strongest and lowest in energy on the isolated 'hill' regions with a diameter of 2 nm, where the graphene is decoupled from the surface.

  10. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2013-10-31

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1) the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2) the multiple exciton generation (MEG) of QDs, 3) fabrication methods of QDs, and 4) nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future.

  11. Cavity-Mediated Coherent Coupling between Distant Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolí, Giorgio; Ferguson, Michael Sven; Rössler, Clemens; Wolfertz, Alexander; Blatter, Gianni; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Reichl, Christian; Wegscheider, Werner; Zilberberg, Oded

    2018-06-01

    Scalable architectures for quantum information technologies require one to selectively couple long-distance qubits while suppressing environmental noise and cross talk. In semiconductor materials, the coherent coupling of a single spin on a quantum dot to a cavity hosting fermionic modes offers a new solution to this technological challenge. Here, we demonstrate coherent coupling between two spatially separated quantum dots using an electronic cavity design that takes advantage of whispering-gallery modes in a two-dimensional electron gas. The cavity-mediated, long-distance coupling effectively minimizes undesirable direct cross talk between the dots and defines a scalable architecture for all-electronic semiconductor-based quantum information processing.

  12. Andreev molecules in semiconductor nanowire double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhaoen; Tacla, Alexandre B; Hocevar, Moïra; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastien R; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Daley, Andrew J; Pekker, David; Frolov, Sergey M

    2017-09-19

    Chains of quantum dots coupled to superconductors are promising for the realization of the Kitaev model of a topological superconductor. While individual superconducting quantum dots have been explored, control of longer chains requires understanding of interdot coupling. Here, double quantum dots are defined by gate voltages in indium antimonide nanowires. High transparency superconducting niobium titanium nitride contacts are made to each of the dots in order to induce superconductivity, as well as probe electron transport. Andreev bound states induced on each of dots hybridize to define Andreev molecular states. The evolution of these states is studied as a function of charge parity on the dots, and in magnetic field. The experiments are found in agreement with a numerical model.Quantum dots in a nanowire are one possible approach to creating a solid-state quantum simulator. Here, the authors demonstrate the coupling of electronic states in a double quantum dot to form Andreev molecule states; a potential building block for longer chains suitable for quantum simulation.

  13. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    DOE PAGES

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; ...

    2014-10-14

    In this study, we introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions atmore » longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.« less

  14. Fourier transform spectra of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damian, V.; Ardelean, I.; Armăşelu, Anca; Apostol, D.

    2009-09-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are nanometer-sized crystals with unique photochemical and photophysical properties that are not available from either isolated molecules or bulk solids. These nanocrystals absorb light over a very broad spectral range as compared to molecular fluorophores which have very narrow excitation spectra. High-quality QDs are proper to be use in different biological and medical applications (as fluorescent labels, the cancer treatment and the drug delivery). In this article, we discuss Fourier transform visible spectroscopy of commercial quantum dots. We reveal that QDs produced by Evident Technologies when are enlightened by laser or luminescent diode light provides a spectral shift of their fluorescence spectra correlated to exciting emission wavelengths, as shown by the ARCspectroNIR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. In the final part of this paper we show an important biological application of CdSe/ZnS core-shell ODs as microbial labeling both for pure cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechocystis PCC 6803) and for mixed cultures of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms.

  15. Fourier transform spectra of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damian, V.; Ardelean, I.; Armăşelu, Anca; Apostol, D.

    2010-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are nanometer-sized crystals with unique photochemical and photophysical properties that are not available from either isolated molecules or bulk solids. These nanocrystals absorb light over a very broad spectral range as compared to molecular fluorophores which have very narrow excitation spectra. High-quality QDs are proper to be use in different biological and medical applications (as fluorescent labels, the cancer treatment and the drug delivery). In this article, we discuss Fourier transform visible spectroscopy of commercial quantum dots. We reveal that QDs produced by Evident Technologies when are enlightened by laser or luminescent diode light provides a spectral shift of their fluorescence spectra correlated to exciting emission wavelengths, as shown by the ARCspectroNIR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. In the final part of this paper we show an important biological application of CdSe/ZnS core-shell ODs as microbial labeling both for pure cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechocystis PCC 6803) and for mixed cultures of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms.

  16. Using quantum dot photoluminescence for load detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, M.; Martin, J.; Hartwig, M.; Baumann, R. R.; Otto, T.; Gessner, T.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel concept for an integrable and flexible sensor capable to visualize mechanical impacts on lightweight structures by quenching the photoluminescence (PL) of CdSe quantum dots. Considering the requirements such as visibility, storage time and high optical contrast of PL quenching with low power consumption, we have investigated a symmetrical and an asymmetrical layer stack consisting of semiconductor organic N,N,N',N'-Tetrakis(3-methylphenyl)-3,3'-dimethylbenzidine (HMTPD) and CdSe quantum dots with elongated CdS shell. Time-resolved series of PL spectra from layer stacks with applied voltages of different polarity and simultaneous observation of power consumption have shown that a variety of mechanisms such as photo-induced charge separation and charge injection, cause PL quenching. However, mechanisms such as screening of external field as well as Auger-assisted charge ejection is working contrary to that. Investigations regarding the influence of illumination revealed that the positive biased asymmetrical layer stack is the preferred sensor configuration, due to a charge carrier injection at voltages of 10 V without the need of coincident illumination.

  17. Quantum Dot Enabled Molecular Sensing and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2012-01-01

    Since its emergence, semiconductor nanoparticles known as quantum dots (QDs) have drawn considerable attention and have quickly extended their applicability to numerous fields within the life sciences. This is largely due to their unique optical properties such as high brightness and narrow emission band as well as other advantages over traditional organic fluorophores. New molecular sensing strategies based on QDs have been developed in pursuit of high sensitivity, high throughput, and multiplexing capabilities. For traditional biological applications, QDs have already begun to replace traditional organic fluorophores to serve as simple fluorescent reporters in immunoassays, microarrays, fluorescent imaging applications, and other assay platforms. In addition, smarter, more advanced QD probes such as quantum dot fluorescence resonance energy transfer (QD-FRET) sensors, quenching sensors, and barcoding systems are paving the way for highly-sensitive genetic and epigenetic detection of diseases, multiplexed identification of infectious pathogens, and tracking of intracellular drug and gene delivery. When combined with microfluidics and confocal fluorescence spectroscopy, the detection limit is further enhanced to single molecule level. Recently, investigations have revealed that QDs participate in series of new phenomena and exhibit interesting non-photoluminescent properties. Some of these new findings are now being incorporated into novel assays for gene copy number variation (CNV) studies and DNA methylation analysis with improved quantification resolution. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review on the latest developments of QD based molecular diagnostic platforms in which QD plays a versatile and essential role. PMID:22916072

  18. Spectroscopy of Single AlInAs Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derebezov, I. A.; Gaisler, A. V.; Gaisler, V. A.; Dmitriev, D. V.; Toropov, A. I.; Kozhukhov, A. S.; Shcheglov, D. V.; Latyshev, A. V.; Aseev, A. L.

    2018-03-01

    A system of quantum dots based on Al x In1- x As/Al y Ga1- y As solid solutions is investigated. The use of Al x In1- x As wide-gap solid solutions as the basis of quantum dots substantially extends the spectral emission range to the short-wavelength region, including the wavelength region near 770 nm, which is of interest for the development of aerospace systems of quantum cryptography. The optical characteristics of Al x In1- x As single quantum dots grown by the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism were studied by cryogenic microphotoluminescence. The statistics of the emission of single quantum dot excitons was studied using a Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometer. The pair photon correlation function indicates the sub-Poissonian nature of the emission statistics, which directly confirms the possibility of developing single-photon emitters based on Al x In1- x As quantum dots. The fine structure of quantum dot exciton states was investigated at wavelengths near 770 nm. The splitting of the exciton states is found to be similar to the natural width of exciton lines, which is of great interest for the development of entangled photon pair emitters based on Al x In1- x As quantum dots.

  19. Ferritin-Templated Quantum-Dots for Quantum Logic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Elliott, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum logic gates (QLGs) or other logic systems are based on quantum-dots (QD) with a stringent requirement of size uniformity. The QD are widely known building units for QLGs. The size control of QD is a critical issue in quantum-dot fabrication. The work presented here offers a new method to develop quantum-dots using a bio-template, called ferritin, that ensures QD production in uniform size of nano-scale proportion. The bio-template for uniform yield of QD is based on a ferritin protein that allows reconstitution of core material through the reduction and chelation processes. One of the biggest challenges for developing QLG is the requirement of ordered and uniform size of QD for arrays on a substrate with nanometer precision. The QD development by bio-template includes the electrochemical/chemical reconsitution of ferritins with different core materials, such as iron, cobalt, manganese, platinum, and nickel. The other bio-template method used in our laboratory is dendrimers, precisely defined chemical structures. With ferritin-templated QD, we fabricated the heptagonshaped patterned array via direct nano manipulation of the ferritin molecules with a tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). We also designed various nanofabrication methods of QD arrays using a wide range manipulation techniques. The precise control of the ferritin-templated QD for a patterned arrangement are offered by various methods, such as a site-specific immobilization of thiolated ferritins through local oxidation using the AFM tip, ferritin arrays induced by gold nanoparticle manipulation, thiolated ferritin positioning by shaving method, etc. In the signal measurements, the current-voltage curve is obtained by measuring the current through the ferritin, between the tip and the substrate for potential sweeping or at constant potential. The measured resistance near zero bias was 1.8 teraohm for single holoferritin and 5.7 teraohm for single apoferritin, respectively.

  20. Ultraviolet/ultrasound-activated persulfate for degradation of drug by zinc selenide quantum dots: Catalysis and microbiology study.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Ali; Naji, Mahsa; Tahami, Shiva

    2017-05-01

    In this study, wet chemical method used for ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) and characterized by, UV-vis, photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The crystallites size of ZnSe QDs was 4.0nm. The average diameters of ZnSe QDs were 3.0-5.3nm. Ritalin was degraded using the UV/ZnSe QDs/persulfate process. The several parameters investigated for the influence of Rtialin degradation were the temperature, the persulfate concentration, and the initial Ritalin concentration. The values of optimum parameters ware room temperature, concentration persulfate 5mmol/L and initial Ritalin concentration 0.09mmol/L. Comparative analyses showed the maximum degradation of Ritalin was found for ZnSe/persulfate under ultra-visible and ultra-sonic irradiation process. Comparative analysis showed the maximum degradation of Ritalin was found for ZnSe/persulfate under ultra-visible and ultra-sonic irradiation process. The values of first-order rate constants from degradation of Ritalin at 25°C were 0.96×10 -2 , 1.09×10 -2 , 1.59×10 -2 and 2.19×10 -2 for US/PS, UV/PS, ZnSe/US/PS and ZnSe/UV/PS system, respectively. The antibacterial activity evaluation against two bacterials, including Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 43300), Bacillus megaterium (ATCC 14581) and Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Micrococcus luteus (ATCC 4698) was considered. It was found that the MIC values for the antibacterial assay in the presence of ZnSe QDs were around 0.30mM with 64.0, 66.0, 79.2, and 83.5% inhibition for the S. aureus, B. megaterium, P. aeruginosa and M. luteus bacterial strains, respectively. Then, results show that the ZnSe QDs have antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. InP/ZnSe/ZnS core-multishell quantum dots for improved luminescence efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Tonino; Ippen, Christian; Wedel, Armin

    2012-04-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit unique optical properties like size-tunable emission color, narrow emission peak, and high luminescence efficiency. QDs are therefore investigated towards their application in light-emitting devices (QLEDs), solar cells, and for bio-imaging purposes. In most cases QDs made from cadmium compounds like CdS, CdSe or CdTe are studied because of their facile and reliable synthesis. However, due to the toxicity of Cd compounds and the corresponding regulation (e.g. RoHS directive in Europe) these materials are not feasible for customer applications. Indium phosphide is considered to be the most promising alternative because of the similar band gap (InP 1.35 eV, CdSe 1.73 eV). InP QDs do not yet reach the quality of CdSe QDs, especially in terms of photoluminescence quantum yield and peak width. Typically, QDs are coated with another semiconductor material of wider band gap, often ZnS, to passivate surface defects and thus improve luminescence efficiency. Concerning CdSe QDs, multishell coatings like CdSe/CdS/ZnS or CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS have been shown to be advantageous due to the improved compatibility of lattice constants. Here we present a method to improve the luminescence efficiency of InP QDs by coating a ZnSe/ZnS multishell instead of a ZnS single shell. ZnSe exhibits an intermediate lattice constant of 5.67 Å between those of InP (5.87 Å) and ZnS (5.41 Å) and thus acts as a wetting layer. As a result, InP/ZnSe/ZnS is introduced as a new core-shell quantum dot material which shows improved photoluminescence quantum yield (up to 75 %) compared to the conventional InP/ZnS system.

  2. RKKY interaction in a chirally coupled double quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, A. W.; Tutuc, D.; Haug, R. J.

    2013-12-04

    The competition between the Kondo effect and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida (RKKY) interaction is investigated in a double quantum dots system, coupled via a central open conducting region. A perpendicular magnetic field induces the formation of Landau Levels which in turn give rise to the so-called Kondo chessboard pattern in the transport through the quantum dots. The two quantum dots become therefore chirally coupled via the edge channels formed in the open conducting area. In regions where both quantum dots exhibit Kondo transport the presence of the RKKY exchange interaction is probed by an analysis of the temperature dependence. The thus obtainedmore » Kondo temperature of one dot shows an abrupt increase at the onset of Kondo transport in the other, independent of the magnetic field polarity, i.e. edge state chirality in the central region.« less

  3. Magneto-optical studies of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Andreas Hans

    Significant effort in condensed matter physics has recently been devoted to the field of "spintronics" which seeks to utilize the spin degree of freedom of electrons. Unlike conventional electronics that rely on the electron charge, devices exploiting their spin have the potential to yield new and novel technological applications, including spin transistors, spin filters, and spin-based memory devices. Any such application has the following essential requirements: 1) Efficient electrical injection of spin-polarized carriers; 2) Long spin lifetimes; 3) Ability to control and manipulate electron spins; 4) Effective detection of spin-polarized carriers. Recent work has demonstrated efficient electrical injection from ferromagnetic contacts such as Fe and MnAs, utilizing a spin-Light Emitting Diode (spin-LED) as a method of detection. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive candidates for satisfying requirements 2 and 3 as their zero dimensionality significantly suppresses many spin-flip mechanisms leading to long spin coherence times, as well as enabling the localization and manipulation of a controlled number of electrons and holes. This thesis is composed of three projects that are all based on the optical properties of QD structures including: I) Intershell exchange between spin-polarized electrons occupying adjacent shells in InAs QDs; II) Spin-polarized multiexitons in InAs QDs in the presence of spin-orbit interactions; III) The optical Aharonov-Bohm effect in AlxGa1-xAs/AlyGa1-yAs quantum wells (QWs). In the following we introduce some of the basic optical properties of quantum dots, describe the main tool (spin-LED) employed in this thesis to inject and detect spins in these QDs, and conclude with the optical Aharonov-Bohm effect (OAB) in type-II QDs.

  4. Optical detection of organophosphorus compounds based on Mn-doped ZnSe d-dot enzymatic catalytic sensor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue; Tang, Guangchao; Su, Xingguang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report a sensitive and selective method for detection of organophosphorus compounds (OPs) based on Mn:ZnSe d-dots-enzyme-hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) fluorescence quenching system. Acetylcholine esterase (AChE) can hydrolyze acetylcholine (ACh) to choline. Subsequently, choline oxidase (ChOx) oxidizes choline to generate H(2)O(2). The enzyme-generated H(2)O(2) can quench the fluorescence of Mn:ZnSe d-dots. When paraoxon are introduced in solution, it can interact with the active centers of AChE and decrease the enzyme activity. This leads to the decrease of the H(2)O(2) production and then the fluorescence quenching rate of Mn:ZnSe d-dots. Experimental results showed that the enzyme inhibition percentage of Mn:ZnSe d-dots-ChOx-AChE-ACh system was proportional to the logarithm of paraoxon in the range 4.84×10(-11) to 4.84×10(-6) mol/L with the detection limit (S/N=3) of 1.31×10(-11) mol/L. The proposed biosensor has been employed for quick determination of paraoxon in tap water and milk samples with satisfactory reproducibility and accuracy. This nano-biosensor was proved to be sensitive, rapid, simple and tolerance of most interfering substances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A 2 × 2 quantum dot array with controllable inter-dot tunnel couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Uditendu; Dehollain, Juan Pablo; Reichl, Christian; Wegscheider, Werner; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.

    2018-04-01

    The interaction between electrons in arrays of electrostatically defined quantum dots is naturally described by a Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Moreover, the high degree of tunability of these systems makes them a powerful platform to simulate different regimes of the Hubbard model. However, most quantum dot array implementations have been limited to one-dimensional linear arrays. In this letter, we present a square lattice unit cell of 2 × 2 quantum dots defined electrostatically in an AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure using a double-layer gate technique. We probe the properties of the array using nearby quantum dots operated as charge sensors. We show that we can deterministically and dynamically control the charge occupation in each quantum dot in the single- to few-electron regime. Additionally, we achieve simultaneous individual control of the nearest-neighbor tunnel couplings over a range of 0-40 μeV. Finally, we demonstrate fast (˜1 μs) single-shot readout of the spin state of electrons in the dots through spin-to-charge conversion via Pauli spin blockade. These advances pave the way for analog quantum simulations in two dimensions, not previously accessible in quantum dot systems.

  6. Quantum dot nanoparticle conjugation, characterization, and applications in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Smita

    Quantum dot are semiconducting nanoparticles that have been used for decades in a variety of applications such as solar cells, LEDs and medical imaging. Their use in the last area, however, has been extremely limited despite their potential as revolutionary new biological labeling tools. Quantum dots are much brighter and more stable than conventional fluorophores, making them optimal for high resolution imaging and long term studies. Prior work in this area involves synthesizing and chemically conjugating quantum dots to molecules of interest in-house. However this method is both time consuming and prone to human error. Additionally, non-specific binding and nanoparticle aggregation currently prevent researchers from utilizing this system to its fullest capacity. Another critical issue that has not been addressed is determining the number of ligands bound to nanoparticles, which is crucial for proper interpretation of results. In this work, methods to label fixed cells using two types of chemically modified quantum dots are studied. Reproducible non-specific artifact labeling is consistently demonstrated if antibody-quantum dot conditions are less than optimal. In order to explain this, antibodies bound to quantum dots were characterized and quantified. While other groups have qualitatively characterized antibody functionalized quantum dots using TEM, AFM, UV spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis, and in some cases have reported calculated estimates of the putative number of total antibodies bound to quantum dots, no quantitative experimental results had been reported prior to this work. The chemical functionalization and characterization of quantum dot nanocrystals achieved in this work elucidates binding mechanisms of ligands to nanoparticles and allows researchers to not only translate our tools to studies in their own areas of interest but also derive quantitative results from these studies. This research brings ease of use and increased reliability to

  7. Hybrid Circuit QED with Double Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petta, Jason

    2014-03-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics explores quantum optics at the most basic level of a single photon interacting with a single atom. We have been able to explore cavity QED in a condensed matter system by placing a double quantum dot (DQD) inside of a high quality factor microwave cavity. Our results show that measurements of the cavity field are sensitive to charge and spin dynamics in the DQD.[2,3] We can explore non-equilibrium physics by applying a finite source-drain bias across the DQD, which results in sequential tunneling. Remarkably, we observe a gain as large as 15 in the cavity transmission when the DQD energy level detuning is matched to the cavity frequency. These results will be discussed in the context of single atom lasing.[4] I will also describe recent progress towards reaching the strong-coupling limit in cavity-coupled Si DQDs. In collaboration with Manas Kulkarni, Yinyu Liu, Karl Petersson, George Stehlik, Jacob Taylor, and Hakan Tureci. We acknowledge support from the Sloan and Packard Foundations, ARO, DARPA, and NSF.

  8. Characteristics of gradient-interface-structured ZnCdSSe quantum dots with modified interface and its application to quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Da-Woon; Kim, Jae-Yup; Seo, Han Wook; Lim, Kyoung-Mook; Ko, Min Jae; Seong, Tae-Yeon; Kim, Bum Sung

    2018-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are attractive materials for application in photovoltaics, LEDs, displays, and bio devices owing to their unique properties. In this study, we synthesized gradient-interface-structured ZnCdSSe QDs and modified the interface based on a thermodynamic simulation to investigate its optical and physical properties. In addition, the interface was modified by increasing the molar concentration of Se. QDs at the modified interface were applied to QD-sensitized solar cells, which showed a 25.5% increase in photoelectric conversion efficiency owing to the reduced electron confinement effect. The increase seems to be caused by the excited electrons being relatively easily transferred to the level of TiO2 owing to the reduced electron confinement effect. Consequently, the electron confinement effect was observed to be reduced by increasing the ZnSe (or Zn1-xCdxSe)-rich phase at the interface. This means that, based on the thermodynamic simulation, the interface between the core QDs and the surface of the QDs can be controlled. The improvement of optical and electronic properties by controlling interfaces and surfaces during the synthesis of QDs, as reported in this work, can be useful for many applications beyond solar cells.

  9. A triple quantum dot based nano-electromechanical memory device

    SciTech Connect

    Pozner, R.; Lifshitz, E.; Solid State Institute, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are free-standing nano-structures with chemically tunable electronic properties. This tunability offers intriguing possibilities for nano-electromechanical devices. In this work, we consider a nano-electromechanical nonvolatile memory (NVM) device incorporating a triple quantum dot (TQD) cluster. The device operation is based on a bias induced motion of a floating quantum dot (FQD) located between two bound quantum dots (BQDs). The mechanical motion is used for switching between two stable states, “ON” and “OFF” states, where ligand-mediated effective interdot forces between the BQDs and the FQD serve to hold the FQD in each stable position under zero bias. Consideringmore » realistic microscopic parameters, our quantum-classical theoretical treatment of the TQD reveals the characteristics of the NVM.« less

  10. Gate-controlled electromechanical backaction induced by a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Yuma; Mahboob, Imran; Onomitsu, Koji; Sasaki, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Semiconductor-based quantum structures integrated into mechanical resonators have emerged as a unique platform for generating entanglement between macroscopic phononic and mesocopic electronic degrees of freedom. A key challenge to realizing this is the ability to create and control the coupling between two vastly dissimilar systems. Here, such coupling is demonstrated in a hybrid device composed of a gate-defined quantum dot integrated into a piezoelectricity-based mechanical resonator enabling milli-Kelvin phonon states to be detected via charge fluctuations in the quantum dot. Conversely, the single electron transport in the quantum dot can induce a backaction onto the mechanics where appropriate bias of the quantum dot can enable damping and even current-driven amplification of the mechanical motion. Such electron transport induced control of the mechanical resonator dynamics paves the way towards a new class of hybrid semiconductor devices including a current injected phonon laser and an on-demand single phonon emitter.

  11. ``Flash'' synthesis of ``giant'' Mn-doped CdS/ZnSe/ZnS nanocrystals with ZnSe layer as hole quantum-well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruilin; Zhang, Jiayu

    Usually, exciton-Mn energy transfer in Mn-doped CdS/ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) can readily outcompete the exciton trapping by an order of magnitude. However, with the accumulation of non-radiative defects in the giant shell during the rapid growth of the thick shell (up to ~20 monolayers in no more than 10 minutes), the photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield of this kind of ``giant'' NCs is significantly reduced by the accumulation of non-radiative defects during the rapid growth of thick shell. That is because the exciton-Mn energy transfer in Mn-doped CdS/ZnS NCs is significantly inhibited by the hole trapping as the major competing process, resulting from the insufficient hole-confinement in CdS/ZnS NCs. Accordingly ``flash'' synthesis of giant Mn-doped CdS/ZnSe/ZnS NCs with ZnSe layer as hole quantum-well is developed to suppress the inhibition. Meanwhile Mn2+ PL peak changes profoundly from ~620 nm to ~540 nm after addition of ZnSe layer. Studies are under the way to explore the relevant mechanisms.

  12. The effect of defect emissions on enhancement photocatalytic performance of ZnSe QDs and ZnSe/rGO nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Ramin; Azimi, H. R.; Mahmoudian, M. R.; Basirun, Wan Jeffrey

    2018-03-01

    A systematic study about the origin of defects emission of ZnSe structure was conducted by photoluminescence (PL) spectrometer at room temperature. It was observed that different intermediate energy levels in band-gap space of ZnSe structure were generated by different defects such as Se-, Zn-vacancies, Se-, Zn-interstitials, and surface states. Effects of these defects on the photocatalytic performance of ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) and ZnSe/graphene nanocomposites were investigated. The pristine ZnSe QDs and ZnSe/graphene nanocomposites were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The PL spectra of the samples showed four emissions from four regions of the visible spectrum such as violet, green, orange, and red emissions. The violet emission was associated with the near-band-edge (NBE) of the ZnSe nanostructures, while, the other emissions were related to different defects of ZnSe structures. Annealing the samples in the H2 atmosphere caused to increase orange emission intensity and indicated that origin of orange emission was a donor-acceptor pair (DAPs) related to singly positively charged Se-vacancies (VSe) to singly negatively charged zinc vacancy (VZn-). Photocatalytic study of the samples to remove the methylene blue (MB) dye showed that the photocatalytic performance of the samples improved by graphene as an additive and increasing the orange emission intensity.

  13. Nuclear Spin Nanomagnet in an Optically Excited Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenev, V. L.

    2007-12-01

    Linearly polarized light tuned slightly below the optical transition of the negatively charged exciton (trion) in a single quantum dot causes the spontaneous nuclear spin polarization (self-polarization) at a level close to 100%. The effective magnetic field of spin-polarized nuclei shifts the optical transition energy close to resonance with photon energy. The resonantly enhanced Overhauser effect sustains the stability of the nuclear self-polarization even in the absence of spin polarization of the quantum dot electron. As a result the optically selected single quantum dot represents a tiny magnet with the ferromagnetic ordering of nuclear spins—the nuclear spin nanomagnet.

  14. Nuclear spin nanomagnet in an optically excited quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Korenev, V L

    2007-12-21

    Linearly polarized light tuned slightly below the optical transition of the negatively charged exciton (trion) in a single quantum dot causes the spontaneous nuclear spin polarization (self-polarization) at a level close to 100%. The effective magnetic field of spin-polarized nuclei shifts the optical transition energy close to resonance with photon energy. The resonantly enhanced Overhauser effect sustains the stability of the nuclear self-polarization even in the absence of spin polarization of the quantum dot electron. As a result the optically selected single quantum dot represents a tiny magnet with the ferromagnetic ordering of nuclear spins-the nuclear spin nanomagnet.

  15. Quantum Dots Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Williams, P. A.; Burke, E. R.

    2015-01-01

    A novel concept for the detection of x-rays with microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide is presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dots application technique are discussed.

  16. Quantum Dots Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, Stan; Williams, Phillip; Burke, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide are presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dot application technique are discussed.

  17. PREFACE: Quantum dots as probes in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2013-05-01

    The recent availability of nanostructured materials has resulted in an explosion of research focused on their unique optical, thermal, mechanical and magnetic properties. Optical imagining, magnetic enhancement of contrast and drug delivery capabilities make the nanoparticles of special interest in biomedical applications. These materials have been involved in the development of theranostics—a new field of medicine that is focused on personalized tests and treatment. It is likely that multimodal nanomaterials will be responsible for future diagnostic advances in medicine. Quantum dots (QD) are nanoparticles which exhibit luminescence either through the formation of three-dimensional excitons or excitations of the impurities. The excitonic luminescence can be tuned by changing the size (the smaller the size, the higher the frequency). QDs are usually made of semiconducting materials. Unlike fluorescent proteins and organic dyes, QDs resist photobleaching, allow for multi-wavelength excitations and have narrow emission spectra. The techniques to make QDs are cheap and surface modifications and functionalizations can be implemented. Importantly, QDs could be synthesized to exhibit useful optomagnetic properties and, upon functionalization with an appropriate biomolecule, directed towards a pre-selected target for diagnostic imaging and photodynamic therapy. This special issue on Quantum dots in Biology is focused on recent research in this area. It starts with a topical review by Sreenivasan et al on various physical mechanisms that lead to the QD luminescence and on using wavelength shifts for an improvement in imaging. The next paper by Szczepaniak et al discusses nanohybrids involving QDs made of CdSe coated by ZnS and combined covalently with a photosynthetic enzyme. These nanohybrids are shown to maintain the enzymatic activity, however the enzyme properties depend on the size of a QD. They are proposed as tools to study photosynthesis in isolated

  18. Highly Fluorescent Noble Metal Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Nicovich, Philip R.; Dickson, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Highly fluorescent, water-soluble, few-atom noble metal quantum dots have been created that behave as multi-electron artificial atoms with discrete, size-tunable electronic transitions throughout the visible and near IR. These “molecular metals” exhibit highly polarizable transitions and scale in size according to the simple relation, Efermi/N1/3, predicted by the free electron model of metallic behavior. This simple scaling indicates that fluorescence arises from intraband transitions of free electrons and that these conduction electron transitions are the low number limit of the plasmon – the collective dipole oscillations occurring when a continuous density of states is reached. Providing the “missing link” between atomic and nanoparticle behavior in noble metals, these emissive, water-soluble Au nanoclusters open new opportunities for biological labels, energy transfer pairs, and light emitting sources in nanoscale optoelectronics. PMID:17105412

  19. Resonant tunneling based graphene quantum dot memristors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuan; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-12-08

    In this paper, we model two-terminal all graphene quantum dot (GQD) based resistor-type memory devices (memristors). The resistive switching is achieved by resonant electron tunneling. We show that parallel GQDs can be used to create multi-state memory circuits. The number of states can be optimised with additional voltage sources, whilst the noise margin for each state can be controlled by appropriately choosing the branch resistance. A three-terminal GQD device configuration is also studied. The addition of an isolated gate terminal can be used to add further or modify the states of the memory device. The proposed devices provide a promising route towards volatile memory devices utilizing only atomically thin two-dimensional graphene.

  20. Subdiffusive exciton transport in quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Akselrod, Gleb M; Prins, Ferry; Poulikakos, Lisa V; Lee, Elizabeth M Y; Weidman, Mark C; Mork, A Jolene; Willard, Adam P; Bulović, Vladimir; Tisdale, William A

    2014-06-11

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are promising materials for use in solar cells, light-emitting diodes, lasers, and photodetectors, but the mechanism and length of exciton transport in QD materials is not well understood. We use time-resolved optical microscopy to spatially visualize exciton transport in CdSe/ZnCdS core/shell QD assemblies. We find that the exciton diffusion length, which exceeds 30 nm in some cases, can be tuned by adjusting the inorganic shell thickness and organic ligand length, offering a powerful strategy for controlling exciton movement. Moreover, we show experimentally and through kinetic Monte Carlo simulations that exciton diffusion in QD solids does not occur by a random-walk process; instead, energetic disorder within the inhomogeneously broadened ensemble causes the exciton diffusivity to decrease over time. These findings reveal new insights into exciton dynamics in disordered systems and demonstrate the flexibility of QD materials for photonic and optoelectronic applications.

  1. Selenium quantum dots: Preparation, structure, and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Fuli; Li, Xueming; Tang, Libin; Lai, Sin Ki; Lu, Chaoyu; Lau, Shu Ping

    2017-01-01

    An interesting class of low-dimensional nanomaterials, namely, selenium quantum dots (SeQDs), which are composed of nano-sized selenium particles, is reported in this study. The SeQDs possess a hexagonal crystal structure. They can be synthesized in large quantity by ultrasound liquid-phase exfoliation using NbSe2 powders as the source material and N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as the dispersant. During sonication, the Nb-Se bonds dissociate; the SeQDs are formed, while niobium is separated by centrifugation. The SeQDs have a narrow diameter distribution from 1.9 to 4.6 nm and can be dispersed with high stability in NMP without the need for passivating agents. They exhibit photoluminescence properties that are expected to find useful applications in bioimaging, optoelectronics, as well as nanocomposites.

  2. Building devices from colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Cherie R; Lifshitz, Efrat; Sargent, Edward H; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2016-08-26

    The continued growth of mobile and interactive computing requires devices manufactured with low-cost processes, compatible with large-area and flexible form factors, and with additional functionality. We review recent advances in the design of electronic and optoelectronic devices that use colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The properties of materials assembled of QDs may be tailored not only by the atomic composition but also by the size, shape, and surface functionalization of the individual QDs and by the communication among these QDs. The chemical and physical properties of QD surfaces and the interfaces in QD devices are of particular importance, and these enable the solution-based fabrication of low-cost, large-area, flexible, and functional devices. We discuss challenges that must be addressed in the move to solution-processed functional optoelectronic nanomaterials. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Multifunctional Quantum Dots for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel; Gao, Xiaohu

    2009-01-01

    Successes in biomedical research and state-of-the-art medicine have undoubtedly improved the quality of life. However, a number of diseases, such as cancer, immunodeficiencies, and neurological disorders, still evade conventional diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. A transformation towards personalized medicine may help to combat these diseases. For this, identification of disease molecular fingerprints and their association with prognosis and targeted therapy must become available. Quantum dots (QDs), semiconductor nanocrystals with unique photo-physical properties, represent a novel class of fluorescence probes to address many of the needs of personalized medicine. This review outlines the properties of QDs that make them a suitable platform for advancing personalized medicine, examines several proof-of-concept studies showing utility of QDs for clinically relevant applications, and discusses current challenges in introducing QDs into clinical practice. PMID:20161004

  4. First principles study of edge carboxylated graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Elhaes, Hanan; Ibrahim, Medhat A.

    2018-05-01

    The structure stability and electronic properties of edge carboxylated hexagonal and triangular graphene quantum dots are investigated using density functional theory. The calculated binding energies show that the hexagonal clusters with armchair edges have the highest stability among all the quantum dots. The binding energy of carboxylated graphene quantum dots increases by increasing the number of carboxyl groups. Our study shows that the total dipole moment significantly increases by adding COOH with the highest value observed in triangular clusters. The edge states in triangular graphene quantum dots with zigzag edges produce completely different energy spectrum from other dots: (a) the energy gap in triangular zigzag is very small as compared to other clusters and (b) the highest occupied molecular orbital is localized at the edges which is in contrast to other clusters where it is distributed over the cluster surface. The enhanced reactivity and the controllable energy gap by shape and edge termination make graphene quantum dots ideal for various nanodevice applications such as sensors. The infrared spectra are presented to confirm the stability of the quantum dots.

  5. Unity quantum yield of photogenerated charges and band-like transport in quantum-dot solids.

    PubMed

    Talgorn, Elise; Gao, Yunan; Aerts, Michiel; Kunneman, Lucas T; Schins, Juleon M; Savenije, T J; van Huis, Marijn A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houtepen, Arjan J; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2011-09-25

    Solid films of colloidal quantum dots show promise in the manufacture of photodetectors and solar cells. These devices require high yields of photogenerated charges and high carrier mobilities, which are difficult to achieve in quantum-dot films owing to a strong electron-hole interaction and quantum confinement. Here, we show that the quantum yield of photogenerated charges in strongly coupled PbSe quantum-dot films is unity over a large temperature range. At high photoexcitation density, a transition takes place from hopping between localized states to band-like transport. These strongly coupled quantum-dot films have electrical properties that approach those of crystalline bulk semiconductors, while retaining the size tunability and cheap processing properties of colloidal quantum dots.

  6. Spectral properties of finite two dimensional quantum dot arrays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Ernesto; Ramírez, Felipe; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    1997-08-01

    Motivated by recent proposed geometries in cellular automata, we study arrays of four or five coupled quantum dots located at the corners and at the center of a square. We calculate the addition spectrum for dots with equal or different sizes at each site and compare with the case of linear arrays. We obtain the numerically exact solution for arrays with two electrons and study the properties of this system as a cell or building block of quantum dot cellular automata. We obtain the ``polarization" for each state and discuss its possible use as a two-state system or ``qubit," as proposed recently(C. S. Lent, P. D. Tougaw, and W. Porod, Appl. Phys. Lett. 62) 714, (1993). An extended Hubbard Hamiltonian is used which takes into account quantum confinement, intra- an inter-dot Coulomb interaction as well as tunneling between neighboring dots.

  7. Spectral properties of finite two dimensional quantum dot arrays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Felipe; Cota, Ernesto; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    1997-03-01

    Motivated by recent proposed geometries in cellular automata, we study arrays of four or five coupled quantum dots located at the corners and at the center of a square. We calculate the addition spectrum for dots with equal or different sizes at each site and compare with the case of linear arrays. We obtain the numerically exact solution for arrays with two electrons and study the properties of this system as a cell or building block of quantum dot cellular automata. We obtain the ``polarization" for each state and discuss its possible use as a two-state system or ``qubit," as proposed recently(C. S. Lent, P. D. Tougaw, and W. Porod, Appl. Phys. Lett. 62) 714, (1993). An extended Hubbard Hamiltonian is used which takes into account quantum confinement, intra- an inter-dot Coulomb interaction as well as tunneling between neighboring dots.

  8. Spin interactions in InAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, M. F.; Ware, M. E.; Stinaff, E. A.; Scheibner, M.; Bracker, A. S.; Gammon, D.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Reinecke, T. L.; Korenev, V. L.

    2006-03-01

    Fine structure splittings in optical spectra of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) generally arise from spin interactions between particles confined in the dots. We present experimental studies of the fine structure that arises from multiple charges confined in a single dot [1] or in molecular orbitals of coupled pairs of dots. To probe the underlying spin interactions we inject particles with a known spin orientation (by using polarized light to perform photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy experiments) or use a magnetic field to orient and/or mix the spin states. We develop a model of the spin interactions that aids in the development of quantum information processing applications based on controllable interactions between spins confined to QDs. [1] Polarized Fine Structure in the Photoluminescence Excitation Spectrum of a Negatively Charged Quantum Dot, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 177403 (2005)

  9. Optical properties of self-assembled ZnTe quantum dots grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.S.; Lai, Y.J.; Chou, W.C.

    2005-02-01

    The morphology and the size-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the type-II ZnTe quantum dots (QDs) grown in a ZnSe matrix were obtained. The coverage of ZnTe varied from 2.5 to 3.5 monolayers (MLs). The PL peak energy decreased as the dot size increased. Excitation power and temperature-dependent PL spectra are used to characterize the optical properties of the ZnTe quantum dots. For 2.5- and 3.0-ML samples, the PL peak energy decreased monotonically as the temperature increased. However, for the 3.5-ML sample, the PL peak energy was initially blueshifted and then redshifted as the temperature increased above 40 K. Carrier thermalizationmore » and carrier transfer between QDs are used to explain the experimental data. A model of temperature-dependent linewidth broadening is employed to fit the high-temperature data. The activation energy, which was found by the simple PL intensity quenching model, of the 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 MLs were determined to be 6.35, 9.40, and 18.87 meV, respectively.« less

  10. Aptamer-Modified Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biosensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lin; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Yongxiang; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-07-28

    Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted extensive interest in the biosensing area because of their properties, such as narrow and symmetric emission with tunable colors, high quantum yield, high stability and controllable morphology. The introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of semiconductor quantum dots allows one to conjugate a spectrum of ligands, antibodies, peptides, or nucleic acids for broader and smarter applications. Among these ligands, aptamers exhibit many advantages including small size, high chemical stability, simple synthesis with high batch-to-batch consistency and convenient modification. More importantly, it is easy to introduce nucleic acid amplification strategies and/or nanomaterials to improve the sensitivity of aptamer-based sensing systems. Therefore, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers brings more opportunities in bioanalysis. Here we summarize recent advances on aptamer-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots in biosensing applications. Firstly, we discuss the properties and structure of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers. Then, the applications of biosensors based on aptamer-modified semiconductor quantum dots by different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical, electrochemical and electrogenerated chemiluminescence approaches, is discussed. Finally, our perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this promising field are provided.

