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Sample records for zodiacal light model

  1. A study of zodiacal light models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. A.; Craven, P. D.

    1973-01-01

    A review is presented of the basic equations used in the analysis of photometric observations of zodiacal light. A survey of the methods used to model the zodiacal light in and out of the ecliptic is given. Results and comparison of various models are presented, as well as recent results by the authors.

  2. Colour dependence of zodiacal light models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Leinert, C.

    1973-01-01

    Colour models of the zodiacal light in the ecliptic have been calculated for both dielectric and metallic particles in the sub-micron and micron size range. Two colour ratios were computed, a blue ratio and a red ratio. The models with a size distribution proportional to s to the -2.5 power ds (where s is the particle radius) generally show a colour close to the solar colour and almost independent of elongation. Especially in the blue colour ratio there is generally no significant dependence on the lower cutoff size (0.1-1 micron). The main feature of absorbing particles is a reddening at small elongations. The models for size distributions proportional to s to the -4 power ds show larger departures from solar colour and more variation with model parameters. Colour measurements, including red and near infra-red, therefore are useful to distinguish between flat and steep size spectra and to verify the presence of slightly absorbing particles.

  3. Dynamical Zodiacal Cloud Models Constrained by High Resolution Spectroscopy of the Zodiacal Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Madsen, G. J.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H.; Reynolds, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a set of self-consistent dynamical models of the Zodiacal cloud, following the orbital evolution of dust particles. Three populations were considered, originating from the Kuiper belt, asteroids and comets. Using the models developed, we investigated how the solar spectrum is changed by scattering by the zodiacal cloud grains and compared the obtained spectra with the observations.

  4. Observations and Modelling of the Zodiacal Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsall, T.

    1994-12-01

    The DIRBE instrument on the COBE satellite performed a full-sky survey in ten bands covering the spectral range from 1.25 to 240 microns, and made measurements of the polarization from 1.25 to 3.5 microns. These observations provide a wealth of data on the radiations from the interplanetary dust cloud (IPD). The presentation covers the observations, the model-independent findings, and the results from the extensive efforts of the DIRBE team to model the IPD. Emphasis is placed on describing the importance of correctly accounting for the IPD contribution to the observed-sky signal for the purpose of detecting the cosmic infrared background. (*) The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is responsible for the design, development, and operation of the COBE mission. GSFC is also responsible for the development of the analysis software and for the production of the mission data sets. Scientific guidance is provided by the COBE Science Working Group. The COBE program is supported by the Astrophysics Division of NASA's Office of Space Science.

  5. COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS AND ZODIACAL LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.

    We performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution or from IRAC observations of high-latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS field at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of ∼2 over the range of solar elongations atmore » which the field can be observed. We find that the white-noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that are evident in the zodiacal light model. At large angular scales (≳100″) where excess power above the white noise is observed, we find no correlation of the power with the modeled intensity of the zodiacal light. This test clearly indicates that the large-scale power in the infrared background is not being caused by the zodiacal light.« less

  6. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations and Zodiacal Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR (near-infrared)background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution or from IRAC (Infrared Array Camera) observations of high-latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS (Cosmic Evolution Survey) field at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of approximately 2 over the range of solar elongations at which the field can be observed. We find that the white-noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that are evident in the zodiacal light model. At large angular scales (greater than or approximately equal to 100 arcseconds) where excess power above the white noise is observed, we find no correlation of the power with the modeled intensity of the zodiacal light. This test clearly indicates that the large-scale power in the infrared background is not being caused by the zodiacal light.

  7. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations and Zodiacal Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2016-06-01

    We performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution or from IRAC observations of high-latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS field at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of ˜2 over the range of solar elongations at which the field can be observed. We find that the white-noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that are evident in the zodiacal light model. At large angular scales (≳100″) where excess power above the white noise is observed, we find no correlation of the power with the modeled intensity of the zodiacal light. This test clearly indicates that the large-scale power in the infrared background is not being caused by the zodiacal light.

  8. OAO-2 observations of the zodiacal light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillie, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Photometric measurements of the night sky brightness have been obtained at twelve wavelengths between 1000 A and 4300 A from above the earth's atmosphere. A preliminary analysis of the data reveals a component of the sky brightness with ecliptic symmetry and an intensity distribution similar to that of the zodiacal light. The ultraviolet spectrum of the zodiacal light can be closely approximated with a two component model in which one component has an albedo proportional to the wavelength lambda and the other component has a scattering efficiency proportional to lambda to lbe minus 19 power.

  9. The NGST and the Zodiacal Light in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorkavyi, Nick; Ozernoy, Leonid; Mather, John; Taidakova, Tanya

    1999-01-01

    We develop a physical model of the zodiacal cloud incorporating the real dust sources of asteroidal, cometary, and kuiperoidal origin. Using the inferred distribution of the zodiacal dust, we compute its thermal emission and scattering at several wavelengths (1.25, 5, and 20 micron) as a function of NGST location assumed to be at 1 AU or 3 AU. Areas on the sky with a minimum of zodiacal light are determined.

  10. Pioneer 10 observations of zodiacal light brightness near the ecliptic - Changes with heliocentric distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, M. S.; Weinberg, J. L.; Beeson, D. E.; Sparrow, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Sky maps made by the Pioneer 10 Imaging Photopolarimeter (IPP) at sun-spacecraft distances from 1 to 3 AU have been analyzed to derive the brightness of the zodiacal light near the ecliptic at elongations greater than 90 degrees. The change in zodiacal light brightness with heliocentric distance is compared with models of the spatial distribution of the dust. Use of background starlight brightnesses derived from IPP measurements beyond the asteroid belt, where the zodiacal light is not detected, and, especially, use of a corrected calibration lead to considerably lower values for zodiacal light than those reported by us previously.

  11. A Near-Infrared Spectrometer to Measure Zodiacal Light Absorption Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, A. S.; Arendt, R.; Dwek, E.; Kimble, R.; Moseley, S. H.; Rapchun, D.; Silverberg, R. F.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a high throughput infrared spectrometer for zodiacal light fraunhofer lines measurements. The instrument is based on a cryogenic dual silicon Fabry-Perot etalon which is designed to achieve high signal to noise Fraunhofer line profile measurements. Very large aperture silicon Fabry-Perot etalons and fast camera optics make these measurements possible. The results of the absorption line profile measurements will provide a model free measure of the zodiacal Light intensity in the near infrared. The knowledge of the zodiacal light brightness is crucial for accurate subtraction of zodiacal light foreground for accurate measure of the extragalactic background light after the subtraction of zodiacal light foreground. We present the final design of the instrument and the first results of its performance.

  12. Rutgers zodiacal light experiment on OSO-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, B.

    1975-01-01

    A detector was placed in a slowly spinning wheel on OSO-6 whose axis was perpendicular to the line drawn to the sun, to measure the surface brightness and polarization at all elongations from the immediate neighborhood of the sun to the anti-solar point. Different wavelength settings and polarizations were calculated from the known order of magnitude brightness of the zodiacal light. The measuring sequence was arranged to give longer integration times for the regions of lower surface brightness. Three types of analysis to which the data on OSO-6 were subjected are outlined; (1) photometry, (2) colorimetry and (3) polarimetry.

  13. Experiment S001: Zodiacal Light Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ney, E. P.; Huch, W. F.

    1971-01-01

    Observations made during the Gemini 5, 9, and 10 missions in the context of their relation to ground-based and balloon-based experiments on dim-light phenomena are reported. Zodiacal light is the visible manifestation of dust grains in orbit around the sun. The negatives that were exposed on the Gemini 9 mission were studied by the use of an isodensitracer to produce intensity isophotes. Data on the following factors were obtained: (1) intensity distribution of the zodiacal light, both morning and evening; (2) the height and intensity of the airglow at various geographic positions; and (3) intensity distribution of the Milky Way in the region of the sky near Cygnus. Also, a previously unreported phenomenon was discovered. This phenomenon appeared as an upward extension of the normal 90-kilometer airglow layer. The extension was in the form of wisps or plumes approximately 5 deg wide and extending upward approximately 5 deg. The results obtained from pictures exposed on the Gemini 10 mission were of qualitative or geometrical value only.

  14. Zodiacal light as an indicator of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, J. L.; Sparrow, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The most striking feature of the night sky in the tropics is the zodiacal light, which appears as a cone in the west after sunset and in the east before sunrise. It is caused by sunlight scattered or absorbed by particles in the interplanetary medium. The zodiacal light is the only source of information about the integrated properties of the whole ensemble of interplanetary dust. The brightness and polarization in different directions and at different colors can provide information on the optical properties and spatial distribution of the scattering particles. The zodiacal light arises from two independent physical processes related to the scattering of solar continuum radiation by interplanetary dust and to thermal emission which arises from solar radiation that is absorbed by interplanetary dust and reemitted mainly at infrared wavelengths. Attention is given to observational parameters of zodiacal light, the methods of observation, errors and absolute calibration, and the observed characteristics of zodiacal light.

  15. Research studies using OSO-6 zodiacal light experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The results of research studies on the OSO-6 zodiacal light experiment, conducted during the period from May 1976 to October 1977 are described. A discussion is included of the instrument performance and the empirical calibrations developed. Main areas of the research performed, i.e., (1) zodiacal light variation analysis; (2) integrated starlight and diffuse galactic light; and (3) earth/moon libration region counterglow, are covered. Considerable data processing was performed during these studies and it is summarized. Recommendations for future research to complete the interim results are given.

  16. Ten-color Gegenschein-zodiacal light photometer. [onboard Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.; Weinberg, J. L.; Hahn, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A ten-color Fabry photometer was used during Skylab missions SL-2 and SL-3 to measure sky brightness and polarization associated with zodiacal light, background starlight, F region airglow, and spacecraft corona. A brief description is given of the design, calibration, and performance of the instrument.

  17. Polarization of the zodiacal light - First results from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.; Weinberg, J. L.; Hahn, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief description is given of the Skylab ten color photoelectric photometer and the programs of measurements made during Skylab missions SL-2 and SL-3. Results obtained on the polarized brightness of zodiacal light at five points on the antisolar hemisphere are discussed and compared with other published data for the north celestial pole, south ecliptic pole, at elongation 90 degrees on the ecliptic, and at two places near the north galactic pole.

  18. Observations of the zodiacal light from the ecliptic to the poles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.; Ney, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    The brightness and polarization of the zodiacal light have been measured from the satellite OSO-5, using two photometers of effective wavelengths 4180 and 6820 A. The satellite configuration restricts the observations to ecliptic longitudes close to 90 deg, but measurements have been made from the ecliptic to the poles. On the ecliptic, the intensity of the zodiacal light was found to be 117 S10 (blue) and 315 S10 (red) with polarizations of 16.5 and 15 per cent, respectively. At the ecliptic poles the zodiacal intensity was 35 S10 (blue) with 20 per cent polarization. No temporal changes in zodiacal light have been found nor any significant differences in the intensities in the two hemispheres. The direction of polarization of the zodiacal light has been shown to be H-pass radial.

  19. Galactic and zodiacal light surface brightness measurements with the Atmosphere Explorer satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, V. J.; Hays, P. B.; Yee, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Galactic and zodiacal light surface maps based on the Atmosphere Explorer-C, -D, and -E satellite data are presented at 7320, 6300, 5577, 5200, and 4278 A. A procedure used to generate these maps, which involves separation of the individual stars and diffuse starlight from the zodiacal light, is described in detail. The maps can be used in atmospheric emission studies to correct for galactic emissions which contaminate satellite as well as ground-based photometric observations. The zodiacal light maps show enhanced features which are important for understanding the nature of interplanetary dust.

  20. Zodiacal light and the asteroid belt - The view from Pioneer 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, M. S.; Weinberg, J. L.; Deshields, L. M., II; Green, B. A.; Toller, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Brightnesses measured by the Pioneer 10 imaging photopolarimeter in two regions of sky were compared on sky maps at sun-spacecraft distances from 2.4 to 4.8 AU to determine the spatial extent of the zodiacal light. Data in the ecliptic at elongations greater than 90 deg show negligible contribution to the zodiacal light beyond 3.3 AU, the 2:1 Jupiter resonance. The zodiacal light brightness at 2.4 AU is less than 10% of that observed at 1 AU.

  1. Is the zodiacal light intensity steady. [cloud surface brightness and polarization from OSO-5 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, G. B.; Sparrow, J. G.; Ney, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that conclusions reported by Sparrow and Ney (1972, 1973) could be confirmed in an investigation involving the refinement of OSO-5 data on zodiacal light. It had been found by Sparrow and Ney that the absolute value of both the surface brightness and polarization of the zodiacal cloud varied by less than 10% over the 4-yr period from January 1969 to January 1973.

  2. Clementine Observations of the Zodiacal Light and the Dust Content of the Inner Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Joseph M.; Zook, Herbert A.; Cooper, Bonnie; Sunkara, Bhaskar

    2002-01-01

    Using the Moon to occult the Sun, the Clementine spacecraft used its navigation cameras to map the inner zodiacal light at optical wavelengths over elongations of 3 approx. less than epsilon approx. less than 30 deg from the Sun. This surface brightness map is then used to infer the spatial distribution of interplanetary dust over heliocentric distances of about 10 solar radii to the orbit of Venus. The averaged ecliptic surface brightness of the zodiacal light falls off as Z(epsilon) is a member of epsilon(sup -2.45 +/- 0.05), which suggests that the dust cross-sectional density nominally falls off as sigma(r) is a member of r(sup - 1.45 +/- 0.05). The interplanetary dust also has an albedo of alpha approx. = 0.1 that is uncertain by a factor of approx. 2. Asymmetries of approx. 10% are seen in directions east-west and north-south of the Sun, and these may be due the giant planets' secular gravitational perturbations. We apply a simple model that attributes the zodiacal light as due to three dust populations having distinct inclination distributions, namely, dust from asteroids and Jupiter-family comets (JFCs) having characteristic inclinations of i approx. 7 deg, dust from Halley-type comets having i approx. 33 deg, and an isotropic cloud of dust from Oort Cloud comets. The best-fitting scenario indicates that asteroids + JFCs are the source of about 45% of the optical dust cross section seen in the ecliptic at 1 AU but that at least 89% of the dust cross section enclosed by a 1-AU-radius sphere is of a cometary origin. Each population's radial density variations can also deviate somewhat from the nominal sigma(r) is a member of r(sup -1.45). When these results are extrapolated out to the asteroid belt, we find an upper limit on the mass of the light-reflecting asteroidal dust that is equivalent to a 12-km asteroid, and a similar extrapolation of the isotropic dust cloud out to Oort Cloud distances yields a mass equivalent to a 30-km comet, although the latter

  3. Skylab experiment SO73: Gegenschein/zodiacal light. [electrophotometry of surface brightness and polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    A 10 color photoelectric polarimeter was used to measure the surface brightness and polarization associated with zodiacal light, background starlight, and spacecraft corona during each of the Skylab missions. Fixed position and sky scanning observations were obtained during Skylab missions SL-2 and SL-3 at 10 wavelenghts between 4000A and 8200A. Initial results from the fixed-position data are presented on the spacecraft corona and on the polarized brightness of the zodiacal light. Included among the fixed position regions that were observed are the north celestial pole, south ecliptic pole, two regions near the north galactic pole, and 90 deg from the sun in the ecliptic. The polarized brightness of the zodiacal light was found to have the color of the sun at each of these positions. Because previous observations found the total brightness to have the color of the sun from the near ultraviolet out to 2.4 micrometers, the degree of polarization of the zodiacal light is independent of wavelength from 4000A to 8200A.

  4. Signatures of planets: Observations and modeling of structure in the zodiacal cloud and Kuiper disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Elizabeth Katherine

    2002-12-01

    There is a possible connection between structure in evolved circumstellar disks and the presence of planets, our own zodiacal cloud being a proven example. Asymmetries in such a disk could be diagnostic of planets which would be otherwise undetectable. Using COBE DIRBE observations, we link structure in the zodiacal cloud, namely the warp and offset of the cloud, to the presence of planets using secular perturbation theory. In addition, we obtain supplementary ISO observations and determine a scale factor for the data which we apply to calibrate the data to the observed COBE brightness. A Kuiper dust disk will have a resonant structure, with two concentrations in brightness along the ecliptic longitude arising because 10 15% of the Kuiper belt objects are in the 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune. We run numerical integrations of particles originating from source bodies trapped in the 3:2 resonance and we determine what percentage of particles remain in the resonance for a variety of particle and source body sizes. The dynamical evolution of the particles is followed from source to sink with Poynting- Robertson light drag, solar wind drag, radiation pressure, the Lorentz force, neutral interstellar gas drag, and the effects of planetary gravitational perturbations included. We then conduct an observational search in the 60 μm COBE data for the Kuiper disk, which is predicted to be, at most, a few percent of the brightness of the zodiacal cloud. By removing emission due to the background zodiacal cloud and the dust bands, we expect to see the trailing/leading signature of Earth's resonant ring. However, when subtracted from the data, we find that none of the empirical background zodiacal cloud models give the residuals predicted by theory. We conclude that a dynamical two-component (both inner and outer) zodiacal cloud model must be created to complete the search. Lastly, we extend our work outside the solar system and obtain upper limits on the flux around ten

  5. A Global, Multi-Waveband Model for the Zodiacal Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grogan, Keith; Dermott, Stanley F.; Kehoe, Thomas J. J.

    2003-01-01

    This recently completed three-year project was undertaken by the PI at the University of Florida, NASA Goddard and JPL, and by the Co-I and Collaborator at the University of Florida. The funding was used to support a continuation of research conducted at the University of Florida over the last decade which focuses on the dynamics of dust particles in the interplanetary environment. The main objectives of this proposal were: To produce improved dynamical models of the zodiacal cloud by performing numerical simulations of the orbital evolution of asteroidal and cometary dust particles. To provide visualizations of the results using our visualization software package, SIMUL, simulating the viewing geometries of IRAS and COBE and comparing the model results with archived data. To use the results to provide a more accurate model of the brightness distribution of the zodiacal cloud than existing empirical models. In addition, our dynamical approach can provide insight into fundamental properties of the cloud, including but not limited to the total mass and surface area of dust, the size-frequency distribution of dust, and the relative contributions of asteroidal and cometary material. The model can also be used to provide constraints on trace signals from other sources, such as dust associated with the "Plutinos" , objects captured in the 2:3 resonance with Neptune.

  6. A CMB foreground study in WMAP data: Extragalactic point sources and zodiacal light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It serves as a primary tool to understand the global properties, content and evolution of the universe. Since 2001, NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite has been napping the full sky anisotropy with unprecedented accuracy, precision and reliability. The CMB angular power spectrum calculated from the WMAP full sky maps not only enables accurate testing of cosmological models, but also places significant constraints on model parameters. The CMB signal in the WMAP sky maps is contaminated by microwave emission from the Milky Way and from extragalactic sources. Therefore, in order to use the maps reliably for cosmological studies, the foreground signals must be well understood and removed from the maps. This thesis focuses on the separation of two foreground contaminants from the WMAP maps: extragalactic point sources and zodiacal light emission. Extragalactic point sources constitute the most important foreground on small angular scales. Various methods have been applied to the WMAP single frequency maps to extract sources. However, due to the limited angular resolution of WMAP, it is possible to confuse positive CMB excursions with point sources or miss sources that are embedded in negative CMB fluctuations. We present a novel CMB-free source finding technique that utilizes the spectrum difference of point sources and CMB to form internal linear combinations of multifrequency maps to suppress the CMB and better reveal sources. When applied to the WMAP 41, 64 and 94 GHz maps, this technique has not only enabled detection of sources that are previously cataloged by independent methods, but also allowed disclosure of new sources. Without the noise contribution from the CMB, this method responds rapidly with the integration time. The number of detections varies as 0( t 0.72 in the two-band search and 0( t 0.70 in the three-band search from one year to five years

  7. Dynamical Model for the Zodiacal Cloud and Sporadic Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesvorny, David; Janches, Diego; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pokorny, Petr; Bottke, William F.; Jenniskens, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The solar system is dusty, and would become dustier over time as asteroids collide and comets disintegrate, except that small debris particles in interplanetary space do not last long. They can be ejected from the solar system by Jupiter, thermally destroyed near the Sun, or physically disrupted by collisions. Also, some are swept by the Earth (and other planets), producing meteors. Here we develop a dynamical model for the solar system meteoroids and use it to explain meteor radar observations. We find that the Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) are the main source of the prominent concentrations of meteors arriving to the Earth from the helion and antihelion directions. To match the radiant and orbit distributions, as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR), our model implies that comets, and JFCs in particular, must frequently disintegrate when reaching orbits with low perihelion distance. Also, the collisional lifetimes of millimeter particles may be longer (approx. > 10(exp 5) yr at 1 AU) than postulated in the standard collisional models (approx 10(exp 4) yr at 1 AU), perhaps because these chondrule-sized meteoroids are stronger than thought before. Using observations of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) to calibrate the model, we find that the total cross section and mass of small meteoroids in the inner solar system are (1.7-3.5) 10(exp 11) sq km and approx. 4 10(exp 19) g, respectively, in a good agreement with previous studies. The mass input required to keep the Zodiacal Cloud (ZC) in a steady state is estimated to be approx. 10(exp 4)-10(exp 5) kg/s. The input is up to approx 10 times larger than found previously, mainly because particles released closer to the Sun have shorter collisional lifetimes, and need to be supplied at a faster rate. The total mass accreted by the Earth in particles between diameters D = 5 micron and 1 cm is found to be approx 15,000 tons/yr (factor of 2 uncertainty), which is

  8. Dynamical Model for the Zodiacal Cloud and Sporadic Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Janches, Diego; Vokrouhlický, David; Pokorný, Petr; Bottke, William F.; Jenniskens, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The solar system is dusty, and would become dustier over time as asteroids collide and comets disintegrate, except that small debris particles in interplanetary space do not last long. They can be ejected from the solar system by Jupiter, thermally destroyed near the Sun, or physically disrupted by collisions. Also, some are swept by the Earth (and other planets), producing meteors. Here we develop a dynamical model for the solar system meteoroids and use it to explain meteor radar observations. We find that the Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) are the main source of the prominent concentrations of meteors arriving at the Earth from the helion and antihelion directions. To match the radiant and orbit distributions, as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR), our model implies that comets, and JFCs in particular, must frequently disintegrate when reaching orbits with low perihelion distance. Also, the collisional lifetimes of millimeter particles may be longer (gsim 105 yr at 1 AU) than postulated in the standard collisional models (~104 yr at 1 AU), perhaps because these chondrule-sized meteoroids are stronger than thought before. Using observations of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite to calibrate the model, we find that the total cross section and mass of small meteoroids in the inner solar system are (1.7-3.5) × 1011 km2 and ~4 × 1019 g, respectively, in a good agreement with previous studies. The mass input required to keep the zodiacal cloud in a steady state is estimated to be ~104-105 kg s-1. The input is up to ~10 times larger than found previously, mainly because particles released closer to the Sun have shorter collisional lifetimes and need to be supplied at a faster rate. The total mass accreted by the Earth in particles between diameters D = 5 μm and 1 cm is found to be ~15,000 tons yr-1 (factor of two uncertainty), which is a large share of the accretion flux measured by the Long Term Duration

  9. Optimization of high-inclination orbits using planetary flybys for a zodiacal light-imaging mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Gabriel; Lloyd, James; Savransky, Dmitry; Grogan, Keith; Sinha, Amlan

    2017-09-01

    The zodiacal light caused by interplanetary dust grains is the second-most luminous source in the solar system. The dust grains coalesce into structures reminiscent of early solar system formation; their composition has been predicted through simulations and some edge-on observations but better data is required to validate them. Scattered light from these dust grains presents challenges to exoplanet imaging missions: resolution of their stellar environment is hindered by exozodiacal emissions and therefore sets the size and scope of these imaging missions. Understanding the composition of this interplanetary dust in our solar system requires an imaging mission from a vantage point above the ecliptic plane. The high surface brightness of the zodiacal light requires only a small aperture with moderate sensitivity; therefore a 3cm camera is enough to meet the science goals of the mission at an orbital height of 0.1AU above the ecliptic. A 6U CubeSat is the target mass for this mission which will be a secondary payload detaching from an existing interplanetary mission. Planetary flybys are utilized to produce most of the plane change Δv deep space corrective maneuvers are implemented to optimize each planetary flyby. We developed an algorithm which determines the minimum Δv required to place the CubeSat on a transfer orbit to a planet's sphere of influence and maximizes the resultant orbital height with respect to the ecliptic plane. The satellite could reach an orbital height of 0.22 AU with an Earth gravity assist in late 2024 by boarding the Europa Clipper mission.

  10. The S sub 10 /V/ unit of surface brightness. [for zodiacal light measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.; Weinberg, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Some discrepancies in the use of the unit of zodiacal light measurements - S sub 10 (V), which is the equivalent number of tenth magnitude stars of solar spectral type per square degree - are discussed. It is suggested that: (1) the S sub 10 (V) unit be understood to represent 10th magnitude solar (G2V) stars per square degree at mean solar distance, (2) the V refers to the visual color in the UBV system defined by Johnson and Morgan (1953), (3) the apparent solar visual magnitude be taken as -26.73 and the B-V index as .63, (4) the solar spectral irradiance values of Labs and Neckel (1970) be used, and (5) when using Vega as a standard to obtain brightnesses in S sub 10 (V), +.04 be used as its magnitude at all wavelengths and the irradiance values of Hayes and Latham (1975) be used.

  11. DYNAMICAL MODEL FOR THE ZODIACAL CLOUD AND SPORADIC METEORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pokorny, Petr

    2011-12-20

    The solar system is dusty, and would become dustier over time as asteroids collide and comets disintegrate, except that small debris particles in interplanetary space do not last long. They can be ejected from the solar system by Jupiter, thermally destroyed near the Sun, or physically disrupted by collisions. Also, some are swept by the Earth (and other planets), producing meteors. Here we develop a dynamical model for the solar system meteoroids and use it to explain meteor radar observations. We find that the Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) are the main source of the prominent concentrations of meteors arriving atmore » the Earth from the helion and antihelion directions. To match the radiant and orbit distributions, as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR), our model implies that comets, and JFCs in particular, must frequently disintegrate when reaching orbits with low perihelion distance. Also, the collisional lifetimes of millimeter particles may be longer ({approx}> 10{sup 5} yr at 1 AU) than postulated in the standard collisional models ({approx}10{sup 4} yr at 1 AU), perhaps because these chondrule-sized meteoroids are stronger than thought before. Using observations of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite to calibrate the model, we find that the total cross section and mass of small meteoroids in the inner solar system are (1.7-3.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} km{sup 2} and {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} g, respectively, in a good agreement with previous studies. The mass input required to keep the zodiacal cloud in a steady state is estimated to be {approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} kg s{sup -1}. The input is up to {approx}10 times larger than found previously, mainly because particles released closer to the Sun have shorter collisional lifetimes and need to be supplied at a faster rate. The total mass accreted by the Earth in particles between diameters D = 5 {mu}m and 1 cm is found to be {approx

  12. Modeling the effects of an offset of the center of symmetry in the zodiacal cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, E. K.; Dermott, S. F.; Xu, Y. L.; Wyatt, M.; Jayaraman, S.

    1998-04-01

    There is a possible connection between structure in circumstellar dust clouds and the presence of planets, our own zodiacal cloud being the prime example. Asymmetries in such clouds could be diagnostic of planets which would be otherwise undetectable. One such feature is an offset of the center of symmetry of the disk with respect to the central star. The offset is caused by the forced eccentricities (ef) of particles in the cloud. The orbit of a particle can be described by a set of five orbital elements: the semi-major axis (a), eccentricity (e), inclination (I), longitude of ascending node (Omega) and the argument of pericenter (omega). In low order secular perturbation theory, osculating elements of small bodies are decomposed into proper and forced elements. The proper elements are dependent on initial conditions while the forced elements are imposed on the particle's orbit by the gravitational perturbations of the planets. This decomposition is still applicable in the presence of drag forces. We compare COBE observations of the variation in average polar brightness of the background cloud, (N + S)/2, with ecliptic longitude of Earth with those of a model cloud made of asteroidal particles which populate the inner solar system according to a 1/rgamma where (gamma) = 1 (Poynting Robertson light drag) distribution. The variation with ecliptic longitude of Earth in mean polar brightness is shown in for the 25 micron waveband. Sine curves are fit to both the COBE observations and the model. The variation in (N+S)/2 with ecliptic longitude of Earth can be represented as a superposition of two sine curves: one for the variation in (N + S)/2 due to the Earth's eccentric orbit and the other for the variation in (N + S)/2 due to the forced eccentricities of particles in the cloud. If the cloud were symmetric about the Sun (i.e., if there were no offset), the maximum and minimum brightnesses of the cloud would occur at perihelion and aphelion, respectively. Looking at

  13. Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix T: Experiment T027/S073 contamination measurement, photometer and Gegenschein/zodiacal light (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A series of analyses for Experiment T027/S073, contamination measurement, photometer and gegenschein/zodiacal light (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and post-flight conditons is presented. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are presented in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

  14. The Origin of the Excess Near-Infrared Diffuse Sky Brightness: Population III Stars or Zodiacal Light?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2006-01-01

    The intensity of the diffuse 1 to 5 micron sky emission from which solar system and Galactic foregrounds have been subtracted is in excess of that expected from energy released by galaxies and stars that formed during the z < 5 redshift interval. The spectral signature of this excess near-infrared background light (NIRBL) component is almost identical to that of reflected sunlight from the interplanetary dust cloud, and could therefore be the result of the incomplete subtraction of this foreground emission component from the diffuse sky maps. Alternatively, this emission component could be extragalactic. Its spectral signature is consistent with that of redshifted continuum and recombination line emission from H-II regions formed by the first generation of very massive stars. In this talk I will present the implications of this excess emission for our understanding of the zodiacal dust cloud, the formation rate of Pop III stars, and the TeV gamma-ray opacity to nearby blazars.

  15. The Zodiacal Cloud Model applied to the Martian atmosphere. Diurnal variations in meteoric ion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Withers, P.; Fallows, K.; Nesvorny, D.; Pokorný, P.

    2016-12-01

    Sporadic metal layers have been detected in the Martian atmosphere by radio occultation measurements using the Mars Express Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. More recently, metallic ion layers produced by the meteor storm event following the close encounter between Comet Siding Spring (C/2013 A1) and Mars were identified by the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) and the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. Work is now in progress to detect the background metal layers produced by the influx of sporadic meteors. In this study we predict the likely appearance of these layers. The Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model for particle populations released by asteroids (AST), and dust grains from Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) and Halley-Type Comets (HTCs) has been combined with a Monte Carlo sampling method and the Chemical ABlation MODel (CABMOD) to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca and Al above 40 km altitude in the Martian atmosphere. CABMOD considers the standard treatment of meteor physics, including the balance of frictional heating by radiative losses and the absorption of heat energy through temperature increases, melting phase transitions and vaporization, as well as sputtering by inelastic collisions with the air molecules. The vertical injection profiles are input into the Leeds 1-D Mars atmospheric model which includes photo-ionization, and gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral chemistry, in order to explore the evolution of the resulting metallic ions and atoms. We conclude that the dominant contributor in the Martian's atmosphere is the JFCs over other sources. Finally, we explore the changes of the neutral and ionized Na, Mg and Fe layers over a diurnal cycle.

  16. Innovative Techniques to Model, Analyze and Monitor Space Effects on Air Force Space-Based Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-20

    of Comets in the Heliosphere as Observed by SMEI 4 2.8. Zodiacal Light Observations and Modeling 5 2.9. Space Weather Forecasting Lab (SWFL...This research resulted in two publications and a presentation at the 2007 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. 2.8. Zodiacal Light Observations...and Modeling One of the backgrounds removed from SMEI imagery is the scattered zodiacal light from solar system dust. The zodiacal light has

  17. Sources of zodiacal dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2007-08-01

    The orbital evolution of dust particles produced by asteroids, comets, and trans- Neptunian objects was integrated [1-3]. Analysis of results of these integrations testify in favor of a considerable fraction of particles produced by comets among overall zodiacal dust particles, but it does not contradict to >30% of asteroidal dust needed for explanation of formation of dust bands. Fractions of asteroidal particles, particles originating beyond Jupiter's orbit (including trans-Neptunian particles), and cometary particles originating inside of Jupiter's orbit are estimated to be about 1/3 each, with a possible deviation from 1/3 up to 0.1-0.2. Comparison of the plots of the number density vs. the distance R from the Sun obtained for particles produced by different small bodies with the plots based on observations shows that asteroidal and trans- Neptunian particles alone can not explain the observed almost constant number density at R ∼3-18 AU and a lot of particles must be produced by comets at R ∼5-10 AU [2-3]. Comparison of the WHAM (Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper spectrometer) observations of spectra of zodiacal light with our models showed [4-5] that a significant fraction of particles produced by short-period comets is required to fit the observations of the width and velocity of the Mg I line. Comparison of the observations of the number density inside Jupiter's orbit with the number density of particles produced by different small bodies leads to the same conclusion about a considerable fraction of cometary particles. This comparison does not make limitations on cometary particles produced beyond Jupiter's orbit, but it shows that the fraction of particles produced by Encke-type comets (with eccentricities ∼0.8-0.9) does not exceed 0.15 of the overall population. The estimated fraction of particles produced by long-period and Halley-type comets among zodiacal dust also does not exceed 0.1-0.15. Though trans-Neptunian particles fit different observations of

  18. Zodiac II: Debris Disk Imaging Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub Wesley; Bryden, Geoff; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Chen, Pin; Trauger, John

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac II is a proposed coronagraph on a balloon-borne platform, for the purpose of observing debris disks around nearby stars. Zodiac II will have a 1.2-m diameter telescope mounted in a balloon-borne gondola capable of arcsecond quality pointing, and with the capability to make long-duration (several week) flights. Zodiac II will have a coronagraph able to make images of debris disks, meaning that its scattered light speckles will be at or below an average contrast level of about 10(exp -7) in three narrow (7 percent) bands centered on the V band, and one broad (20%) one at I band. We will discuss the potential science to be done with Zodiac II.

  19. A Chinese Zodiac Mathematical Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, John F., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Helps students identify the animal that corresponds to the year of their birth according to the Chinese zodiac. Defines the structure of the Chinese zodiac so that the subsets of compatibles and opposites form closed substructures with interesting mathematical properties. (ASK)

  20. Inferring Sources in the Interplanetary Dust Cloud, from Observations and Simulations of Zodiacal Light and Thermal Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.

    2011-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles physical properties may be approached through observations of the solar light they scatter, specially its polarization, and of their thermal emission. Results, at least near the ecliptic plane, on polarization phase curves and on the heliocentric dependence of the local spatial density, albedo, polarization and temperature are summarized. As far as interpretations through simulations are concerned, a very good fit of the polarization phase curve near 1.5 AU is obtained for a mixture of silicates and more absorbing organics material, with a significant amount of fluffy aggregates. In the 1.5-0.5 AU solar distance range, the temperature variation suggests the presence of a large amount of absorbing organic compounds, while the decrease of the polarization with decreasing solar distance is indeed compatible with a decrease of the organics towards the Sun. Such results are in favor of the predominance of dust of cometary origin in the interplanetary dust cloud, at least below 1.5 AU. The implication of these results on the delivery of complex organic molecules on Earth during the LHB epoch, when the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was orders of magnitude greater than today, is discussed.

  1. Polarization of the diffuse galactic light.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.; Ney, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    Polarization measurements made from the satellite OSO-5 show that the polarized intensity in the direction of the Scutum arm of the Galaxy is different in intensity and direction of the polarization from that observed due to the zodiacal light. The observations are consistent with polarized diffuse galactic light superposed on the zodiacal light. The results are interpreted in terms of a model in which the galactic starlight is scattered by interstellar dust.

  2. A study of extended zodiacal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Mark V.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of cometary dust trails and zodiacal dust bands, discovered by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) were analyzed in a continuing effort to understand their nature and relationship to comets, asteroids, and processes effecting those bodies. A survey of all trails observed by IRAS has been completed, and analysis of this phenomenon continues. A total of 8 trails have been associated with known short-period comets (Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Encke, Gunn, Kopff, Pons-Winnecke, Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, Tempel 1, and Tempel 2), and a few faint trails have been detected which are not associated with any known comet. It is inferred that all short-period comets may have trails, and that the trails detected were seen as a consequence of observational selection effects. Were IRAS launched today, it would likely observe a largely different set of trails. The Tempel 2 trail exhibits a small but significant excess in color temperature relative to a blackbody at the same heliocentric distance. This excess may be due to the presence of a population of small, low-beta particles deriving from large particles within the trail, or a temperature gradient over the surface of large trail particles. Trails represent the very first stage in the formation and evolution of a meteor stream, and may also be the primary mechanism by which comets contribute to the interplanetary dust complex. A mathematical model of the spatial distribution of orbitally evolved collisional debris was developed which reproduces the zodiacal dust band phenomena and was used in the analysis of dust band observations made by IRAS. This has resulted in the principal zodiacal dust bands being firmly related to the principal Hirayama asteroid families. In addition, evidence for the collisional diffusion of the orbital elements of the dust particles has been found in the case of dust generated in the Eos asteroid family.

  3. The exo-zodiacal disk mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Larry; Bely, P.; Burg, R.; Wade, L.; Beichman, C.; Gay, J.; Baudoz, P.; Rabbia, Y.; Perrin, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Zodiacal dust around neighboring stars could obscure the signal of terrestrial planets observed with the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) if that dust is similar to that in the Solar System. Unfortunately, little is known about the presence, or frequency of occurrence of zodiacal dust around stars and so the relevance of zodiacal dust to the design of the TPF, or to the TPF mission, is unknown. It is likely that direct observation of zodiacal dust disks will be necessary to confidently determine the characteristics of individual systems. A survey of a large number of stars in the solar neighborhood that could be candidates for observation with TPF should be undertaken. We present a concept for a space mission to undertake a sensitive, large-scale survey capable of characterizing solar-system-like zodiacal dust around 400 stars within 20 pc of the Sun.

  4. The Dynamic Community of Interest and Its Realization in ZODIAC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    the ZODIAC project. ZODIAC is a network architecture that puts security first and foremost, with security broken down into confidentiality, integrity...hosts, a unified solution for MANETs will work for hosts or routers as well. DYNAMIC COMMUNITIES OF INTEREST The basis of the ZODIAC design is a new dis...narrow scope of each DCoI limits attack propagation, and supports confidentiality ABSTRACT The ZODIAC project has been exploring a security first

  5. The Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time (ZEIT) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Gaidos, Eric; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rizzuto, Aaron C.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Mace, Gregory N.; Kraus, Adam L.

    2017-01-01

    Planets and their host stars evolve with time, and the first few hundred million years are thought to be the most formative. However, the majority of known exoplanets orbit stars older than the timescales of interest (>1 Gyr). We have launched the Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time (ZEIT) survey with the goal of identifying and characterizing young (<1 Gyr) transiting planets. To this end, we have utilized high-precision photometry of nearby young clusters and stellar associations taken as part of the K2 mission. Thus far we have discovered transiting planets in the Hyades and Praesepe clusters (˜800 Myr), and the Upper Scorpius OB association (˜11 Myr), but interestingly none in the Pleiades (˜125 Myr). These discoveries can be used to set limits on the migration timescale, estimate atmosphere loss around young planets, and provide independent tests of pre-main sequence stellar models. Here I overview some key science results from our survey and briefly discuss our plans to identify more young planetary systems.

  6. Zodiacal emission. III - Dust near the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reach, William T.

    1992-01-01

    Properties of the zodiacal dust bands are derived from fits to Infrared Astronomical Satellite profiles of the ecliptic. Three observations lead to the conclusion that the dust-band material is spread over a range of heliocentric distances between the asteroid belt and the sun: parallax, color temperature, and wavelength dependence of the band latitudes. The orientations of the midplanes of the bands are found to be typical of asteroids. A model of 'migrating bands', wherein dust is produced near the asteroid belt and spirals into the sun under the influence of Poynting-Robertson drag, is used to explain the range of heliocentric distances of dust-band material.

  7. [Signs of the zodiac and personality].

    PubMed

    Angst, J; Scheidegger, P

    1976-01-01

    3074 young men resident in the canton of Zurich, representing 50% of the 19 year old male population, form the fully representative sample of our large scale investigation. We investigated whether personality traits measured by means of the differentiated "Freiburger personality inventory" (FPI) could in any way be correlated to the signs of the zodiac under which the young men were born. The statistical analysis did not reveal any correlation between signs of the zodiac and personality. The claim made by astrologers that people can be characterized according to their sign of the zodiac (sagitarius, taurus, cancer, scorpion) must be refuted. Of course the astrologically founded description of human personality does not base itself on the position of the sun only, however the latter does form a very essential part of the astrological evaluation of people. This, at any rate has been shown to be without any scientific basis. The fact that astrological evaluation of human personality is so popular nowadays can be explained by the fact that even modern people are inclined towards magical thinking.

  8. 72. 451 MADISON AVENUE, GRAND STAIR, ZODIAC CLOCK WITH DECORATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. 451 MADISON AVENUE, GRAND STAIR, ZODIAC CLOCK WITH DECORATIVE CARVING BY STANFORD WHITE AND AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS - Villard Houses, 451-457 Madison Avenue & 24 East Fifty-first Street, New York County, NY

  9. The Primeval Zodiac: Its Social, Religious, and Mythological Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verderame, L.

    2009-08-01

    In this brief paper we try to draw the lines of the possible development of the originary iconographic and symbolic repertoire of the Mesopotamian zodiac, which through the Greeks was adopted in the Western world.

  10. Zodiac II: Debris Disk Science from a Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Bruno, Robin; Unwin, Stephen; Backovsky, Stan; Brugarolas, Paul; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Chen, Pin; Hillenbrand, Lynne; hide

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac II is a proposed balloon-borne science investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. Zodiac II will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of a statistically significant sample of disks. These measurements will enable us to probe these fundamental questions: what do debris disks tell us about the evolution of planetary systems; how are debris disks produced; how are debris disks shaped by planets; what materials are debris disks made of; how much dust do debris disks make sa they grind down; and how long do debris disks live? In addition, Zodiac II will observe hot, young exoplanets as targets of opportunity. The Zodiac II instrument is a 1.1-m diameter SiC telescope and an imaging coronagraph on a gondola carried by a stratospheric balloon. Its data product is a set of images of each targeted debris disk in four broad visible wavelength bands. Zodiac II will address its science questions by taking high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Mid-latitude flights are considered: overnight test flights within the United States followed by half-global flights in the Southern Hemisphere. These longer flights are required to fully explore the set of known debris disks accessible only to Zodiac II. On these targets, it will be 100 times more sensitive than the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS); no existing telescope can match the Zodiac II contrast and resolution performance. A second objective of Zodiac II is to use the near-space environment to raise the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of SiC mirrors, internal coronagraphs, deformable mirrors, and wavefront sensing and control, all potentially needed for a future space-based telescope for high-contrast exoplanet imaging.

  11. Zodiac II: Debris Disk Science from a Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Bruno, Robin; Unwin, Stephen; Backovsky, Stan; Brugarolas, Paul; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Chen, Pin; Hillenbrand, Lynne; hide

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac II is a proposed balloon-borne science investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. Zodiac II will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of a statistically significant sample of disks. These measurements will enable us to probe these fundamental questions: what do debris disks tell us about the evolution of planetary systems; how are debris disks produced; how are debris disks shaped by planets; what materials are debris disks made of; how much dust do debris disks make as they grind down; and how long do debris disks live? In addition, Zodiac II will observe hot, young exoplanets as targets of opportunity. The Zodiac II instrument is a 1.1-m diameter SiC (Silicone carbide) telescope and an imaging coronagraph on a gondola carried by a stratospheric balloon. Its data product is a set of images of each targeted debris disk in four broad visible-wavelength bands. Zodiac II will address its science questions by taking high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Mid-latitude flights are considered: overnight test flights in the US followed by half-global flights in the Southern Hemisphere. These longer flights are required to fully explore the set of known debris disks accessible only to Zodiac II. On these targets, it will be 100 times more sensitive than the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS); no existing telescope can match the Zodiac II contrast and resolution performance. A second objective of Zodiac II is to use the near-space environment to raise the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of SiC mirrors, internal coronagraphs, deformable mirrors, and wavefront sensing and control, all potentially needed for a future space-based telescope for high-contrast exoplanet imaging.

  12. Teeth and numerology from zodiac signs. A correlative study.

    PubMed

    Kudva, S; Bhat, A P

    2000-01-01

    Comparative anatomical descriptions have been time and again mentioned in the literature. Based on these aspects, an attempt is made to correlate the morphological features of the human teeth, the zodiac sun signs and numerology. This unique study (first ever of its kind) is also done with a purpose as to whether a particular 'Zodiac Sunsign' or numerology can predict about an individual dental health, the same way the future predictions are being made. It was quite interesting to note that there are few definite attributable dental morphological traits and health to the specific sun signs and numerology.

  13. Sky Glow from Cities: The Army Illumination Model v2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    magnetic field and is negligible. Zodiacal light is sunlight scattered by interplanetary dust and contributes up to half the brightness of the ...Sky Glow from Cities: The Army Illumination Model v2 by Richard C. Shirkey ARL-TR-5719 September 2011...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES Disclaimers The

  14. The Chevroches zodiacal cap and its Burgundy relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devevey, Frédéric; Vernou, Christian; Rousseau, Aurélie

    2011-06-01

    The excavation of an unexplored secondary agglomeration in Chevroches (France), from 2001 to 2002 has led to the discovery of a bronze dome of a type unknown in the Ancient world. It is inscribed with three lines in Greek transcribing Egyptian and Roman months, and the twelve signs of the Zodiac. This paper presents the first observations and some other finds from similar objects in Burgundy.

  15. Prehistory of Zodiac Dating: Three Strata of Upper Paleolithic Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurshtein, Alex A.

    A pattern of archaic proto-constellations is extracted from Aratus' "The Phaenomena" didactic poem list according to a size criterion elaborated earlier, and their symbolism is analyzed. As a result of this approach three celestial symbolical strata are discovered to be probably a reflection of the symbols for the Lower, the Middle and the Upper Worlds; the Under-World creatures have a water character, the Middle World ones are mostly anthropomorphic and flying beings are for the Upper World. The strata excerpted from Aratus' sky seems to be in agreement with the well-known Babylonian division into three god pathways for Ea (Enki), Anu and Enlil. There is a possibility of dating the pattern discovered because of precession's strong influence as far back as 16 thousand years, the result being supported by the comparison of different star group mean sizes. The archaic constellation pattern under consideration is a reasonable background of symbolical meanings for the first Zodiacal generation quartet (7.5 thousand years old) examined by the author previously. The enormous size of the Argo constellation (Ship of Argo and his Argonauts) as well as the large sizes of other southern constellations are explained as due to the existence of an accumulation zone near the South celestial pole. Some extra correlations between the reconstruction proposed and cultural data available are discussed. The paper is the second part of the investigation "On the Origin of the Zodiacal constellations" published in Vistas in Astronomy, vol.36, pp.171-190, 1993.

  16. GreenLight Model 960.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Richard; Carey, Conn; Hynes, James; Papkovsky, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    The importance of food safety has resulted in a demand for a more rapid, high-throughput method for total viable count (TVC). The industry standard for TVC determination (ISO 4833:2003) is widely used but presents users with some drawbacks. The method is materials- and labor-intensive, requiring multiple agar plates per sample. More importantly, the method is slow, with 72 h typically required for a definitive result. Luxcel Biosciences has developed the GreenLight Model 960, a microtiter plate-based assay providing a rapid high-throughput method of aerobic bacterial load assessment through analysis of microbial oxygen consumption. Results are generated in 1-12 h, depending on microbial load. The mix and measure procedure allows rapid detection of microbial oxygen consumption and equates oxygen consumption to microbial load (CFU/g), providing a simple, sensitive means of assessing the microbial contamination levels in foods (1). As bacteria in the test sample grow and respire, they deplete O2, which is detected as an increase in the GreenLight probe signal above the baseline level (2). The time required to reach this increase in signal can be used to calculate the CFU/g of the original sample, based on a predetermined calibration. The higher the initial microbial load, the earlier this threshold is reached (1).

  17. Image and Processing Models for Satellite Detection in Images Acquired by Space-based Surveillance-of-Space Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    external sources ‘L1’ like zodiacal light (or diffuse nebula ) or stray light ‘L2’ and these components change with the telescope pointing. Bk (T,t...Astronomical scene background (zodiacal light, diffuse nebulae , etc.). L2(P A(tk), t): Image background component caused by stray light. MS

  18. Light reflection models for computer graphics.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, D P

    1989-04-14

    During the past 20 years, computer graphic techniques for simulating the reflection of light have progressed so that today images of photorealistic quality can be produced. Early algorithms considered direct lighting only, but global illumination phenomena with indirect lighting, surface interreflections, and shadows can now be modeled with ray tracing, radiosity, and Monte Carlo simulations. This article describes the historical development of computer graphic algorithms for light reflection and pictorially illustrates what will be commonly available in the near future.

  19. Extra-Zodiacal-Cloud Astronomy via Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Scott W.; Falck, Robert D.; Oleson, Steven R.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Thronson, Harley A.; Vaughn, Frank J.; Fixsen, Dale J.

    2011-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) is often considered as primary propulsion for robotic planetary missions, providing the opportunity to deliver more payload mass to difficult, high-delta-velocity destinations. However, SEP application to astrophysics has not been well studied. This research identifies and assesses a new application of SEP as primary propulsion for low-cost high-performance robotic astrophysics missions. The performance of an optical/infrared space observatory in Earth orbit or at the Sun-Earth L2 point (SEL2) is limited by background emission from the Zodiacal dust cloud that has a disk morphology along the ecliptic plane. By delivering an observatory to a inclined heliocentric orbit, most of this background emission can be avoided, resulting in a very substantial increase in science performance. This advantage enabled by SEP allows a small-aperture telescope to rival the performance of much larger telescopes located at SEL2. In this paper, we describe a novel mission architecture in which SEP technology is used to enable unprecedented telescope sensitivity performance per unit collecting area. This extra-zodiacal mission architecture will enable a new class of high-performance, short-development time, Explorer missions whose sensitivity and survey speed can rival flagship-class SEL2 facilities, thus providing new programmatic flexibility for NASA's astronomy mission portfolio. A mission concept study was conducted to evaluate this application of SEP. Trajectory analyses determined that a 700 kg-class science payload could be delivered in just over 2 years to a 2 AU mission orbit inclined 15 to the ecliptic using a 13 kW-class NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) SEP system. A mission architecture trade resulted in a SEP stage architecture, in which the science spacecraft separates from the stage after delivery to the mission orbit. The SEP stage and science spacecraft concepts were defined in collaborative engineering environment studies. The

  20. Voyages of the Zodiac, an Impenitent Traveller across Lands and Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    2015-05-01

    The zodiac is one of humankind's oldest astronomical heritages. Indeed, it has a long history and had an impressive cultural influence in the past that could be traced from the steppes of Mesopotamia to the wilderness of the Roman frontiers in Great Britain. In the present essay, we will discuss the origin of the zodiacal constellations in ancient Mesopotamia from their possible prehistoric ancestors in the pre-ceramic context of the 10,000-year-old site of Göbleki Tepe. Later on, we will discuss the role that the zodiac played in the development of the new cult established by King Antiochos I of Commagene in his hierothesion at Nemrud Dag, where a planetary conjunction in Leo has played a role in the clues to understand the enigmas of such an impressive monument. This will be followed by the analysis of its southwards travel to the Valley of the Nile, where we will study the famous Zodiac of Dendera. Then we will travel westwards to discuss the astronomical aspects of a new religion where astronomical eras and the zodiac ought to play a most relevant role, Mithraism. Finally, new ideas for future research in this most interesting topic will briefly be sketched.

  1. A model for plant lighting system selection.

    PubMed

    Ciolkosz, D E; Albright, L D; Sager, J C; Langhans, R W

    2002-01-01

    A decision model is presented that compares lighting systems for a plant growth scenario and chooses the most appropriate system from a given set of possible choices. The model utilizes a Multiple Attribute Utility Theory approach, and incorporates expert input and performance simulations to calculate a utility value for each lighting system being considered. The system with the highest utility is deemed the most appropriate system. The model was applied to a greenhouse scenario, and analyses were conducted to test the model's output for validity. Parameter variation indicates that the model performed as expected. Analysis of model output indicates that differences in utility among the candidate lighting systems were sufficiently large to give confidence that the model's order of selection was valid.

  2. An exponential filter model predicts lightness illusions

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, Astrid; Brooks, Kevin R.; Ghebreab, Sennay

    2015-01-01

    Lightness, or perceived reflectance of a surface, is influenced by surrounding context. This is demonstrated by the Simultaneous Contrast Illusion (SCI), where a gray patch is perceived lighter against a black background and vice versa. Conversely, assimilation is where the lightness of the target patch moves toward that of the bounding areas and can be demonstrated in White's effect. Blakeslee and McCourt (1999) introduced an oriented difference-of-Gaussian (ODOG) model that is able to account for both contrast and assimilation in a number of lightness illusions and that has been subsequently improved using localized normalization techniques. We introduce a model inspired by image statistics that is based on a family of exponential filters, with kernels spanning across multiple sizes and shapes. We include an optional second stage of normalization based on contrast gain control. Our model was tested on a well-known set of lightness illusions that have previously been used to evaluate ODOG and its variants, and model lightness values were compared with typical human data. We investigate whether predictive success depends on filters of a particular size or shape and whether pooling information across filters can improve performance. The best single filter correctly predicted the direction of lightness effects for 21 out of 27 illusions. Combining two filters together increased the best performance to 23, with asymptotic performance at 24 for an arbitrarily large combination of filter outputs. While normalization improved prediction magnitudes, it only slightly improved overall scores in direction predictions. The prediction performance of 24 out of 27 illusions equals that of the best performing ODOG variant, with greater parsimony. Our model shows that V1-style orientation-selectivity is not necessary to account for lightness illusions and that a low-level model based on image statistics is able to account for a wide range of both contrast and assimilation effects

  3. The influence of the Chinese zodiac on fertility in Hong Kong SAR.

    PubMed

    Yip, Paul S F; Lee, Joseph; Cheung, Y B

    2002-11-01

    The annual total of births in Hong Kong SAR fell substantially in the past 20 years; hence the total fertility rate (TFR) followed the downward trend and dropped to a low of 0.9 below replacement level in 2000. Despite the long-term downward trend, short-run increases in the annual total of births and the TFR were exhibited. Such temporary fertility increases are identified in the Dragon Years of 1988 and 2000. The phenomenon of fertility changes associated with zodiacal animal years is examined in this paper with a view to gaining some insight into whether Chinese cultural preferences and folklore beliefs might have influenced prospective parents' reproductive behaviour. The paper explains the underlying philosophy of the Chinese astrological tradition and discusses how zodiacal preferences affect fertility between 1976 and 2000. The paper also explores why zodiacal influences on Chinese fertility before 1976 did not exist. It is unquestionable that the Dragon Year preference exerts an influence on fertility of modern Chinese populations through zodiacal birth-timing motivations. Birth rate rise in the Dragon Year is due to changes in timing of births that will have little effect on cumulative fertility.

  4. Light Z' in heterotic string standardlike models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasopoulos, P.; Faraggi, A. E.; Mehta, V. M.

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC supports the hypothesis that the Standard Model provides an effective parametrization of all subatomic experimental data up to the Planck scale. String theory, which provides a viable perturbative approach to quantum gravity, requires for its consistency the existence of additional gauge symmetries beyond the Standard Model. The construction of heterotic string models with a viable light Z' is, however, highly constrained. We outline the construction of standardlike heterotic string models that allow for an additional Abelian gauge symmetry that may remain unbroken down to low scales. We present a string inspired model, consistent with the string constraints.

  5. Graph Coloring Used to Model Traffic Lights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John

    1992-01-01

    Two scheduling problems, one involving setting up an examination schedule and the other describing traffic light problems, are modeled as colorings of graphs consisting of a set of vertices and edges. The chromatic number, the least number of colors necessary for coloring a graph, is employed in the solutions. (MDH)

  6. Resolution of the discrepancy between Balmer alpha emission rates, the solar Lyman beta flux, and models of geocoronal hydrogen concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur, A.-C.; Meier, R. R.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New satellite Balmer alpha measurements and solar Lyman beta flux and line profile measurements, together with new measurements of the zodiacal light intensity used in correcting both ground and satellite Balmer alpha measurements for the effects of the Fraunhofer line in the zodiacal light, have been used in a reevaluation of the long-standing discrepancy between ground-based Balmer alpha emission rates and other geocoronal hydrogen parameters. The solar Lyman beta line center flux is found to be (4.1 plus or minus 1.3) billion photons per sq cm per sec per angstrom at S(10.7) equals 110 and, together with a current hydrogen model which has 92,000 atoms per cu cm at 650 km for T(inf) equals 950 K, gives good agreement between calculated Balmer alpha emission rates and the ground-based and satellite measurements.

  7. Mid-Infrared Spectrum of the Zodiacal Emission: Detection of Crystalline Silicates in Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ootsubo, T.; Onaka, T.; Yamamura, I.; Ishihara, D.; Tanabe, T.; Roellig, T. L.

    2003-01-01

    Within a few astronomical units of the Sun the solar system is filled with interplanetary dust, which is believed to be dust of cometary and asteroidal origin. Spectroscopic observations of the zodiacal emission with moderate resolution provide key information on the composition and size distribution of the dust in the interplanetary space. They can be compared directly to laboratory measurements of candidate materials, meteorites, and dust particles collected in the stratosphere. Recently mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of the zodiacal emission have been made by two instruments on board the Infrared Space Observatory; the camera (ISOCAM) and the spectrophotometer (ISOPHOT-S). A broad excess emission feature in the 9-11 micron range is reported in the ISOCAM spectrum, whereas the ISOPHOT-S spectra in 6-12 microns can be well fitted by a blackbody radiation without spectral features.

  8. World cup soccer players tend to be born with sun and moon in adjacent zodiacal signs

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, J

    2000-01-01

    The ecliptic elongation of the moon with respect to the sun does not show uniform distribution on the birth dates of the 704 soccer players selected for the 1998 World Cup. However, a uniform distribution is expected on astronomical grounds. The World Cup players show a very pronounced tendency (p = 0.00001) to be born on days when the sun and moon are in adjacent zodiacal signs. Key Words: soccer; World Cup; astrology; moon PMID:11131239

  9. The Zodiacal Emission Spectrum as Determined by COBE and its Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Dwek, Eli; Oliversen, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We combine observations from the DIRBE and FIRAS instruments on the COBE satellite to derive an annually-averaged spectrum of the zodiacal cloud in the 10 to 1000 micron wavelength region. The spectrum exhibits a break at approx. 150 microns which indicates a sharp break in the dust size distribution at a radius of about 30 microns The spectrum can be fit with a single blackbody with a lambda(exp -2) emissivity law beyond 150 microns and a temperature of 240 K. We also used a more realistic characterization of the cloud to fit the spectrum, including a distribution of dust temperatures, representing different dust compositions and distances from the sun, as well as a realistic representation of the spatial distribution of the dust. We show that amorphous carbon and silicate dust with respective temperatures of 280 and 274 K at 1 AU, and size distributions with a break at grain radii of 14 and 32 microns, can provide a good fit to the average zodiacal dust spectrum. The total mass of the zodiacal cloud is 2 to 11 Eg (Eg=10(exp 18) g), depending on the grain composition. The lifetime of the cloud, against particle loss by Poynting- Robertson drag and the effects of solar wind, is about 10(exp 5) yr. The required replenishment rate is approx. 10(exp 14) g/yr. If this is provided by asteroid belt alone, the asteroids lifetime would be approx. 3 x 10(exp 10) yr. But comets and Kuiper belt objects may also contribute to the zodiacal cloud.

  10. BLAM (Benthic Light Availability Model): A Proposed Model of Hydrogeomorphic Controls on Light in Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, J. P.; Doyle, M. W.; Stanley, E. H.

    2006-12-01

    Light is vital to the dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. It drives photosynthesis and photochemical reactions, affects thermal structure, and influences behavior of aquatic biota. Despite the fundamental role of light to riverine ecosystems, light studies in rivers have been mostly neglected because i) boundary conditions (e.g., banks, riparian vegetation) make ambient light measurements difficult, and ii) the optical water quality of rivers is highly variable and difficult to characterize. We propose a benthic light availability model (BLAM) that predicts the percent of incoming photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) available at the river bed. BLAM was developed by quantifying light attenuation of the five hydrogeomorphic controls that dictate riverine light availability: topography, riparian vegetation, channel geometry, optical water quality, and water depth. BLAM was calibrated using hydrogeomorphic data and light measurements from two rivers: Deep River - a 5th-order, turbid river in central North Carolina, and Big Spring Creek - a 2nd-order, optically clear stream in central Wisconsin. We used a series of four PAR sensors to measure i) above-canopy PAR, ii) PAR above water surface, iii) PAR below water surface, and iv) PAR on stream bed. These measurements were used to develop empirical light attenuation coefficients, which were then used in combination with optical water quality measurements, shading analyses, channel surveys, and flow records to quantify the spatial and temporal variability in riverine light availability. Finally, we apply BLAM to the Baraboo River - a 6th-order, 120-mile, unimpounded river in central Wisconsin - in order to characterize light availability along the river continuum (from headwaters to mouth).

  11. Modeling repetitive motions using structured light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Aliaga, Daniel G

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining models of dynamic 3D objects is an important part of content generation for computer graphics. Numerous methods have been extended from static scenarios to model dynamic scenes. If the states or poses of the dynamic object repeat often during a sequence (but not necessarily periodically), we call such a repetitive motion. There are many objects, such as toys, machines, and humans, undergoing repetitive motions. Our key observation is that when a motion-state repeats, we can sample the scene under the same motion state again but using a different set of parameters; thus, providing more information of each motion state. This enables robustly acquiring dense 3D information difficult for objects with repetitive motions using only simple hardware. After the motion sequence, we group temporally disjoint observations of the same motion state together and produce a smooth space-time reconstruction of the scene. Effectively, the dynamic scene modeling problem is converted to a series of static scene reconstructions, which are easier to tackle. The varying sampling parameters can be, for example, structured-light patterns, illumination directions, and viewpoints resulting in different modeling techniques. Based on this observation, we present an image-based motion-state framework and demonstrate our paradigm using either a synchronized or an unsynchronized structured-light acquisition method.

  12. Why Are There so Many Different Models of Light?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Is light a ray, a wave, or a particle? Yes, yes, and yes. An article in this issue ("The Benefits of Scientific Modeling," p. 40) discusses the process of scientific modeling, and light is a great example of how modeling works. There are three viable models for light, each appropriate for different situations. The author will discuss the…

  13. An underwater light attenuation scheme for marine ecosystem models.

    PubMed

    Penta, Bradley; Lee, Zhongping; Kudela, Raphael M; Palacios, Sherry L; Gray, Deric J; Jolliff, Jason K; Shulman, Igor G

    2008-10-13

    Simulation of underwater light is essential for modeling marine ecosystems. A new model of underwater light attenuation is presented and compared with previous models. In situ data collected in Monterey Bay, CA. during September 2006 are used for validation. It is demonstrated that while the new light model is computationally simple and efficient it maintains accuracy and flexibility. When this light model is incorporated into an ecosystem model, the correlation between modeled and observed coastal chlorophyll is improved over an eight-year time period. While the simulation of a deep chlorophyll maximum demonstrates the effect of the new model at depth.

  14. Modeling of Light Reflection from Human Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, J. A.; Cornejo, A.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.; Rodríguez, E. E.

    2006-09-01

    In this work a two-layer model is used to simulate the spectral reflectance of adult human skin. We report and discuss diffuse reflectance spectra of this model for three values of the volume fraction of melanosomes fme, namely a) lightly pigmented skin fme = 4%, b) moderately pigmented skin fme = 14% and c) heavily pigmented skin fme = 30% at a volume fraction of blood fbl = 0.2%. We also considered the modeling of reflectance spectra for two values of fbl (0.2% and 1%) with fme = 4%. Both simulations were done in the 400-700 nm spectral range using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCML in standard C. Results showed that the principal signatures of human skin reflectance spectrum are obtained with this model and that it could be of valuable use to made predictions of diffuse reflectance of human skin for different values of the parameters related to skin characterization. These parameters can be associated to distinct medical conditions, such as erythema, jaundice, etc.

  15. A new supernova light curve modeling program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Zoltán; Nagy, Andrea P.; Biro, Barna I.; Vinkó, József

    2017-12-01

    Supernovae are extremely energetic explosions that highlight the violent deaths of various types of stars. Studying such cosmic explosions may be important because of several reasons. Supernovae play a key role in cosmic nucleosynthesis processes, and they are also the anchors of methods of measuring extragalactic distances. Several exotic physical processes take place in the expanding ejecta produced by the explosion. We have developed a fast and simple semi-analytical code to model the the light curve of core collapse supernovae. This allows the determination of their most important basic physical parameters, like the the radius of the progenitor star, the mass of the ejected envelope, the mass of the radioactive nickel synthesized during the explosion, among others.

  16. Modeling of light scattering by icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, L.; Mackowski, D.; Pitman, K.; Verbiscer, A.; Buratti, B.; Momary, T.

    2014-07-01

    As a result of ground-based, space-based, and in-situ spacecraft mission observations, a great amount of photometric, polarimetric, and spectroscopic data of icy bodies (satellites of giant planets, Kuiper Belt objects, comet nuclei, and icy particles in cometary comae and rings) has been accumulated. These data have revealed fascinating light-scattering phenomena, such as the opposition surge resulting from coherent backscattering and shadow hiding and the negative polarization associated with them. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of these bodies are especially informative as the depth, width, and shape of the absorption bands of ice are sensitive not only to the ice abundance but also to the size of icy grains. Numerous NIR spectra obtained by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have been used to map the microcharacteristics of the icy satellites [1] and rings of Saturn [2]. VIMS data have also permitted a study of the opposition surge for icy satellites of Saturn [3], showing that coherent backscattering affects not only brightness and polarization of icy bodies but also their spectra [4]. To study all of the light-scattering phenomena that affect the photopolarimetric and spectroscopic characteristics of icy bodies, including coherent backscattering, requires computer modeling that rigorously considers light scattering by a large number of densely packed small particles that form either layers (in the case of regolith) or big clusters (ring and comet particles) . Such opportunity has appeared recently with a development of a new version MSTM4 of the Multi-Sphere T-Matrix code [5]. Simulations of reflectance and absorbance spectra of a ''target'' (particle layer or cluster) require that the dimensions of the target be significantly larger than the wavelength, sphere radius, and layer thickness. For wavelength-sized spheres and packing fractions typical of regolith, targets can contain dozens of thousands of spheres that, with the original MSTM

  17. Effectiveness of angiotensin II receptor antagonists in a cohort of Dutch patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (ZODIAC-14).

    PubMed

    van Hateren, Kornelis J J; Landman, Gijs W D; Groenier, Klaas H; Bilo, Henk J G; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2015-04-01

    There is limited evidence with respect to the between-group effects of various angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) on blood pressure and albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of differing ARBs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and the albumin-creatinine ratio after 1 year in a large cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 2007, 24 940 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus participated in the Zwolle Outpatient Diabetes project Integrating Available Care (ZODIAC) study, a prospective observational cohort study. Patients were included in the current study if they were prescribed an ARB in 2007 and if 1-year follow-up data were available. The final study population comprised 3610 patients. Multivariate mixed-model analyses were performed to estimate effects of the various ARBs on SBP and albuminuria. Stratified subgroup analyses were performed according to baseline hypertension and albuminuria. SBP decreased in all groups, the largest decrease being observed in the group receiving telmisartan. No significant or relevant changes over time were observed among groups for SBP and albuminuria. In the subgroup (n=1225) of normotensive patients, telmisartan was associated with a larger decrease in SBP after 1 year compared to other ARBs, without different effects on the albumin-creatinine ratio. We observed no differences in effects on SBP and the albumin-creatinine ratio among differing ARBs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Colors of attraction: Modeling insect flight to light behavior.

    PubMed

    Donners, Maurice; van Grunsven, Roy H A; Groenendijk, Dick; van Langevelde, Frank; Bikker, Jan Willem; Longcore, Travis; Veenendaal, Elmar

    2018-06-26

    Light sources attract nocturnal flying insects, but some lamps attract more insects than others. The relation between the properties of a light source and the number of attracted insects is, however, poorly understood. We developed a model to quantify the attractiveness of light sources based on the spectral output. This model is fitted using data from field experiments that compare a large number of different light sources. We validated this model using two additional datasets, one for all insects and one excluding the numerous Diptera. Our model facilitates the development and application of light sources that attract fewer insects without the need for extensive field tests and it can be used to correct for spectral composition when formulating hypotheses on the ecological impact of artificial light. In addition, we present a tool allowing the conversion of the spectral output of light sources to their relative insect attraction based on this model. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XZ Catalog of Zodiacal Stars (XZ80Q) (Herald, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herald, D.

    2003-11-01

    The XZ catalog was created at the U.S. Naval Observatory in 1977 by Richard Schmidt and Tom Van Flandern, primarily for the purpose of generating predictions of lunar occultations, and for analyzing timings of these events. It was designed to include all stars within 6d 40' of the ecliptic (the "Zodiac"), which is as far as the Moon's limb can ever get as seen from anywhere on the Earth's surface, leaving some margin for stellar proper motions and change in the obliquity of the ecliptic over the course of three centuries. The original version contained 32,221 entries; since that time, many changes have been made in succeeding versions, including better positions and proper motions, and the elimination and addition of stars. Details about the history of XZ catalog can be found in the "doc.txt" file. The XZ80Q revision has been developed from XZ80P, which was created by Mitsuru Soma. It is now complete over the Zodiac for stars down to visual magnitude 12.0. The "xz80q.dat" file contains the list of stars making the catalog; additional files provide details about double and variable stars included in the XZ80Q. The catalog includes also lists of the various existing names of the stars. (11 data files).

  20. The evolution of the zodiac in the context of ancient oriental history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurshtein, Alex A.

    The dates for the second (ca. 2700 B.C. to within 250 years) and the third ecliptical quartets (ca. 1200 B.C. to within 400 years) evaluated earlier are considered in the context of ancient Egyptian history. The origin of the second quartet coincides with the Great Pyramids and the initiation of the Egyptian solar, or so-called "civil" calendar, the first of such a type in the world. The third quartet is concurrent with the solar conversion of Amenhotep IV (Akhenaton) and takes place at the finale of the great Sothic period of 1461 years after the initiation of the solar calendar. It is argued that the Great Pyramids seem to be monuments to the Sun-god built in honor of the Egyptians having reached an understanding of the Sun's track upon the starry background, Akhenaton's conversion being in a direct connection with the original Pyramids' ideology. This paper is the third part of a single investigation. The first two parts "On the Origin of the Zodiacal Constellations" and "Prehistory of Zodiac Dating: Three Strata of Upper Paleolithic Constellations" were published in Vistas in Astronomy in 1993 and 1995.

  1. Astronomical photography. Part A: Gum nebula, galactic cluster, and zodiacal light photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, R. D.; Dunkelman, L.; Mattingly, T. K.

    1972-01-01

    It is reported that the Apollo 16 command module astronomical photography was performed with the specific objective of capitalizing on the uniqueness of the double umbra as a vantage point to collect astronomical data that are obtainable only near our Moon. For this reason, these data will be compared directly to analogous photography performed from Earth orbit during Project Mercury and the Gemini Program as well as to the Apollo-duplicated photography taken from sites on the Earth surface. Comparison with Earth-based photography should yield direct information on the Earth airglow layer and on atmospheric scattering and extinction.

  2. A Guess about light quantum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-03-01

    Photon is a ring, the diameter of the ring is the quantum fluctuated wave length. The linear movement of the ring, namely, the transmission of light, is reflected in the particle of light. A plurality of light quantum interactions or through a very narrow gap, the shape of quantum would temporarily be changed. The motion of photons to interference and diffraction phenomena occurs is determined by the structure of light quantum, the quantum ring radius and light quantum mass squared product is a constant. The smaller the light quantum ring radius is, the bigger the quality is, just consistent as the modern scientific experimental results, the energy of the purple is bigger than the red. This conclusion can be extrapolated to all of the electromagnetic wave. The shorter the photon wavelength is, the bigger the quality and density is , when the wavelength is less than 10-15 meters, it will convergence to atomic or subatomic composition material entity due to the gravity. In fact, the divergence and convergence of quantum is reversible, that is, the phenomenon of radiate ``light'' quantum occurs due to the energy exchange or other external energy. Author: hanyongquan TEL: 15611860790.

  3. Light refraction in the Swiss-cheese model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csapó, Adelinda; Bene, Gyula

    2012-08-01

    We investigate light propagation in the Swiss-cheese model. On both sides of Swiss-cheese sphere surfaces, observers resting in the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space and the Schwarzschild space respectively, see the same light ray enclosing different angles with the normal. We examine light refraction at each crossing of the boundary surfaces, showing that the angle of refraction is larger than the angle of incidence for both directions of the light.

  4. Modeling of an Adjustable Beam Solid State Light Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Toni

    2015-01-01

    This proposal is for the development of a computational model of a prototype variable beam light source using optical modeling software, Zemax Optics Studio. The variable beam light source would be designed to generate flood, spot, and directional beam patterns, while maintaining the same average power usage. The optical model would demonstrate the possibility of such a light source and its ability to address several issues: commonality of design, human task variability, and light source design process improvements. An adaptive lighting solution that utilizes the same electronics footprint and power constraints while addressing variability of lighting needed for the range of exploration tasks can save costs and allow for the development of common avionics for lighting controls.

  5. Addition of sulphonylurea to metformin does not relevantly change body weight: a prospective observational cohort study (ZODIAC-39).

    PubMed

    Schrijnders, Dennis; Wever, Raiza; Kleefstra, Nanne; Houweling, Sebastiaan T; van Hateren, Kornelis J J; de Bock, Geertruida H; Bilo, Henk J G; Groenier, Klaas H; Landman, Gijs W D

    2016-10-01

    To investigate changes in body weight trajectories after the addition of individual sulphonylureas (SUs) to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study, in a primary care setting in the Netherlands. Patients aged ≥18 years with type 2 diabetes who were included in the ZODIAC cohort between 1998 and 2012 and who received metformin monotherapy at inclusion (n = 29 195), and had used metformin as monotherapy for at least 1 year before receiving dual therapy through the addition of an SU for at least 1 year were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome was within-drug yearly change in body weight after receiving add-on therapy with individual SUs during 5 years of follow-up. The secondary outcome was within-drug yearly change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Annual changes in weight and HbA1c were estimated with linear mixed models, adjusted for age, gender and diabetes duration. A total of 2958 patients were included. No significant weight changes were observed within and between any of the individual SUs after treatment intensification (p = 0.24). In addition, no significant difference in weight between the add-on therapy combinations was observed (p = 0.26). The average HbA1c the year before intensification was 7.2% (55 mmol/mol) and dropped below 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) the year after. In patients with type 2 diabetes treated in primary care, strict glycaemic control can be maintained with SUs used as add-on therapy to metformin, without the offset of relevant weight changes. © 2016 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Light extraction in planar light-emitting diode with nonuniform current injection: model and simulation.

    PubMed

    Khmyrova, Irina; Watanabe, Norikazu; Kholopova, Julia; Kovalchuk, Anatoly; Shapoval, Sergei

    2014-07-20

    We develop an analytical and numerical model for performing simulation of light extraction through the planar output interface of the light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with nonuniform current injection. Spatial nonuniformity of injected current is a peculiar feature of the LEDs in which top metal electrode is patterned as a mesh in order to enhance the output power of light extracted through the top surface. Basic features of the model are the bi-plane computation domain, related to other areas of numerical grid (NG) cells in these two planes, representation of light-generating layer by an ensemble of point light sources, numerical "collection" of light photons from the area limited by acceptance circle and adjustment of NG-cell areas in the computation procedure by the angle-tuned aperture function. The developed model and procedure are used to simulate spatial distributions of the output optical power as well as the total output power at different mesh pitches. The proposed model and simulation strategy can be very efficient in evaluation of the output optical performance of LEDs with periodical or symmetrical configuration of the electrodes.

  7. Radar detectability studies of slow and small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles: I. The case of Arecibo 430 MHz meteor head echo observations

    PubMed Central

    Janches, D.; Plane, J.M.C.; Nesvorný, D.; Feng, W.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Nicolls, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model (Nesvorný et al. 2010, 2011b) argue that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth’s upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date. For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when: 1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (~16 t/d) and 2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones (1997) for low speeds meteors. However, even at this lower limit the model over predicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of 3, suggesting the model requires some revision. PMID:27642186

  8. Radar Detectability Studies of Slow and Small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles: I. The Case of Arecibo 430 MHz Meteor Head Echo Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janches, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Nesvorny, D.; Feng, W.; Vokrouhlicky, D.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model (Nesvorny et al. 2010, 2011b) argue that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth's upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date. For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when: 1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (approximately 16 t/d) and 2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones (1997) for low speeds meteors. However, even at this lower limit the model over predicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of 3, suggesting the model requires some revision.

  9. The influence of lunar phases and zodiac sign 'Leo' on perioperative complications and outcome in elective spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Joswig, Holger; Stienen, Martin N; Hock, Carolin; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Surbeck, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Many people believe that the moon has an influence on daily life, and some even request elective surgery dates depending on the moon calendar. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of 'unfavorable' lunar or zodiac constellations on perioperative complications and outcome in elective surgery for degenerative disc disease. Retrospective database analysis including 924 patients. Using uni- and multivariate logistic regression, the likelihood for intraoperative complications and re-do surgeries as well as the clinical outcomes at 4 weeks was analyzed for surgeries performed during the waxing moon, full moon, and dates when the moon passed through the zodiac sign 'Leo.' In multivariate analysis, patients operated on during the waxing moon were 1.54 times as likely as patients who were operated on during the waning moon to suffer from an intraoperative complication (OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.07-2.21, p = 0.019). In contrast, there was a trend toward fewer re-do surgeries for surgery during the waxing moon (OR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.23-1.16, p = 0.109), while the 4-week responder status was similar (OR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.47-1.14, p = 0.169). A full moon and the zodiac sign Leo did not increase the likelihood for complications, re-do surgeries or unfavorable outcomes. We found no influence of 'unfavorable' lunar or zodiac constellations on the 4-week responder status or the revision rate that would justify a moon calendar-based selection approach to elective spine surgery dates. However, the fact that patients undergoing surgery during the waxing moon were more likely to suffer from an intraoperative complication is a surprising curiosity and defies our ability to find a rational explanation.

  10. Reaction times to weak test lights. [psychophysics biological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.; Ahumada, P.; Welsh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Maloney and Wandell (1984) describe a model of the response of a single visual channel to weak test lights. The initial channel response is a linearly filtered version of the stimulus. The filter output is randomly sampled over time. Each time a sample occurs there is some probability increasing with the magnitude of the sampled response - that a discrete detection event is generated. Maloney and Wandell derive the statistics of the detection events. In this paper a test is conducted of the hypothesis that the reaction time responses to the presence of a weak test light are initiated at the first detection event. This makes it possible to extend the application of the model to lights that are slightly above threshold, but still within the linear operating range of the visual system. A parameter-free prediction of the model proposed by Maloney and Wandell for lights detected by this statistic is tested. The data are in agreement with the prediction.

  11. Radar detectability studies of slow and small zodiacal dust cloud particles. I. The case of Arecibo 430 MHz meteor head echo observations

    SciTech Connect

    Janches, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.

    2014-11-20

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) argues that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth's upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper, we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date.more » For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization, and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when (1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (∼16 t d{sup –1}) and (2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high-speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones for low-speed meteors. However, even at this lower limit, the model overpredicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of three, suggesting that the model requires some revision.« less

  12. Affordable and personalized lighting using inverse modeling and virtual sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Chandrayee; Chen, Benjamin; Richards, Jacob; Dhinakaran, Aparna; Agogino, Alice; Martin, Rodney

    2014-03-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have great potential to enable personalized intelligent lighting systems while reducing building energy use by 50%-70%. As a result WSN systems are being increasingly integrated in state-ofart intelligent lighting systems. In the future these systems will enable participation of lighting loads as ancillary services. However, such systems can be expensive to install and lack the plug-and-play quality necessary for user-friendly commissioning. In this paper we present an integrated system of wireless sensor platforms and modeling software to enable affordable and user-friendly intelligent lighting. It requires ⇠ 60% fewer sensor deployments compared to current commercial systems. Reduction in sensor deployments has been achieved by optimally replacing the actual photo-sensors with real-time discrete predictive inverse models. Spatially sparse and clustered sub-hourly photo-sensor data captured by the WSN platforms are used to develop and validate a piece-wise linear regression of indoor light distribution. This deterministic data-driven model accounts for sky conditions and solar position. The optimal placement of photo-sensors is performed iteratively to achieve the best predictability of the light field desired for indoor lighting control. Using two weeks of daylight and artificial light training data acquired at the Sustainability Base at NASA Ames, the model was able to predict the light level at seven monitored workstations with 80%-95% accuracy. We estimate that 10% adoption of this intelligent wireless sensor system in commercial buildings could save 0.2-0.25 quads BTU of energy nationwide.

  13. Computational model of lightness perception in high dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Grzegorz; Myszkowski, Karol; Seidel, Hans-Peter

    2006-02-01

    An anchoring theory of lightness perception by Gilchrist et al. [1999] explains many characteristics of human visual system such as lightness constancy and its spectacular failures which are important in the perception of images. The principal concept of this theory is the perception of complex scenes in terms of groups of consistent areas (frameworks). Such areas, following the gestalt theorists, are defined by the regions of common illumination. The key aspect of the image perception is the estimation of lightness within each framework through the anchoring to the luminance perceived as white, followed by the computation of the global lightness. In this paper we provide a computational model for automatic decomposition of HDR images into frameworks. We derive a tone mapping operator which predicts lightness perception of the real world scenes and aims at its accurate reproduction on low dynamic range displays. Furthermore, such a decomposition into frameworks opens new grounds for local image analysis in view of human perception.

  14. Spatial Reasoning Training Through Light Curves Of Model Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziffer, Julie; Nakroshis, Paul A.; Rudnick, Benjamin T.; Brautigam, Maxwell J.; Nelson, Tyler W.

    2015-11-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that spatial reasoning skills, long known to be crucial to math and science success, are teachable. Even short stints of training can improve spatial reasoning skills among students who lack them (Sorby et al., 2006). Teaching spatial reasoning is particularly valuable to women and minorities who, through societal pressure, often doubt their spatial reasoning skill (Hill et al., 2010). We have designed a hands on asteroid rotation lab that provides practice in spatial reasoning tasks while building the student’s understanding of photometry. For our tool, we mount a model asteroid, with any shape of our choosing, on a slowly rotating motor shaft, whose speed is controlled by the experimenter. To mimic an asteroid light curve, we place the model asteroid in a dark box, shine a movable light source upon our asteroid, and record the light reflected onto a moveable camera. Students may then observe changes in the light curve that result from varying a) the speed of rotation, b) the model asteroid’s orientation with respect to the motor axis, c) the model asteroid’s shape or albedo, and d) the phase angle. After practicing with our tool, students are asked to pair new objects to their corresponding light curves. To correctly pair objects to their light curves, students must imagine how light scattering off of a three dimensional rotating object is imaged on a ccd sensor plane, and then reduced to a series of points on a light curve plot. Through the use of our model asteroid, the student develops confidence in spatial reasoning skills.

  15. Models of filter-based particle light absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasha, Khadeejeh M.

    Light absorption by aerosol is very important in the visible, near UN, and near I.R region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have a great influence on the flux of solar energy, and also impact health in a negative sense when they are breathed into lungs. Aerosol absorption measurements are usually performed by filter-based methods that are derived from the change in light transmission through a filter where particles have been deposited. These methods suffer from interference between light-absorbing and light-scattering aerosol components. The Aethalometer is the most commonly used filter-based instrument for aerosol light absorption measurement. This dissertation describes new understanding of aerosol light absorption obtained by the filter method. The theory uses a multiple scattering model for the combination of filter and particle optics. The theory is evaluated using Aethalometer data from laboratory and ambient measurements in comparison with photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption. Two models were developed to calculate aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data, and were compared to the in-situ aerosol light absorption coefficients. The first is an approximate model and the second is a "full" model. In the approximate model two extreme cases of aerosol optics were used to develop a model-based calibration scheme for the 7-wavelength Aethalometer. These cases include those of very strong scattering aerosols (Ammonium sulfate sample) and very absorbing aerosols (kerosene soot sample). The exponential behavior of light absorption in the strong multiple scattering limit is shown to be the square root of the total absorption optical depth rather than linear with optical depth as is commonly assumed with Beer's law. 2-stream radiative transfer theory was used to develop the full model to calculate the aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data. This comprehensive model

  16. Improved spring model-based collaborative indoor visible light positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhijie; Zhang, WeiNan; Zhou, GuoFu

    2016-06-01

    Gaining accuracy with indoor positioning of individuals is important as many location-based services rely on the user's current position to provide them with useful services. Many researchers have studied indoor positioning techniques based on WiFi and Bluetooth. However, they have disadvantages such as low accuracy or high cost. In this paper, we propose an indoor positioning system in which visible light radiated from light-emitting diodes is used to locate the position of receivers. Compared with existing methods using light-emitting diode light, we present a high-precision and simple implementation collaborative indoor visible light positioning system based on an improved spring model. We first estimate coordinate position information using the visible light positioning system, and then use the spring model to correct positioning errors. The system can be employed easily because it does not require additional sensors and the occlusion problem of visible light would be alleviated. We also describe simulation experiments, which confirm the feasibility of our proposed method.

  17. A plant canopy light absorption model with application to wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, J. E.; Lemaster, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    From the light absorption model the absorption of light in the photosynthetically active region of the spectrum was calculated for a Penjamo wheat crop for several situations including: (1) the percent absorption of the incident radiation by a canopy having a four layer structure; (2) the percent absorption of light by the individual layers within a four layer canopy and by the underlying soil; (3) the percent absorption of light by each vegetative canopy layer for variable sun angle; and (4) the cumulative solar energy absorbed by the developing wheat canopy as it progresses from a single layer through its growth stages to a three layer canopy. This calculation was also presented as a function of the leaf area index.

  18. Radar Detectability Studies of Slow and Small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles. III. The Role of Sodium and the Head Echo Size on the Probability of Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Swarnalingam, N.; Carrillo-Sanchez, J. D.; Gomez-Martin, J. C.; Marshall, R.; Nesvorný, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Pokorný, P.

    2017-07-01

    We present a path forward on a long-standing issue concerning the flux of small and slow meteoroids, which are believed to be the dominant portion of the incoming meteoric mass flux into the Earth’s atmosphere. Such a flux, which is predicted by dynamical dust models of the Zodiacal Cloud, is not evident in ground-based radar observations. For decades this was attributed to the fact that the radars used for meteor observations lack the sensitivity to detect this population, due to the small amount of ionization produced by slow-velocity meteors. Such a hypothesis has been challenged by the introduction of meteor head echo (HE) observations with High Power and Large Aperture radars, in particular the Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Janches et al. developed a probabilistic approach to estimate the detectability of meteors by these radars and initially showed that, with the current knowledge of ablation and ionization, such particles should dominate the detected rates by one to two orders of magnitude compared to the actual observations. In this paper, we include results in our model from recently published laboratory measurements, which showed that (1) the ablation of Na is less intense covering a wider altitude range; and (2) the ionization probability, {β }{ip}, for Na atoms in the air is up to two orders of magnitude smaller for low speeds than originally believed. By applying these results and using a somewhat smaller size of the HE radar target we offer a solution that reconciles these observations with model predictions.

  19. Radar Detectability Studies of Slow and Small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles. III. The Role of Sodium and the Head Echo Size on the Probability of Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janches, D.; Swarnalingam, N.; Carrillo-Sanchez, J. D.; Gomez-Martin, J. C.; Marshall, R.; Nesvorny, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Pokorny, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a path forward on a long-standing issue concerning the flux of small and slow meteoroids, which are believed to be the dominant portion of the incoming meteoric mass flux into the Earth's atmosphere. Such a flux, which is predicted by dynamical dust models of the Zodiacal Cloud, is not evident in ground-based radar observations. For decades this was attributed to the fact that the radars used for meteor observations lack the sensitivity to detect this population, due to the small amount of ionization produced by slow-velocity meteors. Such a hypothesis has been challenged by the introduction of meteor head echo (HE) observations with High Power and Large Aperture radars, in particular the Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Janches et al. developed a probabilistic approach to estimate the detectability of meteors by these radars and initially showed that, with the current knowledge of ablation and ionization, such particles should dominate the detected rates by one to two orders of magnitude compared to the actual observations. In this paper, we include results in our model from recently published laboratory measurements, which showed that (1) the ablation of Na is less intense covering a wider altitude range; and (2) the ionization probability, Beta ip, for Na atoms in the air is up to two orders of magnitude smaller for low speeds than originally believed. By applying these results and using a somewhat smaller size of the HE radar target we offer a solution that reconciles these observations with model predictions.

  20. Light dependence of carboxylation capacity for C3 photosynthesis models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Photosynthesis at high light is often modelled by assuming limitation by the maximum capacity of Rubisco carboxylation at low carbon dioxide concentrations, by electron transport capacity at higher concentrations, and sometimes by triose-phosphate utilization rate at the highest concentrations. Pho...

  1. Parasitic light scattered by complex optical coatings: modelization and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerrad, Myriam; Lequime, Michel; Liukaityte, Simona; Amra, Claude

    2017-12-01

    Optical components realized for space applications have to be mastered in term of parasitic light. This paper present the last improvements performed at the Institute Fresnel to predict and measure scattering losses of optical components with a special care to complex optical coatings. Agreement between numerical models and metrology is now excellent. Some examples will be presented.

  2. Alanine aminotransferase and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (ZODIAC-38).

    PubMed

    Deetman, Petronella E; Alkhalaf, Alaa; Landman, Gijs W D; Groenier, Klaas H; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E; Navis, Gerjan; Bilo, Henk J G; Kleefstra, Nanne; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2015-08-01

    Combined data suggest a bimodal association of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with mortality in the general population. Little is known about the association of ALT with mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. We therefore investigated the association of ALT with all-cause, cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. A prospective study was performed in patients with type 2 diabetes, treated in primary care, participating in the Zwolle Outpatient Diabetes project Integrating Available Care (ZODIAC) study. Cox regression analyses were performed to determine the associations of log2 -transformed baseline ALT with all-cause, cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality. In 1187 patients with type 2 diabetes (67 ± 12 years, 45% female), ALT levels were 11 (8-16) U/L. During median follow-up for 11.1 (6.1-14.0) years, 553 (47%) patients died, with 238 (20%) attributable to cardiovascular causes. Overall, ALT was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72-0.92), independently of potential confounders. This was less attributable to cardiovascular mortality (HR 0.87; 95% CI 0.72-1.05), than to noncardiovascular mortality (HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.65-0.90). Despite the overall inverse association of ALT with mortality, it appeared that a bimodal association with all-cause mortality was present with increasing risk for levels of ALT above normal (P = 0.003). In patients with type 2 diabetes, low levels of ALT are associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, in particular noncardiovascular mortality, compared to normal levels of ALT, while risk again starts to increase when levels are above normal. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  3. Modeling of photoluminescence in laser-based lighting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzizyrli, Elisavet; Tinne, Nadine; Lachmayer, Roland; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2017-12-01

    The development of laser-based lighting systems has been the latest step towards a revolution in illumination technology brought about by solid-state lighting. Laser-activated remote phosphor systems produce white light sources with significantly higher luminance than LEDs. The weak point of such systems is often considered to be the conversion element. The high-intensity exciting laser beam in combination with the limited thermal conductivity of ceramic phosphor materials leads to thermal quenching, the phenomenon in which the emission efficiency decreases as temperature rises. For this reason, the aim of the presented study is the modeling of remote phosphor systems in order to investigate their thermal limitations and to calculate the parameters for optimizing the efficiency of such systems. The common approach to simulate remote phosphor systems utilizes a combination of different tools such as ray tracing algorithms and wave optics tools for describing the incident and converted light, whereas the modeling of the conversion process itself, i.e. photoluminescence, in most cases is circumvented by using the absorption and emission spectra of the phosphor material. In this study, we describe the processes involved in luminescence quantum-mechanically using the single-configurational-coordinate diagram as well as the Franck-Condon principle and propose a simulation model that incorporates the temperature dependence of these processes. Following an increasing awareness of climate change and environmental issues, the development of ecologically friendly lighting systems featuring low power consumption and high luminous efficiency is imperative more than ever. The better understanding of laser-based lighting systems is an important step towards that aim as they may improve on LEDs in the near future.

  4. Application of Peterson's stray light model to complex optical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fray, S.; Goepel, M.; Kroneberger, M.

    2016-07-01

    Gary L. Peterson (Breault Research Organization) presented a simple analytical model for in- field stray light evaluation of axial optical systems. We exploited this idea for more complex optical instruments of the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) mission. For the Flexible Combined Imager (FCI) we evaluated the in-field stray light of its three-mirroranastigmat telescope, while for the Infrared Sounder (IRS) we performed an end-to-end analysis including the front telescope, interferometer and back telescope assembly and the cold optics. A comparison to simulations will be presented. The authors acknowledge the support by ESA and Thales Alenia Space through the MTG satellites program.

  5. A Characterization of the Hot Infrared Background: The Infrared Cirrus, Zodiacal Dust Bands, and Solar System Dust Trails

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    AD-A239 132 PL -TR-91-2065 A CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HOT INFRARED BACKGROUND: THE INFRARED CIRRUS, ZODIACAL DUST BANDS, AND SOLAR SYSTEM DUST TRAILS F...addressee is no longer employed by your organization, please notify OL-AA PL /IMA, Hanscom AFB, MA 01731. This will assist us in maintaining a current...DECLASSIFICATION /DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE Distribution unlimited 4 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) S MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) PL -TR-91-2065 6a

  6. The US Naval Observatory Zodiacal Zone Catalog (Douglas and Harrington 1990): Documentation for the machine-readable version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The machine readable version of the catalog, as it is currently being distributed from the Astronomical Data Center, is described. The Zodiacal Zone Catalog is a catalog of positions and proper motions for stars in the magnitude range where m sub v is between 4 and 10, lying within 16 deg of the ecliptic and north of declination -30 deg. The catalog contains positions and proper motions, at epoch, for equator and equinox J2000.0, magnitudes and spectral types taken mostly from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Star Catalog, and reference positions and proper motions for equinox and epoch B1950.0.

  7. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, H.N.

    The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive pathmore » is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.« less

  8. Modeling of light absorption in tissue during infrared neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alexander C; Wade, Scott A; Brown, William G A; Stoddart, Paul R

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate light transport and absorption in neural tissue during infrared neural stimulation (INS). A range of fiber core sizes and numerical apertures are compared illustrating the advantages of using simulations when designing a light delivery system. A range of wavelengths, commonly used for INS, are also compared for stimulation of nerves in the cochlea, in terms of both the energy absorbed and the change in temperature due to a laser pulse. Modeling suggests that a fiber with core diameter of 200 μm and NA=0.22 is optimal for optical stimulation in the geometry used and that temperature rises in the spiral ganglion neurons are as low as 0.1°C. The results show a need for more careful experimentation to allow different proposed mechanisms of INS to be distinguished.

  9. Modeling of light absorption in tissue during infrared neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Alexander C.; Wade, Scott A.; Brown, William G. A.; Stoddart, Paul R.

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate light transport and absorption in neural tissue during infrared neural stimulation (INS). A range of fiber core sizes and numerical apertures are compared illustrating the advantages of using simulations when designing a light delivery system. A range of wavelengths, commonly used for INS, are also compared for stimulation of nerves in the cochlea, in terms of both the energy absorbed and the change in temperature due to a laser pulse. Modeling suggests that a fiber with core diameter of 200 μm and NA=0.22 is optimal for optical stimulation in the geometry used and that temperature rises in the spiral ganglion neurons are as low as 0.1°C. The results show a need for more careful experimentation to allow different proposed mechanisms of INS to be distinguished.

  10. Modeling Ponderomotive Squeezed Light in Gravitational-Wave Laser Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckey, Jacob; Miao, Haixing; Töyrä, Daniel; Brown, Daniel; Freise, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Earth-based gravitational wave detectors are plagued by many sources of noise. The sensitivity of these detectors is ultimately limited by Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle once all other noise sources (thermal, seismic, etc.) are mitigated. When varying laser power, the standard quantum limit of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors is a trade-off between photon shot noise (due to statistical arrival times of photons) and radiation pressure noise. This project demonstrates a method of using squeezed states of light to lower noise levels below the standard quantum limit at certain frequencies. The squeezed state can be generated by either using nonlinear optics or the ponderomotive squeezer. The latter is the focus of this project. Ponderomotive squeezing occurs due to amplitude fluctuations in the laser being converted into phase fluctuations upon reflecting off of the interferometer’s end test masses. This correlated noise allows the standard quantum limit to be surpassed at certain frequencies. The ponderomotive generation of squeezed states is modeled using FINESSE, an open source interferometer modelling software. The project resulted in a stand-alone element to be implemented in the FINESSE code base that will allow users to model ponderomotive squeezing in their optical setups. Upcoming work will explore the effects of higher order modes of light and more realistic mirror surfaces on the ponderomotive squeezing of light.

  11. Space telescope low scattered light camera - A model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Kuper, T. G.; Shack, R. V.

    1982-01-01

    A design approach for a camera to be used with the space telescope is given. Camera optics relay the system pupil onto an annular Gaussian ring apodizing mask to control scattered light. One and two dimensional models of ripple on the primary mirror were calculated. Scattered light calculations using ripple amplitudes between wavelength/20 wavelength/200 with spatial correlations of the ripple across the primary mirror between 0.2 and 2.0 centimeters indicate that the detection of an object a billion times fainter than a bright source in the field is possible. Detection of a Jovian type planet in orbit about alpha Centauri with a camera on the space telescope may be possible.

  12. Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: Thin window model

    DOE PAGES

    Vaseva, Irina A.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; ...

    2016-08-02

    Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminatemore » the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. Furthermore, the area of applicability of the proposed “thin window” model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing.« less

  13. Quasar microlensing models with constraints on the Quasar light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, S. S.; Kochanek, C. S.

    2018-01-01

    Quasar microlensing analyses implicitly generate a model of the variability of the source quasar. The implied source variability may be unrealistic yet its likelihood is generally not evaluated. We used the damped random walk (DRW) model for quasar variability to evaluate the likelihood of the source variability and applied the revized algorithm to a microlensing analysis of the lensed quasar RX J1131-1231. We compared estimates of the size of the quasar disc and the average stellar mass of the lens galaxy with and without applying the DRW likelihoods for the source variability model and found no significant effect on the estimated physical parameters. The most likely explanation is that unreliastic source light-curve models are generally associated with poor microlensing fits that already make a negligible contribution to the probability distributions of the derived parameters.

  14. Modeling of lighting behaviour of a hybrid lighting system in inner spaces of Building of Electrical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amado, L.; Osma, G.; Villamizar, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the modelling of lighting behaviour of a hybrid lighting system - HLS in inner spaces for tropical climate. HLS aims to mitigate the problem of high electricity consumption used by artificial lighting in buildings. These systems integrate intelligently the daylight and artificial light through control strategies. However, selection of these strategies usually depends on expertise of designer and of available budget. In order to improve the selection process of the control strategies, this paper analyses the Electrical Engineering Building (EEB) case, initially modelling of lighting behaviour is established for the HLS of a classroom and an office. This allows estimating the illuminance level of the mixed lighting in the space, and energy consumption by artificial light according to different lighting control techniques, a control strategy based on occupancy and a combination of them. The model considers the concept of Daylight Factor (DF) for the estimating of daylight illuminance on the work plane for tropical climatic conditions. The validation of the model was carried out by comparing the measured and model-estimated indoor illuminances.

  15. Modeling light scattering by mineral dust particles using spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikallio, Sini; Nousiainen, Timo

    Suspended dust particles have a considerable influence on light scattering in both terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and can therefore have a large effect on the interpretation of remote sensing measurements. Assuming dust particles to be spherical is known to produce inaccurate results when modeling optical properties of real mineral dust particles. Yet this approximation is widely used for its simplicity. Here, we simulate light scattering by mineral dust particles using a distribution of model spheroids. This is done by comparing scattering matrices calculated from a dust optical database of Dubovik et al. [2006] with those measured in the laboratory by Volten et al. [2001]. Wavelengths of 441,6 nm and 632,8 nm and refractive indexes of Re = 1.55 -1.7 and Im = 0.001i -0.01i were adopted in this study. Overall, spheroids are found to fit the measurements significantly better than Mie spheres. Further, we confirm that the shape distribution parametrization developed in Nousiainen et al. (2006) significantly improves the accuracy of simulated single-scattering for small mineral dust particles. The spheroid scheme should therefore yield more reliable interpretations of remote sensing data from dusty planetary atmospheres. While the spheroidal scheme is superior to spheres in remote sensing applications, its performance is far from perfect especially for samples with large particles. Thus, additional advances are clearly possible. Further studies of the Martian atmosphere are currently under way. Dubovik et al. (2006) Application of spheroid models to account for aerosol particle nonspheric-ity in remote sensing of desert dust, JGR, Vol. 111, D11208 Volten et al. (2001) Scattering matrices of mineral aerosol particles at 441.6 nm and 632.8 nm, JGR, Vol. 106, No. D15, pp. 17375-17401 Nousiainen et al. (2006) Light scattering modeling of small feldspar aerosol particles using polyhedral prisms and spheroids, JQSRT 101, pp. 471-487

  16. Popular belief meets surgical reality: impact of lunar phases, Friday the 13th and zodiac signs on emergency operations and intraoperative blood loss.

    PubMed

    Schuld, Jochen; Slotta, Jan E; Schuld, Simone; Kollmar, Otto; Schilling, Martin K; Richter, Sven

    2011-09-01

    The influence of superstition, moon calendars, and popular belief on evidence-based medicine is stunning. More than 40% of medical staff is convinced that lunar phases can affect human behavior. The idea that Friday the 13th is associated with adverse events and bad luck is deep-rooted in the population of Western industrial countries. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that these myths are transferable to real-life surgery. We analyzed the extent to which moon phases, zodiac signs, and Friday the 13th influence blood loss, emergency frequency, and intestinal perforations by evaluating the operation records of all 27,914 consecutive patients of our institution undergoing general, visceral, or vascular surgery between August 2001 and August 2010. Dates of surgery were allocated to lunar phases and to zodiac signs, as well as to Friday the 13th. A total of 111 lunar cycles and 15 Fridays the 13th occurred within the 3,281-day observation period. Patients' characteristics did not differ in lunar phases, zodiac signs, or Fridays the 13th. Full moon phases, the presence of Friday the 13th, and zodiac signs influenced neither intraoperative blood loss nor emergency frequency. No statistical peaks regarding perforated aortic aneurysms and gastrointestinal perforations were found on full moon or Friday the 13th. Scientific analysis of our data does not support the belief that moon phases, zodiac signs, or Friday 13th influence surgical blood loss and emergency frequency. Our data indicate that such beliefs are myths far beyond reality.

  17. Lunar phases and zodiac signs do not influence quality of radical cystectomy--a statistical analysis of 452 patients with invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    May, Matthias; Braun, Kay-Patrick; Helke, Christian; Richter, Willi; Vogler, Horst; Hoschke, Bernd; Siegsmund, Michael

    2007-01-01

    To determine the influence of the lunar phases and the position of the moon in the zodiac on the frequency of complications and the survival of bladder cancer patients after radical cystectomy. It has been postulated that radical cystectomy performed during the waxing moon, or particularly at full moon, or at the zodiac sign Libra is associated with a poorer outcome. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating the progression-free survival, the complication rate and the re-operation rate for 452 consecutive patients after radical cystectomy. In this retrospective review, the dates of surgery were allocated to the lunar phases and the zodiac signs. Based on these classifications, the patients were placed in groups which combined the lunar phase laws and differentiated between evidently unfavorable (full moon or waxing moon and/or the zodiac sign Libra; assigned to group 1) and favorable periods for surgery (new moon or waning moon and other signs of the zodiac apart from Libra; assigned to group 2). The mean follow-up was 49 months (range 0-158 months). A total of 244 patients (54%) were operated during an unfavorable period (group 1) and 208 (46%) patients during the auspicious period (group 2). The mean age, gender and kind of urinary derivation did not differ significantly in the two groups. Pathological tumor stages were evenly distributed according to the lunar phase groups (P = 0.713). We found no significant differences in the perioperative mortality rates, early re-operation rates, early complications, and late complications across the two groups. No significant differences in progression-free survival were observed when timing of cystectomy during the lunar cycle was considered (P = 0.231). Our analysis demonstrated no predictable influence of the lunar phase on survival or complications. Although this was not a prospective randomized trial, the statistical magnitude of the results do not support any recommendations for scheduling patients for radical

  18. Design and modeling of a light powered biomimicry micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, Tsun-kay Jackie; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2015-06-01

    The design of compact micropumps to provide steady flow has been an on-going challenge in the field of microfluidics. In this work, a novel micropump concept is introduced utilizing bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins. The micropump utilizes light energy to activate the transporter proteins, which create an osmotic pressure gradient and drive the fluid flow. The capability of the bio inspired micropump is demonstrated using a quasi 1D numerical model, where the contributions of bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins are taken care of by appropriate flux boundary conditions in the flow channel. Proton flux created by the bacteriorhodopsin proteins is compared with experimental results to obtain the appropriate working conditions of the proteins. To identify the pumping capability, we also investigate the influences of several key parameters, such as the membrane fraction of transporter proteins, membrane proton permeability and the presence of light. Our results show that there is a wide bacteriorhodopsin membrane fraction range (from 0.2 to 10%) at which fluid flow stays nearly at its maximum value. Numerical results also indicate that lipid membranes with low proton permeability can effectively control the light source as a method to turn on/off fluid flow. This capability allows the micropump to be activated and shut off remotely without bulky support equipment. In comparison with existing micropumps, this pump generates higher pressures than mechanical pumps. It can produce peak fluid flow and shutoff head comparable to other non-mechanical pumps.

  19. A point particle model of lightly bound skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillard, Mike; Harland, Derek; Kirk, Elliot; Maybee, Ben; Speight, Martin

    2017-04-01

    A simple model of the dynamics of lightly bound skyrmions is developed in which skyrmions are replaced by point particles, each carrying an internal orientation. The model accounts well for the static energy minimizers of baryon number 1 ≤ B ≤ 8 obtained by numerical simulation of the full field theory. For 9 ≤ B ≤ 23, a large number of static solutions of the point particle model are found, all closely resembling size B subsets of a face centred cubic lattice, with the particle orientations dictated by a simple colouring rule. Rigid body quantization of these solutions is performed, and the spin and isospin of the corresponding ground states extracted. As part of the quantization scheme, an algorithm to compute the symmetry group of an oriented point cloud, and to determine its corresponding Finkelstein-Rubinstein constraints, is devised.

  20. Light-meson masses in an unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Ping, Jialun; Roberts, Craig D.; Segovia, Jorge

    2018-05-01

    We perform a coupled-channels calculation of the masses of light mesons with the quantum numbers I JP =-, (I ,J )=0 , 1, by including q q ¯ and (q q ¯)2 components in a nonrelativistic chiral quark model. The coupling between two- and four-quark configurations is realized through a 3P0 quark-pair creation model. With the usual form of this operator, the mass shifts are large and negative, an outcome which raises serious issues of validity for the quenched quark model. Herein, therefore, we introduce some improvements of the 3P0 operator in order to reduce the size of the mass shifts. By introducing two simple factors, physically well motivated, the coupling between q q ¯ and (q q ¯)2 components is weakened, producing mass shifts that are around 10%-20% of hadron bare masses.

  1. Light aircraft sound transmission studies - Noise reduction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, Mahabir S.; Heitman, Karen E.; Crocker, Malcolm J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental tests conducted on the fuselage of a single-engine Piper Cherokee light aircraft suggest that the cabin interior noise can be reduced by increasing the transmission loss of the dominant sound transmission paths and/or by increasing the cabin interior sound absorption. The validity of using a simple room equation model to predict the cabin interior sound-pressure level for different fuselage and exterior sound field conditions is also presented. The room equation model is based on the sound power flow balance for the cabin space and utilizes the measured transmitted sound intensity data. The room equation model predictions were considered good enough to be used for preliminary acoustical design studies.

  2. Light-meson masses in an unquenched quark model

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Ping, Jialun; Roberts, Craig D.; ...

    2018-05-17

    We perform a coupled-channels calculation of the masses of light mesons with the quantum numbers IJ P=-, (I,J) = 0,1, by includingmore » $$q\\bar{q}$$ and ($$q\\bar{q}$$) 2 components in a nonrelativistic chiral quark model. The coupling between two- and four-quark configurations is realized through a 3P 0 quark-pair creation model. With the usual form of this operator, the mass shifts are large and negative, an outcome which raises serious issues of validity for the quenched quark model. Therefore, we introduce some improvements of the 3P 0 operator in order to reduce the size of the mass shifts. By introducing two simple factors, physically well motivated, the coupling between $$q\\bar{q}$$ and ($$q\\bar{q}$$) 2 components is weakened, producing mass shifts that are around 10%–20% of hadron bare masses.« less

  3. Light-meson masses in an unquenched quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Ping, Jialun; Roberts, Craig D.

    We perform a coupled-channels calculation of the masses of light mesons with the quantum numbers IJ P=-, (I,J) = 0,1, by includingmore » $$q\\bar{q}$$ and ($$q\\bar{q}$$) 2 components in a nonrelativistic chiral quark model. The coupling between two- and four-quark configurations is realized through a 3P 0 quark-pair creation model. With the usual form of this operator, the mass shifts are large and negative, an outcome which raises serious issues of validity for the quenched quark model. Therefore, we introduce some improvements of the 3P 0 operator in order to reduce the size of the mass shifts. By introducing two simple factors, physically well motivated, the coupling between $$q\\bar{q}$$ and ($$q\\bar{q}$$) 2 components is weakened, producing mass shifts that are around 10%–20% of hadron bare masses.« less

  4. Modeling of light distribution in the brain for topographical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Eiji; Hayashi, Toshiyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi

    2004-07-01

    Multi-channel optical imaging system can obtain a topographical distribution of the activated region in the brain cortex by a simple mapping algorithm. Near-infrared light is strongly scattered in the head and the volume of tissue that contributes to the change in the optical signal detected with source-detector pair on the head surface is broadly distributed in the brain. This scattering effect results in poor resolution and contrast in the topographic image of the brain activity. We report theoretical investigations on the spatial resolution of the topographic imaging of the brain activity. The head model for the theoretical study consists of five layers that imitate the scalp, skull, subarachnoid space, gray matter and white matter. The light propagation in the head model is predicted by Monte Carlo simulation to obtain the spatial sensitivity profile for a source-detector pair. The source-detector pairs are one dimensionally arranged on the surface of the model and the distance between the adjoining source-detector pairs are varied from 4 mm to 32 mm. The change in detected intensity caused by the absorption change is obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. The position of absorption change is reconstructed by the conventional mapping algorithm and the reconstruction algorithm using the spatial sensitivity profiles. We discuss the effective interval between the source-detector pairs and the choice of reconstruction algorithms to improve the topographic images of brain activity.

  5. CONSTRUCTION OF AN EARTH MODEL: ANALYSIS OF EXOPLANET LIGHT CURVES AND MAPPING THE NEXT EARTH WITH THE NEW WORLDS OBSERVER

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, P. H. H.; Cash, W.

    2009-08-01

    The orbital light curve of a terrestrial exoplanet will likely contain valuable information about the surface and atmospheric features of the planet, both in its overall shape and hourly variations. We have constructed an empirically based code capable of simulating observations of the Earth from any orientation, at any time of year with continuously updated cloud and snow coverage with a New Worlds Observatory. By simulating these observations over a full orbital revolution at a distance of 10 pc we determine that the detection of an obliquity or seasonal terrain change is possible at low inclinations. In agreement with othermore » studies, a 4 m New Worlds Observer can accurately determine the rotation rate of the planet at a success rate from {approx}30% to 80% with only 5 days of observations depending on the signal to noise of the observations. We also attempt simple inversions of these diurnal light curves to sketch a map of the reflecting planet's surface features. This mapping technique is only successful with highly favorable systems and in particular requires that the cloud coverage must be lower than the Earth's average. Our test case of a 2 M {sub +} planet at 7 pc distance with low exo-zodiacal light and 25% cloud coverage produced crude, but successful results. Additionally, with these highly favorable systems NWO may be able to discern the presence of liquid surface water (or other smooth surfaces) though it requires a complex detection available only at crescent phases in high inclination systems.« less

  6. Invariant visual object recognition: a model, with lighting invariance.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Edmund T; Stringer, Simon M

    2006-01-01

    How are invariant representations of objects formed in the visual cortex? We describe a neurophysiological and computational approach which focusses on a feature hierarchy model in which invariant representations can be built by self-organizing learning based on the statistics of the visual input. The model can use temporal continuity in an associative synaptic learning rule with a short term memory trace, and/or it can use spatial continuity in Continuous Transformation learning. The model of visual processing in the ventral cortical stream can build representations of objects that are invariant with respect to translation, view, size, and in this paper we show also lighting. The model has been extended to provide an account of invariant representations in the dorsal visual system of the global motion produced by objects such as looming, rotation, and object-based movement. The model has been extended to incorporate top-down feedback connections to model the control of attention by biased competition in for example spatial and object search tasks. The model has also been extended to account for how the visual system can select single objects in complex visual scenes, and how multiple objects can be represented in a scene.