  11. Aptamer-Modified Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Lin; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Yongxiang; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted extensive interest in the biosensing area because of their properties, such as narrow and symmetric emission with tunable colors, high quantum yield, high stability and controllable morphology. The introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of semiconductor quantum dots allows one to conjugate a spectrum of ligands, antibodies, peptides, or nucleic acids for broader and smarter applications. Among these ligands, aptamers exhibit many advantages including small size, high chemical stability, simple synthesis with high batch-to-batch consistency and convenient modification. More importantly, it is easy to introduce nucleic acid amplification strategies and/or nanomaterials to improve the sensitivity of aptamer-based sensing systems. Therefore, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers brings more opportunities in bioanalysis. Here we summarize recent advances on aptamer-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots in biosensing applications. Firstly, we discuss the properties and structure of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers. Then, the applications of biosensors based on aptamer-modified semiconductor quantum dots by different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical, electrochemical and electrogenerated chemiluminescence approaches, is discussed. Finally, our perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this promising field are provided. PMID:28788080

  12. Shell Thickness Dependence of Interparticle Energy Transfer in Core-Shell ZnSe/ZnSe Quantum Dots Doping with Europium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ni; Li, Shuxin; Wang, Caifeng; Li, Jie

    2018-04-01

    Low-toxic core-shell ZnSe:Eu/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared through two steps in water solution: nucleation doping and epitaxial shell grown. The structural and morphological characteristics of ZnSe/ZnS:Eu QDs with different shell thickness were explored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results. The characteristic photoluminescence (PL) intensity of Eu ions was enhanced whereas that of band-edge luminescence and defect-related luminescence of ZnSe QDs was decreased with increasing shell thickness. The transformation of PL intensity revealed an efficient energy transfer process between ZnSe and Eu. The PL intensity ratio of Eu ions ( I 613) to ZnSe QDs ( I B ) under different shell thickness was systemically analyzed by PL spectra and time-resolved PL spectra. The obtained results were in agreement with the theory analysis results by the kinetic theory of energy transfer, revealing that energy was transmitted in the form of dipole-electric dipole interaction. This particular method of adjusting luminous via changing the shell thickness can provide valuable insights towards the fundamental understanding and application of QDs in the field of optoelectronics.

  13. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  14. Quantum Dots in the Therapy: Current Trends and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots are an emerging nanomaterial with broad use in technical disciplines; however, their application in the field of biomedicine becomes also relevant and significant possibilities have appeared since the discovery in 1980s. The current review is focused on the therapeutic applications of quantum dots which become an emerging use of the particles. They are introduced as potent carriers of drugs and as a material well suited for the diagnosis of disparate pathologies like visualization of cancer cells or pathogenic microorganisms. Quantum dots toxicity and modifications for the toxicity reduction are discussed here as well. Survey of actual papers and patents in the field of quantum dots use in the biomedicine is provided. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Berry phase jumps and giant nonreciprocity in Dirac quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin F.; Levitov, Leonid S.

    2016-12-01

    We predict that a strong nonreciprocity in the resonance spectra of Dirac quantum dots can be induced by the Berry phase. The nonreciprocity arises in relatively weak magnetic fields and is manifest in anomalously large field-induced splittings of quantum dot resonances which are degenerate at B =0 due to time-reversal symmetry. This exotic behavior, which is governed by field-induced jumps in the Berry phase of confined electronic states, is unique to quantum dots in Dirac materials and is absent in conventional quantum dots. The effect is strong for gapless Dirac particles and can overwhelm the B -induced orbital and Zeeman splittings. A finite Dirac mass suppresses the effect. The nonreciprocity, predicted for generic two-dimensional Dirac materials, is accessible through Faraday and Kerr optical rotation measurements and scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

  16. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    DOEpatents

    Stavis, Samuel M.; Edel, Joshua B.; Samiee, Kevan T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2010-04-13

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  17. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    DOEpatents

    Stavis, Samuel M [Ithaca, NY; Edel, Joshua B [Brookline, MA; Samiee, Kevan T [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY

    2008-07-29

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  18. A fabrication guide for planar silicon quantum dot heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruijtenburg, Paul C.; Amitonov, Sergey V.; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.; Zwanenburg, Floris A.

    2018-04-01

    We describe important considerations to create top-down fabricated planar quantum dots in silicon, often not discussed in detail in literature. The subtle interplay between intrinsic material properties, interfaces and fabrication processes plays a crucial role in the formation of electrostatically defined quantum dots. Processes such as oxidation, physical vapor deposition and atomic-layer deposition must be tailored in order to prevent unwanted side effects such as defects, disorder and dewetting. In two directly related manuscripts written in parallel we use techniques described in this work to create depletion-mode quantum dots in intrinsic silicon, and low-disorder silicon quantum dots defined with palladium gates. While we discuss three different planar gate structures, the general principles also apply to 0D and 1D systems, such as self-assembled islands and nanowires.

  19. Coal as an abundant source of graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ruquan; Xiang, Changsheng; Lin, Jian; Peng, Zhiwei; Huang, Kewei; Yan, Zheng; Cook, Nathan P.; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Ruan, Gedeng; Ceriotti, Gabriel; Raji, Abdul-Rahman O.; Martí, Angel A.; Tour, James M.

    2013-12-01

    Coal is the most abundant and readily combustible energy resource being used worldwide. However, its structural characteristic creates a perception that coal is only useful for producing energy via burning. Here we report a facile approach to synthesize tunable graphene quantum dots from various types of coal, and establish that the unique coal structure has an advantage over pure sp2-carbon allotropes for producing quantum dots. The crystalline carbon within the coal structure is easier to oxidatively displace than when pure sp2-carbon structures are used, resulting in nanometre-sized graphene quantum dots with amorphous carbon addends on the edges. The synthesized graphene quantum dots, produced in up to 20% isolated yield from coal, are soluble and fluorescent in aqueous solution, providing promise for applications in areas such as bioimaging, biomedicine, photovoltaics and optoelectronics, in addition to being inexpensive additives for structural composites.

  20. Coal as an abundant source of graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ruquan; Xiang, Changsheng; Lin, Jian; Peng, Zhiwei; Huang, Kewei; Yan, Zheng; Cook, Nathan P; Samuel, Errol L G; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Ruan, Gedeng; Ceriotti, Gabriel; Raji, Abdul-Rahman O; Martí, Angel A; Tour, James M

    2013-01-01

    Coal is the most abundant and readily combustible energy resource being used worldwide. However, its structural characteristic creates a perception that coal is only useful for producing energy via burning. Here we report a facile approach to synthesize tunable graphene quantum dots from various types of coal, and establish that the unique coal structure has an advantage over pure sp2-carbon allotropes for producing quantum dots. The crystalline carbon within the coal structure is easier to oxidatively displace than when pure sp2-carbon structures are used, resulting in nanometre-sized graphene quantum dots with amorphous carbon addends on the edges. The synthesized graphene quantum dots, produced in up to 20% isolated yield from coal, are soluble and fluorescent in aqueous solution, providing promise for applications in areas such as bioimaging, biomedicine, photovoltaics and optoelectronics, in addition to being inexpensive additives for structural composites.

  1. Quantum Dot Solar Cell Fabrication Protocols

    DOE PAGES

    Chernomordik, Boris D.; Marshall, Ashley R.; Pach, Gregory F.; ...

    2016-09-26

    Colloidally synthesized quantum-confined semiconducting spherical nanocrystals, often referred to as quantum dots (QDs), offer a high degree of chemical, optical, and electronic tunability. As a result, there is an increasing interest in employing colloidal QDs for electronic and optical applications that is reflected in a growing number of publications. In this protocol we provide detailed procedures for the fabrication of QD solar cells specifically employing PbSe and PbS QDs. Here we include details that are learned through experience, beyond those in typical methodology sections, and include example pictures and videos to aid in fabricating QD solar cells. Although successful solarmore » cell fabrication is ultimately learned through experience, this protocol is intended to accelerate that process. The protocol developed here is intended to be a general starting point for developing PbS and PbSe QD test bed solar cells. We include steps for forming conductive QD films via dip coating as well as spin coating. Finally, we provide protocols that detail the synthesis of PbS and PbSe QDs through a unique cation exchange reaction and discuss how different QD synthetic routes could impact the resulting solar cell performance.« less

  2. Lead selenide quantum dot polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Dennis L.; Preske, Amanda; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Krauss, Todd D.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-01

    Optical absorption and fluorescence properties of PbSe quantum dots (QDs) in an Angstrom Bond AB9093 epoxy polymer matrix to form a nanocomposite were investigated. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported use of AB9093 as a QD matrix material and it was shown to out-perform the more common poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix in terms of preserving the optical properties of the QD, resulting in the first reported quantum yield (QY) for PbSe QDs in a polymer matrix, 26%. The 1-s first excitonic absorption peak of the QDs in a polymer matrix red shifted 65 nm in wavelength compared to QDs in a hexane solution, while the emission peak in the polymer matrix red shifted by 38 nm. The fluorescence QY dropped from 55% in hexane to 26% in the polymer matrix. A time resolved fluorescence study of the QDs showed single exponential lifetimes of 2.34 and 1.34 μs in toluene solution and the polymer matrix respectively.

  3. Cyto-molecular Tuning of Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bong; Suresh, Sindhuja; Ekpenyong, Andrew

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanoparticles composed of groups II-VI or III-V elements, with physical dimensions smaller than the exciton Bohr radius, and between 1-10 nm. Their applications and promising myriad applications in photovoltaic cells, biomedical imaging, targeted drug delivery, quantum computing, etc, have led to much research on their interactions with other systems. For biological systems, research has focused on biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of QDs in the context of imaging/therapy. However, there is a paucity of work on how biological systems might be used to tune QDs. Here, we hypothesize that the photo-electronic properties of QDs can be tuned by biological macromolecules following controlled changes in cellular activities. Using CdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs, we perform spectroscopic analysis of optically excited colloidal QDs with and without promyelocytic HL60 cells. Preliminary results show shifts in the emission spectra of the colloidal dispersions with and without cells. We will present results for activated HL60-derived cells where specific macromolecules produced by these cells perturb the electric dipole moments of the excited QDs and the associated electric fields, in ways that constitute what we describe as cyto-molecular tuning. Startup funds from the College of Arts and Sciences, Creighton University (to AEE).

  4. Fluorescent quantum dot hydrophilization with PAMAM dendrimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, Dmitry V.; Geißler, Daniel; Resch-Genger, Ute; Goryacheva, Irina Yu.

    2016-05-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were used to produce CdSe core/multi-shell fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) which are colloidally stable in aqueous solutions. The size, charge, and optical properties of QDs functionalized with the 4th (G4) and 5th (G5) generation of PAMAM were compared with amphiphilic polymer-covered QDs and used as criteria for the evaluation of the suitability of both water solubilization methods. As revealed by dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering (DLS and ELS), the hydrodynamic sizes of the QDs varied from 30 to 65 nm depending on QD type and dendrimer generation, with all QDs displaying highly positive surface charges, i.e., zeta potentials of around +50 mV in water. PAMAM functionalization yielded stable core/multi-shell QDs with photoluminescence quantum yields ( Φ) of up to 45 %. These dendrimer-covered QDs showed a smaller decrease in their Φ upon phase transfer compared with QDs made water soluble via encapsulation with amphiphilic brush polymer bearing polyoxyethylene/polyoxypropylene chains.

  5. Quantum Dot Solar Cell Fabrication Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Chernomordik, Boris D.; Marshall, Ashley R.; Pach, Gregory F.

    Colloidally synthesized quantum-confined semiconducting spherical nanocrystals, often referred to as quantum dots (QDs), offer a high degree of chemical, optical, and electronic tunability. As a result, there is an increasing interest in employing colloidal QDs for electronic and optical applications that is reflected in a growing number of publications. In this protocol we provide detailed procedures for the fabrication of QD solar cells specifically employing PbSe and PbS QDs. Here we include details that are learned through experience, beyond those in typical methodology sections, and include example pictures and videos to aid in fabricating QD solar cells. Although successful solarmore » cell fabrication is ultimately learned through experience, this protocol is intended to accelerate that process. The protocol developed here is intended to be a general starting point for developing PbS and PbSe QD test bed solar cells. We include steps for forming conductive QD films via dip coating as well as spin coating. Finally, we provide protocols that detail the synthesis of PbS and PbSe QDs through a unique cation exchange reaction and discuss how different QD synthetic routes could impact the resulting solar cell performance.« less

  6. Controlled Photon Switch Assisted by Coupled Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Ma, Song-Ya; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Wang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Quantum switch is a primitive element in quantum network communication. In contrast to previous switch schemes on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we consider controlled switches of photon system with two DOFs. These controlled photon switches are constructed by exploring the optical selection rules derived from the quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. Several double controlled-NOT gate on different joint systems are greatly simplified with an auxiliary DOF of the controlling photon. The photon switches show that two DOFs of photons can be independently transmitted in quantum networks. This result reduces the quantum resources for quantum network communication. PMID:26095049

  7. Theory of Spin States of Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, I. V.; Reinecke, T. L.; Scheibner, M.; Stinaff, E. A.; Bracker, A. S.; Doty, M. F.; Gammon, D.; Korenev, V. L.

    2007-04-01

    The photoluminescence spectrum of an asymmetric pair of coupled InAs quantum dots in an applied electric field shows a rich pattern of level anticrossings, crossings and fine structure that can be understood as a superposition of charge and spin configurations. We present a theoretical model that provides a description of the energy positions and intensities of the optical transitions in exciton, biexciton and charged exciton states of coupled quantum dots molecules.

  8. UV Nano-Lights - Nonlinear Quantum Dot-Plasmon Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0072 UV Nano-Lights - Nonlinear Quantum Dot- Plasmon Coupling Eric Waclawik QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Final Report 06...Final 3.  DATES COVERED (From - To)  03 Feb 2014 to 02 Feb 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE UV Nano-Lights - Nonlinear Quantum Dot- Plasmon Coupling 5a...in the form of the localised surface plasmon resonance of the gold component of nanoparticle hybrids could enhance nonlinear emission by several

  9. UV Nano Lights - Nonlinear Quantum Dot-Plasmon Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0072 UV Nano-Lights - Nonlinear Quantum Dot- Plasmon Coupling Eric Waclawik QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Final Report 06...Final 3.  DATES COVERED (From - To)  03 Feb 2014 to 02 Feb 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE UV Nano-Lights - Nonlinear Quantum Dot- Plasmon Coupling 5a...in the form of the localised surface plasmon resonance of the gold component of nanoparticle hybrids could enhance nonlinear emission by several

  10. Resonant Scattering of Surface Plasmon Polaritons by Dressed Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-23

    Resonant scattering of surface plasmon polaritons by dressed quantum dots Danhong Huang,1 Michelle Easter,2 Godfrey Gumbs,3 A. A. Maradudin,4 Shawn... polariton waves (SPP) by embedded semiconductor quantum dots above the dielectric/metal interface is explored in the strong-coupling regime. In con- trast to...induced polarization field, treated as a source term9 arising from photo-excited electrons, allows for a resonant scattering of surface plasmon- polariton

  11. Double Tunneling Injection Quantum Dot Lasers for High Speed Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-23

    Double Tunneling-Injection Quantum Dot Lasers for High -Speed Operation The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT 6...State University Title: Double Tunneling-Injection Quantum Dot Lasers for High -Speed Operation Report Term: 0-Other Email: asryan@vt.edu Distribution

  12. Los Alamos Quantum Dots for Solar, Display Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Klimov, Victor

    2018-05-01

    Quantum dots are ultra-small bits of semiconductor matter that can be synthesized with nearly atomic precision via modern methods of colloidal chemistry. Their emission color can be tuned by simply varying their dimensions. Color tunability is combined with high emission efficiencies approaching 100 percent. These properties have recently become the basis of a new technology – quantum dot displays – employed, for example, in the newest generation of e-readers and video monitors.

  13. Improved dot size uniformity and luminescense of InAs quantum dots on InP substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Y.; Uhl, D.

    2002-01-01

    InAs self-organized quantum dots have been grown in InGaAs quantum well on InP substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Atomic Force Microscopy confirmed of quantum dot formation with dot density of 3X10(sup 10) cm(sup -2). Improved dot size uniformity and strong room temperature photoluminescence up to 2 micron were observed after modifying the InGaAs well.

  14. Interaction of solitons with a string of coupled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Vijendra, E-mail: vsmedphysics@gmail.com; Swami, O. P., E-mail: omg1789@gmail.com; Nagar, A. K., E-mail: ajaya.nagar@gmail.com

    2016-05-06

    In this paper, we develop a theory for discrete solitons interaction with a string of coupled quantum dots in view of the local field effects. Discrete nonlinear Schrodinger (DNLS) equations are used to describe the dynamics of the string. Numerical calculations are carried out and results are analyzed with the help of matlab software. With the help of numerical solutions we demonstrate that in the quantum dots string, Rabi oscillations (RO) are self trapped into stable bright Rabi solitons. The Rabi oscillations in different types of nanostructures have potential applications to the elements of quantum logic and quantum memory.

  15. Quantum Phase Transitions in Cavity Coupled Dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasisomayajula, Vijay; Russo, Onofrio

    2011-03-01

    We investigate a Quantum Dot System, in which the transconductance, in part, is due to spin coupling, with each dot subjected to a biasing voltage. When this system is housed in a QED cavity, the cavity dot coupling alters the spin coupling of the coupled dots significantly via the Purcell Effect. In this paper we show the extent to which one can control the various coupling parameters: the inter dot coupling, the individual dots coupling with the cavity and the coupled dots coupling with the cavity as a single entity. We show that the dots coupled to each other and to the cavity, the spin transport can be controlled selectively. We derive the conditions for such control explicitly. Further, we discuss the Quantum phase transition effects due to the charge and spin transport through the dots. The electron transport through the dots, electron-electron spin interaction and the electron-photon interaction are treated using the Non-equilibrium Green's Function Formalism. http://publish.aps.org/search/field/author/Trif_Mircea (Trif Mircea), http://publish.aps.org/search/field/author/Golovach_Vitaly_N (Vitaly N. Golovach), and http://publish.aps.org/search/field/author/Loss_Daniel (Daniel Loss), Phys. Rev. B 75, 085307 (2007)

  16. Heparin conjugated quantum dots for in vitro imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Ciaran Manus; Mahfoud, Omar Kazem; Rakovich, Tatsiana; Gerard, Valerie Anne; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Gun'ko, Yurii; Volkov, Yuri

    2014-11-01

    In this work heparin-gelatine multi-layered cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDgel/hep) were synthesised using a novel 'one-pot' method. The QDs produced were characterised using various spectroscopic and physiochemical techniques. Suitable QDs were then selected and compared to thioglycolic acid stabilised quantum dots (QDTGA) and gelatine coated quantum dots (QDgel) for utilisation in in vitro imaging experiments on live and fixed permeabilised THP-1, A549 and Caco-2 cell lines. Exposure of live THP-1 cells to QDgel/hep resulted in localisation of the QDs to the nucleus of the cells. QDgel/hep show affinity for the nuclear compartment of fixed permeabilised THP-1 and A549 cells but remain confined to cytoplasm of fixed permeabilised Caco-2 cells. It is postulated that heparin binding to the CD11b receptor facilitates the internalisation of the QDs into the nucleus of THP-1 cells. In addition, the heparin layer may reduce the unfavourable thrombogenic nature of quantum dots observed in vivo. In this study, heparin conjugated quantum dots were found to have superior imaging properties compared to its native counterparts. The authors postulate that heparin binding to the CD11b receptor facilitates QD internalization to the nucleus, and the heparin layer may reduce the in vivo thrombogenic properties of quantum dots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rhizopus stolonifer mediated biosynthesis of biocompatible cadmium chalcogenide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Mareeswari, P; Brijitta, J; Harikrishna Etti, S; Meganathan, C; Kaliaraj, Gobi Saravanan

    2016-12-01

    We report an efficient method to biosynthesize biocompatible cadmium telluride and cadmium sulphide quantum dots from the fungus Rhizopus stolonifer. The suspension of the quantum dots exhibited purple and greenish-blue luminescence respectively upon UV light illumination. Photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy confirms the formation of the quantum dots. From the photoluminescence spectrum the emission maxima is found to be 424 and 476nm respectively. The X-ray diffraction of the quantum dots matches with results reported in literature. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay for cell viability evaluation carried out on 3-days transfer, inoculum 3×10 5 cells, embryonic fibroblast cells lines shows that more than 80% of the cells are viable even after 48h, indicating the biocompatible nature of the quantum dots. A good contrast in imaging has been obtained upon incorporating the quantum dots in human breast adenocarcinoma Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 cell lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of surface states of CuInS2 quantum dots in quantum dots sensitized photo-electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhuoyin; Liu, Yueli; Wu, Lei; Zhao, Yinghan; Chen, Keqiang; Chen, Wen

    2016-12-01

    Surface states are significant factor for the enhancement of electrochemical performance in CuInS2 quantum dot sensitized photo-electrodes. DDT, OLA, MPA, and S2- ligand capped CuInS2 quantum dot sensitized photo-electrodes are prepared by thermolysis, solvethermal and ligand-exchange processes, respectively, and their optical properties and photoelectrochemical properties are investigated. The S2- ligand enhances the UV-vis absorption and electron-hole separation property as well as the excellent charge transfer performance of the photo-electrodes, which is attributed to the fact that the atomic S2- ligand for the interfacial region of quantum dots may improve the electron transfer rate. These S2--capped CuInS2 quantum dot sensitized photo-electrodes exhibit the excellent photoelectrochemical efficiency and IPCE peak value, which is higher than that of the samples with DDT, OLA and MPA ligands.

  19. Computation of energy states of hydrogenic quantum dot with two-electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yakar, Y., E-mail: yuyakar@yahoo.com; Özmen, A., E-mail: aozmen@selcuk.edu.tr; Çakır, B., E-mail: bcakir@selcuk.edu.tr

    2016-03-25

    In this study we have investigated the electronic structure of the hydrogenic quantum dot with two electrons inside an impenetrable potential surface. The energy eigenvalues and wavefunctions of the ground and excited states of spherical quantum dot have been calculated by using the Quantum Genetic Algorithm (QGA) and Hartree-Fock Roothaan (HFR) method, and the energies are investigated as a function of dot radius. The results show that as dot radius increases, the energy of quantum dot decreases.

  20. Ligand-Asymmetric Janus Quantum Dots for Efficient Blue-Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ikjun; Jung, Heeyoung; Jeong, Byeong Guk; Hahm, Donghyo; Chang, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Taesoo; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Doh C; Lim, Jaehoon; Lee, Changhee; Cho, Jinhan; Bae, Wan Ki

    2018-06-19

    We present ligand-asymmetric Janus quantum dots (QDs) to improve the device performance of quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QLEDs). Specifically, we devise blue QLEDs incorporating blue QDs with asymmetrically modified ligands, in which the bottom ligand of QDs in contact with ZnO electron-transport layer serves as a robust adhesive layer and an effective electron-blocking layer and the top ligand ensures uniform deposition of organic hole transport layers with enhanced hole injection properties. Suppressed electron overflow by the bottom ligand and stimulated hole injection enabled by the top ligand contribute synergistically to boost the balance of charge injection in blue QDs and therefore the device performance of blue QLEDs. As an ultimate achievement, the blue QLED adopting ligand-asymmetric QDs displays 2-fold enhancement in peak external quantum efficiency (EQE = 3.23%) compared to the case of QDs with native ligands (oleic acid) (peak EQE = 1.49%). The present study demonstrates an integrated strategy to control over the charge injection properties into QDs via ligand engineering that enables enhancement of the device performance of blue QLEDs and thus promises successful realization of white light-emitting devices using QDs.

  1. Facile synthetic method for pristine graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide quantum dots: origin of blue and green luminescence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Jang, Min-Ho; Ha, Hyun Dong; Kim, Je-Hyung; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Seo, Tae Seok

    2013-07-19

    Pristine graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide quantum dots are synthesized by chemical exfoliation from the graphite nanoparticles with high uniformity in terms of shape (circle), size (less than 4 nm), and thickness (monolayer). The origin of the blue and green photoluminescence of GQDs and GOQDs is attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic energy states, respectively. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. High quantum yield ZnO quantum dots synthesizing via an ultrasonication microreactor method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Yang, Huafang; Ding, Wenhao; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Le; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-11-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic microreactor. Ultrasonic radiation brought bubbles through ultrasonic cavitation. These bubbles built microreactor inside the microreactor. The photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots synthesized with different flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature were discussed. Flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature would influence the type and quantity of defects in ZnO quantum dots. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by those conditions as well. Flow rate affected the reaction time. With the increasing of flow rate, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots decreased and the quantum yields first increased then decreased. Ultrasonic power changed the ultrasonic cavitation intensity, which affected the reaction energy and the separation of the solution. With the increasing of ultrasonic power, sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased, while the quantum yields kept increasing. The effect of ultrasonic temperature on the photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots was influenced by the flow rate. Different flow rate related to opposite changing trend. Moreover, the quantum yields of ZnO QDs synthesized by ultrasonic microreactor could reach 64.7%, which is higher than those synthesized only under ultrasonic radiation or only by microreactor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrically tunable g factors in quantum dot molecular spin states.

    PubMed

    Doty, M F; Scheibner, M; Ponomarev, I V; Stinaff, E A; Bracker, A S; Korenev, V L; Reinecke, T L; Gammon, D

    2006-11-10

    We present a magnetophotoluminescence study of individual vertically stacked InAs/GaAs quantum dot pairs separated by thin tunnel barriers. As an applied electric field tunes the relative energies of the two dots, we observe a strong resonant increase or decrease in the g factors of different spin states that have molecular wave functions distributed over both quantum dots. We propose a phenomenological model for the change in g factor based on resonant changes in the amplitude of the wave function in the barrier due to the formation of bonding and antibonding orbitals.

  4. Electrically Tunable g Factors in Quantum Dot Molecular Spin States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, M. F.; Scheibner, M.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Stinaff, E. A.; Bracker, A. S.; Korenev, V. L.; Reinecke, T. L.; Gammon, D.

    2006-11-01

    We present a magnetophotoluminescence study of individual vertically stacked InAs/GaAs quantum dot pairs separated by thin tunnel barriers. As an applied electric field tunes the relative energies of the two dots, we observe a strong resonant increase or decrease in the g factors of different spin states that have molecular wave functions distributed over both quantum dots. We propose a phenomenological model for the change in g factor based on resonant changes in the amplitude of the wave function in the barrier due to the formation of bonding and antibonding orbitals.

  5. Infrared Focal Plane Arrays Based on Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    an ensemble of self -assembled InAs/GaAs or InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) are typically in the range of 10-30 monolayers [1]. Here, we report on InAs...photoconductive properties of QDIPs based on self organized InAs quantum dots grown on In.52Al.48As/InP(100), using the MBE technique. Dr. Gendry grew the...composed of 10 layers of self assembled InAs dots, separated by 500 Å thick InAlAs (lattice matched to the semi-insulating InP substrate) barrier

  6. Universal Adiabatic Quantum Computing using Double Quantum Dot Charge Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan-Anderson, Ciaran; Jacobson, N. Tobias; Landahl, Andrew

    Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) provides one path to achieving universal quantum computing in experiment. Computation in the AQC model occurs by starting with an easy to prepare groundstate of some simple Hamiltonian and then adiabatically evolving the Hamiltonian to obtain the groundstate of a final, more complex Hamiltonian. It has been shown that the circuit model can be mapped to AQC Hamiltonians and, thus, AQC can be made universal. Further, these Hamiltonians can be made planar and two-local. We propose using double quantum dot charge qubits (DQDs) to implement such universal AQC Hamiltonians. However, the geometry and restricted set of interactions of DQDs make the application of even these 2-local planar Hamiltonians non-trivial. We present a construction tailored to DQDs to overcome the geometric and interaction contraints and allow for universal AQC. These constraints are dealt with in this construction by making use of perturbation gadgets, which introduce ancillary qubits to mediate interactions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarress, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Architectures that would exploit the distinct characteristics of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) have been proposed for digital communication networks that connect advanced digital computing circuits. In comparison with networks of wires in conventional very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry, the networks according to the proposed architectures would be more compact. The proposed architectures would make it possible to implement complex interconnection schemes that are required for some advanced parallel-computing algorithms and that are difficult (and in many cases impractical) to implement in VLSI circuitry. The difficulty of implementation in VLSI and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA were described previously in Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots (NPO-20801), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42. To recapitulate: Wherever two wires in a conventional VLSI circuit cross each other and are required not to be in electrical contact with each other, there must be a layer of electrical insulation between them. This, in turn, makes it necessary to resort to a noncoplanar and possibly a multilayer design, which can be complex, expensive, and even impractical. As a result, much of the cost of designing VLSI circuits is associated with minimization of data routing and assignment of layers to minimize crossing of wires. Heretofore, these considerations have impeded the development of VLSI circuitry to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. On the other hand, with suitable design and under suitable operating conditions, QCA-based signal paths can be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. The proposed architectures require two advances in QCA-based circuitry beyond basic QCA-based binary

  8. Quantum-dot cellular automata: Review and recent experiments (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snider, G. L.; Orlov, A. O.; Amlani, I.; Zuo, X.; Bernstein, G. H.; Lent, C. S.; Merz, J. L.; Porod, W.

    1999-04-01

    An introduction to the operation of quantum-dot cellular automata is presented, along with recent experimental results. Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is a transistorless computation paradigm that addresses the issues of device density and interconnection. The basic building blocks of the QCA architecture, such as AND, OR, and NOT are presented. The experimental device is a four-dot QCA cell with two electrometers. The dots are metal islands, which are coupled by capacitors and tunnel junctions. An improved design of the cell is presented in which all four dots of the cell are coupled by tunnel junctions. The operation of this basic cell is confirmed by the externally controlled polarization change of the cell.

  9. Reducing inhomogeneity in the dynamic properties of quantum dots via self-aligned plasmonic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demory, Brandon; Hill, Tyler A.; Teng, Chu-Hsiang; Deng, Hui; Ku, P. C.

    2018-01-01

    A plasmonic cavity is shown to greatly reduce the inhomogeneity of dynamic optical properties such as quantum efficiency and radiative lifetime of InGaN quantum dots. By using an open-top plasmonic cavity structure, which exhibits a large Purcell factor and antenna quantum efficiency, the resulting quantum efficiency distribution for the quantum dots narrows and is no longer limited by the quantum dot inhomogeneity. The standard deviation of the quantum efficiency can be reduced to 2% while maintaining the overall quantum efficiency at 70%, making InGaN quantum dots a viable candidate for high-speed quantum cryptography and random number generation applications.

  10. Reducing inhomogeneity in the dynamic properties of quantum dots via self-aligned plasmonic cavities.

    PubMed

    Demory, Brandon; Hill, Tyler A; Teng, Chu-Hsiang; Deng, Hui; Ku, P C

    2018-01-05

    A plasmonic cavity is shown to greatly reduce the inhomogeneity of dynamic optical properties such as quantum efficiency and radiative lifetime of InGaN quantum dots. By using an open-top plasmonic cavity structure, which exhibits a large Purcell factor and antenna quantum efficiency, the resulting quantum efficiency distribution for the quantum dots narrows and is no longer limited by the quantum dot inhomogeneity. The standard deviation of the quantum efficiency can be reduced to 2% while maintaining the overall quantum efficiency at 70%, making InGaN quantum dots a viable candidate for high-speed quantum cryptography and random number generation applications.

  11. A linear triple quantum dot system in isolated configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flentje, Hanno; Bertrand, Benoit; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Thiney, Vivien; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Bäuerle, Christopher; Meunier, Tristan

    2017-06-01

    The scaling up of electron spin qubit based nanocircuits has remained challenging up till date and involves the development of efficient charge control strategies. Here, we report on the experimental realization of a linear triple quantum dot in a regime isolated from the reservoir. We show how this regime can be reached with a fixed number of electrons. Charge stability diagrams of the one, two, and three electron configurations where only electron exchange between the dots is allowed are observed. They are modeled with the established theory based on a capacitive model of the dot systems. The advantages of the isolated regime with respect to experimental realizations of quantum simulators and qubits are discussed. We envision that the results presented here will make more manipulation schemes for existing qubit implementations possible and will ultimately allow to increase the number of tunnel coupled quantum dots which can be simultaneously controlled.

  12. Mid-Infrared Quantum-Dot Quantum Cascade Laser: A Theoretical Feasibility Study

    DOE PAGES

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng; Schneider, Hans

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of a microscopic model for intersubband gain from electrically pumped quantum-dot structures we investigate electrically pumped quantum-dots as active material for a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser. Our previous calculations have indicated that these structures could operate with reduced threshold current densities while also achieving a modal gain comparable to that of quantum well active materials. We study the influence of two important quantum-dot material parameters, here, namely inhomogeneous broadening and quantum-dot sheet density, on the performance of a proposed quantum cascade laser design. In terms of achieving a positive modal net gain, a high quantum-dot density canmore » compensate for moderately high inhomogeneous broadening, but at a cost of increased threshold current density. By minimizing quantum-dot density with presently achievable inhomogeneous broadening and total losses, significantly lower threshold densities than those reported in quantum-well quantum-cascade lasers are predicted by our theory.« less

  13. Transient Dynamics of Double Quantum Dots Coupled to Two Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukadai, Takahisa; Sasamoto, Tomohiro

    2018-05-01

    We study the time-dependent properties of double quantum dots coupled to two reservoirs using the nonequilibrium Green function method. For an arbitrary time-dependent bias, we derive an expression for the time-dependent electron density of a dot and several currents, including the current between the dots in the wide-band-limit approximation. For the special case of a constant bias, we calculate the electron density and the currents numerically. As a result, we find that these quantities oscillate and that the number of crests in a single period of the current from a dot changes with the bias voltage. We also obtain an analytical expression for the relaxation time, which expresses how fast the system converges to its steady state. From the expression, we find that the relaxation time becomes constant when the coupling strength between the dots is sufficiently large in comparison with the difference of coupling strength between the dots and the reservoirs.

  14. Towards Violation of Classical Inequalities using Quantum Dot Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiris, Manoj

    Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots have attracted considerable interest recently, ranging from fundamental studies of quantum optics to advanced applications in the field of quantum information science. With their atom-like properties, quantum dot based nanophotonic devices may also substantially contribute to the development of quantum computers. This work presents experimental progress towards the understanding of light-matter interactions that occur beyond well-understood monochromatic resonant light scattering processes in semiconductor quantum dots. First, we report measurements of resonance fluorescence under bichromatic laser excitation. With the inclusion of a second laser, both first-order and second-order correlation functions are substantially altered. Under these conditions, the scattered light exhibits a rich spectrum containing many spectral features that lead to a range of nonlinear multiphoton dynamics. These observations are discussed and compared with a theoretical model. Second, we investigated the light scattered by a quantum dot in the presence of spectral filtering. By scanning the tunable filters placed in front of each detector of a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss setup and recording coincidence measurements, a \\two-photon spectrum" has been experimentally reconstructed for the first time. The two-photon spectrum contains a wealth of information about the cascaded emission involved in the scattering process, such as transitions occurring via virtual intermediate states. Our measurements also reveal that the scattered frequency-filtered light from a quantum dot violates the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. Finally, Franson-interferometry has been performed using spectrally filtered light from quantum dot resonance fluorescence. Visibilities exceeding the classical limit were demonstrated by using a pair of folded Mach-Zehnder interferometers, paving the way for producing single time-energy entangled photon pairs that could violate Bell

  15. 2 Micrometers InAsSb Quantum-dot Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Yueming; Uhl, David; Keo, Sam

    2004-01-01

    InAsSb quantum-dot lasers near 2 micrometers were demonstrated in cw operation at room temperature with a threshold current density of 733 A,/cm(sup 2), output power of 3 mW/facet and a differential quantum efficiency of 13%.

  16. Optically programmable electron spin memory using semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kroutvar, Miro; Ducommun, Yann; Heiss, Dominik; Bichler, Max; Schuh, Dieter; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J

    2004-11-04

    The spin of a single electron subject to a static magnetic field provides a natural two-level system that is suitable for use as a quantum bit, the fundamental logical unit in a quantum computer. Semiconductor quantum dots fabricated by strain driven self-assembly are particularly attractive for the realization of spin quantum bits, as they can be controllably positioned, electronically coupled and embedded into active devices. It has been predicted that the atomic-like electronic structure of such quantum dots suppresses coupling of the spin to the solid-state quantum dot environment, thus protecting the 'spin' quantum information against decoherence. Here we demonstrate a single electron spin memory device in which the electron spin can be programmed by frequency selective optical excitation. We use the device to prepare single electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots with a well defined orientation, and directly measure the intrinsic spin flip time and its dependence on magnetic field. A very long spin lifetime is obtained, with a lower limit of about 20 milliseconds at a magnetic field of 4 tesla and at 1 kelvin.

  17. Electrical control of single hole spins in nanowire quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Pribiag, V S; Nadj-Perge, S; Frolov, S M; van den Berg, J W G; van Weperen, I; Plissard, S R; Bakkers, E P A M; Kouwenhoven, L P

    2013-03-01

    The development of viable quantum computation devices will require the ability to preserve the coherence of quantum bits (qubits). Single electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots are a versatile platform for quantum information processing, but controlling decoherence remains a considerable challenge. Hole spins in III-V semiconductors have unique properties, such as a strong spin-orbit interaction and weak coupling to nuclear spins, and therefore, have the potential for enhanced spin control and longer coherence times. A weaker hyperfine interaction has previously been reported in self-assembled quantum dots using quantum optics techniques, but the development of hole-spin-based electronic devices in conventional III-V heterostructures has been limited by fabrication challenges. Here, we show that gate-tunable hole quantum dots can be formed in InSb nanowires and used to demonstrate Pauli spin blockade and electrical control of single hole spins. The devices are fully tunable between hole and electron quantum dots, which allows the hyperfine interaction strengths, g-factors and spin blockade anisotropies to be compared directly in the two regimes.

  18. Counted Sb donors in Si quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Pacheco, Jose; Bielejec, Edward; Perry, Daniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Bishop, Nathaniel; Wendt, Joel; Luhman, Dwight; Carroll, Malcolm; Lilly, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is critical for donor spin qubits in semiconductor based quantum computing. We have developed techniques using a focused ion beam and a diode detector integrated next to a silicon MOS single electron transistor to gain such control. With the diode detector operating in linear mode, the numbers of ions implanted have been counted and single ion implants have been detected. Poisson statistics in the number of ions implanted have been observed. Transport measurements performed on samples with counted number of implants have been performed and regular coulomb blockade and charge offsets observed. The capacitances to various gates are found to be in agreement with QCAD simulations for an electrostatically defined dot. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Quantum dot laser optimization: selectively doped layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenev, Vladimir V.; Konoplev, Sergey S.; Savelyev, Artem V.; Shernyakov, Yurii M.; Maximov, Mikhail V.; Zhukov, Alexey E.

    2016-08-01

    Edge emitting quantum dot (QD) lasers are discussed. It has been recently proposed to use modulation p-doping of the layers that are adjacent to QD layers in order to control QD's charge state. Experimentally it has been proven useful to enhance ground state lasing and suppress the onset of excited state lasing at high injection. These results have been also confirmed with numerical calculations involving solution of drift-diffusion equations. However, deep understanding of physical reasons for such behavior and laser optimization requires analytical approaches to the problem. In this paper, under a set of assumptions we provide an analytical model that explains major effects of selective p-doping. Capture rates of elections and holes can be calculated by solving Poisson equations for electrons and holes around the charged QD layer. The charge itself is ruled by capture rates and selective doping concentration. We analyzed this self-consistent set of equations and showed that it can be used to optimize QD laser performance and to explain underlying physics.