  7. Multiscale model of light harvesting by photosystem II in plants

    DOE PAGES

    Amarnath, Kapil; Bennett, Doran I. G.; Schneider, Anna R.; ...

    2016-01-19

    The first step of photosynthesis in plants is the absorption of sunlight by pigments in the antenna complexes of photosystem II (PSII), followed by transfer of the nascent excitation energy to the reaction centers, where long-term storage as chemical energy is initiated. Quantum mechanical mechanisms must be invoked to explain the transport of excitation within individual antenna. However, it is unclear how these mechanisms influence transfer across assemblies of antenna and thus the photochemical yield at reaction centers in the functional thylakoid membrane. In this paper, we model light harvesting at the several-hundred-nanometer scale of the PSII membrane, while preservingmore » the dominant quantum effects previously observed in individual complexes. We show that excitation moves diffusively through the antenna with a diffusion length of 50 nm until it reaches a reaction center, where charge separation serves as an energetic trap. The diffusion length is a single parameter that incorporates the enhancing effect of excited state delocalization on individual rates of energy transfer as well as the complex kinetics that arise due to energy transfer and loss by decay to the ground state. The diffusion length determines PSII’s high quantum efficiency in ideal conditions, as well as how it is altered by the membrane morphology and the closure of reaction centers. Finally, we anticipate that the model will be useful in resolving the nonphotochemical quenching mechanisms that PSII employs in conditions of high light stress.« less

  8. Light propagation in linearly perturbed ΛLTB models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sven; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    We apply a generic formalism of light propagation to linearly perturbed spherically symmetric dust models including a cosmological constant. For a comoving observer on the central worldline, we derive the equation of geodesic deviation and perform a suitable spherical harmonic decomposition. This allows to map the abstract gauge-invariant perturbation variables to well-known quantities from weak gravitational lensing like convergence or cosmic shear. The resulting set of differential equations can effectively be solved by a Green's function approach leading to line-of-sight integrals sourced by the perturbation variables on the backward lightcone. The resulting spherical harmonic coefficients of the lensing observables are presented and the shear field is decomposed into its E- and B-modes. Results of this work are an essential tool to add information from linear structure formation to the analysis of spherically symmetric dust models with the purpose of testing the Copernican Principle with multiple cosmological probes.

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study the impact of exposure to light emitting diode (LED) domestic lighting.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Okeremgbo, Bethel; Alhamadah, Fatimah; Jamadar, Sakha; Anthony, Kevin; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2017-04-16

    This study aimed to investigate the biological impact of exposure on domestic light emitting diodes (LED) lighting using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. Nematodes were separately exposed to white LED light covering the range of 380-750 nm, blue light at 450 nm and black light at 380-420 nm for one life cycle (egg to adult) with dark exposure as the control. Each light range induced stress to the nematode C. elegans such as reducing the number of the hatched eggs and/or delayed the maturation of the hatched eggs to the adult stage. In addition, it lowered or prevented the ability of adults to lay eggs and impaired the locomotion in the exposed worms. The observed type of biological stress was also associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to nematodes grown in the dark. It is concluded that the blue light component of white LED light may cause health problems, and further investigation is required to test commercial brands of white LEDs that emit different amounts of blue light.

  10. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} inmore » EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.« less

  11. Modeling Global Urbanization Supported by Nighttime Light Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Urbanization, a major driver of global change, profoundly impacts our physical and social world, for example, altering carbon cycling and climate. Understanding these consequences for better scientific insights and effective decision-making unarguably requires accurate information on urban extent and its spatial distributions. In this study, we developed a cluster-based method to estimate the optimal thresholds and map urban extents from the nighttime light remote sensing data, extended this method to the global domain by developing a computational method (parameterization) to estimate the key parameters in the cluster-based method, and built a consistent 20-year global urban map series to evaluate the time-reactive nature of global urbanization (e.g. 2000 in Fig. 1). Supported by urban maps derived from nightlights remote sensing data and socio-economic drivers, we developed an integrated modeling framework to project future urban expansion by integrating a top-down macro-scale statistical model with a bottom-up urban growth model. With the models calibrated and validated using historical data, we explored urban growth at the grid level (1-km) over the next two decades under a number of socio-economic scenarios. The derived spatiotemporal information of historical and potential future urbanization will be of great value with practical implications for developing adaptation and risk management measures for urban infrastructure, transportation, energy, and water systems when considered together with other factors such as climate variability and change, and high impact weather events.

  12. Research on light rail electric load forecasting based on ARMA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yifan

    2018-04-01

    The article compares a variety of time series models and combines the characteristics of power load forecasting. Then, a light load forecasting model based on ARMA model is established. Based on this model, a light rail system is forecasted. The prediction results show that the accuracy of the model prediction is high.

  13. Retinal endoilluminator toxicity of xenon and light-emitting diode (LED) light source: rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Bahri; Dinç, Erdem; Yilmaz, S Necat; Altiparmak, U Emrah; Yülek, Fatma; Ertekin, Sevda; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Yakın, Mehmet

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates retinal toxicity due to endoillumination with the light-emitting diode (LED) light source in comparison to endoillumination with xenon light source. Twenty-five eyes of 14 New Zealand pigmented rabbits were used in the study. The LED light (Omesis Medical Systems, Turkey) group was composed of 7 right eyes, while the other 7 right eyes constituted the xenon group (420 nm filter, 357mW/cm(2)) (Bright Star; DORC, Zuidland, Netherlands). Eleven untreated left eyes composed the control group. Twenty gauge pars plana incision 1.5 mm behind the limbus was performed in the right eyes. Twenty gauge bullet type fiberoptic endoilluminator was inserted into the eye from the incision without any pars plana vitrectomy. Fiberoptic endoilluminator was placed in such a way that it was directed toward visual streak of the rabbit retina with a 5 mm distance to retinal surface. Endoillumination was then applied for 20 min with a maximum light intensity for LED and xenon light. In left control eyes, no surgical procedure and no endoillumination were performed. One week after the endoillumination procedure, both eyes of the rabbits were enucleated following electroretinography. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin to evaluate morphologic changes. Retina tissues were assessed by active caspase-3 staining. There was no difference in the shape of the waveforms recorded in the eyes endoilluminated with LED light and xenon light sources compared to control eyes both before and after endoillumination application (p > 0.05). Microscopic evaluation of the retinas with hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated that all study groups have normal histologic properties similar to control group. No apoptosis positive cells were found within all sections in all groups. When the LED light source is used with maximum power and limited duration for endoillumination in rabbit eyes it does not produce phototoxic effects that may be detectable by electrophysiology

  14. Computational Modeling to Limit the Impact Displays and Indicator Lights Have on Habitable Volume Operational Lighting Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Brainard, G.; Salazar, G.; Johnston, S.; Schwing, B.; Litaker, H.; Kolomenski, A.; Venus, D.; Tran, K.; Hanifin, J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    NASA has demonstrated an interest in improving astronaut health and performance through the installment of a new lighting countermeasure on the International Space Station. The Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) system is designed to positively influence astronaut health by providing a daily change to light spectrum to improve circadian entrainment. Unfortunately, existing NASA standards and requirements define ambient light level requirements for crew sleep and other tasks, yet the number of light-emitting diode (LED) indicators and displays within a habitable volume is currently uncontrolled. Because each of these light sources has its own unique spectral properties, the additive lighting environment ends up becoming something different from what was planned or researched. Restricting the use of displays and indicators is not a solution because these systems provide beneficial feedback to the crew. The research team for this grant used computer-based computational modeling and real-world lighting mockups to document the impact that light sources other than the ambient lighting system contribute to the ambient spectral lighting environment. In particular, the team was focused on understanding the impacts of long-term tasks located in front of avionics or computer displays. The team also wanted to understand options for mitigating the changes to the ambient light spectrum in the interest of maintaining the performance of a lighting countermeasure. The project utilized a variety of physical and computer-based simulations to determine direct relationships between system implementation and light spectrum. Using real-world data, computer models were built in the commercially available optics analysis software Zemax Optics Studio(c). The team also built a mockup test facility that had the same volume and configuration as one of the Zemax models. The team collected over 1200 spectral irradiance measurements, each representing a different configuration of the mockup

  15. Computational Modeling to Limit the Impact Displays and Indicator Lights Have on Habitable Volume Operational Lighting Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. E.; Salazr, G. A; Brainard, G. C.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to determine design limitations and architectural solutions that limit the impact light from displays and indicator lamps have on the operational environment task lighting and lighting countermeasure spectrum constraints. It is concerning that this innovative architectural lighting system, could be compromised by spectrums from display systems, architectural materials, and structures that are not considered as part a full system design implementation. The introduction of many Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) products to the spacecraft volume that contain LEDs, without consideration to the human factors and biological constraints, is another problem. Displays and indicators are a necessary part of the spacecraft and it is the goal of this research project to determine constraints and solutions that allow these systems to be integrated while minimizing how the lighting environment is modified by them. Due to the potentially broad scope of this endeavor, the project team developed constraints for the evaluation. The evaluation will be on a set of tasks that required significant exposure in the same environment while having a large chance of impacting the light spectrum the crew is expected to receive from the architectural lighting system. The team plans to use recent HRP research on "Net Habitable Volume" [1] to provide the boundary conditions for volume size. A Zemax ® lighting model was developed of a small enclosure that had high intensity overhead lighting and a standard intensity display with LED indicator arrays. The computer model demonstrated a work surface illuminated at a high level by the overhead light source compared to displays and indicators whose light is parallel to the work plane. The overhead lighting oversaturated spectral contributions from the display and indicator at the task work surface. Interestingly, when the observer looked at the displays and LEDs within the small enclosure, their spectral contribution

  16. New meteoroid model predictions for directional impacts on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, Neil; Aguero, Rene C.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive body of data, from meteors, zodiacal light, spacecraft-borne impact detectors (helios, Pioneer, Galileo, and Ulysses), and other sources, forms the basis of a new numerical model for the distributions of interplanetary meteoroids. For each of the five populations in this model it is possible to evaluate meteoroid concentration and flux for oriented surfaces or detectors having arbitrary position and velocity in interplanetary space (Divine, 1992, in preparation). For a spacecraft in geocentric orbit, the effects of gravitational focusing and shielding by the Earth were derived with full attention to the directionality of the particles, both on approach (i.e., relative to a massless Earth) and at the target. This modeling approach was exercised to provide an estimate of meteoroid fluence for each of several oriented surfaces on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).

  17. New meteoroid model predictions for directional impacts on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, Neil; Agueero, Rene C.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive body of data, from meteors, zodiacal light, spacecraft-borne impact detectors (Helios, Pioneer, Galileo, Ulysses), and other sources, forms the basis of a new numerical model for the distributions of interplanetary meteoroids. For each of the five populations in this model it is possible to evaluate meteoroid concentration and flux for oriented surfaces or detectors having arbitrary position and velocity in interplanetary space. For a spacecraft in geocentric orbit the effects of gravitational focussing and shielding by the Earth have been newly derived with full attention to the directionality of the particles, both on approach (i.e., relative to a massless Earth) and at the target. This modeling approach was exercised to provide an estimate of meteoroid fluence for each of several oriented surfaces on LDEF.

  18. Modeling and simulation of RF photoinjectors for coherent light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; Dohlus, M.

    2018-05-01

    We propose a three-dimensional fully electromagnetic numerical approach for the simulation of RF photoinjectors for coherent light sources. The basic idea consists in incorporating a self-consistent photoemission model within a particle tracking code. The generation of electron beams in the injector is determined by the quantum efficiency (QE) of the cathode, the intensity profile of the driving laser as well as by the accelerating field and magnetic focusing conditions in the gun. The total charge emitted during an emission cycle can be limited by the space charge field at the cathode. Furthermore, the time and space dependent electromagnetic field at the cathode may induce a transient modulation of the QE due to surface barrier reduction of the emitting layer. In our modeling approach, all these effects are taken into account. The beam particles are generated dynamically according to the local QE of the cathode and the time dependent laser intensity profile. For the beam dynamics, a tracking code based on the Lienard-Wiechert retarded field formalism is employed. This code provides the single particle trajectories as well as the transient space charge field distribution at the cathode. As an application, the PITZ injector is considered. Extensive electron bunch emission simulations are carried out for different operation conditions of the injector, in the source limited as well as in the space charge limited emission regime. In both cases, fairly good agreement between measurements and simulations is obtained.

  19. 40 CFR 86.097-9 - Emission standards for 1997 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....097-9 Emission standards for 1997 and later model year light-duty trucks. (a)(1) Standards—(i) Light... standards. (ii) Heavy light-duty trucks. (A) Exhaust emissions from 1997 and later model year heavy light... model year light-duty trucks from compliance at low altitude with the emission standards set forth in...

  20. Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time: Searching for Young Stars in K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Nathan; Mann, Andrew W.

    2017-06-01

    Nearby young, open clusters such as the Hyades, Pleiades, and Praesepe provide an important reference point for the properties of stellar systems in general. In each cluster, all stars are of the same known age. As such, observations of planetary systems around these stars can be used to gain insight into the early stages of planetary system formation. K2, the revived Kepler mission, has provided a vast number of light curves for young stars in the and elsewhere in the K2 field. We aim to compute rotational periods from sunspot patterns for all K2 target stars and use gyrochronometric relationships derived from cluster stars to determine their ages. From there, we will search for planets around young stars outside the clusters with the ultimate goal of shedding light on how planets and planetary systems evolve with time.

  1. Light charged Higgs boson scenario in 3-Higgs doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeroyd, A. G.; Moretti, Stefano; Yagyu, Kei; Yildirim, Emine

    2017-08-01

    The constraints from the measurements of the B → Xsγ decay rate on the parameter space of 3-Higgs Doublet Models (3HDMs), where all the doublets have nonzero vacuum expectation values, are studied at the next-to-leading order in QCD. In order to naturally avoid the presence of flavour changing neutral currents at the tree level, we impose two softly-broken discrete Z2 symmetries. This gives rise to five independent types of 3HDMs that differ in their Yukawa couplings. We show that in all these 3HDMs (including the case of type-II-like Yukawa interactions) both masses of the two charged Higgs bosons mH1± and mH2± can be smaller than the top mass mt while complying with the constraints from B → Xsγ. As an interesting phenomenological consequence, the branching ratios of the charged Higgs bosons decay into the cb final states can be as large as 80% when their masses are taken to be below mt in two of the five 3HDMs (named as Type-Y and Type-Z). This light charged Higgs boson scenario provides a hallmark 3HDM signature that cannot be realised in Z2 symmetric 2-Higgs doublet models. We find that in the Type-Y and Type-Z 3HDMs the scenario with 90GeV < mH1±, mH2± < mt is ruled out by the direct searches at the LHC, but in the Type-Y 3HDM 80GeV < mH1± < 90GeV and 90GeV < mH2± < mt is allowed by B → Xsγ and direct searches at LEP2, Tevatron and LHC due to the reduced sensitivity of these searches to the degenerate case mH1±≈ mW±. The cases where only one or both charged Higgs bosons are above the top quark mass are also naturally allowed in the both Type-Y and Type-Z 3HDMs.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation for light propagation in 3D tooth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yongji; Jacques, Steven L.

    2011-03-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was implemented in a three dimensional tooth model to simulate the light propagation in the tooth for antibiotic photodynamic therapy and other laser therapy. The goal of this research is to estimate the light energy deposition in the target region of tooth with given light source information, tooth optical properties and tooth structure. Two use cases were presented to demonstrate the practical application of this model. One case was comparing the isotropic point source and narrow beam dosage distribution and the other case was comparing different incident points for the same light source. This model will help the doctor for PDT design in the tooth.

  3. Monte Carlo model of light transport in multi-layered tubular organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunyao; Zhu, Jingping; Zhang, Ning

    2017-02-01

    We present a Monte Carlo static light migration model (Endo-MCML) to simulate endoscopic optical spectroscopy for tubular organs such as esophagus and colon. The model employs multi-layered hollow cylinder which emitting and receiving light both from the inner boundary to meet the conditions of endoscopy. Inhomogeneous sphere can be added in tissue layers to model cancer or other abnormal changes. The 3D light distribution and exit angle would be recorded as results. The accuracy of the model has been verified by Multi-layered Monte Carlo(MCML) method and NIRFAST. This model can be used for the forward modeling of light transport during endoscopically diffuse optical spectroscopy, light scattering spectroscopy, reflectance spectroscopy and other static optical detection or imaging technologies.

  4. Relativistic quantum optics: The relativistic invariance of the light-matter interaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo

    2018-05-01

    In this article we discuss the invariance under general changes of reference frame of all the physical predictions of particle detector models in quantum field theory in general and, in particular, of those used in quantum optics to model atoms interacting with light. We find explicitly how the light-matter interaction Hamiltonians change under general coordinate transformations, and analyze the subtleties of the Hamiltonians commonly used to describe the light-matter interaction when relativistic motion is taken into account.

  5. Ferns, mosses and liverworts as model systems for light-mediated chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2017-11-01

    Light-induced chloroplast movement is found in most plant species, including algae and land plants. In land plants with multiple small chloroplasts, under weak light conditions, the chloroplasts move towards the light and accumulate on the periclinal cell walls to efficiently perceive light for photosynthesis (the accumulation response). Under strong light conditions, chloroplasts escape from light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). In most plant species, blue light induces chloroplast movement, and phototropin receptor kinases are the blue light receptors. Molecular mechanisms for photoreceptors, signal transduction and chloroplast motility systems are being studied using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, to further understand the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary history of chloroplast movement in green plants, analyses using other plant systems are required. Here, we review recent works on chloroplast movement in green algae, liverwort, mosses and ferns that provide new insights on chloroplast movement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fast and accurate modeling of stray light in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Jean-Claude

    2017-11-01

    The first problem to be solved in most optical designs with respect to stray light is that of internal reflections on the several surfaces of individual lenses and mirrors, and on the detector itself. The level of stray light ratio can be considerably reduced by taking into account the stray light during the optimization to determine solutions in which the irradiance due to these ghosts is kept to the minimum possible value. Unhappily, the routines available in most optical design software's, for example CODE V, do not permit all alone to make exact quantitative calculations of the stray light due to these ghosts. Therefore, the engineer in charge of the optical design is confronted to the problem of using two different software's, one for the design and optimization, for example CODE V, one for stray light analysis, for example ASAP. This makes a complete optimization very complex . Nevertheless, using special techniques and combinations of the routines available in CODE V, it is possible to have at its disposal a software macro tool to do such an analysis quickly and accurately, including Monte-Carlo ray tracing, or taking into account diffraction effects. This analysis can be done in a few minutes, to be compared to hours with other software's.

  7. The effect of ambient lighting on Laser Doppler Imaging of a standardized cutaneous injury model

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Alan Chuong Q; Hei, Erik La; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew JA

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential confounding effects of four different types of ambient lighting on the results of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) of a standardized cutaneous injury model. Methods: After applying a mechanical stimulus to the anterior forearm of a healthy volunteer and inducing a wheal and arteriolar flare (the Triple response), we used a Laser Doppler Line Scanner (LDLS) to image the forearm under four different types of ambient lighting: light-emitting-diode (LED), compact fluorescent lighting (CFL), halogen, daylight, and darkness as a control. A spectrometer was used to measure the intensity of light energy at 785 nm, the wavelength used by the scanner for measurement under each type of ambient lighting. Results: Neither the LED nor CFL bulbs emitted detectable light energy at a wavelength of 785 nm. The color-based representation of arbitrary perfusion unit (APU) values of the Triple response measured by the scanner was similar between darkness, LED, and CFL light. Daylight emitted 2 mW at 785 nm, with a slight variation tending more towards lower APU values compared to darkness. Halogen lighting emitted 6 mW of light energy at 785 nm rendering the color-based representation impossible to interpret. Conclusions: Halogen lighting and daylight have the potential to confound results of LDI of cutaneous injuries whereas LED and CFL lighting did not. Any potential sources of daylight should be reduced and halogen lighting completely covered or turned off prior to wound imaging. PMID:29348978

  8. The effect of ambient lighting on Laser Doppler Imaging of a standardized cutaneous injury model.

    PubMed

    Pham, Alan Chuong Q; Hei, Erik La; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew Ja

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential confounding effects of four different types of ambient lighting on the results of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) of a standardized cutaneous injury model. After applying a mechanical stimulus to the anterior forearm of a healthy volunteer and inducing a wheal and arteriolar flare (the Triple response), we used a Laser Doppler Line Scanner (LDLS) to image the forearm under four different types of ambient lighting: light-emitting-diode (LED), compact fluorescent lighting (CFL), halogen, daylight, and darkness as a control. A spectrometer was used to measure the intensity of light energy at 785 nm, the wavelength used by the scanner for measurement under each type of ambient lighting. Neither the LED nor CFL bulbs emitted detectable light energy at a wavelength of 785 nm. The color-based representation of arbitrary perfusion unit (APU) values of the Triple response measured by the scanner was similar between darkness, LED, and CFL light. Daylight emitted 2 mW at 785 nm, with a slight variation tending more towards lower APU values compared to darkness. Halogen lighting emitted 6 mW of light energy at 785 nm rendering the color-based representation impossible to interpret. Halogen lighting and daylight have the potential to confound results of LDI of cutaneous injuries whereas LED and CFL lighting did not. Any potential sources of daylight should be reduced and halogen lighting completely covered or turned off prior to wound imaging.

  9. Demand for Light Duty Trucks : The Wharton EFA Motor Vehicle Demand Model (Mark II).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary model of U.S. light-duty vehicle demand is presented which contains an integrated analysis of automobiles and light trucks (under 10,000 lbs. GVW). The model has been estimated using both cross-section and time-series data, and is a dev...

  10. Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time: Searching for Young Stars in K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Nathan Ryan; Mann, Andrew; Rizzuto, Aaron

    2018-01-01

    Observations of planetary systems around young stars provide insight into the early stages of planetary system formation. Nearby young open clusters such as the Hyades, Pleiades, and Praesepe provide important benchmarks for the properties of stellar systems in general. These clusters are all known to be less than 1 Gyr old, making them ideal targets for a survey of young planetary systems. Few transiting planets have been detected around clusters stars, however, so this alone is too small of a sample. K2, the revived Kepler mission, has provided a vast number of light curves for young stars in clusters and elsewhere in the K2 field. This provides us with the opportunity to extend the sample of young systems to field stars while calibrating with cluster stars. We compute rotational periods from starspot patterns for ~36,000 K2 targets and use gyrochronological relationships derived from cluster stars to determine their ages. From there, we have begun searching for planets around young stars outside the clusters with the ultimate goal of shedding light on how planets and planetary systems evolve in their early, most formative years.

  11. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of ade...

  12. The Involvement of the Oxidative Stress in Murine Blue LED Light-Induced Retinal Damage Model.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maho; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of study was to establish a mouse model of blue light emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal damage and to evaluate the effects of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Mice were exposed to 400 or 800 lx blue LED light for 2 h, and were evaluated for retinal damage 5 d later by electroretinogram amplitude and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. Additionally, we investigated the effect of blue LED light exposure on shorts-wave-sensitive opsin (S-opsin), and rhodopsin expression by immunohistochemistry. Blue LED light induced light intensity dependent retinal damage and led to collapse of S-opsin and altered rhodopsin localization from inner and outer segments to ONL. Conversely, NAC administered at 100 or 250 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice a day, before dark adaptation and before light exposure. NAC protected the blue LED light-induced retinal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Further, blue LED light-induced decreasing of S-opsin levels and altered rhodopsin localization, which were suppressed by NAC. We established a mouse model of blue LED light-induced retinal damage and these findings indicated that oxidative stress was partially involved in blue LED light-induced retinal damage.

  13. Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time (ZEIT). IV. Seven Transiting Planets in the Praesepe Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Gaidos, Eric; Vanderburg, Andrew; Rizzuto, Aaron C.; Ansdell, Megan; Medina, Jennifer Vanessa; Mace, Gregory N.; Kraus, Adam L.; Sokal, Kimberly R.

    2017-02-01

    Open clusters and young stellar associations are attractive sites to search for planets and to test theories of planet formation, migration, and evolution. We present our search for, and characterization of, transiting planets in the 800 Myr old Praesepe (Beehive, M44) Cluster from K2 light curves. We identify seven planet candidates, six of which we statistically validate to be real planets, the last of which requires more data. For each host star, we obtain high-resolution NIR spectra to measure its projected rotational broadening and radial velocity, the latter of which we use to confirm cluster membership. We combine low-resolution spectra with the known cluster distance and metallicity to provide precise temperatures, masses, radii, and luminosities for the host stars. Combining our measurements of rotational broadening, rotation periods, and our derived stellar radii, we show that all planetary orbits are consistent with alignment to their host star’s rotation. We fit the K2 light curves, including priors on stellar density to put constraints on the planetary eccentricities, all of which are consistent with zero. The difference between the number of planets found in Praesepe and Hyades (8 planets, ≃ 800 Myr) and a similar data set for Pleiades (0 planets, ≃125 Myr) suggests a trend with age, but may be due to incompleteness of current search pipelines for younger, faster-rotating stars. We see increasing evidence that some planets continue to lose atmosphere past 800 Myr, as now two planets at this age have radii significantly larger than their older counterparts from Kepler.

  14. A Geometric Model for Specularity Prediction on Planar Surfaces with Multiple Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Morgand, Alexandre; Tamaazousti, Mohamed; Bartoli, Adrien

    2018-05-01

    Specularities are often problematic in computer vision since they impact the dynamic range of the image intensity. A natural approach would be to predict and discard them using computer graphics models. However, these models depend on parameters which are difficult to estimate (light sources, objects' material properties and camera). We present a geometric model called JOLIMAS: JOint LIght-MAterial Specularity, which predicts the shape of specularities. JOLIMAS is reconstructed from images of specularities observed on a planar surface. It implicitly includes light and material properties, which are intrinsic to specularities. This model was motivated by the observation that specularities have a conic shape on planar surfaces. The conic shape is obtained by projecting a fixed quadric on the planar surface. JOLIMAS thus predicts the specularity using a simple geometric approach with static parameters (object material and light source shape). It is adapted to indoor light sources such as light bulbs and fluorescent lamps. The prediction has been tested on synthetic and real sequences. It works in a multi-light context by reconstructing a quadric for each light source with special cases such as lights being switched on or off. We also used specularity prediction for dynamic retexturing and obtained convincing rendering results. Further results are presented as supplementary video material, which can be found on the Computer Society Digital Library at http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/TVCG.2017.2677445.

  15. Modeling the role of mid-wavelength cones in circadian responses to light

    PubMed Central

    Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria; Gronfier, Claude; De Vanssay, Wena; Flamant, Frédéric; Cooper, Howard M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Non-visual responses to light, such as photic entrainment of the circadian clock, involve intrinsically light sensitive melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells as well as rod and cone photoreceptors. However, previous studies have been unable to demonstrate a specific contribution of cones in the photic control of circadian responses to light. Using a mouse model that specifically lacks mid-wavelength (MW) cones we show that these photoreceptors play a significant role in light entrainment and in phase shifting of the circadian oscillator. The contribution of MW cones is mainly observed for light exposures of short duration and towards the longer wavelength region of the spectrum, consistent with the known properties of this opsin. Modelling the contributions of the various photoreceptors stresses the importance of considering the particular spectral, temporal and irradiance response domains of the photopigments when assessing their role and contribution in circadian responses to light. PMID:17329208

  16. Transcranial Red and Near Infrared Light Transmission in a Cadaveric Model

    PubMed Central

    Jagdeo, Jared R.; Adams, Lauren E.; Brody, Neil I.; Siegel, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective Low level light therapy has garnered significant interest within the past decade. The exact molecular mechanisms of how red and near infrared light result in physiologic modulation are not fully understood. Heme moieties and copper within cells are red and near infrared light photoreceptors that induce the mitochondrial respiratory chain component cytochrome C oxidase, resulting in a cascade linked to cytoprotection and cellular metabolism. The copper centers in cytochrome C oxidase have a broad absorption range that peaks around 830 nm. Several in vitro and in vivo animal and human models exist that have demonstrated the benefits of red light and near infrared light for various conditions. Clinical applications for low level light therapy are varied. One study in particular demonstrated improved durable functional outcomes status post-stroke in patients treated with near infrared low level light therapy compared to sham treatment [1]. Despite previous data suggesting the beneficial effect in treating multiple conditions, including stroke, with low level light therapy, limited data exists that measures transmission in a human model. Study Design/Materials and Methods To investigate this idea, we measured the transmission of near infrared light energy, using red light for purposes of comparison, through intact cadaver soft tissue, skull bones, and brain using a commercially available LED device at 830 nm and 633 nm. Results Our results demonstrate that near infrared measurably penetrates soft tissue, bone and brain parenchyma in the formalin preserved cadaveric model, in comparison to negligible red light transmission in the same conditions. Conclusion These findings indicate that near infrared light can penetrate formalin fixed soft tissue, bone and brain and implicate that benefits observed in clinical studies are potentially related to direct action of near infrared light on neural tissue. PMID:23077622

  17. Modelling the effect of diffuse light on canopy photosynthesis in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavazzoni, James; Volk, Tyler; Tubiello, Francesco; Monje, Oscar; Janes, H. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A layered canopy model was used to analyze the effects of diffuse light on canopy gross photosynthesis in controlled environment plant growth chambers, where, in contrast to the field, highly diffuse light can occur at high irradiance. The model suggests that high diffuse light fractions (approximately 0.7) and irradiance (1400 micromoles m-2 s-1) may enhance crop life-cycle canopy gross photosynthesis for hydroponic wheat by about 20% compared to direct light at the same irradiance. Our simulations suggest that high accuracy is not needed in specifying diffuse light fractions in chambers between approximately 0.7 and 1, because simulated photosynthesis for closed canopies plateau in this range. We also examined the effect of leaf angle distribution on canopy photosynthesis under growth chamber conditions, as these distributions determine canopy extinction coefficients for direct and diffuse light. We show that the spherical leaf angle distribution is not suitable for modeling photosynthesis of planophile canopies (e.g., soybean and peanut) in growth chambers. Also, the absorption of the light reflected from the surface below the canopy should generally be included in model simulations, as the corresponding albedo values in the photosynthetically active range may be quite high in growth chambers (e.g., approximately 0.5). In addition to the modeling implications, our results suggest that diffuse light conditions should be considered when drawing conclusions from experiments in controlled environments.

  18. AutoLens: Automated Modeling of a Strong Lens's Light, Mass and Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, J. W.; Dye, S.; Massey, Richard J.

    2018-05-01

    This work presents AutoLens, the first entirely automated modeling suite for the analysis of galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. AutoLens simultaneously models the lens galaxy's light and mass whilst reconstructing the extended source galaxy on an adaptive pixel-grid. The method's approach to source-plane discretization is amorphous, adapting its clustering and regularization to the intrinsic properties of the lensed source. The lens's light is fitted using a superposition of Sersic functions, allowing AutoLens to cleanly deblend its light from the source. Single component mass models representing the lens's total mass density profile are demonstrated, which in conjunction with light modeling can detect central images using a centrally cored profile. Decomposed mass modeling is also shown, which can fully decouple a lens's light and dark matter and determine whether the two component are geometrically aligned. The complexity of the light and mass models are automatically chosen via Bayesian model comparison. These steps form AutoLens's automated analysis pipeline, such that all results in this work are generated without any user-intervention. This is rigorously tested on a large suite of simulated images, assessing its performance on a broad range of lens profiles, source morphologies and lensing geometries. The method's performance is excellent, with accurate light, mass and source profiles inferred for data sets representative of both existing Hubble imaging and future Euclid wide-field observations.

  19. Modelling of salad plants growth and physiological status in vitamin space greenhouse during lighting regime optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalova, Irina; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana; Erokhin, Alexei; Yakovleva, Olga; Lapach, Sergij; Radchenko, Stanislav; Znamenskii, Artem; Tarakanov, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of the photoautotrophic element as part of bio-engineering life-support systems is determined substantially by lighting regime. The artificial light regime optimization complexity results from the wide range of plant physiological functions controlled by light: trophic, informative, biosynthetical, etc. An average photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), light spectral composition and pulsed light effects on the crop growth and plant physiological status were studied in the multivariate experiment, including 16 independent experiments in 3 replicates. Chinese cabbage plants (Brassica chinensis L.), cultivar Vesnianka, were grown during 24 days in a climatic chamber under white and red light-emitting diodes (LEDs): photoperiod 24 h, PPFD from 260 to 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s), red light share in the spectrum varying from 33% to 73%, pulsed (pulse period from 30 to 501 µs) and non-pulsed lighting. The regressions of plant photosynthetic and biochemical indexes as well as the crop specific productivity in response to the selected parameters of lighting regime were calculated. Developed models of crop net photosynthesis and dark respiration revealed the most intense gas exchange area corresponding to PPFD level 450 - 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s) with red light share in the spectrum about 60% and the pulse length 30 µs with a pulse period from 300 to 400 µs. Shoot dry weight increased monotonically in response to the increasing PPFD and changed depending on the pulse period under stabilized PPFD level. An increase in ascorbic acid content in the shoot biomass was revealed when increasing red light share in spectrum from 33% to 73%. The lighting regime optimization criterion (Q) was designed for the vitamin space greenhouse as the maximum of a crop yield square on its ascorbic acid concentration, divided by the light energy consumption. The regression model of optimization criterion was constructed based on the experimental data. The analysis of the model made it

  20. Lead Apron Inspection Using Infrared Light: A Model Validation Study.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Sarah E; Otero, Hansel J; Fricke, Stanley T

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate defect detection in radiation protective apparel, typically called lead aprons, using infrared (IR) thermal imaging. The use of IR lighting eliminates the need for access to x-ray-emitting equipment and radiation dose to the inspector. The performance of radiation workers was prospectively assessed using both a tactile inspection and the IR inspection with a lead apron phantom over a 2-month period. The phantom was a modified lead apron with a series of nine holes of increasing diameter ranging from 2 to 35 mm in accordance with typical rejection criteria. Using the tactile method, a radiation worker would feel for the defects in the lead apron. For the IR inspection, a 250-W IR light source was used to illuminate the lead apron phantom; an IR camera detected the transmitted radiation. The radiation workers evaluated two stills from the IR camera. From the 31 participants inspecting the lead apron phantom with the tactile method, only 2 participants (6%) correctly discovered all 9 holes and 1 participant reported a defect that was not there; 10 of the 20 participants (50%) correctly identified all 9 holes using the IR method. Using a weighted average, 5.4 defects were detected with the tactile method and 7.5 defects were detected with the IR method. IR light can penetrate an apron's protective outer fabric and illuminate defects below the current standard rejection size criteria. The IR method improves defect detectability as compared with the tactile method. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cold light dark matter in extended seesaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulebnane, Sami; Heeck, Julian; Nguyen, Anne; Teresi, Daniele

    2018-04-01

    We present a thorough discussion of light dark matter produced via freeze-in in two-body decays A→ B DM . If A and B are quasi-degenerate, the dark matter particle has a cold spectrum even for keV masses. We show this explicitly by calculating the transfer function that encodes the impact on structure formation. As examples for this setup we study extended seesaw mechanisms with a spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry, such as the inverse seesaw. The keV-scale pseudo-Goldstone dark matter particle is then naturally produced cold by the decays of the quasi-degenerate right-handed neutrinos.

  2. Standard model light-by-light scattering in SANC: Analytic and numeric evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bardin, D. Yu., E-mail: bardin@nu.jinr.ru; Kalinovskaya, L. V., E-mail: kalinov@nu.jinr.ru; Uglov, E. D., E-mail: corner@nu.jinr.r

    2010-11-15

    The implementation of the Standard Model process {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} through a fermion and boson loop into the framework of SANC system and additional precomputation modules used for calculation of massive box diagrams are described. The computation of this process takes into account nonzero mass of loop particles. The covariant and helicity amplitudes for this process, some particular cases of D{sub 0} and C{sub 0} Passarino-Veltman functions, and also numerical results of corresponding SANC module evaluation are presented. Whenever possible, the results are compared with those existing in the literature.

  3. Modelling of a laser-pumped light source for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Hanna, George B.; Neil, Mark A. A.

    2008-09-01

    A white light source, based on illumination of a yellow phosphor with a fibre-coupled blue-violet diode laser, has been designed and built for use in endoscopic surgery. This narrow light probe can be integrated into a standard laparoscope or inserted into the patient separately via a needle. We present a Monte Carlo model of light scattering and phosphorescence within the phosphor/silicone matrix at the probe tip, and measurements of the colour, intensity, and uniformity of the illumination. Images obtained under illumination with this light source are also presented, demonstrating the improvement in illumination quality over existing endoscopic light sources. This new approach to endoscopic lighting has the advantages of compact design, improved ergonomics, and more uniform illumination in comparison with current technologies.

  4. Modeling of the Autofluorescence Spectra of the Crystalline Lens with Cataract Taking into Account Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, K. A.; Salmin, V. V.; Lazarenko, V. I.; Gar‧kavenko, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    The model of the autofluorescence spectrum formation of a crystalline lens taking into account light scattering was presented. Cross sections of extinction, scattering and absorption were obtained numerically for models of normal crystalline lens and cataract according to the Mie theory for polydisperse systems. To validate the model, data on the autofluorescence spectra of the normal lens and cataracts were obtained using an experimental ophthalmologic spectrofluorometer with excitation by UV light emitting diodes. In the framework of the model, the influence of the lens light scattering on the shape of the luminescence spectrum was estimated. It was found that the changes in the fluorescence spectrum of lenses with cataracts can be completely interpreted by the light scattering.

  5. Kinetic modeling of the light-dependent photosynthetic activity of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yeoung-Sang; Park, Jong Moon

    2003-08-05

    Light-dependent photosynthesis of Chlorella vulgaris was investigated by using a novel photosynthesis measurement system that could cover wide ranges of incident light and cell density and reproduce accurate readings. Various photosynthesis models, which have been reported elsewhere, were classified and/or reformulated based upon the underlying hypotheses of the light dependence of the algal photosynthesis. Four types of models were derived, which contained distinct light-related variables such as the average or local photon flux density (APFD or LPFD) and the average or local photon absorption rate (APAR or LPAR). According to our experimental results, the LPFD and LPAR models could predict the experimental data more accurately although the APFD and APAR models have been widely used for the kinetic study of microalgal photosynthesis. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 83: 303-311, 2003.

  6. Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission Light Curves and Power Density Spectra in the ICMART Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter σ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high σ flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  7. PREDICTIVE MODELING OF LIGHT-INDUCED MORTALITY OF ENTEROCOCCI FAECALIS IN RECREATIONAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One approach to predictive modeling of biological contamination of recreational waters involves the application of process-based approaches that consider microbial sources, hydrodynamic transport, and microbial fate. This presentation focuses on one important fate process, light-...

  8. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Hinschberger, Y.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trendsmore » and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.« less

  9. Science yield modeling with the Exoplanet Open-Source Imaging Mission Simulator (EXOSIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacroix, Christian; Savransky, Dmitry; Garrett, Daniel; Lowrance, Patrick; Morgan, Rhonda

    2016-08-01

    We report on our ongoing development of EXOSIMS and mission simulation results for WFIRST. We present the interface control and the modular structure of the software, along with corresponding prototypes and class definitions for some of the software modules. More specifically, we focus on describing the main steps of our high-fidelity mission simulator EXOSIMS, i.e., the completeness, optical system and zodiacal light modules definition, the target list module filtering, and the creation of a planet population within our simulated universe module. For the latter, we introduce the integration of a recent mass-radius model from the FORECASTER software. We also provide custom modules dedicated to WFIRST using both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) for detection and characterization, respectively. In that context, we show and discuss the results of some preliminary WFIRST simulations, focusing on comparing different methods of integration time calculation, through ensembles (large numbers) of survey simulations.

  10. A Numerical Method for Calculating Stellar Occultation Light Curves from an Arbitrary Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, D. M.; Elliot, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    We present a method for speeding up numerical calculations of a light curve for a stellar occultation by a planetary atmosphere with an arbitrary atmospheric model that has spherical symmetry. This improved speed makes least-squares fitting for model parameters practical. Our method takes as input several sets of values for the first two radial derivatives of the refractivity at different values of model parameters, and interpolates to obtain the light curve at intermediate values of one or more model parameters. It was developed for small occulting bodies such as Pluto and Triton, but is applicable to planets of all sizes. We also present the results of a series of tests showing that our method calculates light curves that are correct to an accuracy of 10(exp -4) of the unocculted stellar flux. The test benchmarks are (i) an atmosphere with a l/r dependence of temperature, which yields an analytic solution for the light curve, (ii) an atmosphere that produces an exponential refraction angle, and (iii) a small-planet isothermal model. With our method, least-squares fits to noiseless data also converge to values of parameters with fractional errors of no more than 10(exp -4), with the largest errors occurring in small planets. These errors are well below the precision of the best stellar occultation data available. Fits to noisy data had formal errors consistent with the level of synthetic noise added to the light curve. We conclude: (i) one should interpolate refractivity derivatives and then form light curves from the interpolated values, rather than interpolating the light curves themselves; (ii) for the most accuracy, one must specify the atmospheric model for radii many scale heights above half light; and (iii) for atmospheres with smoothly varying refractivity with altitude, light curves can be sampled as coarsely as two points per scale height.

  11. Modeling of low-finesse, extrinsic fiber optic Fabry-Perot white light interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cheng; Tian, Zhipeng; Wang, Anbo

    2012-06-01

    This article introduces an approach for modeling the fiber optic low-finesse extrinsic Fabry-Pérot Interferometers (EFPI), aiming to address signal processing problems in EFPI demodulation algorithms based on white light interferometry. The main goal is to seek physical interpretations to correlate the sensor spectrum with the interferometer geometry (most importantly, the optical path difference). Because the signal demodulation quality and reliability hinge heavily on the understanding of such relationships, the model sheds light on optimizing the sensor performance.

  12. [Light response characteristics of photosynthesis and model comparison of Distylium chinense in different flooding durations].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-bin; Cheng, Rui-mei; Xiao, Wen-fa; Guo, Quan-shui; Wang, Na

    2015-04-01

    The light responses of photosynthesis of two-year-old Distytum chinense seedlings subjected to a simulated reservoir flooding environment in autumn and winter seasons were measured by using a Li-6400 XT portable photosynthesis system, and the light response curves were fitted and analyzed by three models of the rectangular hyperbola, non-rectangular hyperbola and modified rectangular hyperbola to investigate the applicability of different light response models for the D. chinense in different flooding durations and the adaption regulation of light response parameters to flooding stress. The results showed that the fitting effect of the non-rectangular hyperbola model for light response process of D. chinense under normal growth condition and under short-term flooding (15 days of flooding) was better than that of the other two models, while the fitting effect of the modified rectangular hyperbola model for light response process of D. chinense under longer-term flooding (30, 45 and 60 days of flooding) was better than that of the other two models. The modified rectangular hyperbola model gave the best fitted results of light compensation point (LCP) , maximum net photosynthetic rate (P(n max)) and light saturation point (LSP), and the non-rectangular hyperbola model gave the best fitted result of dark respiration rate (R(d)). The apparent quantum yield (Φ), P(n max) and LSP of D. chinense gradually decreased, and the LCP and R(d) of D. chinense gradually increased in early flooding (30 days), but D. chinense gradually produced adaptability for flooding as the flooding duration continued to increase, and various physiological indexes were gradually stabilized. Thus, this species has adaptability to some degree to the flooding environment.

  13. Model predictions of ocular injury from 1315-nm laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polhamus, Garrett D.; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Thomas, Robert J.; Foltz, Michael

    2003-06-01

    With the advent of future weapons systems that employ high energy lasers, the 1315 nm wavelength will present a new laser safety hazard to the armed forces. Experiments in non-human primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular and retinal lesions, as a function of pulse duration and spot size at the cornea. To improve our understanding of this phenomena, there is a need for a mathematical model that properly predicts these injuries and their dependence on appropriate exposure parameters. This paper describes the use of a finite difference model of laser thermal injury in the cornea and retina. The model was originally developed for use with shorter wavelength laser irradiation, and as such, requires estimation of several key parameters used in the computations. The predictions from the model are compared to the experimental data, and conclusions are drawn regarding the ability of the model to properly follow the published observations at this wavelength.

  14. Comparison of three light doses in the photodynamic treatment of actinic keratosis using mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Betrouni, Nacim; Tylcz, Jean-Baptiste; Vermandel, Maximilien; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality for various diseases, especially for cancer therapy. Although high efficacy is demonstrated for PDT using standardized protocols in nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses, alternative light doses expected to increase efficiency, to reduce adverse effects or to expand the use of PDT, are still being evaluated and refined. We propose a comparison of the three most common light doses in the treatment of actinic keratosis with 5-aminolevulinic acid PDT through mathematical modeling. The proposed model is based on an iterative procedure that involves determination of the local fluence rate, updating of the local optical properties, and estimation of the local damage induced by the therapy. This model was applied on a simplified skin sample model including an actinic keratosis lesion, with three different light doses (red light dose, 37 J/cm2, 75 mW/cm2, 500 s blue light dose, 10 J/cm2, 10 mW/cm2, 1000 s and daylight dose, 9000 s). Results analysis shows that the three studied light doses, although all efficient, lead to variable local damage. Defining reference damage enables the nonoptimal parameters for the current light doses to be refined and the treatment to be more suitable.

  15. Three-dimensional light-tissue interaction models for bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, D.; Allard, M.; Henkelman, R. M.; Vitkin, I. A.

    2005-09-01

    Many diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in medical physics today take advantage of the unique properties of light and its interaction with tissues. Because light scatters in tissue, our ability to develop these techniques depends critically on our knowledge of the distribution of light in tissue. Solutions to the diffusion equation can provide such information, but often lack the flexibility required for more general problems that involve, for instance, inhomogeneous optical properties, light polarization, arbitrary three-dimensional geometries, or arbitrary scattering. Monte Carlo techniques, which statistically sample the light distribution in tissue, offer a better alternative to analytical models. First, we discuss our implementation of a validated three-dimensional polarization-sensitive Monte Carlo algorithm and demonstrate its generality with respect to the geometry and scattering models it can treat. Second, we apply our model to bioluminescence tomography. After appropriate genetic modifications to cell lines, bioluminescence can be used as an indicator of cell activity, and is often used to study tumour growth and treatment in animal models. However, the amount of light escaping the animal is strongly dependent on the position and size of the tumour. Using forward models and structural data from magnetic resonance imaging, we show how the models can help to determine the location and size of tumour made of bioluminescent cancer cells in the brain of a mouse.

  16. Lumped Parameter Model (LPM) for Light-Duty Vehicles

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s Lumped Parameter Model (LPM) is a free, desktop computer application that estimates the effectiveness (CO2 Reduction) of various technology combinations or “packages,” in a manner that accounts for synergies between technologies.

  17. New Spectral Evidence of an Unaccounted Component of the Near-infrared Extragalactic Background Light from the CIBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Shuji; Arai, Toshiaki; Bock, James J.; Cooray, Asantha; Korngut, Phillip M.; Kim, Min Gyu; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Dae Hee; Levenson, Louis R.; Matsumoto, Toshio; Onishi, Yosuke; Shirahata, Mai; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Zemcov, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) captures the total integrated emission from stars and galaxies throughout the cosmic history. The amplitude of the near-infrared EBL from space absolute photometry observations has been controversial and depends strongly on the modeling and subtraction of the zodiacal light (ZL) foreground. We report the first measurement of the diffuse background spectrum at 0.8-1.7 μm from the CIBER experiment. The observations were obtained with an absolute spectrometer over two flights in multiple sky fields to enable the subtraction of ZL, stars, terrestrial emission, and diffuse Galactic light. After subtracting foregrounds and accounting for systematic errors, we find the nominal EBL brightness, assuming the Kelsall ZL model, is {42.7}-10.6+11.9 nW m-2 sr-1 at 1.4 μm. We also analyzed the data using the Wright ZL model, which results in a worse statistical fit to the data and an unphysical EBL, falling below the known background light from galaxies at λ < 1.3 μm. Using a model-independent analysis based on the minimum EBL brightness, we find an EBL brightness of {28.7}-3.3+5.1 nWm-2 sr-1 at 1.4 μm. While the derived EBL amplitude strongly depends on the ZL model, we find that we cannot fit the spectral data to ZL, Galactic emission, and EBL from solely integrated galactic light from galaxy counts. The results require a new diffuse component, such as an additional foreground or an excess EBL with a redder spectrum than that of ZL.

  18. Modelling of light pollution in suburban areas using remotely sensed imagery and GIS.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, C; Petrakis, M; Psiloglou, B; Lianou, M

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes a methodology for modelling light pollution using geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technology. The proposed approach attempts to address the issue of environmental assessment in sensitive suburban areas. The modern way of life in developing countries is conductive to environmental degradation in urban and suburban areas. One specific parameter for this degradation is light pollution due to intense artificial night lighting. This paper aims to assess this parameter for the Athens metropolitan area, using modern analytical and data capturing technologies. For this purpose, night-time satellite images and analogue maps have been used in order to create the spatial database of the GIS for the study area. Using GIS advanced analytical functionality, visibility analysis was implemented. The outputs for this analysis are a series of maps reflecting direct and indirect light pollution around the city of Athens. Direct light pollution corresponds to optical contact with artificial night light sources, while indirect light pollution corresponds to optical contact with the sky glow above the city. Additionally, the assessment of light pollution in different periods allows for dynamic evaluation of the phenomenon. The case study demonstrates high levels of light pollution in Athens suburban areas and its increase over the last decade.

  19. Modeling the spatiotemporal dynamics of light and heat propagation for in vivo optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Stujenske, Joseph M.; Spellman, Timothy; Gordon, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the increasing use of optogenetics in vivo, the effects of direct light exposure to brain tissue are understudied. Of particular concern is the potential for heat induced by prolonged optical stimulation. We demonstrate that high intensity light, delivered through an optical fiber, is capable of elevating firing rate locally, even in the absence of opsin expression. Predicting the severity and spatial extent of any temperature increase during optogenetic stimulation is therefore of considerable importance. Here we describe a realistic model that simulates light and heat propagation during optogenetic experiments. We validated the model by comparing predicted and measured temperature changes in vivo. We further demonstrate the utility of this model by comparing predictions for various wavelengths of light and fiber sizes, as well as testing methods for reducing heat effects on neural targets in vivo. PMID:26166563

  20. The quantitative models for broiler chicken response to monochromatic, combined, and mixed light-emitting diode light: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yefeng; Pan, Chenhao; Zhong, Renhai; Pan, Jinming

    2018-06-01

    Although many experiments have been conducted to clarify the response of broiler chickens to light-emitting diode (LED) light, those published results do not provide a solid scientific basis for quantifying the response of broiler chickens. This study used a meta-analysis to establish light spectral models of broiler chickens. The results indicated that 455 to 495 nm blue LED light produced the greatest positive response in body weight by 10.66% (BW; P < 0.001) and 515 to 560 nm green LED light increased BW by 6.27% (P < 0.001) when compared with white light. Regression showed that the wavelength (455 to 660 nm) was negatively related to BW change of birds, with a decrease of about 4.9% BW for each 100 nm increase in wavelength (P = 0.002). Further analysis suggested that a combination of the two beneficial light sources caused a synergistic effect. BW was further increased in birds transferred either from green LED light to blue LED light (17.23%; P < 0.001) or from blue LED light to green LED light (17.52%; P < 0.001). Moreover, birds raised with a mixture of green and blue LED light showed a greater BW promotion (10.66%; P < 0.001) than those raised with green LED light (6.27%). A subgroup analysis indicated that BW response to monochromatic LED light was significant regardless of the genetic strain, sex, control light sources, light intensity and regime of LED light, environmental temperature, and dietary ME and CP (P > 0.05). However, there was an interaction between the FCR response to monochromatic LED light with those covariant factors (P < 0.05). Additionally, green and yellow LED light played a role in affecting the meat color, quality, and nutrition of broiler chickens. The results indicate that the optimal ratio of green × blue of mixed LED light or shift to green-blue of combined LED light may produce the optimized production performance, whereas the optimal ratio of green/yellow of mixed or combined LED light may result in the optimized meat

  1. Shell-model-based deformation analysis of light cadmium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Heyde, K. L. G.; Blazhev, A.; Jolie, J.

    2017-07-01

    Large-scale shell-model calculations for the even-even cadmium isotopes 98Cd-108Cd have been performed with the antoine code in the π (2 p1 /2;1 g9 /2) ν (2 d5 /2;3 s1 /2;2 d3 /2;1 g7 /2;1 h11 /2) model space without further truncation. Known experimental energy levels and B (E 2 ) values could be well reproduced. Taking these calculations as a starting ground we analyze the deformation parameters predicted for the Cd isotopes as a function of neutron number N and spin J using the methods of model independent invariants introduced by Kumar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 28, 249 (1972), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.28.249] and Cline [Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 36, 683 (1986), 10.1146/annurev.ns.36.120186.003343].

  2. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  3. Lidar: shedding new light on habitat characterization and modeling.

    Treesearch

    Kerri T. Vierling; Lee A. Vierling; William A. Gould; Sebastian Martinuzzi; Rick M. Clawges

    2008-01-01

    Ecologists need data on animal–habitat associations in terrestrial and aquatic environments to design and implement effective conservation strategies. Habitat characteristics used in models typically incorporate (1) field data of limited spatial extent and/or (2) remote sensing data that do not characterize the vertical habitat structure. Remote sensing tools that...

  4. Light weakly coupled axial forces: models, constraints, and projections

    DOE PAGES

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; ...

    2017-05-01

    Here, we investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the e ects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a darkmore » photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, brie y commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in π 0 and 8Be* decay.« less

  5. Light weakly coupled axial forces: models, constraints, and projections

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth

    Here, we investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the e ects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a darkmore » photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, brie y commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in π 0 and 8Be* decay.« less

  6. 3D Monte Carlo model with direct photon flux recording for optimal optogenetic light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Younghoon; Kim, Dongmok; Lee, Jihoon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2017-02-01

    Configuring the light power emitted from the optical fiber is an essential first step in planning in-vivo optogenetic experiments. However, diffusion theory, which was adopted for optogenetic research, precluded accurate estimates of light intensity in the semi-diffusive region where the primary locus of the stimulation is located. We present a 3D Monte Carlo model that provides an accurate and direct solution for light distribution in this region. Our method directly records the photon trajectory in the separate volumetric grid planes for the near-source recording efficiency gain, and it incorporates a 3D brain mesh to support both homogeneous and heterogeneous brain tissue. We investigated the light emitted from optical fibers in brain tissue in 3D, and we applied the results to design optimal light delivery parameters for precise optogenetic manipulation by considering the fiber output power, wavelength, fiber-to-target distance, and the area of neural tissue activation.

  7. Statistical-thermodynamic model for light scattering from eye lens protein mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Michael M.; Ross, David S.; Bautista, Maurino P.; Shahmohamad, Hossein; Langner, Andreas; Hamilton, John F.; Lahnovych, Carrie N.; Thurston, George M.

    2017-02-01

    We model light-scattering cross sections of concentrated aqueous mixtures of the bovine eye lens proteins γB- and α-crystallin by adapting a statistical-thermodynamic model of mixtures of spheres with short-range attractions. The model reproduces measured static light scattering cross sections, or Rayleigh ratios, of γB-α mixtures from dilute concentrations where light scattering intensity depends on molecular weights and virial coefficients, to realistically high concentration protein mixtures like those of the lens. The model relates γB-γB and γB-α attraction strengths and the γB-α size ratio to the free energy curvatures that set light scattering efficiency in tandem with protein refractive index increments. The model includes (i) hard-sphere α-α interactions, which create short-range order and transparency at high protein concentrations, (ii) short-range attractive plus hard-core γ-γ interactions, which produce intense light scattering and liquid-liquid phase separation in aqueous γ-crystallin solutions, and (iii) short-range attractive plus hard-core γ-α interactions, which strongly influence highly non-additive light scattering and phase separation in concentrated γ-α mixtures. The model reveals a new lens transparency mechanism, that prominent equilibrium composition fluctuations can be perpendicular to the refractive index gradient. The model reproduces the concave-up dependence of the Rayleigh ratio on α/γ composition at high concentrations, its concave-down nature at intermediate concentrations, non-monotonic dependence of light scattering on γ-α attraction strength, and more intricate, temperature-dependent features. We analytically compute the mixed virial series for light scattering efficiency through third order for the sticky-sphere mixture, and find that the full model represents the available light scattering data at concentrations several times those where the second and third mixed virial contributions fail. The model

  8. Computational Modeling to Limit the Impact Displays and Indicator Lights Have on Habitable Volume Operational Lighting Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Salazar, G. A.; Brainard, G. C.; Litaker, H. L.; Hanifin, J.; Schwing, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    Even with no ambient lighting system "on", the International Space Station glows at night. The glow is caused by indicator lamps and displays that are not included with the specification of the ambient lighting system. How does this impact efforts to improve the astronaut's lighting environment to promote more effective sleep patterns? Do the extra indicators and displays add enough light to change the spectrum of light the crew sees during the day as well? If spacecraft environments are specifically engineered to have an ambient lighting system that emits a spectrum promoting a healthy circadian response, is there a way control the impact? The goal of this project is to investigate how additional light sources, such as displays and indicators change the effective light spectrum of the architectural lighting system and how impacts can be mitigated.

  9. Modeling the low-light response of photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Patrick; Niculescu, Ioana

    2017-09-01

    A number of crucial experiments exploring the intricate tomography of protons and neutrons will be carried out in Hall A at Jefferson Lab using the SuperBigBite Spectrometer (SBS), a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer sporting 0.5% momentum and 0.5 mr angular resolution. As part of the standard SBS detector package the Gas Ring Imaging Cherenkov (GRINCH) detector will help identify particles produced in the experiments. To determine which photomultiplier (PMT) tubes would be used in GRINCH, more than 900 29 mm 9125B PMTs were tested. Two models, were used to fit test data. For the parameters relevant to this study, results from both models were found to be equivalent, and will be discussed here.

  10. Scale model experimentation: using terahertz pulses to study light scattering.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Jeremy; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2002-11-07

    We describe a new class of experiments involving applications of terahertz radiation to problems in biomedical imaging and diagnosis. These involve scale model measurements, in which information can be gained about pulse propagation in scattering media. Because of the scale invariance of Maxwell's equations, these experiments can provide insight for researchers working on similar problems at shorter wavelengths. As a first demonstration, we measure the propagation constants for pulses in a dense collection of spherical scatterers, and compare with the predictions of the quasi-crystalline approximation. Even though the fractional volume in our measurements exceeds the limit of validity of this model, we find that it still predicts certain features of the propagation with reasonable accuracy.

  11. Quantitative Modeling of Cerenkov Light Production Efficiency from Medical Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Bradley J.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Schmidtlein, Charles R.; Pentlow, Keith S.; Humm, John L.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    There has been recent and growing interest in applying Cerenkov radiation (CR) for biological applications. Knowledge of the production efficiency and other characteristics of the CR produced by various radionuclides would help in accessing the feasibility of proposed applications and guide the choice of radionuclides. To generate this information we developed models of CR production efficiency based on the Frank-Tamm equation and models of CR distribution based on Monte-Carlo simulations of photon and β particle transport. All models were validated against direct measurements using multiple radionuclides and then applied to a number of radionuclides commonly used in biomedical applications. We show that two radionuclides, Ac-225 and In-111, which have been reported to produce CR in water, do not in fact produce CR directly. We also propose a simple means of using this information to calibrate high sensitivity luminescence imaging systems and show evidence suggesting that this calibration may be more accurate than methods in routine current use. PMID:22363636

  12. Generalized Beer-Lambert model for near-infrared light propagation in thick biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Manish; Ayyalasomayajula, Kalyan R.; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K.

    2016-07-01

    The attenuation of near-infrared (NIR) light intensity as it propagates in a turbid medium like biological tissue is described by modified the Beer-Lambert law (MBLL). The MBLL is generally used to quantify the changes in tissue chromophore concentrations for NIR spectroscopic data analysis. Even though MBLL is effective in terms of providing qualitative comparison, it suffers from its applicability across tissue types and tissue dimensions. In this work, we introduce Lambert-W function-based modeling for light propagation in biological tissues, which is a generalized version of the Beer-Lambert model. The proposed modeling provides parametrization of tissue properties, which includes two attenuation coefficients μ0 and η. We validated our model against the Monte Carlo simulation, which is the gold standard for modeling NIR light propagation in biological tissue. We included numerous human and animal tissues to validate the proposed empirical model, including an inhomogeneous adult human head model. The proposed model, which has a closed form (analytical), is first of its kind in providing accurate modeling of NIR light propagation in biological tissues.

  13. Color design model of high color rendering index white-light LED module.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shang-Ping; Fu, Han-Kuei; Hsieh, Hsin-Hsin; Hsieh, Kun-Yang

    2017-05-10

    The traditional white-light light-emitting diode (LED) is packaged with a single chip and a single phosphor but has a poor color rendering index (CRI). The next-generation package comprises two chips and a single phosphor, has a high CRI, and retains high luminous efficacy. This study employs two chips and two phosphors to improve the diode's color tunability with various proportions of two phosphors and various densities of phosphor in the silicone used. A color design model is established for color fine-tuning of the white-light LED module. The maximum difference between the measured and color-design-model simulated CIE 1931 color coordinates is approximately 0.0063 around a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2500 K. This study provides a rapid method to obtain the color fine-tuning of a white-light LED module with a high CRI and luminous efficacy.

  14. Observational effects of varying speed of light in quadratic gravity cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, Azam; Shacker, Shadi Sajedi; Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Banerjee, Robi

    We study different manifestations of the speed of light in theories of gravity where metric and connection are regarded as independent fields. We find that for a generic gravity theory in a frame with locally vanishing affine connection, the usual degeneracy between different manifestations of the speed of light is broken. In particular, the space-time causal structure constant (cST) may become variable in that local frame. For theories of the form f(ℛ,ℛμνℛ μν), this variation in cST has an impact on the definition of the luminosity distance (and distance modulus), which can be used to confront the predictions of particular models against Supernovae type Ia (SN Ia) data. We carry out this test for a quadratic gravity model without cosmological constant assuming (i) a constant speed of light and (ii) a varying speed of light (VSL), and find that the latter scenario is favored by the data.

  15. Establishment of a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Su, G; Cai, S J; Gong, X; Wang, L L; Li, H H; Wang, L M

    2016-06-24

    To establish a blue-light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fourth-generation human RPE cells were randomly divided into two groups. In group A, cells were exposed to blue light (2000 ± 500 lux) for 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h, and cell culture was stopped after 12 h. In group B, cells were exposed to blue light at the same intensity and time periods, but cell culture was stopped after 24 h. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to determine the most suitable illuminating time with apoptotic index. Flow cytometry was used to determine apoptotic ratio of RPEs. In group A, the apoptotic index of cells that received 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light was higher than that of control. The apoptotic index of cells receiving 9 and 12 h was higher than that of 6 h (P = 0.000). In group B, the apoptotic index and RPE cell apoptosis ratio of cells exposed to 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light were higher than that of 3 h (P = 0.000); and cells receiving 9 and 12 h had higher values than that of 6 h. This study demonstrated that the best conditions to establish a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro are 2000 ± 500 lux light intensity for 6 h, with 24 h of cell culture post-exposure.

  16. Quantum model of light transmission in array waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Capmany, J; Mora, J; Fernández-Pousa, C R; Muñoz, P

    2013-06-17

    We develop, to the best of our knowledge, the first model for an array waveguide grating (AWG) device subject to quantum inputs and analyze its basic transformation functionalities for single-photon states. A commercial, cyclic AWG is experimentally characterized with weak input coherent states as a means of exploring its behaviour under realistic quantum detection. In particular it is shown the existence of a cutoff value of the average photon number below which quantum crosstalk between AWG ports is negligible with respect to dark counts. These results can be useful when considering the application of AWG devices to integrated quantum photonic systems.

  17. Naturally light Dirac neutrino in Left-Right Symmetric Model

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Debasish; Dasgupta, Arnab, E-mail: dborah@iitg.ernet.in, E-mail: arnab.d@iopb.res.in

    We study the possibility of generating tiny Dirac masses of neutrinos in Left-Right Symmetric Model (LRSM) without requiring the existence of any additional symmetries. The charged fermions acquire masses through a universal seesaw mechanism due to the presence of additional vector like fermions. The neutrinos acquire a one-loop Dirac mass from the same additional vector like charged leptons without requiring any additional discrete symmetries. The model can also be extended by an additional Z {sub 2} symmetry in order to have a scotogenic version of this scenario predicting a stable dark matter candidate. We show that the latest Planck uppermore » bound on the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom N {sub eff}=3.15 ± 0.23 tightly constrains the right sector gauge boson masses to be heavier than 3.548 TeV . This bound on gauge boson mass also affects the allowed values of right scalar doublet dark matter mass from the requirement of satisfying the Planck bound on dark matter relic abundance. We also discuss the possible implications of such a scenario in charged lepton flavour violation and generating observable electric dipole moment of leptons.« less

  18. Studying light-harvesting models with superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Potočnik, Anton; Bargerbos, Arno; Schröder, Florian A Y N; Khan, Saeed A; Collodo, Michele C; Gasparinetti, Simone; Salathé, Yves; Creatore, Celestino; Eichler, Christopher; Türeci, Hakan E; Chin, Alex W; Wallraff, Andreas

    2018-03-02

    The process of photosynthesis, the main source of energy in the living world, converts sunlight into chemical energy. The high efficiency of this process is believed to be enabled by an interplay between the quantum nature of molecular structures in photosynthetic complexes and their interaction with the environment. Investigating these effects in biological samples is challenging due to their complex and disordered structure. Here we experimentally demonstrate a technique for studying photosynthetic models based on superconducting quantum circuits, which complements existing experimental, theoretical, and computational approaches. We demonstrate a high degree of freedom in design and experimental control of our approach based on a simplified three-site model of a pigment protein complex with realistic parameters scaled down in energy by a factor of 10 5 . We show that the excitation transport between quantum-coherent sites disordered in energy can be enabled through the interaction with environmental noise. We also show that the efficiency of the process is maximized for structured noise resembling intramolecular phononic environments found in photosynthetic complexes.

  19. Light {xi} hypernuclei in four-body cluster models

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyama, E.; Yamamoto, Y.; Motoba, T.

    Detailed structure calculations in {sub {xi}{sup -}}{sup 12}Be, {sub {xi}{sup -}}{sup 5}H, {sub {xi}{sup -}}{sup 9}Li, {sub {xi}{sup -}}{sup 7}H, and {sub {xi}{sup -}}{sup 10}Li are performed within the framework of the microscopic two-, three-, and four-body cluster models using the Gaussian expansion method. We adopted effective {xi}N interactions derived from the Nijmegen interaction models, which give rise to substantially attractive {xi}-nucleus potentials in accordance with the experimental indications. {sub {xi}{sup -}}{sup 7}H and {sub {xi}{sup -}}{sup 10}Li are predicted to have bound states. we propose to observe the bound states in future (K{sup -},K{sup +}) experiments using {sup 7}Limore » and {sup 10}B targets in addition to the standard {sup 12}C target. The experimental confirmation of these states will provide information on the spin- and isospin-averaged {xi}N interaction.« less

  20. 76 FR 48758 - 2017-2025 Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle GHG Emissions and CAFE Standards: Supplemental Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Presidential Memorandum on May 21, 2010, concerning the development of a new generation of clean cars and... cars, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles (light-duty vehicles) built in those model... and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions of passenger cars and light-duty trucks of model years 2017...

  1. Modeling future scenarios of light attenuation and potential seagrass success in a eutrophic estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    del Barrio, Pilar; Ganju, Neil K.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Hayn, Melanie; García, Andrés; Howarth, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine eutrophication has led to numerous ecological changes, including loss of seagrass beds. One potential cause of these losses is a reduction in light availability due to increased attenuation by phytoplankton. Future sea level rise will also tend to reduce light penetration and modify seagrass habitat. In the present study, we integrate a spectral irradiance model into a biogeochemical model coupled to the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). It is linked to a bio-optical seagrass model to assess potential seagrass habitat in a eutrophic estuary under future nitrate loading and sea-level rise scenarios. The model was applied to West Falmouth Harbor, a shallow estuary located on Cape Cod (Massachusetts) where nitrate from groundwater has led to eutrophication and seagrass loss in landward portions of the estuary. Measurements of chlorophyll, turbidity, light attenuation, and seagrass coverage were used to assess the model accuracy. Mean chlorophyll based on uncalibrated in-situ fluorometry varied from 28 μg L−1 at the landward-most site to 6.5 μg L−1 at the seaward site, while light attenuation ranged from 0.86 to 0.45 m-1. The model reproduced the spatial variability in chlorophyll and light attenuation with RMS errors of 3.72 μg L−1 and 0.07 m-1 respectively. Scenarios of future nitrate reduction and sea-level rise suggest an improvement in light climate in the landward basin with a 75% reduction in nitrate loading. This coupled model may be useful to assess habitat availability changes due to eutrophication and sediment resuspension and fully considers spatial variability on the tidal timescale.

  2. An analytical model for light backscattering by coccoliths and coccospheres of Emiliania huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Georges; Neukermans, Griet

    2017-06-26

    We present an analytical model for light backscattering by coccoliths and coccolithophores of the marine calcifying phytoplankter Emiliania huxleyi. The model is based on the separation of the effects of diffraction, refraction, and reflection on scattering, a valid assumption for particle sizes typical of coccoliths and coccolithophores. Our model results match closely with results from an exact scattering code that uses complex particle geometry and our model also mimics well abrupt transitions in scattering magnitude. Finally, we apply our model to predict changes in the spectral backscattering coefficient during an Emiliania huxleyi bloom with results that closely match in situ measurements. Because our model captures the key features that control the light backscattering process, it can be generalized to coccoliths and coccolithophores of different morphologies which can be obtained from size-calibrated electron microphotographs. Matlab codes of this model are provided as supplementary material.

  3. Advanced network planning for bus rapid transit : the "Quickway" model as a modal alternative to "Light Rail Lite"

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-02-01

    Transit planning in the United States has tended toward viewing BRT as an analogue to light rail transit, with similar operating patterns. This model, referred to as Light Rail Lite, is compared to international best practices, which have often...

  4. Computational Modeling to Limit the Impact Displays and Indicator Lights Have on Habitable Volume Operational Lighting Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Salazar, G. A.; Brainard, G. C.; Kolomenski, A.; Hanifin, J.; Schwin, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    NASA has demonstrated an interest in improving astronaut health and performance through the installment of a new lighting countermeasure on the International Space Station. The Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) system is designed to positively influence astronaut health by providing a daily change to light spectrum to improve circadian entrainment. Unfortunately, existing NASA standards and requirements define ambient light level requirements for crew sleep and other tasks, yet the number of light-emitting diode (LED) indicators and displays within a habitable volume is currently uncontrolled. Because each of these light sources has its own unique spectral properties, the additive lighting environment ends up becoming something different from what was planned or researched. Restricting the use of displays and indicators is not a solution because these systems provide beneficial crew feedback.

  5. Studying the Fine Structure and Temporal Variations of the Zodiacal Cloud and Asteroidal Dust Bands Using the 3-Year Near-IR COBE-DIRBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraman, Sumita

    1999-01-01

    The report presents the results of the data analyses of the DIRBE-COBE data set to study the structure of the zodiacal cloud in the near-infrared wavebands at 1.2, 2.2, and 3.4 microns. The cloud has been divided into two components which have been analyzed and studied separately. The annual variation of the flux in the smooth or low frequency component has been measured in all three bands and the presence of any asymmetries due to the Earth's resonant ring have been studied. The high frequency component which primarily consisted of the asteroidal dust bands. Extensive and careful co-addition was done to extract the central bands in all three wavebands. The ten-degree bands are present in the 1.2 and 2.2 microns but not in the 3.4 micron waveband.

  6. Quantifying light-dependent circadian disruption in humans and animal models.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mark S; Figueiro, Mariana G

    2014-12-01

    Although circadian disruption is an accepted term, little has been done to develop methods to quantify the degree of disruption or entrainment individual organisms actually exhibit in the field. A variety of behavioral, physiological and hormonal responses vary in amplitude over a 24-h period and the degree to which these circadian rhythms are synchronized to the daily light-dark cycle can be quantified with a technique known as phasor analysis. Several studies have been carried out using phasor analysis in an attempt to measure circadian disruption exhibited by animals and by humans. To perform these studies, species-specific light measurement and light delivery technologies had to be developed based upon a fundamental understanding of circadian phototransduction mechanisms in the different species. When both nocturnal rodents and diurnal humans, experienced different species-specific light-dark shift schedules, they showed, based upon phasor analysis of the light-dark and activity-rest patterns, similar levels of light-dependent circadian disruption. Indeed, both rodents and humans show monotonically increasing and quantitatively similar levels of light-dependent circadian disruption with increasing shift-nights per week. Thus, phasor analysis provides a method for quantifying circadian disruption in the field and in the laboratory as well as a bridge between ecological measurements of circadian entrainment in humans and parametric studies of circadian disruption in animal models, including nocturnal rodents.

  7. Examination of the interaction of different lighting conditions and chronic mild stress in animal model.

    PubMed

    Muller, A; Gal, N; Betlehem, J; Fuller, N; Acs, P; Kovacs, G L; Fusz, K; Jozsa, R; Olah, A

    2015-09-01

    We examined the effects of different shift work schedules and chronic mild stress (CMS) on mood using animal model. The most common international shift work schedules in nursing were applied by three groups of Wistar-rats and a control group with normal light-dark cycle. One subgroup from each group was subjected to CMS. Levels of anxiety and emotional life were evaluated in light-dark box. Differences between the groups according to independent and dependent variables were examined with one- and two-way analysis of variance, with a significance level defined at p < 0.05. Interaction of lighting regimen and CMS was proved to be significant according to time spent in the light compartment and the average number of changes between the light and dark compartments. Results of our examination confirm that the changes of lighting conditions evocate anxiety more prominently than CMS. No significant differences were found between the results of the low rotating group and the control group, supposing that this schedule is the least harmful to health. Our results on the association between the use of lighting regimens and the level of CMS provide evidence that the fast rotating shift work schedule puts the heaviest load on the organism of animals.

  8. Calculation of the hadron contribution from light-by-light scattering to the anomalous (g-2)μ muon magnetic moment for a nonlocal quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevlakov, A. S.; Radzhabov, A. E.; Dorokhov, A. E.

    2010-11-01

    The muon contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment from light-by-light scattering diagrams with pion participation is calculated for a nonlocal chiral quark model. For various nonlocal model parameterizations, the contribution makes a μ Had,LbL = 5.1(0.2) 10-10. Later on, we plan to calculate contributions from diagrams with an intermediate scalar meson and quark boxing.

  9. Simplification of a light-based model for estimating final internode length in greenhouse cucumber canopies.

    PubMed

    Kahlen, Katrin; Stützel, Hartmut

    2011-10-01

    Light quantity and quality affect internode lengths in cucumber (Cucumis sativus), whereby leaf area and the optical properties of the leaves mainly control light quality within a cucumber plant community. This modelling study aimed at providing a simple, non-destructive method to predict final internode lengths (FILs) using light quantity and leaf area data. Several simplifications of a light quantity and quality sensitive model for estimating FILs in cucumber have been tested. The direct simplifications substitute the term for the red : far-red (R : FR) ratios, by a term for (a) the leaf area index (LAI, m(2) m(-2)) or (b) partial LAI, the cumulative leaf area per m(2) ground, where leaf area per m(2) ground is accumulated from the top of each plant until a number, n, of leaves per plant is reached. The indirect simplifications estimate the input R : FR ratio based on partial leaf area and plant density. In all models, simulated FILs were in line with the measured FILs over various canopy architectures and light conditions, but the prediction quality varied. The indirect simplification based on leaf area of ten leaves revealed the best fit with measured data. Its prediction quality was even higher than of the original model. This study showed that for vertically trained cucumber plants, leaf area data can substitute local light quality data for estimating FIL data. In unstressed canopies, leaf area over the upper ten ranks seems to represent the feedback of the growing architecture on internode elongation with respect to light quality. This highlights the role of this domain of leaves as the primary source for the specific R : FR signal controlling the final length of an internode and could therefore guide future research on up-scaling local processes to the crop level.

  10. Regional impacts of iron-light colimitation in a global biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, E. D.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Dunne, J. P.; Hiscock, M. R.

    2009-07-01

    Laboratory and field studies have revealed that iron has multiple roles in phytoplankton physiology, with particular importance for light-harvesting cellular machinery. However, although iron-limitation is explicitly included in numerous biogeochemical/ecosystem models, its implementation varies, and its effect on the efficiency of light harvesting is often ignored. Given the complexity of the ocean environment, it is difficult to predict the consequences of applying different iron limitation schemes. Here we explore the interaction of iron and nutrient cycles using a new, streamlined model of ocean biogeochemistry. Building on previously published parameterizations of photoadaptation and export production, the Biogeochemistry with Light Iron Nutrients and Gasses (BLING) model is constructed with only three explicit tracers but including macronutrient and micronutrient limitation, light limitation, and an implicit treatment of community structure. The structural simplicity of this computationally inexpensive model allows us to clearly isolate the global effects of iron availability on maximum light-saturated photosynthesis rates from those of photosynthetic efficiency. We find that the effect on light-saturated photosynthesis rates is dominant, negating the importance of photosynthetic efficiency in most regions, especially the cold waters of the Southern Ocean. The primary exceptions to this occur in iron-rich regions of the Northern Hemisphere, where high light-saturated photosynthesis rates cause photosynthetic efficiency to play a more important role. Additionally, we speculate that the small phytoplankton dominating iron-limited regions tend to have relatively high photosynthetic efficiency, such that iron-limitation has less of a deleterious effect on growth rates than would be expected from short-term iron addition experiments.

  11. A Dynamic Model for Prediction of Psoriasis Management by Blue Light Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Félix Garza, Zandra C.; Liebmann, Joerg; Born, Matthias; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical investigations prove that blue light irradiation reduces the severity of psoriasis vulgaris. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved in the management of this condition remain poorly defined. Despite the encouraging results of the clinical studies, no clear guidelines are specified in the literature for the irradiation scheme regime of blue light-based therapy for psoriasis. We investigated the underlying mechanism of blue light irradiation of psoriatic skin, and tested the hypothesis that regulation of proliferation is a key process. We implemented a mechanistic model of cellular epidermal dynamics to analyze whether a temporary decrease of keratinocytes hyper-proliferation can explain the outcome of phototherapy with blue light. Our results suggest that the main effect of blue light on keratinocytes impacts the proliferative cells. They show that the decrease in the keratinocytes proliferative capacity is sufficient to induce a transient decrease in the severity of psoriasis. To study the impact of the therapeutic regime on the efficacy of psoriasis treatment, we performed simulations for different combinations of the treatment parameters, i.e., length of treatment, fluence (also referred to as dose), and intensity. These simulations indicate that high efficacy is achieved by regimes with long duration and high fluence levels, regardless of the chosen intensity. Our modeling approach constitutes a framework for testing diverse hypotheses on the underlying mechanism of blue light-based phototherapy, and for designing effective strategies for the treatment of psoriasis. PMID:28184200

  12. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. Results We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. AMS subject classification Modelling and simulation PMID:26329404

  13. Sensitivity of light interaction computer model to the absorption properties of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsten, A. E.; Singh, A.

    2011-06-01

    Light based treatments offer major benefits to patients. Many of the light based treatments or diagnostic techniques need to penetrate the skin to reach the site of interest. Human skin is a highly scattering medium and the melanin in the epidermal layer of the skin is a major absorber of light in the visible and near infrared wavelength bands. The effect of increasing absorption in the epidermis is tested on skin simulating phantoms as well as on a computer model. Changing the absorption coefficient between 0.1 mm-1 and 1.0 mm-1 resulted in a decrease of light reaching 1 mm into the sample. Transmission through a 1 mm thick sample decreased from 48% to 13% and from 31% to 2% for the different scattering coefficients.

  14. LITE microscopy: Tilted light-sheet excitation of model organisms offers high resolution and low photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Gerbich, Therese M.; Rana, Kishan; Suzuki, Aussie; Schaefer, Kristina N.; Heppert, Jennifer K.; Boothby, Thomas C.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Gladfelter, Amy S.; Maddox, Amy S.

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful approach for studying subcellular dynamics at high spatiotemporal resolution; however, conventional fluorescence microscopy techniques are light-intensive and introduce unnecessary photodamage. Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) mitigates these problems by selectively illuminating the focal plane of the detection objective by using orthogonal excitation. Orthogonal excitation requires geometries that physically limit the detection objective numerical aperture (NA), thereby limiting both light-gathering efficiency (brightness) and native spatial resolution. We present a novel live-cell LSFM method, lateral interference tilted excitation (LITE), in which a tilted light sheet illuminates the detection objective focal plane without a sterically limiting illumination scheme. LITE is thus compatible with any detection objective, including oil immersion, without an upper NA limit. LITE combines the low photodamage of LSFM with high resolution, high brightness, and coverslip-based objectives. We demonstrate the utility of LITE for imaging animal, fungal, and plant model organisms over many hours at high spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:29490939

  15. Systematic identification of light-regulated cold-responsive proteome in a model cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Fang, Longfa; Huang, Xiahe; Ge, Haitao; Wang, Jinlong; Wang, Xiaorong; Zhang, Yuanya; Sui, Na; Xu, Wu; Wang, Yingchun

    2018-05-15

    Differential expression of cold-responsive proteins is necessary for cyanobacteria to acclimate to cold stress frequently occurring in their natural habitats. Accumulating evidence indicates that cold-induced expression of certain proteins is dependent on light illumination, but a systematic identification of light-dependent and/or light-independent cold-responsive proteins in cyanobacteria is still lacking. Herein, we comprehensively identified cold-responsive proteins in a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Hereafter Synechocystis) that was cold-stressed in light or in dark. In total, 72 proteins were identified as cold-responsive, including 19 and 17 proteins whose cold-responsiveness are light-dependent and light-independent, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that outer membrane proteins, proteins involved in translation, and proteins involved in divergent types of stress responses were highly enriched in the cold-responsive proteins. Moreover, a protein network responsible for nitrogen assimilation and amino acid biosynthesis, transcription, and translation were upregulated in response to the cold stress. The network contains both light-dependent and light-independent cold-responsive proteins, probably for fine tuning its activity to endow Synechocystis the flexibility necessary for cold adaptation in their natural habitats, where days and nights are alternating. Together, our results should serve as an important resource for future study toward understanding the mechanism of cold acclimation in cyanobacteria. Photosynthetic cyanobacteria need to acclimate to frequently occurring abiotic stresses such as cold in their natural habitats, and the acclimation process has to be coordinated with photosynthesis, the light-dependent process that provides carbon and energy for propagation of cyanobacteria. It is conceivable that cold-induced differential protein expression can also be regulated by light. Hence it is important to systematically

  16. Aural-Nondetectability Model Predictions for Night-Vision Goggles across Ambient Lighting Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    ARL-TR-7564 ● DEC 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Aural-Nondetectability Model Predictions for Night -Vision Goggles across...ARL-TR-7564 ● DEC 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Aural-Nondetectability Model Predictions for Night -Vision Goggles across Ambient...May 2015–30 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Aural-Nondetectability Model Predictions for Night -Vision Goggles across Ambient Lighting Conditions 5a

  17. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    PubMed

    Postnova, Svetlana; Robinson, Peter A; Postnov, Dmitry D

    2013-01-01

    Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8) in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.

  18. Adaptation to Shift Work: Physiologically Based Modeling of the Effects of Lighting and Shifts’ Start Time

    PubMed Central

    Postnova, Svetlana; Robinson, Peter A.; Postnov, Dmitry D.

    2013-01-01

    Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers’ sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8) in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers’ adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21∶00 instead of 00∶00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters. PMID:23308206

  19. Modeling Filamentous Cyanobacteria Reveals the Advantages of Long and Fast Trichomes for Optimizing Light Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Tamulonis, Carlos; Postma, Marten; Kaandorp, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria form a very large and diverse phylum of prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Many species of cyanobacteria live colonially in long trichomes of hundreds to thousands of cells. Of the filamentous species, many are also motile, gliding along their long axis, and display photomovement, by which a trichome modulates its gliding according to the incident light. The latter has been found to play an important role in guiding the trichomes to optimal lighting conditions, which can either inhibit the cells if the incident light is too weak, or damage the cells if too strong. We have developed a computational model for gliding filamentous photophobic cyanobacteria that allows us to perform simulations on the scale of a Petri dish using over 105 individual trichomes. Using the model, we quantify the effectiveness of one commonly observed photomovement strategy—photophobic responses—in distributing large populations of trichomes optimally over a light field. The model predicts that the typical observed length and gliding speeds of filamentous cyanobacteria are optimal for the photophobic strategy. Therefore, our results suggest that not just photomovement but also the trichome shape itself improves the ability of the cyanobacteria to optimize their light exposure. PMID:21789215

  20. Variable classification in the LSST era: exploring a model for quasi-periodic light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, J. C.; Kochanek, C. S.; Kozłowski, S.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.

    2017-06-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is expected to yield ˜107 light curves over the course of its mission, which will require a concerted effort in automated classification. Stochastic processes provide one means of quantitatively describing variability with the potential advantage over simple light-curve statistics that the parameters may be physically meaningful. Here, we survey a large sample of periodic, quasi-periodic and stochastic Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment-III variables using the damped random walk (DRW; CARMA(1,0)) and quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO; CARMA(2,1)) stochastic process models. The QPO model is described by an amplitude, a period and a coherence time-scale, while the DRW has only an amplitude and a time-scale. We find that the periodic and quasi-periodic stellar variables are generally better described by a QPO than a DRW, while quasars are better described by the DRW model. There are ambiguities in interpreting the QPO coherence time due to non-sinusoidal light-curve shapes, signal-to-noise ratio, error mischaracterizations and cadence. Higher order implementations of the QPO model that better capture light-curve shapes are necessary for the coherence time to have its implied physical meaning. Independent of physical meaning, the extra parameter of the QPO model successfully distinguishes most of the classes of periodic and quasi-periodic variables we consider.

  1. A kinetic model for estimating net photosynthetic rates of cos lettuce leaves under pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Jishi, Tomohiro; Matsuda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2015-04-01

    Time-averaged net photosynthetic rate (P n) under pulsed light (PL) is known to be affected by the PL frequency and duty ratio, even though the time-averaged photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) is unchanged. This phenomenon can be explained by considering that photosynthetic intermediates (PIs) are pooled during light periods and then consumed by partial photosynthetic reactions during dark periods. In this study, we developed a kinetic model to estimate P n of cos lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. longifolia) leaves under PL based on the dynamics of the amount of pooled PIs. The model inputs are average PPFD, duty ratio, and frequency; the output is P n. The rates of both PI accumulation and consumption at a given moment are assumed to be dependent on the amount of pooled PIs at that point. Required model parameters and three explanatory variables (average PPFD, frequency, and duty ratio) were determined for the simulation using P n values under PL based on several combinations of the three variables. The model simulation for various PL levels with a wide range of time-averaged PPFDs, frequencies, and duty ratios further demonstrated that P n under PL with high frequencies and duty ratios was comparable to, but did not exceed, P n under continuous light, and also showed that P n under PL decreased as either frequency or duty ratio was decreased. The developed model can be used to estimate P n under various light environments where PPFD changes cyclically.

  2. Influence investigation of a void region on modeling light propagation in a heterogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Defu; Chen, Xueli; Ren, Shenghan; Qu, Xiaochao; Tian, Jie; Liang, Jimin

    2013-01-20

    A void region exists in some biological tissues, and previous studies have shown that inaccurate images would be obtained if it were not processed. A hybrid radiosity-diffusion method (HRDM) that couples the radiosity theory and the diffusion equation has been proposed to deal with the void problem and has been well demonstrated in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) simple models. However, the extent of the impact of the void region on the accuracy of modeling light propagation has not been investigated. In this paper, we first implemented and verified the HRDM in 3D models, including both the regular geometries and a digital mouse model, and then investigated the influences of the void region on modeling light propagation in a heterogeneous medium. Our investigation results show that the influence of the region can be neglected when the size of the void is less than a certain range, and other cases must be taken into account.

  3. Modeling light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P.; Gage, J.; Takatsuka, M.; Goyette, S.

    2009-02-01

    To compete with other digital images, holograms must go beyond the current range of source-image types, such as sequences of photographs, laser scans, and 3D computer graphics (CG) scenes made with software designed for other applications. This project develops a set of innovative techniques for creating 3D digital content specifically for digital holograms, with virtual tools which enable the direct hand-crafting of subjects, mark by mark, analogous to Michelangelo's practice in drawing, painting and sculpture. The haptic device, the Phantom Premium 1.5 is used to draw against three-dimensional laser- scan templates of Michelangelo's sculpture placed within the holographic viewing volume.

  4. Modeling of efficient light extraction in light-pipes through specular surfaces with elliptical and lineal front shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Guerrero, Guillermo E.; Viera-González, Perla M.; Ceballos-Herrera, Daniel E.; Martínez-Guerra, Edgar

    2016-09-01

    Extraction light in light-pipes with different specular surfaces was analyzed. In the analysis, the impact of the surface shape in all properties of the extracted light in order to obtain an efficient extraction and a uniform illumination using a LED as light source. Also, several parameters of the specular surface to obtain spatial uniformity inside the light-pipe are considered. In this case, the simulation was made for a rectangular light­pipe. One objective of this work is to compare how the front face shape of the specular surface can affect the extraction of light in the lateral face of the light-pipe, only straight and elliptical front faces were used in this work and the comparison between them at different tilts and lengths were made. The main purpose of the front face was extract the light uniformly at the lateral face and this was done by studying simulations on OpticStudio Zemax. The results show how the extraction length is lower in the elliptical front but its total power performs better than the line front.

  5. Theoretical model of a polarization diffractive elements for the light beams conversion holographic formation in PDLCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharangovich, Sergey N.; Semkin, Artem O.

    2017-12-01

    In this work a theoretical model of the holographic formation of the polarization diffractive optical elements for the transformation of Gaussian light beams into Bessel-like ones in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) is developed. The model is based on solving the equations of photo-induced Fredericks transition processes for polarization diffractive elements formation by orthogonally polarized light beams with inhomogeneous amplitude and phase profiles. The results of numerical simulation of the material's dielectric tensor changing due to the structure's formation process are presented for various recording beams' polarization states. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the ability to form the diffractive optical elements for light beams transformation by the polarization holography methods is shown.

  6. Stray light modeling of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbach, Scott O.; Irvin, Ryan G.; Seals, Lenward T.; Skelton, Dennis L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes an integrated stray light model of each Science Instrument (SI) in the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the Optical Telescope Element Simulator (OSIM), the light source used to characterize the performance of ISIM in cryogenic-vacuum tests at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). We present three cases where this stray light model was integral to solving questions that arose during the testing campaign - 1) ghosting and coherent diffraction from hardware surfaces in the Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) GR700XD grism mode, 2) ghost spots in the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) GRISM modes, and 3) scattering from knife edges of the NIRCam focal plane array masks.

  7. Hybrid light transport model based bioluminescence tomography reconstruction for early gastric cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Yang, Defu; Chen, Duofang; Zhu, Shouping; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer is the second cause of cancer-related death in the world, and it remains difficult to cure because it has been in late-stage once that is found. Early gastric cancer detection becomes an effective approach to decrease the gastric cancer mortality. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been applied to detect early liver cancer and prostate cancer metastasis. However, the gastric cancer commonly originates from the gastric mucosa and grows outwards. The bioluminescent light will pass through a non-scattering region constructed by gastric pouch when it transports in tissues. Thus, the current BLT reconstruction algorithms based on the approximation model of radiative transfer equation are not optimal to handle this problem. To address the gastric cancer specific problem, this paper presents a novel reconstruction algorithm that uses a hybrid light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. The radiosity theory integrated with the diffusion equation to form the hybrid light transport model is utilized to describe light propagation in the non-scattering region. After the finite element discretization, the hybrid light transport model is converted into a minimization problem which fuses an l1 norm based regularization term to reveal the sparsity of bioluminescent source distribution. The performance of the reconstruction algorithm is first demonstrated with a digital mouse based simulation with the reconstruction error less than 1mm. An in situ gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse based experiment is then conducted. The primary result reveals the ability of the novel BLT reconstruction algorithm in early gastric cancer detection.

  8. The Information Content in Analytic Spot Models of Broadband Precision Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  9. THE INFORMATION CONTENT IN ANALYTIC SPOT MODELS OF BROADBAND PRECISION LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits,more » the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.« less

  10. Modeling the impact of roadway emissions in light wind, stable and transition conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper examines the processes that govern air pollution dispersion under light wind, stable and transition conditions by using a state-of-the-art dispersion model to interpret measurements from a tracer experiment conducted next to US highway 99 in Sacramento in 1981–1982 dur...

  11. Bioconvective patterns, synchrony, and survival. [in light-limited growth model of motile algae culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-01-01

    With and without bioconvective pattern formation, a theoretical model predicts growth in light-limited cultures of motile algae. At the critical density for pattern formation, the resulting doubly exponential population curves show an inflection. Such growth corresponds quantitatively to experiments in mechanically unstirred cultures. This attaches survival value to synchronized pattern formation.

  12. Light scattering by marine algae: two-layer spherical and nonspherical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirantes, Arturo; Bernard, Stewart

    2004-11-01

    Light scattering properties of algae-like particles are modeled using the T-matrix for coated scatterers. Two basic geometries have been considered: off-centered coated spheres and centered spheroids. Extinction, scattering and absorption efficiencies, plus scattering in the backward plane, are compared to simpler models like homogeneous (Mie) and coated (Aden-Kerker) models. The anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA), of widespread use in the oceanographic light-scattering community, has also been used as a first approximation, for both homogeneous and coated spheres. T-matrix calculations show that some light scattering values, such as extinction and scattering efficiencies, have little dependence on particle shape, thus reinforcing the view that simpler (Mie, Aden-Kerker) models can be applied to infer refractive index (RI) data from absorption curves. The backscattering efficiency, on the other hand, is quite sensitive to shape. This calls into question the use of light scattering techniques where the phase function plays a pivotal role, and can help explain the observed discrepancy between theoretical and experimental values of the backscattering coefficient in observed in oceanic studies.

  13. Investigating Students' Mental Models about the Quantization of Light, Energy, and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Didis, Nilüfer; Eryilmaz, Ali; Erkoç, Sakir

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a multiphase study examining students' mental models about the quantization of physical observables--light, energy, and angular momentum. Thirty-one second-year physics and physics education college students who were taking a modern physics course participated in the study. The qualitative analysis of data revealed…

  14. Model-assisted forest yield estimation with light detection and ranging

    Treesearch

    Jacob L. Strunk; Stephen E. Reutebuch; Hans-Erik Andersen; Peter J. Gould; Robert J. McGaughey

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that light detection and ranging (LiDAR)-derived variables can be used to model forest yield variables, such as biomass, volume, and number of stems. However, the next step is underrepresented in the literature: estimation of forest yield with appropriate confidence intervals. It is of great importance that the procedures required for...

  15. A Simple Way of Modeling the Expansion of the Universe: What Does Light Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coban, Gul Unal; Sengoren, Serap Kaya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to model the expansion of the universe by investigating the behavior of water waves. It is designed for students in the upper grades of physics and physical science who are learning about the wave nature of light and are ready to discover such important questions about science. The article explains first the Doppler…

  16. A non-stochastic iterative computational method to model light propagation in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Thomas J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2015-03-01

    Monte Carlo models are widely used to model light transport in turbid media, however their results implicitly contain stochastic variations. These fluctuations are not ideal, especially for inverse problems where Jacobian matrix errors can lead to large uncertainties upon matrix inversion. Yet Monte Carlo approaches are more computationally favorable than solving the full Radiative Transport Equation. Here, a non-stochastic computational method of estimating fluence distributions in turbid media is proposed, which is called the Non-Stochastic Propagation by Iterative Radiance Evaluation method (NSPIRE). Rather than using stochastic means to determine a random walk for each photon packet, the propagation of light from any element to all other elements in a grid is modelled simultaneously. For locally homogeneous anisotropic turbid media, the matrices used to represent scattering and projection are shown to be block Toeplitz, which leads to computational simplifications via convolution operators. To evaluate the accuracy of the algorithm, 2D simulations were done and compared against Monte Carlo models for the cases of an isotropic point source and a pencil beam incident on a semi-infinite turbid medium. The model was shown to have a mean percent error less than 2%. The algorithm represents a new paradigm in radiative transport modelling and may offer a non-stochastic alternative to modeling light transport in anisotropic scattering media for applications where the diffusion approximation is insufficient.

  17. Manifestation of Hyperandrogenism in the Continuous Light Exposure-Induced PCOS Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xuezhi; Jia, Lina; Shen, Xueyong

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder, and its pathogenesis has yet to be completely clarified. A fully convincing animal model has not been established for PCOS. In earlier studies, researchers have shown that the exposure of rats to continuous light can induce PCOS; nevertheless, hyperandrogenism, a key characteristic observed in human PCOS, has not been reported previously. In the present study, we found that (1) body weights decreased in female rats in a continuous light environment with both ovarian and uterine augmentation; (2) the estrous cycle in rats under continuous light environment was disordered, and polycystic ovary-like changes occurred, accompanied with fur loss and lethargy; and (3) serum testosterone levels in rats in a continuous light environment significantly increased. Our data suggest that continuous light can lead to the occurrence of PCOS in female rats without the need for drugs; this is a reasonable PCOS animal model that is more consistent with the natural disease state in humans; and poor sleep habits or negligence of sleep hygiene may be an important lifestyle factor in pathogenesis of PCOS. PMID:26064969

  18. Regional impacts of iron-light colimitation in a global biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, E. D.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Dunne, J. P.; Hiscock, M. R.

    2010-03-01

    Laboratory and field studies have revealed that iron has multiple roles in phytoplankton physiology, with particular importance for light-harvesting cellular machinery. However, although iron-limitation is explicitly included in numerous biogeochemical/ecosystem models, its implementation varies, and its effect on the efficiency of light harvesting is often ignored. Given the complexity of the ocean environment, it is difficult to predict the consequences of applying different iron limitation schemes. Here we explore the interaction of iron and nutrient cycles in an ocean general circulation model using a new, streamlined model of ocean biogeochemistry. Building on previously published parameterizations of photoadaptation and export production, the Biogeochemistry with Light Iron Nutrients and Gasses (BLING) model is constructed with only four explicit tracers but including macronutrient and micronutrient limitation, light limitation, and an implicit treatment of community structure. The structural simplicity of this computationally-inexpensive model allows us to clearly isolate the global effect that iron availability has on maximum light-saturated photosynthesis rates vs. the effect iron has on photosynthetic efficiency. We find that the effect on light-saturated photosynthesis rates is dominant, negating the importance of photosynthetic efficiency in most regions, especially the cold waters of the Southern Ocean. The primary exceptions to this occur in iron-rich regions of the Northern Hemisphere, where high light-saturated photosynthesis rates allow photosynthetic efficiency to play a more important role. In other words, the ability to efficiently harvest photons has little effect in regions where light-saturated growth rates are low. Additionally, we speculate that the phytoplankton cells dominating iron-limited regions tend to have relatively high photosynthetic efficiency, due to reduced packaging effects. If this speculation is correct, it would imply that

  19. Regression Model for Light Weight and Crashworthiness Enhancement Design of Automotive Parts in Frontal CAR Crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Gihyun; Huh, Hoon; Park, Sungho

    This paper deals with a regression model for light weight and crashworthiness enhancement design of automotive parts in frontal car crash. The ULSAB-AVC model is employed for the crash analysis and effective parts are selected based on the amount of energy absorption during the crash behavior. Finite element analyses are carried out for designated design cases in order to investigate the crashworthiness and weight according to the material and thickness of main energy absorption parts. Based on simulations results, a regression analysis is performed to construct a regression model utilized for light weight and crashworthiness enhancement design of automotive parts. An example for weight reduction of main energy absorption parts demonstrates the validity of a regression model constructed.

  20. 40 CFR 86.096-8 - Emission standards for 1996 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....096-8 Emission standards for 1996 and later model year light-duty vehicles. (a)(1) Standards. (i... tested with the procedures in subpart B indicated for 1996 model year, and shall not exceed the standards... subpart B of this part for 1995 model year light-duty vehicles and be subject to the standards described...

  1. 40 CFR 86.096-8 - Emission standards for 1996 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....096-8 Emission standards for 1996 and later model year light-duty vehicles. (a)(1) Standards. (i... tested with the procedures in subpart B indicated for 1996 model year, and shall not exceed the standards... subpart B of this part for 1995 model year light-duty vehicles and be subject to the standards described...

  2. Can red-light 5-aminolevulinic photodynamic therapy cure port wine stains on comb animal model?

    PubMed

    Lai, Yongxian; Zhang, Haiyan; Wei, Minglei; Ji, Jie; Shi, Lei; Wang, Peiru; Wang, Bo; Huang, Zheng; Wang, Xiuli

    2018-06-01

    To study the curative effect of red-light 5-Aminolevulinic photodynamic therapy(ALA-PDT) to port wine stains(PWS) on comb animal model. 160 male cocks were randomly divided into 16 groups. The ALA only group was given ALA only topical or systemic application. Light only groups were only given 630 nm red light irradiation with different light density. ALA-PDT groups were given red light after the application of topical or systemic ALA. PDL group was given PDL irradiation. The distribution of fluorescence in tissue after topical or systemic application of ALA was detected. The morphological changes, the pathological changes and the capillary reduction rate of the comb were observed after treatment for 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 days. The PpIX fluorescence generated after topical and systemic application of ALA. In the topical ALA-PDT group at low light density 80 J/cm 2 , the morphology and the histopathology had no obvious change. While under 160 J/cm 2 and 200 J/cm 2 light density, severe erosion and thick scab appeared. The histopathology showed epidermal necrosis and loss. The immunohistochemistry showed that there was no significant change in the number of capillaries under different light density (P > 0.05). In the systemic ALA-PDT group under low light density 80 J/cm 2 , only partial erosion and thin scab was observed on the treatment side. With the increase of light density, thick charred crust and even scar was observed. The histopathology showed that there were different degrees of damage to dermal and epidermal tissues. And the immunohistochemistry showed the capillary reduced significantly in the treatment side (P < 0.01). In control group, the comb is ruddy and plump. These results suggest that either topical or systemic red-light ALA-PDT is not suitable treatment methods for PWS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling Type IIn Supernovae: Understanding How Shock Development Effects Light Curves Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa, Janie

    2016-06-01

    Type IIn supernovae are produced when massive stars experience dramatic mass loss phases caused by opacity edges or violent explosions. Violent mass ejections occur quite often just prior to the collapse of the star. If the final episode happens just before collapse, the outward ejecta is sufficiently dense to alter the supernova light-curve, both by absorbing the initial supernova light and producing emission when the supernova shock hits the ejecta. Initially, the ejecta is driven by shock progating through the interior of the star, and eventually expands through the circumstellar medium, forming a cold dense shell. As the shock wave approaches the shell, there is an increase in UV and optical radiation at the location of the shock breakout. We have developed a suite of simple semi-analytical models in order to understand the relationship between our observations and the properties of the expanding SN ejecta. When we compare Type IIn observations to a set of modeled SNe, we begin to see the influence of initial explosion conditions on early UV light curve properties such as peak luminosities and decay rate.The fast rise and decay corresponds to the models representing a photosphere moving through the envelope, while the modeled light curves with a slower rise and decay rate are powered by 56Ni decay. However, in both of these cases, models that matched the luminosity were unable to match the low radii from the blackbody models. The effect of shock heating as the supernova material blasts through the circumstellar material can drastically alter the temperature and position of the photosphere. The new set of models redefine the initial modeling conditions to incorporate an outer shell-like structure, and include late-time shock heating from shocks produced as the supernova ejecta travels through the inhomogeneous circumstellar medium.

  4. Leading Twist TMDs in a Light-Front Quark-Diquark Model for Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, Dipankar

    2018-05-01

    We present p_{\\perp } variation (fixed x) of the leading-twist T-even transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of a proton in a light-front quark-diquark model at μ ^2=2.4 and 20 GeV^2. The quark densities for unpolarized and transversely polarized proton are also presented. We observe a Soffer bound for TMDs in this model.

  5. Refinement of a limit cycle oscillator model of the effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, M. E.; Kronauer, R. E.; Brown, E. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    In 1990, Kronauer proposed a mathematical model of the effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker. Although this model predicted many general features of the response of the human circadian pacemaker to light exposure, additional data now available enable us to refine the original model. We first refined the original model by incorporating the results of a dose response curve to light into the model's predicted relationship between light intensity and the strength of the drive onto the pacemaker. Data from three bright light phase resetting experiments were then used to refine the amplitude recovery characteristics of the model. Finally, the model was tested and further refined using data from an extensive phase resetting experiment in which a 3-cycle bright light stimulus was presented against a background of dim light. In order to describe the results of the four resetting experiments, the following major refinements to the original model were necessary: (i) the relationship between light intensity (I) and drive onto the pacemaker was reduced from I1/3 to I0.23 for light levels between 150 and 10,000 lux; (ii) the van der Pol oscillator from the original model was replaced with a higher-order limit cycle oscillator so that amplitude recovery is slower near the singularity and faster near the limit cycle; (iii) a direct effect of light on circadian period (tau x) was incorporated into the model such that as I increases, tau x decreases, which is in accordance with "Aschoff's rule". This refined model generates the following testable predictions: it should be difficult to enhance normal circadian amplitude via bright light; near the critical point of a type 0 phase response curve (PRC) the slope should be steeper than it is in a type 1 PRC; and circadian period measured during forced desynchrony should be directly affected by ambient light intensity.

  6. Modeling light use efficiency in a subtropical mangrove forest equipped with CO2 eddy covariance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, J.G.; Engel, V.; Fuentes, J.D.; Fuller, D.O.; Kwon, H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of mangrove ecosystems in the global carbon budget, the relationships between environmental drivers and carbon dynamics in these forests remain poorly understood. This limited understanding is partly a result of the challenges associated with in situ flux studies. Tower-based CO2 eddy covariance (EC) systems are installed in only a few mangrove forests worldwide, and the longest EC record from the Florida Everglades contains less than 9 years of observations. A primary goal of the present study was to develop a methodology to estimate canopy-scale photosynthetic light use efficiency in this forest. These tower-based observations represent a basis for associating CO2 fluxes with canopy light use properties, and thus provide the means for utilizing satellite-based reflectance data for larger scale investigations. We present a model for mangrove canopy light use efficiency utilizing the enhanced green vegetation index (EVI) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) that is capable of predicting changes in mangrove forest CO2 fluxes caused by a hurricane disturbance and changes in regional environmental conditions, including temperature and salinity. Model parameters are solved for in a Bayesian framework. The model structure requires estimates of ecosystem respiration (RE), and we present the first ever tower-based estimates of mangrove forest RE derived from nighttime CO2 fluxes. Our investigation is also the first to show the effects of salinity on mangrove forest CO2 uptake, which declines 5% per each 10 parts per thousand (ppt) increase in salinity. Light use efficiency in this forest declines with increasing daily photosynthetic active radiation, which is an important departure from the assumption of constant light use efficiency typically applied in satellite-driven models. The model developed here provides a framework for estimating CO2 uptake by these forests from reflectance data and information about

  7. Hierarchical Models for Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the Optical and Near Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Kaisey; Narayan, G.; Kirshner, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    I have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova optical and near infrared light curves. Since the near infrared light curves are excellent standard candles and are less sensitive to dust extinction and reddening, the combination of near infrared and optical data better constrains the host galaxy extinction and improves the precision of distance predictions to SN Ia. A hierarchical probabilistic model coherently accounts for multiple random and uncertain effects, including photometric error, intrinsic supernova light curve variations and correlations across phase and wavelength, dust extinction and reddening, peculiar velocity dispersion and distances. An improved BayeSN MCMC code is implemented for computing probabilistic inferences for individual supernovae and the SN Ia and host galaxy dust populations. I use this hierarchical model to analyze nearby Type Ia supernovae with optical and near infared data from the PAIRITEL, CfA3, and CSP samples and the literature. Using cross-validation to test the robustness of the model predictions, I find that the rms Hubble diagram scatter of predicted distance moduli is 0.11 mag for SN with optical and near infrared data versus 0.15 mag for SN with only optical data. Accounting for the dispersion expected from random peculiar velocities, the rms intrinsic prediction error is 0.08-0.10 mag for SN with both optical and near infrared light curves. I discuss results for the inferred intrinsic correlation structures of the optical-NIR SN Ia light curves and the host galaxy dust distribution captured by the hierarchical model. The continued observation and analysis of Type Ia SN in the optical and near infrared is important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  8. Re-evaluation of model-based light-scattering spectroscopy for tissue spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Condon; Šćepanović, Obrad; Mirkovic, Jelena; McGee, Sasha; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Fulghum, Stephen; Wallace, Michael; Tunnell, James; Bechtel, Kate; Feld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Model-based light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) seemed a promising technique for in-vivo diagnosis of dysplasia in multiple organs. In the studies, the residual spectrum, the difference between the observed and modeled diffuse reflectance spectra, was attributed to single elastic light scattering from epithelial nuclei, and diagnostic information due to nuclear changes was extracted from it. We show that this picture is incorrect. The actual single scattering signal arising from epithelial nuclei is much smaller than the previously computed residual spectrum, and does not have the wavelength dependence characteristic of Mie scattering. Rather, the residual spectrum largely arises from assuming a uniform hemoglobin distribution. In fact, hemoglobin is packaged in blood vessels, which alters the reflectance. When we include vessel packaging, which accounts for an inhomogeneous hemoglobin distribution, in the diffuse reflectance model, the reflectance is modeled more accurately, greatly reducing the amplitude of the residual spectrum. These findings are verified via numerical estimates based on light propagation and Mie theory, tissue phantom experiments, and analysis of published data measured from Barrett’s esophagus. In future studies, vessel packaging should be included in the model of diffuse reflectance and use of model-based LSS should be discontinued. PMID:19405760

  9. Analytical design and performance studies of nuclear furnace tests of small nuclear light bulb models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical studies were continued to identify the design and performance characteristics of a small-scale model of a nuclear light bulb unit cell suitable for testing in a nuclear furnace reactor. Emphasis was placed on calculating performance characteristics based on detailed radiant heat transfer analyses, on designing the test assembly for ease of insertion, connection, and withdrawal at the reactor test cell, and on determining instrumentation and test effluent handling requirements. In addition, a review of candidate test reactors for future nuclear light bulb in-reactor tests was conducted.

  10. Numerical modeling and analytical evaluation of light absorption by gold nanostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkov, Sergey; Akchurin, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Akchurin, Garif; Tuchin, Valery

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the regularity of local light absorption by gold nanostars (AuNSts) model is studied by method of numerical simulation. The mutual diffraction influence of individual geometric fragments of AuNSts is analyzed. A comparison is made with an approximate analytical approach for estimating the average bulk density of absorbed power and total absorbed power by individual geometric fragments of AuNSts. It is shown that the results of the approximate analytical estimate are in qualitative agreement with the numerical calculations of the light absorption by AuNSts.

  11. Gain-clamped semiconductor optical amplifiers based on compensating light: Theoretical model and performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xin-Hong; Wu, Zheng-Mao; Xia, Guang-Qiong

    2006-12-01

    It is well known that the gain-clamped semiconductor optical amplifier (GC-SOA) based on lasing effect is subject to transmission rate restriction because of relaxation oscillation. The GC-SOA based on compensating effect between signal light and amplified spontaneous emission by combined SOA and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) can be used to overcome this problem. In this paper, the theoretical model on GC-SOA based on compensating light has been constructed. The numerical simulations demonstrate that good gain and noise figure characteristics can be realized by selecting reasonably the FBG insertion position, the peak reflectivity of FBG and the biasing current of GC-SOA.

  12. Observed light yield of scintillation pixels: Extending the two-ray model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantorski, Igor; Jurkowski, Jacek; Drozdowski, Winicjusz

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose an extended, two dimensional model describing the propagation of scintillation photons inside a cuboid crystal until they reach a PMT window. In the simplest approach the model considers two main reasons for light losses: standard absorption obeying the classical Lambert-Beer law and non-ideal reflectivity of the "mummy" covering formed by several layers of Teflon tape wrapping the sample. Results of the model calculations are juxtaposed with experimental data as well as with predictions of an earlier, one dimensional model.