  20. Enhancement of pumped current in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Juan Pablo; Foa, Luis; Apel, Victor Marcelo; Orellana, Pedro

    A direct current usually requires the application of a non-zero potential difference between source and drain, but on nanoscale systems (NSS) it is possible to obtain a non-zero current while the potential difference is zero. The effect is known as quantum charge pumping (QCP) and it is due to the interference provided by the existence of a time-dependent potential (TDP). QCP can be generated by a TDP in non-adiabatic limit. An example of this is a system composed by a ring with a dot embedded on it, under the application of an oscillating TDP. By the action of a magnetic field across the system, a pumped current is generated, since time reversal symmetry is broken. Decoherence is crucial, both from a scientific and technological point of view. In NSS it is expected that decoherence, among others things, decreases the QCP amplitude. In this context, we study what is the effect of a bath on the pumped current in our system. We find that for certain values of magnetic flux, the bath-system produce amplification of the pumped current.

  1. Immune cells tracing using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Yasuhara, Masato; Dohi, Taeko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles, such as nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs), have potential to be applied to molecular biology and bioimaging, since some nanocrystals emit higher and longer lasting fluorescence than conventional organic probes do. Here we report an example of labeling immune cells by QDs. We collected splenic CD4 + T-lymphocyte and peritoneal macrophages from mice. Then cells were labeled with QDs. QDs are incorporated into the T-lymphocyte and macrophages immediately after addition and located in the cytoplasm via endocytosis pathway. The fluorescence of QDs held in the endosomes was easily detected for more than a week. In addition, T-lymphocytes labeled with QDs were stable and cell proliferation or cytokine production including IL-2 and IFN-γ was not affected. When QD-labeled T-lymphocytes were adoptively transferred intravenously to mice, they remained in the peripheral blood and spleen up to a week. Using QD-labeled peritoneal macrophages, we studied cell traffic during inflammation on viscera in peritoneum cavity. QD-labeled macrophages were transplanted into the peritoneum of the mouse, and colitis was induced by intracolonic injection of a hapten, trinitrobenzensulfonic acid. With the aid of stong signals of QDs, we found that macrophage accumuled on the inflammation site of the colon. These results suggested that fluorescent probes of QDs might be useful as bioimaging tools for tracing target cells in vivo.

  2. Asymmetric shape transitions of epitaxial quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We construct a two-dimensional continuum model to describe the energetics of shape transitions in fully faceted epitaxial quantum dots (strained islands) via minimization of elastic energy and surface energy at fixed volume. The elastic energy of the island is based on a third-order approximation, enabling us to consider shape transitions between pyramids, domes, multifaceted domes and asymmetric intermediate states. The energetics of the shape transitions are determined by numerically calculating the facet lengths that minimize the energy of a given island type of prescribed island volume. By comparing the energy of different island types with the same volume and analysing the energy surface as a function of the island shape parameters, we determine the bifurcation diagram of equilibrium solutions and their stability, as well as the lowest barrier transition pathway for the island shape as a function of increasing volume. The main result is that the shape transition from pyramid to dome to multifaceted dome occurs through sequential nucleation of facets and involves asymmetric metastable transition shapes. We also explicitly determine the effect of corner energy (facet edge energy) on shape transitions and interpret the results in terms of the relative stability of asymmetric island shapes as observed in experiment. PMID:27436989

  3. Advancing colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yan; Arinze, Ebuka S.; Palmquist, Nathan; Thon, Susanna M.

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are attractive materials for solar cells due to their low cost, ease of fabrication and spectral tunability. Progress in CQD photovoltaic technology over the past decade has resulted in power conversion efficiencies approaching 10%. In this review, we give an overview of this progress, and discuss limiting mechanisms and paths for future improvement in CQD solar cell technology.We briefly summarize nanoparticle synthesis and film processing methods and evaluate the optoelectronic properties of CQD films, including the crucial role that surface ligands play in materials performance. We give an overview of device architecture engineering in CQD solar cells. The compromise between carrier extraction and photon absorption in CQD photovoltaics is analyzed along with different strategies for overcoming this trade-off. We then focus on recent advances in absorption enhancement through innovative device design and the use of nanophotonics. Several light-trapping schemes, which have resulted in large increases in cell photocurrent, are described in detail. In particular, integrating plasmonic elements into CQD devices has emerged as a promising approach to enhance photon absorption through both near-field coupling and far-field scattering effects. We also discuss strategies for overcoming the single junction efficiency limits in CQD solar cells, including tandem architectures, multiple exciton generation and hybrid materials schemes. Finally, we offer a perspective on future directions for the field and the most promising paths for achieving higher device efficiencies.

  4. Magnetic Polarons in Anisotropic Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszwaldowski, Rafal; Petukhov, Andre; Zutic, Igor

    2010-03-01

    Tunability of confinement in magnetically-doped quantum dots (QDs) allows to tailor magnetism to an extent not available in bulk semiconductors. Versatile control of magnetic ordering, along with piezomagnetism, has been predicted even at a fixed number of carriers [1]. Recent experiments on colloidal QDs revealed strongly bound magnetic polarons (MPs) [2]. Previous studies of MPs in bulk semiconductors showed that the mean-field theory predicts a spurious magnetic phase transition, which is removed by taking into account spin fluctuations [3]. Here we present our theoretical results for MPs forming in QDs with pronounced magnetic anisotropy, which influences the spin fluctuations. We apply our findings to explain some peculiarities of the magnetic behavior of type-II ZnSe/(Zn,Mn)Te QDs, where magnetic polarons are found to persist to at least 200K [4]. Supported by ONR, AFOSR, and NSF-ECCS CAREER. [4pt] [1] R. M. Abolfath, A. G. Petukhov, and I. Zutic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 207202 (2008); I. Zutic and A. G. Petukhov, Nature Mater.4, 623 (2009). [0pt] [2] R. Beaulac et al., Science 325, 973 (2009). [0pt] [3] T. Dietl and J. Spalek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 355 (1982). [0pt] [4] I. R. Sellers, R. Oszwaldowski, et al., preprint; I. R. Sellers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 136405 (2008).

  5. Quantum dot lasers: From promise to high-performance devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Mi, Z.; Yang, J.; Basu, D.; Saha, D.

    2009-03-01

    Ever since self-organized In(Ga)As/Ga(AI)As quantum dots were realized by molecular beam epitaxy, it became evident that these coherently strained nanostructures could be used as the active media in devices. While the expected advantages stemming from three-dimensional quantum confinement were clearly outlined, these were not borne out by the early experiments. It took a very detailed understanding of the unique carrier dynamics in the quantum dots to exploit their full potential. As a result, we now have lasers with emission wavelengths ranging from 0.7 to 1.54 μm, on GaAs, which demonstrate ultra-low threshold currents, near-zero chip and α-factor and large modulation bandwidth. State-of-the-art performance characteristics of these lasers are briefly reviewed. The growth, fabrication and characteristics of quantum dot lasers on silicon substrates are also described. With the incorporation of multiple quantum dot layers as a dislocation filter, we demonstrate lasers with Jth=900 A/cm 2. The monolithic integration of the lasers with guided wave modulators on silicon is also described. Finally, the properties of spin-polarized lasers with quantum dot active regions are described. Spin injection of electrons is done with a MnAs/GaAs tunnel barrier. Laser operation at 200 K is demonstrated, with the possibility of room temperature operation in the near future.

  6. Electrically protected resonant exchange qubits in triple quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J M; Srinivasa, V; Medford, J

    2013-08-02

    We present a modulated microwave approach for quantum computing with qubits comprising three spins in a triple quantum dot. This approach includes single- and two-qubit gates that are protected against low-frequency electrical noise, due to an operating point with a narrowband response to high frequency electric fields. Furthermore, existing double quantum dot advances, including robust preparation and measurement via spin-to-charge conversion, are immediately applicable to the new qubit. Finally, the electric dipole terms implicit in the high frequency coupling enable strong coupling with superconducting microwave resonators, leading to more robust two-qubit gates.

  7. Slow Auger Relaxation in HgTe Colloidal Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Melnychuk, Christopher; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2018-05-03

    The biexciton lifetimes in HgTe colloidal quantum dots are measured as a function of particle size. Samples produced by two synthetic methods, leading to partially aggregated or well-dispersed particles, exhibit markedly different dynamics. The relaxation characteristics of partially aggregated HgTe inhibit reliable determinations of the Auger lifetime. In well-dispersed HgTe quantum dots, the biexciton lifetime increases approximately linearly with particle volume, confirming trends observed in other systems. The extracted Auger coefficient is three orders of magnitude smaller than that for bulk HgCdTe materials with similar energy gaps. We discuss these findings in the context of understanding Auger relaxation in quantum-confined systems and their relevance to mid-infrared optoelectronic devices based on HgTe colloidal quantum dots.

  8. Dynamical thermalization in isolated quantum dots and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovsky, Andrey R.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2017-01-01

    We study numerically a model of quantum dot with interacting fermions. At strong interactions with small conductance the model is reduced to the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev black-hole model while at weak interactions and large conductance it describes a Landau-Fermi liquid in a regime of quantum chaos. We show that above the Åberg threshold for interactions there is an onset of dynamical themalization with the Fermi-Dirac distribution describing the eigenstates of an isolated dot. At strong interactions in the isolated black-hole regime there is also the onset of dynamical thermalization with the entropy described by the quantum Gibbs distribution. This dynamical thermalization takes place in an isolated system without any contact with a thermostat. We discuss the possible realization of these regimes with quantum dots of 2D electrons and cold ions in optical lattices.

  9. Micelle-templated composite quantum dots for super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianquan; Fan, Qirui; Mahajan, Kalpesh D; Ruan, Gang; Herrington, Andrew; Tehrani, Kayvan F; Kner, Peter; Winter, Jessica O

    2014-05-16

    Quantum dots (QDs) have tremendous potential for biomedical imaging, including super-resolution techniques that permit imaging below the diffraction limit. However, most QDs are produced via organic methods, and hence require surface treatment to render them water-soluble for biological applications. Previously, we reported a micelle-templating method that yields nanocomposites containing multiple core/shell ZnS-CdSe QDs within the same nanocarrier, increasing overall particle brightness and virtually eliminating QD blinking. Here, this technique is extended to the encapsulation of Mn-doped ZnSe QDs (Mn-ZnSe QDs), which have potential applications in super-resolution imaging as a result of the introduction of Mn(2+) dopant energy levels. The size, shape and fluorescence characteristics of these doped QD-micelles were compared to those of micelles created using core/shell ZnS-CdSe QDs (ZnS-CdSe QD-micelles). Additionally, the stability of both types of particles to photo-oxidation was investigated. Compared to commercial QDs, micelle-templated QDs demonstrated superior fluorescence intensity, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and greater stability against photo-oxidization,while reducing blinking. Additionally, the fluorescence of doped QD-micelles could be modulated from a bright 'on' state to a dark 'off' state, with a modulation depth of up to 76%, suggesting the potential of doped QD-micelles for applications in super-resolution imaging.

  10. Optically Driven Spin Based Quantum Dots for Quantum Computing - Research Area 6 Physics 6.3.2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    quantum dots (SAQD) in Schottky diodes . Based on spins in these dots, a scalable architecture has been proposed [Adv. in Physics, 59, 703 (2010)] by us...housed in two coupled quantum dots with tunneling between them, as described above, may not be scalable but can serve as a node in a quantum network. The... tunneling -coupled two-electron spin ground states in the vertically coupled quantum dots for “universal computation” two spin qubits within the universe of

  11. Entanglement of Electron Spins in Two Coupled Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuanzhen; Webb, Richard

    2004-03-01

    We study the entanglement of electron spins in a coupled quantum dots system at 70 mK. Two quantum dots are fabricated in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure containing a high mobility 2-D electron gas. The two dots can be tuned independently and the electron spins in the dots are coupled through an exchange interaction between them. An exchange gate is used to vary the height and width of a potential barrier between the two dots, thus controlling the strength of the exchange interaction. Electrons are injected to the coupled dots by two independent DC currents and the output of the dots is incident on a beam splitter, which introduces quantum interferences. Cross-correlations of the shot noise of currents from the two output channels are measured and compared with theory (1). *Work supported by LPS and ARDA under MDA90401C0903 and NSF under DMR 0103223. (1) Burkard, Loss, & Sukhorukov, Phys. Rev. B61, R16303 (2000).

  12. Detection of CdSe quantum dot photoluminescence for security label on paper

    SciTech Connect

    Isnaeni,, E-mail: isnaeni@lipi.go.id; Sugiarto, Iyon Titok; Bilqis, Ratu

    CdSe quantum dot has great potential in various applications especially for emitting devices. One example potential application of CdSe quantum dot is security label for anti-counterfeiting. In this work, we present a practical approach of security label on paper using one and two colors of colloidal CdSe quantum dot, which is used as stamping ink on various types of paper. Under ambient condition, quantum dot is almost invisible. The quantum dot security label can be revealed by detecting emission of quantum dot using photoluminescence and cnc machine. The recorded quantum dot emission intensity is then analyzed using home-made program tomore » reveal quantum dot pattern stamp having the word ’RAHASIA’. We found that security label using quantum dot works well on several types of paper. The quantum dot patterns can survive several days and further treatment is required to protect the quantum dot. Oxidation of quantum dot that occurred during this experiment reduced the emission intensity of quantum dot patterns.« less

  13. Ultrafast optical control of individual quantum dot spin qubits.

    PubMed

    De Greve, Kristiaan; Press, David; McMahon, Peter L; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-09-01

    Single spins in semiconductor quantum dots form a promising platform for solid-state quantum information processing. The spin-up and spin-down states of a single electron or hole, trapped inside a quantum dot, can represent a single qubit with a reasonably long decoherence time. The spin qubit can be optically coupled to excited (charged exciton) states that are also trapped in the quantum dot, which provides a mechanism to quickly initialize, manipulate and measure the spin state with optical pulses, and to interface between a stationary matter qubit and a 'flying' photonic qubit for quantum communication and distributed quantum information processing. The interaction of the spin qubit with light may be enhanced by placing the quantum dot inside a monolithic microcavity. An entire system, consisting of a two-dimensional array of quantum dots and a planar microcavity, may plausibly be constructed by modern semiconductor nano-fabrication technology and could offer a path toward chip-sized scalable quantum repeaters and quantum computers. This article reviews the recent experimental developments in optical control of single quantum dot spins for quantum information processing. We highlight demonstrations of a complete set of all-optical single-qubit operations on a single quantum dot spin: initialization, an arbitrary SU(2) gate, and measurement. We review the decoherence and dephasing mechanisms due to hyperfine interaction with the nuclear-spin bath, and show how the single-qubit operations can be combined to perform spin echo sequences that extend the qubit decoherence from a few nanoseconds to several microseconds, more than 5 orders of magnitude longer than the single-qubit gate time. Two-qubit coupling is discussed, both within a single chip by means of exchange coupling of nearby spins and optically induced geometric phases, as well as over longer-distances. Long-distance spin-spin entanglement can be generated if each spin can emit a photon that is entangled

  14. Tuning Single Quantum Dot Emission with a Micromirror.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gangcheng; Gómez, Daniel; Kirkwood, Nicholas; Mulvaney, Paul

    2018-02-14

    The photoluminescence of single quantum dots fluctuates between bright (on) and dark (off) states, also termed fluorescence intermittency or blinking. This blinking limits the performance of quantum dot-based devices such as light-emitting diodes and solar cells. However, the origins of the blinking remain unresolved. Here, we use a movable gold micromirror to determine both the quantum yield of the bright state and the orientation of the excited state dipole of single quantum dots. We observe that the quantum yield of the bright state is close to unity for these single QDs. Furthermore, we also study the effect of a micromirror on blinking, and then evaluate excitation efficiency, biexciton quantum yield, and detection efficiency. The mirror does not modify the off-time statistics, but it does change the density of optical states available to the quantum dot and hence the on times. The duration of the on times can be lengthened due to an increase in the radiative recombination rate.

  15. Periodic scarred States in open quantum dots as evidence of quantum Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Burke, A M; Akis, R; Day, T E; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, D K; Bennett, B R

    2010-04-30

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is used to image scar structures in an open quantum dot, which is created in an InAs quantum well by electron-beam lithography and wet etching. The scanned images demonstrate periodicities in magnetic field that correlate to those found in the conductance fluctuations. Simulations have shown that these magnetic transform images bear a strong resemblance to actual scars found in the dot that replicate through the modes in direct agreement with quantum Darwinism.

  16. Periodic Scarred States in Open Quantum Dots as Evidence of Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Day, T. E.; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, D. K.; Bennett, B. R.

    2010-04-01

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is used to image scar structures in an open quantum dot, which is created in an InAs quantum well by electron-beam lithography and wet etching. The scanned images demonstrate periodicities in magnetic field that correlate to those found in the conductance fluctuations. Simulations have shown that these magnetic transform images bear a strong resemblance to actual scars found in the dot that replicate through the modes in direct agreement with quantum Darwinism.

  17. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  18. Synthetic Control of Exciton Behavior in Colloidal Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Pu, Chaodan; Qin, Haiyan; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Jianhai; Wang, Peng; Peng, Xiaogang

    2017-03-08

    Colloidal quantum dots are promising optical and optoelectronic materials for various applications, whose performance is dominated by their excited-state properties. This article illustrates synthetic control of their excited states. Description of the excited states of quantum-dot emitters can be centered around exciton. We shall discuss that, different from conventional molecular emitters, ground-state structures of quantum dots are not necessarily correlated with their excited states. Synthetic control of exciton behavior heavily relies on convenient and affordable monitoring tools. For synthetic development of ideal optical and optoelectronic emitters, the key process is decay of band-edge excitons, which renders transient photoluminescence as important monitoring tool. On the basis of extensive synthetic developments in the past 20-30 years, synthetic control of exciton behavior implies surface engineering of quantum dots, including surface cation/anion stoichiometry, organic ligands, inorganic epitaxial shells, etc. For phosphors based on quantum dots doped with transition metal ions, concentration and location of the dopant ions within a nanocrystal lattice are found to be as important as control of the surface states in order to obtain bright dopant emission with monoexponential yet tunable photoluminescence decay dynamics.

  19. Detection of viral infections using colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentzen, Elizabeth L.; House, Frances S.; Utley, Thomas J.; Crowe, James E., Jr.; Wright, David W.

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescence is a tool widely employed in biological assays. Fluorescent semiconducting nanocrystals, quantum dots (QDs), are beginning to find their way into the tool box of many biologist, chemist and biochemist. These quantum dots are an attractive alternative to the traditional organic dyes due to their broad excitation spectra, narrow emission spectra and photostability. Quantum dots were used to detect and monitor the progession of viral glycoproteins, F (fusion) and G (attachment), from Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in HEp-2 cells. Additionally, oligo-Qdot RNA probes have been developed for identification and detection of mRNA of the N(nucleocapsid) protein for RSV. The use of quantum dot-FISH probes provides another confirmatory route to diagnostics as well as a new class of probes for monitoring the flux and fate of viral RNA RSV is the most common cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. Antiviral therapy is available for treatment of RSV but is only effective if given within the first 48 hours of infection. Existing test methods require a virus level of at least 1000-fold of the amount needed for infection of most children and require several days to weeks to obtain results. The use of quantum dots may provide an early, rapid method for detection and provide insight into the trafficking of viral proteins during the course of infection.

  20. Photoconductive gain and quantum efficiency of remotely doped Ge/Si quantum dot photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, A. I.; Kirienko, V. V.; Armbrister, V. A.; Bloshkin, A. A.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Shklyaev, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of quantum dot charging on the mid-infrared photocurrent, optical gain, hole capture probability, and absorption quantum efficiency in remotely delta-doped Ge/Si quantum dot photodetectors. The dot occupation with holes is controlled by varying dot and doping densities. From our investigations of samples doped to contain from about one to nine holes per dot we observe an over 10 times gain enhancement and similar suppression of the hole capture probability with increased carrier population. The data are explained by quenching the capture process and increasing the photoexcited hole lifetime due to formation of the repulsive Coulomb potential of the extra holes inside the quantum dots. The normal incidence quantum efficiency is found to be strongly asymmetric with respect to applied bias polarity. Based on the polarization-dependent absorption measurements it is concluded that, at a positive voltage, when holes move toward the nearest δ-doping plane, photocurrent is originated from the bound-to-continuum transitions of holes between the ground state confined in Ge dots and the extended states of the Si matrix. At a negative bias polarity, the photoresponse is caused by optical excitation to a quasibound state confined near the valence band edge with subsequent tunneling to the Si valence band. In a latter case, the possibility of hole transfer into continuum states arises from the electric field generated by charge distributed between quantum dots and delta-doping planes.

  1. Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot spacing control.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liangfeng; Choi, Joshua J; Stachnik, David; Bartnik, Adam C; Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Malliaras, George G; Hanrath, Tobias; Wise, Frank W

    2012-05-06

    Infrared light-emitting diodes are currently fabricated from direct-gap semiconductors using epitaxy, which makes them expensive and difficult to integrate with other materials. Light-emitting diodes based on colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, on the other hand, can be solution-processed at low cost, and can be directly integrated with silicon. However, so far, exciton dissociation and recombination have not been well controlled in these devices, and this has limited their performance. Here, by tuning the distance between adjacent PbS quantum dots, we fabricate thin-film quantum-dot light-emitting diodes that operate at infrared wavelengths with radiances (6.4 W sr(-1) m(-2)) eight times higher and external quantum efficiencies (2.0%) two times higher than the highest values previously reported. The distance between adjacent dots is tuned over a range of 1.3 nm by varying the lengths of the linker molecules from three to eight CH(2) groups, which allows us to achieve the optimum balance between charge injection and radiative exciton recombination. The electroluminescent powers of the best devices are comparable to those produced by commercial InGaAsP light-emitting diodes. By varying the size of the quantum dots, we can tune the emission wavelengths between 800 and 1,850 nm.

  2. Generation of heralded entanglement between distant quantum dot hole spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delteil, Aymeric

    Entanglement plays a central role in fundamental tests of quantum mechanics as well as in the burgeoning field of quantum information processing. Particularly in the context of quantum networks and communication, some of the major challenges are the efficient generation of entanglement between stationary (spin) and propagating (photon) qubits, the transfer of information from flying to stationary qubits, and the efficient generation of entanglement between distant stationary (spin) qubits. In this talk, I will present such experimental implementations achieved in our team with semiconductor self-assembled quantum dots.Not only are self-assembled quantum dots good single-photon emitters, but they can host an electron or a hole whose spin serves as a quantum memory, and then present spin-dependent optical selection rules leading to an efficient spin-photon quantum interface. Moreover InGaAs quantum dots grown on GaAs substrate can profit from the maturity of III-V semiconductor technology and can be embedded in semiconductor structures like photonic cavities and Schottky diodes.I will report on the realization of heralded quantum entanglement between two semiconductor quantum dot hole spins separated by more than five meters. The entanglement generation scheme relies on single photon interference of Raman scattered light from both dots. A single photon detection projects the system into a maximally entangled state. We developed a delayed two-photon interference scheme that allows for efficient verification of quantum correlations. Moreover the efficient spin-photon interface provided by self-assembled quantum dots allows us to reach an unprecedented rate of 2300 entangled spin pairs per second, which represents an improvement of four orders of magnitude as compared to prior experiments carried out in other systems.Our results extend previous demonstrations in single trapped ions or neutral atoms, in atom ensembles and nitrogen vacancy centers to the domain of

  3. A Quantum Dot with Spin-Orbit Interaction--Analytical Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu, B.; Roy, B.

    2009-01-01

    The practical applicability of a semiconductor quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction gives an impetus to study analytical solutions to one- and two-electron quantum dots with or without a magnetic field.

  4. Photovoltaic Performance of a Nanowire/Quantum Dot Hybrid Nanostructure Array Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2018-02-23

    An innovative solar cell based on a nanowire/quantum dot hybrid nanostructure array is designed and analyzed. By growing multilayer InAs quantum dots on the sidewalls of GaAs nanowires, not only the absorption spectrum of GaAs nanowires is extended by quantum dots but also the light absorption of quantum dots is dramatically enhanced due to the light-trapping effect of the nanowire array. By incorporating five layers of InAs quantum dots into a 500-nm high-GaAs nanowire array, the power conversion efficiency enhancement induced by the quantum dots is six times higher than the power conversion efficiency enhancement in thin-film solar cells which contain the same amount of quantum dots, indicating that the nanowire array structure can benefit the photovoltaic performance of quantum dot solar cells.

  5. Photovoltaic Performance of a Nanowire/Quantum Dot Hybrid Nanostructure Array Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yao; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2018-02-01

    An innovative solar cell based on a nanowire/quantum dot hybrid nanostructure array is designed and analyzed. By growing multilayer InAs quantum dots on the sidewalls of GaAs nanowires, not only the absorption spectrum of GaAs nanowires is extended by quantum dots but also the light absorption of quantum dots is dramatically enhanced due to the light-trapping effect of the nanowire array. By incorporating five layers of InAs quantum dots into a 500-nm high-GaAs nanowire array, the power conversion efficiency enhancement induced by the quantum dots is six times higher than the power conversion efficiency enhancement in thin-film solar cells which contain the same amount of quantum dots, indicating that the nanowire array structure can benefit the photovoltaic performance of quantum dot solar cells.

  6. Biosensing with Quantum Dots: A Microfluidic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vannoy, Charles H.; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have served as the basis for signal development in a variety of biosensing technologies and in applications using bioprobes. The use of QDs as physical platforms to develop biosensors and bioprobes has attracted considerable interest. This is largely due to the unique optical properties of QDs that make them excellent choices as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and well suited for optical multiplexing. The large majority of QD-based bioprobe and biosensing technologies that have been described operate in bulk solution environments, where selective binding events at the surface of QDs are often associated with relatively long periods to reach a steady-state signal. An alternative approach to the design of biosensor architectures may be provided by a microfluidic system (MFS). A MFS is able to integrate chemical and biological processes into a single platform and allows for manipulation of flow conditions to achieve, by sample transport and mixing, reaction rates that are not entirely diffusion controlled. Integrating assays in a MFS provides numerous additional advantages, which include the use of very small amounts of reagents and samples, possible sample processing before detection, ultra-high sensitivity, high throughput, short analysis time, and in situ monitoring. Herein, a comprehensive review is provided that addresses the key concepts and applications of QD-based microfluidic biosensors with an added emphasis on how this combination of technologies provides for innovations in bioassay designs. Examples from the literature are used to highlight the many advantages of biosensing in a MFS and illustrate the versatility that such a platform offers in the design strategy. PMID:22163723

  7. Quantum strain sensor with a topological insulator HgTe quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    We present a theory of electronic properties of HgTe quantum dot and propose a strain sensor based on a strain-driven transition from a HgTe quantum dot with inverted bandstructure and robust topologically protected quantum edge states to a normal state without edge states in the energy gap. The presence or absence of edge states leads to large on/off ratio of conductivity across the quantum dot, tunable by adjusting the number of conduction channels in the source-drain voltage window. The electronic properties of a HgTe quantum dot as a function of size and applied strain are described using eight-band Luttinger and Bir-Pikus Hamiltonians, with surface states identified with chirality of Luttinger spinors and obtained through extensive numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. PMID:24811674

  8. Polarization of the photoluminescence of quantum dots incorporated into quantum wires

    SciTech Connect

    Platonov, A. V., E-mail: alexei.platonov@mail.ioffe.ru; Kochereshko, V. P.; Kats, V. N.

    The photoluminescence spectra of individual quantum dots incorporated into a quantum wire are studied. From the behavior of the spectra in a magnetic field, it is possible to estimate the exciton binding energy in a quantum dot incorporated into a quantum wire. It is found that the exciton photoluminescence signal emitted from a quantum dot along the direction of the nanowire axis is linearly polarized. At the same time, the photoluminescence signal propagating in the direction orthogonal to the nanowire axis is practically unpolarized. The experimentally observed effect is attributed to the nonaxial arrangement of the dot in the wiremore » under conditions of a huge increase in the exciton binding energy due to the effect of the image potential on the exciton.« less

  9. Coulomb Mediated Hybridization of Excitons in Coupled Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Ardelt, P-L; Gawarecki, K; Müller, K; Waeber, A M; Bechtold, A; Oberhofer, K; Daniels, J M; Klotz, F; Bichler, M; Kuhn, T; Krenner, H J; Machnikowski, P; Finley, J J

    2016-02-19

    We report Coulomb mediated hybridization of excitonic states in optically active InGaAs quantum dot molecules. By probing the optical response of an individual quantum dot molecule as a function of the static electric field applied along the molecular axis, we observe unexpected avoided level crossings that do not arise from the dominant single-particle tunnel coupling. We identify a new few-particle coupling mechanism stemming from Coulomb interactions between different neutral exciton states. Such Coulomb resonances hybridize the exciton wave function over four different electron and hole single-particle orbitals. Comparisons of experimental observations with microscopic eight-band k·p calculations taking into account a realistic quantum dot geometry show good agreement and reveal that the Coulomb resonances arise from broken symmetry in the artificial semiconductor molecule.

  10. Nanowire–quantum-dot lasers on flexible membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatebayashi, Jun; Ota, Yasutomo; Ishida, Satomi; Nishioka, Masao; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2018-06-01

    We demonstrate lasing in a single nanowire with quantum dots as an active medium embedded on poly(dimethylsiloxane) membranes towards application in nanowire-based flexible nanophotonic devices. Nanowire laser structures with 50 quantum dots are grown on patterned GaAs(111)B substrates and then transferred from the as-grown substrates on poly(dimethylsiloxane) transparent flexible organosilicon membranes, by means of spin-casting and curing processes. We observe lasing oscillation in the transferred single nanowire cavity with quantum dots at 1.425 eV with a threshold pump pulse fluence of ∼876 µJ/cm2, which enables the realization of high-performance multifunctional NW-based flexible photonic devices.

  11. Charge noise in quantum dot qubits: beyond the Markovian approximation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Chi; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.

    Charge noise is a limiting factor in the performance of semiconductor quantum dot qubits, including both spin and charge qubits. In this work, we develop an analytical formalism for treating semiclassical noise beyond the Markovian approximation, which allows us to investigate noise models relevant for quantum dots, such as 1 / f noise. We apply our methods to both charge qubits and quantum dot hybrid qubits, and study the effects of charge noise on single-qubit rotations in these systems. The formalism is also directly applicable to the case of strong microwave driving, for which the rotating wave approximation breaks down. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607) and ONR (N00014-15-1-0029), and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  12. Effective theory of monolayer TMDC double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Alessandro; Burkard, Guido; Kormányos, Andor

    2018-07-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are promising candidates for quantum technologies, such as spin qubits in quantum dots, because they are truly two-dimensional semiconductors with a direct band gap. In this work, we analyse theoretically the behaviour of a double quantum dot (DQD) system created in the conduction band of these materials, with two electrons in the (1,1) charge configuration. Motivated by recent experimental progress, we consider several scenarios, including different spin–orbit splittings in the two dots and including the case when the valley degeneracy is lifted due to an insulating ferromagnetic substrate. Finally, we discuss in which cases it is possible to reduce the low energy subspace to the lowest Kramers pairs. We find that in this case the low energy model is formally identical to the Heisenberg exchange Hamiltonian, indicating that such Kramers pairs may serve as qubit implementations.

  13. Coulomb-coupled quantum-dot thermal transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanchao; Yang, Zhimin; Zhang, Xin; Lin, Bihong; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2018-04-01

    A quantum-dot thermal transistor consisting of three Coulomb-coupled quantum dots coupled to the respective electronic reservoirs by tunnel contacts is established. The heat flows through the collector and emitter can be controlled by the temperature of the base. It is found that a small change in the base heat flow can induce a large heat flow change in the collector and emitter. The huge amplification factor can be obtained by optimizing the Coulomb interaction between the collector and the emitter or by decreasing the tunneling rate at the base. The proposed quantum-dot thermal transistor may open up potential applications in low-temperature solid-state thermal circuits at the nanoscale.

  14. Magneto-exciton transitions in laterally coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barticevic, Zdenka; Pacheco, Monica; Duque, Carlos A.; Oliveira, Luiz E.

    2008-03-01

    We present a study of the electronic and optical properties of laterally coupled quantum dots. The excitonic spectra of this system under the effects of an external magnetic field applied perpendicular to the plane of the dots is obtained, with the potential of every individual dot taken as the superposition of a quantum well potential along the axial direction with a lateral parabolic confinement potential, and the coupled two- dot system then modeled by a superposition of the potentials of each dot, with their minima at different positions and truncated at the intersection plane. The wave functions and eigenvalues are obtained in the effective-mass approximation by using an extended variational approach in which the magneto- exciton states are simultaneously obtained [1]. The allowed magneto-exciton transitions are investigated by using circularly polarized radiation in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. We present results on the excitonic absorption coefficient as a function of the photon energy for different geometric quantum-dot confinement and magnetic-field values. Reference: [1] Z. Barticevic, M. Pacheco, C. A. Duque and L. E. Oliveira, Phys. Rev. B 68, 073312 (2003).

  15. Optical manipulation of electron spin in quantum dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villas-Boas, Jose; Ulloa, Sergio; Govorov, Alexander

    2006-03-01

    Self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) are of particular interest for fundamental physics because of their similarity with atoms. Coupling two of such dots and addressing them with polarized laser light pulses is perhaps even more interesting. In this paper we use a multi-exciton density matrix formalism to model the spin dynamics of a system with single or double layers of QDs. Our model includes the anisotropic electron-hole exchange in the dots, the presence of wetting layer states, and interdot tunneling [1]. Our results show that it is possible to switch the spin polarization of a single self-assembled quantum dot under elliptically polarized light by increasing the laser intensity. In the nonlinear mechanism described here, intense elliptically polarized light creates an effective exchange channel between the exciton spin states through biexciton states, as we demonstrate by numerical and analytical methods. We further show that the effect persists in realistic ensembles of dots, and we propose alternative ways to detect it. We also extend our study to a double layer of quantum dots, where we find a competition between Rabi frequency and tunneling oscillations. [1] J. M. Villas-Boas, S. E. Ulloa, and A. O. Govorov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 057404 (2005); Phys. Rev. B 69, 125342 (2004).

  16. Vacuum-induced coherence in quantum dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, Anna; Machnikowski, Paweł

    2012-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of vacuum-induced coherence in a pair of vertically stacked semiconductor quantum dots. The process consists in a coherent excitation transfer from a single-exciton state localized in one dot to a delocalized state in which the exciton occupation gets trapped. We study the influence of the factors characteristic of quantum dot systems (as opposed to natural atoms): energy mismatch, coupling between the single-exciton states localized in different dots, and different and nonparallel dipoles due to sub-band mixing, as well as coupling to phonons. We show that the destructive effect of the energy mismatch can be overcome by an appropriate interplay of the dipole moments and coupling between the dots which allows one to observe the trapping effect even in a structure with technologically realistic energy splitting of the order of milli-electron volts. We also analyze the impact of phonon dynamics on the occupation trapping and show that phonon effects are suppressed in a certain range of system parameters. This analysis shows that the vacuum-induced coherence effect and the associated long-living trapped excitonic population can be achieved in quantum dots.

  17. Spin-dependent transport through an interacting quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Yupeng; Xie, X C

    2002-12-31

    We study the nonequilibrium spin transport through a quantum dot coupled to the magnetic electrodes. A formula for the spin-dependent current is obtained and is applied to discuss the linear conductance and magnetoresistance in the interacting regime. We show that the Kondo resonance and the correlation-induced spin splitting of the dot levels may be systematically controlled by internal magnetization in the electrodes. As a result, when the electrodes are in parallel magnetic configuration, the linear conductance is characterized by two spin-resolved peaks. Furthermore, the presence of the spin-flip process in the dot splits the Kondo resonance into three peaks.

  18. QCAD simulation and optimization of semiconductor double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Erik; Gao, Xujiao; Kalashnikova, Irina

    2013-12-01

    We present the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) simulator that targets modeling quantum devices, particularly silicon double quantum dots (DQDs) developed for quantum qubits. The simulator has three di erentiating features: (i) its core contains nonlinear Poisson, e ective mass Schrodinger, and Con guration Interaction solvers that have massively parallel capability for high simulation throughput, and can be run individually or combined self-consistently for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices; (ii) the core solvers show superior convergence even at near-zero-Kelvin temperatures, which is critical for modeling quantum computing devices; (iii) it couples with an optimization engine Dakota that enables optimization of gate voltagesmore » in DQDs for multiple desired targets. The Poisson solver includes Maxwell- Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac statistics, supports Dirichlet, Neumann, interface charge, and Robin boundary conditions, and includes the e ect of dopant incomplete ionization. The solver has shown robust nonlinear convergence even in the milli-Kelvin temperature range, and has been extensively used to quickly obtain the semiclassical electrostatic potential in DQD devices. The self-consistent Schrodinger-Poisson solver has achieved robust and monotonic convergence behavior for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices at very low temperatures by using a predictor-correct iteration scheme. The QCAD simulator enables the calculation of dot-to-gate capacitances, and comparison with experiment and between solvers. It is observed that computed capacitances are in the right ballpark when compared to experiment, and quantum con nement increases capacitance when the number of electrons is xed in a quantum dot. In addition, the coupling of QCAD with Dakota allows to rapidly identify which device layouts are more likely leading to few-electron quantum dots. Very efficient QCAD simulations on a large number of fabricated and proposed Si DQDs have made it possible to provide fast feedback for

  19. Preparation of carbon quantum dots based high photostability luminescent membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinxing; Liu, Cui; Li, Yunchuan; Liang, Jiyuan; Liu, Jiyan; Qian, Tonghui; Ding, Jianjun; Cao, Yuan-Cheng

    2017-06-01

    Urethane acrylate (UA) was used to prepare carbon quantum dots (C-dots) luminescent membranes and the resultants were examined with FT-IR, mechanical strength, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and quantum yields (QYs). FT-IR results showed the polyurethane acrylate (PUA) prepolymer -C = C-vibration at 1101 cm -1 disappeared but there was strong vibration at1687cm -1 which was contributed from the-C = O groups in cross-linking PUA. Mechanical strength results showed that the different quantity of C-dots loadings and UV-curing time affect the strength. SEM observations on the cross-sections of the membranes are uniform and have no structural defects, which prove that the C-dots are compatible with the water-soluble PUA resin. The C-dot loading was increased from 0 to 1 g, the maximum tensile stress was nearly 2.67 MPa, but the tensile strain was decreased from 23.4% to 15.1% and 7.2% respectively. QYs results showed that the C-dots in the membrane were stable after 120 h continuous irradiation. Therefore, the C-dots photoluminescent film is the promising material for the flexible devices in the future applications. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Multi-bit dark state memory: Double quantum dot as an electronic quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Eran; Pozner, Roni; Lifshitz, Efrat; Peskin, Uri

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dot clusters enable the creation of dark states which preserve electrons or holes in a coherent superposition of dot states for a long time. Various quantum logic devices can be envisioned to arise from the possibility of storing such trapped particles for future release on demand. In this work, we consider a double quantum dot memory device, which enables the preservation of a coherent state to be released as multiple classical bits. Our unique device architecture uses an external gating for storing (writing) the coherent state and for retrieving (reading) the classical bits, in addition to exploiting an internal gating effect for the preservation of the coherent state.

  1. Self-organized formation of quantum dots of a material on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wendelken, John F.; Chang, Ming-Che; Pai, Woei Wu

    2001-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for fabricating arrays of quantum dots. A method for making a quantum dot device, includes: forming clusters of atoms on a substrate; and charging the clusters of atoms such that the clusters of atoms repel one another. The systems and methods provide advantages because the quantum dots can be ordered with regard to spacing and/or size.

  2. Quantum Dots in a Polymer Composite: A Convenient Particle-in-a-Box Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Charles V.; Giffin, Guinevere A.

    2008-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are at the forefront of materials science chemistry with applications in biological imaging and photovoltaic technologies. We have developed a simple laboratory experiment to measure the quantum-dot size from fluorescence spectra. A major roadblock of quantum-dot based exercises is the particle synthesis and handling;…

  3. Quantum control and process tomography of a semiconductor quantum dot hybrid qubit.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohun; Shi, Zhan; Simmons, C B; Ward, D R; Prance, J R; Koh, Teck Seng; Gamble, John King; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S N; Eriksson, Mark A

    2014-07-03

    The similarities between gated quantum dots and the transistors in modern microelectronics--in fabrication methods, physical structure and voltage scales for manipulation--have led to great interest in the development of quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor quantum dots. Although quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications, such as factoring. Furthermore, scalability and manufacturability are enhanced when qubits are as simple as possible. Previous work has increased the speed of spin qubit rotations by making use of integrated micromagnets, dynamic pumping of nuclear spins or the addition of a third quantum dot. Here we demonstrate a qubit that is a hybrid of spin and charge. It is simple, requiring neither nuclear-state preparation nor micromagnets. Unlike previous double-dot qubits, the hybrid qubit enables fast rotations about two axes of the Bloch sphere. We demonstrate full control on the Bloch sphere with π-rotation times of less than 100 picoseconds in two orthogonal directions, which is more than an order of magnitude faster than any other double-dot qubit. The speed arises from the qubit's charge-like characteristics, and its spin-like features result in resistance to decoherence over a wide range of gate voltages. We achieve full process tomography in our electrically controlled semiconductor quantum dot qubit, extracting high fidelities of 85 per cent for X rotations (transitions between qubit states) and 94 per cent for Z rotations (phase accumulation between qubit states).

  4. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dot Donors and Quantum Dot Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Kenny F.; Dennis, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer amongst semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is reviewed, with particular interest in biosensing applications. The unique optical properties of QDs provide certain advantages and also specific challenges with regards to sensor design, compared to other FRET systems. The brightness and photostability of QDs make them attractive for highly sensitive sensing and long-term, repetitive imaging applications, respectively, but the overlapping donor and acceptor excitation signals that arise when QDs serve as both the donor and acceptor lead to high background signals from direct excitation of the acceptor. The fundamentals of FRET within a nominally homogeneous QD population as well as energy transfer between two distinct colors of QDs are discussed. Examples of successful sensors are highlighted, as is cascading FRET, which can be used for solar harvesting. PMID:26057041

  5. Graphene quantum dots, graphene oxide, carbon quantum dots and graphite nanocrystals in coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yongqiang; Lin, Jianpeng; Chen, Yingmei; Fu, Fengfu; Chi, Yuwu; Chen, Guonan

    2014-06-01

    Six coal samples of different ranks have been used to prepare single-layer graphene quantum dots (S-GQDs). After chemical oxidation and a series of centrifugation separation, every coal could be treated into two fractions, namely, CoalA and CoalB. According to the characterization results of TEM, AFM, XRD, Raman and FTIR, CoalA was revealed to be mainly composed of S-GQDs, which have an average height of about 0.5 nm and an average plane dimension of about 10 nm. The obtained S-GQDs showed excitation-dependent fluorescence and excellent electrochemiluminescence. CoalB was found to be some other carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs), including agglomerated GQDs, graphene oxide, carbon quantum dots and agglomerated carbon nanocrystals. Generally, low-ranked coals might be more suitable for the preparation of S-GQDs. The production yield of S-GQDs from the six investigated coals decreased from 56.30% to 14.66% when the coal rank increased gradually. In contrast, high-ranked coals had high production yield of CoalB and might be more suitable for preparing other CNMs that were contained in CoalB, although those CNMs were difficult to separate from each other in our experiment.Six coal samples of different ranks have been used to prepare single-layer graphene quantum dots (S-GQDs). After chemical oxidation and a series of centrifugation separation, every coal could be treated into two fractions, namely, CoalA and CoalB. According to the characterization results of TEM, AFM, XRD, Raman and FTIR, CoalA was revealed to be mainly composed of S-GQDs, which have an average height of about 0.5 nm and an average plane dimension of about 10 nm. The obtained S-GQDs showed excitation-dependent fluorescence and excellent electrochemiluminescence. CoalB was found to be some other carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs), including agglomerated GQDs, graphene oxide, carbon quantum dots and agglomerated carbon nanocrystals. Generally, low-ranked coals might be more suitable for the preparation of

  6. Quantum Dot Nanobioelectronics and Selective Antimicrobial Redox Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Samuel Martin

    The unique properties of nanomaterials have engendered a great deal of interest in applying them for applications ranging from solid state physics to bio-imaging. One class of nanomaterials, known collectively as quantum dots, are defined as semiconducting crystals which have a characteristic dimension smaller than the excitonic radius of the bulk material which leads to quantum confinement effects. In this size regime, excited charge carriers behave like prototypical particles in a box, with their energy levels defined by the dimensions of the constituent particle. This is the source of the tunable optical properties which have drawn a great deal of attention with regards to finding appropriate applications for these materials. This dissertation is divided into multiple sections grouped by the type of application explored. The first sectoin investigates the energetic interactions of physically-coupled quantum dots and DNA, with the goal of gaining insight into how self-assembled molecular wires can bridge the energetic states of physically separated nanocrystals. Chapter 1 begins with an introduction to the properties of quantum dots, the conductive properties of DNA, and the common characterization methods used to characterize materials on the nanoscale. In Chapter 2 scanning tunneling measurements of QD-DNA constructs on the single particle level are presented which show the tunable coupling between the two materials and their resulting hybrid electronic structure. This is expanded upon in Chapter 3 where the conduction of photogenerated charges in QD-DNA hybrid thin films are characterized, which exhibit different charge transfer pathways through the constituent nucleobases depending on the energy of the incident light and resulting electrons. Complementary investigations of energy transfer mediated through DNA are presented in Chapter 4, with confirmation of Dexter-like transfer being facilitated through the oligonucleotides. The second section quantifies the

  7. Overview of Stabilizing Ligands for Biocompatible Quantum Dot Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanjie; Clapp, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Luminescent colloidal quantum dots (QDs) possess numerous advantages as fluorophores in biological applications. However, a principal challenge is how to retain the desirable optical properties of quantum dots in aqueous media while maintaining biocompatibility. Because QD photophysical properties are directly related to surface states, it is critical to control the surface chemistry that renders QDs biocompatible while maintaining electronic passivation. For more than a decade, investigators have used diverse strategies for altering the QD surface. This review summarizes the most successful approaches for preparing biocompatible QDs using various chemical ligands. PMID:22247651

  8. Synthesis and characterization of graphene quantum dots-silver nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandana, M.; Ashokkumar, S. P.; Vijeth, H.; Niranjana, M.; Yesappa, L.; Devendrappa, H.

    2018-04-01

    A facile microwave assisted hydrothermal method is used to synthesise glucose derived water soluble crystalline graphene quantum dots (GQDs) andcitrate reduction method was used to synthesized silver nanoparticles (SNPs). The formation of graphene quantum dots-silver nanocomposites (GSC) was synthesized through a simple refluxing process and characterised using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) to study the chemical interaction, Surface morphology using FESEM, Optical properties were studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The absorption band shows at 249, 306 and 447 nm confirms the formation of GQDs and GSC. The electrochemical performance of GSC tested to determine the oxidation/reduction processes by cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry.

  9. Laterally coupled circular quantum dots under applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque, C. M.; Correa, J. D.; Morales, A. L.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Duque, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    The optical response of a system of two laterally coupled quantum dots with circular cross-sectional shape is investigated within the effective mass approximation, taking into account the effects of the change in the geometrical configuration, the application of an external static electric field, and the presence of a donor impurity center. The first-order dielectric susceptibility is calculated in order to derive the corresponding light absorption and relative refractive index coefficients. The possibility of tuning these optical properties by means of changes in the quantum dot symmetry and the electric field intensity is particularly discussed.

  10. Design of Efficient Mirror Adder in Quantum- Dot Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Prashant Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Manju K.

    2018-03-01

    Lower power consumption is an essential demand for portable multimedia system using digital signal processing algorithms and architectures. Quantum dot cellular automata (QCA) is a rising nano technology for the development of high performance ultra-dense low power digital circuits. QCA based several efficient binary and decimal arithmetic circuits are implemented, however important improvements are still possible. This paper demonstrate Mirror Adder circuit design in QCA. We present comparative study of mirror adder cells designed using conventional CMOS technique and mirror adder cells designed using quantum-dot cellular automata. QCA based mirror adders are better in terms of area by order of three.

  11. Device and Method of Scintillating Quantum Dots for Radiation Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Eric R. (Inventor); DeHaven, Stanton L. (Inventor); Williams, Phillip A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A radiation imaging device includes a radiation source and a micro structured detector comprising a material defining a surface that faces the radiation source. The material includes a plurality of discreet cavities having openings in the surface. The detector also includes a plurality of quantum dots disclosed in the cavities. The quantum dots are configured to interact with radiation from the radiation source, and to emit visible photons that indicate the presence of radiation. A digital camera and optics may be used to capture images formed by the detector in response to exposure to radiation.

  12. Quantum-dot based nanothermometry in optical plasmonic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Maestro, Laura Martinez; Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122; Zhang, Qiming

    2014-11-03

    We report on the direct experimental determination of the temperature increment caused by laser irradiation in a optical recording media constituted by a polymeric film in which gold nanorods have been incorporated. The incorporation of CdSe quantum dots in the recording media allowed for single beam thermal reading of the on-focus temperature from a simple analysis of the two-photon excited fluorescence of quantum dots. Experimental results have been compared with numerical simulations revealing an excellent agreement and opening a promising avenue for further understanding and optimization of optical writing processes and media.

  13. Quantum Dots: Proteomics characterization of the impact on biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi-Mucelli, Stefano; Boschi, F.; Calderan, L.; Sbarbati, A.; Osculati, F.

    2009-05-01

    Over the past few years, Quantum Dots have been tested in most biotechnological applications that use fluorescence, including DNA array technology, immunofluorescence assays, cell and animal biology. Quantum Dots tend to be brighter than conventional dyes, because of the compounded effects of extinction coefficients that are an order of magnitude larger than those of most dyes. Their main advantage resides in their resistance to bleaching over long periods of time (minutes to hours), allowing the acquisition of images that are crisp and well contrasted. This increased photostability is especially useful for three-dimensional (3D) optical sectioning, where a major issue is bleaching of fluorophores during acquisition of successive z-sections, which compromises the correct reconstruction of 3D structures. The long-term stability and brightness of Quantum Dots make them ideal candidates also for live animal targeting and imaging. The vast majority of the papers published to date have shown no relevant effects on cells viability at the concentration used for imaging applications; higher concentrations, however, caused some issues on embryonic development. Adverse effects are due to be caused by the release of cadmium, as surface PEGylation of the Quantum Dots reduces these issues. A recently published paper shows evidences of an epigenetic effect of Quantum Dots treatment, with general histones hypoacetylation, and a translocation to the nucleus of p53. In this study, mice treated with Quantum Dots for imaging purposes were analyzed to investigate the impact on protein expression and networking. Differential mono-and bidimensional electrophoresis assays were performed, with the individuation of differentially expressed proteins after intravenous injection and imaging analysis; further, as several authors indicate an increase in reactive oxygen species as a possible mean of damage due to the Quantum Dots treatment, we investigated the signalling pathway of APE1/Ref1, a

  14. Effects of Shape and Strain Distribution of Quantum Dots on Optical Transition in the Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    We present a systemic theoretical study of the electronic properties of the quantum dots inserted in quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs). The strain distribution of three different shaped quantum dots (QDs) with a same ratio of the base to the vertical aspect is calculated by using the short-range valence-force-field (VFF) approach. The calculated results show that the hydrostatic strain ɛHvaries little with change of the shape, while the biaxial strain ɛBchanges a lot for different shapes of QDs. The recursion method is used to calculate the energy levels of the bound states in QDs. Compared with the strain, the shape plays a key role in the difference of electronic bound energy levels. The numerical results show that the deference of bound energy levels of lenslike InAs QD matches well with the experimental results. Moreover, the pyramid-shaped QD has the greatest difference from the measured experimental data. PMID:20596318

  15. Mesoscopic Elastic Distortions in GaAs Quantum Dot Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Pateras, Anastasios; Park, Joonkyu; Ahn, Youngjun; Tilka, Jack A; Holt, Martin V; Reichl, Christian; Wegscheider, Werner; Baart, Timothy A; Dehollain, Juan Pablo; Mukhopadhyay, Uditendu; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Evans, Paul G

    2018-05-09

    Quantum devices formed in high-electron-mobility semiconductor heterostructures provide a route through which quantum mechanical effects can be exploited on length scales accessible to lithography and integrated electronics. The electrostatic definition of quantum dots in semiconductor heterostructure devices intrinsically involves the lithographic fabrication of intricate patterns of metallic electrodes. The formation of metal/semiconductor interfaces, growth processes associated with polycrystalline metallic layers, and differential thermal expansion produce elastic distortion in the active areas of quantum devices. Understanding and controlling these distortions present a significant challenge in quantum device development. We report synchrotron X-ray nanodiffraction measurements combined with dynamical X-ray diffraction modeling that reveal lattice tilts with a depth-averaged value up to 0.04° and strain on the order of 10 -4 in the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Elastic distortions in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures modify the potential energy landscape in the 2DEG due to the generation of a deformation potential and an electric field through the piezoelectric effect. The stress induced by metal electrodes directly impacts the ability to control the positions of the potential minima where quantum dots form and the coupling between neighboring quantum dots.

  16. Perspective: The future of quantum dot photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Justin C.; Jung, Daehwan; Wan, Yating; Bowers, John E.

    2018-03-01

    Direct epitaxial integration of III-V materials on Si offers substantial manufacturing cost and scalability advantages over heterogeneous integration. The challenge is that epitaxial growth introduces high densities of crystalline defects that limit device performance and lifetime. Quantum dot lasers, amplifiers, modulators, and photodetectors epitaxially grown on Si are showing promise for achieving low-cost, scalable integration with silicon photonics. The unique electrical confinement properties of quantum dots provide reduced sensitivity to the crystalline defects that result from III-V/Si growth, while their unique gain dynamics show promise for improved performance and new functionalities relative to their quantum well counterparts in many devices. Clear advantages for using quantum dot active layers for lasers and amplifiers on and off Si have already been demonstrated, and results for quantum dot based photodetectors and modulators look promising. Laser performance on Si is improving rapidly with continuous-wave threshold currents below 1 mA, injection efficiencies of 87%, and output powers of 175 mW at 20 °C. 1500-h reliability tests at 35 °C showed an extrapolated mean-time-to-failure of more than ten million hours. This represents a significant stride toward efficient, scalable, and reliable III-V lasers on on-axis Si substrates for photonic integrate circuits that are fully compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) foundries.

  17. Design strategy for terahertz quantum dot cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Benjamin A; Williams, Benjamin S

    2016-10-31

    The development of quantum dot cascade lasers has been proposed as a path to obtain terahertz semiconductor lasers that operate at room temperature. The expected benefit is due to the suppression of nonradiative electron-phonon scattering and reduced dephasing that accompanies discretization of the electronic energy spectrum. We present numerical modeling which predicts that simple scaling of conventional quantum well based designs to the quantum dot regime will likely fail due to electrical instability associated with high-field domain formation. A design strategy adapted for terahertz quantum dot cascade lasers is presented which avoids these problems. Counterintuitively, this involves the resonant depopulation of the laser's upper state with the LO-phonon energy. The strategy is tested theoretically using a density matrix model of transport and gain, which predicts sufficient gain for lasing at stable operating points. Finally, the effect of quantum dot size inhomogeneity on the optical lineshape is explored, suggesting that the design concept is robust to a moderate amount of statistical variation.

  18. Field-emission from quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids

    PubMed Central

    García de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Gong, Xiwen; Sabatini, Randy P.; Liu, Min; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Xu, Jixian; Pang, Yuangjie; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sinton, David; Sargent, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dot and well architectures are attractive for infrared optoelectronics, and have led to the realization of compelling light sensors. However, they require well-defined passivated interfaces and rapid charge transport, and this has restricted their efficient implementation to costly vacuum-epitaxially grown semiconductors. Here we report solution-processed, sensitive infrared field-emission photodetectors. Using quantum-dots-in-perovskite, we demonstrate the extraction of photocarriers via field emission, followed by the recirculation of photogenerated carriers. We use in operando ultrafast transient spectroscopy to sense bias-dependent photoemission and recapture in field-emission devices. The resultant photodiodes exploit the superior electronic transport properties of organometal halide perovskites, the quantum-size-tuned absorption of the colloidal quantum dots and their matched interface. These field-emission quantum-dot-in-perovskite photodiodes extend the perovskite response into the short-wavelength infrared and achieve measured specific detectivities that exceed 1012 Jones. The results pave the way towards novel functional photonic devices with applications in photovoltaics and light emission. PMID:28337981

  19. Laser-driven two-electron quantum dot in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2018-06-01

    We have investigated the energies of two-electron parabolic quantum dots (TEPQdots) embedded in plasmas characterized by more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential under the action of a monochromatic, linearly polarized laser field by solving the corresponding Schrödinger equation numerically via the asymptotic iteration method. The four different cases of the MGECSC potential constituted by various sets of the potential parameters are reckoned in modeling of the interactions in the plasma environments which are Debye and quantum plasmas. The plasma environment is a remarkable experimental argument for the quantum dots and the interactions in plasma environments are different compared to the interactions in an environment without plasma and the screening specifications of the plasmas can be controlled through the plasma parameters. These findings constitute our major motivation in consideration of the plasma environments. An appreciable confinement effect is made up by implementing the laser field on the TEPQdot. The influences of the laser field on the system are included by using the Ehlotzky approximation, and then Kramers-Henneberger transformation is carried out for the corresponding Schrödinger equation. The influences of the ponderomotive force on two-electron quantum dots embedded in plasmas are investigated. The behaviours, the similarities and the functionalities of the laser field, the plasma environment, and the quantum dot confinement are also scrutinized. In addition, the role of the plasma environments in the mentioned analysis is also discussed in detail.

  20. Semiclassical transport in nearly symmetric quantum dots. I. Symmetry breaking in the dot.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Robert S; Schomerus, Henning; Kopp, Marten

    2009-11-01

    We apply the semiclassical theory of transport to quantum dots with exact and approximate spatial symmetries; left-right mirror symmetry, up-down mirror symmetry, inversion symmetry, or fourfold symmetry. In this work-the first of a pair of articles-we consider (a) perfectly symmetric dots and (b) nearly symmetric dots in which the symmetry is broken by the dot's internal dynamics. The second article addresses symmetry-breaking by displacement of the leads. Using semiclassics, we identify the origin of the symmetry-induced interference effects that contribute to weak localization corrections and universal conductance fluctuations. For perfect spatial symmetry, we recover results previously found using the random-matrix theory conjecture. We then go on to show how the results are affected by asymmetries in the dot, magnetic fields, and decoherence. In particular, the symmetry-asymmetry crossover is found to be described by a universal dependence on an asymmetry parameter gamma_{asym} . However, the form of this parameter is very different depending on how the dot is deformed away from spatial symmetry. Symmetry-induced interference effects are completely destroyed when the dot's boundary is globally deformed by less than an electron wavelength. In contrast, these effects are only reduced by a finite amount when a part of the dot's boundary smaller than a lead-width is deformed an arbitrarily large distance.

  1. Temperature independent infrared responsivity of a quantum dot quantum cascade photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng-Jiao; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Shu-Man, E-mail: liusm@semi.ac.cn

    2016-06-20

    We demonstrate a quantum dot quantum cascade photodetector with a hybrid active region of InAs quantum dots and an InGaAs quantum well, which exhibited a temperature independent response at 4.5 μm. The normal incident responsivity reached 10.3 mA/W at 120 K and maintained a value of 9 mA/W up to 260 K. It exhibited a specific detectivity above 10{sup 11} cm Hz{sup 1/2} W{sup −1} at 77 K, which remained at 10{sup 8} cm Hz{sup 1/2} W{sup −1} at 260 K. We ascribe the device's good thermal stability of infrared response to the three-dimensional quantum confinement of the InAs quantum dots incorporated in the active region.

  2. Double Quantum Dots in Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-02

    occupation of one dot is favored by increasing the detuning between the dots, the Coulomb interaction causes strong correlation effects realized by...al- low the measurement and manipulation of the spin de - gree of freedom of the confined electrons1. Such con- trol is at the heart of semiconductor...of an additional val- ley degree of freedom, the two-electron eigenstates can be separated in an orbital part and a spin-valley part that are, to a

  3. Interaction of Water-Soluble CdTe Quantum Dots with Bovine Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) are promising fluorescent markers, but it is very little known about interaction of quantum dots with biological molecules. In this study, interaction of CdTe quantum dots coated with thioglycolic acid (TGA) with bovine serum albumin was investigated. Steady state spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering methods were used. It was explored how bovine serum albumin affects stability and spectral properties of quantum dots in aqueous media. CdTe–TGA quantum dots in aqueous solution appeared to be not stable and precipitated. Interaction with bovine serum albumin significantly enhanced stability and photoluminescence quantum yield of quantum dots and prevented quantum dots from aggregating. PMID:27502633

  4. Ultra-broadband photodetectors based on epitaxial graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fatimy, Abdel; Nath, Anindya; Kong, Byoung Don; Boyd, Anthony K.; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Daniels, Kevin M.; Jadidi, M. Mehdi; Murphy, Thomas E.; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Barbara, Paola

    2018-03-01

    Graphene is an ideal material for hot-electron bolometers due to its low heat capacity and weak electron-phonon coupling. Nanostructuring graphene with quantum-dot constrictions yields detectors of electromagnetic radiation with extraordinarily high intrinsic responsivity, higher than 1×109 V W-1 at 3 K. The sensing mechanism is bolometric in nature: the quantum confinement gap causes a strong dependence of the electrical resistance on the electron temperature. Here, we show that this quantum confinement gap does not impose a limitation on the photon energy for light detection and these quantum-dot bolometers work in a very broad spectral range, from terahertz through telecom to ultraviolet radiation, with responsivity independent of wavelength. We also measure the power dependence of the response. Although the responsivity decreases with increasing power, it stays higher than 1×108 V W-1 in a wide range of absorbed power, from 1 pW to 0.4 nW.

  5. Radiation Effects in Nanostructures: Comparison of Proton Irradiation Induced Changes on Quantum Dots and Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Swift, G.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W.; Tang, Y.; Wang, K.; Dowd, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Successful implementation of technology using self-forming semiconductor Quantum Dots (QDs) has already demonstrated that temperature independent Dirac-delta density of states can be exploited in low current threshold QD lasers and QD infrared photodetectors.

  6. Efficient single photon detection by quantum dot resonant tunneling diodes.

    PubMed

    Blakesley, J C; See, P; Shields, A J; Kardynał, B E; Atkinson, P; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D A

    2005-02-18

    We demonstrate that the resonant tunnel current through a double-barrier structure is sensitive to the capture of single photoexcited holes by an adjacent layer of quantum dots. This phenomenon could allow the detection of single photons with low dark count rates and high quantum efficiencies. The magnitude of the sensing current may be controlled via the thickness of the tunnel barriers. Larger currents give improved signal to noise and allow sub-mus photon time resolution.

  7. Optical levitation of a microdroplet containing a single quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Minowa, Yosuke; Kawai, Ryoichi; Ashida, Masaaki

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate the optical levitation or trapping in helium gas of a single quantum dot (QD) within a liquid droplet. Bright single photon emission from the levitated QD in the droplet was observed for more than 200 s. The observed photon count rates are consistent with the value theoretically estimated from the two-photon-action cross section. This Letter presents the realization of an optically levitated solid-state quantum emitter.

  8. Calculation of exchange interaction for modified Gaussian coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khordad, R.

    2017-08-01

    A system of two laterally coupled quantum dots with modified Gaussian potential has been considered. Each quantum dot has an electron under electric and magnetic field. The quantum dots have been considered as hydrogen-like atoms. The physical picture has translated into the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. The Schrödinger equation using finite element method has been numerically solved. The exchange energy factor has been calculated as a functions of electric field, magnetic field, and the separation distance between the centers of the dots ( d). According to the results, it is found that there is the transition from anti-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic for constant electric field. Also, the transition occurs from ferromagnetic to anti-ferromagnetic for constant magnetic field (B>1 T). With decreasing the distance between the centers of the dots and increasing magnetic field, the transition occurs from anti-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic. It is found that a switching of exchange energy factor is presented without canceling the interactions of the electric and magnetic fields on the system.

  9. Towards a feasible implementation of quantum neural networks using quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Altaisky, Mikhail V., E-mail: altaisky@mx.iki.rssi.ru, E-mail: nzolnik@iki.rssi.ru; Zolnikova, Nadezhda N., E-mail: altaisky@mx.iki.rssi.ru, E-mail: nzolnik@iki.rssi.ru; Kaputkina, Natalia E., E-mail: nataly@misis.ru

    2016-03-07

    We propose an implementation of quantum neural networks using an array of quantum dots with dipole-dipole interactions. We demonstrate that this implementation is both feasible and versatile by studying it within the framework of GaAs based quantum dot qubits coupled to a reservoir of acoustic phonons. Using numerically exact Feynman integral calculations, we have found that the quantum coherence in our neural networks survive for over a hundred ps even at liquid nitrogen temperatures (77 K), which is three orders of magnitude higher than current implementations, which are based on SQUID-based systems operating at temperatures in the mK range.

  10. Recent Progress Towards Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Enhanced Optical Absorption.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zerui; Ji, Haining; Yu, Peng; Wang, Zhiming

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dot solar cells, as a promising candidate for the next generation solar cell technology, have received tremendous attention in the last 10 years. Some recent developments in epitaxy growth and device structures have opened up new avenues for practical quantum dot solar cells. Unfortunately, the performance of quantum dot solar cells is often plagued by marginal photon absorption. In this review, we focus on the recent progress made in enhancing optical absorption in quantum dot solar cells, including optimization of quantum dot growth, improving the solar cells structure, and engineering light trapping techniques.

  11. The photosensitivity of carbon quantum dots/CuAlO2 films composites.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jiaqi; Sheng, Yingzhuo; Zhang, Jingxiang; Wei, Jumeng; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Xin; Feng, Boxue

    2015-07-31

    Carbon quantum dots/CuAlO2 films were prepared by a simple route through which CuAlO2 films prepared by sol-gel on crystal quartz substrates were composited with carbon quantum dots on their surface. The characterization results indicated that CuAlO2 films were well combined with carbon quantum dots. The photoconductivity of carbon quantum dots/CuAlO2 films was investigated under illumination and darkness switching, and was demonstrated to be significantly enhanced compared with CuAlO2 films. Through analysis, this enhancement of photoconductivity was attributed to the carbon quantum dots with unique up-converted photoluminescence behavior.

  12. The photosensitivity of carbon quantum dots/CuAlO2 films composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jiaqi; Sheng, Yingzhuo; Zhang, Jingxiang; Wei, Jumeng; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Xin; Feng, Boxue

    2015-07-01

    Carbon quantum dots/CuAlO2 films were prepared by a simple route through which CuAlO2 films prepared by sol-gel on crystal quartz substrates were composited with carbon quantum dots on their surface. The characterization results indicated that CuAlO2 films were well combined with carbon quantum dots. The photoconductivity of carbon quantum dots/CuAlO2 films was investigated under illumination and darkness switching, and was demonstrated to be significantly enhanced compared with CuAlO2 films. Through analysis, this enhancement of photoconductivity was attributed to the carbon quantum dots with unique up-converted photoluminescence behavior.

  13. Study of CdTe quantum dots grown using a two-step annealing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kriti; Pandey, Praveen K.; Nagpal, Swati; Bhatnagar, P. K.; Mathur, P. C.

    2006-02-01

    High size dispersion, large average radius of quantum dot and low-volume ratio has been a major hurdle in the development of quantum dot based devices. In the present paper, we have grown CdTe quantum dots in a borosilicate glass matrix using a two-step annealing method. Results of optical characterization and the theoretical model of absorption spectra have shown that quantum dots grown using two-step annealing have lower average radius, lesser size dispersion, higher volume ratio and higher decrease in bulk free energy as compared to quantum dots grown conventionally.

  14. Downconversion quantum interface for a single quantum dot spin and 1550-nm single-photon channel.

    PubMed

    Pelc, Jason S; Yu, Leo; De Greve, Kristiaan; McMahon, Peter L; Natarajan, Chandra M; Esfandyarpour, Vahid; Maier, Sebastian; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Hadfield, Robert H; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Fejer, M M

    2012-12-03

    Long-distance quantum communication networks require appropriate interfaces between matter qubit-based nodes and low-loss photonic quantum channels. We implement a downconversion quantum interface, where the single photons emitted from a semiconductor quantum dot at 910 nm are downconverted to 1560 nm using a fiber-coupled periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide and a 2.2-μm pulsed pump laser. The single-photon character of the quantum dot emission is preserved during the downconversion process: we measure a cross-correlation g(2)(τ = 0) = 0.17 using resonant excitation of the quantum dot. We show that the downconversion interface is fully compatible with coherent optical control of the quantum dot electron spin through the observation of Rabi oscillations in the downconverted photon counts. These results represent a critical step towards a long-distance hybrid quantum network in which subsystems operating at different wavelengths are connected through quantum frequency conversion devices and 1.5-μm quantum channels.

  15. Chemical Structure, Ensemble and Single-Particle Spectroscopy of Thick-Shell InP-ZnSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kemar R; McBride, James R; Freymeyer, Nathaniel J; Thal, Lucas B; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2018-02-14

    Thick-shell (>5 nm) InP-ZnSe colloidal quantum dots (QDs) grown by a continuous-injection shell growth process are reported. The growth of a thick crystalline shell is attributed to the high temperature of the growth process and the relatively low lattice mismatch between the InP core and ZnSe shell. In addition to a narrow ensemble photoluminescence (PL) line-width (∼40 nm), ensemble and single-particle emission dynamics measurements indicate that blinking and Auger recombination are reduced in these heterostructures. More specifically, high single-dot ON-times (>95%) were obtained for the core-shell QDs, and measured ensemble biexciton lifetimes, τ 2x ∼ 540 ps, represent a 7-fold increase compared to InP-ZnS QDs. Further, high-resolution energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) chemical maps directly show for the first time significant incorporation of indium into the shell of the InP-ZnSe QDs. Examination of the atomic structure of the thick-shell QDs by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) reveals structural defects in subpopulations of particles that may mitigate PL efficiencies (∼40% in ensemble), providing insight toward further synthetic refinement. These InP-ZnSe heterostructures represent progress toward fully cadmium-free QDs with superior photophysical properties important in biological labeling and other emission-based technologies.

  16. Single colloidal quantum dots as sources of single photons for quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Qualtieri, Antonio; Leménager, Godefroy; Martiradonna, Luigi; Stomeo, Tiziana; Cingolani, Roberto; Bramati, Alberto; De Vittorio, Massimo

    2011-02-01

    Colloidal nanocrystals, i.e. quantum dots synthesized trough wet-chemistry approaches, are promising nanoparticles for photonic applications and, remarkably, their quantum nature makes them very promising for single photon emission at room temperature. In this work we describe two approaches to engineer the emission properties of these nanoemitters in terms of radiative lifetime and photon polarization, drawing a viable strategy for their exploitation as room-temperature single photon sources for quantum information and quantum telecommunications.

  17. Hot-electron transfer in quantum-dot heterojunction films.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Gianluca; Crisp, Ryan W; Ten Brinck, Stephanie; Zapata, Felipe; van Ouwendorp, Michiko; Renaud, Nicolas; Kirkwood, Nicholas; Evers, Wiel H; Kinge, Sachin; Infante, Ivan; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Houtepen, Arjan J

    2018-06-13

    Thermalization losses limit the photon-to-power conversion of solar cells at the high-energy side of the solar spectrum, as electrons quickly lose their energy relaxing to the band edge. Hot-electron transfer could reduce these losses. Here, we demonstrate fast and efficient hot-electron transfer between lead selenide and cadmium selenide quantum dots assembled in a quantum-dot heterojunction solid. In this system, the energy structure of the absorber material and of the electron extracting material can be easily tuned via a variation of quantum-dot size, allowing us to tailor the energetics of the transfer process for device applications. The efficiency of the transfer process increases with excitation energy as a result of the more favorable competition between hot-electron transfer and electron cooling. The experimental picture is supported by time-domain density functional theory calculations, showing that electron density is transferred from lead selenide to cadmium selenide quantum dots on the sub-picosecond timescale.

  18. Controlling the Properties of Matter with Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, Victor

    2017-03-22

    Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes. Photoconversion is a process wherein the energy of a photon, or quantum of light, is converted into other forms of energy, for example, chemical or electrical. Semiconductor quantum dots are chemically synthesized crystalline nanoparticles that have been studied for more than three decades in the context of various photoconversion schemes including photovoltaics (generation of photo-electricity) and photo-catalysis (generation of “solar fuels”). The appeal of quantum dots comes from the unmatchedmore » tunability of their physical properties, which can be adjusted by controlling the size, shape and composition of the dots. At Los Alamos, the research connects to the institutional mission of solving national security challenges through scientific excellence, in this case focusing on novel physical principles for highly efficient photoconversion, charge manipulation in exploratory device structures and novel nanomaterials.« less

  19. Electronic Structure of Helium Atom in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Jayanta K.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Mukherjee, T. K.

    2016-03-01

    Bound and resonance states of helium atom have been investigated inside a quantum dot by using explicitly correlated Hylleraas type basis set within the framework of stabilization method. To be specific, precise energy eigenvalues of bound 1sns (1Se) (n = 1-6) states and the resonance parameters i.e. positions and widths of 1Se states due to 2sns (n = 2-5) and 2pnp (n = 2-5) configurations of confined helium below N = 2 ionization threshold of He+ have been estimated. The two-parameter (Depth and Width) finite oscillator potential is used to represent the confining potential due to the quantum dot. It has been explicitly demonstrated that the electronic structural properties become sensitive functions of the dot size. It is observed from the calculations of ionization potential that the stability of an impurity ion within a quantum dot may be manipulated by varying the confinement parameters. A possibility of controlling the autoionization lifetime of doubly excited states of two-electron ions by tuning the width of the quantum cavity is also discussed here. TKM Gratefully Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. 37(3)/14/27/2014-BRNS from the Department of Atomic Energy, BRNS, Government of India. SB Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. PSW-160/14-15(ERO) from University Grants Commission, Government of India

  20. Attachment of Quantum Dots on Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seay, Jared; Liang, Huan; Harikumar, Parameswar

    2011-03-01

    ZnO nanorods grown by hydrothermal technique are of great interest for potential applications in photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. In this study we investigate the optimization of the optical absorption properties by a low temperature, chemical bath deposition technique. Our group fabricated nanorods on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate with precursor solution of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylenetramine (1:1 molar ratio) at 95C for 9 hours. In order to optimize the light absorption characteristics of ZnO nanorods, CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) of various diameters were attached to the surface of ZnO nanostructures grown on ITO and gold-coated silicon substrates. Density of quantum dots was varied by controlling the number drops on the surface of the ZnO nanorods. For a 0.1 M concentration of QDs of 10 nm diameter, the PL intensity at 385 nm increased as the density of the quantum dots on ZnO nanostructures was increased. For quantum dots at 1 M concentration, the PL intensity at 385 nm increased at the beginning and then decreased at higher density. We will discuss the observed changes in PL intensity with QD concentration with ZnO-QD band structure and recombination-diffusion processes taking place at the interface.

  1. High-fidelity gates in quantum dot spin qubits

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Teck Seng; Coppersmith, S. N.; Friesen, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Several logical qubits and quantum gates have been proposed for semiconductor quantum dots controlled by voltages applied to top gates. The different schemes can be difficult to compare meaningfully. Here we develop a theoretical framework to evaluate disparate qubit-gating schemes on an equal footing. We apply the procedure to two types of double-dot qubits: the singlet–triplet and the semiconducting quantum dot hybrid qubit. We investigate three quantum gates that flip the qubit state: a DC pulsed gate, an AC gate based on logical qubit resonance, and a gate-like process known as stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. These gates are all mediated by an exchange interaction that is controlled experimentally using the interdot tunnel coupling g and the detuning ϵ, which sets the energy difference between the dots. Our procedure has two steps. First, we optimize the gate fidelity (f) for fixed g as a function of the other control parameters; this yields an that is universal for different types of gates. Next, we identify physical constraints on the control parameters; this yields an upper bound that is specific to the qubit-gate combination. We show that similar gate fidelities should be attainable for singlet-triplet qubits in isotopically purified Si, and for hybrid qubits in natural Si. Considerably lower fidelities are obtained for GaAs devices, due to the fluctuating magnetic fields ΔB produced by nuclear spins. PMID:24255105

  2. High-fidelity gates in quantum dot spin qubits.

    PubMed

    Koh, Teck Seng; Coppersmith, S N; Friesen, Mark

    2013-12-03

    Several logical qubits and quantum gates have been proposed for semiconductor quantum dots controlled by voltages applied to top gates. The different schemes can be difficult to compare meaningfully. Here we develop a theoretical framework to evaluate disparate qubit-gating schemes on an equal footing. We apply the procedure to two types of double-dot qubits: the singlet-triplet and the semiconducting quantum dot hybrid qubit. We investigate three quantum gates that flip the qubit state: a DC pulsed gate, an AC gate based on logical qubit resonance, and a gate-like process known as stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. These gates are all mediated by an exchange interaction that is controlled experimentally using the interdot tunnel coupling g and the detuning [Symbol: see text], which sets the energy difference between the dots. Our procedure has two steps. First, we optimize the gate fidelity (f) for fixed g as a function of the other control parameters; this yields an f(opt)(g) that is universal for different types of gates. Next, we identify physical constraints on the control parameters; this yields an upper bound f(max) that is specific to the qubit-gate combination. We show that similar gate fidelities (~99:5%) should be attainable for singlet-triplet qubits in isotopically purified Si, and for hybrid qubits in natural Si. Considerably lower fidelities are obtained for GaAs devices, due to the fluctuating magnetic fields ΔB produced by nuclear spins.

  3. Quantum Dots for Live Cell and In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Walling, Maureen A; Novak, Jennifer A; Shepard, Jason R. E

    2009-01-01

    In the past few decades, technology has made immeasurable strides to enable visualization, identification, and quantitation in biological systems. Many of these technological advancements are occurring on the nanometer scale, where multiple scientific disciplines are combining to create new materials with enhanced properties. The integration of inorganic synthetic methods with a size reduction to the nano-scale has lead to the creation of a new class of optical reporters, called quantum dots. These semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals have emerged as an alternative to organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, and are brighter and more stable against photobleaching than standard fluorescent indicators. Quantum dots have tunable optical properties that have proved useful in a wide range of applications from multiplexed analysis such as DNA detection and cell sorting and tracking, to most recently demonstrating promise for in vivo imaging and diagnostics. This review provides an in-depth discussion of past, present, and future trends in quantum dot use with an emphasis on in vivo imaging and its related applications. PMID:19333416

  4. Making Ternary Quantum Dots From Single-Source Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Banger, Kulbinder; Castro, Stephanie; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    A process has been devised for making ternary (specifically, CuInS2) nanocrystals for use as quantum dots (QDs) in a contemplated next generation of high-efficiency solar photovoltaic cells. The process parameters can be chosen to tailor the sizes (and, thus, the absorption and emission spectra) of the QDs.

  5. Application of zinc oxide quantum dots in food safety

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zinc oxide quantum dots (ZnO QDs) are nanoparticles of purified powdered ZnO. The ZnO QDs were directly added into liquid foods or coated on the surface of glass jars using polylactic acid (PLA) as a carrier. The antimicrobial activities of ZnO QDs against Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteriti...