  13. Hue-saturation-density (HSD) model for stain recognition in digital images from transmitted light microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Der Laak, J A; Pahlplatz, M M; Hanselaar, A G; de Wilde, P C

    2000-04-01

    Transmitted light microscopy is used in pathology to examine stained tissues. Digital image analysis is gaining importance as a means to quantify alterations in tissues. A prerequisite for accurate and reproducible quantification is the possibility to recognise stains in a standardised manner, independently of variations in the staining density. The usefulness of three colour models was studied using data from computer simulations and experimental data from an immuno-doublestained tissue section. Direct use of the three intensities obtained by a colour camera results in the red-green-blue (RGB) model. By decoupling the intensity from the RGB data, the hue-saturation-intensity (HSI) model is obtained. However, the major part of the variation in perceived intensities in transmitted light microscopy is caused by variations in staining density. Therefore, the hue-saturation-density (HSD) transform was defined as the RGB to HSI transform, applied to optical density values rather than intensities for the individual RGB channels. In the RGB model, the mixture of chromatic and intensity information hampers standardisation of stain recognition. In the HSI model, mixtures of stains that could be distinguished from other stains in the RGB model could not be separated. The HSD model enabled all possible distinctions in a two-dimensional, standardised data space. In the RGB model, standardised recognition is only possible by using complex and time-consuming algorithms. The HSI model is not suitable for stain recognition in transmitted light microscopy. The newly derived HSD model was found superior to the existing models for this purpose. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model.

    PubMed

    Perna, J J; Mannix, M L; Rooney, J F; Notkins, A L; Straus, S E

    1987-09-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation.

  15. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.

    1987-09-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpesmore » simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation.« less

  16. Light-induced depigmentation in planarians models the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Stubenhaus, Bradford M; Dustin, John P; Neverett, Emily R; Beaudry, Megan S; Nadeau, Leanna E; Burk-McCoy, Ethan; He, Xinwen; Pearson, Bret J; Pellettieri, Jason

    2016-05-31

    Porphyrias are disorders of heme metabolism frequently characterized by extreme photosensitivity. This symptom results from accumulation of porphyrins, tetrapyrrole intermediates in heme biosynthesis that generate reactive oxygen species when exposed to light, in the skin of affected individuals. Here we report that in addition to producing an ommochrome body pigment, the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea generates porphyrins in its subepithelial pigment cells under physiological conditions, and that this leads to pigment cell loss when animals are exposed to intense visible light. Remarkably, porphyrin biosynthesis and light-induced depigmentation are enhanced by starvation, recapitulating a common feature of some porphyrias - decreased nutrient intake precipitates an acute manifestation of the disease. Our results establish planarians as an experimentally tractable animal model for research into the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias, and potentially for the identification of novel pharmacological interventions capable of alleviating porphyrin-mediated photosensitivity or decoupling dieting and fasting from disease pathogenesis.

  17. Modelling and Display of the Ultraviolet Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, J.; Henry, R.; Murthy, J.; Allen, M.; McGlynn, T. A.; Scollick, K.

    1994-12-01

    A computer program is currently under development to model in 3D - one dimension of which is wavelength - all the known and major speculated sources of ultraviolet (900 A - 3100 A ) radiation over the celestial sphere. The software is being written in Fortran 77 and IDL and currently operates under IRIX (the operating system of the Silicon Graphics Iris Machine); all output models are in FITS format. Models along with display software will become available to the astronomical community. The Ultraviolet Sky Model currently includes the Zodiacal Light, Point Sources of Emission, and the Diffuse Galactic Light. The Ultraviolet Sky Model is currently displayed using SkyView: a package under development at NASA/ GSFC, which allows users to retrieve and display publically available all-sky astronomical survey data (covering many wavebands) over the Internet. We present a demonstration of the SkyView display of the Ultraviolet Model. The modelling is a five year development project: the work illustrated here represents product output at the end of year one. Future work includes enhancements to the current models and incorporation of the following models: Galactic Molecular Hydrogen Fluorescence; Galactic Highly Ionized Atomic Line Emission; Integrated Extragalactic Light; and speculated sources in the intergalactic medium such as Ionized Plasma and radiation from Non-Baryonic Particle Decay. We also present a poster which summarizes the components of the Ultraviolet Sky Model and outlines a further package that will be used to display the Ultraviolet Model. This work is supported by United States Air Force Contract F19628-93-K-0004. Dr J. Daniels is supported with a post-doctoral Fellowship from the Leverhulme Foundation, London, United Kingdom. We are also grateful for the encouragement of Dr Stephen Price (Phillips Laboratory, Hanscomb Air Force Base, MA)

  18. Type Ia supernovae: Pulsating delayed detonation models, IR light curves, and the formation of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflich, Peter; Khokhlov, A.; Wheeler, C.

    1995-01-01

    We computed optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). It is demonstrated that observations of the IR light curves can be used to identify subluminous SNe Ia by testing whether secondary maxima occur in the IR. Our pulsating delayed detonation models are in agreement with current observations both for subluminous and normal bright SN Ia, namely SN1991bg, SN1992bo, and SN1992bc. Observations of molecular bands provide a test to distinguish whether strongly subluminous supernovae are a consequence of the pulsating mechanism occurring in a high-mass white dwarf (WD) or, alternatively, are formed by the helium detonation in a low-mass WD as was suggested by Woosley. In the latter case, no carbon is left after the explosion of low-mass WDs whereas a log of C/O-rich material is present in pulsating delayed detonation models.

  19. An agent-vector-host-environment model for controlling small arms and light weapons.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andrew D; Sharma, Malika; Muggah, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Armed violence is a significant public health problem. It results in fatal and non-fatal injuries and disrupts social and economic processes that are essential to the health of individuals and communities. We argue that an agent-vector-host-environment model can be helpful in understanding and describing the availability and misuse of small arms and light weapons. Moreover, such a model can assist in identifying potential control points and in developing mitigation strategies. These concepts have been developed from analogous vector control programs and are applied to controlling arms to reduce their misuse. So-called 'denormalization' and 'de-legitimization' campaigns that focus on the vector - including the industry producing these commodities - can be based on the experience of public health in controlling tobacco use and exposure. This model can assist health professionals, civil society and governments in developing comprehensive strategies to limit the production, distribution and misuse of small arms and light weapons.

  20. A decision model applied to alcohol effects on driver signal light behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, S. H.; Allen, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    A decision model including perceptual noise or inconsistency is developed from expected value theory to explain driver stop and go decisions at signaled intersections. The model is applied to behavior in a car simulation and instrumented vehicle. Objective and subjective changes in driver decision making were measured with changes in blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Treatment levels averaged 0.00, 0.10 and 0.14 BAC for a total of 26 male subjects. Data were taken for drivers approaching signal lights at three timing configurations. The correlation between model predictions and behavior was highly significant. In contrast to previous research, analysis indicates that increased BAC results in increased perceptual inconsistency, which is the primary cause of increased risk taking at low probability of success signal lights.

  1. Modeling ocean primary production: Sensitivity to spectral resolution of attenuation and absorption of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Helen; Merchant, Chris J.

    2008-08-01

    Modeling the vertical penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) through the ocean, and its utilization by phytoplankton, is fundamental to simulating marine primary production. The variation of attenuation and absorption of light with wavelength suggests that photosynthesis should be modeled at high spectral resolution, but this is computationally expensive. To model primary production in global 3d models, a balance between computer time and accuracy is necessary. We investigate the effects of varying the spectral resolution of the underwater light field and the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton ( α∗), on primary production using a 1d coupled ecosystem ocean turbulence model. The model is applied at three sites in the Atlantic Ocean (CIS (∼60°N), PAP (∼50°N) and ESTOC (∼30°N)) to include the effect of different meteorological forcing and parameter sets. We also investigate three different methods for modeling α∗ - as a fixed constant, varying with both wavelength and chlorophyll concentration [Bricaud, A., Morel, A., Babin, M., Allali, K., Claustre, H., 1998. Variations of light absorption by suspended particles with chlorophyll a concentration in oceanic (case 1) waters. Analysis and implications for bio-optical models. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 31033-31044], and using a non-spectral parameterization [Anderson, T.R., 1993. A spectrally averaged model of light penetration and photosynthesis. Limnol. Oceanogr. 38, 1403-1419]. After selecting the appropriate ecosystem parameters for each of the three sites we vary the spectral resolution of light and α∗ from 1 to 61 wavebands and study the results in conjunction with the three different α∗ estimation methods. The results show modeled estimates of ocean primary productivity are highly sensitive to the degree of spectral resolution and α∗. For accurate simulations of primary production and chlorophyll distribution we recommend a spectral resolution of at least six wavebands

  2. Light Curve Simulation Using Spacecraft CAD Models and Empirical Material Spectral BRDFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willison, A.; Bedard, D.

    This paper presents a Matlab-based light curve simulation software package that uses computer-aided design (CAD) models of spacecraft and the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (sBRDF) of their homogenous surface materials. It represents the overall optical reflectance of objects as a sBRDF, a spectrometric quantity, obtainable during an optical ground truth experiment. The broadband bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), the basis of a broadband light curve, is produced by integrating the sBRDF over the optical wavelength range. Colour-filtered BRDFs, the basis of colour-filtered light curves, are produced by first multiplying the sBRDF by colour filters, and integrating the products. The software package's validity is established through comparison of simulated reflectance spectra and broadband light curves with those measured of the CanX-1 Engineering Model (EM) nanosatellite, collected during an optical ground truth experiment. It is currently being extended to simulate light curves of spacecraft in Earth orbit, using spacecraft Two-Line-Element (TLE) sets, yaw/pitch/roll angles, and observer coordinates. Measured light curves of the NEOSSat spacecraft will be used to validate simulated quantities. The sBRDF was chosen to represent material reflectance as it is spectrometric and a function of illumination and observation geometry. Homogeneous material sBRDFs were obtained using a goniospectrometer for a range of illumination and observation geometries, collected in a controlled environment. The materials analyzed include aluminum alloy, two types of triple-junction photovoltaic (TJPV) cell, white paint, and multi-layer insulation (MLI). Interpolation and extrapolation methods were used to determine the sBRDF for all possible illumination and observation geometries not measured in the laboratory, resulting in empirical look-up tables. These look-up tables are referenced when calculating the overall sBRDF of objects, where

  3. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional-structural plant model.

    PubMed

    Sarlikioti, V; de Visser, P H B; Marcelis, L F M

    2011-04-01

    At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy heterogeneity of an explicitly described tomato canopy in relation to temporal dynamics of horizontal and vertical light distribution and photosynthesis under direct- and diffuse-light conditions. Detailed measurements of canopy architecture, light interception and leaf photosynthesis were carried out on a tomato crop. These data were used for the development and calibration of a functional-structural tomato model. The model consisted of an architectural static virtual plant coupled with a nested radiosity model for light calculations and a leaf photosynthesis module. Different scenarios of horizontal and vertical distribution of light interception, incident light and photosynthesis were investigated under diffuse and direct light conditions. Simulated light interception showed a good correspondence to the measured values. Explicitly described leaf angles resulted in higher light interception in the middle of the plant canopy compared with fixed and ellipsoidal leaf-angle distribution models, although the total light interception remained the same. The fraction of light intercepted at a north-south orientation of rows differed from east-west orientation by 10 % on winter and 23 % on summer days. The horizontal distribution of photosynthesis differed significantly between the top, middle and lower canopy layer. Taking into account the vertical variation of leaf photosynthetic parameters in the canopy, led to approx. 8 % increase on simulated canopy photosynthesis. Leaf angles of heterogeneous canopies should be explicitly described as they have a big impact both on light distribution and photosynthesis. Especially, the vertical variation of photosynthesis in canopy is such that the

  4. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional–structural plant model

    PubMed Central

    Sarlikioti, V.; de Visser, P. H. B.; Marcelis, L. F. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy heterogeneity of an explicitly described tomato canopy in relation to temporal dynamics of horizontal and vertical light distribution and photosynthesis under direct- and diffuse-light conditions. Methods Detailed measurements of canopy architecture, light interception and leaf photosynthesis were carried out on a tomato crop. These data were used for the development and calibration of a functional–structural tomato model. The model consisted of an architectural static virtual plant coupled with a nested radiosity model for light calculations and a leaf photosynthesis module. Different scenarios of horizontal and vertical distribution of light interception, incident light and photosynthesis were investigated under diffuse and direct light conditions. Key Results Simulated light interception showed a good correspondence to the measured values. Explicitly described leaf angles resulted in higher light interception in the middle of the plant canopy compared with fixed and ellipsoidal leaf-angle distribution models, although the total light interception remained the same. The fraction of light intercepted at a north–south orientation of rows differed from east–west orientation by 10 % on winter and 23 % on summer days. The horizontal distribution of photosynthesis differed significantly between the top, middle and lower canopy layer. Taking into account the vertical variation of leaf photosynthetic parameters in the canopy, led to approx. 8 % increase on simulated canopy photosynthesis. Conclusions Leaf angles of heterogeneous canopies should be explicitly described as they have a big impact both on light distribution and photosynthesis. Especially, the vertical

  5. A Model of the Temporal Variability of Optical Light from Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, E. B.; Seager, S.; Turner, E. L.

    2001-05-01

    New observatories such as TPF (NASA) and Darwin (ESA) are being designed to detect light directly from terrestrial-mass planets. Such observations will provide new data to constrain theories of planet formation and may identify the possible presence of liquid water and even spectroscopic signatures suggestive of life. We model the light scattered by Earth-like planets focusing on temporal variability due to planetary rotation and weather. Since a majority of the scattered light comes from only a small fraction of the planet's surface, significant variations in brightness are possible. The variations can be as large as a factor of two for a cloud-free planet which has a range of albedos similar to those of the different surfaces found on Earth. If a significant fraction of the observed light is scattered by the planet's atmosphere, including clouds, then the amplitude of variations due to surface features will be diluted. Atmospheric variability (e.g. clouds) itself is extremely interesting because it provides evidence for weather. The planet's rotation period, fractional ice and cloud cover, gross distribution of land and water on the surface, large scale weather patterns, large regions of unusual reflectivity or color (such as major desserts or vegetation's "red edge") as well as the geometry of its spin, orbit, and illumination relative to the observer all have substantial effects on the planet's rotational light curve.

  6. Light pollution: measuring and modelling skyglow. An application in two Portuguese reserves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Raul Cerveira Pinto Sousa

    Outdoors human-made lighting at night causes sky glow, one of the effects of light pollution. Sky glow is rising with the growth of world population. Urban inhabitants are increasingly deprived from a starry sky. However, since light propagates to regions far from where it is produced, light pollution spreads to places where few or none artificial light at night existed, disturbing the quality of the night sky. In this work we assess for the first time the sky brightness of two regions in Portugal, the Peneda-Geres National Park, and the recently created Starlight Reserve Dark Sky® Alqueva. We used a portable unit, a Unihedron Sky Quality Meter-L (SQM-L), to measure the luminance of the night sky. We also tested the SQM-L in a laboratory to a more thorough analysis of the device, and to check the effect of polarization on the unit, suggested by our observations and other users. Our results suggest that the SQM-L is not affected by any measurable effect of polarization, but some guidelines to use the SQM-L in the field are provided based on our work. The data from the field measurement was used to compare to one light pollution propagation model (Kocifaj, 2007), using VIIRS DNB satellite upwards radiance as input to the model. The results obtained from the model are favourably compared to the field measurements. We proceeded to a set of tests with the model to find the best fit. Our best results were achieved by analysing the data by night rather than the global set of data. Our first results were used to apply to the classification of the region of Alqueva to a Starlight Tourism Destination. That classification was attained during the course of this work (December 2011). A guideline on the Peneda-Geres National Park was also implemented after our first results were provided. We believe we have achieved a set of results in a set of parallel issues all related to light pollution that we hope may contribute to the current knowledge on this area of research.

  7. Multispectral simulation environment for modeling low-light-level sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ientilucci, Emmett J.; Brown, Scott D.; Schott, John R.; Raqueno, Rolando V.

    1998-11-01

    Image intensifying cameras have been found to be extremely useful in low-light-level (LLL) scenarios including military night vision and civilian rescue operations. These sensors utilize the available visible region photons and an amplification process to produce high contrast imagery. It has been demonstrated that processing techniques can further enhance the quality of this imagery. For example, fusion with matching thermal IR imagery can improve image content when very little visible region contrast is available. To aid in the improvement of current algorithms and the development of new ones, a high fidelity simulation environment capable of producing radiometrically correct multi-band imagery for low- light-level conditions is desired. This paper describes a modeling environment attempting to meet these criteria by addressing the task as two individual components: (1) prediction of a low-light-level radiance field from an arbitrary scene, and (2) simulation of the output from a low- light-level sensor for a given radiance field. The radiance prediction engine utilized in this environment is the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model which is a first principles based multi-spectral synthetic image generation model capable of producing an arbitrary number of bands in the 0.28 to 20 micrometer region. The DIRSIG model is utilized to produce high spatial and spectral resolution radiance field images. These images are then processed by a user configurable multi-stage low-light-level sensor model that applies the appropriate noise and modulation transfer function (MTF) at each stage in the image processing chain. This includes the ability to reproduce common intensifying sensor artifacts such as saturation and 'blooming.' Additionally, co-registered imagery in other spectral bands may be simultaneously generated for testing fusion and exploitation algorithms. This paper discusses specific aspects of the DIRSIG radiance prediction for low

  8. New GABA modulators protect photoreceptor cells from light-induced degeneration in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Schur, Rebecca M; Gao, Songqi; Yu, Guanping; Chen, Yu; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2018-01-24

    No clinically approved therapies are currently available that prevent the onset of photoreceptor death in retinal degeneration. Signaling between retinal neurons is regulated by the release and uptake of neurotransmitters, wherein GABA is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter. In this work, novel 3-chloropropiophenone derivatives and the clinical anticonvulsants tiagabine and vigabatrin were tested to modulate GABA signaling and protect against light-induced retinal degeneration. Abca4 -/- Rdh8 -/- mice, an accelerated model of retinal degeneration, were exposed to intense light after prophylactic injections of one of these compounds. Imaging and functional assessments of the retina indicated that these compounds successfully protected photoreceptor cells from degeneration to maintain a full-visual-field response. Furthermore, these compounds demonstrated a strong safety profile in wild-type mice and did not compromise visual function or damage the retina, despite repeated administration. These results indicate that modulating inhibitory GABA signaling can offer prophylactic protection against light-induced retinal degeneration.-Schur, R. M., Gao, S., Yu, G., Chen, Y., Maeda, A., Palczewski, K., Lu, Z.-R. New GABA modulators protect photoreceptor cells from light-induced degeneration in mouse models.

  9. Modeling boundary measurements of scattered light using the corrected diffusion approximation

    PubMed Central

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Tarvainen, Tanja; Kim, Arnold D.

    2012-01-01

    We study the modeling and simulation of steady-state measurements of light scattered by a turbid medium taken at the boundary. In particular, we implement the recently introduced corrected diffusion approximation in two spatial dimensions to model these boundary measurements. This implementation uses expansions in plane wave solutions to compute boundary conditions and the additive boundary layer correction, and a finite element method to solve the diffusion equation. We show that this corrected diffusion approximation models boundary measurements substantially better than the standard diffusion approximation in comparison to numerical solutions of the radiative transport equation. PMID:22435102

  10. Models for integrated and differential scattering optical properties of encapsulated light absorbing carbon aggregates.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Michael; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa

    2013-04-08

    Optical properties of light absorbing carbon (LAC) aggregates encapsulated in a shell of sulfate are computed for realistic model geometries based on field measurements. Computations are performed for wavelengths from the UV-C to the mid-IR. Both climate- and remote sensing-relevant optical properties are considered. The results are compared to commonly used simplified model geometries, none of which gives a realistic representation of the distribution of the LAC mass within the host material and, as a consequence, fail to predict the optical properties accurately. A new core-gray shell model is introduced, which accurately reproduces the size- and wavelength dependence of the integrated and differential optical properties.

  11. Modeling Diurnal and Seasonal 3D Light Profiles in Amazon Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. C.; Rubio, J.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.; Cook, B. D.; Hunter, M. O.; Yin, T.; Nagol, J. R.; Keller, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The complex horizontal and vertical structure in tropical forests generates a diversity of light environments for canopy and understory trees. These 3D light profiles are dynamic on diurnal and seasonal time scales based on changes in solar illumination and the fraction of diffuse light. Understanding this variability is critical for improving ecosystem models and interpreting optical and LiDAR remote sensing data from tropical forests. Here, we initialized the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model using dense airborne LiDAR data (>20 returns m2) from three forest sites in the central and eastern Amazon. Forest scenes derived from airborne LiDAR data were tested using modeled and observed large-footprint LiDAR data from the ICESat-GLAS sensor. Next, diurnal and seasonal profiles of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for each forest site were simulated under clear sky and cloudy conditions using DART. Incident PAR was summarized for canopy, understory, and ground levels. Our study illustrates the importance of realistic canopy models for accurate representation of LiDAR and optical radiative transfer. In particular, canopy rugosity and ground topography information from airborne LiDAR data provided critical 3D information that cannot be recreated using stem maps and allometric relationships for crown dimensions. The spatial arrangement of canopy trees altered PAR availability, even for dominant individuals, compared to downwelling measurements from nearby eddy flux towers. Pseudo-realistic branch and leaf architecture was also essential for recreating multiple scattering within canopies at near-infrared wavelengths commonly used for LiDAR remote sensing and quantifying PAR attenuation from shading within and between canopies. These findings point to the need for more spatial information on forest structure to improve the representation of light availability in models of tropical forest productivity.

  12. New limb-darkening coefficients for modeling binary star light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hamme, W.

    1993-01-01

    We present monochromatic, passband-specific, and bolometric limb-darkening coefficients for a linear as well as nonlinear logarithmic and square root limb-darkening laws. These coefficients, including the bolometric ones, are needed when modeling binary star light curves with the latest version of the Wilson-Devinney light curve progam. We base our calculations on the most recent ATLAS stellar atmosphere models for solar chemical composition stars with a wide range of effective temperatures and surface gravitites. We examine how well various limb-darkening approximations represent the variation of the emerging specific intensity across a stellar surface as computed according to the model. For binary star light curve modeling purposes, we propose the use of a logarithmic or a square root law. We design our tables in such a manner that the relative quality of either law with respect to another can be easily compared. Since the computation of bolometric limb-darkening coefficients first requires monochromatic coefficients, we also offer tables of these coefficients (at 1221 wavelength values between 9.09 nm and 160 micrometer) and tables of passband-specific coefficients for commonly used photometric filters.

  13. 40 CFR 86.099-9 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....099-9 Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty trucks. (a)(1)(i)-(iii) [Reserved... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty trucks. 86.099-9 Section 86.099-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  14. 40 CFR 86.004-9 - Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....004-9 Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks. Section 86.004-9 includes... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks. 86.004-9 Section 86.004-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  15. 40 CFR 86.004-9 - Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....004-9 Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks. Section 86.004-9 includes... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks. 86.004-9 Section 86.004-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  16. 40 CFR 86.004-9 - Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....004-9 Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks. Section 86.004-9 includes... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks. 86.004-9 Section 86.004-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  17. 40 CFR 86.004-9 - Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....004-9 Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks. Section 86.004-9 includes... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards for 2004 and later model year light-duty trucks. 86.004-9 Section 86.004-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  18. 40 CFR 86.099-9 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....099-9 Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty trucks. (a)(1)(i)-(iii) [Reserved... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty trucks. 86.099-9 Section 86.099-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  19. Modeling Oceanic Primary Production: Photoacclimation and Nutrient Effects on Light-saturated Photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Maranon, Emilio; Siegel, David A.; Hooker, Stanford B.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we describe a new model (the 'PhotoAcc' model) for estimating changes in the light-saturated rate of chlorophyll-normalized phytoplankton carbon fixation (Pbmax). The model is based on measurements conducted during the Atlantic Meridional Transect studies and the Bermuda Time Series program. The PhotoAcc model explained 64% to 82% of the observed variability in Pbmax for our data set, whereas none of the previously published Pbmax models described over the past 44 years explained any of the variance. The significance of this result is that a primary limiting factor for extracting ocean carbon fixation rates from satellite measurements of near surface chlorophyll has been errors in the estimate of Pbmax. Our new model should thus result in much improved calculations of oceanic photosynthesis and thus the role of the oceans in the global carbon cycle.

  20. Colorimetric characterization models based on colorimetric characteristics evaluation for active matrix organic light emitting diode panels.

    PubMed

    Gong, Rui; Xu, Haisong; Tong, Qingfen

    2012-10-20

    The colorimetric characterization of active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) panels suffers from their poor channel independence. Based on the colorimetric characteristics evaluation of channel independence and chromaticity constancy, an accurate colorimetric characterization method, namely, the polynomial compensation model (PC model) considering channel interactions was proposed for AMOLED panels. In this model, polynomial expressions are employed to calculate the relationship between the prediction errors of XYZ tristimulus values and the digital inputs to compensate the XYZ prediction errors of the conventional piecewise linear interpolation assuming the variable chromaticity coordinates (PLVC) model. The experimental results indicated that the proposed PC model outperformed other typical characterization models for the two tested AMOLED smart-phone displays and for the professional liquid crystal display monitor as well.

  1. An Optical Model for Estimating the Underwater Light Field from Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Cheng-Chien; Miller, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    A model of the wavelength-integrated scalar irradiance for a vertically homogeneous water column is developed. It runs twenty thousand times faster than simulations obtained using full Hydrolight code and limits the percentage error to less than 3.7%. Both the distribution of incident sky radiance and a wind-roughened surface are integrated in the model. Our model removes common limitations of earlier models and can be applied to waters with any composition of the inherent optical properties. Implementation of this new model, as well as the ancillary information required for processing global-scale satellite data, is discussed. This new model is fast, accurate, and flexible and therefore provides important information of the underwater light field from remote sensing.

  2. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  3. Competition for light between individual trees lowers reference canopy stomatal conductance: Results from a model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranty, Michael M.; Mackay, D. Scott; Ewers, Brent E.; Traver, Elizabeth; Kruger, Eric L.

    2010-12-01

    We have used an ecosystem model, TREES (Terrestrial Regional Ecosystem Exchange Simulator), to test the hypothesis that competition for light limits reference canopy stomatal conductance (GSref; conductance at 1 kPa vapor pressure deficit) for individual tree crowns. Sap flux (JS) data was collected at an aspen-dominated unmanaged early successional site, and at a sugar maple dominated midsuccessional site managed for timber production. Using a Monte Carlo approach, JS scaled canopy transpiration (EC) estimates were used to parameterize two versions of the model for each tree individually; a control model treated trees as isolated individuals, and a modified version incorporated the shading effects of neighboring individuals on incident radiation. Agreement between simulated and observed EC was better for maple than for aspen using the control model. Accounting for canopy heterogeneity using a three-dimensional canopy representation had minimal effects on estimates of GSref or model performance for individual maples. At the Aspen site the modified model resulted in improved EC estimates, particularly for trees with lower GSref and more shading by neighboring individuals. Our results imply a link between photosynthetic capacity, as mediated by competitive light environment, and GSref. We conclude that accounting for the effects of canopy heterogeneity on incident radiation improves modeled estimates of canopy carbon and water fluxes, especially for shade intolerant species. Furthermore our results imply a link between ecosystem structure and function that may be exploited to elucidate the impacts of forest structural heterogeneity on ecosystem fluxes of carbon and water via LiDAR remote sensing.

  4. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters with PHOENIX; a First Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Torres, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 μm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 μm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  5. Imaging and modeling of collagen architecture in living tissue with polarized light transfer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Stoff, Susan; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Bai, Yuqiang

    2016-03-01

    The extra-cellular space in connective tissue of animals and humans alike is comprised in large part of collagen. Monitoring of collagen arrangement and cross-linking has been utilized to diagnose a variety of medical conditions and guide surgical intervention. For example, collagen monitoring is useful in the assessment and treatment of cervical cancer, skin cancer, myocardial infarction, and non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. We have developed a suite of tools and models based on polarized light transfer for the assessment of collagen presence, cross-linking, and orientation in living tissue. Here we will present some example of such approach applied to the human cervix. We will illustrate a novel Mueller Matrix (MM) imaging system for the study of cervical tissue; furthermore we will show how our model of polarized light transfer through cervical tissue compares to the experimental findings. Finally we will show validation of the methodology through histological results and Second Harmonic imaging microscopy.

  6. Quantum mechanical modeling the emission pattern and polarization of nanoscale light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rulin; Zhang, Yu; Bi, Fuzhen; Frauenheim, Thomas; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2016-07-21

    Understanding of the electroluminescence (EL) mechanism in optoelectronic devices is imperative for further optimization of their efficiency and effectiveness. Here, a quantum mechanical approach is formulated for modeling the EL processes in nanoscale light emitting diodes (LED). Based on non-equilibrium Green's function quantum transport equations, interactions with the electromagnetic vacuum environment are included to describe electrically driven light emission in the devices. The presented framework is illustrated by numerical simulations of a silicon nanowire LED device. EL spectra of the nanowire device under different bias voltages are obtained and, more importantly, the radiation pattern and polarization of optical emission can be determined using the current approach. This work is an important step forward towards atomistic quantum mechanical modeling of the electrically induced optical response in nanoscale systems.

  7. Kinetic Modeling Sheds Light on the Mode of Action of Recombinant Factor VIIa on Thrombin Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Regular Article Kinetic modeling sheds light on the mode of action of recombinant factor VIIa on thrombin generation Alexander Y. Mitrophanov...its effects on the quantitative parameters of thrombin generation. For recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) ― a promising hemostasis-inducing...modulate thrombin production , it is necessary to identify rFVIIa-induced effects that are compatible with the available biochemical knowledge about

  8. Application for certification 1988 model year light-duty vehicles - US Technical Research Company (Peugeot)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings that describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems, and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems.

  9. Ratios of Vector and Pseudoscalar B Meson Decay Constants in the Light-Cone Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiman, Nisha; Dahiya, Harleen

    2018-05-01

    We study the decay constants of pseudoscalar and vector B meson in the framework of light-cone quark model. We apply the variational method to the relativistic Hamiltonian with the Gaussian-type trial wave function to obtain the values of β (scale parameter). Then with the help of known values of constituent quark masses, we obtain the numerical results for the decay constants f_P and f_V, respectively. We compare our numerical results with the existing experimental data.

  10. Modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters: Implications for underwater optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, Sai Shri; Sahu, Sanjay Kumar; Dev, Pravin Jeba; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2018-05-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients of particulate (algal and non-algal components) and dissolved substances are modelled and combined with the pure seawater component to determine the total light absorption coefficients of seawater in the Bay of Bengal. Two parameters namely chlorophyll-a (Chl) concentration and turbidity were measured using commercially available instruments with high sampling rates. For modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters, the measured data are classified into two broad groups - algal dominant and non-algal particle (NAP) dominant. With these criteria the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP were established based on their concentrations using an iterative method. To account for the spectral dependence of absorption by phytoplankton, the wavelength-dependent coefficients were introduced into the model. The CDOM absorption was determined by subtracting the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP from the measured total absorption data and then related to the Chl concentration. Validity of the model is assessed based on independent in-situ data from certain discrete locations in the Bay of Bengal. The total absorption coefficients estimated using the new model by considering the contributions of algal, non-algal and CDOM have good agreement with the measured total absorption data with the error range of 6.9 to 28.3%. Results obtained by the present model are important for predicting the propagation of the radiant energy within the ocean and interpreting remote sensing observation data.

  11. Parameterized source term in the diffusion approximation for enhanced near-field modeling of collimated light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mengyu; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Xueying; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2016-03-01

    Most analytical methods for describing light propagation in turbid medium exhibit low effectiveness in the near-field of a collimated source. Motivated by the Charge Simulation Method in electromagnetic theory as well as the established discrete source based modeling, we have reported on an improved explicit model, referred to as "Virtual Source" (VS) diffuse approximation (DA), to inherit the mathematical simplicity of the DA while considerably extend its validity in modeling the near-field photon migration in low-albedo medium. In this model, the collimated light in the standard DA is analogously approximated as multiple isotropic point sources (VS) distributed along the incident direction. For performance enhancement, a fitting procedure between the calculated and realistic reflectances is adopted in the nearfield to optimize the VS parameters (intensities and locations). To be practically applicable, an explicit 2VS-DA model is established based on close-form derivations of the VS parameters for the typical ranges of the optical parameters. The proposed VS-DA model is validated by comparing with the Monte Carlo simulations, and further introduced in the image reconstruction of the Laminar Optical Tomography system.

  12. Modelling of underwater light fields in turbid and eutrophic waters: application and validation with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundarabalan, B.; Shanmugam, P.

    2014-09-01

    A reliable radiative transfer model is an essential and indispensable tool for understanding of the radiative transfer processes in homogenous and layered waters, analyzing measurements made by radiance sensors and developing remote sensing algorithms to derive meaningful physical quantities and biogeochemical variables in turbid and productive coastal waters. Existing radiative transfer models have been designed to be applicable to either homogenous waters or inhomogeneous waters. To overcome such constraints associated with these models, this study presents a radiative transfer model that treats a homogenous layer as a diffuse part and an inhomogeneous layer as a direct part in the water column and combines these two parts appropriately in order to generate more reliable underwater light field data such as upwelling radiance (Lu), downwelling irradiance (Ed) and upwelling irradiance (Eu). The diffuse model assumes the inherent optical properties (IOPs) to be vertically continuous and the light fields to exponentially decrease with the depth, whereas the direct part considers the water column to be vertically inhomogeneous (layer-by-layer phenomena) with the vertically varying phase function. The surface and bottom boundary conditions, source function due to chlorophyll and solar incident geometry are also included in the present RT model. The performance of this model is assessed in a variety of waters (clear, turbid and eutrophic) using the measured radiometric data. The present model shows an advantage in terms of producing accurate Lu, Ed and Eu profiles (in spatial domain) in different waters determined by both homogenous and inhomogeneous conditions. The feasibility of predicting these underwater light fields based on the remotely estimated IOP data is also examined using the present RT model. For this application, vertical profiles of the water constituents and IOPs are estimated by empirical models based on our in-situ data. The present RT model generates

  13. Modelling of underwater light fields in turbid and eutrophic waters: application and validation with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundarabalan, B.; Shanmugam, P.

    2015-01-01

    A reliable radiative transfer (RT) model is an essential and indispensable tool for understanding the radiative transfer processes in homogenous and layered waters, analyzing measurements made by radiance sensors and developing remote-sensing algorithms to derive meaningful physical quantities and biogeochemical variables in turbid and productive coastal waters. Existing radiative transfer models have been designed to be applicable to either homogenous waters or inhomogeneous waters. To overcome such constraints associated with these models, this study presents a radiative transfer model that treats a homogenous layer as a diffuse part and an inhomogeneous layer as a direct part in the water column and combines these two parts appropriately in order to generate more reliable underwater light-field data such as upwelling radiance (Lu), downwelling irradiance (Ed) and upwelling irradiance (Eu). The diffuse model assumes the inherent optical properties (IOPs) to be vertically continuous and the light fields to exponentially decrease with depth, whereas the direct part considers the water column to be vertically inhomogeneous (layer-by-layer phenomena) with the vertically varying phase function. The surface and bottom boundary conditions, source function due to chlorophyll and solar incident geometry are also included in the present RT model. The performance of this model is assessed in a variety of waters (clear, turbid and eutrophic) using the measured radiometric data. The present model shows an advantage in terms of producing accurate Lu, Ed and Eu profiles (in spatial domain) in different waters determined by both homogenous and inhomogeneous conditions. The feasibility of predicting these underwater light fields based on the remotely estimated IOP data is also examined using the present RT model. For this application, vertical profiles of the water constituents and IOPs are estimated by empirical models based on our in situ data. The present RT model generates Lu

  14. A molecular model for self-assembly of amyloid fibrils: Immunoglobulin light chains

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.; Myatt, E.A.; Westholm, F.A.

    1995-08-29

    The formation and pathological deposition of amyloid fibrils are defining features of many acquired and inherited disorders, including primary or light-chain-associated amyloidosis, Alzheimer`s disease, and adult-onset diabetes. No pharmacological methods exist to block this process or to effect the removal of fibrils from tissue, and thus, little can be done to prevent organ failure and ultimate death that result from deposition of amyloid. Knowledge of the pathogenesis, treatment, or prevention of these presently incurable diseases is limited due to the relative paucity of information regarding the biophysical basis of amyloid formation. Antibody light chains of different amino acid sequence showmore » differential amyloid-forming tendencies and, as such, can provide insight into the structural organization of amyloid fibrils as well as into basic mechanisms of protein self-assembly. We have compared primary structures of 180 human monoclonal light chains and have identified particular residues and positions within the variable domain that differentiate amyloid-from nonamyloid-associated proteins. We propose a molecular model that accounts for amyloid formation by antibody light chains and might also have implications for other forms of amyloidosis. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.« less

  15. Long lived light scalars as probe of low scale seesaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Zhang, Yongchao

    2017-10-01

    We point out that in generic TeV scale seesaw models for neutrino masses with local B- L symmetry breaking, there is a phenomenologically allowed range of parameters where the Higgs field responsible for B- L symmetry breaking leaves a physical real scalar field with mass around GeV scale. This particle (denoted here by H3) is weakly mixed with the Standard Model Higgs field (h) with mixing θ1 ≲mH3 /mh, barring fine-tuned cancellation. In the specific case when the B- L symmetry is embedded into the TeV scale left-right seesaw scenario, we show that the bounds on the h-H3 mixing θ1 become further strengthened due to low energy flavor constraints, thus forcing the light H3 to be long lived, with displaced vertex signals at the LHC. The property of left-right TeV scale seesaw models are such that they make the H3 decay to two photons as the dominant mode. This is in contrast with a generic light scalar that mixes with the SM Higgs boson, which could also have leptonic and hadronic decay modes with comparable or larger strength. We discuss the production of this new scalar field at the LHC and show that it leads to testable displaced vertex signals of collimated photon jets, which is a new distinguishing feature of the left-right seesaw model. We also study a simpler version of the model where the SU(2)R breaking scale is much higher than the O(TeV) U(1) B- L breaking scale, in which case the production and decay of H3 proceed differently, but its long lifetime feature is still preserved for a large range of parameters. Thus, the search for such long-lived light scalar particles provides a new way to probe TeV scale seesaw models for neutrino masses at colliders.

  16. A validated model to predict microalgae growth in outdoor pond cultures subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Crowe, Braden J.; Waller, Peter

    Here, a microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in outdoor ponds subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to a scatter-corrected Beer-Lambert Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires the following experimentally determined strain-specific input parameters: specific growth rate as a function of light intensity and temperature, biomass loss rate in the dark as amore » function of temperature and average light intensity during the preceding light period, and the scatter-corrected biomass light absorption coefficient. The model was successful in predicting the growth performance and biomass productivity of three different microalgae species (Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Picochlorum sp.) in raceway pond cultures (batch and semi-continuous) subjected to diurnal sunlight intensity and water temperature variations. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor deviations in input parameters. To increase the predictive power of this and other microalgae biomass growth models, a better understanding of the effects of mixing-induced rapid light dark cycles on photo-inhibition and short-term biomass losses due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of the pond is needed.« less

  17. A validated model to predict microalgae growth in outdoor pond cultures subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Crowe, Braden J.; Waller, Peter; ...

    2015-12-11

    Here, a microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in outdoor ponds subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to a scatter-corrected Beer-Lambert Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires the following experimentally determined strain-specific input parameters: specific growth rate as a function of light intensity and temperature, biomass loss rate in the dark as amore » function of temperature and average light intensity during the preceding light period, and the scatter-corrected biomass light absorption coefficient. The model was successful in predicting the growth performance and biomass productivity of three different microalgae species (Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Picochlorum sp.) in raceway pond cultures (batch and semi-continuous) subjected to diurnal sunlight intensity and water temperature variations. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor deviations in input parameters. To increase the predictive power of this and other microalgae biomass growth models, a better understanding of the effects of mixing-induced rapid light dark cycles on photo-inhibition and short-term biomass losses due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of the pond is needed.« less

  18. Final Report: System Reliability Model for Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Luminaires

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. Lynn

    2017-05-31

    The primary objectives of this project was to develop and validate reliability models and accelerated stress testing (AST) methodologies for predicting the lifetime of integrated SSL luminaires. This study examined the likely failure modes for SSL luminaires including abrupt failure, excessive lumen depreciation, unacceptable color shifts, and increased power consumption. Data on the relative distribution of these failure modes were acquired through extensive accelerated stress tests and combined with industry data and other source of information on LED lighting. This data was compiled and utilized to build models of the aging behavior of key luminaire optical and electrical components.

  19. Progress toward an explicit mechanistic model for the light-driven pump, bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1999-01-01

    Recent crystallographic information about the structure of bacteriorhodopsin and some of its photointermediates, together with a large amount of spectroscopic and mutational data, suggest a mechanistic model for how this protein couples light energy to the translocation of protons across the membrane. Now nearing completion, this detailed molecular model will describe the nature of the steric and electrostatic conflicts at the photoisomerized retinal, as well as the means by which it induces proton transfers in the two half-channels leading to the two membrane surfaces, thereby causing unidirectional, uphill transport.

  20. Investigating students’ mental models about the nature of light in different contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Özgür

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigated pre-service physics teachers’ mental models of light in different contexts, such as blackbody radiation, the photoelectric effect and the Compton effect. The data collected through the paper-and-pencil questionnaire (PPQ) were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Sampling of this study consists of a total of 110 physics education students who were taking a modern physics course at two different state universities in Turkey. As a result, three mental models, which were called the beam ray model (BrM), hybrid model (HM) and particle model (PM), were being used by the students while explaining these phenomena. The most model fluctuation was seen in HM and BrM. In addition, some students were in a mixed-model state where they use multiple mental models in explaining a phenomenon and used these models inconsistently. On the other hand, most of the students who used the particle model can be said to be in a pure model state.

  1. White Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) at Domestic Lighting Levels and Retinal Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Lee, Li-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000–10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. Objective: We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functional, histological, and biochemical measurements. Methods: We used blue LEDs (460 nm) and full-spectrum white LEDs, coupled with matching compact fluorescent lights, for exposures. Pathological examinations included electroretinogram, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also measured free radical production in the retina to determine the oxidative stress level. Results: H&E staining and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors, which indicated blue-light induced photochemical injury of the retina. Free radical production in the retina was increased in LED-exposed groups. IHC staining demonstrated that oxidative stress was associated with retinal injury. Although we found serious retinal light injury in LED groups, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) groups showed moderate to mild injury. Conclusion: Our results raise questions about adverse effects on the retina from chronic exposure to LED light compared with other light sources that have less blue light. Thus, we suggest a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich “white” LEDs for general lighting. Citation: Shang YM, Wang GS, Sliney D, Yang CH, Lee LL. 2014. White light–emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model. Environ Health Perspect 122:269–276; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307294 PMID:24362357

  2. A new parameterization for surface ocean light attenuation in Earth System Models: assessing the impact of light absorption by colored detrital material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. E.; Pradal, M.-A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2015-03-01

    Light limitation can affect the distribution of biota and nutrients in the ocean. Light absorption by colored detrital material (CDM) was included in a fully coupled Earth System Model using a new parameterization for shortwave attenuation. Two model runs were conducted, with and without light attenuation by CDM. In a global average sense, greater light limitation associated with CDM increased surface chlorophyll, biomass and nutrients together. These changes can be attributed to the movement of biological productivity higher up the water column, which increased surface chlorophyll and biomass while simultaneously decreasing total biomass. Meanwhile, the reduction in biomass resulted in greater nutrient availability throughout the water column. Similar results were found on a regional scale in an analysis of the oceans by biome. In coastal regions, surface chlorophyll increased by 35% while total integrated phytoplankton biomass diminished by 18%. The largest relative increases in modeled surface chlorophyll and biomass in the open ocean were found in the equatorial biomes, while largest decreases in depth-integrated biomass and chlorophyll were found in the subpolar and polar biomes. This mismatch of surface and subsurface trends and their regional dependence was analyzed by comparing the competing factors of diminished light availability and increased nutrient availability on phytoplankton growth in the upper 200 m. Overall, increases in surface biomass were expected to accompany greater nutrient uptake and therefore diminish surface nutrients, but changes in light limitation decoupled trends between these two variables. Understanding changes in biological productivity requires both surface and depth-resolved information. Surface trends may be minimal or of the opposite sign to depth-integrated amounts, depending on the vertical structure of phytoplankton abundance.

  3. Plum pudding random medium model of biological tissue toward remote microscopy from spectroscopic light scattering

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min

    2017-01-01

    Biological tissue has a complex structure and exhibits rich spectroscopic behavior. There has been no tissue model until now that has been able to account for the observed spectroscopy of tissue light scattering and its anisotropy. Here we present, for the first time, a plum pudding random medium (PPRM) model for biological tissue which succinctly describes tissue as a superposition of distinctive scattering structures (plum) embedded inside a fractal continuous medium of background refractive index fluctuation (pudding). PPRM faithfully reproduces the wavelength dependence of tissue light scattering and attributes the “anomalous” trend in the anisotropy to the plum and the powerlaw dependence of the reduced scattering coefficient to the fractal scattering pudding. Most importantly, PPRM opens up a novel venue of quantifying the tissue architecture and microscopic structures on average from macroscopic probing of the bulk with scattered light alone without tissue excision. We demonstrate this potential by visualizing the fine microscopic structural alterations in breast tissue (adipose, glandular, fibrocystic, fibroadenoma, and ductal carcinoma) deduced from noncontact spectroscopic measurement. PMID:28663913

  4. Imaging a seizure model in zebrafish with structured illumination light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Dale, Savannah; Ball, Rebecca; VanLeuven, Ariel J.; Baraban, Scott; Sornborger, Andrew; Lauderdale, James D.; Kner, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Zebrafish are a promising vertebrate model for elucidating how neural circuits generate behavior under normal and pathological conditions. The Baraban group first demonstrated that zebrafish larvae are valuable for investigating seizure events and can be used as a model for epilepsy in humans. Because of their small size and transparency, zebrafish embryos are ideal for imaging seizure activity using calcium indicators. Light-sheet microscopy is well suited to capturing neural activity in zebrafish because it is capable of optical sectioning, high frame rates, and low excitation intensities. We describe work in our lab to use light-sheet microscopy for high-speed long-time imaging of neural activity in wildtype and mutant zebrafish to better understand the connectivity and activity of inhibitory neural networks when GABAergic signaling is altered in vivo. We show that, with light-sheet microscopy, neural activity can be recorded at 23 frames per second in twocolors for over 10 minutes allowing us to capture rare seizure events in mutants. We have further implemented structured illumination to increase resolution and contrast in the vertical and axial directions during high-speed imaging at an effective frame rate of over 7 frames per second.

  5. The vacuole model: new terms in the second order deflection of light

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Amrita; Nandi, Kamal K.; Garipova, Guzel M.

    2011-02-01

    The present paper is an extension of a recent work (Bhattacharya et al. 2010) to the Einstein-Strauss vacuole model with a cosmological constant, where we work out the light deflection by considering perturbations up to order M{sup 3} and confirm the light bending obtained previously in their vacuole model by Ishak et al. (2008). We also obtain another local coupling term −5πM{sup 2}Λ/8 related to Λ, in addition to the one obtained by Sereno (2008, 2009). We argue that the vacuole method for light deflection is exclusively suited to cases where the cosmological constant Λ disappears from the path equation.more » However, the original Rindler-Ishak method (2007) still applies even if a certain parameter γ of Weyl gravity does not disappear. Here, using an alternative prescription, we obtain the known term −γR/2, as well as another new local term 3πγM/2 between M and γ. Physical implications are compared, where we argue that the repulsive term −γR/2 can be masked by the Schwarzschild term 2M/R in the halo regime supporting attractive property of the dark matter.« less

  6. Mature red blood cells: from optical model to inverse light-scattering problem.

    PubMed

    Gilev, Konstantin V; Yurkin, Maxim A; Chernyshova, Ekaterina S; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Chernyshev, Andrei V; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2016-04-01

    We propose a method for characterization of mature red blood cells (RBCs) morphology, based on measurement of light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual RBCs with the scanning flow cytometer and on solution of the inverse light-scattering (ILS) problem for each LSP. We considered a RBC shape model, corresponding to the minimal bending energy of the membrane with isotropic elasticity, and constructed an analytical approximation, which allows rapid simulation of the shape, given the diameter and minimal and maximal thicknesses. The ILS problem was solved by the nearest-neighbor interpolation using a preliminary calculated database of 250,000 theoretical LSPs. For each RBC in blood sample we determined three abovementioned shape characteristics and refractive index, which also allows us to calculate volume, surface area, sphericity index, spontaneous curvature, hemoglobin concentration and content.

  7. Mature red blood cells: from optical model to inverse light-scattering problem

    PubMed Central

    Gilev, Konstantin V.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshova, Ekaterina S.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for characterization of mature red blood cells (RBCs) morphology, based on measurement of light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual RBCs with the scanning flow cytometer and on solution of the inverse light-scattering (ILS) problem for each LSP. We considered a RBC shape model, corresponding to the minimal bending energy of the membrane with isotropic elasticity, and constructed an analytical approximation, which allows rapid simulation of the shape, given the diameter and minimal and maximal thicknesses. The ILS problem was solved by the nearest-neighbor interpolation using a preliminary calculated database of 250,000 theoretical LSPs. For each RBC in blood sample we determined three abovementioned shape characteristics and refractive index, which also allows us to calculate volume, surface area, sphericity index, spontaneous curvature, hemoglobin concentration and content. PMID:27446656

  8. A synchronous strobed laser light sheet for helicopter model rotor flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Rhodes, David B.; Jones, Stephen B.; Franke, John M.

    1990-01-01

    A synchronous, strobed laser light sheet has been developed for use in flow visualization of a helicopter rotor model. The light sheet strobe circuit included selectable blade position, strobe duration, and multiple pulses per revolution for rotors having 2 to 9 blades. The flow was seeded with propylene glycol. Between runs, a calibration grid board was placed in the plane of the laser sheet and recorded with the video camera at the position used to record the flow field. A slip-sync mode permitted slow motion visualization of the flow field over complete rotations of the rotor. The system was used to make two-dimensional flow field cuts of a four-bladed rotor operating at advance ratio of 0.37 at wind tunnel speeds up to 79.25 meters per second (260 feet per second).

  9. Application for certification, 1993 model-year light-duty trucks - Grumman Olson

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. The report deals with light-duty trucks from Grumman Olson Company. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirementsmore » to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  10. Impaired light detection of the circadian clock in a zebrafish melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Noémie; Diaz-de-Cerio, Natalia; Whitmore, David

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock controls the timing of the cell cycle in healthy tissues and clock disruption is known to increase tumourigenesis. Melanoma is one of the most rapidly increasing forms of cancer and the precise molecular circadian changes that occur in a melanoma tumor are unknown. Using a melanoma zebrafish model, we have explored the molecular changes that occur to the circadian clock within tumors. We have found disruptions in melanoma clock gene expression due to a major impairment to the light input pathway, with a parallel loss of light-dependent activation of DNA repair genes. Furthermore, the timing of mitosis in tumors is perturbed, as well as the regulation of certain key cell cycle regulators, such that cells divide arhythmically. The inability to co-ordinate DNA damage repair and cell division is likely to promote further tumourigenesis and accelerate melanoma development. PMID:25832911

  11. Impaired light detection of the circadian clock in a zebrafish melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Noémie; Diaz-de-Cerio, Natalia; Whitmore, David

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock controls the timing of the cell cycle in healthy tissues and clock disruption is known to increase tumourigenesis. Melanoma is one of the most rapidly increasing forms of cancer and the precise molecular circadian changes that occur in a melanoma tumor are unknown. Using a melanoma zebrafish model, we have explored the molecular changes that occur to the circadian clock within tumors. We have found disruptions in melanoma clock gene expression due to a major impairment to the light input pathway, with a parallel loss of light-dependent activation of DNA repair genes. Furthermore, the timing of mitosis in tumors is perturbed, as well as the regulation of certain key cell cycle regulators, such that cells divide arhythmically. The inability to co-ordinate DNA damage repair and cell division is likely to promote further tumourigenesis and accelerate melanoma development.

  12. Application for certification, 1991 model year light-duty vehicles - Sports Car America, Puma Division Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. The report deals with light-duty vehicles from Sports Car America, PUMA Division Incorporated. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, andmore » proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  13. Spotted star light curve numerical modeling technique and its application to HII 1883 surface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbin, A. I.; Shimansky, V. V.

    2014-04-01

    We developed a code for imaging the surfaces of spotted stars by a set of circular spots with a uniform temperature distribution. The flux from the spotted surface is computed by partitioning the spots into elementary areas. The code takes into account the passing of spots behind the visible stellar limb, limb darkening, and overlapping of spots. Modeling of light curves includes the use of recent results of the theory of stellar atmospheres needed to take into account the temperature dependence of flux intensity and limb darkening coefficients. The search for spot parameters is based on the analysis of several light curves obtained in different photometric bands. We test our technique by applying it to HII 1883.

  14. Ultraviolet Light Curves of Gaia16apd in Superluminous Supernova Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Zhiglo, Andrey; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Sorokina, Elena; Kozyreva, Alexandra; Blinnikov, Sergei

    2017-08-01

    Observations of Gaia16apd revealed extremely luminous ultraviolet emission among superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we perform a comparison of UV light curves, color temperatures, and photospheric velocities between the most popular SLSN models: pair-instability supernova, magnetar, and interaction with circumstellar medium. We find that the interaction model is the most promising to explain the extreme UV luminosity of Gaia16apd. The differences in late-time UV emission and in color evolution found between the models can be used to link an observed SLSN event to the most appropriate model. Observations at UV wavelengths can be used to clarify the nature of SLSNe and more attention should be paid to them in future follow-up observations.

  15. Ultraviolet Light Curves of Gaia16apd in Superluminous Supernova Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstov, Alexey; Zhiglo, Andrey; Nomoto, Ken’ichi

    2017-08-10

    Observations of Gaia16apd revealed extremely luminous ultraviolet emission among superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we perform a comparison of UV light curves, color temperatures, and photospheric velocities between the most popular SLSN models: pair-instability supernova, magnetar, and interaction with circumstellar medium. We find that the interaction model is the most promising to explain the extreme UV luminosity of Gaia16apd. The differences in late-time UV emission and in color evolution found between the models can be used to link an observed SLSN event to the most appropriate model. Observations at UV wavelengths can be used to clarify the naturemore » of SLSNe and more attention should be paid to them in future follow-up observations.« less

  16. Experimental evaluation of models for predicting Cherenkov light intensities from short-cooled nuclear fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branger, E.; Grape, S.; Jansson, P.; Jacobsson Svärd, S.

    2018-02-01

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is a tool used by nuclear safeguards inspectors to verify irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage based on the recording of Cherenkov light produced by the assemblies. One type of verification involves comparing the measured light intensity from an assembly with a predicted intensity, based on assembly declarations. Crucial for such analyses is the performance of the prediction model used, and recently new modelling methods have been introduced to allow for enhanced prediction capabilities by taking the irradiation history into account, and by including the cross-talk radiation from neighbouring assemblies in the predictions. In this work, the performance of three models for Cherenkov-light intensity prediction is evaluated by applying them to a set of short-cooled PWR 17x17 assemblies for which experimental DCVD measurements and operator-declared irradiation data was available; (1) a two-parameter model, based on total burnup and cooling time, previously used by the safeguards inspectors, (2) a newly introduced gamma-spectrum-based model, which incorporates cycle-wise burnup histories, and (3) the latter gamma-spectrum-based model with the addition to account for contributions from neighbouring assemblies. The results show that the two gamma-spectrum-based models provide significantly higher precision for the measured inventory compared to the two-parameter model, lowering the standard deviation between relative measured and predicted intensities from 15.2 % to 8.1 % respectively 7.8 %. The results show some systematic differences between assemblies of different designs (produced by different manufacturers) in spite of their similar PWR 17x17 geometries, and possible ways are discussed to address such differences, which may allow for even higher prediction capabilities. Still, it is concluded that the gamma-spectrum-based models enable confident verification of the fuel assembly inventory at the currently used

  17. 40 CFR 86.000-9 - Emission standards for 2000 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....000-9 Emission standards for 2000 and later model year light-duty trucks. Section 86.000-9 includes...) and CO Model year Percentage 2002 40 2003 80 2004 100 Table A00-6—Useful Life Standards (G/MI) for... applicable model year's heavy light-duty trucks shall not exceed the applicable SFTP standards in table A00-6...