  6. Photonic emitters and circuits based on colloidal quantum dot composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Vinod M.; Husaini, Saima; Valappil, Nikesh; Luberto, Matthew

    2009-02-01

    We discuss our work on light emitters and photonic circuits realized using colloidal quantum dot composites. Specifically we will report our recent work on flexible microcavity laser, microdisk emitters and integrated active - passive waveguides. The entire microcavity laser structure was realized using spin coating and consisted of an all-polymer distributed Bragg reflector with a poly-vinyl carbazole cavity layer embedded with InGaP/ZnS colloidal quantum dots. These microcavities can be peeled off the substrate yielding a flexible structure that can conform to any shape and whose emission spectra can be mechanically tuned. The microdisk emitters and the integrated waveguide structures were realized using soft lithography and photo-lithography, respectively and were fabricated using a composite consisting of quantum dots embedded in SU8 matrix. Finally, we will discuss the effect of the host matrix on the optical properties of the quantum dots using results of steady-state and time-resolved luminescence measurements. In addition to their specific functionalities, these novel device demonstrations and their development present a low cost alternative to the traditional photonic device fabrication techniques.

  7. Staircase Quantum Dots Configuration in Nanowires for Optimized Thermoelectric Power

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lijie; Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The performance of thermoelectric energy harvesters can be improved by nanostructures that exploit inelastic transport processes. One prototype is the three-terminal hopping thermoelectric device where electron hopping between quantum-dots are driven by hot phonons. Such three-terminal hopping thermoelectric devices have potential in achieving high efficiency or power via inelastic transport and without relying on heavy-elements or toxic compounds. We show in this work how output power of the device can be optimized via tuning the number and energy configuration of the quantum-dots embedded in parallel nanowires. We find that the staircase energy configuration with constant energy-step can improve the power factor over a serial connection of a single pair of quantum-dots. Moreover, for a fixed energy-step, there is an optimal length for the nanowire. Similarly for a fixed number of quantum-dots there is an optimal energy-step for the output power. Our results are important for future developments of high-performance nanostructured thermoelectric devices. PMID:27550093

  8. Bit-Serial Adder Based on Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarress, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Mathew

    2003-01-01

    A proposed integrated circuit based on quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) would function as a bit-serial adder. This circuit would serve as a prototype building block for demonstrating the feasibility of quantum-dots computing and for the further development of increasingly complex and increasingly capable quantum-dots computing circuits. QCA-based bit-serial adders would be especially useful in that they would enable the development of highly parallel and systolic processors for implementing fast Fourier, cosine, Hartley, and wavelet transforms. The proposed circuit would complement the QCA-based circuits described in "Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots" (NPO-20801), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42 and "Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots" (NPO-20855), which appears elsewhere in this issue. Those articles described the limitations of very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) circuitry and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA. To recapitulate: In a VLSI circuit, signal paths that are required not to interact with each other must not cross in the same plane. In contrast, for reasons too complex to describe in the limited space available for this article, suitably designed and operated QCA-based signal paths that are required not to interact with each other can nevertheless be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. To enable a meaningful description of the proposed bit-serial adder, it is necessary to further recapitulate the description of a quantum-dot cellular automation from the first-mentioned prior article: A quantum-dot cellular automaton contains four quantum dots positioned at the corners of a square cell. The cell contains two extra mobile electrons that can tunnel (in the

  9. Atomistic theory of excitonic fine structure in InAs/InP nanowire quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świderski, M.; Zieliński, M.

    2017-03-01

    Nanowire quantum dots have peculiar electronic and optical properties. In this work we use atomistic tight binding to study excitonic spectra of artificial molecules formed by a double nanowire quantum dot. We demonstrate a key role of atomistic symmetry and nanowire substrate orientation rather than cylindrical shape symmetry of a nanowire and a molecule. In particular for [001 ] nanowire orientation we observe a nonvanishing bright exciton splitting for a quasimolecule formed by two cylindrical quantum dots of different heights. This effect is due to interdot coupling that effectively reduces the overall symmetry, whereas single uncoupled [001 ] quantum dots have zero fine structure splitting. We found that the same double quantum dot system grown on [111 ] nanowire reveals no excitonic fine structure for all considered quantum dot distances and individual quantum dot heights. Further we demonstrate a pronounced, by several orders of magnitude, increase of the dark exciton optical activity in a quantum dot molecule as compared to a single quantum dot. For [111 ] systems we also show spontaneous localization of single particle states in one of nominally identical quantum dots forming a molecule, which is mediated by strain and origins from the lack of the vertical inversion symmetry in [111 ] nanostructures of overall C3 v symmetry. Finally, we study lowering of symmetry due to alloy randomness that triggers nonzero excitonic fine structure and the dark exciton optical activity in realistic nanowire quantum dot molecules of intermixed composition.

  10. Suppression of low-frequency charge noise in gates-defined GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jie; Li, Hai-Ou, E-mail: haiouli@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn; Wang, Ke

    To reduce the charge noise of a modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot, we have fabricated shallow-etched GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots using the wet-etching method to study the effects of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) underneath the metallic gates. The low-frequency 1/f noise in the Coulomb blockade region of the shallow-etched quantum dot is compared with a non-etched quantum dot on the same wafer. The average values of the gate noise are approximately 0.5 μeV in the shallow-etched quantum dot and 3 μeV in the regular quantum dot. Our results show the quantum dot low-frequency charge noise can be suppressed by the removal ofmore » the 2DEG underneath the metallic gates, which provides an architecture for noise reduction.« less

  11. [Imaging of surface cell antigens on the tumor sections of lymph nodes using fluorescence quantum dots].

    PubMed

    Rafalovskaia-Orlovskaia, E P; Gorgidze, L A; Gladkikh, A A; Tauger, S M; Vorob'ev, I A

    2012-01-01

    The usefulness of quantum dots for the immunofluorescent detection of surface antigens on the lymphoid cells has been studied. To optimize quantum dots detection we have upgraded fluorescent microscope that allows obtaining multiple images from different quantum dots from one section. Specimens stained with quantum dots remained stable over two weeks and practically did not bleach under mercury lamp illumination during tens of minutes. Direct conjugates of primary mouse monoclonal antibodies with quantum dots demonstrated high specificity and sufficient sensitivity in the case of double staining on the frozen sections. Because of the high stability of quantum dots' fluorescence, this method allows to analyze antigen coexpression on the lymphoid tissue sections for diagnostic purposes. The spillover of fluorescent signals from quantum dots into adjacent fluorescent channels, with maxima differing by 40 nm, did not exceed 8%, which makes the spectral compensation is practically unnecessary.

  12. Time-bin entangled photons from a quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Harishankar; Predojević, Ana; Kauten, Thomas; Huber, Tobias; Solomon, Glenn S.; Weihs, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Long distance quantum communication is one of the prime goals in the field of quantum information science. With information encoded in the quantum state of photons, existing telecommunication fibre networks can be effectively used as a transport medium. To achieve this goal, a source of robust entangled single photon pairs is required. Here, we report the realization of a source of time-bin entangled photon pairs utilizing the biexciton-exciton cascade in a III/V self-assembled quantum dot. We analyse the generated photon pairs by an inherently phase-stable interferometry technique, facilitating uninterrupted long integration times. We confirm the entanglement by performing quantum state tomography of the emitted photons, which yields a fidelity of 0.69(3) and a concurrence of 0.41(6) for our realization of time-energy entanglement from a single quantum emitter. PMID:24968024

  13. Multi-dimensional photonic states from a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. P.; Bennett, A. J.; Stevenson, R. M.; Ellis, D. J. P.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum states superposed across multiple particles or degrees of freedom offer an advantage in the development of quantum technologies. Creating these states deterministically and with high efficiency is an ongoing challenge. A promising approach is the repeated excitation of multi-level quantum emitters, which have been shown to naturally generate light with quantum statistics. Here we describe how to create one class of higher dimensional quantum state, a so called W-state, which is superposed across multiple time bins. We do this by repeated Raman scattering of photons from a charged quantum dot in a pillar microcavity. We show this method can be scaled to larger dimensions with no reduction in coherence or single-photon character. We explain how to extend this work to enable the deterministic creation of arbitrary time-bin encoded qudits.

  14. Time-bin entangled photons from a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Harishankar; Predojević, Ana; Kauten, Thomas; Huber, Tobias; Solomon, Glenn S; Weihs, Gregor

    2014-06-26

    Long-distance quantum communication is one of the prime goals in the field of quantum information science. With information encoded in the quantum state of photons, existing telecommunication fibre networks can be effectively used as a transport medium. To achieve this goal, a source of robust entangled single-photon pairs is required. Here we report the realization of a source of time-bin entangled photon pairs utilizing the biexciton-exciton cascade in a III/V self-assembled quantum dot. We analyse the generated photon pairs by an inherently phase-stable interferometry technique, facilitating uninterrupted long integration times. We confirm the entanglement by performing quantum state tomography of the emitted photons, which yields a fidelity of 0.69(3) and a concurrence of 0.41(6) for our realization of time-energy entanglement from a single quantum emitter.

  15. Colloidal-Quantum-Dot Ring Lasers with Active Color Control.

    PubMed

    le Feber, Boris; Prins, Ferry; De Leo, Eva; Rabouw, Freddy T; Norris, David J

    2018-02-14

    To improve the photophysical performance of colloidal quantum dots for laser applications, sophisticated core/shell geometries have been developed. Typically, a wider bandgap semiconductor is added as a shell to enhance the gain from the quantum-dot core. This shell is designed to electronically isolate the core, funnel excitons to it, and reduce nonradiative Auger recombination. However, the shell could also potentially provide a secondary source of gain, leading to further versatility in these materials. Here we develop high-quality quantum-dot ring lasers that not only exhibit lasing from both the core and the shell but also the ability to switch between them. We fabricate ring resonators (with quality factors up to ∼2500) consisting only of CdSe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots using a simple template-stripping process. We then examine lasing as a function of the optical excitation power and ring radius. In resonators with quality factors >1000, excitons in the CdSe cores lead to red lasing with thresholds at ∼25 μJ/cm 2 . With increasing power, green lasing from the CdS shell emerges (>100 μJ/cm 2 ) and then the red lasing begins to disappear (>250 μJ/cm 2 ). We present a rate-equation model that can explain this color switching as a competition between exciton localization into the core and stimulated emission from excitons in the shell. Moreover, by lowering the quality factor of the cavity we can engineer the device to exhibit only green lasing. The mechanism demonstrated here provides a potential route toward color-switchable quantum-dot lasers.

  16. A real-time spectrum acquisition system design based on quantum dots-quantum well detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Guo, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the structure characteristics of quantum dots-quantum well photodetector with response wavelength range from 400 nm to 1000 nm. It has the characteristics of high sensitivity, low dark current and the high conductance gain. According to the properties of the quantum dots-quantum well photodetectors, we designed a new type of capacitive transimpedence amplifier (CTIA) readout circuit structure with the advantages of adjustable gain, wide bandwidth and high driving ability. We have implemented the chip packaging between CTIA-CDS structure readout circuit and quantum dots detector and tested the readout response characteristics. According to the timing signals requirements of our readout circuit, we designed a real-time spectral data acquisition system based on FPGA and ARM. Parallel processing mode of programmable devices makes the system has high sensitivity and high transmission rate. In addition, we realized blind pixel compensation and smoothing filter algorithm processing to the real time spectrum data by using C++. Through the fluorescence spectrum measurement of carbon quantum dots and the signal acquisition system and computer software system to realize the collection of the spectrum signal processing and analysis, we verified the excellent characteristics of detector. It meets the design requirements of quantum dot spectrum acquisition system with the characteristics of short integration time, real-time and portability.

  17. Magneto-conductance fingerprints of purely quantum states in the open quantum dot limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Michel; Ujevic, Sebastian

    2012-06-01

    We present quantum magneto-conductance simulations, at the quantum low energy condition, to study the open quantum dot limit. The longitudinal conductance G(E,B) of spinless and non-interacting electrons is mapped as a function of the magnetic field B and the energy E of the electrons. The quantum dot linked to the semi-infinite leads is tuned by quantum point contacts of variable width w. We analyze the transition from a quantum wire to an open quantum dot and then to an effective closed system. The transition, as a function of w, occurs in the following sequence: evolution of quasi-Landau levels to Fano resonances and quasi-bound states between the quasi-Landau levels, followed by the formation of crossings that evolve to anti-crossings inside the quasi-Landau level region. After that, Fano resonances are created between the quasi-Landau states with the final generation of resonant tunneling peaks. By comparing the G(E,B) maps, we identify the closed and open-like limits of the system as a function of the applied magnetic field. These results were used to build quantum openness diagrams G(w,B). Also, these maps allow us to determine the w-limit value from which we can qualitatively relate the closed system properties to the open one. The above analysis can be used to identify single spinless particle effects in experimental measurements of the open quantum dot limit.

  18. Structural and optical properties of ZnSe:Eu/ZnS quantum dots depending on interfacial residual europium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Young; Lee, Chan Gi; Seo, Han Wook; Jeong, Da-Woon; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Woo-Byoung; Kim, Bum Sung

    2018-01-01

    A multimodal emitter comprising of ZnSe:Eu/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots (QDs) by adding a ZnS precursor in situ during synthesis. ZnSe/Eu2+/Eu3+/ZnS actives both core and core/shell. QDs prepared with the ZnS precursor displayed a luminescence intensity three times that of ZnSe QDs due to the passivation effect of the Shell. While the core QDs display the 450-550 nm emission of Eu2+ (4F65D1 → 4F7), the core/shell system showed no Eu2+ emission but only the sharp peaks in the red at 579, 592, 615, 651, and 700 nm due to the electronic transitions of 5D0 → 7Fn (n = 0-4) depending on leisurely decreased with increased reaction time. These results are in agreement with Eu 3d spectra of XPS analysis results. Microscopic analyses show that the core and core/shell QDs both have a zinc blende structure, and their respective sizes were about 3.19 and 3.44 nm. The lattice constant in the central portion of the core/shell QDs are around d111 = 3.13 Å, which is between the outside and inside ring patterns (d111 = 3.27 and 3.07 Å, respectively). This shows the effective over-capping of shell onto the core QDs. The core/shell structure may contain Eu2O3 bonding the over-coated ZnS surface on the Eu3+-doped ZnSe core.

  19. Electronic structure and linear optical properties of ZnSe and ZnSe:Mn.

    PubMed

    Su, Kang; Wang, Yuhua

    2010-03-01

    As an important wide band-gap II-VI semiconductor, ZnSe has attracted much attention for its various applications in photo-electronic devices such as blue light-emitting diodes and blue-green diode lasers. Mn-doped ZnSe is an excellent quantum dot material. The electronic structures of the sphalerite ZnSe and ZnSe:Mn were calculated using the Vienna ab initio Simulation Package with ultra-soft pseudo potentials and Material Studio. The calculated equilibrium lattice constants agree well with the experimental values. Using the optimized equilibrium lattice constants, the densities of states and energy band structures were further calculated. By analyzing the partial densities of states, the contributions of different electron states in different atoms were estimated. The p states of Zn mostly contribute to the top of the valence band, and the s states of Zn and the s states of Se have major effects on the bottom of the conduction band. The calculated results of ZnSe:Mn show the band gap was changed from 2.48 to 1.1 eV. The calculated linear optical properties, such as refractive index and absorption spectrum, are in good agreement with experimental values.

  20. Autonomous quantum Maxwell's demon based on two exchange-coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptaszyński, Krzysztof

    2018-01-01

    I study an autonomous quantum Maxwell's demon based on two exchange-coupled quantum dots attached to the spin-polarized leads. The principle of operation of the demon is based on the coherent oscillations between the spin states of the system which act as a quantum iSWAP gate. Due to the operation of the iSWAP gate, one of the dots acts as a feedback controller which blocks the transport with the bias in the other dot, thus inducing the electron pumping against the bias; this leads to the locally negative entropy production. Operation of the demon is associated with the information transfer between the dots, which is studied quantitatively by mapping the analyzed setup onto the thermodynamically equivalent auxiliary system. The calculated entropy production in a single subsystem and information flow between the subsystems are shown to obey a local form of the second law of thermodynamics, similar to the one previously derived for classical bipartite systems.

  1. [Spectral Analysis of CdZnSe Ternary Quantum Dots Sensitized TiO2 Tubes and Its Application in Visible-Light Photocatalysis].

    PubMed

    Han, Zhi-zhong; Ren, Li-li; Pan, Hai-bo; Li, Chun-yan; Chen, Jing-hua; Chen, Jian-zhong

    2015-11-01

    In this work, cadmium nitrate hexahydrate [Cd(NO₃)₂ · 6H₂O] is as a source of cadmium, zinc nitrate [Zn(NO₃)₂] as a source of zinc source, and NaHSe as a source of selenium which was prepared through reducing the elemental selenium with sodium borohydride (NaBH₄). Then water-soluble Cd₁₋xZnxSe ternary quantum dots with different component were prepared by colloid chemistry. The as-prepared Cd₁₋xZnx Se ternary quantum dots exhibit stable fluorescent property in aqueous solution, and can still maintain good dispersivity at room temperature for four months. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) were used to analyze crystal structure and morphology of the prepared Cd₁₋xZnxSe. It is found that the as-prepared ternary quantum dots are cubic phase, show as sphere, and the average of particle size is approximate 4 nm. The spectral properties and energy band structure of the as-prepared ternary quantum dots were modulated through changing the atom ratio of elements Zn and Cd. Compared with binary quantum dots CdSe and ZnSe, the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Visible) absorption spectrum and fluorescence (FL) emission spectrum of ternary quantum dots are both red-shift. The composites (Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se@TNTs) of Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se ternary quantum dots and TiO₂ nanotubes (TNTs) were prepared by directly immerging TNTs into quantum dots dispersive solution for 5 hours. TEM image shows that the Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se ternary quantum dots were closely combined to nanotube surface. The infrared spectra show that the Ti-Se bond was formed between Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se ternary quantum dots and TiO₂ nanotubes, which improve the stability of the composite. Compared to pristine TNTs, UV-Visible absorption spectrum of the composites is significantly enhanced in the visible region of light. And the absorption band edge of Cd₀.₅Zn₀.₅ Se@TNTs red-shift from 400 to 700 nm. The recombination of the

  2. Oxide double quantum dot - an answer to the qubit problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarlagadda, Sudhakar; Dey, Amit

    We propose that oxide-based double quantum dots with only one electron (tunnelling between the dots) can be regarded as a qubit with little decoherence; these dots can possibly meet future challenges of miniaturization. The tunnelling of the eg electron between the dots and the attraction between the electron and the hole on adjacent dots can be modelled as an anisotropic Heisenberg interaction between two spins with the total z-component of the spins being zero. We study two anisotropically interacting spins coupled to optical phonons; we restrict our analysis to the regime of strong coupling to the environment, to the antiadiabatic region, and to the subspace with zero value for SzT (the z-component of the total spin). In the case where each spin is coupled to a different phonon bath, we assume that the system and the environment are initially uncorrelated (and form a simply separable state) in the polaronic frame of reference. By analyzing the polaron dynamics through a non-Markovian quantum master equation, we find that the system manifests a small amount of decoherence that decreases both with increasing nonadiabaticity and with enhancing strength of coupling g. Recently I got an invitation to visit Argonne National Lab from Jan./2106 to end of March/2016. I thought I would give a talk at APS March meeting. Please accept the submission.

  3. Inter-dot strain field effect on the optoelectronic properties of realistic InP lateral quantum-dot molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Barettin, Daniele, E-mail: Daniele.Barettin@uniroma2.it; Auf der Maur, Matthias; De Angelis, Roberta

    2015-03-07

    We report on numerical simulations of InP surface lateral quantum-dot molecules on In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52 }P buffer, using a model strictly derived by experimental results by extrapolation of the molecules shape from atomic force microscopy images. Our study has been inspired by the comparison of a photoluminescence spectrum of a high-density InP surface quantum dot sample with a numerical ensemble average given by a weighted sum of simulated single quantum-dot spectra. A lack of experimental optical response from the smaller dots of the sample is found to be due to strong inter-dot strain fields, which influence the optoelectronic properties of lateralmore » quantum-dot molecules. Continuum electromechanical, k{sup →}·p{sup →} bandstructure, and optical calculations are presented for two different molecules, the first composed of two dots of nearly identical dimensions (homonuclear), the second of two dots with rather different sizes (heteronuclear). We show that in the homonuclear molecule the hydrostatic strain raises a potential barrier for the electrons in the connection zone between the dots, while conversely the holes do not experience any barrier, which considerably increases the coupling. Results for the heteronuclear molecule show instead that its dots do not appear as two separate and distinguishable structures, but as a single large dot, and no optical emission is observed in the range of higher energies where the smaller dot is supposed to emit. We believe that in samples of such a high density the smaller dots result as practically incorporated into bigger molecular structures, an effect strongly enforced by the inter-dot strain fields, and consequently it is not possible to experimentally obtain a separate optical emission from the smaller dots.« less

  4. Inter-dot strain field effect on the optoelectronic properties of realistic InP lateral quantum-dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barettin, Daniele; Auf der Maur, Matthias; De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Casalboni, Mauro; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    We report on numerical simulations of InP surface lateral quantum-dot molecules on In0.48Ga0.52P buffer, using a model strictly derived by experimental results by extrapolation of the molecules shape from atomic force microscopy images. Our study has been inspired by the comparison of a photoluminescence spectrum of a high-density InP surface quantum dot sample with a numerical ensemble average given by a weighted sum of simulated single quantum-dot spectra. A lack of experimental optical response from the smaller dots of the sample is found to be due to strong inter-dot strain fields, which influence the optoelectronic properties of lateral quantum-dot molecules. Continuum electromechanical, k →.p → bandstructure, and optical calculations are presented for two different molecules, the first composed of two dots of nearly identical dimensions (homonuclear), the second of two dots with rather different sizes (heteronuclear). We show that in the homonuclear molecule the hydrostatic strain raises a potential barrier for the electrons in the connection zone between the dots, while conversely the holes do not experience any barrier, which considerably increases the coupling. Results for the heteronuclear molecule show instead that its dots do not appear as two separate and distinguishable structures, but as a single large dot, and no optical emission is observed in the range of higher energies where the smaller dot is supposed to emit. We believe that in samples of such a high density the smaller dots result as practically incorporated into bigger molecular structures, an effect strongly enforced by the inter-dot strain fields, and consequently it is not possible to experimentally obtain a separate optical emission from the smaller dots.

  5. Evaporation-Induced Assembly of Quantum Dots into Nanorings

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jixin; Liao, Wei-Ssu; Chen, Xin; Yang, Tinglu; Wark, Stacey E.; Son, Dong Hee; Batteas, James D.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the controlled formation of two-dimensional periodic arrays of ring-shaped nanostructures assembled from CdSe semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The patterns were fabricated by using an evaporative templating method. This involves the introduction of an aqueous solution containing both quantum dots and polystyrene microspheres onto the surface of a planar hydrophilic glass substrate. The quantum dots became confined to the meniscus of the microspheres during evaporation, which drove ring assembly via capillary forces at the polystyrene sphere/glass substrate interface. The geometric parameters for nanoring formation could be controlled by tuning the size of the microspheres and the concentration of the QDs employed. This allowed hexagonal arrays of nanorings to be formed with thicknesses ranging from single dot necklaces to thick multilayer structures over surface areas of many square millimeters. Moreover, the diameter of the ring structures could be simultaneously controlled. A simple model was employed to explain the forces involved in the formation of nanoparticle nanorings. PMID:19206264

  6. The emission wavelength dependent photoluminescence lifetime of the N-doped graphene quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xingxia; School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 201210; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049

    2015-12-14

    Aromatic nitrogen doped graphene quantum dots were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) techniques. The PL lifetime was found to be dependent on the emission wavelength and coincident with the PL spectrum, which is different from most semiconductor quantum dots and fluorescent dyes. This result shows the synergy and competition between the quantum confinement effect and edge functional groups, which may have the potential to guide the synthesis and expand the applications of graphene quantum dots.

  7. Spectrum Tunable Quantum Dot-In-A-Well Infrared Detector Arrays for Thermal Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Spectrum tunable quantum dot-in-a- well infrared detector arrays for thermal imaging Jonathan R. Andrews1, Sergio R. Restaino1, Scott W. Teare2...Materials at the University of New Mexico has been investigating quantum dot and quantum well detectors for thermal infrared imaging applications...SEP 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Spectrum tunable quantum dot-in-a- well infrared

  8. Array of nanoparticles coupling with quantum-dot: Lattice plasmon quantum features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmanogli, Ahmad; Gecim, H. Selcuk

    2018-06-01

    In this study, we analyze the interaction of lattice plasmon with quantum-dot in order to mainly examine the quantum features of the lattice plasmon containing the photonic/plasmonic properties. Despite optical properties of the localized plasmon, the lattice plasmon severely depends on the array geometry, which may influence its quantum features such as uncertainty and the second-order correlation function. To investigate this interaction, we consider a closed system containing an array of the plasmonic nanoparticles and quantum-dot. We analyze this system with full quantum theory by which the array electric far field is quantized and the strength coupling of the quantum-dot array is analytically calculated. Moreover, the system's dynamics are evaluated and studied via the Heisenberg-Langevin equations to attain the system optical modes. We also analytically examine the Purcell factor, which shows the effect of the lattice plasmon on the quantum-dot spontaneous emission. Finally, the lattice plasmon uncertainty and its time evolution of the second-order correlation function at different spatial points are examined. These parameters are dramatically affected by the retarded field effect of the array nanoparticles. We found a severe quantum fluctuation at points where the lattice plasmon occurs, suggesting that the lattice plasmon photons are correlated.

  9. Nanoscale patterning of colloidal quantum dots on transparent and metallic planar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonsang; Roh, Young-Geun; Kim, Un Jeong; Chung, Dae-Young; Suh, Hwansoo; Kim, Jineun; Cheon, Sangmo; Lee, Jaesoong; Kim, Tae-Ho; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Lee, Chang-Won

    2012-09-07

    The patterning of colloidal quantum dots with nanometer resolution is essential for their application in photonics and plasmonics. Several patterning approaches, such as the use of polymer composites, molecular lock-and-key methods, inkjet printing and microcontact printing of quantum dots have been recently developed. Herein, we present a simple method of patterning colloidal quantum dots for photonic nanostructures such as straight lines, rings and dot patterns either on transparent or metallic substrates. Sub-10 nm width of the patterned line could be achieved with a well-defined sidewall profile. Using this method, we demonstrate a surface plasmon launcher from a quantum dot cluster in the visible spectrum.

  10. Tunable Kondo physics in a carbon nanotube double quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Chorley, S J; Galpin, M R; Jayatilaka, F W; Smith, C G; Logan, D E; Buitelaar, M R

    2012-10-12

    We investigate a tunable two-impurity Kondo system in a strongly correlated carbon nanotube double quantum dot, accessing the full range of charge regimes. In the regime where both dots contain an unpaired electron, the system approaches the two-impurity Kondo model. At zero magnetic field the interdot coupling disrupts the Kondo physics and a local singlet state arises, but we are able to tune the crossover to a Kondo screened phase by application of a magnetic field. All results show good agreement with a numerical renormalization group study of the device.

  11. Coherent electron{endash}hole correlations in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Joensson, L.; Steiner, M.M.; Wilkins, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    Using numerical time propagation of the electron{endash}hole wave function, we demonstrate how various coherent correlation effects can be observed by laser excitation of a nanoscale semiconductor quantum dot. The lowest-lying states of an electron{endash}hole pair, when appropriately excited by a laser pulse, give rise to charge oscillations that are manifested by beatings in the optical or intraband polarizations. A GaAs 5{times}25{times}25 nm{sup 3} dot in the effective-mass approximation, including the screened Coulomb interaction between the electron and a heavy or light hole, is simulated. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Nitrogen Incorporation Effects On Site-Controlled Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juska, G.; Dimastrodonato, V.; Mereni, L. O.; Pelucchi, E.

    2011-12-01

    We report here on the optical properties of site-controlled diluted nitride In0.25Ga0.75As1-xNx quantum dots grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). We show photoluminescence energy shift as a function of nitrogen precursor U-dimethylhydrazine, with a maximum value of 35 meV achieved. Optical features, substantially different from the counterpart nitrogen-free dots, are presented: an antibinding biexciton, a large distribution of lifetimes, significantly reduced fine structure splitting.

  13. Carbon "Quantum" Dots for Fluorescence Labeling of Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Cao, Li; LeCroy, Gregory E; Wang, Ping; Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Yiyang; Liu, Yuanfang; Luo, Pengju G; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-02

    The specifically synthesized and selected carbon dots of relatively high fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated in their fluorescence labeling of cells. For the cancer cell lines, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was generally efficient, resulting in the labeling of the cells with bright fluorescence emissions for both one- and two-photon excitations from predominantly the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In the exploration on labeling the live stem cells, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was relatively less efficient, though fluorescence emissions could still be adequately detected in the labeled cells, with the emissions again predominantly from the cell membrane and cytoplasm. This combined with the observed more efficient internalization of the same carbon dots by the fixed stem cells might suggest some significant selectivity of the stem cells toward surface functionalities of the carbon dots. The needs and possible strategies for more systematic and comparative studies on the fluorescence labeling of different cells, including especially live stem cells, by carbon dots as a new class of brightly fluorescent probes are discussed.

  14. Helical quantum states in HgTe quantum dots with inverted band structures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai; Lou, Wen-Kai

    2011-05-20

    We investigate theoretically the electron states in HgTe quantum dots (QDs) with inverted band structures. In sharp contrast to conventional semiconductor quantum dots, the quantum states in the gap of the HgTe QD are fully spin-polarized and show ringlike density distributions near the boundary of the QD and spin-angular momentum locking. The persistent charge currents and magnetic moments, i.e., the Aharonov-Bohm effect, can be observed in such a QD structure. This feature offers us a practical way to detect these exotic ringlike edge states by using the SQUID technique.

  15. Classical and quantum optical correlation effects between single quantum dots: The role of the hopping photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S.; Gotoh, H.; Kamada, H.

    2006-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of photon-coupled single quantum dots in a semiconductor. A series of optical effects are demonstrated, including a subradiant dark resonance, superradiance, reversible spontaneous emission decay, and pronounced exciton entanglement. Both classical and quantum optical approaches are presented using a self-consistent formalism that treats real and virtual photon exchange on an equal footing and can account for different quantum dot properties, surface effects, and retardation in the dipole-dipole coupling, all of which are shown to play a non-negligible role.

  16. Quantum Well and Quantum Dot Modeling for Advanced Infrared Detectors and Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Hill, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of Quantum Well Infrared Detectors (QWIP) and Quantum Dot Infrared Detectors (QDIP) in the development of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). The QWIP Detector being developed is a dual band detector. It is capable of running on two bands Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) and Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR). The same large-format dual-band FPA technology can be applied to Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) with no modification, once QDIP exceeds QWIP in single device performance. Details of the devices are reviewed.

  17. Pushing indium phosphide quantum dot emission deeper into the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeboe, A. M.; Kays, J.; Mahler, A. H.; Dennis, A. M.

    2018-02-01

    Cadmium-free near infrared (NIR) emitting quantum dots (QDs) have significant potential for multiplexed tissue-depth imaging applications in the first optical tissue window (i.e., 650 - 900 nm). Indium phosphide (InP) chemistry provides one of the more promising cadmium-free options for biomedical imaging, but the full tunability of this material has not yet been achieved. Specifically, InP QD emission has been tuned from 480 - 730 nm in previous literature reports, but examples of samples emitting from 730 nm to the InP bulk bandgap limit of 925 nm are lacking. We hypothesize that by generating inverted structures comprising ZnSe/InP/ZnS in a core/shell/shell heterostructure, optical emission from the InP shell can be tuned by changing the InP shell thickness, including pushing deeper into the NIR than current InP QDs. Colloidal synthesis methods including hot injection precipitation of the ZnSe core and a modified successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method for stepwise shell deposition were used to promote growth of core/shell/shell materials with varying thicknesses of the InP shell. By controlling the number of injections of indium and phosphorous precursor material, the emission peak was tuned from 515 nm to 845 nm (2.41 - 1.47 eV) with consistent full width half maximum (FWHM) values of the emission peak 0.32 eV. To confer water solubility, the nanoparticles were encapsulated in PEGylated phospholipid micelles, and multiplexing of NIR-emitting InP QDs was demonstrated using an IVIS imaging system. These materials show potential for multiplexed imaging of targeted QD contrast agents in the first optical tissue window.

  18. Tandem luminescent solar concentrators based on engineered quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kaifeng; Li, Hongbo; Klimov, Victor I.

    2018-02-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) can serve as large-area sunlight collectors for terrestrial and space-based photovoltaics. Due to their high emission efficiencies and readily tunable emission and absorption spectra, colloidal quantum dots have emerged as a new and promising type of LSC fluorophore. Spectral tunability of the quantum dots also facilitates the realization of stacked multilayered LSCs, where enhanced performance is obtained through spectral splitting of incident sunlight, as in multijunction photovoltaics. Here, we demonstrate a large-area (>230 cm2) tandem LSC based on two types of nearly reabsorption-free quantum dots spectrally tuned for optimal solar-spectrum splitting. This prototype device exhibits a high optical quantum efficiency of 6.4% for sunlight illumination and solar-to-electrical power conversion efficiency of 3.1%. The efficiency gains due to the tandem architecture over single-layer devices quickly increase with increasing LSC size and can reach more than 100% in structures with window sizes of more than 2,500 cm2.

  19. Spectroscopic Characterization of Streptavidin Functionalized Quantum dots1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Sklar, Larry A.; Buranda, Tione

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of quantum dots can be strongly influenced by the conditions of their synthesis. In this work we have characterized several spectroscopic properties of commercial, streptavidin functionalized quantum dots (QD525, lot#1005-0045 and QD585, Lot#0905-0031 from Invitrogen). This is the first step in the development of calibration beads, to be used in a generalizable quantification scheme of multiple fluorescent tags in flow cytometry or microscopy applications. We used light absorption, photoexcitation, and emission spectra, together with excited-state lifetime measurements to characterize their spectroscopic behavior, concentrating on the 400-500nm wavelength ranges that are important in biological applications. Our data show an anomalous dependence of emission spectrum, lifetimes, and quantum yield (QY) on excitation wavelength that is particularly pronounced in the QD525. For QD525, QY values ranged from 0.2 at 480nm excitation up to 0.4 at 450nm and down again to 0.15 at 350nm. For QD585, QY values were constant at 0.2 between 500nm and 400nm, but dropped to 0.1 at 350nm. We attribute the wavelength dependences to heterogeneity in size and surface defects in the QD525, consistent with characteristics previously described in the chemistry literature. The results are discussed in the context of bridging the gap between what is currently known in the physical chemistry literature of quantum dots, and the quantitative needs of assay development in biological applications. PMID:17368555

  20. Density-functional theory simulation of large quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong; Baranger, Harold U.; Yang, Weitao

    2003-10-01

    Kohn-Sham spin-density functional theory provides an efficient and accurate model to study electron-electron interaction effects in quantum dots, but its application to large systems is a challenge. Here an efficient method for the simulation of quantum dots using density-function theory is developed; it includes the particle-in-the-box representation of the Kohn-Sham orbitals, an efficient conjugate-gradient method to directly minimize the total energy, a Fourier convolution approach for the calculation of the Hartree potential, and a simplified multigrid technique to accelerate the convergence. We test the methodology in a two-dimensional model system and show that numerical studies of large quantum dots with several hundred electrons become computationally affordable. In the noninteracting limit, the classical dynamics of the system we study can be continuously varied from integrable to fully chaotic. The qualitative difference in the noninteracting classical dynamics has an effect on the quantum properties of the interacting system: integrable classical dynamics leads to higher-spin states and a broader distribution of spacing between Coulomb blockade peaks.

  1. Quantum Dot Platform for Single-Cell Molecular Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel S.

    In-depth understanding of the nature of cell physiology and ability to diagnose and control the progression of pathological processes heavily rely on untangling the complexity of intracellular molecular mechanisms and pathways. Therefore, comprehensive molecular profiling of individual cells within the context of their natural tissue or cell culture microenvironment is essential. In principle, this goal can be achieved by tagging each molecular target with a unique reporter probe and detecting its localization with high sensitivity at sub-cellular resolution, primarily via microscopy-based imaging. Yet, neither widely used conventional methods nor more advanced nanoparticle-based techniques have been able to address this task up to date. High multiplexing potential of fluorescent probes is heavily restrained by the inability to uniquely match probes with corresponding molecular targets. This issue is especially relevant for quantum dot probes---while simultaneous spectral imaging of up to 10 different probes is possible, only few can be used concurrently for staining with existing methods. To fully utilize multiplexing potential of quantum dots, it is necessary to design a new staining platform featuring unique assignment of each target to a corresponding quantum dot probe. This dissertation presents two complementary versatile approaches towards achieving comprehensive single-cell molecular profiling and describes engineering of quantum dot probes specifically tailored for each staining method. Analysis of expanded molecular profiles is achieved through augmenting parallel multiplexing capacity with performing several staining cycles on the same specimen in sequential manner. In contrast to other methods utilizing quantum dots or other nanoparticles, which often involve sophisticated probe synthesis, the platform technology presented here takes advantage of simple covalent bioconjugation and non-covalent self-assembly mechanisms for straightforward probe

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Mercaptoacetic Acid Capped Cadmium Sulphide Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Wageh, S; Maize, Mai; Donia, A M; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Umar, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the facile synthesis and detailed characterization of mercaptoacetic acid capped cadmium sulphide (CdS) quantum dots using various cadmium precursors. The mercaptoacetic acid capped CdS quantum dots were prepared by facile and simple wet chemical method and characterized by several techniques such as energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-vis. spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM) and thremogravimetric analysis. The EDS studies revealed that the prepared quantum dots possess higher atomic percentage of sulfur compared to cadmium due to the coordination of thiolate to the quantum dots surfaces. The X-ray and absorption analyses exhibited that the size of quantum dots prepared by cadmium acetate is larger than the quantum dots prepared by cadmium chloride and cadmium nitrate. The increase in size can be attributed to the low stability constant of cadmium acetate in comparison with cadmium chloride and cadmium nitrate. The FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis showed that the nature of capping molecule on the surface of quantum dots are different depending on the cadmium precursors which affect the emission from CdS quantum dots. Photoemission spectroscopy revealed that the emission of quantum dots prepared by cadmium acetate has high intensity band edge emission along with low intensity trapping state emission. However the CdS quantum dots prepared by cadmium chloride and cadmium nitrate produced only trapping state emissions.

  3. Design and Synthesis of Antiblinking and Antibleaching Quantum Dots in Multiple Colors via Wave Function Confinement.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hujia; Ma, Junliang; Huang, Lin; Qin, Haiyan; Meng, Renyang; Li, Yang; Peng, Xiaogang

    2016-12-07

    Single-molecular spectroscopy reveals that photoluminescence (PL) of a single quantum dot blinks, randomly switching between bright and dim/dark states under constant photoexcitation, and quantum dots photobleach readily. These facts cast great doubts on potential applications of these promising emitters. After ∼20 years of efforts, synthesis of nonblinking quantum dots is still challenging, with nonblinking quantum dots only available in red-emitting window. Here we report synthesis of nonblinking quantum dots covering most part of the visible window using a new synthetic strategy, i.e., confining the excited-state wave functions of the core/shell quantum dots within the core quantum dot and its inner shells (≤ ∼5 monolayers). For the red-emitting ones, the new synthetic strategy yields nonblinking quantum dots with small sizes (∼8 nm in diameter) and improved nonblinking properties. These new nonblinking quantum dots are found to be antibleaching. Results further imply that the PL blinking and photobleaching of quantum dots are likely related to each other.