  18. 40 CFR 86.000-9 - Emission standards for 2000 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....000-9 Emission standards for 2000 and later model year light-duty trucks. Section 86.000-9 includes...) and CO Model year Percentage 2002 40 2003 80 2004 100 Table A00-6—Useful Life Standards (G/MI) for... applicable model year's heavy light-duty trucks shall not exceed the applicable SFTP standards in table A00-6...

  19. 40 CFR 86.000-8 - Emission standards for 2000 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....000-8 Emission standards for 2000 and later model year light-duty vehicles. Section 86.000-8 includes... later model year light-duty vehicles shall meet the additional SFTP standards of table A00-2 (defined by...=NOX) and CO Model year Percentage 2000 40 2001 80 2002 100 Table A00-2—Useful Life Standards (G/MI...

  20. 40 CFR 86.000-8 - Emission standards for 2000 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....000-8 Emission standards for 2000 and later model year light-duty vehicles. Section 86.000-8 includes... later model year light-duty vehicles shall meet the additional SFTP standards of table A00-2 (defined by...=NOX) and CO Model year Percentage 2000 40 2001 80 2002 100 Table A00-2—Useful Life Standards (G/MI...

  1. MODELING POROUS DUST GRAINS WITH BALLISTIC AGGREGATES. II. LIGHT SCATTERING PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue; Draine, B. T.; Johnson, Eric T.

    2009-05-10

    We study the light scattering properties of random ballistic aggregates constructed in Shen et al. Using the discrete-dipole approximation, we compute the scattering phase function and linear polarization for random aggregates with various sizes and porosities, and with two different compositions: 100% silicate and 50% silicate +50% graphite. We investigate the dependence of light scattering properties on wavelength, cluster size, and porosity using these aggregate models. We find that while the shape of the phase function depends mainly on the size parameter of the aggregates, the linear polarization depends on both the size parameter and the porosity of the aggregates,more » with increasing degree of polarization as the porosity increases. Contrary to previous studies, we argue that the monomer size has negligible effects on the light scattering properties of ballistic aggregates, as long as the constituent monomer is smaller than the incident wavelength up to 2{pi}a {sub 0}/{lambda} {approx} 1.6 where a {sub 0} is the monomer radius. Previous claims for such monomer size effects are in fact the combined effects of size parameter and porosity. Finally, we present aggregate models that can reproduce the phase function and polarization of scattered light from the AU Mic debris disk and from cometary dust, including the negative polarization observed for comets at scattering angles 160 deg. {approx}< {theta} < 180 deg. These aggregates have moderate porosities, P{approx}0.6, and are of sub-{mu}m size for the debris disk case, or {mu}m size for the comet case.« less

  2. Elucidating the interaction between light competition and herbivore feeding patterns using functional-structural plant modelling.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jorad; Poelman, Erik H; Anten, Niels; Evers, Jochem B

    2018-01-24

    Plants usually compete with neighbouring plants for resources such as light as well as defend themselves against herbivorous insects. This requires investment of limiting resources, resulting in optimal resource distribution patterns and trade-offs between growth- and defence-related traits. A plant's competitive success is determined by the spatial distribution of its resources in the canopy. The spatial distribution of herbivory in the canopy in turn differs between herbivore species as the level of herbivore specialization determines their response to the distribution of resources and defences in the canopy. Here, we investigated to what extent competition for light affects plant susceptibility to herbivores with different feeding preferences. To quantify interactions between herbivory and competition, we developed and evaluated a 3-D spatially explicit functional-structural plant model for Brassica nigra that mechanistically simulates competition in a dynamic light environment, and also explicitly models leaf area removal by herbivores with different feeding preferences. With this novel approach, we can quantitatively explore the extent to which herbivore feeding location and light competition interact in their effect on plant performance. Our results indicate that there is indeed a strong interaction between levels of plant-plant competition and herbivore feeding preference. When plants did not compete, herbivory had relatively small effects irrespective of feeding preference. Conversely, when plants competed, herbivores with a preference for young leaves had a strong negative effect on the competitiveness and subsequent performance of the plant, whereas herbivores with a preference for old leaves did not. Our study predicts how plant susceptibility to herbivory depends on the composition of the herbivore community and the level of plant competition, and highlights the importance of considering the full range of dynamics in plant-plant-herbivore interactions

  3. Elucidating the interaction between light competition and herbivore feeding patterns using functional–structural plant modelling

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Jorad; Poelman, Erik H; Anten, Niels; Evers, Jochem B

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims Plants usually compete with neighbouring plants for resources such as light as well as defend themselves against herbivorous insects. This requires investment of limiting resources, resulting in optimal resource distribution patterns and trade-offs between growth- and defence-related traits. A plant’s competitive success is determined by the spatial distribution of its resources in the canopy. The spatial distribution of herbivory in the canopy in turn differs between herbivore species as the level of herbivore specialization determines their response to the distribution of resources and defences in the canopy. Here, we investigated to what extent competition for light affects plant susceptibility to herbivores with different feeding preferences. Methods To quantify interactions between herbivory and competition, we developed and evaluated a 3-D spatially explicit functional–structural plant model for Brassica nigra that mechanistically simulates competition in a dynamic light environment, and also explicitly models leaf area removal by herbivores with different feeding preferences. With this novel approach, we can quantitatively explore the extent to which herbivore feeding location and light competition interact in their effect on plant performance. Key Results Our results indicate that there is indeed a strong interaction between levels of plant–plant competition and herbivore feeding preference. When plants did not compete, herbivory had relatively small effects irrespective of feeding preference. Conversely, when plants competed, herbivores with a preference for young leaves had a strong negative effect on the competitiveness and subsequent performance of the plant, whereas herbivores with a preference for old leaves did not. Conclusions Our study predicts how plant susceptibility to herbivory depends on the composition of the herbivore community and the level of plant competition, and highlights the importance of considering

  4. Three-dimensional plant architecture and sunlit-shaded patterns: a stochastic model of light dynamics in canopies.

    PubMed

    Retkute, Renata; Townsend, Alexandra J; Murchie, Erik H; Jensen, Oliver E; Preston, Simon P

    2018-05-25

    Diurnal changes in solar position and intensity combined with the structural complexity of plant architecture result in highly variable and dynamic light patterns within the plant canopy. This affects productivity through the complex ways that photosynthesis responds to changes in light intensity. Current methods to characterize light dynamics, such as ray-tracing, are able to produce data with excellent spatio-temporal resolution but are computationally intensive and the resulting data are complex and high-dimensional. This necessitates development of more economical models for summarizing the data and for simulating realistic light patterns over the course of a day. High-resolution reconstructions of field-grown plants are assembled in various configurations to form canopies, and a forward ray-tracing algorithm is applied to the canopies to compute light dynamics at high (1 min) temporal resolution. From the ray-tracer output, the sunlit or shaded state for each patch on the plants is determined, and these data are used to develop a novel stochastic model for the sunlit-shaded patterns. The model is designed to be straightforward to fit to data using maximum likelihood estimation, and fast to simulate from. For a wide range of contrasting 3-D canopies, the stochastic model is able to summarize, and replicate in simulations, key features of the light dynamics. When light patterns simulated from the stochastic model are used as input to a model of photoinhibition, the predicted reduction in carbon gain is similar to that from calculations based on the (extremely costly) ray-tracer data. The model provides a way to summarize highly complex data in a small number of parameters, and a cost-effective way to simulate realistic light patterns. Simulations from the model will be particularly useful for feeding into larger-scale photosynthesis models for calculating how light dynamics affects the photosynthetic productivity of canopies.

  5. Light dosimetry for focused and defocused beam irradiation in multi-layered tissue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Kremena S.; Stoykova, Elena V.

    2006-09-01

    Treatment of acupuncture points, trigger points, joint inflammations in low level laser therapy as well as various applications of lasers for treatment of soft tissues in dental medicine, require irradiation by a narrow converging laser beam. The aim of this study is to compare light delivery produced by focused or defocused narrow beam irradiation in a multi-layered skin tissue model at increasing depth of the target. The task is solved by 3-D Monte-Carlo simulation for matched and mismatched refractive indices at the tissue/ambient medium interface. The modeled light beams have a circular cross-section at the tissue entrance with uniform or Gaussian intensity distribution. Three are the tissue models used in simulation : i) a bloodless skin layer; ii) a bloodless skin layer with embedded scattering object; iii) a skin layer with small blood vessels of varying size, which are modeled as infinite cylinders parallel to the tissue surface located at different depths. Optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, anisotropy factor, g, and index of refraction) of different tissue constituents are chosen from the literature.

  6. New higher-order Godunov code for modelling performance of two-stage light gas guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.; Miller, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    A new quasi-one-dimensional Godunov code for modeling two-stage light gas guns is described. The code is third-order accurate in space and second-order accurate in time. A very accurate Riemann solver is used. Friction and heat transfer to the tube wall for gases and dense media are modeled and a simple nonequilibrium turbulence model is used for gas flows. The code also models gunpowder burn in the first-stage breech. Realistic equations of state (EOS) are used for all media. The code was validated against exact solutions of Riemann's shock-tube problem, impact of dense media slabs at velocities up to 20 km/sec, flow through a supersonic convergent-divergent nozzle and burning of gunpowder in a closed bomb. Excellent validation results were obtained. The code was then used to predict the performance of two light gas guns (1.5 in. and 0.28 in.) in service at the Ames Research Center. The code predictions were compared with measured pressure histories in the powder chamber and pump tube and with measured piston and projectile velocities. Very good agreement between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions and measurements was obtained. Actual powder-burn rates in the gun were found to be considerably higher (60-90 percent) than predicted by the manufacturer and the behavior of the piston upon yielding appears to differ greatly from that suggested by low-strain rate tests.

  7. Modeling light scattering in the shadow region behind thin cylinders for diameter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blohm, Werner

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the scattered light intensities resulting in the shadow region at an observation plane behind monochromatically illuminated circular cylinders are modeled by sinusoidal sequences having a squared dependence on spatial position in the observation plane. Whereas two sinusoidal components appear to be sufficient for modeling the light distribution behind intransparent cylinders, at least three sinusoidal components are necessary for transparent cylinders. Based on this model, a novel evaluation algorithm for a very fast retrieval of the diameter of thin cylindrical products like metallic wires and transparent fibers is presented. This algorithm was tested in a cylinder diameter range typical for these products (d ≈ 70 … 150 μm; n ≈ 1.5). Numerical examples are given to illustrate its application by using both synthetic and experimental scattering data. Diameter accuracies below 0.05 μm could be achieved for intransparent cylinders in the tested diameter range. However, scattering effects due to morphological-dependent resonances (MDRs) are problematical in the diameter analysis of transparent products. In order to incorporate these effects into the model, further investigations are needed.

  8. Testing Dissipative Magnetosphere Model Light Curves and Spectra with Fermi Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2015-01-01

    We explore the emission properties of a dissipative pulsar magnetosphere model introduced by Kalapotharakos et al. comparing its high-energy light curves and spectra, due to curvature radiation, with data collected by the Fermi LAT. The magnetosphere structure is assumed to be near the force-free solution. The accelerating electric field, inside the light cylinder (LC), is assumed to be negligible, while outside the LC it rescales with a finite conductivity (sigma). In our approach we calculate the corresponding high-energy emission by integrating the trajectories of test particles that originate from the stellar surface, taking into account both the accelerating electric field components and the radiation reaction forces. First, we explore the parameter space assuming different value sets for the stellar magnetic field, stellar period, and conductivity. We show that the general properties of the model are in a good agreement with observed emission characteristics of young gamma-ray pulsars, including features of the phase-resolved spectra. Second, we find model parameters that fit each pulsar belonging to a group of eight bright pulsars that have a published phase-resolved spectrum. The sigma values that best describe each of the pulsars in this group show an increase with the spin-down rate (E? ) and a decrease with the pulsar age, expected if pair cascades are providing the magnetospheric conductivity. Finally, we explore the limits of our analysis and suggest future directions for improving such models.

  9. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L., E-mail: pejcha@astro.princeton.edu

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles resultmore » in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.« less

  10. Light Competition and Carbon Partitioning-Allocation in an improved Forest Ecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collalti, Alessio; Santini, Monia; Valentini Valentini, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    In Italy about 100.000 km2 are covered by forests. This surface is the 30% of the whole national land and this shows how the forests are important both for socio-economic and for environmental aspects. Forests changes affect a delicate balance that involve not only vegetation components but also bio-geochemical cycles and global climate. The knowledge of the amount of Carbon sequestered by forests represents a precious information for their sustainable management in the framework of climate changes. Primary studies in terms of model about this important issue, has been done through Forest Ecosystem Model (FEM), well known and validated as 3PG (Landsberg et Waring, 1997; Sands 2004). It is based on light use efficiency approach at the canopy level. The present study started from the original model 3PG, producing an improved version that uses many of explicit formulations of all relevant ecophysiological processes but makes it able to be applied for natural forests. The mutual interaction of forest growth and light conditions causes vertical and horizontal differentiation in the natural forest mosaic. Only ecophysiological parameters which can be either directly measured or estimates with reasonable certainty are used. The model has been written in C language and has been created considering a tri-dimensional cell structure with different vertical layers depending on the forest type that has to be simulated. This 3PG 'improved' version enable to work on multi-layer and multi-species forests type with cell resolution of one hectare for the typical Italian forest species. The multi-layer version is the result of the implementation and development of Lambert-Beer law for the estimation of intercepted, absorbed and transmitted light through different storeys of the forest. It is possible estimates, for each storey, a Par value (Photosynthetic Active Radiation) through Leaf Area Index (LAI), Light Extinction Coefficient and cell Canopy Cover using a "Big Leaf" approach

  11. Modeling Phase-Aligned Gamma-Ray and Radio Millisecond Pulsar Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, C.; Johnson, T.; Harding, A.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first eight gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, this population has been steadily expanding. Four of the more recent detections, PSR J00340534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first discovery of a black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit a phenomenon not present in the original discoveries: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder or near the polar caps. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to search for best-fit model parameters, we obtain reasonable LC fits for the first three of these MSPs in the context of altitude-limited outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries (for both gamma-ray and radio emission). These models differ from the standard outer gap (OG)/two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual conal radio beams, and we allow both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the gamma-ray and radio emission regions to vary within a limited range (excluding the minimum gamma-ray altitude of the alTPC model, which is kept constant at the stellar radius, and that of the alOG model, which is set to the position-dependent null charge surface altitude). Alternatively, phase-aligned solutions also exist for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap scenario (low-altitude slot gap (laSG) models). We find that the alTPC models provide slightly better LC fits than the alOG models, and both of these give better fits than the laSG models (for the limited range of parameters considered in the case of the laSG models). Thus, our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the outer magnetosphere, and

  12. Monitoring the trajectory of urban nighttime light hotspots using a Gaussian volume model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiming; Jiang, Ruowei; Wang, Ke; Huang, Lingyan; Ye, Ziran; Gan, Muye; Ji, Biyong

    2018-03-01

    Urban nighttime light hotspot is an ideal representation of the spatial heterogeneity of human activities within a city, which is sensitive to regional urban expansion pattern. However, most of previous studies related to nighttime light imageries focused on extracting urban extent, leaving the spatial variation of radiance intensity insufficiently explored. With the help of global radiance calibrated DMSP-OLS datasets (NTLgrc), we proposed an innovative framework to explore the spatio-temporal trajectory of polycentric urban nighttime light hotspots. Firstly, NTLgrc was inter-annually calibrated to improve the consistency. Secondly, multi-resolution segmentation and region-growing SVM classification were employed to remove blooming effect and to extract potential clusters. At last, the urban hotspots were identified by a Gaussian volume model, and the resulting parameters were used to quantitatively depict hotspot features (i.e., intensity, morphology and centroid dynamics). The result shows that our framework successfully captures hotspots in polycentric urban area, whose Ra2 are over 0.9. Meanwhile, the spatio-temporal dynamics of the hotspot features intuitively reveal the impact of the regional urban growth pattern and planning strategies on human activities. Compared to previous studies, our framework is more robust and offers an effective way to describe hotspot pattern. Also, it provides a more comprehensive and spatial-explicit understanding regarding the interaction between urbanization pattern and human activities. Our findings are expected to be beneficial to governors in term of sustainable urban planning and decision making.

  13. Electrochemical models for the radical annihilation reactions in organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Neal R.; Anderson, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Paul A.; McDonald, Erin; Wightman, R. M.; Hall, Hank K.; Hopkins, Tracy; Padias, Anne; Thayumanavan, Sankaran; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.

    1998-12-01

    Bilayer organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), based upon vacuum deposited molecules, or single layer OLEDs, based upon spin-cast polymeric materials, doped with these same molecules, produce light from emissive states of the lumophores which are created through annihilation reactions of radical species, which can be modeled through solution electrochemistry. Difference seen in solution reduction and oxidation potentials of molecular components of OLEDs are a lower limit estimate to the differences in energy of these same radical species in the condensed phase environmental. The light emitted from an aluminum quinolate (Alq3)/triarylamine (TPD)-based OLED, or an Alq3/PVK single layers OLED, can be reproduce from solution cross reactions of Alq3/TPD+. The efficiency of this process increases as the oxidation potential of the TPD increases, due to added substituents. Radical cations and anions of solubilized version of quinacridone dopants (DIQA) which have been used to enhance efficiencies in these OLEDs, are shown to be electrochemically more stable than Alq3 and Alq3, and DIQA radical annihilation reactions produce the same emissive state as in the quinacridone-doped OLEDs. Electrochemical studies demonstrate the ways in which other dopants might enhance the efficiency and shift the color output of OLEDs, across the entire visible and near-IR spectrum. Chemical degradation pathways of these same molecular components, which they may undergo during OLED operation, are also revealed by these electrochemical studies.

  14. A Simple Model for the Light Curve Generated by a Shoemaker-Levy 9 Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Mordecai-Mark, Mac Low

    1995-01-01

    The impact of a typical Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragment produced three light peaks as seen from Earth. The first peak is related to the entry of the fragment into the Jovian atmosphere. The second peak occurs when the exploding fireball rises above Jupiter's limb into direct view from Earth. The third peak, much the brightest, occurs when the ejecta plume falls back on the atmosphere. By contrast, Galileo, which had a direct view of the impacts, saw two peaks, one at entry, and one at plumefall. Here we present a simple, highly idealized model of a ballistic plume, which we then use to fit the observed light curve of the R impact as recorded at Mauna Kea and Mount Palomar. From the light curve we find that the nominal R fragment had diameter 450-500 m and mass approx. 2-3 x 10(exp 13) g. The uncertainty in the mass is probably about a factor of 3, with a smaller event more likely than a larger one.

  15. Can the relativistic light-bending model explain X-ray spectral variations of Seyfert galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Misaki; Moriyama, Kotaro; Ebisawa, Ken; Mineshige, Shin; Kawanaka, Norita; Tsujimoto, Masahiro

    2018-06-01

    Many Seyfert galaxies are known to exhibit Fe-K broad emission line features in their X-ray energy spectra. The observed lines have three distinct features: (1) the line profiles are skewed and show significant low-energy tails, (2) the Fe-K band has low variability, which produces a broad and deep dip in the root-mean-square (rms) spectra, and (3) photons in this band have time lags behind those in the adjacent energy bands with amplitudes of several Rg/c, where Rg is the gravitational radius. The "relativistic light-bending model" is proposed to explain these observed features, where a compact X-ray source ("lamp post") above an extreme Kerr black hole illuminates the innermost area of the accretion disc. In this paper, we critically examine the relativistic light-bending model by computing the rms spectra and the lag features using a ray-tracing technique, when a lamp post moves vertically on the black hole spin axis. As a result, we found that the observed deep rms dip requires that the iron is extremely overabundant (≳10 solar), whereas the observed lag amplitude is consistent with the normal iron abundance. Furthermore, disappearance of the lag in the high-flux state requires a source height as high as ˜40 Rg, which contradicts the relativistically broad emission line feature. Our simulations agree with the data that the reverberation feature moves to lower frequencies with larger source height; however, if this scenario is correct, the simulations predict the detection of a clear Fe-K lag at low frequencies, which is not constrained in the data. Therefore, we conclude that the relativistic light-bending model may not explain the characteristic Fe-K spectral variations in Seyfert galaxies.

  16. Can the relativistic light-bending model explain X-ray spectral variations of Seyfert galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Misaki; Moriyama, Kotaro; Ebisawa, Ken; Mineshige, Shin; Kawanaka, Norita; Tsujimoto, Masahiro

    2018-04-01

    Many Seyfert galaxies are known to exhibit Fe-K broad emission line features in their X-ray energy spectra. The observed lines have three distinct features: (1) the line profiles are skewed and show significant low-energy tails, (2) the Fe-K band has low variability, which produces a broad and deep dip in the root-mean-square (rms) spectra, and (3) photons in this band have time lags behind those in the adjacent energy bands with amplitudes of several Rg/c, where Rg is the gravitational radius. The "relativistic light-bending model" is proposed to explain these observed features, where a compact X-ray source ("lamp post") above an extreme Kerr black hole illuminates the innermost area of the accretion disc. In this paper, we critically examine the relativistic light-bending model by computing the rms spectra and the lag features using a ray-tracing technique, when a lamp post moves vertically on the black hole spin axis. As a result, we found that the observed deep rms dip requires that the iron is extremely overabundant (≳10 solar), whereas the observed lag amplitude is consistent with the normal iron abundance. Furthermore, disappearance of the lag in the high-flux state requires a source height as high as ˜40 Rg, which contradicts the relativistically broad emission line feature. Our simulations agree with the data that the reverberation feature moves to lower frequencies with larger source height; however, if this scenario is correct, the simulations predict the detection of a clear Fe-K lag at low frequencies, which is not constrained in the data. Therefore, we conclude that the relativistic light-bending model may not explain the characteristic Fe-K spectral variations in Seyfert galaxies.

  17. Modeling the light-travel-time effect on the far-infrared size of IRC +10216

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    1995-01-01

    Models of the far-infrared emission from the large circumstellar dust envelope surrounding the carbon star IRC +10216 are used to assess the importance of the light-travel-time effect (LTTE) on the observed size of the source. The central star is a long-period variable with an average period of 644 +/- 17 days and a peak-to-peak amplitude of two magnituds, so a large light-travel-time effect is seen at 1 min radius. An attempt is made to use the LTTE to reconcile the discrepancy between the observations of Fazio et al. and Lester et al. regarding the far-infrared source size. This discrepancy is reviewed in light of recent, high-spatial-resolution observations at 11 microns by Danchi et al. We conclude that IRC +10216 has been resolved on the arcminute scale by Fazio et al. Convolution of the model intensity profile at 61 microns with the 60 sec x 90 sec Gaussian beam of Fazio et al. yields an observed source size full width at half maximum (FWHM) that ranges from approximately 67 sec to 75 sec depending on the phase of the star and the assumed distance to the source. Using a simple r(exp -2) dust distribution and the 106 deg phase of the Fazio et al. observations, the LTTE model reaches a peak size of 74.3 sec at a distance of 300 pc. This agrees favorably with the 78 sec x 6 sec size measured by Fazio et al. Finally, a method is outlined for using the LTTE as a distance indicator to IRC +10216 and other stars with extended mass outflows.

  18. Photokinetic Drug Delivery: Light-Enhanced Permeation in an In Vitro Eye Model.

    PubMed

    Godley, Bernard F; Kraft, Edward R; Giannos, Steven A; Zhao, Zhen-Yang; Haag, Anthony M; Wen, Julie W

    2015-12-01

    To investigate light-enhanced molecular movement as a potential technology for drug delivery. To do this, we developed an in vitro eye model while representing similar concentration gradient conditions and compositions found in the eye. The eye model unit was fabricated by inserting a cross-linked type I collagen membrane in a spectrophotometer cuvette with 1% hyaluronic acid as the drug recipient medium. Photokinetic delivery was studied by illuminating 1 mg/mL methotrexate (MTX) placed in the drug donor compartment on top of the membrane, with noncoherent 450 nm light at 8.2 mW from an LED source pulsed at 25 cycles per second, placed in contact with the solution. A modified UV-visual spectrophotometer was employed to rapidly determine the concentration of MTX, at progressive 1 mm distances away from the membrane, within the viscous recipient medium of the model eye after 1 h. A defined, progressive concentration gradient was observed within the nonagitated drug recipient media, diminishing with greater distances from the membrane. Transport of MTX through the membrane was significantly enhanced (ranging from 2 to 3 times, P < 0.05 to P ≤ 0.001) by photokinetic methods compared with control conditions by determining drug concentrations at 4 defined distances from the membrane. According to scanning electron microscopy images, no structural damage or shunts were created on the surface of the cross-linked gelatin membrane. The application of pulsed noncoherent visible light significantly enhances the permeation of MTX through a cross-linked collagen membrane and hyaluronic acid recipient medium without causing structural damage to the membrane.

  19. A Global Study of GPP focusing on Light Use Efficiency in a Random Forest Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, W.; Wei, S.; Yi, C.; Hendrey, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    Light use efficiency (LUE) is at the core of mechanistic modeling of global gross primary production (GPP). However, most LUE estimates in global models are satellite-based and coarsely measured with emphasis on environmental variables. Others are from eddy covariance towers with much greater spatial and temporal data quality and emphasis on mechanistic processes, but in a limited number of sites. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive global study of tower-based LUE from 237 FLUXNET towers, and scaled up LUEs from in-situ tower level to global biome level. We integrated key environmental and biological variables into the tower-based LUE estimates, at 0.5o x 0.5o grid-cell resolution, using a random forest regression (RFR) approach. We then developed an RFR-LUE-GPP model using the grid-cell LUE data, and compared it to a tower-LUE-GPP model by the conventional way of treating LUE as a series of biome-specific constants. In order to calibrate the LUE models, we developed a data-driven RFR-GPP model using a random forest regression method. Our results showed that LUE varies largely with latitude. We estimated a global area-weighted average of LUE at 1.21 gC m-2 MJ-1 APAR, which led to an estimated global GPP of 102.9 Gt C /year from 2000 to 2005. The tower-LUE-GPP model tended to overestimate forest GPP in tropical and boreal regions. Large uncertainties exist in GPP estimates over sparsely vegetated areas covered by savannas and woody savannas around the middle to low latitudes (i.g. 20oS to 40oS and 5oN to 15oN) due to lack of available data. Model results were improved by incorporating Köppen climate types to represent climate /meteorological information in machine learning modeling. This shed new light on the recognized issues of climate dependence of spring onset of photosynthesis and the challenges in modeling the biome GPP of evergreen broad leaf forests (EBF) accurately. The divergent responses of GPP to temperature and precipitation at mid

  20. A Nonlinear Model for Transient Responses from Light-Adapted Wolf Spider Eyes

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Robert D.

    1967-01-01

    A quantitative model is proposed to test the hypothesis that the dynamics of nonlinearities in retinal action potentials from light-adapted wolf spider eyes may be due to delayed asymmetries in responses of the visual cells. For purposes of calculation, these delayed asymmetries are generated in an analogue by a time-variant resistance. It is first shown that for small incremental stimuli, the linear behavior of such a resistance describes peaking and low frequency phase lead in frequency responses of the eye to sinusoidal modulations of background illumination. It also describes the overshoots in linear step responses. It is next shown that the analogue accounts for nonlinear transient and short term DC responses to large positive and negative step stimuli and for the variations in these responses with changes in degree of light adaptation. Finally, a physiological model is proposed in which the delayed asymmetries in response are attributed to delayed rectification by the visual cell membrane. In this model, cascaded chemical reactions may serve to transduce visual stimuli into membrane resistance changes. PMID:6056011

  1. Thermalization and light cones in a model with weak integrability breaking

    DOE PAGES

    Bertini, Bruno; Essler, Fabian H. L.; Groha, Stefan; ...

    2016-12-09

    Here, we employ equation-of-motion techniques to study the nonequilibrium dynamics in a lattice model of weakly interacting spinless fermions. Our model provides a simple setting for analyzing the effects of weak integrability-breaking perturbations on the time evolution after a quantum quench. We establish the accuracy of the method by comparing results at short and intermediate times to time-dependent density matrix renormalization group computations. For sufficiently weak integrability-breaking interactions we always observe prethermalization plateaus, where local observables relax to nonthermal values at intermediate time scales. At later times a crossover towards thermal behavior sets in. We determine the associated time scale,more » which depends on the initial state, the band structure of the noninteracting theory, and the strength of the integrability-breaking perturbation. Our method allows us to analyze in some detail the spreading of correlations and in particular the structure of the associated light cones in our model. We find that the interior and exterior of the light cone are separated by an intermediate region, the temporal width of which appears to scale with a universal power law t 1/3.« less

  2. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Polarized Light Scanning Cryomacroscopy, Part II: Thermal Modeling and Analysis of Experimental Observations

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Justin S.G.; Solanki, Prem K.; Eisenberg, David P.; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy. PMID:27343139

  4. Influence of the light propagation models on a linearized photoacoustic image reconstruction of the light absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Shinpei; Hirasawa, Takeshi; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Ishihara, Miya

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of the optical properties of the tissues and blood by noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) imaging may provide useful information for screening and early diagnosis of diseases. Linearized 2D image reconstruction algorithm based on PA wave equation and the photon diffusion equation (PDE) can reconstruct the image with computational cost smaller than a method based on 3D radiative transfer equation. However, the reconstructed image is affected by the differences between the actual and assumed light propagations. A quantitative capability of a linearized 2D image reconstruction was investigated and discussed by the numerical simulations and the phantom experiment in this study. The numerical simulations with the 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and the 2D finite element calculation of the PDE were carried out. The phantom experiment was also conducted. In the phantom experiment, the PA pressures were acquired by a probe which had an optical fiber for illumination and the ring shaped P(VDF-TrFE) ultrasound transducer. The measured object was made of Intralipid and Indocyanine green. In the numerical simulations, it was shown that the linearized image reconstruction method recovered the absorption coefficients with alleviating the dependency of the PA amplitude on the depth of the photon absorber. The linearized image reconstruction method worked effectively under the light propagation calculated by 3D MC simulation, although some errors occurred. The phantom experiments validated the result of the numerical simulations.

  5. Electroexcitation of Nucleon Resonances in a Light-Front Relativistic Quark Model

    DOE PAGES

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker G.

    2018-06-08

    Here, we report the predictions for the 3q core contributions to the electroexcitation of the resonances Delta(1232)3/2 +, N(1440)1/2 +, N(1520)3/2 -, N(1535)1/2 -, and N(1675)5/2 - on the proton obtained in the light-front relativistic quark model (LF RQM). For these states, experimental data on the electroexcitation transition amplitudes allow us to make comparison between the experiment and LF RQM predictions in wide range of Q 2 and also to quantify the expected meson-baryon contributions as a function of Q 2.

  6. Investigating the protective properties of milk phospholipids against ultraviolet light exposure in a skin equivalent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ashley; Laubscher, Andrea; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Laiho, Lily H.

    2010-02-01

    Current research on bioactive molecules in milk has documented health advantages of bovine milk and its components. Milk Phospholipids, selected for this study, represent molecules with great potential benefit in human health and nutrition. In this study we used confocal reflectance and multiphoton microscopy to monitor changes in skin morphology upon skin exposure to ultraviolet light and evaluate the potential of milk phospholipids in preventing photodamage to skin equivalent models. The results suggest that milk phospholipids act upon skin cells in a protective manner against the effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Similar results were obtained from MTT tissue viability assay and histology.

  7. NIR light propagation in a digital head model for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Robert; Khan, Bilal; Alexandrakis, George; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is capable of detecting and monitoring acute changes in cerebral blood volume and oxygenation associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wavelength selection, source-detector separation, optode density, and detector sensitivity are key design parameters that determine the imaging depth, chromophore separability, and, ultimately, clinical usefulness of a NIRS instrument. We present simulation results of NIR light propagation in a digital head model as it relates to the ability to detect intracranial hematomas and monitor the peri-hematomal tissue viability. These results inform NIRS instrument design specific to TBI diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26417498

  8. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of bacterial microcolonies for rapid detection using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Nan

    A label-free and nondestructive optical elastic forward light scattering method has been extended for the analysis of microcolonies for food-borne bacteria detection and identification. To understand the forward light scattering phenomenon, a model based on the scalar diffraction theory has been employed: a bacterial colony is considered as a biological spatial light modulator with amplitude and phase modulation to the incoming light, which continues to propagate to the far-field to form a distinct scattering 'fingerprint'. Numerical implementation via angular spectrum method (ASM) and Fresnel approximation have been carried out through Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to simulate this optical model. Sampling criteria to achieve unbiased and un-aliased simulation results have been derived and the effects of violating these conditions have been studied. Diffraction patterns predicted by these two methods (ASM and Fresnel) have been compared to show their applicability to different simulation settings. Through the simulation work, the correlation between the colony morphology and its forward scattering pattern has been established to link the number of diffraction rings and the half cone angle with the diameter and the central height of the Gaussian-shaped colonies. In order to experimentally prove the correlation, a colony morphology analyzer has been built and used to characterize the morphology of different bacteria genera and investigate their growth dynamics. The experimental measurements have demonstrated the possibility of differentiating bacteria Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia in their early growth stage (100˜500 µm) based on their phenotypic characteristics. This conclusion has important implications in microcolony detection, as most bacteria of our interest need much less incubation time (8˜12 hours) to grow into this size range. The original forward light scatterometer has been updated to capture scattering patterns from microcolonies. Experiments have

  9. Many light Higgs bosons in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Dermisek, Radovan; Gunion, John F.

    2009-03-01

    The next-to-minimal supersymmetric model with a light doubletlike CP-odd Higgs boson and small tan{beta} can satisfy all experimental limits on Higgs bosons even with light superpartners. In these scenarios, the two lightest CP-even Higgs bosons, h{sub 1} and h{sub 2}, and the charged Higgs boson, h{sup +}, can all be light enough to be produced at CERN LEP and yet have decays that have not been looked for or are poorly constrained by existing collider experiments. The channel h{sub 1}{yields}a{sub 1}a{sub 1} with a{sub 1}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} or 2j is still awaiting LEP constraints for m{sub h{sub 1}}>86 or 82more » GeV, respectively. LEP data may also contain e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}h{sub 2}a{sub 1} events where h{sub 2}{yields}Za{sub 1} is the dominant decay, a channel that was never examined. Decays of the charged Higgs bosons are often dominated by H{sup {+-}}{yields}W{sup {+-}}{sup (}*{sup )}a{sub 1} with a{sub 1}{yields}gg, cc, and {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}. This is a channel that has so far been ignored in the search for t{yields}h{sup +}b decays at the Tevatron. A specialized analysis might reveal a signal. The light a{sub 1} might be within the reach of B factories via {upsilon}{yields}{gamma}a{sub 1} decays. We study typical mass ranges and branching ratios of Higgs bosons in this scenario and compare these scenarios where the a{sub 1} has a large doublet component to the more general scenarios with arbitrary singlet component for the a{sub 1}.« less

  10. An optical to IR sky brightness model for the LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoachim, Peter; Coughlin, Michael; Angeli, George Z.; Claver, Charles F.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Cook, Kem; Daniel, Scott; Ivezić, Željko; Jones, R. Lynne; Petry, Catherine; Reuter, Michael; Stubbs, Christopher; Xin, Bo

    2016-07-01

    To optimize the observing strategy of a large survey such as the LSST, one needs an accurate model of the night sky emission spectrum across a range of atmospheric conditions and from the near-UV to the near-IR. We have used the ESO SkyCalc Sky Model Calculator1, 2 to construct a library of template spectra for the Chilean night sky. The ESO model includes emission from the upper and lower atmosphere, scattered starlight, scattered moonlight, and zodiacal light. We have then extended the ESO templates with an empirical fit to the twilight sky emission as measured by a Canon all-sky camera installed at the LSST site. With the ESO templates and our twilight model we can quickly interpolate to any arbitrary sky position and date and return the full sky spectrum or surface brightness magnitudes in the LSST filter system. Comparing our model to all-sky observations, we find typical residual RMS values of +/-0.2-0.3 magnitudes per square arcsecond.

  11. Optical properties of light absorbing carbon aggregates mixed with sulfate: assessment of different model geometries for climate forcing calculations.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Michael; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Ebert, Martin

    2012-04-23

    Light scattering by light absorbing carbon (LAC) aggregates encapsulated into sulfate shells is computed by use of the discrete dipole method. Computations are performed for a UV, visible, and IR wavelength, different particle sizes, and volume fractions. Reference computations are compared to three classes of simplified model particles that have been proposed for climate modeling purposes. Neither model matches the reference results sufficiently well. Remarkably, more realistic core-shell geometries fall behind homogeneous mixture models. An extended model based on a core-shell-shell geometry is proposed and tested. Good agreement is found for total optical cross sections and the asymmetry parameter. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  12. Light-weight Parallel Python Tools for Earth System Modeling Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, S. A.; Paul, K.; Xu, H.; Dennis, J.; Brown, D. I.

    2015-12-01

    With the growth in computing power over the last 30 years, earth system modeling codes have become increasingly data-intensive. As an example, it is expected that the data required for the next Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report (AR6) will increase by more than 10x to an expected 25PB per climate model. Faced with this daunting challenge, developers of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) have chosen to change the format of their data for long-term storage from time-slice to time-series, in order to reduce the required download bandwidth needed for later analysis and post-processing by climate scientists. Hence, efficient tools are required to (1) perform the transformation of the data from time-slice to time-series format and to (2) compute climatology statistics, needed for many diagnostic computations, on the resulting time-series data. To address the first of these two challenges, we have developed a parallel Python tool for converting time-slice model output to time-series format. To address the second of these challenges, we have developed a parallel Python tool to perform fast time-averaging of time-series data. These tools are designed to be light-weight, be easy to install, have very few dependencies, and can be easily inserted into the Earth system modeling workflow with negligible disruption. In this work, we present the motivation, approach, and testing results of these two light-weight parallel Python tools, as well as our plans for future research and development.

  13. A model for light distribution and average solar irradiance inside outdoor tubular photobioreactors for the microalgal mass culture

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, F.G.A.; Camacho, F.G.; Perez, J.A.S.

    1997-09-05

    A mathematical model to estimate the solar irradiance profile and average light intensity inside a tubular photobioreactor under outdoor conditions is proposed, requiring only geographic, geometric, and solar position parameters. First, the length of the path into the culture traveled by any direct or disperse ray of light was calculated as the function of three variables: day of year, solar hour, and geographic latitude. Then, the phenomenon of light attenuation by biomass was studied considering Lambert-Beer`s law (only considering absorption) and the monodimensional model of Cornet et al. (1900) (considering absorption and scattering phenomena). Due to the existence of differentialmore » wavelength absorption, none of the literature models are useful for explaining light attenuation by the biomass. Therefore, an empirical hyperbolic expression is proposed. The equations to calculate light path length were substituted in the proposed hyperbolic expression, reproducing light intensity data obtained in the center of the loop tubes. The proposed model was also likely to estimate the irradiance accurately at any point inside the culture. Calculation of the local intensity was thus extended to the full culture volume in order to obtain the average irradiance, showing how the higher biomass productivities in a Phaeodactylum tricornutum UTEX 640 outdoor chemostat culture could be maintained by delaying light limitation.« less

  14. Development of a patient-specific anatomical foot model from structured light scan data.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Samuel J; Huissoon, Jan P; Bedi, Sanjeev S

    2014-01-01

    The use of anatomically accurate finite element (FE) models of the human foot in research studies has increased rapidly in recent years. Uses for FE foot models include advancing knowledge of orthotic design, shoe design, ankle-foot orthoses, pathomechanics, locomotion, plantar pressure, tissue mechanics, plantar fasciitis, joint stress and surgical interventions. Similar applications but for clinical use on a per-patient basis would also be on the rise if it were not for the high costs associated with developing patient-specific anatomical foot models. High costs arise primarily from the expense and challenges of acquiring anatomical data via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) and reconstructing the three-dimensional models. The proposed solution morphs detailed anatomy from skin surface geometry and anatomical landmarks of a generic foot model (developed from CT or MRI) to surface geometry and anatomical landmarks acquired from an inexpensive structured light scan of a foot. The method yields a patient-specific anatomical foot model at a fraction of the cost of standard methods. Average error for bone surfaces was 2.53 mm for the six experiments completed. Highest accuracy occurred in the mid-foot and lowest in the forefoot due to the small, irregular bones of the toes. The method must be validated in the intended application to determine if the resulting errors are acceptable.

  15. Lifestyle and emotional well-being in men and women with type 2 diabetes (e-VitaDM-4; ZODIAC-48).

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Steven H; van Soldt, Evelien G W; van Vugt, Michael; Groenier, Klaas H; Roelofsen, Yvonne; Maas, Angela H E M; Bilo, Henk J G; Kleefstra, Nanne; van Hateren, Kornelis J J

    2017-12-01

    Whether lifestyle is associated with well-being in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is largely unknown. Uncovering and clarifying associations between these constructs may lead to new strategies for improving both. The aim was to investigate the relationship between lifestyle and well-being, focussing on gender differences. This cross-sectional study included 1085 patients with T2D that participated in the e-Vita part of the Zwolle outpatient diabetes project integrating available care (ZODIAC) study. Patients were included from May 2012 until September 2014 from 52 general practices. Emotional well-being was assessed with the World Health Organization-5 well-being index (WHO-5). Lifestyle information on body mass index, smoking, physical activity and alcohol use was extracted from self-reported questionnaires. Multiple linear regression analyses were used. After adjustment for other lifestyle factors, physical activity, smoking and drinking 22-35 alcohol consumptions per week were associated with the WHO-5 score in men and physical activity and smoking were associated with the WHO-5 score in women. In the fully adjusted analyses for the total study population, physical activity and smoking were still associated with the WHO-5 score (b = 1.1, P < .001 and b =-3.1, P = .018, respectively). In the fully adjusted analyses stratified to gender only physical activity was associated with the WHO-5 score (in men: b =0.8, P = .006, in women: b = 1.4, P = .001). This study shows a negative, non-clinically relevant association between smoking and emotional well-being in the total population with T2D and a positive, non-clinically relevant association between physical activity and emotional well-being in both men and women with T2D.

  16. Sign of the Zodiac as a predictor of survival for recipients of an allogeneic stem cell transplant for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML): an artificial association.

    PubMed

    Szydlo, R M; Gabriel, I; Olavarria, E; Apperley, J

    2010-10-01

    Astrological or Zodiac (star) sign has been shown to be a statistically significant factor in the outcome of a variety of diseases, conditions, and phenomena. To investigate its relevance in the context of a stem cell transplant (SCT), we examined its influence in chronic myeloid leukaemia, a disease with well-established prognostic factors. Data were collected on 626 patients who received a first myeloablative allogeneic SCT between 1981 and 2006. Star sign was determined for each patient. Univariate analyses comparing all 12 individual star signs showed considerable variation of 5-year probabilities of survival, 63% for Arians, to 45% for Aquarians, but without significance (P=.65). However, it was possible to pool together star signs likely to provide dichotomous results. Thus, grouping together Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Leo, Scorpio, and Capricorn (group A; n=317) versus others (group B; n=309) resulted in a highly significant difference (58% vs 48%; P=.007). When adjusted for known prognostic factors in a multivariate analysis, group B was associated with an increased risk of mortality when compared with group A (relative risk [RR], 1.37; P=.005). In this study, we show that, providing adequate care is taken, a significant relationship between patient star sign and survival post SCT for CML can be observed. This is, however, a completely erroneous result, and is based on the pooling together of observations to artificially create a statistically significant result. Statistical analyses should thus be carried out on a priori hypotheses and not to find a meaningful or significant result. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Time-related aspects of suicides - suicide frequency related to birthday, major holidays, day of the week, season, month of birth and zodiac signs].

    PubMed

    Deisenhammer, Eberhard A; Stiglbauer, Christoph; Kemmler, Georg

    2018-06-01

    Suicides are generally the consequence of overchallenged coping strategies of individual for psychological, social or internal and external biological strain factors. Timing of the suicide, too, may be influenced by external factors. Studies so far have yielded in part inconsistent results concerning the association of suicides with particular days or periods of the year. Even less is known regarding a potential effect of the time of birth on suicide risk. The Tyrol Suicide Register (TSR) provides data on suicides occurring in the Austrian State of Tyrol including birthday of the suicide victim and day of the suicide. In the present study the frequency of suicides was analyzed with regard to birthday, day of the week, major holidays and season over a period of 17 years. Further, a potential association with month of birth and zodiac signs was studied. We found a significant variation in suicide frequency concerning day of the week with a peak on Mondays and Tuesdays and seasonality with increased numbers in spring and summer months. The increase of suicide numbers at the beginning of the week may be explained by the "broken-promise effect" which has been described as the consequence of frustrated expectations concerning the weekend. Possible explanations for the suicide peaks in spring and summer may be biological, specifically serotonergic alterations as well as the experience of depressed patients perceiving the social and emotional contrast to people who are able to enjoy these periods of pleasure and outdoor activities.

  18. Relativistic bound-state problem in the light-front Yukawa model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głazek, Stanisław; Harindranath, Avaroth; Pinsky, Stephen; Shigemitsu, Junko; Wilson, Kenneth

    1993-02-01

    We study the renormalization problem on the light front for the two-fermion bound state in the (3+1)-dimensional Yukawa model, working within the lowest-order Tamm-Dancoff approximation. In addition to traditional mass and wave-function renormalization, new types of counterterms are required. These are nonlocal and involve arbitrary functions of the longitudinal momenta. Their appearance is consistent with general power-counting arguments on the light front. We estimate the ``arbitrary function'' in two ways: (1) by using perturbation theory as a guide and (2) by considering the asymptotic large transverse momentum behavior of the kernel in the bound-state equations. The latter method, as it is currently implemented, is applicable only to the helicity-zero sector of the theory. Because of triviality, in the Yukawa model one must retain a finite cutoff Λ in order to have a nonvanishing renormalized coupling. For the range of renormalized couplings (and cutoffs) allowed by triviality, one finds that the perturbative counterterm does a good job in eliminating cutoff dependence in the low-energy spectrum (masses <<Λ).

  19. Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation in the human head for applications in sinus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Mishra, Nikhil; You, Joon; Bhandarkar, Naveen; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2015-02-01

    Sinus blockages are a common reason for physician visits, affecting 1 out of 7 in the United States. Over 20 million cases of acute bacterial sinusitis become chronic and require medical treatment. Diagnosis in the primary care setting is challenging because symptom criteria (via detailed clinical history) plus objective imaging (CT or endoscopy) is recommended. Unfortunately, neither option is routinely available in primary care. Our previous work demonstrated that low-cost near infrared (NIR) transillumination instruments produced signals that correlated with the bulk findings of sinus opacity measured by CT. We have upgraded the technology, but questions remain such as finding the optimal arrangement of light sources, measuring the influence of specific anatomical structures, and determining detection limits. In order to begin addressing these questions, we have modeled NIR light propagation inside the adult human head using a mesh-based Monte Carlo algorithm (MMCLab) applied to a detailed anatomical head model constructed from CT images. In this application the sinus itself, which under healthy conditions is a void region (e.g., non-scattering), is the region of interest instead of an obstacle to other contrast mechanisms. We report preliminary simulations that characterize the changes in detected intensity due to clear (i.e., healthy) versus blocked sinuses. We also ran simulations for two of our clinical cases and compared results with the measurements. The simulations presented herein serve as a proof of concept that this approach could be used to understand contrast mechanisms and limitations of NIR imaging of the sinus cavities.

  20. Model for fluorescence quenching in light harvesting complex II in different aggregation states.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Atanaska; Abarova, Silvia; Stoitchkova, Katerina; Busheva, Mira

    2009-02-01

    Low-temperature (77 K) steady-state fluorescence emission spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering were applied to the main chlorophyll a/b protein light harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC II) in different aggregation states to elucidate the mechanism of fluorescence quenching within LHC II oligomers. Evidences presented that LHC II oligomers are heterogeneous and consist of large and small particles with different fluorescence yield. At intermediate detergent concentrations the mean size of the small particles is similar to that of trimers, while the size of large particles is comparable to that of aggregated trimers without added detergent. It is suggested that in small particles and trimers the emitter is monomeric chlorophyll, whereas in large aggregates there is also another emitter, which is a poorly fluorescing chlorophyll associate. A model, describing populations of antenna chlorophyll molecules in small and large aggregates in their ground and first singlet excited states, is considered. The model enables us to obtain the ratio of the singlet excited-state lifetimes in small and large particles, the relative amount of chlorophyll molecules in large particles, and the amount of quenchers as a function of the degree of aggregation. These dependencies reveal that the quenching of the chl a fluorescence upon aggregation is due to the formation of large aggregates and the increasing of the amount of chlorophyll molecules forming these aggregates. As a consequence, the amount of quenchers, located in large aggregates, is increased, and their singlet excited-state lifetimes steeply decrease.

  1. Zodiacal exoplanets in time (ZEIT) - II. A `super-Earth' orbiting a young K dwarf in the Pleiades Neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, E.; Mann, A. W.; Rizzuto, A.; Nofi, L.; Mace, G.; Vanderburg, A.; Feiden, G.; Narita, N.; Takeda, Y.; Esposito, T. M.; De Rosa, R. J.; Ansdell, M.; Hirano, T.; Graham, J. R.; Kraus, A.; Jaffe, D.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a `super-Earth'-size (2.30 ± 0.16 R⊕) planet transiting an early K-type dwarf star in the Campaign 4 field observed by the K2 mission. The host star, EPIC 210363145, was identified as a candidate member of the approximately 120 Myr-old Pleiades cluster based on its kinematics and photometric distance. It is rotationally variable and exhibits near-ultraviolet emission consistent with a Pleiades age, but its rotational period is ≈20 d and its spectrum contains no Hα emission nor the Li I absorption expected of Pleiades K dwarfs. Instead, the star is probably an interloper that is unaffiliated with the cluster, but younger (≲1.3 Gyr) than the typical field dwarf. We ruled out a false positive transit signal produced by confusion with a background eclipsing binary by adaptive optics imaging and a statistical calculation. Doppler radial velocity measurements limit the companion mass to <2 times that of Jupiter. Screening of the light curves of 1014 potential Pleiades candidate stars uncovered no additional planets. An injection-and-recovery experiment using the K2 Pleiades light curves with simulated planets, assuming a planet population like that in the Kepler prime field, predicts only 0.8-1.8 detections (versus ˜20 in an equivalent Kepler sample). The absence of Pleiades planet detections can be attributed to the much shorter monitoring time of K2 (80 d versus 4 yr), increased measurement noise due to spacecraft motion, and the intrinsic noisiness of the stars.

  2. An analysis of the massless planet approximation in transit light curve models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Ruch, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    Many extrasolar planet transit light curve models use the approximation of a massless planet. They approximate the planet as orbiting elliptically with the host star at the orbit’s focus instead of depicting the planet and star as both orbiting around a common center of mass. This approximation should generally be very good because the transit is a small fraction of the full-phase curve and the planet to stellar mass ratio is typically very small. However, to fully examine the legitimacy of this approximation, it is useful to perform a robust, all-parameter space-encompassing statistical comparison between the massless planet model and the more accurate model.Towards this goal, we establish two questions: (1) In what parameter domain is the approximation invalid? (2) If characterizing an exoplanetary system in this domain, what is the error of the parameter estimates when using the simplified model? We first address question (1). Given each parameter vector in a finite space, we can generate the simplified and more complete model curves. Associated with these model curves is a measure of the deviation between them, such as the root mean square (RMS). We use Gibbs sampling to generate a sample that is distributed according to the RMS surface. The high-density regions in the sample correspond to a large deviation between the models. To determine the domains of these high-density areas, we first employ the Ordering Points to Identify the Clustering Structure (OPTICS) algorithm. We then characterize the subclusters by performing the Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) on the transformed Principal Component spaces of each cluster. This process yields descriptors of the parameter domains with large discrepancies between the models.To consider question (2), we start by generating synthetic transit curve observations in the domains specified by the above analysis. We then derive the best-fit parameters of these synthetic light curves according to each model and examine

  3. Light-curve modelling constraints on the obliquities and aspect angles of the young Fermi pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierbattista, M.; Harding, A. K.; Grenier, I. A.; Johnson, T. J.; Caraveo, P. A.; Kerr, M.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2015-03-01

    In more than four years of observation the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite has identified pulsed γ-ray emission from more than 80 young or middle-aged pulsars, in most cases providing light curves with high statistics. Fitting the observed profiles with geometrical models can provide estimates of the magnetic obliquity α and of the line of sight angle ζ, yielding estimates of the radiation beaming factor and radiated luminosity. Using different γ-ray emission geometries (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, One Pole Caustic) and core plus cone geometries for the radio emission, we fit γ-ray light curves for 76 young or middle-aged pulsars and we jointly fit their γ-ray plus radio light curves when possible. We find that a joint radio plus γ-ray fit strategy is important to obtain (α,ζ) estimates that can explain simultaneously detectable radio and γ-ray emission: when the radio emission is available, the inclusion of the radio light curve in the fit leads to important changes in the (α,ζ) solutions. The most pronounced changes are observed for Outer Gap and One Pole Caustic models for which the γ-ray only fit leads to underestimated α or ζ when the solution is found to the left or to the right of the main α-ζ plane diagonal respectively. The intermediate-to-high altitude magnetosphere models, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One pole Caustic, are favoured in explaining the observations. We find no apparent evolution of α on a time scale of 106 years. For all emission geometries our derived γ-ray beaming factors are generally less than one and do not significantly evolve with the spin-down power. A more pronounced beaming factor vs. spin-down power correlation is observed for Slot Gap model and radio-quiet pulsars and for the Outer Gap model and radio-loud pulsars. The beaming factor distributions exhibit a large dispersion that is less pronounced for the Slot Gap case and that decreases from radio-quiet to radio-loud solutions. For all

  4. Light on fluorescent lipids in rafts: a lesson from model membranes.

    PubMed

    Kahya, Nicoletta

    2010-09-15

    Tracking fluorescent lipids in cellular membranes has been applied for decades to shed light on membrane trafficking, sorting, endocytosis and exocytosis, viral entry, and to understand the functional relevance of membrane heterogeneity, phase separation and lipid rafts. However, fluorescent probes may display different organizing behaviour from their corresponding endogenous lipids. A full characterization of these probes is therefore required for proper interpretation of fluorescence microscopy data in complex membrane systems. Model membrane studies provide essential clues that guide us to design and interpret our experiments, help us to avoid pitfalls and resolve artefacts in complex cellular environments. In the present issue of the Biochemical Journal, Juhasz, Davis and Sharom demonstrate the importance of testing lipid probes systematically in heterogeneous model membranes of specific composition and well-defined thermodynamic properties. The phase-partitioning behaviour of fluorescent probes, alone and/or in combination, cannot simply be assumed, but has to be fully characterized.

  5. Thermal-structural modeling of polymer Bragg grating waveguides illuminated by a light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Joon Kim, Kyoung; Bar-Cohen, Avram; Han, Bongtae

    2012-02-20

    This study reports both analytical and numerical thermal-structural models of polymer Bragg grating (PBG) waveguides illuminated by a light emitting diode (LED). A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) Bragg grating (BG) waveguide is chosen as an analysis vehicle to explore parametric effects of incident optical powers and substrate materials on the thermal-structural behavior of the BG. Analytical models are verified by comparing analytically predicted average excess temperatures, and thermally induced axial strains and stresses with numerical predictions. A parametric study demonstrates that the PMMA substrate induces more adverse effects, such as higher excess temperatures, complex axial temperature profiles, and greater and more complicated thermally induced strains in the BG compared with the Si substrate. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of light-tissue interactions in narrow band imaging.

    PubMed

    Le, Du V N; Wang, Quanzeng; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Pfefer, T Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Light-tissue interactions that influence vascular contrast enhancement in narrow band imaging (NBI) have not been the subject of extensive theoretical study. In order to elucidate relevant mechanisms in a systematic and quantitative manner we have developed and validated a Monte Carlo model of NBI and used it to study the effect of device and tissue parameters, specifically, imaging wavelength (415 versus 540 nm) and vessel diameter and depth. Simulations provided quantitative predictions of contrast-including up to 125% improvement in small, superficial vessel contrast for 415 over 540 nm. Our findings indicated that absorption rather than scattering-the mechanism often cited in prior studies-was the dominant factor behind spectral variations in vessel depth-selectivity. Narrow-band images of a tissue-simulating phantom showed good agreement in terms of trends and quantitative values. Numerical modeling represents a powerful tool for elucidating the factors that affect the performance of spectral imaging approaches such as NBI.