  4. Photoluminescence of patterned CdSe quantum dot for anti-counterfeiting label on paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnaeni, Yulianto, Nursidik; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha

    2016-03-01

    We successfully developed a method utilizing colloidal CdSe nanocrystalline quantum dot for anti-counterfeiting label on a piece of glossy paper. We deposited numbers and lines patterns of toluene soluble CdSe quantum dot using rubber stamper on a glossy paper. The width of line pattern was about 1-2 mm with 1-2 mm separation between lines. It required less than one minute for deposited CdSe quantum dot on glossy paper to dry and become invisible by naked eyes. However, patterned quantum dot become visible using long-pass filter glasses upon excitation of UV lamp or blue laser. We characterized photoluminescence of line patterns of quantum dot, and we found that emission boundaries of line patterns were clearly observed. The error of line size and shape were mainly due to defect of the original stamper. The emission peak wavelength of CdSe quantum dot was 629 nm. The emission spectrum of deposited quantum dot has full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 30-40 nm. The spectra similarity between deposited quantum dot and the original quantum dot in solution proved that our stamping method can be simply applied on glossy paper without changing basic optical property of the quantum dot. Further development of this technique is potential for anti-counterfeiting label on very important documents or objects.

  5. Templated self-assembly of quantum dots from aqueous solution using protein scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuchmacher Blum, Amy; Soto, Carissa M.; Wilson, Charmaine D.; Whitley, Jessica L.; Moore, Martin H.; Sapsford, Kim E.; Lin, Tianwei; Chatterji, Anju; Johnson, John E.; Ratna, Banahalli R.

    2006-10-01

    Short, histidine-containing peptides can be conjugated to lysine-containing protein scaffolds to controllably attach quantum dots (QDs) to the scaffold, allowing for generic attachment of quantum dots to any protein without the use of specially engineered domains. This technique was used to bind quantum dots from aqueous solution to both chicken IgG and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), a 30 nm viral particle. These quantum dot protein assemblies were studied in detail. The IgG QD complexes were shown to retain binding specificity to their antigen after modification. The CPMV QD complexes have a local concentration of quantum dots greater than 3000 nmol ml-1, and show a 15% increase in fluorescence quantum yield over free quantum dots in solution.

  6. [Effect of quantum dots CdSe/ZnS's concentration on its fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Jin, Min; Huang, Yu-hua; Luo, Ji-xiang

    2015-02-01

    The authors measured the absorption and the fluorescence spectra of the quantum dots CdSe/ZnS with 4 nm in size at different concentration with the use of the UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence spectrometer. The effect of quantum dots CdSe/ZnS's concentration on its fluorescence was especially studied and its physical mechanism was analyzed. It was observed that the optimal concentration of the quantum dots CdSe/ZnS for fluorescence is 2 micromole x L(-1). When the quantum dot's concentration is over 2 micromol x L(-1), the fluorescence is decreased with the increase in the concentration. While the quantum dot's concentration is less than 2 micromol x L(-1), the fluorescence is decreased with the decrease in the concentration. There are two main reasons: (1) fluorescence quenching and 2) the competition between absorption and fluorescence. When the quantum dot's concentration is over 2 micromol x L(-1), the distance between quantum dots is so close that the fluorescence quenching is induced. The closer the distance between quantum dots is, the more serious the fluorescence quenching is induced. Also, in this case, the absorption is so large that some of the quantum dots can not be excited because the incident light can not pass through the whole sample. As a result, the fluorescence is decreased with the increase in the quantum dot's concentration. As the quantum dot's concentration is below 2 micromol x L(-1), the distance between quantum dots is far enough that no more fluorescence quenching is induced. In this case, the fluorescence is determined by the particle number per unit volume. More particle number per unit volume produces more fluorescence. Therefore, the fluorescence is decreased with the decrease in the quantum dot's concentration.

  7. Elimination of Bimodal Size in InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots for Preparation of 1.3-μm Quantum Dot Lasers.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiang-Bin; Ding, Ying; Ma, Ben; Zhang, Ke-Lu; Chen, Ze-Sheng; Li, Jing-Lun; Cui, Xiao-Ran; Xu, Ying-Qiang; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2018-02-21

    The device characteristics of semiconductor quantum dot lasers have been improved with progress in active layer structures. Self-assembly formed InAs quantum dots grown on GaAs had been intensively promoted in order to achieve quantum dot lasers with superior device performances. In the process of growing high-density InAs/GaAs quantum dots, bimodal size occurs due to large mismatch and other factors. The bimodal size in the InAs/GaAs quantum dot system is eliminated by the method of high-temperature annealing and optimized the in situ annealing temperature. The annealing temperature is taken as the key optimization parameters, and the optimal annealing temperature of 680 °C was obtained. In this process, quantum dot growth temperature, InAs deposition, and arsenic (As) pressure are optimized to improve quantum dot quality and emission wavelength. A 1.3-μm high-performance F-P quantum dot laser with a threshold current density of 110 A/cm 2 was demonstrated.

  8. Elimination of Bimodal Size in InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots for Preparation of 1.3-μm Quantum Dot Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiang-Bin; Ding, Ying; Ma, Ben; Zhang, Ke-Lu; Chen, Ze-Sheng; Li, Jing-Lun; Cui, Xiao-Ran; Xu, Ying-Qiang; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2018-02-01

    The device characteristics of semiconductor quantum dot lasers have been improved with progress in active layer structures. Self-assembly formed InAs quantum dots grown on GaAs had been intensively promoted in order to achieve quantum dot lasers with superior device performances. In the process of growing high-density InAs/GaAs quantum dots, bimodal size occurs due to large mismatch and other factors. The bimodal size in the InAs/GaAs quantum dot system is eliminated by the method of high-temperature annealing and optimized the in situ annealing temperature. The annealing temperature is taken as the key optimization parameters, and the optimal annealing temperature of 680 °C was obtained. In this process, quantum dot growth temperature, InAs deposition, and arsenic (As) pressure are optimized to improve quantum dot quality and emission wavelength. A 1.3-μm high-performance F-P quantum dot laser with a threshold current density of 110 A/cm2 was demonstrated.

  9. Quantum simulation of a Fermi-Hubbard model using a semiconductor quantum dot array.

    PubMed

    Hensgens, T; Fujita, T; Janssen, L; Li, Xiao; Van Diepen, C J; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Das Sarma, S; Vandersypen, L M K

    2017-08-02

    Interacting fermions on a lattice can develop strong quantum correlations, which are the cause of the classical intractability of many exotic phases of matter. Current efforts are directed towards the control of artificial quantum systems that can be made to emulate the underlying Fermi-Hubbard models. Electrostatically confined conduction-band electrons define interacting quantum coherent spin and charge degrees of freedom that allow all-electrical initialization of low-entropy states and readily adhere to the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Until now, however, the substantial electrostatic disorder of the solid state has meant that only a few attempts at emulating Fermi-Hubbard physics on solid-state platforms have been made. Here we show that for gate-defined quantum dots this disorder can be suppressed in a controlled manner. Using a semi-automated and scalable set of experimental tools, we homogeneously and independently set up the electron filling and nearest-neighbour tunnel coupling in a semiconductor quantum dot array so as to simulate a Fermi-Hubbard system. With this set-up, we realize a detailed characterization of the collective Coulomb blockade transition, which is the finite-size analogue of the interaction-driven Mott metal-to-insulator transition. As automation and device fabrication of semiconductor quantum dots continue to improve, the ideas presented here will enable the investigation of the physics of ever more complex many-body states using quantum dots.

  10. Photon antibunching from a single quantum-dot-microcavity system in the strong coupling regime.

    PubMed

    Press, David; Götzinger, Stephan; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Hofmann, Carolin; Löffler, Andreas; Kamp, Martin; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-03-16

    We observe antibunching in the photons emitted from a strongly coupled single quantum dot and pillar microcavity in resonance. When the quantum dot was spectrally detuned from the cavity mode, the cavity emission remained antibunched, and also anticorrelated from the quantum dot emission. Resonant pumping of the selected quantum dot via an excited state enabled these observations by eliminating the background emitters that are usually coupled to the cavity. This device demonstrates an on-demand single-photon source operating in the strong coupling regime, with a Purcell factor of 61+/-7 and quantum efficiency of 97%.

  11. Parallel Photonic Quantum Computation Assisted by Quantum Dots in One-Side Optical Microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Universal quantum logic gates are important elements for a quantum computer. In contrast to previous constructions on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we investigate the possibility of parallel quantum computations dependent on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gates operating on the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of two-photon or one-photon systems by exploring the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. These hyper-CNOT gates show that the quantum states of two DOFs can be viewed as independent qubits without requiring auxiliary DOFs in theory. This result can reduce the quantum resources by half for quantum applications with large qubit systems, such as the quantum Shor algorithm. PMID:25030424

  12. Parallel photonic quantum computation assisted by quantum dots in one-side optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-07-17

    Universal quantum logic gates are important elements for a quantum computer. In contrast to previous constructions on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we investigate the possibility of parallel quantum computations dependent on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gates operating on the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of two-photon or one-photon systems by exploring the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. These hyper-CNOT gates show that the quantum states of two DOFs can be viewed as independent qubits without requiring auxiliary DOFs in theory. This result can reduce the quantum resources by half for quantum applications with large qubit systems, such as the quantum Shor algorithm.

  13. Correlated Coulomb Drag in Capacitively Coupled Quantum-Dot Structures.

    PubMed

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-05-13

    We study theoretically Coulomb drag in capacitively coupled quantum dots (CQDs)-a bias-driven dot coupled to an unbiased dot where transport is due to Coulomb mediated energy transfer drag. To this end, we introduce a master-equation approach that accounts for higher-order tunneling (cotunneling) processes as well as energy-dependent lead couplings, and identify a mesoscopic Coulomb drag mechanism driven by nonlocal multielectron cotunneling processes. Our theory establishes the conditions for a nonzero drag as well as the direction of the drag current in terms of microscopic system parameters. Interestingly, the direction of the drag current is not determined by the drive current, but by an interplay between the energy-dependent lead couplings. Studying the drag mechanism in a graphene-based CQD heterostructure, we show that the predictions of our theory are consistent with recent experiments on Coulomb drag in CQD systems.

  14. Photoluminescence of patterned CdSe quantum dot for anti-counterfeiting label on paper

    SciTech Connect

    Isnaeni,, E-mail: isnaeni@lipi.go.id; Yulianto, Nursidik; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha

    We successfully developed a method utilizing colloidal CdSe nanocrystalline quantum dot for anti-counterfeiting label on a piece of glossy paper. We deposited numbers and lines patterns of toluene soluble CdSe quantum dot using rubber stamper on a glossy paper. The width of line pattern was about 1-2 mm with 1-2 mm separation between lines. It required less than one minute for deposited CdSe quantum dot on glossy paper to dry and become invisible by naked eyes. However, patterned quantum dot become visible using long-pass filter glasses upon excitation of UV lamp or blue laser. We characterized photoluminescence of line patterns of quantummore » dot, and we found that emission boundaries of line patterns were clearly observed. The error of line size and shape were mainly due to defect of the original stamper. The emission peak wavelength of CdSe quantum dot was 629 nm. The emission spectrum of deposited quantum dot has full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 30-40 nm. The spectra similarity between deposited quantum dot and the original quantum dot in solution proved that our stamping method can be simply applied on glossy paper without changing basic optical property of the quantum dot. Further development of this technique is potential for anti-counterfeiting label on very important documents or objects.« less

  15. Electron Spin Optical Orientation in Charged Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabaev, A.; Gershoni, D.; Korenev, V. L.

    2005-03-01

    We present a theory of nonresonant optical orientation of electron spins localized in quantum dots. This theory explains the negative circularly polarized photoluminescence of singlet trions localized in quantum dots previously observed in experiments where trion polarization changed to negative with time and where the degree of the negative polarization increased with intensity of pumping light. We have shown that this effect can be explained by the accumulation of dark excitons that occurs due to the spin blocking of the singlet trion formation - the major mechanism of dark exciton recombination. The accumulation of dark excitons results from a lack of electrons with a spin matching the exciton polarization. The electron spin lifetime is shortened by a transverse magnetic field or a temperature increase. This takes the block off the dark exciton recombination and restores the positive degree of trion polarization. The presented theory gives good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Real-Time Nanoscopy by Using Blinking Enhanced Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fukui, Shingo; Jin, Takashi; Fujii, Fumihiko; Yanagida, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Superresolution optical microscopy (nanoscopy) is of current interest in many biological fields. Superresolution optical fluctuation imaging, which utilizes higher-order cumulant of fluorescence temporal fluctuations, is an excellent method for nanoscopy, as it requires neither complicated optics nor illuminations. However, it does need an impractical number of images for real-time observation. Here, we achieved real-time nanoscopy by modifying superresolution optical fluctuation imaging and enhancing the fluctuation of quantum dots. Our developed quantum dots have higher blinking than commercially available ones. The fluctuation of the blinking improved the resolution when using a variance calculation for each pixel instead of a cumulant calculation. This enabled us to obtain microscopic images with 90-nm and 80-ms spatial-temporal resolution by using a conventional fluorescence microscope without any optics or devices. PMID:20923631

  17. Enchanced methods of hydrophilized CdSe quantum dots synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, D. V.; Zharkova, I. S.; Goryacheva, I. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum dots are bright and stable fluorescence signal sources, but for most of applications they need an additional hydrophilization step. Unfortunately, most of existing approaches lead to QD's fluorescence quenching, so there is a need for additional enhancing of hydrophilized QD's brightness like UV irradiation, which can be used both on water insoluble QD's with oleic acid ligands (in toluene) and on hydrophilized QD's covered with UV-stable polymer (in aqueous solution). For synthesis of bright water-soluble fluorescent labels CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots were covered with PAMAM dendrimer and irradiated with UV lamp in quartz cuvettes for 3 hours at the room temperature and then compared with control sample.

  18. Valley splitting of single-electron Si MOS quantum dots

    DOE PAGES

    Gamble, John King; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Jacobson, N. Tobias; ...

    2016-12-19

    Here, silicon-based metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dots are prominent candidates for high-fidelity, manufacturable qubits. Due to silicon's band structure, additional low-energy states persist in these devices, presenting both challenges and opportunities. Although the physics governing these valley states has been the subject of intense study, quantitative agreement between experiment and theory remains elusive. Here, we present data from an experiment probing the valley states of quantum dot devices and develop a theory that is in quantitative agreement with both this and a recently reported experiment. Through sampling millions of realistic cases of interface roughness, our method provides evidence that the valley physicsmore » between the two samples is essentially the same.« less

  19. Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus using chitosan quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2018-01-01

    Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) using chitosan modified quantum dots (CTS@CdS QDs) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide is reported. The method is based on the intrinsic positive catalase activity of S. aureus. CTS@CdS quantum dots provide high dispersion in aqueous media with high fluorescence emission. Staphylococcus aureus causes a selective quenching of the fluorescence emission of CTS@CdS QDs in the presence of H2O2 compared to other pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The intrinsic enzymatic character of S. aureus (catalase positive) offers selective and fast biosensing. The present method is highly selective for positive catalase species and requires no expensive reagents such as antibodies, aptamers or microbeads. It could be extended for other species that are positive catalase.

  20. Titanium-based silicide quantum dot superlattices for thermoelectrics applications.

    PubMed

    Savelli, Guillaume; Stein, Sergio Silveira; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Faucherand, Pascal; Montès, Laurent; Dilhaire, Stefan; Pernot, Gilles

    2015-07-10

    Ti-based silicide quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) are grown by reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition. They are made of titanium-based silicide nanodots scattered in an n-doped SiGe matrix. This is the first time that such nanostructured materials have been grown in both monocrystalline and polycrystalline QDSLs. We studied their crystallographic structures and chemical properties, as well as the size and the density of the quantum dots. The thermoelectric properties of the QDSLs are measured and compared to equivalent SiGe thin films to evaluate the influence of the nanodots. Our studies revealed an increase in their thermoelectric properties-specifically, up to a trifold increase in the power factor, with a decrease in the thermal conductivity-making them very good candidates for further thermoelectric applications in cooling or energy-harvesting fields.

  1. Spin-flip transitions in self-assembled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrou, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    Detailed realistic calculations of the spin-flip time (T 1) for an electron in a self-assembled quantum dot (SAQD) due to emission of an acoustic phonon, using only bulk properties with no fitting parameters, are presented. Ellipsoidal lens shaped Inx Ga1-x As quantum dots, with electronic states calculated using 8-band strain dependent {k \\cdot p} theory, are considered. The phonons are treated as bulk acoustic phonons coupled to the electron by both deformation potential and piezoelectric interactions. The dependence of T 1 on the geometry of SAQD, on the applied external magnetic field and on the lattice temperature is highlighted. The theoretical results are close to the experimental measurements on the spin-flip times for a single electron in QD.

  2. Wigner crystalline edges in ν<~1 quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldmann, Eyal; Renn, Scot R.

    1999-12-01

    We investigate the edge reconstruction phenomenon believed to occur in quantum dots in the quantum Hall regime when the filling fraction is ν<~1. Our approach involves the examination of large dots (<= 40 electrons) using a partial diagonalization technique in which the occupancies of the deep interior orbitals are frozen. To interpret the results of this calculation, we evaluate the overlap between the diagonalized ground state and a set of trial wave functions which we call projected necklace (PN) states. A PN state is simply the angular momentum projection of a maximum density droplet surrounded by a ring of localized electrons. Our calculations reveal that PN states have up to 99% overlap with the diagonalized ground states, and are lower in energy than the states identified in Chamon and Wen's study of the edge reconstruction.

  3. Strong electron-hole exchange in coherently coupled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Fält, Stefan; Atatüre, Mete; Türeci, Hakan E; Zhao, Yong; Badolato, Antonio; Imamoglu, Atac

    2008-03-14

    We have investigated few-body states in vertically stacked quantum dots. Because of a small interdot tunneling rate, the coupling in our system is in a previously unexplored regime where electron-hole exchange plays a prominent role. By tuning the gate bias, we are able to turn this coupling off and study a complementary regime where total electron spin is a good quantum number. The use of differential transmission allows us to obtain unambiguous signatures of the interplay between electron and hole-spin interactions. Small tunnel coupling also enables us to demonstrate all-optical charge sensing, where a conditional exciton energy shift in one dot identifies the charging state of the coupled partner.

  4. Self-sustaining dynamical nuclear polarization oscillations in quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rudner, M S; Levitov, L S

    2013-02-22

    Early experiments on spin-blockaded double quantum dots revealed robust, large-amplitude current oscillations in the presence of a static (dc) source-drain bias. Despite experimental evidence implicating dynamical nuclear polarization, the mechanism has remained a mystery. Here we introduce a minimal albeit realistic model of coupled electron and nuclear spin dynamics which supports self-sustained oscillations. Our mechanism relies on a nuclear spin analog of the tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon (spin-dependent tunneling rates in the presence of an inhomogeneous Overhauser field) and nuclear spin diffusion, which governs dynamics of the spatial profile of nuclear polarization. The proposed framework naturally explains the differences in phenomenology between vertical and lateral quantum dot structures as well as the extremely long oscillation periods.

  5. Electric transport through circular graphene quantum dots: Presence of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, G.; Apel, W.; Schweitzer, L.

    2011-08-01

    The electronic states of an electrostatically confined cylindrical graphene quantum dot and the electric transport through this device are studied theoretically within the continuum Dirac-equation approximation and compared with numerical results obtained from a tight-binding lattice description. A spectral gap, which may originate from strain effects, additional adsorbed atoms, or substrate-induced sublattice-symmetry breaking, allows for bound and scattering states. As long as the diameter of the dot is much larger than the lattice constant, the results of the continuum and the lattice model are in very good agreement. We also investigate the influence of a sloping dot-potential step, of on-site disorder along the sample edges, of uncorrelated short-range disorder potentials in the bulk, and of random magnetic fluxes that mimic ripple disorder. The quantum dot's spectral and transport properties depend crucially on the specific type of disorder. In general, the peaks in the density of bound states are broadened but remain sharp only in the case of edge disorder.

  6. Quantum-dot temperature profiles during laser irradiation for semiconductor-doped glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Swati

    2002-12-01

    Temperature profiles around laser irradiated CdX (X=S, Se, and Te) quantum dots in borosilicate glasses were theoretically modeled. Initially the quantum dots heat up rapidly, followed by a gradual increase of temperature. Also it is found that larger dots reach higher temperatures for the same pulse characteristics. After the pulse is turned off, the dots initially cool rapidly, followed by a gradual decrease in temperature.

  7. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Keller, A J; Lim, J S; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S; Katine, J A; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2016-08-05

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  8. Graphene quantum dots-carbon nanotube hybrid arrays for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yue; Zhao, Yang; Lu, Gewu; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Zhipan; Li, Hui; Shao, Huibo; Qu, Liangti

    2013-05-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been successfully deposited onto aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a benign electrochemical method and the capacitive properties of the as-formed GQD/CNT hybrid arrays were evaluated in symmetrical supercapacitors. It was found that supercapacitors fabricated from GQD/CNT hybrid arrays exhibited a high capacitance of 44 mF cm-2, representing a more than 200% improvement over that of bare CNT electrodes.

  9. Graphene quantum dots-carbon nanotube hybrid arrays for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Zhao, Yang; Lu, Gewu; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Zhipan; Li, Hui; Shao, Huibo; Qu, Liangti

    2013-05-17

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been successfully deposited onto aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a benign electrochemical method and the capacitive properties of the as-formed GQD/CNT hybrid arrays were evaluated in symmetrical supercapacitors. It was found that supercapacitors fabricated from GQD/CNT hybrid arrays exhibited a high capacitance of 44 mF cm(-2), representing a more than 200% improvement over that of bare CNT electrodes.

  10. Synthesis, Characterization, and Fabrication of All Inorganic Quantum Dot LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Haider Baqer

    Quantum Dot LEDs with all inorganic materials are investigated in this thesis. The research was motivated by the potential disruptive technology of core shell quantum dots in lighting and display applications. These devices consisted of three main layers: hole transport layer (HTL), electron transport layer (ETL), and emissive layer where the emission of photons occurs. The latter part was formed of CdSe / ZnS core-shell quantum dots, which were synthesized following hot injection method. The ETL and the HTL were formed of zinc oxide nanocrystals and nickel oxide, respectively. Motivated by the low cost synthesis and deposition, NiO and ZnO were synthesized following sol-gel method and deposited using spin coating. The anode of the device was a commercial slide of indium tin oxide deposited on glass substrate while the cathode was a 100 nm aluminum layer that was deposited using an Auto 306T Edwards thermal evaporator. In this research, Raman spectroscopy, micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, absorbance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy, were used to characterize the materials. Three sharp peaks were observed in the XRD measurements of the NiO thin film related to three planes and indicated a proper level of crystallinity. The AFM image of the same material indicated a roughness RMS value of 2 nm which was accepted for a device fabrication. The photoluminescence spectrum exhibited a peak at 515 nm for the quantum dots and a peak at 315 nm for the ZnO nanocrystals. The narrow shape of these spectra proved a limited amount of size variation. The transfer characteristics of the fabricated device indicated that the current density ramped up producing green light when the voltage was higher than 5 V to reach 160 mA cm -2 at 9 V.

  11. Probing the energy reactance with adiabatically driven quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Arrachea, Liliana; Moskalets, Michael; Sánchez, David

    2018-02-01

    The tunneling Hamiltonian describes a particle transfer from one region to another. Although there is no particle storage in the tunneling region itself, it has an associated amount of energy. The corresponding energy flux was named reactance since, such as an electrical reactance, it manifests itself in time-dependent transport only. We show here that the existence of the energy reactance leads to the universal response of a mesoscopic thermometer, a floating contact coupled to an adiabatically driven quantum dot.

  12. Stability and Tolerance to Optical Feedback of Quantum Dot Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Libre de Bruxelles Optique Nonlineaire Theorique Campus Plaine, C.P. 213 Bruxelles, Belgium 1050 EOARD GRANT 09-3068 Report Date...Universite Libre de Bruxelles Optique Nonlineaire Theorique Campus Plaine, C.P. 213 Bruxelles, Belgium 1050 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Universite Libre de Bruxelles as follows: Quantum dot (QD) lasers have attracted a lot of attention because of their low threshold currents, low line

  13. Sexithiophenes as efficient luminescence quenchers of quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Christopher R; Li, Yang; O’Brien, Paul; Findlay, Neil J

    2011-01-01

    Summary Sexithiophenes 1a and 1b, in which a 4-(dimethylamino)phenyl unit is incorporated as an end-capping group, were synthesised and characterised by cyclic voltammetry, absorption spectroscopy and UV–vis spectroelectrochemistry. Additionally, their ability to function as effective luminescence quenchers for quantum dot emission was studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy and compared with the performance of alkyl end-capped sexithiophenes 2a and 2b. PMID:22238551

  14. Quantum Dots Based Rad-Hard Computing and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, A.; Klimeck, G.; Leon, R.; Qiu, Y.; Toomarian, N.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are solid-state structures made of semiconductors or metals that confine a small number of electrons into a small space. The confinement of electrons is achieved by the placement of some insulating material(s) around a central, well-conducting region. Thus, they can be viewed as artificial atoms. They therefore represent the ultimate limit of the semiconductor device scaling. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Lighting up micromotors with quantum dots for smart chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Sánchez, B; Escarpa, A; Wang, J

    2015-09-25

    A new "on-the-fly" chemical optical detection strategy based on the incorporation of fluorescence CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on the surface of self-propelled tubular micromotors is presented. The motion-accelerated binding of trace Hg to the QDs selectively quenches the fluorescence emission and leads to an effective discrimination between different mercury species and other co-existing ions.

  16. Optical Spectroscopy of Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-07

    Theoretical studies of spin- photon entangled complementarity”. Mr. Anderson Hayes in physics finished B.S. degree in May 2013 with a capstone thesis entitled...working on “Semiconductor quantum dots and photon entanglement ”. Mr. Quinn Allen Hailes, undergraduate student in physics completed B.S. degree in...great interests for the Department of Defense’s (DoD) photonic applications. Our research focused on developing and characterizing advanced optical

  17. Computational models for the berry phase in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, S., E-mail: rmelnik@wlu.ca; Melnik, R. V. N., E-mail: rmelnik@wlu.ca; Sebetci, A.

    2014-10-06

    By developing a new model and its finite element implementation, we analyze the Berry phase low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures, focusing on quantum dots (QDs). In particular, we solve the Schrödinger equation and investigate the evolution of the spin dynamics during the adiabatic transport of the QDs in the 2D plane along circular trajectory. Based on this study, we reveal that the Berry phase is highly sensitive to the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit lengths.

  18. Orientation-dependent imaging of electronically excited quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Goings, Joshua J.; Nguyen, Huy A.; Lyding, Joseph; Li, Xiaosong; Gruebele, Martin

    2018-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that we can image electronic excitations of quantum dots by single-molecule absorption scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM). With this technique, a modulated laser beam periodically saturates an electronic transition of a single nanoparticle, and the resulting tunneling current modulation ΔI(x0, y0) maps out the SMA-STM image. In this paper, we first derive the basic theory to calculate ΔI(x0, y0) in the one-electron approximation. For near-resonant tunneling through an empty orbital "i" of the nanostructure, the SMA-STM signal is approximately proportional to the electron density |φi) (x0,y0)|quantum dots on the surface and roll them, thus imaging excited state electronic structure of a single quantum dot at different orientations. We use density functional theory to model ODMs at various orientations, for qualitative comparison with the SMA-STM experiment. The model demonstrates that our experimentally observed signal monitors excited states, localized by defects near the surface of an individual quantum dot. The sub-nanometer super-resolution imaging technique demonstrated here could become useful for mapping out the three-dimensional structure of excited states localized by defects within nanomaterials.

  19. Orientation-dependent imaging of electronically excited quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Goings, Joshua J; Nguyen, Huy A; Lyding, Joseph; Li, Xiaosong; Gruebele, Martin

    2018-02-14

    We previously demonstrated that we can image electronic excitations of quantum dots by single-molecule absorption scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM). With this technique, a modulated laser beam periodically saturates an electronic transition of a single nanoparticle, and the resulting tunneling current modulation ΔI(x 0 , y 0 ) maps out the SMA-STM image. In this paper, we first derive the basic theory to calculate ΔI(x 0 , y 0 ) in the one-electron approximation. For near-resonant tunneling through an empty orbital "i" of the nanostructure, the SMA-STM signal is approximately proportional to the electron density φ i x 0 ,y 0 2 of the excited orbital in the tunneling region. Thus, the SMA-STM signal is approximated by an orbital density map (ODM) of the resonantly excited orbital at energy E i . The situation is more complex for correlated electron motion, but either way a slice through the excited electronic state structure in the tunneling region is imaged. We then show experimentally that we can nudge quantum dots on the surface and roll them, thus imaging excited state electronic structure of a single quantum dot at different orientations. We use density functional theory to model ODMs at various orientations, for qualitative comparison with the SMA-STM experiment. The model demonstrates that our experimentally observed signal monitors excited states, localized by defects near the surface of an individual quantum dot. The sub-nanometer super-resolution imaging technique demonstrated here could become useful for mapping out the three-dimensional structure of excited states localized by defects within nanomaterials.

  20. Single-molecule quantum dot as a Kondo simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, R.; Minamitani, E.; Arafune, R.; Tsukahara, N.; Watanabe, S.; Kawai, M.; Takagi, N.

    2017-06-01

    Structural flexibility of molecule-based systems is key to realizing the novel functionalities. Tuning the structure in the atomic scale enables us to manipulate the quantum state in the molecule-based system. Here we present the reversible Hamiltonian manipulation in a single-molecule quantum dot consisting of an iron phthalocyanine molecule attached to an Au electrode and a scanning tunnelling microscope tip. We precisely controlled the position of Fe2+ ion in the molecular cage by using the tip, and tuned the Kondo coupling between the molecular spins and the Au electrode. Then, we realized the crossover between the strong-coupling Kondo regime and the weak-coupling regime governed by spin-orbit interaction in the molecule. The results open an avenue to simulate low-energy quantum many-body physics and quantum phase transition through the molecular flexibility.

  1. Coherent spin transfer between molecularly bridged quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Min; Awschalom, David D

    2003-08-22

    Femtosecond time-resolved Faraday rotation spectroscopy reveals the instantaneous transfer of spin coherence through conjugated molecular bridges spanning quantum dots of different size over a broad range of temperature. The room-temperature spin-transfer efficiency is approximately 20%, showing that conjugated molecules can be used not only as interconnections for the hierarchical assembly of functional networks but also as efficient spin channels. The results suggest that this class of structures may be useful as two-spin quantum devices operating at ambient temperatures and may offer promising opportunities for future versatile molecule-based spintronic technologies.

  2. Origins of low energy-transfer efficiency between patterned GaN quantum well and CdSe quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xingsheng, E-mail: xsxu@semi.ac.cn

    For hybrid light emitting devices (LEDs) consisting of GaN quantum wells and colloidal quantum dots, it is necessary to explore the physical mechanisms causing decreases in the quantum efficiencies and the energy transfer efficiency between a GaN quantum well and CdSe quantum dots. This study investigated the electro-luminescence for a hybrid LED consisting of colloidal quantum dots and a GaN quantum well patterned with photonic crystals. It was found that both the quantum efficiency of colloidal quantum dots on a GaN quantum well and the energy transfer efficiency between the patterned GaN quantum well and the colloidal quantum dots decreasedmore » with increases in the driving voltage or the driving time. Under high driving voltages, the decreases in the quantum efficiency of the colloidal quantum dots and the energy transfer efficiency can be attributed to Auger recombination, while those decreases under long driving time are due to photo-bleaching and Auger recombination.« less

  3. Semiconductor quantum dot scintillation under gamma-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, S E; Wang, T

    2006-08-23

    We recently demonstrated the ability of semiconductor quantum dots to convert alpha radiation into visible photons. In this letter, we report on the scintillation of quantum dots under gamma-ray irradiation, and compare the energy resolution of the 59 keV line of Americium 241 obtained with our quantum dot-glass nanocomposite material to that of a standard sodium iodide scintillator. A factor 2 improvement is demonstrated experimentally and interpreted theoretically using a combination of energy-loss and photon transport models. These results demonstrate the potential of quantum dots for room-temperature gamma-ray detection, which has applications in medical imaging, environmental monitoring, as well asmore » security and defense. Present technology in gamma radiation detection suffers from flexibility and scalability issues. For example, bulk Germanium provides fine energy resolution (0.2% energy resolution at 1.33 MeV) but requires operation at liquid nitrogen temperature. On the other hand, Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride is a good room temperature detector ( 1% at 662 keV) but the size of the crystals that can be grown is limited to a few centimeters in each direction. Finally, the most commonly used scintillator, Sodium Iodide (NaI), can be grown as large crystals but suffers from a lack of energy resolution (7% energy resolution at 662 keV). Recent advancements in nanotechnology6-10 have provided the possibility of controlling materials synthesis at the molecular level. Both morphology and chemical composition can now be manipulated, leading to radically new material properties due to a combination of quantum confinement and surface to volume ratio effects. One of the main consequences of reducing the size of semiconductors down to nanometer dimensions is to increase the energy band gap, leading to visible luminescence, which suggests that these materials could be used as scintillators. The visible band gap of quantum dots would also ensure both efficient photon

  4. Effect of the Semiconductor Quantum Dot Shell Structure on Fluorescence Quenching by Acridine Ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkov, P. A.; Vokhmintcev, K. V.; Samokhvalov, P. S.; Laronze-Cochard, M.; Sapi, J.; Nabiev, I. R.

    2018-02-01

    The main line of research in cancer treatment is the development of methods for early diagnosis and targeted drug delivery to cancer cells. Fluorescent semiconductor core/shell nanocrystals of quantum dots (e.g., CdSe/ZnS) conjugated with an anticancer drug, e.g., an acridine derivative, allow real-time tracking and control of the process of the drug delivery to tumors. However, linking of acridine derivatives to a quantum dot can be accompanied by quantum dot fluorescence quenching caused by electron transfer from the quantum dot to the organic molecule. In this work, it has been shown that the structure of the shell of the quantum dot plays the decisive role in the process of photoinduced charge transfer from the quantum dot to the acridine ligand, which is responsible for fluorescence quenching. It has been shown that multicomponent ZnS/CdS/ZnS shells of CdSe cores of quantum dots, which have a relatively small thickness, make it possible to significantly suppress a decrease in the quantum yield of fluorescence of quantum dots as compared to both the classical ZnS thin shell and superthick shells of the same composition. Thus, core/multicomponent shell CdSe/ZnS/CdS/ZnS quantum dots can be used as optimal fluorescent probes for the development of systems for diagnosis and treatment of cancer with the use of anticancer compounds based on acridine derivatives.

  5. Quantum Optics with Near-Lifetime-Limited Quantum-Dot Transitions in a Nanophotonic Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Thyrrestrup, Henri; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Le Jeannic, Hanna; Pregnolato, Tommaso; Zhai, Liang; Raahauge, Laust; Midolo, Leonardo; Rotenberg, Nir; Javadi, Alisa; Schott, Rüdiger; Wieck, Andreas D; Ludwig, Arne; Löbl, Matthias C; Söllner, Immo; Warburton, Richard J; Lodahl, Peter

    2018-03-14

    Establishing a highly efficient photon-emitter interface where the intrinsic linewidth broadening is limited solely by spontaneous emission is a key step in quantum optics. It opens a pathway to coherent light-matter interaction for, e.g., the generation of highly indistinguishable photons, few-photon optical nonlinearities, and photon-emitter quantum gates. However, residual broadening mechanisms are ubiquitous and need to be combated. For solid-state emitters charge and nuclear spin noise are of importance, and the influence of photonic nanostructures on the broadening has not been clarified. We present near-lifetime-limited linewidths for quantum dots embedded in nanophotonic waveguides through a resonant transmission experiment. It is found that the scattering of single photons from the quantum dot can be obtained with an extinction of 66 ± 4%, which is limited by the coupling of the quantum dot to the nanostructure rather than the linewidth broadening. This is obtained by embedding the quantum dot in an electrically contacted nanophotonic membrane. A clear pathway to obtaining even larger single-photon extinction is laid out; i.e., the approach enables a fully deterministic and coherent photon-emitter interface in the solid state that is operated at optical frequencies.

  6. L-Cysteine Capped CdSe Quantum Dots Synthesized by Photochemical Route.

    PubMed

    Singh, Avinash; Kunwar, Amit; Rath, M C

    2018-05-01

    L-cysteine capped CdSe quantum dots were synthesized via photochemical route in aqueous solution under UV photo-irradiation. The as grown CdSe quantum dots exhibit broad fluorescence at room temperature. The CdSe quantum dots were found to be formed only through the reactions of the precursors, i.e., Cd(NH3)2+4 and SeSO2-3 with the photochemically generated 1-hydroxy-2-propyl radicals, (CH3)2COH radicals, which are formed through the process of H atom abstraction by the photoexcited acetone from 2-propanol. L-Cysteine was found to act as a suitable capping agent for the CdSe quantum dots and increases their biocompatability. Cytotoxicty effects of these quantum dots were evaluated in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) epithelial cells, indicated a significant lower level for the L-cysteine capped CdSe quantum dots as compare to the bare ones.

  7. Green, Rapid, and Universal Preparation Approach of Graphene Quantum Dots under Ultraviolet Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinli; Tang, Yanfeng; Wang, Gang; Mao, Jiarong; Liu, Zhiduo; Sun, Tongming; Wang, Miao; Chen, Da; Yang, Yucheng; Li, Jipeng; Deng, Yuan; Yang, Siwei

    2017-04-26

    It is of great significance and importance to explore a mild, clean, and highly efficient universal approach for the synthesis of graphene quantum dots. Herein, we introduced a new green, rapid, and universal preparation approach for graphene quantum dots via the free-radical polymerization of oxygen-containing aromatic compounds under ultraviolet irradiation. This approach had a high yield (86%), and the byproducts are only H 2 O and CO 2 . The obtained graphene quantum dots were well-crystallized and showed remarkable optical and biological properties. The colorful, different-sized graphene quantum dots can be used in fluorescent bioimaging in vitro and in vivo. This approach is suitable not only for the preparation of graphene quantum dots but also for heteroatom-doped graphene quantum dots.

  8. Functional Carbon Quantum Dots: A Versatile Platform for Chemosensing and Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui; Qian, Zhaosheng

    2018-05-01

    Carbon quantum dot has emerged as a new promising fluorescent nanomaterial due to its excellent optical properties, outstanding biocompatibility and accessible fabrication methods, and has shown huge application perspective in a variety of areas, especially in chemosensing and biosensing applications. In this personal account, we give a brief overview of carbon quantum dots from its origin and preparation methods, present some advance on fluorescence origin of carbon quantum dots, and focus on development of chemosensors and biosensors based on functional carbon quantum dots. Comprehensive advances on functional carbon quantum dots as a versatile platform for sensing from our group are included and summarized as well as some typical examples from the other groups. The biosensing applications of functional carbon quantum dots are highlighted from selective assays of enzyme activity to fluorescent identification of cancer cells and bacteria. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A reconfigurable gate architecture for Si/SiGe quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zajac, D. M.; Hazard, T. M.; Mi, X.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a reconfigurable quantum dot gate architecture that incorporates two interchangeable transport channels. One channel is used to form quantum dots, and the other is used for charge sensing. The quantum dot transport channel can support either a single or a double quantum dot. We demonstrate few-electron occupation in a single quantum dot and extract charging energies as large as 6.6 meV. Magnetospectroscopy is used to measure valley splittings in the range of 35–70 μeV. By energizing two additional gates, we form a few-electron double quantum dot and demonstrate tunable tunnel coupling at the (1,0) to (0,1) interdot charge transition.

  10. Highly sensitive humidity sensing properties of carbon quantum dots films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Ming, Hai; Liu, Ruihua

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A humidity sensing device was fabricated based on carbon quantum dots (CQDs) films. ► The conductivity of the CQDs films shows a linear and rapid response to atmosphere humidity. ► The humidity sensing property was due to the hydrogen bonds between the functional groups on CQDs. -- Abstract: We reported the fabrication of a humidity sensing device based on carbon quantum dots (CQDs) film. The conductivity of the CQDs film has a linear and rapid response to relative humidity, providing the opportunity for the fabrication of humidity sensing devices. The mechanism of our humiditymore » sensor was proposed to be the formation of hydrogen bonds between carbon quantum dots and water molecules in the humidity environment, which significantly promote the electrons migration. In a control experiment, this hypothesis was confirmed by comparing the humidity sensitivity of candle soot (i.e. carbon nanoparticles) with and without oxygen containing groups on the surfaces.« less

  11. Quantum-dots-encoded-microbeads based molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Liu, Le; He, Yonghong; He, Qinghua; Ma, Hui

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots encoded microbeads have various advantages such as large surface area, superb optical properties and the ability of multiplexing. Molecularly imprinted polymer that can mimic the natural recognition entities has high affinity and selectivity for the specific analyte. Here, the concept of utilizing the quantum dots encoded microbeads as the supporting material and the polydopamine as the functional monomer to form the core-shell molecular imprinted polymer was proposed for the first time. The resulted imprinted polymer can provide various merits: polymerization can complete in aqueous environment; fabrication procedure is facile and universal; the obvious economic advantage; the thickness of the imprinting layer is highly controllable; polydopamine coating can improve the biocompatibility of the quantum dot encoded microbeads. The rabbit IgG binding and flow cytometer experiment result showed the distinct advantages of this strategy: cost-saving, facile and fast preparation procedure. Most importantly, the ability for the multichannel detection, which makes the imprinted polydopamine modified encoded-beads very attractive in protein pre-concentration, recognition, separation and biosensing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Anomalous electron spin decoherence in an optically pumped quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaofeng; Sham, L. J.

    2013-03-01

    We study the nuclear-spin-fluctuation induced spin decoherence of an electron (SDE) in an optically pumped quantum dot. The SDE is computed in terms of the steady distribution of the nuclear field (SDNF) formed through the hyperfine interaction (HI) with two different nuclear species in the dot. A feedback loop between the optically driven electron spin and the nuclear spin ensemble determines the SDNF [W. Yang and L. J. Sham, Phy. Rev. B 85, 235319(2012)]. Different from that work and others reviewed therein, where a bilinear HI, SαIβ , between the electron (or hole) spin S and the nuclear spin I is used, we use an effective nonlinear interaction of the form SαIβIγ derived from the Fermi-contact HI. Our feedback loop forms a multi-peak SDNF in which the SDE shows remarkable collapses and revivals in nanosecond time scale. Such an anomalous SDE results from a quantum interference effect of the electron Larmor precession in a multi-peak effective magnetic field. In the presence of a bilinear HI that suppresses the nuclear spin fluctuation, the non-Markovian SDE persists whenever there are finite Fermi contact interactions between two or more kinds of nuclei and the electron in the quantum dot. This work is supported by NSF(PHY 1104446) and the US Army Research Office MURI award W911NF0910406.

  13. Dynamics of Photoexcited State of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Dhara J.

    In this thesis, non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) of excited states in semiconductor quantum dots are investigated. Nanoscale systems provide important opportunities for theory and computation for research because the experimental tools often provide an incomplete picture of the structure and/or function of nanomaterials, and theory can often fill in missing features crucial in understanding what is being measured. The simulation of NAMD is an indispensable tool for understanding complex ultrafast photoinduced processes such as charge and energy transfer, thermal relaxation, and charge recombination. Based on the state-of-the-art ab initio approaches in both the energy and time domains, the thesis presents a comprehensive discussion of the dynamical processes in quantum dots, ranging from the initial photon absorption to the final emission. We investigate the energy relaxation and transfer rates in pure and surface passivated quantum dots of different sizes. The study establishes the fundamental mechanisms of the electron and hole relaxation processes with and without hole traps. We develop and implement more accurate and efficient methods for NAMD. These methods are advantageous over the traditional ones when one encounters classically forbidden transitions. We also explore the effect of decoherence and non-adiabatic couplings on the dynamics. The results indicate significant influence on the accuracy and related computational cost of the simulated dynamics.

  14. Photon-assisted tunneling in an asymmetrically coupled triple quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bao-Chuan; Cao, Gang, E-mail: gcao@ustc.edu.cn; Chen, Bao-Bao

    The gate-defined quantum dot is regarded as one of the basic structures required for scalable semiconductor quantum processors. Here, we demonstrate a structure that contains three quantum dots scaled in series. The electron number of each dot and the tunnel coupling between them can be tuned conveniently using splitting gates. We tune the quantum dot array asymmetrically such that the tunnel coupling between the right dot and the central dot is much larger than that between the left dot and the central dot. When driven by microwaves, the sidebands of the photon-assisted tunneling process appear not only in the left-to-centralmore » dot transition region but also in the left-to-right dot transition region. These sidebands are both attributed to the left-to-central transition for asymmetric coupling. Our result shows that there is a region of a triple quantum dot structure that remains indistinct when studied with a normal two-dimensional charge stability diagram; this will be helpful in future studies of the scalability of quantum dot systems.« less

  15. Increased InAs quantum dot size and density using bismuth as a surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasika, Vaishno D.; Krivoy, E. M.; Nair, H. P.; Maddox, S. J.; Park, K. W.; Jung, D.; Lee, M. L.; Yu, E. T.; Bank, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the growth of self-assembled InAs quantum dots using bismuth as a surfactant to control the dot size and density. We find that the bismuth surfactant increases the quantum dot density, size, and uniformity, enabling the extension of the emission wavelength with increasing InAs deposition without a concomitant reduction in dot density. We show that these effects are due to bismuth acting as a reactive surfactant to kinetically suppress the surface adatom mobility. This mechanism for controlling quantum dot density and size has the potential to extend the operating wavelength and enhance the performance of various optoelectronic devices.

  16. Precise Control of Quantum Confinement in Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Quantum Dots via Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yitong; Qiao, Tian; Kim, Doyun; Parobek, David; Rossi, Daniel; Son, Dong Hee

    2018-05-09

    Cesium lead halide (CsPbX 3 ) nanocrystals have emerged as a new family of materials that can outperform the existing semiconductor nanocrystals due to their superb optical and charge-transport properties. However, the lack of a robust method for producing quantum dots with controlled size and high ensemble uniformity has been one of the major obstacles in exploring the useful properties of excitons in zero-dimensional nanostructures of CsPbX 3 . Here, we report a new synthesis approach that enables the precise control of the size based on the equilibrium rather than kinetics, producing CsPbX 3 quantum dots nearly free of heterogeneous broadening in their exciton luminescence. The high level of size control and ensemble uniformity achieved here will open the door to harnessing the benefits of excitons in CsPbX 3 quantum dots for photonic and energy-harvesting applications.

  17. Understanding/Modelling of Thermal and Radiation Benefits of Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-11

    GaAs solar cells have been investigated. Strain compensation is a key step in realizing high- efficiency quantum dots solar cells (QDSC). InAs...factor. A strong correlation between the temperature dependent quantum dot electroluminescence peak emission wavelength and the sub-GaAs bandgap...increased efficiency and radiation resistance devices. The incorporation of quantum dots (QDs) into traditional single or multi-junction crystalline solar

  18. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2014-12-15

    Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes) – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorptionmore » in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing) the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red) shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower) magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra-Landau level

  19. Curcumin Quantum Dots Mediated Degradation of Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashish K; Prakash, Pradyot; Singh, Ranjana; Nandy, Nabarun; Firdaus, Zeba; Bansal, Monika; Singh, Ranjan K; Srivastava, Anchal; Roy, Jagat K; Mishra, Brahmeshwar; Singh, Rakesh K

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm has been reported to be associated with more than 80% of bacterial infections. Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol compound, has anti-quorum sensing activity apart from having antimicrobial action. However, its use is limited by its poor aqueous solubility and rapid degradation. In this study, we attempted to prepare quantum dots of the drug curcumin in order to achieve enhanced solubility and stability and investigated for its antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity. We utilized a newer two-step bottom up wet milling approach to prepare Curcumin Quantum Dots (CurQDs) using acetone as a primary solvent. Minimum inhibitory concentration against select Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was performed. The antibiofilm assay was performed at first using 96-well tissue culture plate and subsequently validated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. Further, biofilm matrix protein was isolated using formaldehyde sludge and TCA/Acetone precipitation method. Protein extracted was incubated with varying concentration of CurQDs for 4 h and was subjected to SDS-PAGE. Molecular docking study was performed to observe interaction between curcumin and phenol soluble modulins as well as curli proteins. The biophysical evidences obtained from TEM, SEM, UV-VIS, fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, and zeta potential analysis confirmed the formation of curcumin quantum dots with increased stability and solubility. The MICs of curcumin quantum dots, as observed against both select gram positive and negative bacterial isolates, was observed to be significantly lower than native curcumin particles. On TCP assay, Curcumin observed to be having antibiofilm as well as biofilm degrading activity. Results of SDS-PAGE and molecular docking have shown interaction between biofilm matrix proteins and curcumin. The results indicate that aqueous solubility and stability of Curcumin can be achieved by preparing its quantum dots. The study also demonstrates that by sizing down the

  20. Current Application of Quantum Dots (QD) in Cancer Therapy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Babu, Lavanya Thilak; Paira, Priyankar

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots proved themselves as efficient fluorescent probes in cancer detection and treatment. Their size, high stability, non-photobleaching and water solubility made them a unique fluorophore in place of conventional organic dyes. Newly emerged theranostic drug delivery system using quantum dots helped us in better understanding of the drug delivery mechanism inside the cells. Surface modified Quantum dots and their applications became wide in bioimaging, immunohistochemistry, tracking intracellular drug and intracellular molecules target. We have highlighted various applications of quantum dots in cancer treatment, drug delivery, flow cytometry, and theranostics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Intracellular distribution of nontargeted quantum dots after natural uptake and microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Damalakiene, Leona; Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Bagdonas, Saulius; Valius, Mindaugas; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of natural uptake of nonfunctionalized quantum dots in comparison with microinjected quantum dots by focusing on their time-dependent accumulation and intracellular localization in different cell lines. Methods: The accumulation dynamics of nontargeted CdSe/ZnS carboxyl-coated quantum dots (emission peak 625 nm) was analyzed in NIH3T3, MCF-7, and HepG2 cells by applying the methods of confocal and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. Intracellular colocalization of the quantum dots was investigated by staining with Lysotracker®. Results: The uptake of quantum dots into cells was dramatically reduced at a low temperature (4°C), indicating that the process is energy-dependent. The uptake kinetics and imaging of intracellular localization of quantum dots revealed three accumulation stages of carboxyl-coated quantum dots at 37°C, ie, a plateau stage, growth stage, and a saturation stage, which comprised four morphological phases: adherence to the cell membrane; formation of granulated clusters spread throughout the cytoplasm; localization of granulated clusters in the perinuclear region; and formation of multivesicular body-like structures and their redistribution in the cytoplasm. Diverse quantum dots containing intracellular vesicles in the range of approximately 0.5–8 μm in diameter were observed in the cytoplasm, but none were found in the nucleus. Vesicles containing quantum dots formed multivesicular body-like structures in NIH3T3 cells after 24 hours of incubation, which were Lysotracker-negative in serum-free medium and Lysotracker-positive in complete medium. The microinjected quantum dots remained uniformly distributed in the cytosol for at least 24 hours. Conclusion: Natural uptake of quantum dots in cells occurs through three accumulation stages via a mechanism requiring energy. The sharp contrast of the intracellular distribution after microinjection of quantum dots in comparison

  2. The influence of bio-conjugation on photoluminescence of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchynska, Tetyana V.; Vorobiev, Yuri V.; Makhniy, Victor P.; Horley, Paul P.

    2014-11-01

    We report a considerable blue shift in the luminescence spectra of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots conjugated to anti-interleukin-10 antibodies. This phenomenon can be explained theoretically by accounting for bio-conjugation as a process causing electrostatic interaction between a quantum dot and an antibody, which reduces effective volume of the dot core. To solve the Schrödinger equation for an exciton confined in the quantum dot, we use mirror boundary conditions that were successfully tested for different geometries of quantum wells.

  3. Single photon emission from charged excitons in CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, K. G.; Rakhlin, M. V.; Sorokin, S. V.; Klimko, G. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Mukhin, I. S.; Ivanov, S. V.; Toropov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    We report on micro-photoluminescence studies of individual self-organized CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots intended for single-photon-source applications in a visible spectral range. The quantum dots surface density below 1010 per cm2 was achieved by using a thermally activated regime of molecular beam epitaxy that allowed fabrication of etched mesa-structures containing only a few emitting quantum dots. The single photon emission with the autocorrelation function g(2)(0)<0.2 was detected and identified as recombination of charged excitons in the individual quantum dot.

  4. Focal-Plane Arrays of Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Wilson, Daniel; Hill, Cory; Liu, John; Bandara, Sumith; Ting, David

    2007-01-01

    Focal-plane arrays of semiconductor quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) are being developed as superior alternatives to prior infrared imagers, including imagers based on HgCdTe devices and, especially, those based on quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs). HgCdTe devices and arrays thereof are difficult to fabricate and operate, and they exhibit large nonunformities and high 1/f (where f signifies frequency) noise. QWIPs are easier to fabricate and operate, can be made nearly uniform, and exhibit lower 1/f noise, but they exhibit larger dark currents, and their quantization only along the growth direction prevents them from absorbing photons at normal incidence, thereby limiting their quantum efficiencies. Like QWIPs, QDIPs offer the advantages of greater ease of operation, greater uniformity, and lower 1/f noise, but without the disadvantages: QDIPs exhibit lower dark currents, and quantum efficiencies of QDIPs are greater because the three-dimensional quantization of QDIPs is favorable to the absorption of photons at normal or oblique incidence. Moreover, QDIPs can be operated at higher temperatures (around 200 K) than are required for operation of QWIPs. The main problem in the development of QDIP imagers is to fabricate quantum dots with the requisite uniformity of size and spacing. A promising approach to be tested soon involves the use of electron-beam lithography to define the locations and sizes of quantum dots. A photoresist-covered GaAs substrate would be exposed to the beam generated by an advanced, high-precision electron beam apparatus. The exposure pattern would consist of spots typically having a diameter of 4 nm and typically spaced 20 nm apart. The exposed photoresist would be developed by either a high-contrast or a low-contrast method. In the high-contrast method, the spots would be etched in such a way as to form steep-wall holes all the way down to the substrate. The holes would be wider than the electron beam spots perhaps as

  5. Fabrication of (In,Ga)As quantum-dot chains on GaAs(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. M.; Holmes, K.; Mazur, Yu. I.; Salamo, G. J.

    2004-03-01

    Nanostructure evolution during the growth of multilayers of In0.5Ga0.5As/GaAs (100) by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated to control the formation of lines of quantum dots called quantum-dot chains. It is found that the dot chains can be substantially increased in length by the introduction of growth interruptions during the initial stages of growth of the GaAs spacer layer. Quantum-dot chains that are longer than 5 μm are obtained by adjusting the In0.5Ga0.5As coverage and growth interruptions. The growth procedure is also used to create a template to form InAs dots into chains with a predictable dot density. The resulting dot chains offer the possibility to engineer carrier interaction among dots for novel physical phenomena and potential devices.

  6. Transport properties of a quantum dot and a quantum ring in series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Minky; Chung, Yunchul

    2018-01-01

    The decoherence mechanism of an electron interferometer is studied by using a serial quantum dot and ring device. By coupling a quantum dot to a quantum ring (closed-loop electron interferometer), we were able to observe both Coulomb oscillations and Aharonov-Bohm interference simultaneously. The coupled device behaves like an ordinary double quantum dot at zero magnetic field while the conductance of the Coulomb blockade peak is modulated by the electron interference at finite magnetic fields. By injecting one electron at a time (by exploiting the sequential tunneling of a quantum dot) into the interferometer, we were able to study the visibility of the electron interference at non-zero bias voltage. The visibility was found to decay rapidly as the electron energy was increased, which was consistent with the recently reported result for an electron interferometer. However, the lobe pattern and the sudden phase jump became less prominent. These results imply that the lobe pattern and the phase jump in an electron interferometer may be due to electron interactions inside the interferometer, as is predicted by the theory.

  7. Laser location and manipulation of a single quantum tunneling channel in an InAs quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Makarovsky, O; Vdovin, E E; Patané, A; Eaves, L; Makhonin, M N; Tartakovskii, A I; Hopkinson, M

    2012-03-16

    We use a femtowatt focused laser beam to locate and manipulate a single quantum tunneling channel associated with an individual InAs quantum dot within an ensemble of dots. The intensity of the directed laser beam tunes the tunneling current through the targeted dot with an effective optical gain of 10(7) and modifies the curvature of the dot's confining potential and the spatial extent of its ground state electron eigenfunction. These observations are explained by the effect of photocreated hole charges which become bound close to the targeted dot, thus acting as an optically induced gate electrode.

  8. Effect of self assembled quantum dots on carrier mobility, with application to modeling the dark current in quantum dot infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Sarah; El-Batawy, Yasser M.; Abouelsaood, Ahmed A.

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical method for calculating the electron mobility in quantum dot infrared photodetectors is developed. The mobility calculation is based on a time-dependent, finite-difference solution of the Boltzmann transport equation in a bulk semiconductor material with randomly positioned conical quantum dots. The quantum dots act as scatterers of current carriers (conduction-band electrons in our case), resulting in limiting their mobility. In fact, carrier scattering by quantum dots is typically the dominant factor in determining the mobility in the active region of the quantum dot device. The calculated values of the mobility are used in a recently developed generalized drift-diffusion model for the dark current of the device [Ameen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 115, 063703 (2014)] in order to fix the overall current scale. The results of the model are verified by comparing the predicted dark current characteristics to those experimentally measured and reported for actual InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors. Finally, the effect of the several relevant device parameters, including the operating temperature and the quantum dot average density, is studied.

  9. Transient Evolutional Dynamics of Quantum-Dot Molecular Phase Coherence for Sensitive Optical Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi; Gu, Jing

    2018-04-01

    Atomic phase coherence (quantum interference) in a multilevel atomic gas exhibits a number of interesting phenomena. Such an atomic quantum coherence effect can be generalized to a quantum-dot molecular dielectric. Two quantum dots form a quantum-dot molecule, which can be described by a three-level Λ-configuration model { |0> ,|1> ,|2> } , i.e., the ground state of the molecule is the lower level |0> and the highly degenerate electronic states in the two quantum dots are the two upper levels |1> ,|2> . The electromagnetic characteristics due to the |0>-|1> transition can be controllably manipulated by a tunable gate voltage (control field) that drives the |2>-|1> transition. When the gate voltage is switched on, the quantum-dot molecular state can evolve from one steady state (i.e., |0>-|1> two-level dressed state) to another steady state (i.e., three-level coherent-population-trapping state). In this process, the electromagnetic characteristics of a quantum-dot molecular dielectric, which is modified by the gate voltage, will also evolve. In this study, the transient evolutional behavior of the susceptibility of a quantum-dot molecular thin film and its reflection spectrum are treated by using the density matrix formulation of the multilevel systems. The present field-tunable and frequency-sensitive electromagnetic characteristics of a quantum-dot molecular thin film, which are sensitive to the applied gate voltage, can be utilized to design optical switching devices.

  10. Quantum Computation by Optically Coupled Steady Atoms/Quantum-Dots Inside a Quantum Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowdhury, V. P.; Anantram, M. P.; Mor, T.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for quantum computation using $n$ steady 3-level atoms kept inside a quantum cavity, or using $n$ quantum-dots (QDs) kept inside a quantum cavity. In this model one external laser is pointed towards all the atoms/QDs, and $n$ pairs of electrodes are addressing the atoms/QDs, so that each atom is addressed by one pair. The energy levels of each atom/QD are controlled by an external Stark field given to the atom/QD by its external pair of electrodes. Transition between two energy levels of an individual atom/ QD are controlled by the voltage on its electrodes, and by the external laser. Interactions between two atoms/ QDs are performed with the additional help of the cavity mode (using on-resonance condition). Laser frequency, cavity frequency, and energy levels are far off-resonance most of the time, and they are brought to the resonance (using the Stark effect) only at the time of operations. Steps for a controlled-NOT gate between any two atoms/QDs have been described for this model. Our model demands some challenging technological efforts, such as manufacturing single-electron QDs inside a cavity. However, it promises big advantages over other existing models which are currently implemented, and might enable a much easier scale-up, to compute with many more qubits.

  11. Quantum Yield Heterogeneity among Single Nonblinking Quantum Dots Revealed by Atomic Structure-Quantum Optics Correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Orfield, Noah J.; McBride, James R.; Wang, Feng; ...

    2016-02-05

    Physical variations in colloidal nanostructures give rise to heterogeneity in expressed optical behavior. This correlation between nanoscale structure and function demands interrogation of both atomic structure and photophysics at the level of single nanostructures to be fully understood. In this paper, by conducting detailed analyses of fine atomic structure, chemical composition, and time-resolved single-photon photoluminescence data for the same individual nanocrystals, we reveal inhomogeneity in the quantum yields of single nonblinking “giant” CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (g-QDs). We find that each g-QD possesses distinctive single exciton and biexciton quantum yields that result mainly from variations in the degree of charging,more » rather than from volume or structure inhomogeneity. We further establish that there is a very limited nonemissive “dark” fraction (<2%) among the studied g-QDs and present direct evidence that the g-QD core must lack inorganic passivation for the g-QD to be “dark”. Finally and therefore, in contrast to conventional QDs, ensemble photoluminescence quantum yield is principally defined by charging processes rather than the existence of dark g-QDs.« less

  12. Theoretical Determination of Optimal Material Parameters for ZnCdTe/ZnCdSe Quantum Dot Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imperato, C. M.; Ranepura, G. A.; Deych, L. I.; Kuskovsky, I. L.

    2018-03-01

    Intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs) are designed to enhance the photovoltaic efficiency significantly over that of a single-junction solar cell as determined by the Shockley-Queisser limit. In this work we present calculations to determine parameters of type-II Zn1-xCdxTe/Zn1-yCdySe quantum dots (QDs) grown on the InP substrate suitable for IBSCs. The calculations are done via the self-consistent variational method, accounting for the disk form of the QDs, presence of the strained ZnSe interfacial layer, and under conditions of a strain-free device structure. We show that to achieve the required parameters relatively thick QDs are required. Barriers must contain Cd concentration in the range of 35-44%, while Cd concentration in QD can vary widely from 0% to 70%, depending on their thickness to achieve the intermediate band energies in the range of 0.50-0.73 eV. It is also shown that the results are weakly dependent on the barrier thickness.

  13. Resonant tunneling spectroscopy of valley eigenstates on a donor-quantum dot coupled system

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T., E-mail: t.kobayashi@unsw.edu.au; Heijden, J. van der; House, M. G.

    We report on electronic transport measurements through a silicon double quantum dot consisting of a donor and a quantum dot. Transport spectra show resonant tunneling peaks involving different valley states, which illustrate the valley splitting in a quantum dot on a Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. The detailed gate bias dependence of double dot transport allows a first direct observation of the valley splitting in the quantum dot, which is controllable between 160 and 240 μeV with an electric field dependence 1.2 ± 0.2 meV/(MV/m). A large valley splitting is an essential requirement for implementing a physical electron spin qubit in a silicon quantum dot.

  14. Transport electron through a quantum wire by side-attached asymmetric quantum-dot rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, A.; Zabihi, S.; Rasooli S., H.; Seyyedi, S. K.

    2011-12-01

    The electronic conductance at zero temperature through a quantum wire with side-attached asymmetric quantum ring (as a scatter system) is theoretically studied using the non-interacting Anderson tunneling Hamiltonian method. We show that the asymmetric configuration of QD- scatter system strongly impresses the amplitude and spectrum of quantum wire nanostructure transmission characteristics. It is shown that whenever the balanced number of quantum dots in two rings is substituted by unbalanced scheme, the number of forbidden mini-bands in quantum wire conductance increases and QW-nanostructure electronic conductance contains rich spectral properties due to appearance of the new anti-resonance and resonance points in spectrum. Considering the suitable gap between nano-rings can strengthen the amplitude of new resonant peaks in the QW conductance spectrum. The proposed asymmetric quantum ring scatter system idea in this paper opens a new insight on designing quantum wire nano structure for given electronic conductance.

  15. Detection of DNA via the fluorescence quenching of Mn-doped ZnSe D-dots/doxorubicin/DNA ternary complexes system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue; Niu, Lu; Su, Xingguang

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript reports a method for the detection of double-stranded DNA, based on Mn:ZnSe d-dots and intercalating agent doxorubicin (DOX). DOX can quench the photoluminescence (PL) of Mn:ZnSe d-dots through photoinduced electron transfer process, after binding with Mn:ZnSe d-dots. The addition of DNA can result in the formation of the Mn:ZnSe d-dots-DOX-DNA ternary complexes, the fluorescence of the Mn:ZnSe d-dots-DOX complexes would be further quenched by the addition of DNA, thus allowing the detection of DNA. The formation mechanism of the Mn:ZnSe d-dots-DOX-DNA ternary complexes was studied in detail in this paper. Under optimal conditions, the quenched fluorescence intensity of Mn:ZnSe d-dots-DOX system are perfectly described by Stern-Volmer equation with the concentration of hsDNA ranging from 0.006 μg mL(-1) to 6.4 μg mL(-1). The detection limit (S/N = 3) for hsDNA is 0.5 ng mL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to the detection of DNA in synthetic samples and the results were satisfactory.

  16. Excited-state relaxation in PbSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Joonhee M.; Califano, Marco; Franceschetti, Alberto; Zunger, Alex

    2008-04-01

    In solids the phonon-assisted, nonradiative decay from high-energy electronic excited states to low-energy electronic excited states is picosecond fast. It was hoped that electron and hole relaxation could be slowed down in quantum dots, due to the unavailability of phonons energy matched to the large energy-level spacings ("phonon-bottleneck"). However, excited-state relaxation was observed to be rather fast (⩽1ps) in InP, CdSe, and ZnO dots, and explained by an efficient Auger mechanism, whereby the excess energy of electrons is nonradiatively transferred to holes, which can then rapidly decay by phonon emission, by virtue of the densely spaced valence-band levels. The recent emergence of PbSe as a novel quantum-dot material has rekindled the hope for a slow down of excited-state relaxation because hole relaxation was deemed to be ineffective on account of the widely spaced hole levels. The assumption of sparse hole energy levels in PbSe was based on an effective-mass argument based on the light effective mass of the hole. Surprisingly, fast intraband relaxation times of 1-7ps were observed in PbSe quantum dots and have been considered contradictory with the Auger cooling mechanism because of the assumed sparsity of the hole energy levels. Our pseudopotential calculations, however, do not support the scenario of sparse hole levels in PbSe: Because of the existence of three valence-band maxima in the bulk PbSe band structure, hole energy levels are densely spaced, in contradiction with simple effective-mass models. The remaining question is whether the Auger decay channel is sufficiently fast to account for the fast intraband relaxation. Using the atomistic pseudopotential wave functions of Pb2046Se2117 and Pb260Se249 quantum dots, we explicitly calculated the electron-hole Coulomb integrals and the P →S electron Auger relaxation rate. We find that the Auger mechanism can explain the experimentally observed P →S intraband decay time scale without the need to

  17. Defect states and charge transport in quantum dot solids

    DOE PAGES

    Brawand, Nicholas P.; Goldey, Matthew B.; Vörös, Márton; ...

    2017-01-16

    Defects at the surface of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) give rise to electronic states within the gap, which are detrimental to charge transport properties of QD devices. We investigated charge transport in silicon quantum dots with deep and shallow defect levels, using ab initio calculations and constrained density functional theory. We found that shallow defects may be more detrimental to charge transport than deep ones, with associated transfer rates differing by up to 5 orders of magnitude for the small dots (1-2 nm) considered here. Hence, our results indicate that the common assumption, that the ability of defects to trapmore » charges is determined by their position in the energy gap of the QD, is too simplistic, and our findings call for a reassessment of the role played by shallow defects in QD devices. Altogether, our results highlight the key importance of taking into account the atomistic structural properties of QD surfaces when investigating transport properties.« less

  18. Symmetry and optical selection rules in graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, Rico; Kavousanaki, Eleftheria G.; Dani, Keshav M.; Shannon, Nic

    2018-03-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQD's) have optical properties which are very different from those of an extended graphene sheet. In this paper, we explore how the size, shape, and edge structure of a GQD affect its optical conductivity. Using representation theory, we derive optical selection rules for regular-shaped dots, starting from the symmetry properties of the current operator. We find that, where the x and y components of the current operator transform with the same irreducible representation (irrep) of the point group (for example in triangular or hexagonal GQD's), the optical conductivity is independent of the polarization of the light. On the other hand, where these components transform with different irreps (for example in rectangular GQD's), the optical conductivity depends on the polarization of light. We carry out explicit calculations of the optical conductivity of GQD's described by a simple tight-binding model and, for dots of intermediate size, find an absorption peak in the low-frequency range of the spectrum which allows us to distinguish between dots with zigzag and armchair edges. We also clarify the one-dimensional nature of states at the Van Hove singularity in graphene, providing a possible explanation for very high exciton-binding energies. Finally, we discuss the role of atomic vacancies and shape asymmetry.

  19. Magic angle for barrier-controlled double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu-Chen; Wang, Xin

    2018-01-01

    We show that the exchange interaction of a singlet-triplet spin qubit confined in double quantum dots, when being controlled by the barrier method, is insensitive to a charged impurity lying along certain directions away from the center of the double-dot system. These directions differ from the polar axis of the double dots by the magic angle, equaling arccos(1 /√{3 })≈54 .7∘ , a value previously found in atomic physics and nuclear magnetic resonance. This phenomenon can be understood from an expansion of the additional Coulomb interaction created by the impurity, but also relies on the fact that the exchange interaction solely depends on the tunnel coupling in the barrier-control scheme. Our results suggest that for a scaled-up qubit array, when all pairs of double dots rotate their respective polar axes from the same reference line by the magic angle, crosstalk between qubits can be eliminated, allowing clean single-qubit operations. While our model is a rather simplified version of actual experiments, our results suggest that it is possible to minimize unwanted couplings by judiciously designing the layout of the qubits.

  20. Quantum Dot-Photonic Crystal Cavity QED Based Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-14

    Majumdar, A. Faraon, M . Toishi, N. Stolz, P. Petroff, J. Vuckovic. Resonant Excitation of a Quantum Dot Strongly Coupled to a Photonic Crystal...11 J. O’Brien, A. Furusawa , J. Vuckovic. Photonic Quantum Technologies, Nature Photonics, (12 2009): . doi: 2010/08/30 15:11:17 10 D. Englund, A...devices via micron-scale electrical heaters, Applied Physics Letters, ( 2009): . doi: 2009/08/19 13:18:36 7 M . Toishi, D. Englund, A. Faraon, J

  1. Novel Photovoltaic Devices Using Ferroelectric Material and Colloidal Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Young Hun

    As the global concern for the financial and environmental costs of traditional energy resources increases, research on renewable energy, most notably solar energy, has taken center stage. Many alternative photovoltaic (PV) technologies for 'the next generation solar cell' have been extensively studied to overcome the Shockley-Queisser 31% efficiency limit as well as tackle the efficiency vs. cost issues. This dissertation focuses on the novel photovoltaic mechanism for the next generation solar cells using two inorganic nanomaterials, nanocrystal quantum dots and ferroelectric nanoparticles. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) materials are widely studied and easy to synthesize using solution based chemistry. One of the fascinating properties of the PZT material is a Bulk Photovoltaic effect (BPVE). This property has been spotlighted because it can produce very high open circuit voltage regardless of the electrical bandgap of the materials. However, the poor optical absorption of the PZT materials and the required high temperature to form the ferroelectric crystalline structure have been obstacles to fabricate efficient photovoltaic devices. Colloidal quantum dots also have fascinating optical and electrical properties such as tailored absorption spectrum, capability of the bandgap engineering due to the wide range of material selection and quantum confinement, and very efficient carrier dynamics called multiple exciton generations. In order to utilize these properties, many researchers have put numerous efforts in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic research and there has been remarkable progress in the past decade. However, several drawbacks are still remaining to achieve highly efficient photovoltaic device. Traps created on the large surface area, low carrier mobility, and lower open circuit voltage while increasing the absorption of the solar spectrum is main issues of the nanocrystal based photovoltaic effect. To address these issues and to take the advantages of

  2. Nanosecond-timescale spin transfer using individual electrons in a quadruple-quantum-dot device

    SciTech Connect

    Baart, T. A.; Jovanovic, N.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2016-07-25

    The ability to coherently transport electron-spin states between different sites of gate-defined semiconductor quantum dots is an essential ingredient for a quantum-dot-based quantum computer. Previous shuttles using electrostatic gating were too slow to move an electron within the spin dephasing time across an array. Here, we report a nanosecond-timescale spin transfer of individual electrons across a quadruple-quantum-dot device. Utilizing enhanced relaxation rates at a so-called hot spot, we can upper bound the shuttle time to at most 150 ns. While actual shuttle times are likely shorter, 150 ns is already fast enough to preserve spin coherence in, e.g., silicon based quantum dots.more » This work therefore realizes an important prerequisite for coherent spin transfer in quantum dot arrays.« less

  3. Strain-induced formation of fourfold symmetric SiGe quantum dot molecules.

    PubMed

    Zinovyev, V A; Dvurechenskii, A V; Kuchinskaya, P A; Armbrister, V A

    2013-12-27

    The strain field distribution at the surface of a multilayer structure with disklike SiGe nanomounds formed by heteroepitaxy is exploited to arrange the symmetric quantum dot molecules typically consisting of four elongated quantum dots ordered along the [010] and [100] directions. The morphological transition from fourfold quantum dot molecules to continuous fortresslike quantum rings with an increasing amount of deposited Ge is revealed. We examine key mechanisms underlying the formation of lateral quantum dot molecules by using scanning tunneling microscopy and numerical calculations of the strain energy distribution on the top of disklike SiGe nanomounds. Experimental data are well described by a simple thermodynamic model based on the accurate evaluation of the strain dependent part of the surface chemical potential. The spatial arrangement of quantum dots inside molecules is attributed to the effect of elastic property anisotropy.

  4. Effects of Shannon entropy and electric field on polaron in RbCl triangular quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Tiotsop; A, J. Fotue; S, C. Kenfack; N, Issofa; H, Fotsin; L, C. Fai

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the time evolution of the quantum mechanical state of a polaron is examined using the Pekar type variational method on the condition of the electric-LO-phonon strong-coupling and polar angle in RbCl triangular quantum dot. We obtain the eigenenergies, and the eigenfunctions of the ground state, and the first excited state respectively. This system in a quantum dot can be treated as a two-level quantum system qubit and the numerical calculations are performed. The effects of Shannon entropy and electric field on the polaron in the RbCl triangular quantum dot are also studied.

  5. Visible-Light-Responsive Catalysts Using Quantum Dot-Modified TiO2 for Air and Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Hintze, Paul E.; Clausen, Christian; Richards, Jeffrey Todd

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalysis, the oxidation or reduction of contaminants by light-activated catalysts, utilizing titanium dioxide (TiO2) as the catalytic substrate has been widely studied for trace contaminant control in both air and water applications. The interest in this process is due primarily to its low energy consumption and capacity for catalyst regeneration. Titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its relatively large band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Traditionally, Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in PCO reactors; however, the use of mercury precludes the use of this PCO technology in a spaceflight environment due to concerns over crew Hg exposure. The development of a visible-light responsive (VLR) TiO2-based catalyst would eliminate the concerns over mercury contamination. Further, VLR development would allow for the use of ambient visible solar radiation or highly efficient LEDs, both of which would make PCO approaches more efficient, flexible, economical, and safe. Though VLR catalyst development has been an active area of research for the past two decades, there are few commercially available VLR catalysts. Those VLR catalysts that are commercially available do not have adequate catalytic activity, in the visible region, to make them competitive with those operating under UV irradiation. This study was initiated to develop more effective VLR catalysts through a novel method in which quantum dots (QD) consisting of narrow band gap semiconductors (e.g., CdS, CdSe, PbS, ZnSe, etc.) are coupled to TiO2 via two preparation methods: 1) photodeposition and 2) mechanical alloying using a high-speed ball mill. A library of catalysts was developed and screened for gas and aqueous phase applications using ethanol and 4-chlorophenol as the target contaminants, respectively. Both target compounds are well studied in photocatalytic systems and served as model contaminants for this research. Synthesized catalysts were compared in terms of

  6. Energy structure and radiative lifetimes of InxGa1-xN /AlN quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Ivan A.; Zhuravlev, Konstantin S.

    2018-01-01

    We report calculations of the ground state transition energies and the radiative lifetimes in InxGa1-xN /AlN quantum dots with different size and indium content. The ground state transition energy and the radiative lifetime of the InxGa1-xN /AlN quantum dots can be varied over a wide range by changing the height of the quantum dot and the indium content. The sizes and compositions for quantum dots emitting in the wavelength range for fiber-optic telecommunications have been found. The radiative lifetime of the InxGa1-xN /AlN quantum dots increases with increase in quantum dot height at a constant indium content, and increases with increase in indium content at constant quantum dot height. For quantum dots with constant ground state transition energy the radiative lifetime decreases with increase in indium content.

  7. Colloidal quantum dot solar cells exploiting hierarchical structuring.

    PubMed

    Labelle, André J; Thon, Susanna M; Masala, Silvia; Adachi, Michael M; Dong, Haopeng; Farahani, Maryam; Ip, Alexander H; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-02-11

    Extremely thin-absorber solar cells offer low materials utilization and simplified manufacture but require improved means to enhance photon absorption in the active layer. Here, we report enhanced-absorption colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells that feature transfer-stamped solution-processed pyramid-shaped electrodes employed in a hierarchically structured device. The pyramids increase, by up to a factor of 2, the external quantum efficiency of the device at absorption-limited wavelengths near the absorber band edge. We show that absorption enhancement can be optimized with increased pyramid angle with an appreciable net improvement in power conversion efficiency, that is, with the gain in current associated with improved absorption and extraction overcoming the smaller fractional decrease in open-circuit voltage associated with increased junction area. We show that the hierarchical combination of micron-scale structured electrodes with nanoscale films provides for an optimized enhancement at absorption-limited wavelengths. We fabricate 54.7° pyramid-patterned electrodes, conformally apply the quantum dot films, and report pyramid CQD solar cells that exhibit a 24% improvement in overall short-circuit current density with champion devices providing a power conversion efficiency of 9.2%.

  8. Laterally Coupled Quantum-Dot Distributed-Feedback Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qui, Yueming; Gogna, Pawan; Muller, Richard; Maker, paul; Wilson, Daniel; Stintz, Andreas; Lester, Luke

    2003-01-01

    InAs quantum-dot lasers that feature distributed feedback and lateral evanescent- wave coupling have been demonstrated in operation at a wavelength of 1.3 m. These lasers are prototypes of optical-communication oscillators that are required to be capable of stable single-frequency, single-spatial-mode operation. A laser of this type (see figure) includes an active layer that comprises multiple stacks of InAs quantum dots embedded within InGaAs quantum wells. Distributed feedback is provided by gratings formed on both sides of a ridge by electron lithography and reactive-ion etching on the surfaces of an AlGaAs/GaAs waveguide. The lateral evanescent-wave coupling between the gratings and the wave propagating in the waveguide is strong enough to ensure operation at a single frequency, and the waveguide is thick enough to sustain a stable single spatial mode. In tests, the lasers were found to emit continuous-wave radiation at temperatures up to about 90 C. Side modes were found to be suppressed by more than 30 dB.