  7. Systematic shell-model study on spectroscopic properties from light to heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Cenxi

    2018-05-01

    A systematic shell-model study is performed to study the spectroscopic properties from light to heavy nuclei, such as binding energies, energy levels, electromagnetic properties, and β decays. The importance of cross-shell excitation is shown in the spectroscopic properties of neutron-rich boron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotopes. A special case is presented for low-lying structure of 14C. The weakly bound effect of proton 1s1/2 orbit is necessary for the description of the mirror energy difference in the nuclei around A=20. Some possible isomers are predicted in the nuclei in the southeast region of 132Sn based on a newly suggested Hamiltonian. A preliminary study on the nuclei around 208Pb are given to show the ability of the shell model in the heavy nuclei.

  8. Symmetry-preserving contact interaction model for heavy-light mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Serna, F. E.; Brito, M. A.; Krein, G.

    2016-01-22

    We use a symmetry-preserving regularization method of ultraviolet divergences in a vector-vector contact interaction model for low-energy QCD. The contact interaction is a representation of nonperturbative kernels used Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations. The regularization method is based on a subtraction scheme that avoids standard steps in the evaluation of divergent integrals that invariably lead to symmetry violation. Aiming at the study of heavy-light mesons, we have implemented the method to the pseudoscalar π and K mesons. We have solved the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the u, d and s quark propagators, and obtained the bound-state Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes in a way thatmore » the Ward-Green-Takahashi identities reflecting global symmetries of the model are satisfied for arbitrary routing of the momenta running in loop integrals.« less

  9. Development of Nonlinear Flight Mechanical Model of High Aspect Ratio Light Utility Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, S.; Sasongko, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    The implementation of Flight Control Law (FCL) for Aircraft Electronic Flight Control System (EFCS) aims to reduce pilot workload, while can also enhance the control performance during missions that require long endurance flight and high accuracy maneuver. In the development of FCL, a quantitative representation of the aircraft dynamics is needed for describing the aircraft dynamics characteristic and for becoming the basis of the FCL design. Hence, a 6 Degree of Freedom nonlinear model of a light utility aircraft dynamics, also called the nonlinear Flight Mechanical Model (FMM), is constructed. This paper shows the construction of FMM from mathematical formulation, the architecture design of FMM, the trimming process and simulations. The verification of FMM is done by analysis of aircraft behaviour in selected trimmed conditions.

  10. Light-curve modelling constraints on the obliquities and aspect angles of the young Fermi pulsars

    DOE PAGES

    Pierbattista, M.; Harding, A. K.; Grenier, I. A.; ...

    2015-02-10

    In more than four years of observation the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite has identified pulsed γ-ray emission from more than 80 young or middle-aged pulsars, in most cases providing light curves with high statistics. Fitting the observed profiles with geometrical models can provide estimates of the magnetic obliquity α and of the line of sight angle ζ, yielding estimates of the radiation beaming factor and radiated luminosity. Using different γ-ray emission geometries (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, One Pole Caustic) and core plus cone geometries for the radio emission, we fit γ-ray light curves formore » 76 young or middle-aged pulsars and we jointly fit their γ-ray plus radio light curves when possible. We find that a joint radio plus γ-ray fit strategy is important to obtain (α,ζ) estimates that can explain simultaneously detectable radio and γ-ray emission: when the radio emission is available, the inclusion of the radio light curve in the fit leads to important changes in the (α,ζ) solutions. The most pronounced changes are observed for Outer Gap and One Pole Caustic models for which the γ-ray only fit leads to underestimated α or ζ when the solution is found to the left or to the right of the main α-ζ plane diagonal respectively. The intermediate-to-high altitude magnetosphere models, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One pole Caustic, are favoured in explaining the observations. We find no apparent evolution of α on a time scale of 106 years. For all emission geometries our derived γ-ray beaming factors are generally less than one and do not significantly evolve with the spin-down power. A more pronounced beaming factor vs. spin-down power correlation is observed for Slot Gap model and radio-quiet pulsars and for the Outer Gap model and radio-loud pulsars. The beaming factor distributions exhibit a large dispersion that is less pronounced for the Slot Gap case and that decreases from radio-quiet to radio-loud solutions. For

  11. Active imaging systems to see through adverse conditions: Light-scattering based models and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, Nicolas; Ceolato, Romain; Hespel, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    Onera, the French aerospace lab, develops and models active imaging systems to understand the relevant physical phenomena affecting these systems performance. As a consequence, efforts have been done on the propagation of a pulse through the atmosphere and on target geometries and surface properties. These imaging systems must operate at night in all ambient illumination and weather conditions in order to perform strategic surveillance for various worldwide operations. We have implemented codes for 2D and 3D laser imaging systems. As we aim to image a scene in the presence of rain, snow, fog or haze, we introduce such light-scattering effects in our numerical models and compare simulated images with measurements provided by commercial laser scanners.

  12. [The modeling of the ricochet shot fired from a light weapon].

    PubMed

    Gusentsov, A O; Chuchko, V A; Kil'dyushev, E M; Tumanov, E V

    The objective of the present study was to choose the optimal method for the modeling of the glance of a bullet after hitting a target under conditions of the laboratory experiment. The study required the designing and construction of an original device for the modeling of the rebound effect of a light-firearm shot under experimental conditions. The device was tested under conditions of the laboratory experiment. The trials have demonstrated the possibility of using barriers of different weight and dimensions in the above device, their positioning and fixation depending on the purpose of the experiment, dynamic alteration of its conditions with due regard for the safety and security arrangements to protect the health and life of the experimenters without compromising the statistical significance and scientific validity of the results of the experiments.

  13. Modeling spatial competition for light in plant populations with the porous medium equation.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Robert; Etard, Octave; Cournède, Paul-Henry; Laurent-Gengoux, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    We consider a plant's local leaf area index as a spatially continuous variable, subject to particular reaction-diffusion dynamics of allocation, senescence and spatial propagation. The latter notably incorporates the plant's tendency to form new leaves in bright rather than shaded locations. Applying a generalized Beer-Lambert law allows to link existing foliage to production dynamics. The approach allows for inter-individual variability and competition for light while maintaining robustness-a key weakness of comparable existing models. The analysis of the single plant case leads to a significant simplification of the system's key equation when transforming it into the well studied porous medium equation. Confronting the theoretical model to experimental data of sugar beet populations, differing in configuration density, demonstrates its accuracy.

  14. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  15. On Being a Father or Sibling in Light of the Humanbecoming Family Model.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L; Braddick, Marybeth

    2016-01-01

    The following article provides an updated discussion on two Parse grounded exploratory descriptive studies in light to her recently added humanbecoming family model. The comments of the fathers and siblings from the studies reveal that family life is unpredictable and that family relationships are paradoxical evolutional emergences of shifting hopes and dreams. The humanbecoming family model provided a useful way to consider fathering and being a sibling, as unexpected unfoldings of joy-sorrow reveal purposeful new possibilities. It guides health professionals to avoid the imposition of their views on what is best for the family in favor of bearing witness to the suffering and disappointments that unfold in family life. It is important to remain open to families' sources of meaning, courage, and hope in the moment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Light-Curve Modelling Constraints on the Obliquities and Aspect Angles of the Young Fermi Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierbattista, M.; Harding, A. K.; Grenier, I. A.; Johnson, T. J.; Caraveo, P. A.; Kerr, M.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2015-01-01

    In more than four years of observation the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite has identified pulsed gamma-ray emission from more than 80 young or middle-aged pulsars, in most cases providing light curves with high statistics. Fitting the observed profiles with geometrical models can provide estimates of the magnetic obliquity alpha and of the line of sight angle zeta, yielding estimates of the radiation beaming factor and radiated luminosity. Using different gamma-ray emission geometries (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, One Pole Caustic) and core plus cone geometries for the radio emission, we fit gamma-ray light curves for 76 young or middle-aged pulsars and we jointly fit their gamma-ray plus radio light curves when possible. We find that a joint radio plus gamma-ray fit strategy is important to obtain (alpha, zeta) estimates that can explain simultaneously detectable radio and gamma-ray emission: when the radio emission is available, the inclusion of the radio light curve in the fit leads to important changes in the (alpha, gamma) solutions. The most pronounced changes are observed for Outer Gap and One Pole Caustic models for which the gamma-ray only fit leads to underestimated alpha or zeta when the solution is found to the left or to the right of the main alpha-zeta plane diagonal respectively. The intermediate-to-high altitude magnetosphere models, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One pole Caustic, are favored in explaining the observations. We find no apparent evolution of a on a time scale of 106 years. For all emission geometries our derived gamma-ray beaming factors are generally less than one and do not significantly evolve with the spin-down power. A more pronounced beaming factor vs. spin-down power correlation is observed for Slot Gap model and radio-quiet pulsars and for the Outer Gap model and radio-loud pulsars. The beaming factor distributions exhibit a large dispersion that is less pronounced for the Slot Gap case and that decreases from

  17. 40 CFR 86.708-94 - In-use emission standards for 1994 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.708-94 In-use emission standards for... exhaust emissions from 1994 and later model year light-duty vehicles shall meet all standards in tables... applicable Tier 1I standards in table H94-3. (2) Particulates. For in-use exhaust emissions for model years...

  18. 40 CFR 86.708-94 - In-use emission standards for 1994 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.708-94 In-use emission standards for... exhaust emissions from 1994 and later model year light-duty vehicles shall meet all standards in tables... applicable Tier 1I standards in table H94-3. (2) Particulates. For in-use exhaust emissions for model years...

  19. 40 CFR 86.708-94 - In-use emission standards for 1994 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.708-94 In-use emission standards for... exhaust emissions from 1994 and later model year light-duty vehicles shall meet all standards in tables... applicable Tier 1I standards in table H94-3. (2) Particulates. For in-use exhaust emissions for model years...

  20. 40 CFR 86.708-94 - In-use emission standards for 1994 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.708-94 In-use emission standards for... exhaust emissions from 1994 and later model year light-duty vehicles shall meet all standards in tables... applicable Tier 1I standards in table H94-3. (2) Particulates. For in-use exhaust emissions for model years...

  1. Multi-level Modeling of Light-Induced Stomatal Opening Offers New Insights into Its Regulation by Drought

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongyao; Jin, Xiaofen; Albert, Réka; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Plant guard cells gate CO2 uptake and transpirational water loss through stomatal pores. As a result of decades of experimental investigation, there is an abundance of information on the involvement of specific proteins and secondary messengers in the regulation of stomatal movements and on the pairwise relationships between guard cell components. We constructed a multi-level dynamic model of guard cell signal transduction during light-induced stomatal opening and of the effect of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) on this process. The model integrates into a coherent network the direct and indirect biological evidence regarding the regulation of seventy components implicated in stomatal opening. Analysis of this signal transduction network identified robust cross-talk between blue light and ABA, in which [Ca2+]c plays a key role, and indicated an absence of cross-talk between red light and ABA. The dynamic model captured more than 1031 distinct states for the system and yielded outcomes that were in qualitative agreement with a wide variety of previous experimental results. We obtained novel model predictions by simulating single component knockout phenotypes. We found that under white light or blue light, over 60%, and under red light, over 90% of all simulated knockouts had similar opening responses as wild type, showing that the system is robust against single node loss. The model revealed an open question concerning the effect of ABA on red light-induced stomatal opening. We experimentally showed that ABA is able to inhibit red light-induced stomatal opening, and our model offers possible hypotheses for the underlying mechanism, which point to potential future experiments. Our modelling methodology combines simplicity and flexibility with dynamic richness, making it well suited for a wide class of biological regulatory systems. PMID:25393147

  2. Relationship Between Vehicle Size and Fatality Risk in Model Year 1985-93 Passenger Cars and Light Trucks

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-01-01

    Fatality rates per million exposure years are computed by make, model and model year, : based on the crash experience of model year 1985-93 passenger cars and light trucks (pickups) vans : and sport utility vehicles) in the United States during calen...

  3. A biophysical study of clathrin utilizing light scattering, neutron scattering and structure based computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Matthew Lee

    A principal component in the protein coats of certain post-golgi and endocytic vesicles is clathrin, which appears as a three-legged heteropolymer (known as a triskelion) that assembles into polyhedral baskets principally made up of pentagonal and hexagonal faces. In vitro, this assembly depends on the pH, with baskets forming more readily at low pH and less readily at high pH. We have developed procedures, based on static and dynamic light scattering, to determine the radius of gyration, Rg, and hydrodynamic radius, RH, of isolated triskelia under conditions where basket assembly occurs. Calculations based on rigid molecular bead models of a triskelion show that the measured values can be accounted for by bending of the legs and a puckering at the vertex. We also show that the values of Rg and R H measured for clathrin triskelia in solution are qualitatively consistent with the conformation of an individual triskelion that is part of a "D6 barrel" basket assembly measured by cryo-EM tomography. We extended this study by performing small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments on isolated triskelia in solution under conditions where baskets do not assemble. SANS experiments were consistent with previous static light scattering experiments but showed a shoulder in the scattering function at intermediate q-values just beyond the central diffraction peak (the Guinier regime). Theoretical calculations based on rigid bead models of a triskelion showed well-defined features in this region different from the experiment. A flexible bead-spring model of a triskelion and Brownian dynamics simulations were used to generate a time averaged scattering function. This model adequately described the experimental data for flexibilities close to previous estimates from the analysis of electron micrographs.

  4. Modelling gamma-ray light curves of phase-aligned millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shan; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Zejun

    2018-04-01

    Three gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs), PSR J1939+2134, PSR J1959+2048, and PSR J0034-0534, have been confirmed to have a common feature of phase-aligned in radio and gamma-ray bands. With a geometric (two-pole caustic) model and a physical outer gap model (revised 3D outer gap model) in a three dimensional (3D) retarded magnetic dipole with a perturbation magnetic field, the observed features of these MSPs are studied. In order to obtained the best-fitting model parameters, the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique is used and reasonable GeV band light curves for three MSPs are given. Our calculations indicate that MSPs emit high energy photons with smaller inclination angles (α ≈ 10°-50°), larger view angles (ζ ≈ 65°-100°), and smaller perturbation factor (ɛ ≈ -0.15-0.1). Note that the factor ɛ, describing the strength of the perturbed magnetic field, is all less than zero in these two models, so the magnetic field caused by current-induced play a leading role in the pulsed location of MSPs.

  5. The Luminous Convolution Model-The light side of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Sophia; Oblath, Noah; Formaggio, Joe; Goedecke, George; Chester, David; Ott, Richard; Ashley, Aaron; Rodriguez, Adrianna

    2014-03-01

    We present a heuristic model for predicting the rotation curves of spiral galaxies. The Luminous Convolution Model (LCM) utilizes Lorentz-type transformations of very small changes in the photon's frequencies from curved space-times to construct a dynamic mass model of galaxies. These frequency changes are derived using the exact solution to the exterior Kerr wave equation, as opposed to a linearized treatment. The LCM Lorentz-type transformations map between the emitter and the receiver rotating galactic frames, and then to the associated flat frames in each galaxy where the photons are emitted and received. This treatment necessarily rests upon estimates of the luminous matter in both the emitter and the receiver galaxies. The LCM is tested on a sample of 22 randomly chosen galaxies, represented in 33 different data sets. LCM fits are compared to the Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) Dark Matter Model and to the Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) model when possible. The high degree of sensitivity of the LCM to the initial assumption of a luminous mass to light ratios (M/L), of the given galaxy, is demonstrated. We demonstrate that the LCM is successful across a wide range of spiral galaxies for predicting the observed rotation curves. Through the generous support of the MIT Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Fellowship program.

  6. Modeling investigation of light-absorbing aerosols in the Amazon Basin during the wet season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiaoqiao; Saturno, Jorge; Chi, Xuguang; Walter, David; Lavric, Jost; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Ditas, Florian; Pöhlker, Christopher; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat

    2017-04-01

    We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to interpret observed light-absorbing aerosols in Amazonia during the wet season. Observed aerosol properties, including black carbon (BC) concentration and light absorption, at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) site in the central Amazon have relatively low background levels but frequently show high peaks during the study period of January-April 2014. With daily temporal resolution for open fire emissions and modified aerosol optical properties, our model successfully captures the observed variation in fine/coarse aerosol and BC concentrations as well as aerosol light absorption and its wavelength dependence over the Amazon Basin. The source attribution in the model indicates the important influence of open fire on the observed variances of aerosol concentrations and absorption, mainly from regional sources (northern South America) and from northern Africa. The contribution of open fires from these two regions is comparable, with the latter becoming more important in the late wet season. The analysis of correlation and enhancement ratios of BC versus CO suggests transport times of < 3 days for regional fires and 11 days for African plumes arriving at ATTO during the wet season. The model performance of long-range transport of African plumes is also evaluated with observations from AERONET, MODIS, and CALIOP. Simulated absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) averaged over the wet season is lower than 0.0015 over the central Amazon, including the ATTO site. We find that more than 50% of total absorption at 550 nm is from BC, except for the northeastern Amazon and the Guianas, where the influence of dust becomes significant (up to 35 %). The brown carbon contribution is generally between 20 and 30 %. The distribution of absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) suggests more influence from fossil fuel combustion in the southern part of the basin (AAE 1) but more open fire and dust influence in the northern part

  7. A Ball Lightning Model as a Possible Explanation of Recently Reported Cavity Lights

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, David; /SLAC

    The salient features of cavity lights, in particular, mobile luminous objects (MLO's), as have been experimentally observed in superconducting accelerator cavities, are summarized. A model based upon standard electromagnetic interactions between a small particle and the 1.5 GHz cavity excitation field is described. This model can explain some features of these data, in particular, the existence of particle orbits without wall contact. While this result is an important success for the model, it is detailed why the model as it stands is incomplete. It is argued that no avenues for a suitable extension of the model through established physics appearmore » evident, which motivates an investigation of a model based upon a more exotic object, ball lightning. As discussed, further motivation derives from the fact that there are significant similarities in many of the qualitative features of ball lightning and MLO's, even though they appear in quite different circumstances and differ in scale by orders of magnitude. The ball lightning model, which incorporates electromagnetic charges and currents, is based on a symmetrized set of Maxwell's equations in which the electromagnetic sources and fields are characterized by a process called dyality rotation. It is shown that a consistent mathematical description of dyality rotation as a physical process can be achieved by adding suitable (phenomenological) current terms to supplement the usual current terms in the symmetrized Maxwell's equations. These currents, which enable the conservation of electric and magnetic charge, are called vacuum currents. It is shown that the proposed ball lightning model offers a good qualitative explanation of the perplexing aspects of the MLO data. Avenues for further study are indicated.« less

  8. A statistical light use efficiency model explains 85% variations in global GPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Ryu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Photosynthesis is a complicated process whose modeling requires different levels of assumptions, simplification, and parameterization. Among models, light use efficiency (LUE) model is highly compact but powerful in monitoring gross primary production (GPP) from satellite data. Most of LUE models adopt a multiplicative from of maximum LUE, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR), and temperature and water stress functions. However, maximum LUE is a fitting parameter with large spatial variations, but most studies only use several biome dependent constants. In addition, stress functions are empirical and arbitrary in literatures. Moreover, meteorological data used are usually coarse-resolution, e.g., 1°, which could cause large errors. Finally, sunlit and shade canopy have completely different light responses but little considered. Targeting these issues, we derived a new statistical LUE model from a process-based and satellite-driven model, the Breathing Earth System Simulator (BESS). We have already derived a set of global radiation (5-km resolution), carbon and water fluxes (1-km resolution) products from 2000 to 2015 from BESS. By exploring these datasets, we found strong correlation between APAR and GPP for sunlit (R2=0.84) and shade (R2=0.96) canopy, respectively. A simple model, only driven by sunlit and shade APAR, was thus built based on linear relationships. The slopes of the linear function act as effective LUE of global ecosystem, with values of 0.0232 and 0.0128 umol C/umol quanta for sunlit and shade canopy, respectively. When compared with MPI-BGC GPP products, a global proxy of FLUXNET data, BESS-LUE achieved an overall accuracy of R2 = 0.85, whereas original BESS was R2 = 0.83 and MODIS GPP product was R2 = 0.76. We investigated spatiotemporal variations of the effective LUE. Spatially, the ratio of sunlit to shade values ranged from 0.1 (wet tropic) to 4.5 (dry inland). By using maps of sunlit and shade effective LUE the accuracy of

  9. Quantitative 3D model of light transmittance through translucent rocks applied to the hypolithic microbial community.

    PubMed

    Jolitz, Rebecca D; McKay, Christopher P

    2013-07-01

    In extreme desert environments, photosynthetic microorganisms often live on the buried undersides of translucent rocks. Computing the light level reaching these locations requires 3D modeling of a finite rock. We report on Monte Carlo calculations of skylight and sunlight transmission through a partially buried flat cylindrical rock using one billion photons per simulation. Transmitted light level drops inversely with increasing rock opacity, as expected for purely scattering media. For a half-buried rock with an extinction coefficient of 0.1 cm(-1) (opacity of 0.2), transmission at the bottom is 64 % for sunlight at a solar zenith angle of 60° and 82 % for skylight. Transmitted light level increases slowly with increasing scattering asymmetry factor of the rock independent of illumination or depth buried. Transmitted sunlight at zenith through a thick half-buried rock (opacity of 0.6) is six times brighter at the bottom than the subsurface sides. Skylight transmits equally to the subsurface sides and bottom. When the sun is not straight overhead, the sunward side of the rock is brighter than the underside of the rock. Compared to the sunlight transmitted to the bottom, transmitted sunlight inclined at 60° is 24 times brighter at the subsurface side towards the sun and 14 times brighter at the subsurface side 70° away from the sun. Transmitted sunlight emitted from zenith and skylight is uniformly bright at the bottom regardless of how deeply the rock is buried. Sunlight not at zenith transmits preferentially to the sunward bottom edge depending on the depth the rock is buried.

  10. Runoff simulation in the Ferghana Valley (Central Asia) using conceptual hydrological HBV-light model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, Iuliia; Breuer, Lutz; Forkutsa, Irina; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2013-04-01

    Glaciers and permafrost on the ranges of the Tien Shan mountain system are primary sources of water in the Ferghana Valley. The water artery of the valley is the Syr Darya River that is formed by confluence of the Naryn and Kara Darya rivers, which originate from the mountain glaciers of the Ak-Shyrak and the Ferghana ranges accordingly. The Ferghana Valley is densely populated and main activity of population is agriculture that heavily depends on irrigation especially in such arid region. The runoff reduction is projected in future due to global temperature rise and glacier shrinkage as a consequence. Therefore, it is essential to study climate change impact on water resources in the area both for ecological and economic aspects. The evaluation of comparative contribution of small upper catchments (n=24) with precipitation predominance in discharge and the large Naryn and Karadarya River basins, which are fed by glacial melt water, to the Fergana Valley water balance under current and future climatic conditions is general aim of the study. Appropriate understanding of the hydrological cycle under current climatic conditions is significant for prognosis of water resource availability in the future. Thus, conceptual hydrological HBV-light model was used for analysing of the water balance of the small upper catchments that surround the Ferghana Valley. Three trial catchments (the Kugart River basin, 1010 km²; the Kurshab River basin, 2010 km2; the Akbura River basin, 2260 km²) with relatively good temporal quality data were chosen to setup the model. Due to limitation of daily temperature data the MODAWEC weather generator, which converts monthly temperature data into daily based on correlation with rainfall, was tested and applied for the HBV-light model.

  11. Serum peroxiredoxin 4: a marker of oxidative stress associated with mortality in type 2 diabetes (ZODIAC-28).

    PubMed

    Gerrits, Esther G; Alkhalaf, Alaa; Landman, Gijs W D; van Hateren, Kornelis J J; Groenier, Klaas H; Struck, Joachim; Schulte, Janin; Gans, Reinold O B; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kleefstra, Nanne; Bilo, Henk J G

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an underlying pathophysiologic role in the development of diabetes complications. The aim of this study was to investigate peroxiredoxin 4 (Prx4), a proposed novel biomarker of oxidative stress, and its association with and capability as a biomarker in predicting (cardiovascular) mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Prx4 was assessed in baseline serum samples of 1161 type 2 diabetes patients. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the relationship between Prx4 and (cardiovascular) mortality. Risk prediction capabilities of Prx4 for (cardiovascular) mortality were assessed with Harrell's C statistic, the integrated discrimination improvement and net reclassification improvement. Mean age was 67 and the median diabetes duration was 4.0 years. After a median follow-up period of 5.8 years, 327 patients died; 137 cardiovascular deaths. Prx4 was associated with (cardiovascular) mortality. The Cox proportional hazard models added the variables: Prx4 (model 1); age and gender (model 2), and BMI, creatinine, smoking, diabetes duration, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol-HDL ratio, history of macrovascular complications, and albuminuria (model 3). Hazard ratios (HR) (95% CI) for cardiovascular mortality were 1.93 (1.57 - 2.38), 1.75 (1.39 - 2.20), and 1.63 (1.28 - 2.09) for models 1, 2 and 3, respectively. HR for all-cause mortality were 1.73 (1.50 - 1.99), 1.50 (1.29 - 1.75), and 1.44 (1.23 - 1.67) for models 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Addition of Prx4 to the traditional risk factors slightly improved risk prediction of (cardiovascular) mortality. Prx4 is independently associated with (cardiovascular) mortality in type 2 diabetes patients. After addition of Prx4 to the traditional risk factors, there was a slightly improvement in risk prediction of (cardiovascular) mortality in this patient group.

  12. 40 CFR 86.709-94 - In-use emission standards for 1994 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Model Year Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.709-94 In-use emission standards for 1994 and... exhaust emissions from 1994 and later model year light light-duty trucks shall meet all standards in... standards in tables H94-9 and H94-10. (ii) For model years 1996 and 1997, a minimum of the percentages shown...

  13. 40 CFR 86.709-94 - In-use emission standards for 1994 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Model Year Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.709-94 In-use emission standards for 1994 and... exhaust emissions from 1994 and later model year light light-duty trucks shall meet all standards in... standards in tables H94-9 and H94-10. (ii) For model years 1996 and 1997, a minimum of the percentages shown...

  14. 40 CFR 86.709-94 - In-use emission standards for 1994 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Model Year Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.709-94 In-use emission standards for 1994 and... exhaust emissions from 1994 and later model year light light-duty trucks shall meet all standards in... standards in tables H94-9 and H94-10. (ii) For model years 1996 and 1997, a minimum of the percentages shown...

  15. 40 CFR 86.709-94 - In-use emission standards for 1994 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Model Year Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.709-94 In-use emission standards for 1994 and... exhaust emissions from 1994 and later model year light light-duty trucks shall meet all standards in... standards in tables H94-9 and H94-10. (ii) For model years 1996 and 1997, a minimum of the percentages shown...

  16. [Polarization Modeling and Analysis of Light Scattering Properties of Multilayer Films on Slightly Rough Substrate].

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Gao, Jun; Wang, Ling-mei; Wang, Chi

    2016-03-01

    To satisfy the demand of multilayer films on polarization detection, polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function of multilayer films on slightly rough substrate is established on the basis of first-order vector perturbation theory and polarization transfer matrix. Due to the function, light scattering polarization properties are studied under multi-factor impacts of two typical targets-monolayer anti-reflection film and multilayer high-reflection films. The result shows that for monolayer anti-reflection film, observing positions have a great influence on the degree of polarization, for the left of the peak increased and right decreased compared with the substrate target. Film target and bare substrate can be distinguished by the degree of polarization in different observation angles. For multilayer high-reflection films, the degree of polarization is significantly associated with the number and optical thickness of layers at different wavelengths of incident light and scattering angles. With the increase of the layer number, the degree of polarization near the mirror reflection area decreases. It reveals that the calculated results coincide with the experimental data, which validates the correctness and rationality of the model. This paper provides a theoretical method for polarization detection of multilayer films target and reflection stealth technology.

  17. Multi-messenger Light Curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Internal Shock Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Heinze, Jonas; Murase, Kohta; Winter, Walter

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma-rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure can be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  18. Light Charged and CP-odd Higgses in MSSM-like Models

    SciTech Connect

    Dermisek, Radovan

    2008-11-23

    We study the Higgs sector of supersymmetric models containing two Higgs doublets with a light MSSM-like CP odd Higgs, m{sub A} < or approx. 10 GeV, and tan{beta} < or approx. 2.5. In this scenario all Higgses resulting from two Higgs doublets: light and heavy CP even Higgses, h and H, the CP odd Higgs, A, and the charged Higgs, H{sup {+-}}, could have been produced at LEP or the Tevatron, but would have escaped detection because they decay in modes that have not been searched for or the experiments are not sensitive to. Especially H{yields}ZA and H{sup {+-}}{yields}W{sup {+-}}*Amore » with A{yields}cc-bar, {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} present an opportunity to discover some of the Higgses at LEP, the Tevatron and also at B factories. In addition, the 2.8{sigma} excess of the branching ratio W{yields}{tau}v with respect to the other leptons measured at LEP correlates well with the existence of the charged Higgs with properties typical for this scenario. Dominant {tau}- and c-rich decay products of all Higgses require modified strategies for their discovery at the LHC.« less

  19. Model-based restoration using light vein for range-gated imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Canjin; Sun, Tao; Wang, Tingfeng; Wang, Rui; Guo, Jin; Tian, Yuzhen

    2016-09-10

    The images captured by an airborne range-gated imaging system are degraded by many factors, such as light scattering, noise, defocus of the optical system, atmospheric disturbances, platform vibrations, and so on. The characteristics of low illumination, few details, and high noise make the state-of-the-art restoration method fail. In this paper, we present a restoration method especially for range-gated imaging systems. The degradation process is divided into two parts: the static part and the dynamic part. For the static part, we establish the physical model of the imaging system according to the laser transmission theory, and estimate the static point spread function (PSF). For the dynamic part, a so-called light vein feature extraction method is presented to estimate the fuzzy parameter of the atmospheric disturbance and platform movement, which make contributions to the dynamic PSF. Finally, combined with the static and dynamic PSF, an iterative updating framework is used to restore the image. Compared with the state-of-the-art methods, the proposed method can effectively suppress ringing artifacts and achieve better performance in a range-gated imaging system.

  20. Delayed detonation models for normal and subluminous type Ia sueprnovae: Absolute brightness, light curves, and molecule formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflich, P.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    We compute optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) using an elaborate treatment of the Local Thermodynamic Equilbrium (LTE) radiation transport, equation of state and ionization balance, expansion opacity including the cooling by CO, Co(+), and SiO, and a Monte Carlo gamma-ray deposition scheme. The models have an amount of Ni-56 in the range from approximately or equal to 0.1 solar mass up to 0.7 solar mass depending on the density at which the transition from a deflagration to a detonation occurs. Models with a large nickel production give light curves comparable to those of typical Type Ia supernovae. Subluminous supernovae can be explained by models with a low nickel production. Multiband light curves are presented in comparison with the normally bright event SN 1992bc and the subluminous events Sn 1991bg and SN 1992bo to establish the principle that the delayed detonation paradigm in Chandrasekhar mass models may give a common explosion mechanism accounting for both normal and subluminous SN Ia's. Secondary IR-maxima are formed in the models of normal SN Ia's as a photospheric effect if the photospheric radius continues to increase well after maximum light. Secondary maxima appear later and stronger in models with moderate expansion velocities and with radioactive material closer to the surface. Model light curves for subluminous SN Ia's tend to show only one 'late' IR-maximum. In some delayed detonation models shell-like envelopes form, which consist of unburned carbon and oxygen. The formation of molecules in these envelopes is addressed. If the model retains a C/O-envelope and is subluminous, strong vibration bands of CO may appear, typically several weeks past maximum light. CO should be very weak or absent in normal Sn Ia's.

  1. A Sarsa(λ)-based control model for real-time traffic light coordination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoke; Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Traffic problems often occur due to the traffic demands by the outnumbered vehicles on road. Maximizing traffic flow and minimizing the average waiting time are the goals of intelligent traffic control. Each junction wants to get larger traffic flow. During the course, junctions form a policy of coordination as well as constraints for adjacent junctions to maximize their own interests. A good traffic signal timing policy is helpful to solve the problem. However, as there are so many factors that can affect the traffic control model, it is difficult to find the optimal solution. The disability of traffic light controllers to learn from past experiences caused them to be unable to adaptively fit dynamic changes of traffic flow. Considering dynamic characteristics of the actual traffic environment, reinforcement learning algorithm based traffic control approach can be applied to get optimal scheduling policy. The proposed Sarsa(λ)-based real-time traffic control optimization model can maintain the traffic signal timing policy more effectively. The Sarsa(λ)-based model gains traffic cost of the vehicle, which considers delay time, the number of waiting vehicles, and the integrated saturation from its experiences to learn and determine the optimal actions. The experiment results show an inspiring improvement in traffic control, indicating the proposed model is capable of facilitating real-time dynamic traffic control.

  2. A Sarsa(λ)-Based Control Model for Real-Time Traffic Light Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Traffic problems often occur due to the traffic demands by the outnumbered vehicles on road. Maximizing traffic flow and minimizing the average waiting time are the goals of intelligent traffic control. Each junction wants to get larger traffic flow. During the course, junctions form a policy of coordination as well as constraints for adjacent junctions to maximize their own interests. A good traffic signal timing policy is helpful to solve the problem. However, as there are so many factors that can affect the traffic control model, it is difficult to find the optimal solution. The disability of traffic light controllers to learn from past experiences caused them to be unable to adaptively fit dynamic changes of traffic flow. Considering dynamic characteristics of the actual traffic environment, reinforcement learning algorithm based traffic control approach can be applied to get optimal scheduling policy. The proposed Sarsa(λ)-based real-time traffic control optimization model can maintain the traffic signal timing policy more effectively. The Sarsa(λ)-based model gains traffic cost of the vehicle, which considers delay time, the number of waiting vehicles, and the integrated saturation from its experiences to learn and determine the optimal actions. The experiment results show an inspiring improvement in traffic control, indicating the proposed model is capable of facilitating real-time dynamic traffic control. PMID:24592183

  3. Modeling Phase-Aligned Gamma-Ray And Radio Millisecond Pulsar Light Curves

    DOE PAGES

    Venter, C.; Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.

    2011-12-12

    The gamma-ray population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has been steadily increasing. A number of the more recent detections, including PSR J0034-0534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit an unusual phenomenon: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma- ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore geometric models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder (R LC) or near the polar caps (PCs). We obtain reasonable fitsmore » for the first three of these MSPs in the context of “altitude- limited” outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries. The outer magnetosphere phase-aligned models differ from the standard outer gap (OG) / two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: first, the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual low-altitude conal radio beams; second, we allow the maximum altitude of the gamma-ray emission region as well as both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the radio emission region to vary within a limited range. Alternatively, there also exist phase-aligned LC solutions for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap (SG) scenario (“low-altitude slot gap” (laSG) models). We find best-fit LCs using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) max- imum likelihood approach [30]. Our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the outer magnetosphere, and that the radio emission may come from close to R LC. We lastly constrain the emission altitudes with typical uncertainties of ~ 0.3RLC. Our results describe a third gamma-ray MSP subclass, in addition to the two (with non-aligned LCs) previously found [50]: those with LCs fit by standard OG / TPC models, and those with LCs fit by pair-starved polar

  4. Blue-light filtering alters angiogenic signaling in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells culture model.

    PubMed

    Vila, Natalia; Siblini, Aya; Esposito, Evangelina; Bravo-Filho, Vasco; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Aldrees, Sultan; Logan, Patrick; Arias, Lluis; Burnier, Miguel N

    2017-11-02

    Light exposure and more specifically the spectrum of blue light contribute to the oxidative stress in Age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The purpose of the study was to establish whether blue light filtering could modify proangiogenic signaling produced by retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells under different conditions simulating risk factors for AMD. Three experiments were carried out in order to expose ARPE-19 cells to white light for 48 h with and without blue light-blocking filters (BLF) in different conditions. In each experiment one group was exposed to light with no BLF protection, a second group was exposed to light with BLF protection, and a control group was not exposed to light. The ARPE-19 cells used in each experiment prior to light exposure were cultured for 24 h as follows: Experiment 1) Normoxia, Experiment 2) Hypoxia, and Experiment 3) Lutein supplemented media in normoxia. The media of all groups was harvested after light exposure for sandwich ELISA-based assays to quantify 10 pro-angiogenic cytokines. A significant decrease in angiogenin secretion levels and a significant increase in bFGF were observed following light exposure, compared to dark conditions, in both normoxia and hypoxia conditions. With the addition of a blue light-blocking filter in normoxia, a significant increase in angiogenin levels was observed. Although statistical significance was not achieved, blue light filters reduce light-induced secretion of bFGF and VEGF to near normal levels. This trend is also observed when ARPE-19 cells are grown under hypoxic conditions and when pre-treated with lutein prior to exposure to experimental conditions. Following light exposure, there is a decrease in angiogenin secretion by ARPE-19 cells, which was abrogated with a blue light - blocking filter. Our findings support the position that blue light filtering affects the secretion of angiogenic factors by retinal pigmented epithelial cells under normoxic, hypoxic, and lutein

  5. Application for certification, 1992 model-year light-duty vehicles - Grumman Olson

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines that he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of themore » application contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  6. Application for certification 1980 model year light-duty vehicles - Audi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems, and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the applicationmore » contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  7. Application for certification, 1988 model year light-duty vehicles - Volkswagen, Audi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems, and exhaust and evaporative emission-control systems. Information is also provided on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application containsmore » the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  8. Application for certification, 1990 model-year light-duty vehicles - Audi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the applicationmore » contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  9. Application for certification for 1979 model year for light-duty vehicles - Audi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. The application consists of two parts. In the part I, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. The part I also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements tomore » be followed during testing. The part II application submitted after emission testing is completed, contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, and maintenance instructions to be followed by the ultimate owners of the vehicles.« less

  10. Application for certification 1993 model year light-duty vehicles - Audi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the applicationmore » contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  11. Application for certification, 1986 model year light-duty vehicles - Volkswagen/Audi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the applicationmore » contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  12. Application for certification, 1991 model-year light-duty vehicles - Audi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model-year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application containsmore » the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  13. Application for certification 1981 model year light-duty vehicles - Audi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the applicationmore » contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  14. Application for certification for 1979 model year for light-duty vehicles - Peugeot

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. The application consists of two parts. In the part I, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. The part I also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements tomore » be followed during testing. The part II application, submitted after emission testing is completed, contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, and maintenance instructions to be followed by the ultimate owners of the vehicles.« less

  15. Application for certification 1987 model year light-duty vehicles - Peugeot

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. The engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. They also provide information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the applicationmore » contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  16. Application for certification 1981 model year light-duty vehicles - Peugeot

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the applicationmore » contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  17. Application for certification, 1990 model-year light-duty vehicles - US Technical Research Company (Peugeot)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the applicationmore » contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  18. Application for certification, 1989 model year light-duty vehicles - US Technical Research Company (Peugeot)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the applicationmore » contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less

  19. Imaging, microscopic analysis, and modeling of a CdTe module degraded by heat and light

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Steve; Albin, David; Hacke, Peter

    Photoluminescence (PL), electroluminescence (EL), and dark lock-in thermography are collected during stressing of a CdTe module under one-Sun light at an elevated temperature of 100 degrees C. The PL imaging system is simple and economical. The PL images show differing degrees of degradation across the module and are less sensitive to effects of shunting and resistance that appear on the EL images. Regions of varying degradation are chosen based on avoiding pre-existing shunt defects. These regions are evaluated using time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Reduced PL intensity correlates to increased Cu concentration at the front interface.more » Numerical modeling and measurements agree that the increased Cu concentration at the junction also correlates to a reduced space charge region.« less

  20. Imaging, microscopic analysis, and modeling of a CdTe module degraded by heat and light

    DOE PAGES

    Johnston, Steve; Albin, David; Hacke, Peter; ...

    2018-01-12

    Photoluminescence (PL), electroluminescence (EL), and dark lock-in thermography are collected during stressing of a CdTe module under one-Sun light at an elevated temperature of 100 degrees C. The PL imaging system is simple and economical. The PL images show differing degrees of degradation across the module and are less sensitive to effects of shunting and resistance that appear on the EL images. Regions of varying degradation are chosen based on avoiding pre-existing shunt defects. These regions are evaluated using time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Reduced PL intensity correlates to increased Cu concentration at the front interface.more » Numerical modeling and measurements agree that the increased Cu concentration at the junction also correlates to a reduced space charge region.« less

  1. A Study of Precataclysmic Binaries Through Theoretic Modeling of Light Curves and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanova, A. A.; Shimansky, V. V.; Borisov, N. V.

    2017-06-01

    The article presents results of three pre-cataclysmic binaries (PN G068.1+11.0, TW Crv and RE J2013+4002) investigation. Spectroscopic and photometric observations were obtained on BTA and Zeiss-1000 of SAO RAS and on RTT-150. We used the modeling of light curves and spectra to determine the fundamental parameters for all three systems. The PN G068.1+11.0 parameters were obtained with the use of the evolutionary tracks for the nuclei of planetary nebulae of different masses. According to the results of the study, it was found that the secondary components of PN G068.1+11.0 and TW Crv have luminosity excess, but secondary component of RE J2013+4002 doesn't have one.

  2. Electrical and optical 3D modelling of light-trapping single-photon avalanche diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tianzhe; Zang, Kai; Morea, Matthew; Xue, Muyu; Lu, Ching-Ying; Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Qiang; Kamins, Theodore I.; Harris, James S.

    2018-02-01

    Single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been widely used to push the frontier of scientific research (e.g., quantum science and single-molecule fluorescence) and practical applications (e.g., Lidar). However, there is a typical compromise between photon detection efficiency and jitter distribution. The light-trapping SPAD has been proposed to break this trade-off by coupling the vertically incoming photons into a laterally propagating mode while maintaining a small jitter and a thin Si device layer. In this work, we provide a 3D-based optical and electrical model based on practical fabrication conditions and discuss about design parameters, which include surface texturing, photon injection position, device area, and other features.

  3. Light Modulates Ocular Complications in an Albino Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Andrawus, Elias; Veildbaum, Gizi; Zemel, Esther; Leibu, Rina; Perlman, Ido; Shehadeh, Naim

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess potential interactions of light exposure and hyperglycemia upon ocular complications in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced) diabetic rats ( N = 39) and non-diabetic rats ( N = 9) were distributed into eight groups according to the irradiance and color of the light phase during the 12/12-hour light/dark regime. Follow-up lasted 90 days and included assessment of cataract development and electroretinogram (ERG) recordings. Stress to the retina was also assessed by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunocytochemistry. Cataract development was fast in diabetic rats that were exposed to unattenuated white light or to bright colored lights during the light phase. Diabetic rats that were kept under attenuated brown or yellow light during the light phase exhibited slower rate of cataract development. Electroretinogram responses indicated very severe retinal damage in diabetic rats kept under bright colored lights in the blue-yellow range or bright white light during the light phase. Electroretinogram damage was milder in rats kept under bright red light or attenuated yellow or brown light during the light phase. Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Müller cells was consistent with ERG assessment of retinal damage. Attenuating white light and filtering out short wavelengths have a protective effect on the eyes of diabetic rats as evident by slower rate of cataract formation and a smaller degree of retinal damage. Our findings suggest that special glasses attenuating light exposure and filtering out short wavelengths (400-530 nm) may be beneficial for diabetic patients.

  4. CFD Modelling of Bore Erosion in Two-Stage Light Gas Guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1998-01-01

    A well-validated quasi-one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for the analysis of the internal ballistics of two-stage light gas guns is modified to explicitly calculate the ablation of steel from the gun bore and the incorporation of the ablated wall material into the hydrogen working cas. The modified code is used to model 45 shots made with the NASA Ames 0.5 inch light gas gun over an extremely wide variety of gun operating conditions. Good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical piston velocities (maximum errors of +/-2% to +/-6%) and maximum powder pressures (maximum errors of +/-10% with good igniters). Overall, the agreement between the experimental and numerically calculated gun erosion values (within a factor of 2) was judged to be reasonably good, considering the complexity of the processes modelled. Experimental muzzle velocities agree very well (maximum errors of 0.5-0.7 km/sec) with theoretical muzzle velocities calculated with loading of the hydrogen gas with the ablated barrel wall material. Comparison of results for pump tube volumes of 100%, 60% and 40% of an initial benchmark value show that, at the higher muzzle velocities, operation at 40% pump tube volume produces much lower hydrogen loading and gun erosion and substantially lower maximum pressures in the gun. Large muzzle velocity gains (2.4-5.4 km/sec) are predicted upon driving the gun harder (that is, upon using, higher powder loads and/or lower hydrogen fill pressures) when hydrogen loading is neglected; much smaller muzzle velocity gains (1.1-2.2 km/sec) are predicted when hydrogen loading is taken into account. These smaller predicted velocity gains agree well with those achieved in practice. CFD snapshots of the hydrogen mass fraction, density and pressure of the in-bore medium are presented for a very erosive shot.

  5. Type II Supernova Energetics and Comparison of Light Curves to Shock-cooling Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, K. I.; Nugent, Peter E.; Pan, Y.-C.; Badenes, C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J.; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C.; Horst, J. Chuck; Armen, Stephen F.; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2016-03-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with \\gt 5 detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1-3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2-20) × 1051 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), and have a mean energy per unit mass of < E/M> =0.85× {10}51 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ({{Δ }}{m}15), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.

  6. Type II supernova energetics and comparison of light curves to shock-cooling models

    DOE PAGES

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; ...

    2016-03-16

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, withmore » $$\\gt 5$$ detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1–3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2–20) × 10 51 erg/(10 $${M}_{\\odot }$$), and have a mean energy per unit mass of $$\\langle E/M\\rangle =0.85\\times {10}^{51}$$ erg/(10 $${M}_{\\odot }$$), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ($${\\rm{\\Delta }}{m}_{15}$$), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. Lastly, this limits the possible power sources for such events.« less

  7. Type II Supernova Energetics and Comparison of Light Curves to Shock-Cooling Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cia, Annalisa De; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with greater than 5 detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 13 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of EM = (0.2-20) x 10(exp 51) erg/(10 M stellar mass), and have a mean energy per unit mass of E/ M = 0.85 x 10(exp 51) erg(10 stellar mass), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of Ni-56 produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate (Delta m(sub15), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.

  8. Three-dimensional modeling of light rays on the surface of a slanted lenticular array for autostereoscopic displays.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung-Min; Kang, In-Byeong

    2013-08-10

    In this paper, we developed an optical model describing the behavior of light at the surface of a slanted lenticular array for autostereoscopic displays in three dimensions and simulated the optical characteristics of autostereoscopic displays using the Monte Carlo method under actual design conditions. The behavior of light is analyzed by light rays for selected inclination and azimuthal angles; numerical aberrations and conditions of total internal reflection for the lenticular array were found. The intensity and the three-dimensional crosstalk distributions calculated from our model coincide very well with those from conventional design software, and our model shows highly enhanced calculation speed that is 67 times faster than that of the conventional software. From the results, we think that the optical model is very useful for predicting the optical characteristics of autostereoscopic displays with enhanced calculation speed.

  9. Sivers and cos 2 ϕ asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering in light-front holographic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2018-01-01

    The spin asymmetries in SIDIS associated with T -odd TMDs are presented in a light-front quark-diquark model of a proton. To incorporate the effects of the final-state interaction, the light front wave functions are modified to have a phase factor which is essential to have Sivers or Boer-Mulders functions. The Sivers and Boer-Mulder asymmetries are compared with HERMES and COMPASS data.

  10. Plant population growth and competition in a light gradient: a mathematical model of canopy partitioning.

    PubMed

    Vance, Richard R; Nevai, Andrew L

    2007-03-21

    Can a difference in the heights at which plants place their leaves, a pattern we call canopy partitioning, make it possible for two competing plant species to coexist? To find out, we examine a model of clonal plants living in a nonseasonal environment that relates the dynamical behavior and competitive abilities of plant populations to the structural and functional features of the plants that form them. This examination emphasizes whole plant performance in the vertical light gradient caused by self-shading. This first of three related papers formulates a prototype single species Canopy Structure Model from biological first principles and shows how all plant properties work together to determine population persistence and equilibrium abundance. Population persistence is favored, and equilibrium abundance is increased, by high irradiance, high maximum photosynthesis rate, rapid saturation of the photosynthetic response to increased irradiance, low tissue respiration rate, small amounts of stem and root tissue necessary to support the needs of leaves, and low density of leaf, stem, and root tissues. In particular, equilibrium abundance decreases as mean leaf height increases because of the increased cost of manufacturing and maintaining stem tissue. All conclusions arise from this formulation by straightforward analysis. The argument concludes by stating this formulation's straightforward extension, called a Canopy Partitioning Model, to two competing species.

  11. Light-induced autofluorescence of animal skin used in tissue optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Bliznakova, I.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2007-07-01

    Light-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy provides many possibilities for medical diagnostics needs for differentiation of tissue pathologies including cancer. For the needs of clinical practice scientists collect spectral data from patients in vivo or they study different tumor models to obtain objective information for fluorescent properties of every kind of normal and diseased tissue. Therefore it is very important to find the most appropriate and close to the human skin samples from the point of view of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which will give the possibility for easier transfer of data obtained in animal models to spectroscopic medical diagnostics in humans. In this study are presented some results for in vitro detection of the autofluorescence signals of the animal skin (pig and chicken) with using of LEDs as excitation sources (maximum emission at 365, 375, 385 and 400 nm). The autofluorescence signals from in vivo human skin were also detected for comparison with the models' results. Specific features of the spectra measured are discussed and there are proposed some of the origins of the fluorescence signals obtained. Fluorescence maxima detected are addressed to the typical fluorophores existing in the cutaneous tissues. Influence of main skin absorbers, namely melanin and hemoglobin, is also discussed.

  12. Symmetries for Light-Front Quantization of Yukawa Model with Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żochowski, Jan; Przeszowski, Jerzy A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we discuss the Yukawa model with the extra term of self-interacting scalar field in D=1+3 dimensions. We present the method of derivation the light-front commutators and anti-commutators from the Heisenberg equations induced by the kinematical generating operator of the translation P+. Mentioned Heisenberg equations are the starting point for obtaining this algebra of the (anti-) commutators. Some discrepancies between existing and proposed method of quantization are revealed. The Lorentz and the CPT symmetry, together with some features of the quantum theory were applied to obtain the two-point Wightman function for the free fermions. Moreover, these Wightman functions were computed especially without referring to the Fock expansion. The Gaussian effective potential for the Yukawa model was found in the terms of the Wightman functions. It was regularized by the space-like point-splitting method. The coupling constants within the model were redefined. The optimum mass parameters remained regularization independent. Finally, the Gaussian effective potential was renormalized.

  13. Zebrafish models flex their muscles to shed light on muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joachim; Currie, Peter D

    2012-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that specifically affect skeletal muscle and are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakening. To develop therapies and treatments for these diseases, a better understanding of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies is required. Thus, identification of causative genes mutated in specific disorders and the study of relevant animal models are imperative. Zebrafish genetic models of human muscle disorders often closely resemble disease pathogenesis, and the optical clarity of zebrafish embryos and larvae enables visualization of dynamic molecular processes in vivo. As an adjunct tool, morpholino studies provide insight into the molecular function of genes and allow rapid assessment of candidate genes for human muscular dystrophies. This unique set of attributes makes the zebrafish model system particularly valuable for the study of muscle diseases. This review discusses how recent research using zebrafish has shed light on the pathological basis of muscular dystrophies, with particular focus on the muscle cell membrane and the linkage between the myofibre cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix.

  14. Safety impacts of red light cameras at signalized intersections based on cellular automata models.

    PubMed

    Chai, C; Wong, Y D; Lum, K M

    2015-01-01

    This study applies a simulation technique to evaluate the hypothesis that red light cameras (RLCs) exert important effects on accident risks. Conflict occurrences are generated by simulation and compared at intersections with and without RLCs to assess the impact of RLCs on several conflict types under various traffic conditions. Conflict occurrences are generated through simulating vehicular interactions based on an improved cellular automata (CA) model. The CA model is calibrated and validated against field observations at approaches with and without RLCs. Simulation experiments are conducted for RLC and non-RLC intersections with different geometric layouts and traffic demands to generate conflict occurrences that are analyzed to evaluate the hypothesis that RLCs exert important effects on road safety. The comparison of simulated conflict occurrences show favorable safety impacts of RLCs on crossing conflicts and unfavorable impacts for rear-end conflicts during red/amber phases. Corroborative results are found from broad analysis of accident occurrence. RLCs are found to have a mixed effect on accident risk at signalized intersections: crossing collisions are reduced, whereas rear-end collisions may increase. The specially developed CA model is found to be a feasible safety assessment tool.

  15. Models of human platelet thrombospondin in solution. A dynamic light-scattering study.

    PubMed Central

    Vuillard, L; Clezardin, P; Miller, A

    1991-01-01

    The translational diffusion coefficient (D20,w) of human platelet thrombospondin was measured by dynamic light-scattering. D20,w, measured in 20 mM-Hepes buffer, pH 7.4, containing 350 mM-NaCl and 2 mM-CaCl2, was 1.73(+/- 0.02) x 10(-7) cm2.s-1. After removal of bound Ca2+ by addition of EDTA, D20,w decreased to 1.56(+/- 0.04) x 10(-7) cm2.s-1; this was not a consequence of aggregation. D20,w showed little sensitivity to NaCl concentration between 130 and 550 mM. Through hydrodynamic analysis combining D20,w and other parameters taken from the literature, two major types of models for thrombospondin can be proposed: either classic compact models (i.e. low degree of hydration) such as prolate or oblate ellipsoids with a high axial ratio (greater than 20) or models of low axial ratio made of multiple subunits with significant cavities (i.e. high degree of hydration). PMID:1902085

  16. 40 CFR 86.099-8 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....099-8 Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty vehicles. (a)(1)(i)-(ii) [Reserved... schedule of table A99-08 of this section for model year 1999. For small volume manufacturers, the standards... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standards for 1999 and later...

  17. 40 CFR 86.001-9 - Emission standards for 2001 and later model year light-duty trucks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....001-9 Emission standards for 2001 and later model year light-duty trucks Section 86.001-9 includes... for 2001 and later model years, and shall not exceed the standards described in paragraph (d)(1) of... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission standards for 2001 and later...

  18. 40 CFR 86.001-9 - Emission standards for 2001 and later model year light-duty trucks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....001-9 Emission standards for 2001 and later model year light-duty trucks Section 86.001-9 includes... for 2001 and later model years, and shall not exceed the standards described in paragraph (d)(1) of... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission standards for 2001 and later...

  19. 40 CFR 86.001-9 - Emission standards for 2001 and later model year light-duty trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....001-9 Emission standards for 2001 and later model year light-duty trucks. Section 86.001-9 includes... for 2001 and later model years, and shall not exceed the standards described in paragraph (d)(1) of... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standards for 2001 and later...

  20. 40 CFR 86.099-8 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....099-8 Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty vehicles. (a)(1)(i)-(ii) [Reserved... schedule of table A99-08 of this section for model year 1999. For small volume manufacturers, the standards... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards for 1999 and later...

  1. 40 CFR 86.001-9 - Emission standards for 2001 and later model year light-duty trucks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....001-9 Emission standards for 2001 and later model year light-duty trucks Section 86.001-9 includes... for 2001 and later model years, and shall not exceed the standards described in paragraph (d)(1) of... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards for 2001 and later...

  2. 40 CFR 86.099-8 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....099-8 Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty vehicles. (a)(1)(i)-(ii) [Reserved... schedule of table A99-08 of this section for model year 1999. For small volume manufacturers, the standards... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission standards for 1999 and later...

  3. 40 CFR 86.099-8 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....099-8 Emission standards for 1999 and later model year light-duty vehicles. (a)(1)(i)-(ii) [Reserved... schedule of table A99-08 of this section for model year 1999. For small volume manufacturers, the standards... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission standards for 1999 and later...

  4. STRESS RESPONSE MODEL FOR THE TROPICAL SEAGRASS THALASSIA TESTUDINUM: THE INTERACTIONS OF LIGHT, TEMPERATURE, SEDIMENTATION AND GEOCHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our modeling objective was to better define the relationship between a tropical seagrass and water-column and sediment stressors (i.e., light, organic and particle sedimentation, sediment nutrients and sulfides). The model was developed and optimized for sediments in Thalassia t...