  9. Measuring charge carrier diffusion in coupled colloidal quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Zhitomirsky, David; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2013-06-25

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are attractive materials for inexpensive, room-temperature-, and solution-processed optoelectronic devices. A high carrier diffusion length is desirable for many CQD device applications. In this work we develop two new experimental methods to investigate charge carrier diffusion in coupled CQD solids under charge-neutral, i.e., undepleted, conditions. The methods take advantage of the quantum-size-effect tunability of our materials, utilizing a smaller-bandgap population of quantum dots as a reporter system. We develop analytical models of diffusion in 1D and 3D structures that allow direct extraction of diffusion length from convenient parametric plots and purely optical measurements. We measure several CQD solids fabricated using a number of distinct methods and having significantly different doping and surface ligand treatments. We find that CQD materials recently reported to achieve a certified power conversion efficiency of 7% with hybrid organic-inorganic passivation have a diffusion length of 80 ± 10 nm. The model further allows us to extract the lifetime, trap density, mobility, and diffusion coefficient independently in each material system. This work will facilitate further progress in extending the diffusion length, ultimately leading to high-quality CQD solid semiconducting materials and improved CQD optoelectronic devices, including CQD solar cells.

  10. Controllable Synthesis of Highly Luminescent Boron Nitride Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongling; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Tsang, Siu Hon; Zhen, Xu; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-12-22

    Boron nitride quantum dots (BNQDs), as a new member of heavy metal-free quantum dots, have aroused great interest in fundamental research and practical application due to their unique physical/chemical properties. However, it is still a challenge to controllably synthesize high-quality BNQDs with high quantum yield (QY), uniform size and strong fluorescent. In this work, BNQDs have been successfully fabricated by the liquid exfoliation and the subsequent solvothermal process with respect to its facileness and easy large scale up. Importantly, BNQDs with high-quality can be controllably obtained by adjusting the synthetic parameters involved in the solvothermal process including filling factor, synthesis temperature, and duration time. Encouragingly, the as-prepared BNQDs possess strong blue luminescence with QY as high as 19.5%, which can be attributed to the synergetic effect of size, surface chemistry and edge defects. In addition, this strategy presented here provides a new reference for the controllable synthesis of other heavy metal-free QDs. Furthermore, the as-prepared BNQDs are non-toxic to cells and exhibit nanosecond-scaled lifetimes, suggesting they have great potential biological and optoelectronic applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Growth of group II-VI semiconductor quantum dots with strong quantum confinement and low size dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Praveen K.; Sharma, Kriti; Nagpal, Swati; Bhatnagar, P. K.; Mathur, P. C.

    2003-11-01

    CdTe quantum dots embedded in glass matrix are grown using two-step annealing method. The results for the optical transmission characterization are analysed and compared with the results obtained from CdTe quantum dots grown using conventional single-step annealing method. A theoretical model for the absorption spectra is used to quantitatively estimate the size dispersion in the two cases. In the present work, it is established that the quantum dots grown using two-step annealing method have stronger quantum confinement, reduced size dispersion and higher volume ratio as compared to the single-step annealed samples. (

  12. Progress towards two double-dot qubits in Si/SiGe: quadruple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Ryan H.; Ward, Daniel R.; Kim, Dohun; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Smith, Luke; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    We present the fabrication and electrical characterization of two types of gate-defined quadruple quantum dot devices formed in Si/SiGe heterostructures. We compare two designs, one which uses three layers of tightly overlapping gates and is similar to the work found in, and one which uses only two layers of gates and has significantly more open space between neighboring gates. We demonstrate charge-state conditional quantum oscillations in the more open device, we compare the tunability of both devices with each other, and we discuss the implications of these measurements on a path towards larger numbers of coupled quantum dot qubits. This work is supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-1-0607), NSF (DMR-1206915, PHY-1104660), ONR (N00014-15-1-0029) and the Department of Defense. Development and maintenance of the growth facilities used for fabricating samples supported by DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028). DK acknowledges support from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Institutional Program (Project No. 2E26681). This research utilized facilities supported by the NSF (DMR-0832760, DMR-1121288).

  13. A quantum optical transistor with a single quantum dot in a photonic crystal nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2011-02-04

    Laser and strong coupling can coexist in a single quantum dot (QD) coupled to a photonic crystal nanocavity. This provides an important clue towards the realization of a quantum optical transistor. Using experimentally realistic parameters, in this work, theoretical analysis shows that such a quantum optical transistor can be switched on or off by turning on or off the pump laser, which corresponds to attenuation or amplification of the probe laser, respectively. Furthermore, based on this quantum optical transistor, an all-optical measurement of the vacuum Rabi splitting is also presented. The idea of associating a quantum optical transistor with this coupled QD-nanocavity system may achieve images of light controlling light in all-optical logic circuits and quantum computers.

  14. Quantum-dot spin-photon entanglement via frequency downconversion to telecom wavelength.

    PubMed

    De Greve, Kristiaan; Yu, Leo; McMahon, Peter L; Pelc, Jason S; Natarajan, Chandra M; Kim, Na Young; Abe, Eisuke; Maier, Sebastian; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Hadfield, Robert H; Forchel, Alfred; Fejer, M M; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-11-15

    Long-distance quantum teleportation and quantum repeater technologies require entanglement between a single matter quantum bit (qubit) and a telecommunications (telecom)-wavelength photonic qubit. Electron spins in III-V semiconductor quantum dots are among the matter qubits that allow for the fastest spin manipulation and photon emission, but entanglement between a single quantum-dot spin qubit and a flying (propagating) photonic qubit has yet to be demonstrated. Moreover, many quantum dots emit single photons at visible to near-infrared wavelengths, where silica fibre losses are so high that long-distance quantum communication protocols become difficult to implement. Here we demonstrate entanglement between an InAs quantum-dot electron spin qubit and a photonic qubit, by frequency downconversion of a spontaneously emitted photon from a singly charged quantum dot to a wavelength of 1,560 nanometres. The use of sub-10-picosecond pulses at a wavelength of 2.2 micrometres in the frequency downconversion process provides the necessary quantum erasure to eliminate which-path information in the photon energy. Together with previously demonstrated indistinguishable single-photon emission at high repetition rates, the present technique advances the III-V semiconductor quantum-dot spin system as a promising platform for long-distance quantum communication.

  15. Nanofabrication of Gate-defined GaAs/AlGaAs Lateral Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Bureau-Oxton, Chloé; Camirand Lemyre, Julien; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2013-01-01

    A quantum computer is a computer composed of quantum bits (qubits) that takes advantage of quantum effects, such as superposition of states and entanglement, to solve certain problems exponentially faster than with the best known algorithms on a classical computer. Gate-defined lateral quantum dots on GaAs/AlGaAs are one of many avenues explored for the implementation of a qubit. When properly fabricated, such a device is able to trap a small number of electrons in a certain region of space. The spin states of these electrons can then be used to implement the logical 0 and 1 of the quantum bit. Given the nanometer scale of these quantum dots, cleanroom facilities offering specialized equipment- such as scanning electron microscopes and e-beam evaporators- are required for their fabrication. Great care must be taken throughout the fabrication process to maintain cleanliness of the sample surface and to avoid damaging the fragile gates of the structure. This paper presents the detailed fabrication protocol of gate-defined lateral quantum dots from the wafer to a working device. Characterization methods and representative results are also briefly discussed. Although this paper concentrates on double quantum dots, the fabrication process remains the same for single or triple dots or even arrays of quantum dots. Moreover, the protocol can be adapted to fabricate lateral quantum dots on other substrates, such as Si/SiGe. PMID:24300661

  16. Demonstration of quantum entanglement between a single electron spin confined to an InAs quantum dot and a photon.

    PubMed

    Schaibley, J R; Burgers, A P; McCracken, G A; Duan, L-M; Berman, P R; Steel, D G; Bracker, A S; Gammon, D; Sham, L J

    2013-04-19

    The electron spin state of a singly charged semiconductor quantum dot has been shown to form a suitable single qubit for quantum computing architectures with fast gate times. A key challenge in realizing a useful quantum dot quantum computing architecture lies in demonstrating the ability to scale the system to many qubits. In this Letter, we report an all optical experimental demonstration of quantum entanglement between a single electron spin confined to a single charged semiconductor quantum dot and the polarization state of a photon spontaneously emitted from the quantum dot's excited state. We obtain a lower bound on the fidelity of entanglement of 0.59±0.04, which is 84% of the maximum achievable given the timing resolution of available single photon detectors. In future applications, such as measurement-based spin-spin entanglement which does not require sub-nanosecond timing resolution, we estimate that this system would enable near ideal performance. The inferred (usable) entanglement generation rate is 3×10(3) s(-1). This spin-photon entanglement is the first step to a scalable quantum dot quantum computing architecture relying on photon (flying) qubits to mediate entanglement between distant nodes of a quantum dot network.

  17. Theoretical study of polarization dependence of carrier-induced refractive index change of quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qingyuan; Yang, Ziyi; Dong, Jianji; He, Ping-An; Huang, Dexiu

    2018-02-05

    The influences of dot material component, barrier material component, aspect ratio and carrier density on the refractive index changes of TE mode and TM mode of columnar quantum dot are analyzed, and a multiparameter adjustment method is proposed to realize low polarization dependence of refractive index change. Then the quantum dots with low polarization dependence of refractive index change (<1.5%) within C-band (1530 nm - 1565 nm) are designed, and it shows that quantum dots with different material parameters are anticipated to have similar characteristics of low polarization dependence.

  18. Photoluminescence kinetics slowdown in an ensemble of GaN/AlN quantum dots upon tunneling interaction with defects

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, I. A., E-mail: Aleksandrov@isp.nsc.ru; Mansurov, V. G.; Zhuravlev, K. S.

    2016-08-15

    The carrier recombination dynamics in an ensemble of GaN/AlN quantum dots is studied. The model proposed for describing this dynamics takes into account the transition of carriers between quantum dots and defects in a matrix. Comparison of the experimental and calculated photoluminescence decay curves shows that the interaction between quantum dots and defects slows down photoluminescence decay in the ensemble of GaN/AlN quantum dots.

  19. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, E., E-mail: ernesto.placidi@ism.cnr.it; Arciprete, F.; Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome

    2014-09-15

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surfacemore » occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.« less

  20. Three-Dimensional Control of Self-Assembled Quantum Dot Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-17

    Lateral Quantum Dot Molecules Around Self-Assembled Nanoholes . Appl. Phys. Lett. 2003, 82, 2892–2894. 7. Alonso-Gonzalez, P.; Martin-Sanchez, J.; Gonzalez...Y.; Alen, B.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, L. Formation of Lateral Low Density In(Ga)As Quantum Dot Pairs in GaAs Nanoholes . Cryst. Growth Des. 2009, 9

  1. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots induce oxidative stress and behavioral impairments in the marine clam Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Poirier, Laurence; Lopes, Christelle; Risso-de-Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots have a number of current applications in electronics and solar cells and significant future potential in medicine. The aim of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of CdS quantum dots on the marine clam Scrobicularia plana exposed for 14 d to these nanomaterials (10 µg Cd L(-1) ) in natural seawater and to compare them with soluble Cd. Measurement of labile Cd released from CdS quantum dots showed that 52% of CdS quantum dots remained in the nanoparticulate form. Clams accumulated the same levels of Cd regardless of the form in which it was delivered (soluble Cd vs CdS quantum dots). However, significant changes in biochemical responses were observed in clams exposed to CdS quantum dots compared with soluble Cd. Increased activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were significantly higher in clams exposed in seawater to Cd as the nanoparticulate versus the soluble form, suggesting a specific nano effect. The behavior of S. plana in sediment showed impairments of foot movements only in the case of exposure to CdS quantum dots. The results show that oxidative stress and behavior biomarkers are sensitive predictors of CdS quantum dots toxicity in S. plana. Such responses, appearing well before changes might occur at the population level, demonstrate the usefulness of this model species and type of biomarker in the assessment of nanoparticle contamination in estuarine ecosystems. © 2015 SETAC.

  2. Facilitated preparation of bioconjugatable zwitterionic quantum dots using dual-lipid encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Shrake, Robert; Demillo, Violeta G; Ahmadiantehrani, Mojtaba; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Publicover, Nelson G; Hunter, Kenneth W

    2015-01-01

    Zwitterionic quantum dots prepared through incorporated zwitterionic ligands on quantum dot surfaces, are being paid significant attention in biomedical applications because of their excellent colloidal stability across a wide pH and ionic strength range, antifouling surface, good biocompatibility, etc. In this work, we report a dual-lipid encapsulation approach to prepare bioconjugatable zwitterionic quantum dots using amidosulfobetaine-16 lipids, dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine lipids with functional head groups, and CuInS2/ZnS quantum dots in a tetrahydrofuran/methanol/water solvent system with sonication. Amidosulfobetaine-16 is a zwitterionic lipid and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, with its functional head, provides bioconjugation capability. Under sonication, tetrahydrofuran/methanol containing amidosulfobetaine-16, dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, and hydrophobic quantum dots are dispersed in water to form droplets. Highly water-soluble tetrahydrofuran/methanol in droplets is further displaced by water, which induces the lipid self-assembling on hydrophobic surface of quantum dots and thus forms water soluble zwitterionic quantum dots. The prepared zwitterionic quantum dots maintain colloidal stability in aqueous solutions with high salinity and over a wide pH range. They are also able to be conjugated with biomolecules for bioassay with minimal nonspecific binding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. In vivo cation exchange in quantum dots for tumor-specific imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B; Qin, Mingde; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sugahara, Kazuki N

    2017-08-24

    In vivo tumor imaging with nanoprobes suffers from poor tumor specificity. Here, we introduce a nanosystem, which allows selective background quenching to gain exceptionally tumor-specific signals. The system uses near-infrared quantum dots and a membrane-impermeable etchant, which serves as a cation donor. The etchant rapidly quenches the quantum dots through cation exchange (ionic etching), and facilitates renal clearance of metal ions released from the quantum dots. The quantum dots are intravenously delivered into orthotopic breast and pancreas tumors in mice by using the tumor-penetrating iRGD peptide. Subsequent etching quenches excess quantum dots, leaving a highly tumor-specific signal provided by the intact quantum dots remaining in the extravascular tumor cells and fibroblasts. No toxicity is noted. The system also facilitates the detection of peritoneal tumors with high specificity upon intraperitoneal tumor targeting and selective etching of excess untargeted quantum dots. In vivo cation exchange may be a promising strategy to enhance specificity of tumor imaging.The imaging of tumors in vivo using nanoprobes has been challenging due to the lack of sufficient tumor specificity. Here, the authors develop a tumor-specific quantum dot system that permits in vivo cation exchange to achieve selective background quenching and high tumor-specific imaging.

  4. Synthesis of Cd-free InP/ZnS Quantum Dots Suitable for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Matthew A; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Fichter, Katye M; Fichter, Kathryn M

    2016-02-06

    Fluorescent nanocrystals, specifically quantum dots, have been a useful tool for many biomedical applications. For successful use in biological systems, quantum dots should be highly fluorescent and small/monodisperse in size. While commonly used cadmium-based quantum dots possess these qualities, they are potentially toxic due to the possible release of Cd(2+) ions through nanoparticle degradation. Indium-based quantum dots, specifically InP/ZnS, have recently been explored as a viable alternative to cadmium-based quantum dots due to their relatively similar fluorescence characteristics and size. The synthesis presented here uses standard hot-injection techniques for effective nanoparticle growth; however, nanoparticle properties such as size, emission wavelength, and emission intensity can drastically change due to small changes in the reaction conditions. Therefore, reaction conditions such temperature, reaction duration, and precursor concentration should be maintained precisely to yield reproducible products. Because quantum dots are not inherently soluble in aqueous solutions, they must also undergo surface modification to impart solubility in water. In this protocol, an amphiphilic polymer is used to interact with both hydrophobic ligands on the quantum dot surface and bulk solvent water molecules. Here, a detailed protocol is provided for the synthesis of highly fluorescent InP/ZnS quantum dots that are suitable for use in biomedical applications.

  5. CdSe quantum dot internalization by Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloepfer, Jeremiah A.; Mielke, Randall E.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2004-01-01

    Biological labeling has been demonstrated with CdSe quantum dots in a variety of animal cells, but bacteria are harder to label because of their cell walls. We discuss the challenges of using minimally coated, bare CdSe quantum dots as luminescent internal labels for bacteria.

  6. Review – Quantum Dots and Their Application in Lighting, Displays, and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Frecker, Talitha; Bailey, Danielle; Arzeta-Ferrer, Xochitl

    2015-08-18

    In this review, we focus on the advancement of white light emitting nanocrystals, their usage as the emissive layer in LEDs and display backlights, and examine the increased efficiency and longevity of quantum dots based colored LEDs. In addition, we also explore recent discoveries on quantum dots as biological labels, dynamic trackers, and applications in drug delivery.

  7. Determination of anisotropic dipole moments in self-assembled quantum dots using Rabi oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, A.; Wang, Q. Q.; Bianucci, P.; Shih, C. K.; Xue, Q. K.

    2004-02-01

    By investigating the polarization-dependent Rabi oscillations using photoluminescence spectroscopy, we determined the respective transition dipole moments of the two excited excitonic states |Ex> and |Ey> of a single self-assembled quantum dot that are nondegenerate due to shape anisotropy. We find that the ratio of the two dipole moments is close to the physical elongation ratio of the quantum dot.

  8. Quantum dot-linked immunosorbent assay (QLISA) using orientation-directed antibodies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miho; Udaka, Hikari; Fukuda, Takeshi

    2017-09-05

    An approach similar to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with the advantage of saving time and effort but exhibiting high performance, was developed using orientation-directed half-part antibodies immobilized on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. ELISA is a widely accepted assay used to detect the presence of a target substance. However, it takes time to quantify the target with specificity and sensitivity owing to signal amplification. In this study, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots are introduced as bright and photobleaching-tolerant fluorescent materials. Since hydrophilic surface coating of quantum dots rendered biocompatibility and functional groups for chemical reactions, the quantum dots were modified with half-sized antibodies after partial reduction. The half-sized antibody could be bound to a quantum dot through a unique thiol site to properly display the recognition domain for the core process of ELISA, which is an antigen-antibody interaction. The reducing conditions were investigated to generate efficient conjugates of quantum dots and half-sized antibodies. This was applied to IL-6 detection, as the quantification of IL-6 is significant owing to its close relationships with various biomedical phenomena that cause different diseases. An ELISA-like assay with CdSe/ZnS quantum dot institution (QLISA; Quantum dot-linked immunosorbent assay) was developed to detect 0.05ng/mL IL-6, which makes it sufficiently sensitive as an immunosorbent assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonlinear optical properties and supercontinuum spectrum of titania-modified carbon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchin, Yu N.; Mayor, A. Yu; Proschenko, D. Yu; Postnova, I. V.; Shchipunov, Yu A.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the nonlinear optical properties and supercontinuum spectrum of solutions of carbon quantum dots prepared by a hydrothermal process from chitin and then coated with titania. The titania coating has been shown to have an activating effect on the carbon quantum dots, enhancing supercontinuum generation in the blue-violet spectral region and enabling their nonlinear optical characteristics to be varied.

  10. The diamagnetic susceptibility of a donor in a semiconductor core shell quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudharshan, M. S.; Subhash, P.; Shaik, Nagoor Babu; Kalpana, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, A. Merwyn Jasper D.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of Aluminium concentration, shell thickness and size of the core shell Quantum Dot on the Diamagnetic Susceptibility of a donor in the Core Shell Quantum Dot is calculated in the effective mass approximation using the variational method. The results are presented and discussed.

  11. Synthesis of Cd-free InP/ZnS Quantum Dots Suitable for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Matthew A.; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Fichter, Katye M.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals, specifically quantum dots, have been a useful tool for many biomedical applications. For successful use in biological systems, quantum dots should be highly fluorescent and small/monodisperse in size. While commonly used cadmium-based quantum dots possess these qualities, they are potentially toxic due to the possible release of Cd2+ ions through nanoparticle degradation. Indium-based quantum dots, specifically InP/ZnS, have recently been explored as a viable alternative to cadmium-based quantum dots due to their relatively similar fluorescence characteristics and size. The synthesis presented here uses standard hot-injection techniques for effective nanoparticle growth; however, nanoparticle properties such as size, emission wavelength, and emission intensity can drastically change due to small changes in the reaction conditions. Therefore, reaction conditions such temperature, reaction duration, and precursor concentration should be maintained precisely to yield reproducible products. Because quantum dots are not inherently soluble in aqueous solutions, they must also undergo surface modification to impart solubility in water. In this protocol, an amphiphilic polymer is used to interact with both hydrophobic ligands on the quantum dot surface and bulk solvent water molecules. Here, a detailed protocol is provided for the synthesis of highly fluorescent InP/ZnS quantum dots that are suitable for use in biomedical applications. PMID:26891282

  12. Stable black phosphorus quantum dots for alkali PH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weilan; Song, Haizeng; Yan, Shancheng

    2018-01-01

    Black phosphorus, as a new two-dimensional material has been widely used in sensors, photovoltaic devices, etc. However, thin layered black phosphorus chemically degrades rapidly under ambient and aqueous conditions, which hinders the application of it in the chemical sensors. In this work, stable black phosphorus quantum dots (BPQDs) in solution are successfully synthesized by functionalization with 4-nitrobenzene-diazonium (4-NBD). The stable BPQDs are investigated by TEM, AFM, Raman, and UV-absorption. As a potential application, the stable BPQDs are used as sensors in alkali solution, which exhibit outstanding performance. Our work paves the way towards a new application with BPQDs in solution.

  13. Quantum dot rolled-up microtube optoelectronic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Sishir; Frost, Thomas; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2013-05-15

    A rolled-up microtube optoelectronic integrated circuit operating as a phototransceiver is demonstrated. The microtube is made of a InGaAs/GaAs strained bilayer with InAs self-organized quantum dots inserted in the GaAs layer. The phototransceiver consists of an optically pumped microtube laser and a microtube photoconductive detector connected by an a-Si/SiO2 waveguide. The loss in the waveguide and responsivity of the entire phototransceiver circuit are 7.96 dB/cm and 34 mA/W, respectively.

  14. Wigner molecules in carbon-nanotube quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchi, Andrea; Rontani, Massimo

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate that electrons in quantum dots defined by electrostatic gates in semiconductor nanotubes freeze orderly in space realizing a “Wigner molecule.” Our exact diagonalization calculations uncover the features of the electron molecule, which may be accessed by tunneling spectroscopy—indeed some of them have already been observed by Deshpande and Bockrath [Nat. Phys. 4, 314 (2008)]10.1038/nphys895. We show that numerical results are satisfactorily reproduced by a simple ansatz vibrational wave function: electrons have localized wave functions, like nuclei in an ordinary molecule, whereas low-energy excitations are collective vibrations of electrons around their equilibrium positions.

  15. Electrically Tunable g Factors in Quantum Dot Molecular Spin States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-10

    Electrically Tunable g Factors in Quantum Dot Molecular Spin States M. F. Doty,1,* M. Scheibner,1 I. V. Ponomarev,1 E. A. Stinaff,1 A. S . Bracker,1 V...L. Korenev ,2 T. L. Reinecke,1 and D. Gammon1 1Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375, USA 2A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St...on the applied electric field (F). PRL 97, 197202 (2006) P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S week ending 10 NOVEMBER 2006 0031-9007=06=97(19

  16. Multifunctional quantum dots and liposome complexes in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Chao, Yimin

    2018-01-01

    Incorporating both diagnostic and therapeutic functions into a single nanoscale system is an effective modern drug delivery strategy. Combining liposomes with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) has great potential to achieve such dual functions, referred to in this review as a liposomal QD hybrid system (L-QD). Here we review the recent literature dealing with the design and application of L-QD for advances in bio-imaging and drug delivery. After a summary of L-QD synthesis processes and evaluation of their properties, we will focus on their multifunctional applications, ranging from in vitro cell imaging to theranostic drug delivery approaches. PMID:28866655

  17. Multifunctional quantum dots and liposome complexes in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Chao, Yi-Min

    2017-09-03

    Incorporating both diagnostic and therapeutic functions into a single nanoscale system is an effective modern drug delivery strategy. Combining liposomes with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) has great potential to achieve such dual functions, referred to in this review as a liposomal QD hybrid system (L-QD). Here we review the recent literature dealing with the design and application of L-QD for advances in bio-imaging and drug delivery. After a summary of L-QD synthesis processes and evaluation of their properties, we will focus on their multifunctional applications, ranging from in vitro cell imaging to theranostic drug delivery approaches.

  18. Optical Rabi Oscillations in a Quantum Dot Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujiraoka, Mamiko; Ishi-Hayase, Junko; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Ema, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2010-09-01

    We have investigated Rabi oscillations of exciton polarization in a self-assembled InAs quantum dot ensemble. The four-wave mixing signals measured as a function of the average of the pulse area showed the large in-plane anisotropy and nonharmonic oscillations. The experimental results can be well reproduced by a two-level model calculation including three types of inhomogeneities without any fitting parameter. The large anisotropy can be well explained by the anisotropic dipole moments. We also find that the nonharmonic behaviors partly originate from the polarization interference.

  19. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J [Chapel Hill, NC; Sykora, Milan [Los Alamos, NM; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  20. Graphene quantum dots as the electrolyte for solid state supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Su; Li, Yutong; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Zhou, Jisheng; Hong, Song; Huang, Minglu

    2016-01-01

    We propose that graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with a sufficient number of acidic oxygen-bearing functional groups such as -COOH and -OH can serve as solution- and solid- type electrolytes for supercapacitors. Moreover, we found that the ionic conductivity and ion-donating ability of the GQDs could be markedly improved by simply neutralizing their acidic functional groups by using KOH. These neutralized GQDs as the solution- or solid-type electrolytes greatly enhanced the capacitive performance and rate capability of the supercapacitors. The reason for the enhancement can be ascribed to the fully ionization of the weak acidic oxygen-bearing functional groups after neutralization. PMID:26763275

  1. Photoresponse of polyaniline-functionalized graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Sin Ki; Luk, Chi Man; Tang, Libin; Teng, Kar Seng; Lau, Shu Ping

    2015-03-01

    Polyaniline-functionalized graphene quantum dots (PANI-GQD) and pristine graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were utilized for optoelectronic devices. The PANI-GQD based photodetector exhibited higher responsivity which is about an order of magnitude at 405 nm and 7 folds at 532 nm as compared to GQD-based photodetectors. The improved photoresponse is attributed to the enhanced interconnection of GQD by island-like polymer matrices, which facilitate carrier transport within the polymer matrices. The optically tunable current-voltage (I-V) hysteresis of PANI-GQD was also demonstrated. The hysteresis magnifies progressively with light intensity at a scan range of +/-1 V. Both GQD and PANI-GQD devices change from positive to negative photocurrent when the bias reaches 4 V. Photogenerated carriers are excited to the trapping states in GQDs with increased bias. The trapped charges interact with charges injected from the electrodes which results in a net decrease of free charge carriers and a negative photocurrent. The photocurrent switching phenomenon in GQD and PANI-GQD devices may open up novel applications in optoelectronics.Polyaniline-functionalized graphene quantum dots (PANI-GQD) and pristine graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were utilized for optoelectronic devices. The PANI-GQD based photodetector exhibited higher responsivity which is about an order of magnitude at 405 nm and 7 folds at 532 nm as compared to GQD-based photodetectors. The improved photoresponse is attributed to the enhanced interconnection of GQD by island-like polymer matrices, which facilitate carrier transport within the polymer matrices. The optically tunable current-voltage (I-V) hysteresis of PANI-GQD was also demonstrated. The hysteresis magnifies progressively with light intensity at a scan range of +/-1 V. Both GQD and PANI-GQD devices change from positive to negative photocurrent when the bias reaches 4 V. Photogenerated carriers are excited to the trapping states in GQDs with increased bias. The

  2. Model of an Injection Semiconductor Quantum-Dot Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koryukin, I. V.

    2018-05-01

    We propose an asymmetric electron-hole model of an injection semiconductor quantum-dot laser, which correctly allows for relaxation at transitions between the electron and hole levels. Steady-state solutions of the proposed model, conditions for the simultaneous operation at transitions between the ground and first excited state levels, and relaxation oscillations in the two-wave lasing regime are studied. It is shown that the model can be simplified when the relaxation between hole levels is much faster than the relaxation between electron levels.

  3. `Giant' nanocrystal quantum dots (gNQDs) as FRET donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Margaret; Nguyen, Thuy; Dennis, Allison

    2017-02-01

    High-quality core/shell CdSe/xCdS quantum dots (QDs) ranging from 3 to 20 nm in diameter were synthesized for use as Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) donors. gNQDs are carefully characterized for size, emission, absorption, QY, and brightness in both organic and aqueous solution. FRET has been verified in optimally designed systems that use short capping ligands and donor-acceptor pairs that have well-matched emission and absorption spectra. The interplay between shell thickness, donor-acceptor distance, and particle brightness is systematically analyzed to optimize our biosensor design.

  4. Correlated sequential tunneling in Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorwart, M.; Egger, R.; Grifoni, M.

    2005-02-01

    We investigate tunneling through a quantum dot formed by two strong impurites in a spinless Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. Upon employing a Markovian master equation approach, we compute the linear conductance due to sequential tunneling processes. Besides the previously used lowest-order Golden Rule rates describing uncorrelated sequential tunneling (UST) processes, we systematically include higher-order correlated sequential tunneling (CST) diagrams within the standard Weisskopf-Wigner approximation. We provide estimates for the parameter regions where CST effects are shown to dominate over UST. Focusing mainly on the temperature dependence of the conductance maximum, we discuss the relation of our results to previous theoretical and experimental results.

  5. Broadband Ge/SiGe quantum dot photodetector on pseudosubstrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a ten-period Ge quantum dot photodetector grown on SiGe pseudosubstrate. The detector exhibits tunable photoresponse in both 3- to 5- μm and 8- to 12- μm spectral regions with responsivity values up to about 1 mA/W at a bias of −3 V and operates under normal incidence radiation with background limited performance at 100 K. The relative response in the mid- and long-wave atmospheric windows could be controlled through the applied voltage. PMID:23651470

  6. Colloidal quantum dot active layers for light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagan, Jennifer G.; Stokes, Edward B.; Patel, Kinnari; Burkhart, Casey C.; Ahrens, Michael T.; Barletta, Philip T.; O'Steen, Mark

    2006-07-01

    In this paper the preliminary results of incorporating a novel active layer into a GaN light emitting diode (LED) are discussed. Integration of colloidal CdSe quantum dots into a GaN LED active layer is demonstrated. Properties of p-type Mg doped overgrowth GaN are examined via circular transmission line method (CTLM). Effects on surface roughness due to the active layer incorporation are examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electroluminescence of LED test structures is reported, and an ideality factor of n = 1.6 is demonstrated.

  7. Passivation Using Molecular Halides Increases Quantum Dot Solar Cell Performance.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xinzheng; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Kiani, Amirreza; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Abbas, Abdullah Saud; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Liu, Mengxia; Yang, Zhenyu; Walters, Grant; Xu, Jixian; Yuan, Mingjian; Ning, Zhijun; Fan, Fengjia; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Kramer, Illan; Zhitomirsky, David; Lee, Philip; Perelgut, Alexander; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-01-13

    A solution-based passivation scheme is developed featuring the use of molecular iodine and PbS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs). The improved passivation translates into a longer carrier diffusion length in the solid film. This allows thicker solar-cell devices to be built while preserving efficient charge collection, leading to a certified power conversion efficiency of 9.9%, which is a new record in CQD solar cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Photon-assisted tunneling through a quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Jauhar, S.; McCormick, K.

    1994-07-15

    We study single-electron tunneling in a two-junction device in the presence of microwave radiation. We introduce a model for numerical simulations that extends the Tien-Gordon theory for photon-assisted tunneling to encompass correlated single-electron tunneling. We predict sharp current jumps which reflect the discrete photon energy [ital hf], and a zero-bias current whose sign changes when an electron is added to the central island of the device. Measurements on split-gate quantum dots show microwave-induced features that are in good agreement with the model.

  9. Emission switching in carbon dots coated CdTe quantum dots driving by pH dependent hetero-interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiao; Wang, Hao; Yi, Qinghua

    2015-11-16

    Due to the different emission mechanism between fluorescent carbon dots and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), it is of interest to explore the potential emission in hetero-structured carbon dots/semiconducting QDs. Herein, we design carbon dots coated CdTe QDs (CDQDs) and investigate their inherent emission. We demonstrate switchable emission for the hetero-interactions of the CDQDs. Optical analyses indicate electron transfer between the carbon dots and the CdTe QDs. A heterojunction electron process is proposed as the driving mechanism based on N atom protonation of the carbon dots. This work advances our understanding of the interaction mechanism of the heterostructured CDQDs and benefitsmore » the future development of optoelectronic nanodevices with new functionalities.« less

  10. Quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes in MoS{sub 2} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Z. X.; Liu, L. Z.; Wu, H. Y.

    2015-06-08

    The low quantum yield (∼10{sup −5}) has restricted practical use of photoluminescence (PL) from MoS{sub 2} composed of a few layers, but the quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes are believed to be able to boost the PL intensity. In this work, PL from 2 to 9 nm MoS{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) is excluded from the solvent and the absorption and PL spectra are shown to be consistent with the size distribution. PL from MoS{sub 2} QDs is also found to be sensitive to aggregation due to the size effect.

  11. Lead Telluride Quantum Dot Solar Cells Displaying External Quantum Efficiencies Exceeding 120%

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in semiconducting quantum dots is a process that produces multiple charge-carrier pairs from a single excitation. MEG is a possible route to bypass the Shockley-Queisser limit in single-junction solar cells but it remains challenging to harvest charge-carrier pairs generated by MEG in working photovoltaic devices. Initial yields of additional carrier pairs may be reduced due to ultrafast intraband relaxation processes that compete with MEG at early times. Quantum dots of materials that display reduced carrier cooling rates (e.g., PbTe) are therefore promising candidates to increase the impact of MEG in photovoltaic devices. Here we demonstrate PbTe quantum dot-based solar cells, which produce extractable charge carrier pairs with an external quantum efficiency above 120%, and we estimate an internal quantum efficiency exceeding 150%. Resolving the charge carrier kinetics on the ultrafast time scale with pump–probe transient absorption and pump–push–photocurrent measurements, we identify a delayed cooling effect above the threshold energy for MEG. PMID:26488847

  12. Dynamics of plasmonic field polarization induced by quantum coherence in quantum dot-metallic nanoshell structures.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, S M

    2014-09-01

    When a hybrid system consisting of a semiconductor quantum dot and a metallic nanoparticle interacts with a laser field, the plasmonic field of the metallic nanoparticle can be normalized by the quantum coherence generated in the quantum dot. In this Letter, we study the states of polarization of such a coherent-plasmonic field and demonstrate how these states can reveal unique aspects of the collective molecular properties of the hybrid system formed via coherent exciton-plasmon coupling. We show that transition between the molecular states of this system can lead to ultrafast polarization dynamics, including sudden reversal of the sense of variations of the plasmonic field and formation of circular and elliptical polarization.

  13. Electron Spin Dephasing and Decoherence by Interaction with Nuclear Spins in Self-Assembled Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Klimeck, Gerhard; Whale, K. Birgitta

    2004-01-01

    Electron spin dephasing and decoherence by its interaction with nuclear spins in self-assembled quantum dots are investigated in the framework of the empirical tight-binding model. Electron spin dephasing in an ensemble of dots is induced by the inhomogeneous precession frequencies of the electron among dots, while electron spin decoherence in a single dot arises from the inhomogeneous precession frequencies of nuclear spins in the dot. For In(x)Ga(1-x) As self-assembled dots containing 30000 nuclei, the dephasing and decoherence times are predicted to be on the order of 100 ps and 1 (micro)s.

  14. Water-soluble luminescent quantum dots and biomolecular conjugates thereof and related compositions and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Nie, Shuming; Chan, Warren C. W.; Emory, Stephen

    2007-03-20

    The present invention provides a water-soluble luminescent quantum dot, a biomolecular conjugate thereof and a composition comprising such a quantum dot or conjugate. Additionally, the present invention provides a method of obtaining a luminescent quantum dot, a method of making a biomolecular conjugate thereof, and methods of using a biomolecular conjugate for ultrasensitive nonisotopic detection in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Water-soluble luminescent quantum dots and biomolecular conjugates thereof and related compositions and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Nie, Shuming; Chan, Warren C. W.; Emory, Steven R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a water-soluble luminescent quantum dot, a biomolecular conjugate thereof and a composition comprising such a quantum dot or conjugate. Additionally, the present invention provides a method of obtaining a luminescent quantum dot, a method of making a biomolecular conjugate thereof, and methods of using a biomolecular conjugate for ultrasensitive nonisotopic detection in vitro and in vivo.

  16. The Effect of Temperature on Photoluminescence Enhancement of Quantum Dots in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Kim, Jongsung

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of temperature on photoluminescence of quantum dots immobilized on the surface of an optical fiber in a rat brain slice. The optical fiber was silanized with 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS), following which quantum dots with carboxyl functional group were immobilized on the optical fiber via amide bond formation. The effect of temperature on the fluorescence intensity of the quantum dots in rat brain slices was studied. This report shows that the fluorescence intensity of quantum dots increases with the increase of temperature of the brain slice. The fluorescence enhancement phenomenon appears to take place via electron transfer related to pH increase. With the gradual increase of temperature, the fluorescence intensity of quantum dots in solution decreased, while that in the brain slice increased. This enhanced thermal performance of QDs in brain slice makes suggestion for the study of QDs-based brain temperature sensors.

  17. Graphene quantum dots as enhanced plant growth regulators: effects on coriander and garlic plants.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Disha; Erande, Manisha B; Late, Dattatray J

    2015-10-01

    We report investigations on the use of graphene quantum dots for growth enhancement in coriander (Coriandrum sativam L.) and garlic (Allium sativum) plants. The as-received seeds of coriander and garlic were treated with 0.2 mg mL(-1) of graphene quantum dots for 3 h before planting. Graphene quantum dots enhanced the growth rate in coriander and garlic plants, including leaves, roots, shoots, flowers and fruits, when the seeds were treated with graphene quantum dots. Our investigations open up the opportunity to use graphene quantum dots as plant growth regulators that can be used in a variety of other food plants for high yield. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. What are the reasons for low use of graphene quantum dots in immunosensing of cancer biomarkers?

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2017-02-01

    Graphene quantum dots-based immunosensors have recently gained importance for detecting antigens and biomarkers responsible for cancer diagnosis. This paper reports a literature survey of the applications of graphene quantum dots for sensing cancer biomarkers. The survey sought to explore three questions: (1) Do graphene quantum dots improve immunosensing technology? (2) If so, can graphene quantum dots have a critical, positive impact on construction of immuno-devices? And (3) What is the reason for some troubles in the application of this technology? The number of published papers in the field seems positively answer the first two questions. However additional efforts must be made to move from the bench to the real diagnosis. Some approaches to improve the analytical performance of graphene quantum dots-based immunosensors through their figures of merit have been also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatially selective assembly of quantum dot light emitters in an LED using engineered peptides.

    PubMed

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Seker, Urartu Ozgur Safak; Zengin, Gulis; Mutlugun, Evren; Sari, Emre; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2011-04-26

    Semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots are utilized in numerous applications in nano- and biotechnology. In device applications, where several different material components are involved, quantum dots typically need to be assembled at explicit locations for enhanced functionality. Conventional approaches cannot meet these requirements where assembly of nanocrystals is usually material-nonspecific, thereby limiting the control of their spatial distribution. Here we demonstrate directed self-assembly of quantum dot emitters at material-specific locations in a color-conversion LED containing several material components including a metal, a dielectric, and a semiconductor. We achieve a spatially selective immobilization of quantum dot emitters by using the unique material selectivity characteristics provided by the engineered solid-binding peptides as smart linkers. Peptide-decorated quantum dots exhibited several orders of magnitude higher photoluminescence compared to the control groups, thus, potentially opening up novel ways to advance these photonic platforms in applications ranging from chemical to biodetection.

  20. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Wei, Guodan

    2010-07-06

    A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.