  5. Modeling of light propagation in the human neck for diagnoses of thyroid cancers by diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Fujii, H; Yamada, Y; Kobayashi, K; Watanabe, M; Hoshi, Y

    2017-05-01

    Diffuse optical tomography using near-infrared light in a wavelength range from 700 to 1000 nm has the potential to enable non-invasive diagnoses of thyroid cancers; some of which are difficult to detect by conventional methods such as ultrasound tomography. Diffuse optical tomography needs to be based on a physically accurate model of light propagation in the neck, because it reconstructs tomographic images of the optical properties in the human neck by inverse analysis. Our objective here was to investigate the effects of three factors on light propagation in the neck using the 2D time-dependent radiative transfer equation: (1) the presence of the trachea, (2) the refractive-index mismatch at the trachea-tissue interface, and (3) the effect of neck organs other than the trachea (spine, spinal cord, and blood vessels). There was a significant influence of reflection and refraction at the trachea-tissue interface on the light intensities in the region between the trachea and the front of the neck surface. Organs other than the trachea showed little effect on the light intensities measured at the front of the neck surface although these organs affected the light intensities locally. These results indicated the necessity of modeling the refractive-index mismatch at the trachea-tissue interface and the possibility of modeling other neck organs simply as a homogeneous medium when the source and detectors were far from large blood vessels. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. [Forest lighting fire forecasting for Daxing'anling Mountains based on MAXENT model].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Shi, Ming-Chang; Peng, Huan; Zhu, Pei-Lin; Liu, Si-Lin; Wu, Shi-Lei; He, Cheng; Chen, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Daxing'anling Mountains is one of the areas with the highest occurrence of forest lighting fire in Heilongjiang Province, and developing a lightning fire forecast model to accurately predict the forest fires in this area is of importance. Based on the data of forest lightning fires and environment variables, the MAXENT model was used to predict the lightning fire in Daxing' anling region. Firstly, we studied the collinear diagnostic of each environment variable, evaluated the importance of the environmental variables using training gain and the Jackknife method, and then evaluated the prediction accuracy of the MAXENT model using the max Kappa value and the AUC value. The results showed that the variance inflation factor (VIF) values of lightning energy and neutralized charge were 5.012 and 6.230, respectively. They were collinear with the other variables, so the model could not be used for training. Daily rainfall, the number of cloud-to-ground lightning, and current intensity of cloud-to-ground lightning were the three most important factors affecting the lightning fires in the forest, while the daily average wind speed and the slope was of less importance. With the increase of the proportion of test data, the max Kappa and AUC values were increased. The max Kappa values were above 0.75 and the average value was 0.772, while all of the AUC values were above 0.5 and the average value was 0. 859. With a moderate level of prediction accuracy being achieved, the MAXENT model could be used to predict forest lightning fire in Daxing'anling Mountains.

  7. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    SciTech Connect

    Turinsky, Paul J., E-mail: turinsky@ncsu.edu; Kothe, Douglas B., E-mail: kothe@ornl.gov

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear powermore » industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics “core simulator” based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL

  8. Measurement and Validation of Bidirectional Reflectance of Space Shuttle and Space Station Materials for Computerized Lighting Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Lauren E.; Aldridge, Ann M.; Wheelwright, Charles; Maida, James

    1997-01-01

    Task illumination has a major impact on human performance: What a person can perceive in his environment significantly affects his ability to perform tasks, especially in space's harsh environment. Training for lighting conditions in space has long depended on physical models and simulations to emulate the effect of lighting, but such tests are expensive and time-consuming. To evaluate lighting conditions not easily simulated on Earth, personnel at NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Graphics Research and Analysis Facility (GRAF) have been developing computerized simulations of various illumination conditions using the ray-tracing program, Radiance, developed by Greg Ward at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Because these computer simulations are only as accurate as the data used, accurate information about the reflectance properties of materials and light distributions is needed. JSC's Lighting Environment Test Facility (LETF) personnel gathered material reflectance properties for a large number of paints, metals, and cloths used in the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, and processed these data into reflectance parameters needed for the computer simulations. They also gathered lamp distribution data for most of the light sources used, and validated the ability to accurately simulate lighting levels by comparing predictions with measurements for several ground-based tests. The result of this study is a database of material reflectance properties for a wide variety of materials, and lighting information for most of the standard light sources used in the Shuttle/Station programs. The combination of the Radiance program and GRAF's graphics capability form a validated computerized lighting simulation capability for NASA.

  9. Phototherapy with blue and green mixed-light is as effective against unconjugated jaundice as blue light and reduces oxidative stress in the Gunn rat model.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yumiko; Morimoto, Yukihiro; Uchiike, Takao; Kamamoto, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Tamaki; Arai, Ikuyo; Nishikubo, Toshiya; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-07-01

    Phototherapy using blue light-emitting diodes (LED) is effective against neonatal jaundice. However, green light phototherapy also reduces unconjugated jaundice. We aimed to determine whether mixed blue and green light can relieve jaundice with minimal oxidative stress as effectively as either blue or green light alone in a rat model. Gunn rats were exposed to phototherapy with blue (420-520 nm), filtered blue (FB; 440-520 nm without<440-nm wavelengths, FB50 (half the irradiance of filtered blue), mixed (filtered 50% blue and 50% green), and green (490-590 nm) LED irradiation for 24h. The effects of phototherapy are expressed as ratios of serum total (TB) and unbound (UB) bilirubin before and after exposure to each LED. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was measured by HPLC before and after exposure to each LED to determine photo-oxidative stress. Values < 1.00 indicate effective phototherapy. The ratios of TB and UB were decreased to 0.85, 0.89, 1.07, 0.90, and 1.04, and 0.85, 0.94, 0.93, 0.89, and 1.09 after exposure to blue, filtered blue, FB50, and filtered blue mixed with green LED, respectively. In contrast, urinary 8-OHdG increased to 2.03, 1.25, 0.96, 1.36, 1.31, and 1.23 after exposure to blue, filtered blue, FB50, mixed, green LED, and control, indicating side-effects (> 1.00), respectively. Blue plus green phototherapy is as effective as blue phototherapy and it attenuates irradiation-induced oxidative stress. Combined blue and green spectra might be effective against neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimation of snow albedo reduction by light absorbing impurities using Monte Carlo radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, D.; Gao, L.; Wilcox, E. M.; Beres, N. D.; Moosmüller, H.; Khlystov, A.

    2017-12-01

    Radiative forcing and climate change greatly depends on earth's surface albedo and its temporal and spatial variation. The surface albedo varies greatly depending on the surface characteristics ranging from 5-10% for calm ocean waters to 80% for some snow-covered areas. Clean and fresh snow surfaces have the highest albedo and are most sensitive to contamination with light absorbing impurities that can greatly reduce surface albedo and change overall radiative forcing estimates. Accurate estimation of snow albedo as well as understanding of feedbacks on climate from changes in snow-covered areas is important for radiative forcing, snow energy balance, predicting seasonal snowmelt, and run off rates. Such information is essential to inform timely decision making of stakeholders and policy makers. Light absorbing particles deposited onto the snow surface can greatly alter snow albedo and have been identified as a major contributor to regional climate forcing if seasonal snow cover is involved. However, uncertainty associated with quantification of albedo reduction by these light absorbing particles is high. Here, we use Mie theory (under the assumption of spherical snow grains) to reconstruct the single scattering parameters of snow (i.e., single scattering albedo ῶ and asymmetry parameter g) from observation-based size distribution information and retrieved refractive index values. The single scattering parameters of impurities are extracted with the same approach from datasets obtained during laboratory combustion of biomass samples. Instead of using plane-parallel approximation methods to account for multiple scattering, we have used the simple "Monte Carlo ray/photon tracing approach" to calculate the snow albedo. This simple approach considers multiple scattering to be the "collection" of single scattering events. Using this approach, we vary the effective snow grain size and impurity concentrations to explore the evolution of snow albedo over a wide

  11. Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Inference: Hierarchical Models for Nearby SN Ia in the Optical and Near Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Kaisey; Kirshner, R. P.; Narayan, G.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Friedman, A. S.; Hicken, M.

    2010-01-01

    I have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova light curves spanning optical through near infrared data simultaneously. The near infrared light curves are found to be excellent standard candles (sigma(MH) = 0.11 +/- 0.03 mag) that are less vulnerable to systematic error from dust extinction, a major confounding factor for cosmological studies. A hierarchical statistical framework incorporates coherently multiple sources of randomness and uncertainty, including photometric error, intrinsic supernova light curve variations and correlations, dust extinction and reddening, peculiar velocity dispersion and distances, for probabilistic inference with Type Ia SN light curves. Inferences are drawn from the full probability density over individual supernovae and the SN Ia and dust populations, conditioned on a dataset of SN Ia light curves and redshifts. To compute probabilistic inferences with hierarchical models, I have developed BayeSN, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm based on Gibbs sampling. This code explores and samples the global probability density of parameters describing individual supernovae and the population. I have applied this hierarchical model to optical and near infrared data of over 100 nearby Type Ia SN from PAIRITEL, the CfA3 sample, and the literature. Using this statistical model, I find that SN with optical and NIR data have a smaller residual scatter in the Hubble diagram than SN with only optical data. The continued study of Type Ia SN in the near infrared will be important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  12. Modeling Indications of Technology in Planetary Transit Light Curves-Dark-side Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, Eric J.; Sallmen, Shauna M.; Leystra Greene, Diana

    2015-08-01

    We analyze potential effects of an extraterrestrial civilization’s use of orbiting mirrors to illuminate the dark side of a synchronously rotating planet on planetary transit light curves. Previous efforts to detect civilizations based on side effects of planetary-scale engineering have focused on structures affecting the host star output (e.g., Dyson spheres). However, younger civilizations are likely to be less advanced in their engineering efforts, yet still capable of sending small spacecraft into orbit. Since M dwarfs are the most common type of star in the solar neighborhood, it seems plausible that many of the nearest habitable planets orbit dim, low-mass M stars, and will be in synchronous rotation. Logically, a civilization evolving on such a planet may be inspired to illuminate their planet’s dark side by placing a single large mirror at the L2 Lagrangian point, or launching a fleet of small thin mirrors into planetary orbit. We briefly examine the requirements and engineering challenges of such a collection of orbiting mirrors, then explore their impact on transit light curves. We incorporate stellar limb darkening and model a simplistic mirror fleet’s effects for transits of Earth-like (R = 0.5 to 2 {R}{Earth}) planets which would be synchronously rotating for orbits within the habitable zone of their host star. Although such an installation is undetectable in Kepler data, the James Webb Space Telescope will provide the sensitivity necessary to detect a fleet of mirrors orbiting Earth-like habitable planets around nearby stars.

  13. Collection of Culicoides spp. with four light trap models during different seasons in the Balearic Islands.

    PubMed

    del Río, R; Monerris, M; Miquel, M; Borràs, D; Calvete, C; Estrada, R; Lucientes, J; Miranda, M A

    2013-07-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a viral disease that affects ruminants, being especially pathogenic in certain breeds of sheep. Its viral agent (bluetongue virus; BTV) is transmitted by several species of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Different models of suction light traps are being used in a number of countries for the collection of BTV vector species. To determine the relative effectiveness of different light traps under field conditions, four traps (Onderstepoort, Mini-CDC, Rieb and Pirbright) were compared. These traps were rotated between four sites on a cattle farm in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) for several non-consecutive nights. Results showed remarkable disparities in the efficacy of the traps for the collection of Culicoides midges. The highest number of midges collected in the Onderstepoort trap (x¯±SD=62±94.2) was not significantly different from that collected in the Mini-CDC (x¯±SD=58±139.2). The Rieb trap collected the lowest number of midges (x¯±SD=3±4.0). Significantly higher mean numbers of midges were collected in the Onderstepoort than in either the Pirbright (P=0.002) or Rieb traps (P=0.008). There were also differences in the Culicoides species composition as determine with the various traps. These results indicate that the Onderstepoort or Mini-CDC traps will be more effective than either the Rieb or Pirbright traps for the collection of large numbers of Culicoides midges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inferring Caravaggio's studio lighting and praxis in The calling of St. Matthew by computer graphics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stork, David G.; Nagy, Gabor

    2010-02-01

    We explored the working methods of the Italian Baroque master Caravaggio through computer graphics reconstruction of his studio, with special focus on his use of lighting and illumination in The calling of St. Matthew. Although he surely took artistic liberties while constructing this and other works and did not strive to provide a "photographic" rendering of the tableau before him, there are nevertheless numerous visual clues to the likely studio conditions and working methods within the painting: the falloff of brightness along the rear wall, the relative brightness of the faces of figures, and the variation in sharpness of cast shadows (i.e., umbrae and penumbrae). We explored two studio lighting hypotheses: that the primary illumination was local (and hence artificial) and that it was distant solar. We find that the visual evidence can be consistent with local (artificial) illumination if Caravaggio painted his figures separately, adjusting the brightness on each to compensate for the falloff in illumination. Alternatively, the evidence is consistent with solar illumination only if the rear wall had particular reflectance properties, as described by a bi-directional reflectance distribution function, BRDF. (Ours is the first research applying computer graphics to the understanding of artists' praxis that models subtle reflectance properties of surfaces through BRDFs, a technique that may find use in studies of other artists.) A somewhat puzzling visual feature-unnoted in the scholarly literature-is the upward-slanting cast shadow in the upper-right corner of the painting. We found this shadow is naturally consistent with a local illuminant passing through a small window perpendicular to the viewer's line of sight, but could also be consistent with solar illumination if the shadow was due to a slanted, overhanging section of a roof outside the artist's studio. Our results place likely conditions upon any hypotheses concerning Caravaggio's working methods and

  15. Modeling the pulsed light inactivation of microorganisms naturally occurring on vegetable substrates.

    PubMed

    Izquier, Adriana; Gómez-López, Vicente M

    2011-09-01

    Pulsed light (PL) is a fast non-thermal method for microbial inactivation. This research studied the kinetics of PL inactivation of microorganisms naturally occurring in some vegetables. Iceberg lettuce, white cabbage and Julienne-style cut carrots were subjected to increasing PL fluences up to 12J/cm(2) in order to study its effect on aerobic mesophilic bacteria determined by plate count. Also, sample temperature increase was determined by infrared thermometry. Survivors' curves were adjusted to several models. No shoulder but tail was observed. The Weibull model showed good fitting performance of data. Results for lettuce were: goodness-of-fit parameter RMSE=0.2289, fluence for the first decimal reduction δ=0.98±0.80J/cm(2) and concavity parameter p=0.33±0.08. Results for cabbage were: RMSE=0.0725, δ=0.81±0.23J/cm(2) and p=0.30±0.02; and for carrot: RMSE=0.1235, δ=0.39±0.24J/cm(2) and p=0.23±0.03. For lettuce, a log-linear and tail model was also suitable. Validation of the Weibull model produced determination coefficients of 0.88-0.96 and slopes of 0.78-0.99. Heating was too low to contribute to inactivation. A single low-energy pulse was enough to achieve one log reduction, with an ultrafast treatment time of 0.5ms. While PL efficacy was found to be limited to high residual counts, the achievable inactivation level may be considered useful for shelf-life extension. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Explaining dark matter and neutrino mass in the light of TYPE-II seesaw model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Anirban; Shaw, Avirup

    2018-02-01

    With the motivation of simultaneously explaining dark matter and neutrino masses, mixing angles, we have invoked the Type-II seesaw model extended by an extra SU(2) doublet Φ. Moreover, we have imposed a Z2 parity on Φ which remains unbroken as the vacuum expectation value of Φ is zero. Consequently, the lightest neutral component of Φ becomes naturally stable and can be a viable dark matter candidate. On the other hand, light Majorana masses for neutrinos have been generated following usual Type-II seesaw mechanism. Further in this framework, for the first time we have derived the full set of vacuum stability and unitarity conditions, which must be satisfied to obtain a stable vacuum as well as to preserve the unitarity of the model respectively. Thereafter, we have performed extensive phenomenological studies of both dark matter and neutrino sectors considering all possible theoretical and current experimental constraints. Finally, we have also discussed a qualitative collider signatures of dark matter and associated odd particles at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Decay constants and radiative decays of heavy mesons in light-front quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the magnetic dipole decays V{yields}P{gamma} of various heavy-flavored mesons such as (D,D*,D{sub s},D{sub s}*,{eta}{sub c},J/{psi}) and (B,B*,B{sub s},B{sub s}*,{eta}{sub b},{upsilon}) using the light-front quark model constrained by the variational principle for the QCD-motivated effective Hamiltonian. The momentum dependent form factors F{sub VP}(q{sup 2}) for V{yields}P{gamma}* decays are obtained in the q{sup +}=0 frame and then analytically continued to the timelike region by changing q{sub perpendicular} to iq{sub perpendicular} in the form factors. The coupling constant g{sub VP{gamma}} for real photon case is then obtained in the limit as q{sup 2}{yields}0, i.e. g{sub VP{gamma}}=F{sub VP}(q{sup 2}=0). The weak decaymore » constants of heavy pseudoscalar and vector mesons are also calculated. Our numerical results for the decay constants and radiative decay widths for the heavy-flavored mesons are overall in good agreement with the available experimental data as well as other theoretical model calculations.« less

  18. Modeling and design of light powered biomimicry micropump utilizing transporter proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Sze, Tsun-Kay Jackie; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-11-01

    The creation of compact micropumps to provide steady flow has been an on-going challenge in the field of microfluidics. We present a mathematical model for a micropump utilizing Bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins. This micropump utilizes transporter proteins as method to drive fluid flow by converting light energy into chemical potential. The fluid flow through a microchannel is simulated using the Nernst-Planck, Navier-Stokes, and continuity equations. Numerical results show that the micropump is capable of generating usable pressure. Designing parameters influencing the performance of the micropump are investigated including membrane fraction, lipid proton permeability, illumination, and channel height. The results show that there is a substantial membrane fraction region at which fluid flow is maximized. The use of lipids with low membrane proton permeability allows illumination to be used as a method to turn the pump on and off. This capability allows the micropump to be activated and shut off remotely without bulky support equipment. This modeling work provides new insights on mechanisms potentially useful for fluidic pumping in self-sustained bio-mimic microfluidic pumps. This work is supported in part by the National Science Fundation Grant CBET-1250107.

  19. Seagrass canopy photosynthetic response is a function of canopy density and light environment: a model for Amphibolis griffithii.

    PubMed

    Hedley, John D; McMahon, Kathryn; Fearns, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer model of canopies of the seagrass Amphibolis griffithii was used to investigate the consequences of variations in canopy structure and benthic light environment on leaf-level photosynthetic saturation state. The model was constructed using empirical data of plant morphometrics from a previously conducted shading experiment and validated well to in-situ data on light attenuation in canopies of different densities. Using published values of the leaf-level saturating irradiance for photosynthesis, results show that the interaction of canopy density and canopy-scale photosynthetic response is complex and non-linear, due to the combination of self-shading and the non-linearity of photosynthesis versus irradiance (P-I) curves near saturating irradiance. Therefore studies of light limitation in seagrasses should consider variation in canopy structure and density. Based on empirical work, we propose a number of possible measures for canopy scale photosynthetic response that can be plotted to yield isoclines in the space of canopy density and light environment. These plots can be used to interpret the significance of canopy changes induced as a response to decreases in the benthic light environment: in some cases canopy thinning can lead to an equivalent leaf level light environment, in others physiological changes may also be required but these alone may be inadequate for canopy survival. By providing insight to these processes the methods developed here could be a valuable management tool for seagrass conservation during dredging or other coastal developments.

  20. Seagrass Canopy Photosynthetic Response Is a Function of Canopy Density and Light Environment: A Model for Amphibolis griffithii

    PubMed Central

    Hedley, John D.; McMahon, Kathryn; Fearns, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer model of canopies of the seagrass Amphibolis griffithii was used to investigate the consequences of variations in canopy structure and benthic light environment on leaf-level photosynthetic saturation state. The model was constructed using empirical data of plant morphometrics from a previously conducted shading experiment and validated well to in-situ data on light attenuation in canopies of different densities. Using published values of the leaf-level saturating irradiance for photosynthesis, results show that the interaction of canopy density and canopy-scale photosynthetic response is complex and non-linear, due to the combination of self-shading and the non-linearity of photosynthesis versus irradiance (P-I) curves near saturating irradiance. Therefore studies of light limitation in seagrasses should consider variation in canopy structure and density. Based on empirical work, we propose a number of possible measures for canopy scale photosynthetic response that can be plotted to yield isoclines in the space of canopy density and light environment. These plots can be used to interpret the significance of canopy changes induced as a response to decreases in the benthic light environment: in some cases canopy thinning can lead to an equivalent leaf level light environment, in others physiological changes may also be required but these alone may be inadequate for canopy survival. By providing insight to these processes the methods developed here could be a valuable management tool for seagrass conservation during dredging or other coastal developments. PMID:25347849

  1. Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time (ZEIT). V. A Uniform Search for Transiting Planets in Young Clusters Observed by K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuto, Aaron C.; Mann, Andrew W.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Kraus, Adam L.; Covey, Kevin R.

    2017-12-01

    Detection of transiting exoplanets around young stars is more difficult than for older systems owing to increased stellar variability. Nine young open cluster planets have been found in the K2 data, but no single analysis pipeline identified all planets. We have developed a transit search pipeline for young stars that uses a transit-shaped notch and quadratic continuum in a 12 or 24 hr window to fit both the stellar variability and the presence of a transit. In addition, for the most rapid rotators ({P}{rot}< 2 days) we model the variability using a linear combination of observed rotations of each star. To maximally exploit our new pipeline, we update the membership for four stellar populations observed by K2 (Upper Scorpius, Pleiades, Hyades, Praesepe) and conduct a uniform search of the members. We identify all known transiting exoplanets in the clusters, 17 eclipsing binaries, one transiting planet candidate orbiting a potential Pleiades member, and three orbiting unlikely members of the young clusters. Limited injection recovery testing on the known planet hosts indicates that for the older Praesepe systems we are sensitive to additional exoplanets as small as 1-2 R ⊕, and for the larger Upper Scorpius planet host (K2-33) our pipeline is sensitive to ˜4 R ⊕ transiting planets. The lack of detected multiple systems in the young clusters is consistent with the expected frequency from the original Kepler sample, within our detection limits. With a robust pipeline that detects all known planets in the young clusters, occurrence rate testing at young ages is now possible.

  2. Influence of drug-light-interval on photodynamic therapy of port wine stains--simulation and validation of mathematic models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Naiyan; Cheng, Gang; Li, Xiaosong; Gu, Ying; Liu, Fanguang; Zhong, Qiuhai; Wang, Ying; Zen, Jin; Qiu, Haixia; Chen, Hongxia

    2008-06-01

    We established mathematical models of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on port wine stains (PWS) to observe the effect of drug-light-interval (DLI) and optimize light dose. The mathematical simulations included determining (1) the distribution of laser light by Monte Carlo model, (2) the change of photosensitizer concentration in PWS vessels by a pharmacokinetics equation, (3) the change of photosensitizer distribution in tissue outside the vessels by a diffuse equation and photobleaching equation, and (4) the change of tissue oxygen concentration by the Fick's law with a consideration of the oxygen consumption during PDT. The concentration of singlet oxygen in the tissue model was calculated by the finite difference method. To validate those models, a PWS lesion of the same patient was divided into two areas and subjected to different DLIs and treated with different energy density. The color of lesion was assessed 8-12 weeks later. The simulation indicated the singlet oxygen concentration of the second treatment area (DLI=40 min) was lower than that of the first treatment area (DLI=0 min). However, it would be increased to a level similar to that of the first treatment area if the light irradiation time of the second treatment area was prolonged from 40 min to 55 min. Clinical results were consistent with the results predicted by the mathematical models. The mathematical models established in this study are helpful to optimize clinical protocol.

  3. An LED light source and novel fluorophore combinations improve fluorescence laparoscopic detection of metastatic pancreatic cancer in orthotopic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Metildi, Cristina A; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Lee, Claudia; Hardamon, Chanae R; Snyder, Cynthia S; Luiken, George A; Talamini, Mark A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to improve fluorescence laparoscopy of pancreatic cancer in an orthotopic mouse model with the use of a light-emitting diode (LED) light source and optimal fluorophore combinations. Human pancreatic cancer models were established with fluorescent FG-RFP, MiaPaca2-GFP, BxPC-3-RFP, and BxPC-3 cancer cells implanted in 6-week-old female athymic mice. Two weeks postimplantation, diagnostic laparoscopy was performed with a Stryker L9000 LED light source or a Stryker X8000 xenon light source 24 hours after tail-vein injection of CEA antibodies conjugated with Alexa 488 or Alexa 555. Cancer lesions were detected and localized under each light mode. Intravital images were also obtained with the OV-100 Olympus and Maestro CRI Small Animal Imaging Systems, serving as a positive control. Tumors were collected for histologic analysis. Fluorescence laparoscopy with a 495-nm emission filter and an LED light source enabled real-time visualization of the fluorescence-labeled tumor deposits in the peritoneal cavity. The simultaneous use of different fluorophores (Alexa 488 and Alexa 555), conjugated to antibodies, brightened the fluorescence signal, enhancing detection of submillimeter lesions without compromising background illumination. Adjustments to the LED light source permitted simultaneous detection of tumor lesions of different fluorescent colors and surrounding structures with minimal autofluorescence. Using an LED light source with adjustments to the red, blue, and green wavelengths, it is possible to simultaneously identify tumor metastases expressing fluorescent proteins of different wavelengths, which greatly enhanced the signal without compromising background illumination. Development of this fluorescence laparoscopy technology for clinical use can improve staging and resection of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Light Scattering by Marine Particles: Modeling with Non-spherical Shapes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    1491−1499, 1994. Gordon, H.R. and Tao Du, Light scattering by nonspherical particles: application to coccoliths detached from Emiliania huxleyi...from Emiliania huxleyi, Applied Optics, (2009). van de Hulst, H.C., 1957. Light Scattering by Small Particles, Wiley. Xu, Yu-lin, and Bo A.S...G.C. Boynton, Light scattering by coccoliths detached from Emiliania huxleyi, Applied Optics, (2009). [submitted, in revision] 6 m = 1.05

  5. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    2016-05-01

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics ;core simulator; based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL's evolving M

  6. Modelling of Electron and Proton Beams in a White-light Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, R. O.; Procházka, O.; Reid, A.; Allred, J. C.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of an X1 class WL solar flare on 2014 June 11 showed a surprisingly weak emission in both higher order Balmer and Lyman lines and continua. The flare was observed by RHESSI but low energy cut-off of non-thermal component was indeterminable due to the unusually hard electron spectrum (delta = 3). An estimate of power in non-thermal electron beams together with an area of WL emission observed by HMI yielded to an upper and lower estimate of flux 1E9 and 3E10 erg/cm2/s, respectively. We performed a grid of models using a radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN in order to compare synthetic spectra with observations. For low energy cut-off we chose a range from 20 to 120 keV with a step of 20 keV and delta parameter equal to 3. Electron beam-driven models show that higher low energy cut-off is more likely to produce an absorption Balmer line profile, if the total energy flux remains relatively low. On the other hand a detectable rise of HMI continuum (617 nm) lays a lower limit on the beam flux. Proton beam-driven models with equivalent fluxes indicate a greater penetration depth, while the Balmer lines reveal significantly weaker emission. Atmospheric temperature profiles show that for higher values of low energy cut-off the energy of the beam is deposited lower in chromosphere or even in temperature minimum region. This finding suggests, that suppressed hydrogen emission can indicate a formation of white-light continuum below chromosphere.

  7. Tree Size Inequality Reduces Forest Productivity: An Analysis Combining Inventory Data for Ten European Species and a Light Competition Model.

    PubMed

    Bourdier, Thomas; Cordonnier, Thomas; Kunstler, Georges; Piedallu, Christian; Lagarrigues, Guillaume; Courbaud, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Plant structural diversity is usually considered as beneficial for ecosystem functioning. For instance, numerous studies have reported positive species diversity-productivity relationships in plant communities. However, other aspects of structural diversity such as individual size inequality have been far less investigated. In forests, tree size inequality impacts directly tree growth and asymmetric competition, but consequences on forest productivity are still indeterminate. In addition, the effect of tree size inequality on productivity is likely to vary with species shade-tolerance, a key ecological characteristic controlling asymmetric competition and light resource acquisition. Using plot data from the French National Geographic Agency, we studied the response of stand productivity to size inequality for ten forest species differing in shade tolerance. We fitted a basal area stand production model that included abiotic factors, stand density, stand development stage and a tree size inequality index. Then, using a forest dynamics model we explored whether mechanisms of light interception and light use efficiency could explain the tree size inequality effect observed for three of the ten species studied. Size inequality negatively affected basal area increment for seven out of the ten species investigated. However, this effect was not related to the shade tolerance of these species. According to the model simulations, the negative tree size inequality effect could result both from reduced total stand light interception and reduced light use efficiency. Our results demonstrate that negative relationships between size inequality and productivity may be the rule in tree populations. The lack of effect of shade tolerance indicates compensatory mechanisms between effect on light availability and response to light availability. Such a pattern deserves further investigations for mixed forests where complementarity effects between species are involved. When studying the

  8. Light output measurements and computational models of microcolumnar CsI scintillators for x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Nillius, Peter; Klamra, Wlodek; Sibczynski, Pawel; Sharma, Diksha; Danielsson, Mats; Badano, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    The authors report on measurements of light output and spatial resolution of microcolumnar CsI:Tl scintillator detectors for x-ray imaging. In addition, the authors discuss the results of simulations aimed at analyzing the results of synchrotron and sealed-source exposures with respect to the contributions of light transport to the total light output. The authors measured light output from a 490-μm CsI:Tl scintillator screen using two setups. First, the authors used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to measure the response of the scintillator to sealed-source exposures. Second, the authors performed imaging experiments with a 27-keV monoenergetic synchrotron beam and a slit to calculate the total signal generated in terms of optical photons per keV. The results of both methods are compared to simulations obtained with hybridmantis, a coupled x-ray, electron, and optical photon Monte Carlo transport package. The authors report line response (LR) and light output for a range of linear absorption coefficients and describe a model that fits at the same time the light output and the blur measurements. Comparing the experimental results with the simulations, the authors obtained an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the model that provides good agreement with the experimentally measured LR. Finally, the authors report light output simulation results and their dependence on scintillator thickness and reflectivity of the backing surface. The slit images from the synchrotron were analyzed to obtain a total light output of 48 keV -1 while measurements using the fast PMT instrument setup and sealed-sources reported a light output of 28 keV -1 . The authors attribute the difference in light output estimates between the two methods to the difference in time constants between the camera and PMT measurements. Simulation structures were designed to match the light output measured with the camera while providing good agreement with the measured LR resulting in a bulk absorption

  9. Light output measurements and computational models of microcolumnar CsI scintillators for x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Nillius, Peter; Klamra, Wlodek; Sibczynski, Pawel; Sharma, Diksha; Danielsson, Mats; Badano, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    The authors report on measurements of light output and spatial resolution of microcolumnar CsI:Tl scintillator detectors for x-ray imaging. In addition, the authors discuss the results of simulations aimed at analyzing the results of synchrotron and sealed-source exposures with respect to the contributions of light transport to the total light output. The authors measured light output from a 490-μm CsI:Tl scintillator screen using two setups. First, the authors used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to measure the response of the scintillator to sealed-source exposures. Second, the authors performed imaging experiments with a 27-keV monoenergetic synchrotron beam and a slit to calculate the total signal generated in terms of optical photons per keV. The results of both methods are compared to simulations obtained with hybridmantis, a coupled x-ray, electron, and optical photon Monte Carlo transport package. The authors report line response (LR) and light output for a range of linear absorption coefficients and describe a model that fits at the same time the light output and the blur measurements. Comparing the experimental results with the simulations, the authors obtained an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the model that provides good agreement with the experimentally measured LR. Finally, the authors report light output simulation results and their dependence on scintillator thickness and reflectivity of the backing surface. The slit images from the synchrotron were analyzed to obtain a total light output of 48 keV−1 while measurements using the fast PMT instrument setup and sealed-sources reported a light output of 28 keV−1. The authors attribute the difference in light output estimates between the two methods to the difference in time constants between the camera and PMT measurements. Simulation structures were designed to match the light output measured with the camera while providing good agreement with the measured LR resulting in a bulk

  10. Mouse model of human RPE65 P25L hypomorph resembles wild type under normal light rearing but is fully resistant to acute light damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yu, Shirley; Duncan, Todd; Li, Yichao; Liu, Pinghu; Gene, Erelda; Cortes-Pena, Yoel; Qian, Haohua; Dong, Lijin; Redmond, T Michael

    2015-08-01

    Human RPE65 mutations cause a spectrum of blinding retinal dystrophies from severe early-onset disease to milder manifestations. The RPE65 P25L missense mutation, though having <10% of wild-type (WT) activity, causes relatively mild retinal degeneration. To better understand these mild forms of RPE65-related retinal degeneration, and their effect on cone photoreceptor survival, we generated an Rpe65/P25L knock-in (KI/KI) mouse model. We found that, when subject to the low-light regime (∼100 lux) of regular mouse housing, homozygous Rpe65/P25L KI/KI mice are morphologically and functionally very similar to WT siblings. While mutant protein expression is decreased by over 80%, KI/KI mice retinae retain comparable 11-cis-retinal levels with WT. Consistently, the scotopic and photopic electroretinographic (ERG) responses to single-flash stimuli also show no difference between KI/KI and WT mice. However, the recovery of a-wave response following moderate visual pigment bleach is delayed in KI/KI mice. Importantly, KI/KI mice show significantly increased resistance to high-intensity (20 000 lux for 30 min) light-induced retinal damage (LIRD) as compared with WT, indicating impaired rhodopsin regeneration in KI/KI. Taken together, the Rpe65/P25L mutant produces sufficient chromophore under normal conditions to keep opsins replete and thus manifests a minimal phenotype. Only when exposed to intensive light is this hypomorphic mutation manifested physiologically, as its reduced expression and catalytic activity protects against the successive cycles of opsin regeneration underlying LIRD. These data also help define minimal requirements of chromophore for photoreceptor survival in vivo and may be useful in assessing a beneficial therapeutic dose for RPE65 gene therapy in humans. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. A Simple Electromagnetic Model for the Light Clock of Special Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2011-01-01

    Thought experiments involving a light clock are common in introductory treatments of special relativity, because they provide a simple way of demonstrating the non-intuitive phenomenon of time dilation. The properties of the ray or pulse of light that is continuously reflected between the parallel mirrors of the clock are often stated vaguely and…

  12. Light Scattering by Marine Particles: Modeling with Non-spherical Shapes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    coccoliths detached from Emiliania huxleyi, Limnology and Oceanography, 46, 1438−1454, 2001. Gordon, H.R., T.J. Smyth, W.M. Balch, and G.C. Boynton...Light scattering by coccoliths detached from Emiliania huxleyi, Applied Optics, (2009). PUBLICATIONS H.R. Gordon, Light scattering by randomly

  13. Analytical modeling of light transport in scattering materials with strong absorption.

    PubMed

    Meretska, M L; Uppu, R; Vissenberg, G; Lagendijk, A; Ijzerman, W L; Vos, W L

    2017-10-02

    We have investigated the transport of light through slabs that both scatter and strongly absorb, a situation that occurs in diverse application fields ranging from biomedical optics, powder technology, to solid-state lighting. In particular, we study the transport of light in the visible wavelength range between 420 and 700 nm through silicone plates filled with YAG:Ce 3+ phosphor particles, that even re-emit absorbed light at different wavelengths. We measure the total transmission, the total reflection, and the ballistic transmission of light through these plates. We obtain average single particle properties namely the scattering cross-section σ s , the absorption cross-section σ a , and the anisotropy factor µ using an analytical approach, namely the P3 approximation to the radiative transfer equation. We verify the extracted transport parameters using Monte-Carlo simulations of the light transport. Our approach fully describes the light propagation in phosphor diffuser plates that are used in white LEDs and that reveal a strong absorption (L/l a > 1) up to L/l a = 4, where L is the slab thickness, l a is the absorption mean free path. In contrast, the widely used diffusion theory fails to describe this parameter range. Our approach is a suitable analytical tool for industry, since it provides a fast yet accurate determination of key transport parameters, and since it introduces predictive power into the design process of white light emitting diodes.

  14. Monte Carlo modeling (MCML) of light propagation in skin layers for detection of fat thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilubol, Chonnipa; Treerattrakoon, Kiatnida; Mohammed, Waleed S.

    2010-05-01

    Nowadays, most activities require lesser physical actions, which could ultimately lead to accumulation of excessive body fat. The main roles of body fat are to store energy and acts as various kinds of insulators for the body. The thickness of fat layers can be measured to indicate fat-body weight ratio. Exceeding the body-mass index (BMI) could lead to many illnesses regarding obesity. Consequently, many studies have proposed various principles and techniques to measure the amount of fat within one's body. In this paper, infrared interactance in skin layers is studied for investigation of the influence of fat thickness upon photon travelling pattern in skin tissues using Monte Carlo model (MCML). Photon propagation is numerically simulated in simplified multi-layered tissues. The optical coefficients of each skin layers are accounted for different traveling paths of photons that move through random motion. The thickness of fat layer is varied, and changing in optical parameters is observed. Then the statistically obtained data are computed and analyzed for the effect of the fat layer upon reflection percentage using different wavelengths. The calculations have shown increment in the slope of change of reflection percentage versus fat thickness, when using infrared compare to visible light. This technique can be used to construct a mobile device that is capable of measuring the volume fraction of melanin and blood in the epidermis layer and dermis layer, to calculate for the necessary optical coefficients that would be necessary for measurement of fat thickness.

  15. Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation in the human head for applications in sinus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Mishra, Nikhil; You, Joon; Bhandarkar, Naveen; Wong, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Sinus blockages are a common reason for physician visits, affecting one out of seven people in the United States, and often require medical treatment. Diagnosis in the primary care setting is challenging because symptom criteria (via detailed clinical history) plus objective imaging [computed tomography (CT) or endoscopy] are recommended. Unfortunately, neither option is routinely available in primary care. We previously demonstrated that low-cost near-infrared (NIR) transillumination correlates with the bulk findings of sinus opacity measured by CT. We have upgraded the technology, but questions of source optimization, anatomical influence, and detection limits remain. In order to begin addressing these questions, we have modeled NIR light propagation inside a three-dimensional adult human head constructed via CT images using a mesh-based Monte Carlo algorithm (MMCLAB). In this application, the sinus itself, which when healthy is a void region (e.g., nonscattering), is the region of interest. We characterize the changes in detected intensity due to clear (i.e., healthy) versus blocked sinuses and the effect of illumination patterns. We ran simulations for two clinical cases and compared simulations with measurements. The simulations presented herein serve as a proof of concept that this approach could be used to understand contrast mechanisms and limitations of NIR sinus imaging.

  16. Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation in the human head for applications in sinus imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Mishra, Nikhil; You, Joon; Bhandarkar, Naveen; Wong, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Sinus blockages are a common reason for physician visits, affecting one out of seven people in the United States, and often require medical treatment. Diagnosis in the primary care setting is challenging because symptom criteria (via detailed clinical history) plus objective imaging [computed tomography (CT) or endoscopy] are recommended. Unfortunately, neither option is routinely available in primary care. We previously demonstrated that low-cost near-infrared (NIR) transillumination correlates with the bulk findings of sinus opacity measured by CT. We have upgraded the technology, but questions of source optimization, anatomical influence, and detection limits remain. In order to begin addressing these questions, we have modeled NIR light propagation inside a three-dimensional adult human head constructed via CT images using a mesh-based Monte Carlo algorithm (MMCLAB). In this application, the sinus itself, which when healthy is a void region (e.g., nonscattering), is the region of interest. We characterize the changes in detected intensity due to clear (i.e., healthy) versus blocked sinuses and the effect of illumination patterns. We ran simulations for two clinical cases and compared simulations with measurements. The simulations presented herein serve as a proof of concept that this approach could be used to understand contrast mechanisms and limitations of NIR sinus imaging. PMID:25781310

  17. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth andmore » fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.« less

  18. Quantum phase transitions of light in a dissipative Dicke-Bose-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ren-Cun; Tan, Lei; Zhang, Wen-Xuan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2017-09-01

    The impact that the environment has on the quantum phase transition of light in the Dicke-Bose-Hubbard model is investigated. Based on the quasibosonic approach, mean-field theory, and perturbation theory, the formulation of the Hamiltonian, the eigenenergies, and the superfluid order parameter are obtained analytically. Compared with the ideal cases, the order parameter of the system evolves with time as the photons naturally decay in their environment. When the system starts with the superfluid state, the dissipation makes the photons more likely to localize, and a greater hopping energy of photons is required to restore the long-range phase coherence of the localized state of the system. Furthermore, the Mott lobes depend crucially on the numbers of atoms and photons (which disappear) of each site, and the system tends to be classical with the number of atoms increasing; however, the atomic number is far lower than that expected under ideal circumstances. As there is an inevitable interaction between the coupled-cavity array and its surrounding environment in the actual experiments, the system is intrinsically dissipative. The results obtained here provide a more realistic image for characterizing the dissipative nature of quantum phase transitions in lossy platforms, which will offer valuable insight into quantum simulation of a dissipative system and which are helpful in guiding experimentalists in open quantum systems.

  19. Neurofilament light chain as disease biomarker in a rodent model of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Cristina; Fumagalli, Giulia; Alberti, Paola; Canta, Annalisa; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Chiorazzi, Alessia; Monza, Laura; Pozzi, Eleonora; Sandelius, Åsa; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2018-06-13

    The objective of this study is to test the feasibility of using serum neurofilament light chain (NfL) as a disease biomarker in Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN) since this easy accessible biological test may have a large impact on clinical management and safety of cancer patients. We performed this preclinical study using a well-characterized rat model based on repeated administration of the cytostatic drug vincristine (VCR, 0.2 mg/kg intravenously via the tail vein once/week for 4 times). Serial NfL serum concentration measured using the in-house Simoa NfL assay and peripheral neuropathy onset was measured by sensory and motor nerve conduction studies. Serum NfL measure in untreated and VCR-treated rats demonstrated a steady, and significant increase during the course of VCR administration, with a final 4-fold increase with respect to controls (p < .001) when sign of axonopathy and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers were clearly evident and verified by behavioral, neurophysiological and pathological examination. This simple monitoring approach based on serum NfL concentration measures may be easily translated to clinical practice and should be considered as a putative marker of CIPN severity in a typical oncology outpatient setting. Further studies are needed to validate it's utility in cancer patients treated with different neurotoxic drugs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Evaluation of a novel laparoscopic camera for characterization of renal ischemia in a porcine model using digital light processing (DLP) hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olweny, Ephrem O.; Tan, Yung K.; Faddegon, Stephen; Jackson, Neil; Wehner, Eleanor F.; Best, Sara L.; Park, Samuel K.; Thapa, Abhas; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2012-03-01

    Digital light processing hyperspectral imaging (DLP® HSI) was adapted for use during laparoscopic surgery by coupling a conventional laparoscopic light guide with a DLP-based Agile Light source (OL 490, Optronic Laboratories, Orlando, FL), incorporating a 0° laparoscope, and a customized digital CCD camera (DVC, Austin, TX). The system was used to characterize renal ischemia in a porcine model.

  1. Performance of Linear and Nonlinear Two-Leaf Light Use Efficiency Models at Different Temporal Scales

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Xiaocui; Ju, Weimin; Zhou, Yanlian; ...

    2015-02-25

    The reliable simulation of gross primary productivity (GPP) at various spatial and temporal scales is of significance to quantifying the net exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. This study aimed to verify the ability of a nonlinear two-leaf model (TL-LUEn), a linear two-leaf model (TL-LUE), and a big-leaf light use efficiency model (MOD17) to simulate GPP at half-hourly, daily and 8-day scales using GPP derived from 58 eddy-covariance flux sites in Asia, Europe and North America as benchmarks. Model evaluation showed that the overall performance of TL-LUEn was slightly but not significantly better than TL-LUE at half-hourlymore » and daily scale, while the overall performance of both TL-LUEn and TL-LUE were significantly better (p < 0.0001) than MOD17 at the two temporal scales. The improvement of TL-LUEn over TL-LUE was relatively small in comparison with the improvement of TL-LUE over MOD17. However, the differences between TL-LUEn and MOD17, and TL-LUE and MOD17 became less distinct at the 8-day scale. As for different vegetation types, TL-LUEn and TL-LUE performed better than MOD17 for all vegetation types except crops at the half-hourly scale. At the daily and 8-day scales, both TL-LUEn and TL-LUE outperformed MOD17 for forests. However, TL-LUEn had a mixed performance for the three non-forest types while TL-LUE outperformed MOD17 slightly for all these non-forest types at daily and 8-day scales. The better performance of TL-LUEn and TL-LUE for forests was mainly achieved by the correction of the underestimation/overestimation of GPP simulated by MOD17 under low/high solar radiation and sky clearness conditions. TL-LUEn is more applicable at individual sites at the half-hourly scale while TL-LUE could be regionally used at half-hourly, daily and 8-day scales. MOD17 is also an applicable option regionally at the 8-day scale.« less

  2. Performance of Linear and Nonlinear Two-Leaf Light Use Efficiency Models at Different Temporal Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaocui; Ju, Weimin; Zhou, Yanlian

    The reliable simulation of gross primary productivity (GPP) at various spatial and temporal scales is of significance to quantifying the net exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. This study aimed to verify the ability of a nonlinear two-leaf model (TL-LUEn), a linear two-leaf model (TL-LUE), and a big-leaf light use efficiency model (MOD17) to simulate GPP at half-hourly, daily and 8-day scales using GPP derived from 58 eddy-covariance flux sites in Asia, Europe and North America as benchmarks. Model evaluation showed that the overall performance of TL-LUEn was slightly but not significantly better than TL-LUE at half-hourlymore » and daily scale, while the overall performance of both TL-LUEn and TL-LUE were significantly better (p < 0.0001) than MOD17 at the two temporal scales. The improvement of TL-LUEn over TL-LUE was relatively small in comparison with the improvement of TL-LUE over MOD17. However, the differences between TL-LUEn and MOD17, and TL-LUE and MOD17 became less distinct at the 8-day scale. As for different vegetation types, TL-LUEn and TL-LUE performed better than MOD17 for all vegetation types except crops at the half-hourly scale. At the daily and 8-day scales, both TL-LUEn and TL-LUE outperformed MOD17 for forests. However, TL-LUEn had a mixed performance for the three non-forest types while TL-LUE outperformed MOD17 slightly for all these non-forest types at daily and 8-day scales. The better performance of TL-LUEn and TL-LUE for forests was mainly achieved by the correction of the underestimation/overestimation of GPP simulated by MOD17 under low/high solar radiation and sky clearness conditions. TL-LUEn is more applicable at individual sites at the half-hourly scale while TL-LUE could be regionally used at half-hourly, daily and 8-day scales. MOD17 is also an applicable option regionally at the 8-day scale.« less

  3. 77 FR 68070 - 2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Corporate Average Fuel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 85, 86, and 600 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 523, 531, 533, 536, and 537 [EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0799; FRL-9706-5; NHTSA-2010-0131] RIN 2060-AQ54; RIN 2127-AK79 2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Corporate...

  4. 76 FR 74853 - 2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Corporate Average Fuel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ...EPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are issuing this joint proposal to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy for light-duty vehicles for model years 2017-2025. This proposal extends the National Program beyond the greenhouse gas and corporate average fuel economy standards set for model years 2012-2016. On May 21, 2010, President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum requesting that NHTSA and EPA develop through notice and comment rulemaking a coordinated National Program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions of light-duty vehicles for model years 2017- 2025. This proposal, consistent with the President's request, responds to the country's critical need to address global climate change and to reduce oil consumption. NHTSA is proposing Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act, and EPA is proposing greenhouse gas emissions standards under the Clean Air Act. These standards apply to passenger cars, light-duty trucks, and medium- duty passenger vehicles, and represent a continued harmonized and consistent National Program. Under the National Program for model years 2017-2025, automobile manufacturers would be able to continue building a single light-duty national fleet that satisfies all requirements under both programs while ensuring that consumers still have a full range of vehicle choices. EPA is also proposing a minor change to the regulations applicable to MY 2012-2016, with respect to air conditioner performance and measurement of nitrous oxides.

  5. Modeling the effects of phosphor converted LED lighting to the night sky of the Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubé, M.; Simoneau, A.; Wainscoat, R.; Nelson, L.

    2018-05-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the current level of light pollution in the night sky at the Haleakala Observatory on the island of Maui in Hawaii. This is accomplished with a numerical model that was tested in the first International Dark Sky Reserve located in Mont-Mégantic National Park in Canada. The model uses ground data on the artificial light sources present in the region of study, geographical data, and remotely sensed data for: 1) the nightly upward radiance; 2) the terrain elevation; and, 3) the ground spectral reflectance of the region. The results of the model give a measure of the current state of the sky spectral radiance at the Haleakala Observatory. Then, using the current state as a reference point, multiple light conversion plans are elaborated and evaluated using the model. We can thus estimate the expected impact of each conversion plan on the night sky radiance spectrum. A complete conversion to white (LEDs) with (CCT) of 4000K and 3000K are contrasted with a conversion using (PC) amber (LEDs). We include recommendations concerning the street lamps to be used in sensitive areas like the cities of Kahului and Kihei and suggest best lighting practices related to the color of lamps used at night.

  6. Radiative Transfer Modeling to Estimate the Impact of CDOM on Light Absorption within Changing Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carns, R.; Light, B.; Frey, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    First-year sea ice differs from multi-year sea ice in several ways that can influence its optical properties. It is thinner than multi-year ice, which tends to increase light transmission. Also, first-year ice retains higher brine volumes in comparison to more heavily drained multi-year ice, in isolated pockets and channels. During melt season, patterns of pond formation on first-year sea ice differ from those on multi-year ice. As first-year sea ice comprises an increasingly large fraction of Arctic sea ice, it becomes more important to understand how much sunlight reaches the ecosystems within the ice, and how those changing ecosystems can feed back into the transmission of light. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and chlorophyll within the ice can absorb light, heating the ice and reducing transmission to the ocean below. Light also encourages algal growth within the ice while degrading CDOM, creating complex feedbacks. We use radiative transfer models to determine the overall effect of colored dissolved organic matter on the light regime within sea ice, both on the overall amount of energy transmitted and on the spectral distribution of energy. Using models allows us to estimate the impact of varying CDOM levels on a wide range of sea ice types, improving our ability to respond to conditions in a rapidly changing Arctic and predict important phenomena such as algal blooms.

  7. Modeling of complex wear behavior associated with grid-to-rod fretting in light water nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P. J.; Qu, J.; Lu, R.

    One significant concern in the operation of light water nuclear reactors is the fretting wear damage to fuel cladding from flow-induced vibrations. For years, research on the grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) phenomena has been underway in countries where nuclear power production is a significant industry. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, an effort has been underway to develop and test an engineering wear model for zirconium alloy fuel rod cladding against a supporting grid. Furthermore, the multi-stage model accounts for oxide layers and wear rate transitions. Our paper describes themore » basis for a GTRF engineering wear model, the physical significance of the wear factor it contains, and recent progress toward model validation based on a fretting wear testing apparatus that accounts for coolant temperature, pressure, and the presence of periodic impacts (gaps) in grid/rod contact.« less

  8. Modeling of complex wear behavior associated with grid-to-rod fretting in light water nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Blau, P. J.; Qu, J.; Lu, R.

    2016-09-21

    One significant concern in the operation of light water nuclear reactors is the fretting wear damage to fuel cladding from flow-induced vibrations. For years, research on the grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) phenomena has been underway in countries where nuclear power production is a significant industry. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, an effort has been underway to develop and test an engineering wear model for zirconium alloy fuel rod cladding against a supporting grid. Furthermore, the multi-stage model accounts for oxide layers and wear rate transitions. Our paper describes themore » basis for a GTRF engineering wear model, the physical significance of the wear factor it contains, and recent progress toward model validation based on a fretting wear testing apparatus that accounts for coolant temperature, pressure, and the presence of periodic impacts (gaps) in grid/rod contact.« less

  9. A multilayer physically based snowpack model simulating direct and indirect radiative impacts of light-absorbing impurities in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzet, Francois; Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Picard, Ghislain; Arnaud, Laurent; Voisin, Didier; Lejeune, Yves; Charrois, Luc; Nabat, Pierre; Morin, Samuel

    2017-11-01

    Light-absorbing impurities (LAIs) decrease snow albedo, increasing the amount of solar energy absorbed by the snowpack. Its most intuitive and direct impact is to accelerate snowmelt. Enhanced energy absorption in snow also modifies snow metamorphism, which can indirectly drive further variations of snow albedo in the near-infrared part of the solar spectrum because of the evolution of the near-surface snow microstructure. New capabilities have been implemented in the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus (referred to as Crocus) to account for impurities' deposition and evolution within the snowpack and their direct and indirect impacts. Once deposited, the model computes impurities' mass evolution until snow melts out, accounting for scavenging by meltwater. Taking advantage of the recent inclusion of the spectral radiative transfer model TARTES (Two-stream Analytical Radiative TransfEr in Snow model) in Crocus, the model explicitly represents the radiative impacts of light-absorbing impurities in snow. The model was evaluated at the Col de Porte experimental site (French Alps) during the 2013-2014 snow season against in situ standard snow measurements and spectral albedo measurements. In situ meteorological measurements were used to drive the snowpack model, except for aerosol deposition fluxes. Black carbon (BC) and dust deposition fluxes used to drive the model were extracted from simulations of the atmospheric model ALADIN-Climate. The model simulates snowpack evolution reasonably, providing similar performances to our reference Crocus version in terms of snow depth, snow water equivalent (SWE), near-surface specific surface area (SSA) and shortwave albedo. Since the reference empirical albedo scheme was calibrated at the Col de Porte, improvements were not expected to be significant in this study. We show that the deposition fluxes from the ALADIN-Climate model provide a reasonable estimate of the amount of light-absorbing impurities deposited on the

  10. Bili lights

    MedlinePlus

    Phototherapy for jaundice; Bilirubin - bili lights; Neonatal care - bili lights; Newborn care - bili lights ... Phototherapy involves shining fluorescent light from the bili lights on bare skin. A specific wavelength of light can break down bilirubin into a form that ...

  11. Theoretical and experimental investigation of near-infrared light propagation in a model of the adult head.

    PubMed

    Okada, E; Firbank, M; Schweiger, M; Arridge, S R; Cope, M; Delpy, D T

    1997-01-01

    Near-infrared light propagation in various models of the adult head is analyzed by both time-of-flight measurements and mathematical prediction. The models consist of three- or four-layered slabs, the latter incorporating a clear cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer. The most sophisticated model also incorporates slots that imitate sulci on the brain surface. For each model, the experimentally measured mean optical path length as a function of source-detector spacing agrees well with predictions from either a Monte Carlo model or a finite-element method based on diffusion theory or a hybrid radiosity-diffusion theory. Light propagation in the adult head is shown to be highly affected by the presence of the clear CSF layer, and both the optical path length and the spatial sensitivity profile of the models with a CSF layer are quite different from those without the CSF layer. However, the geometry of the sulci and the boundary between the gray and the white matter have little effect on the detected light distribution.

  12. Toward real-time diffuse optical tomography: accelerating light propagation modeling employing parallel computing on GPU and CPU.

    PubMed

    Doulgerakis, Matthaios; Eggebrecht, Adam; Wojtkiewicz, Stanislaw; Culver, Joseph; Dehghani, Hamid

    2017-12-01

    Parameter recovery in diffuse optical tomography is a computationally expensive algorithm, especially when used for large and complex volumes, as in the case of human brain functional imaging. The modeling of light propagation, also known as the forward problem, is the computational bottleneck of the recovery algorithm, whereby the lack of a real-time solution is impeding practical and clinical applications. The objective of this work is the acceleration of the forward model, within a diffusion approximation-based finite-element modeling framework, employing parallelization to expedite the calculation of light propagation in realistic adult head models. The proposed methodology is applicable for modeling both continuous wave and frequency-domain systems with the results demonstrating a 10-fold speed increase when GPU architectures are available, while maintaining high accuracy. It is shown that, for a very high-resolution finite-element model of the adult human head with ∼600,000 nodes, consisting of heterogeneous layers, light propagation can be calculated at ∼0.25  s/excitation source. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  13. Toward real-time diffuse optical tomography: accelerating light propagation modeling employing parallel computing on GPU and CPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulgerakis, Matthaios; Eggebrecht, Adam; Wojtkiewicz, Stanislaw; Culver, Joseph; Dehghani, Hamid

    2017-12-01

    Parameter recovery in diffuse optical tomography is a computationally expensive algorithm, especially when used for large and complex volumes, as in the case of human brain functional imaging. The modeling of light propagation, also known as the forward problem, is the computational bottleneck of the recovery algorithm, whereby the lack of a real-time solution is impeding practical and clinical applications